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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  85,  Issue  XIII

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

OPEN SUNY OPENS DOORS FOR STUDENTS STORY ON PAGE 7 | EDITORIAL ON PAGE 9

,Qà X[ ,Q)OX[ ‡  President Christian Says Spring Enrollment Numbers Are Slightly Down

‡Also Says Housing Crisis Could Lead to

More Problems With Enrollment In the Future

STORY ON PAGE 4

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡New  Parking  Lots  Open  For  Students...3J‡  Rebecca  Mackey  Appointed  at  Historic  Huguenot......Pg  6 ‡  Student  Association  Outlines  Goals.....Pg  5                  ‡6KDZDQJXQN/HFWXUH6HULHV%HJLQV3J


Cat  Tacopina EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Andrew  Lief

MANAGING  EDITOR _________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

Anthony  DeRosa FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF

Abbott  Brant

FEATURES          PG.  2B A&E                      PG.  6B

_________________

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS  EDITOR

Maxwell  Reide Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Madeline  Anthony Melissa  Kramer Zameena  Mejia .ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG COPY  EDITORS

Hannah  Nesich Jennifer  Newman ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITORS

The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI 681<1HZ3DOW]2XUFLUFXODWLRQLVThe  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   5RRP'HDGOLQHIRUDOOVXEPLVVLRQVLVSPRQ6XQGD\VLQ The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG E\WKHEXVLQHVVPDQDJHU&RPPXQLW\DQQRXQFHPHQWVDUHSXEOLVKHGJUDWXLWRXVO\EXWDUH VXEMHFWWRUHVWULFWLRQGXHWRVSDFHOLPLWDWLRQV7KHUHLVQRJXDUDQWHHRISXEOLFDWLRQ&RQWHQWV RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] FRPPXQLW\DQGRQOLQHDWoracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH ID[OLQHLV

Volume  85 Issue  XII

_________________

Nicole  Brinkley WEB  CHIEF

Rosalie  Rodriguez MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

THE  GUNK  

1B-­8B

_________________

THE  DEEP  END

Maya  Slouka

EDITORIAL  

John  Sweet

COLUMNS

BUSINESS  MANAGER DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER

SPORTS   $SULO&DVWLOOR.HOVH\'DPUDG1LFN)RGHUD%HQ.LQGORQ6DOO\0RUDQ (LOHHQ/LHEOHU-DKQD5RPDQR.D\FLD6DLOVPDQ'DQD6FKPHU]OHU 6KHOE\6HLS.HOO\6HL]-DFN6RPPHU.DWKHULQH6SHOOHU5\DQ:DO]

STAFF

8B 9

ANDREW  LIEF,  ZAMEENA  MEJIA

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

NEWS

VISIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ORACLEâ&#x20AC;? ONLINE:

University  Police  Blotter

Index

Incident:  Petit  Larceny   Date:  2/4/14 Location:  Shango  Hall Male  Student  reported  unknown  party  stole  his   unattended  bracelet. Incident:  Drugs Date:  2/3/14 Location:  Bouton  Hall 3ROLFH2I¿FHU'LVSDWFKHGIRUDFRPSODLQWRI PDULMXDQDRGRU&DOOXQIRXQGHG

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department (PHUJHQFLHV

@NewPaltzOracle

Thursday,  Feb.  6 Mostly  Sunny High:  24  Low:  7

Friday,  Feb.  7

Partly  Cloudy  High:  25  Low:  -­2

Saturday,  Feb.  8

Sunday,  Feb.  9 Snow High:  29  Low:  7

WANT  TO  WRITE  FOR  THE  ORACLE?

&RQWDFWXVDW Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   IRUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQ The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Five-­Day  Forecast

Partly  Cloudy High:  26  Low:  10

10 11-­15

SPORTS                  PG.  13

Monday,  Feb.  10 Sunny High:  25    Low:  -­1


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   3

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Shift  In  Parking  Lot  Locations

Renovations  on  Lefevre  Hall  have  taken  away  aproximately  20  spaces  in  the  Crispell  Parking  Lot.  

By  John  Tappen News  Editor  |  John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

With   construction   at   various   locations   around   campus,   including   renovations   to   LeFevre   Hall,   Wooster  Science  Building  and  construction  of  a  new   residence   hall   in   the   South   Complex,   the   locale   of   available  parking  spaces  have  shifted.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   perception   is   that   parking   is   gone,â&#x20AC;?  Assis-­ tant  Vice  President  of  Administration  and  Finance  Ju-­ lie  Majak  said  about  the  relocation  of  spaces  through-­ out  campus.   Majak  said  that  while  many  of  the  lots  in  the  heart   of  campus  have  gone  away,  the  number  of  spaces  re-­ mains  roughly  the  same.   According  to  Director  of  Facilities,  Construction   and  Design  John  Shupe,  the  Route  32  parking  exten-­ sion,   which   was   constructed   with   permeable   asphalt   ÂżOWHUV ZDV FRPSOHWHG ODVW \HDU DQG DGGHG DSSUR[L-­ mately   140   spaces.  A   portion   of   lot   23B   next   to   the   Admissions  and  Alumni  Center  was  made  exclusively  

for  student  parking.  Lot  35  behind  Esopus  Hall  was   changed  to  an  overnight  lot.  A  column  in  lot  28  is  now   reserved   for   students   and   the   newly   constructed   Le-­ nape  parking  lot  has  198  spaces.   Those  spaces  will  combat  the  loss  of  parking  lot   37A  where  the  new  residence  hall  is  currently  being   constructed,  as  well  as  approximately  20  spaces  lost   due  to  the  renovations  on  Lefevre  Hall.  Plattekill  Lot   18  at  the  edge  of  campus  is  also  planned  to  be  closed   at   some   point   this   semester   according   to   Director   of   Facilities,   Construction   and   Design   John   Shupe,   where  a  new  science  building  will  be  created.   Shupe  said  the  ultimate  goal  of  maneuvering  the   parking   is   to   create   a   pedestrian-­friendly,   walking   campus,  something  outlined  in  the  Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Site  and   Landscape  Master  Plan.   According  to  the  plan,  one  of  the  major  themes  is   to  create  an  â&#x20AC;&#x153;inviting  and  accessibleâ&#x20AC;?  campus  through   YDULRXVPRGLÂżFDWLRQV â&#x20AC;&#x153;To   achieve   this   goal,   the   plan   proposes   several  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

changes   to   create   new   and   better   accessible   routes   through  the  landscape  and  places  of  the  campus.â&#x20AC;? The  overall  plan  proposed  to  move  parking  from   the   center   of   campus   out   towards   the   peripheral,   so   that  students,  faculty  and  staff  will,  for  the  most  part,   park  on  the  edges  of  campus  and  walk  to  their  classes   DQG RIÂżFHV D PRYH WKDW 6KXSH VDLG LV PRUH LQ OLQH with   other   college   campuses   as   well   as   a   more   sus-­ tainable  alternative.   Shupe   also   said   that   these   changes   would   help   decrease   the   likelihood   of   pedestrian   and   vehicular   FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWV According   to   Shupe,   student   ticket   writers   con-­ duct   campus   lot   counts   to   keep   track   of   the   number   of  empty  spaces  in  lots  across  the  campus.  The  most   recent  lot  count  from  last  semester  revealed  that  there   were  often  approximately  600  empty  spaces  in  cam-­ pus  lots  at  any  given  time.   An  updated  version  of  the  campus  map  is  avail-­ able  on  the  New  Paltz  website.  


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Lack  Of  Housing  Could  Cause  Enrollment  Decrease

VATICAN  POLICIES The   Vatican   â&#x20AC;&#x153;systematicallyâ&#x20AC;?   adopted   policies   that   allowed   priests   to   rape   and   molest   tens   of   thousands   of   chil-­ dren  over  decades,  a  U.N.  human  rights   committee  said  Wednesday,  urging  the   +RO\ 6HH WR RSHQ LWV ÂżOHV RQ SHGR philes  and  bishops  who  concealed  their   crimes. EXPLOSIONS  IN  BAGHDAD 0XOWLSOH H[SORVLRQV URFNHG %DJKGDG RQ :HGQHVGD\ NLOOLQJ DW OHDVW  SHRSOH DQG VHQGLQJ SOXPHV RI VPRNH LQWR WKH VN\ DFURVVWKHVWUHHWIURPDPDMRUJRYHUQPHQW building  in  a  brazen  reminder  of  the  ability   of   insurgents   to   penetrate   the   heart   of   the   capital. CHILDREN  IN  SYRIA Children   in   Syria   have   been   tortured,   VH[XDOO\ DEXVHG DQG VXEMHFWHG WR ÂłLQ GLVFULPLQDWH´ DWWDFNV E\ 3UHVLGHQW Bashar   Assadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   forces,   and   recruited   for  combat  and  terror  operations  by  the   UHEHOVÂżJKWLQJWRWRSSOHKLPGXULQJWKH FRXQWU\ÂśV QHDUO\ \HDUROG FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFW D new  United  Nations  report  said. OLYMPIC  PROTESTERS Protesters  in  cities  around  the  world  targeted   PDMRU 2O\PSLF VSRQVRUV :HGQHVGD\ MXVW ahead   of   the   Winter   Games   in   Sochi,   urg-­ LQJWKHPWRVSHDNRXWDJDLQVW5XVVLDÂśVODZ restricting   gay-­rights   activities.   Two   more   sponsors   of   the   U.S.   Olympic   team   con-­ demned  the  law,  but  leading  global  sponsors   GLGQRWMRLQWKHP THREAT  OF  PROTEST  VIOLENCE The   threat   of   new   protest   violence   in   8NUDLQH LV WDSHULQJ RII EXW WKH FRXQ tryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  two-­month-­old  political  and  eco-­ nomic   crisis   remains   far   from   being   resolved,  the  European  Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  foreign   policy  chief  said  Wednesday. EUROPEAN  UNION The  European  Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  antitrust  watch-­ dog   on   Wednesday   accepted   â&#x20AC;&#x153;far-­ reachingâ&#x20AC;?   concessions   offered   by   Google  to  settle  allegations  it  is  abus-­ ing   its   dominant   position   in   Internet   searches,   bringing   the   three-­year-­old   case  close  to  an  end. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

A  bar  graph  that  displays  SUNY  New  Paltz  enrollment  history.   By  Cat  Tacopina                                                                                 Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctacopina@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY   New   Paltz   President   Donald   Christian   said   in   his   January   Faculty   Report   that  enrollment  numbers  for  the  spring  semes-­ ter   are   lower   than   expected,   despite   hitting   WDUJHWQXPEHUVIRUÂżUVW\HDUDQGWUDQVIHUVWX dents.   In  the  inaugural  report  for  2014,  Christian   said   numbers   were   down   due   in   part   to   pre-­ vious   graduating   classes   and   the   shortage   in   housing  available  at  the  university  and  in  the   community.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   spring   semester   enrollments   are   GRZQ VOLJKWO\ DOWKRXJK LQ WKH ÂżUVW ZHHN of   class,   any   assessments   are   preliminary,â&#x20AC;?   Christian  said  in  the  report.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  successful   in  spite  of  the  deep  external  challenges  we  and   other   colleges   face,   given   the   steep   competi-­ tion  for  highly  capable  students.â&#x20AC;? &KULVWLDQ VDLG RQH RI WKH NH\ IDFWRUV LQ explaining   the   current   decline   in   enrollment   is  that  more  undergraduate  students  complete   WKHLUGHJUHHVLQIRXUWRÂżYH\HDUVDVRSSRVHG WRÂżYHWRVL[\HDUV+HDOVRVDLGWKHQXPEHU of  students  from  the  2008  entering  class  who   were   able   to   complete   their   degrees   in   four   years  has  contributed  to  the  decrease  in  enroll-­ ment.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   slight   decrease   in   undergraduate   en-­ rollment   for   spring   semester   stems   in   part   from  a  great  success:  the  unusually  large  en-­ tering  class  of  2008  had  strong  four-­year  grad-­ XDWLRQUDWHVDQGWKHÂżYH\HDUJUDGXDWLRQUDWH this  past  spring  was  also  very  high,â&#x20AC;?  Christian   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even   though   we   exceeded   our   targets   IRU LQFRPLQJ ÂżUVW\HDU DQG WUDQVIHU VWXGHQWV for  this  year,  our  total  enrollment  is  down  in   part  because  the  class  of  2008  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;moved  through   the  pipelineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  at  a  higher  rate  than  we  had  an-­ ticipated  a  year  ago  when  planning  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   enrollment  targets.â&#x20AC;? While  enrollments  are  currently  â&#x20AC;&#x153;sound,â&#x20AC;?   enrollment   could   decrease   because   of   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   current   â&#x20AC;&#x153;housing   crisis,â&#x20AC;?   Christian   said.   The  school  is  able  to  house  less  than  half   of  students  enrolled.  The  opening  of  the  resi-­ GHQFHKDOOQH[WWR/HQDSH+DOOZLOODOORZWKH school  the  ability  to  house  half  of  the  student   body.   Christian  said  the  potential  problems  that   could   rise   would   be   remedied   if   the   private   company  Wilmorite,  Inc.  were  given  approval   WREXLOG3DUN3RLQWDKRXVLQJSURMHFWWKDWKDV been   a   controversial   topic   among   New   Paltz   community  members  for  the  past  two  years.   Âł,ÂśYH ZULWWHQ DQG VSRNHQ PDQ\ WLPHV

Thursday,  February,  6,  2014

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  L.  DAVID  EATON

with  the  Town  Planning  Board  and  the  Ulster   County   Industrial   Developing   Agency   and   how   important   expanding   housing   is   for   our   students,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   Vice   President   for   Enrollment   Manage-­ ment  L.  David  Eaton  said  the  steady  increase   in   undergraduate   students   since   2007   have   contributed   to   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   need   for   housing.   The   increase   in   undergraduates   is   due   to   the   decline  of  graduate  student  enrollment;Íž  Eaton   said  graduate  students  do  not  use  or  need  the   same  housing  amenities  undergraduates  need   from  the  school.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because  of  the  increase  in  full-­time  un-­ dergraduates,  the  housing  shortage  that  exists   at   New   Paltz   is   a   serious   factor   that   impacts   the  collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  attractiveness  to  potential  trans-­ fer   students   and   graduate   students,â&#x20AC;?   Eaton   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  new  residence  hall  currently  being   FRQVWUXFWHG DGMDFHQW WR WKH :HOOQHVV &HQWHU will  alleviate  some  of  unmet  demand  for  hous-­ ing  from  incoming  transfer  students.â&#x20AC;?   Eaton   also   said   New   Paltz   does   not   in-­ tend   to   increase   undergraduate   enrollments,   and  will  instead  focus  on  increasing  graduate   enrollments.   Should   an   increase   in   graduate   HQUROOPHQWV KDSSHQ WKH VFKRRO ZLOO ORRN WR either   stagnate   undergraduate   enrollment   or   attempt  its  decline.


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

SA  Looks  To  Improve  Campus  Issues

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

OLYMPIC  PROTESTERS Protesters   in   cities   around   the   world   targeted   major   Olympic   sponsors   Wednesday,   just   ahead   of   the   Winter   Games  in  Sochi,  urging  them  to  speak   out  against  Russiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  law  restricting  gay-­ rights  activities.  Two  more  sponsors  of   the  U.S.  Olympic  team  condemned  the   law,  but  leading  global  sponsors  did  not   join  them. NAVY  YARD  RENAMED 2IÂżFLDOVDUHUHQDPLQJWKH:DVKLQJWRQ Navy   Yard   building   where   a   gunman   fatally  shot  12  people  in  September  be-­ fore  he  was  killed  by  police. FORMER   NEW   ORLEANS   MAY-­ OR Federal   prosecutors   rested   their   cor-­ ruption   case   Wednesday   against   for-­ mer   New   Orleans   Mayor   Ray   Nagin,   leaving  it  to  defense  lawyers  to  counter   ÂżYHGD\VRIWHVWLPRQ\IURPPRUHWKDQ WZR GR]HQ ZLWQHVVHV LQFOXGLQJ ÂżYH who  said  they  were  involved  in  bribing   Nagin.

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

7KHÂżUVW6WXGHQW$VVRFLDWLRQ 6$ PHHWLQJRIWKHVSULQJVHPHVWHUZDVKHOGRQ-DQ

By  Abbott  Brant Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   SUNY   New   Paltz   Student   As-­ sociation   (SA)   is   looking   to   continue   working  toward  improving  the  issues  they     took  on  last  semester  as  the  spring  semes-­ ter  gets  underway.   The   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drug   policy,   maintain-­ ing  food  quality  at  affordable  pricing  and   the  ongoing  debate  over  Park  Point  are  is-­ sues  that  will  continue  to  be  discussed,  SA   President  Manny  Tejada  said.   Last  semester,  SA  questioned  aspects   of  the  potential  Park  Point  housing  com-­ plex,  including  cost,  transportation  to  and   from  campus,  police  presence  and  the  use   of  natural  gas  as  opposed  to  the  possibility   of  green  gases.   The  drug  policy  was  also  under  scru-­ tiny  at  the  end  of  last  semester,  as  Tejada   revealed  the  responses  to  the  senate-­creat-­ ed  drug  survey  conducted  last  semester  at  

6$ÂśVÂżQDOIDOOPHHWLQJ7HQSHUFHQWRIWKH student   population   took   the   survey,   and   talks   of   further   analyzing   the   results   in   hopes   of   creating   a   proposed   renovation   to  the  current  policy  took  place.   Tejada   said   increasing   diversity   and   inclusion  on  campus,  particularly  with  use   of  the  remaining  money  SA  has  from  the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Talk  About  Itâ&#x20AC;?  grant,  will  continue   to  be  a  topic  on  the  table  at  SA  meetings   within  the  next  few  weeks.  At  the  end  of   the   semester,   SA   will   begin   focusing   on   looking   at   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;activity   fee   and   constitu-­ tional  convention,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   issues   are   important   because   they  touch  upon  different  constituent  bod-­ ies   campus   interests,   and   are   issues   that   affect   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   futures   and   their   experi-­ ence   on   campus,â&#x20AC;?   Tejada   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Overall   these  issues  highlight  the  need  to  continue   being   active   politically   and   socially   on   campus.â&#x20AC;?

SA  Vice  President  Zachary  Rousseas   said  he  will  use  his  position  on  SA  to  as-­ sist   the   the   Queer   Student   Union   (QSU)   in   their   goal   for   achieving   transgende-­ related   healthcare   to   be   included   in   the   student  insurance  policy,  along  with  other   LGBTQ  activists  on  campus.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  am  in  contact  with  a  few  other  stu-­ dent   government   leaders   in   the   SUNY   system   who   identify   as   queer   who   will   also   be   working   on   this   issue   alongside   SUNY   New   Paltz,â&#x20AC;?   Rousseas   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Al-­ though  this  is  not  necessarily  a  new  issue,   creating  safe  spaces  tends  to  manifest  it-­ self   in   different   ways   every   semester   as   we  continue  to  progress  to  a  more  inclu-­ sive  campus.â&#x20AC;? Rousseas  said  he  cannot  foresee  or  de-­ tail  what  type  of  legislation  will  be  passed   this  semester,  but  â&#x20AC;&#x153;hopes  to  see  legislation   that   works   to   make   SUNY   New   Paltz   a   safer  space  and  more  inclusive.â&#x20AC;?

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

WEST  VIRGINIA  TAP  WATER $FRXQW\KHDOWKRIÂżFLDOLQ:HVW9LUJLQ-­ ia   said   doctors   are   advising   some   pa-­ tients  not  to  drink  tap  water  weeks  after   it   was   deemed   safe   from   a   chemical   contamination,  though  a  federal  health   RIÂżFLDORQ:HGQHVGD\VDLGLWFRXOGEH used  for  any  purpose. NSA  SURVEILLANCE Angry   over   revelations   of   National   Security  Agency  surveillance  and  frus-­ trated  with  what  they  consider  outdated   digital   privacy   laws,   state   lawmakers   around  the  nation  are  proposing  bills  to   curtail   the   powers   of   law   enforcement   to  monitor  and  track  citizens. PHILIP  SEYMOUR  HOFFMAN Four  people  were  taken  into  custody   on  drug  charges  after  police  inves-­ tigating  Philip  Seymour  Hoffmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   death  executed  search  warrants,   two  people  with  knowledge  of  the   investigation  said  Wednesday,  and  the   PHGLFDOH[DPLQHUÂśVRIÂżFHVDLGPRUH tests  are  needed  to  determine  what   killed  him. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


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Huguenot  Changes  Leadership By  Andrew  Lief Managing  Editor|  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

thy r o sw w an e m N New Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.

By  Jennifer  Newman Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  REBECCA  MACKEY

Last   month,   SUNY   New   Paltz   alumnus   Rebecca   Mackey   was   ap-­ pointed  to    the  new  position  of  Di-­ rector  of  Operations  at  Historic  Hu-­ guenot   Street   after   spending   three   months   as   the   interim   executive   director. She   has   been   with   Huguenot   Street  on  and  off  since  2008  and  re-­ turned  full-­time  in  August  of  2011.     In   her   new   role,   she   is   responsible   for  the  administrative  and  logistical   side   of   operations.     She   is   also   in   charge   of   infrastructure,   historical   properties,   preservation   of   resourc-­ es,  human  resources  and  overseeing   large-­scale  sight  projects. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  with  Huguenot  Street   on  and  off  for  some  time  now,  so  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   good  to  be  in  a  position  where  I  feel   I   can   help   move   the   organization   forward,â&#x20AC;?  Mackey  said.     According   to   a   press   release   from   Historic   Huguenot   Street,   the   Board   of   Directors   decided   to   cre-­ ate   this   position   to   deal   with   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;increased   importance   of   attention   to  organizational  administration  and   meet   the   challenges   of   preserving   buildings   and   collections   that   date   to  the  1600s.â&#x20AC;? Taylor   Stoermer,   director   of   strategy,   development   and   historic   interpretation   said   since   Historic   Huguenot   Street   is   looking   to   be-­ come   a   more   active   and   engaging   place,  Mackey  is  the  perfect  person   for   this   role   because   of   her   skill   in   running   the   daily   operations   of   an   organization.     Before   serving   time   as   the   in-­ terim   executive   director,   Mackey   was  the  director  of  visitor  services,   programs,  tours  and  visitor  services   manager,  director  of  visitor  services   at  Historic  Huguenot  Street.     Now   in   her   new   role,   she   said   she  expects  there  to  be  many  chang-­ es   at   Huguenot   Street   in   the   next   WKUHH WR ÂżYH \HDUV E\ WU\LQJ QHZ things   that   will   help   the   organiza-­ tion  grow.       Mackey  said  she  wants  to  con-­ tinue   the   relationship   Huguenot   Street   has   with   SUNY   New   Paltz.     Currently,   students   get   to   tour   for  

 6

Rebecca  Mackey  has  been  with  Historic  Huguenot  Street  since  2008.

free  and  there  are  students  who  have   and   are   currently   interning   at   Hu-­ guenot  Street.     Stoermer   said   Mackeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   traits  are  that  she  has  a  great  analyti-­ cal   mind   and   that   she   is   extremely   level-­headed.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  is  really  able  to  get  at  the   KHDUW RI D LVVXH DQG ÂżQG RXW ZKDW really   matters   about   it,â&#x20AC;?   Stoermer   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   can   really   reduce   what   otherwise   might   be   a   complicated   question   into   its   most   important   part.   That   kind   of   skill,   being   able   to  focus  on  the  important  things,  on   an   otherwise   complicated   issue   is   worth  its  wait  in  gold.â&#x20AC;? Stoermer   said   one   of   the   great   things  about  Rebecca  is  that  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   good  for  her  is  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  good  for  Hu-­ guenot  Street.    He  also  said  dealing   with   the   challenges   and   responsi-­

bilities  she  faces,  along  with  main-­ taining  the  historic  homes  and  trans-­ forming   the   entire   site   into   a   place   that   is   more   friendly   for   visitors   to   visit   is   something   that   can   help   transform  this  area.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   [Transforming   Huguenot   Street]  is  something  that  will  change   the  lives  of  the  people  at  the  organi-­ zation  and  make  a  big  difference  for   the   people   who   visit   it,â&#x20AC;?   Stoermer   said.     Looking   forward,   Mackey   said   there   will   be   changes   with   tours.   7KHUH ZLOO EH PRUH ÂżUVWSHUVRQ types   of   stories   inside   the   houses,   the   exhibitions   will   be   highlighted   more,   there   will   be   a   new   exhibit   this   year   and   there   will   put   a   new   orientation  exhibit  put  in  at  the  ori-­ entation  site.  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

A   congressman   threatens   a   NY1   Reporter   saying   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   break   you   in   half.   Like   a   boy.â&#x20AC;?   A   great  news  headline  if  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  ever  heard    one.   Now   as   a   journalist   with   aspirations   to   get   into   the   political   spectrum,   I   understand   how   intimidating   it   can   be   to   speak   with   politicians.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  so  shocking  (and  exciting)  when   one   of   these   well-­rehearsed   politicians   slips   up   publically.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  people  love  Rob  Ford  so   much   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   because   the   controversy   surrounding   him  is  a  hot  mess.   So  when  I  heard  about  Rep.  Michael  Grimm,   a   Republican   New   York   Congressman   already   dealing  with  an  investigation  into  possible  cam-­ SDLJQ ÂżQDQFH YLRODWLRQV DQG VDZ WKH YLGHR RI him  threatening  a  reporter,  it  brought  up  a  whole   mess  of  emotions  in  me.   For  those  of  you  who  have  not  seen  the  NY1   video,   a   fresh-­out-­of-­college-­looking   reporter,   Michael  Scotto,  asks  Congressman  Grimm  about   WKH RQJRLQJ LQYHVWLJDWLRQ RI KLV ÂżQDQFHV DW WKH recent   State   of   the   Union   address.   Grimm,   in-­ stead   of   the   usual   â&#x20AC;&#x153;no   commentâ&#x20AC;?   response,   got   noticeably  angry  and  walked  away.  But  once  the   reporter  signed  off,  he  came  back  for  an  encore.   At  one  point  Grimm  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let  me  be  clear  to   you,  you  ever  do  that  to  me  again  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  throw  you   off  this  f-­-­-­-­-­g  balcony.â&#x20AC;? So  on  one  hand  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  complete  unpro-­ fessionality   of   the   comments   by   the   Congress-­ man   and   outright   abuse   of   power.   On   the   other   hand,   he   did   not   know   the   camera   was   rolling,   so  it  begs  the  question  of  how  often  this  actually   happens  in  the  world  of  politics.   The  Staten  Island  Congressman  later  apolo-­ gized   for   his   threats,   although   not   initially,   try-­ ing  to  mend  his  image,  the  smart  move  to  make.   However  just  because  he  had  to  appoligize  does   not  mean  the  origin  of  the  issue  magically  goes   away  with  an  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  sorry.â&#x20AC;?     It  is  a  problem  when  politics  are  reduced  to   threats,   because   of   so   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;cheap   shotsâ&#x20AC;?   by   reporters,  instead  of  transparency  within  the  in-­ stitution.  This  reporter  was  just  one  example  of   a  journalist  trying  to  watch  the  watcher,  and  this   video  is  proof  of  the  need  for  reporters  who  are   not  afraid  to  ask  tough  questions.  This  â&#x20AC;&#x153;boyâ&#x20AC;?  did   the  right  thing.  He  did  his  job.


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Open  SUNY  Offers  New  Opportunities By  Andrew  Lief During   SUNY   Chancellor   Nancy   Zimpherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;2014   State   of   the   Univer-­ sity  Address:   Innovation   at   Scale,â&#x20AC;?   last   month,  she  introduced  the  Open  SUNY   program.     This  program  created  eight  new  on-­ line   degree   programs   to   go   along   with   making  all  12,000  online  SUNY  courses   accessible  to  every  student  in  the  SUNY   system.   The   goal   of   the   program   is   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;reach  the  nearly  seven  million  adults  in   New   York   with   a   high   school   diploma   but  no  college  degree,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.    Anoth-­ er  reason  Zimpher  gave  for  starting  this   initiative   was   that   by   at   least   2025,   60   percent  of  jobs  will  require  a  bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree.         The   eight   new   online   degree   pro-­ JUDPV DUH LQ WKH ÂżHOGV RI DSSOLHG VFL-­ ence  in  clinical  laboratory  technologies,   business,   management   and   economics,   science,   mathematics   and   technology,   tourism   management,   electrical   engi-­ neering,   nursing,   business   administra-­ tion  and  health  services  administration.     Provost   Philip   Mauceri   said   he   hopes   Open   SUNY   attracts   and   allows   people   who   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   had   the   ability   to   recieve  higher  education  previous  to  re-­ cieve  a  degree.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   is   a   growing   mismatch   be-­ tween   the   educational   attainment   that   the  US  workforce  currently  has  and  the   higher  skill  levels  needed,  and  this  ini-­ tiative   can   certainly   help   address   this   problem,â&#x20AC;?   Mauceri   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   also   think   that   Open   SUNY   will   offer   students   within  SUNY  and  beyond  more  choices   in  class  and  program  selections.â&#x20AC;? SUNY  New  Paltz  President  Donald   Christian  said  Open  SUNY  was  created   to   help   students   graduate   through   the   program  more  quickly. Christian  said  New  Paltz  is  increas-­ ing  its  online  course  offerings  and  pro-­ grams  by  continuing  to  grow  the  amount   of   online   courses   offered   during   the   January  winter  session,  so  students  can   WDNHFODVVHVWKDWPLJKWQRWÂżWLQWRWKHLU schedule  during  the  fall  and  spring.  He   also   said   the   School   of   Business   is   fo-­ cusing   on   developing   online   classes   as   part   of   the   MBA   program   to   help   stu-­ dents  facilitate  through  the  program.     Mauceri   said   this   initiative   now  

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  THE    SUNY  NEW  PALTZ  FLICKR

Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY  Chancellor  Nancy  Zimpher  presented  the  Open  SUNY  at  her  2014  Stae  of  the  University  address.  

puts  pressure  on  the  school  to  make  sure   they  make  the  right  choices  about  which   courses   to   offer   online,   so   the   students   ZLOO EHQH¿W WKH PRVW +H DOVR VDLG WKH school  is  constantly  working  to  help  in-­ crease  the  online  teaching  abilities  of  its   faculty.     Christian   said   some   colleges   and   universities  require  their  students  to  take   an  online  course  because  some  corpora-­ tions  make  their  employees  take  online   courses   as   a   part   of   continuing   their   education.    He  also  said  faculty  develop   new   approaches   when   teaching   an   on-­ line  course,  which  helps  them  when  they  

go  back  to  teaching  a  class  in  person.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   way   of   diversifying   and   changing   the   way   faculty   assemble   the   course   and   engage   students,â&#x20AC;?   Christian   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   this   initiative,   like   others   that  have  been  launched,  demonstrate  a   willingness  in  SUNY  to  be  creative  and   pro-­active  in  the  face  of  the  vast  changes   reshaping   higher   education,â&#x20AC;?   Mauceri   said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  always  best  to  get  ahead  of   FKDQJHVDQGKHOSGHÂżQHWKHFKDQJHUDWK-­ er  than  to  be  passive  and  allow  change   WRUHGHÂżQHZKRZHDUH´ According   to   Zimpherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   address,  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

students  who  participate  in  Open  SUNY   will   have   the   support   of   a   student   con-­ cierge.   The   concierge   is   a   24/7   help-­ desk   that   includes   tutoring,   mentoring,   GHJUHHSODQQLQJDGYLVLQJDQGÂżQDQFLDO aid  information.     While   the   school   is   continuing   to   grow   its   online   courses   program,   Mau-­ ceri  said  the  students  are  still  focused  on   in  person  classes.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although   our   students   are   inter-­ ested   in   hybrid   and   online   courses,   their   main   focus   remains   on   face-­to-­ face  courses,  and  I  do  not  expect  that  to   change  dramatically,â&#x20AC;?  Mauceri  said.  


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Lecture  Series  Hosted  On  The  Shawangunk %\.ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG Copy  Editor|  :DU¿HON#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX

The  SUNY  New  Paltz  Biology  Department  will  be   hosting  a  six  part  series  of  lectures  in  alliance  with  The   Shawangunk  Ridge  Biodiversity  Partnership  (SRBP)  in   order  to  promote  awareness  of  the  Shawangunk  Ridge   within   the   community.   The   series,   named   “Secrets   of   The  Shawangunks,”  will  begin  on  Thursday,  Feb.  6  and   feature  a  guest  speaker  each  week  that  will  discuss  top-­ ics  concerning  The  Ridge.   Director  of  the  Nature  Conservancy’s  Shawangunks   Ridge  Program  Cara  Lee  said  the  yearly  “Secrets  of  The   Shawangunks”  lectures  play  a  noticeable  part  in  teach-­ ing  the  public  about  the  importance  of  The  Ridge. “I  think  that  many  people  are  interested  in  knowing   more  about  where  they  live  —  that’s  valuable  because  it   improves  one’s  quality  of  life,”  Lee  said.  “And  if  people   know   about   a   place,   they   are   more   inclined   to   protect   it.  If  people  understand  [that]  different  birds  and  wild-­ life   live   on   the   Ridge,   they   are   more   likely   to   be   con-­ cerned  about  protecting  that  area.  Many  of  us  who  work   for   conservation   organizations   want   to   inform   people   [about  this].” According  to  Lee,  the  series  generally  reaches  full   attendance.  “Secrets  of  the  Shawangunks”  has  been  held  

yearly  for  over  a  decade,  with  each  year  bringing  upon   new  topics  and  guest  speakers.   “People  particularly  like  to  learn  about  wildlife  of   the  area,”  she  said.  “We  bring  in  research  scientists,  au-­ thors   and   all   kinds   of   people   who   are   knowledgeable   about  the  natural  history  of  the  Shawangunk,”  she  said.   “We  always  have  it  in  the  dead  of  winter  when  people   are   thinking   about   the   outdoors,   but   maybe   not   going   out  of  doors  as  much  as  they  usually  do.  We  have  pre-­ sented   over   the   years   all   kinds   of   topics   related   to   the   natural  history  and  management  of  the  ridge  in  terms  of   conservation.” Professor   Emerita   of   Biology   Carol   Rietsma   said     although  the  college  hosts  other  lecture  series  through-­ out  the  year,  few,  if  any  provide  this  kind  of  information   to  its  audience. “These   lectures   deal   with   natural   resources   and   their  protection/conservation  on  the  Shawangunk  Ridge   which  is  in  the  backyard,  so  to  speak,  of  the  college,”   VKH VDLG ³>65%3@ XVHV ¿HOG UHVHDUFK DQG DQDO\VLV WR manage   the   landscape,   provide   environmental   educa-­ tion,  and  work  with  local  communities  to  preserve  open   space  on  the  slopes  of  the  Ridge.” Along  with  providing  students  with  an  opportunity   to  learn  about  the  nature  surrounding  New  Paltz,  Riets-­ PDVDLGELRORJ\VWXGHQWVDWWHQGWKHVHOHFWXUHVWRIXO¿OO

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

department  requirements. “As  a  graduation  requirement,  students  in  the  Biol-­ RJ\SURJUDPDUHUHTXLUHGWRDWWHQGDVSHFL¿HGQXPEHU RIVHPLQDUVWKDWDUHRI¿FLDOO\VDQFWLRQHGE\WKHGHSDUW-­ ment.  Many  students  attend  the  Shawangunk  Ridge  lec-­ tures   —   particularly   those   who   are   in   the   Organismal   and  Environmental  track  in  the  Biology  program.”  she   said.   “The   Shawangunk   Ridge   is   a   very   special   place   with  so  much  land  protected  from  development  within   90  miles  of  New  York  City,”  Rietsma  said. Each  “Secrets  Of  The  Shawangunks”  lecture  is  free   and  is  open  to  the  public.  They  will  take  place  in  Lecture   Center  102  at  7  p.m.  on  Feb  6,  13,  20,  and  27.

Secrets  of  The   Shawangunks  Lecture   Series  in  Lecture   Center  102 Feb.  6,  13,  20  and  27


THE GUNK Thursday, Febuary 6, 2014

ABsolut Victory Story on page 5B PHOTO COURTESY OF EMILY HOLUB


2B

FEATURES

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

New Paltz: There’s An App For That MOBILE APP BRINGS NEW PALTZ STRAIGHT TO YOUR PHONE By  Hannah  Nesich Assistant  Copy  Editor  |  Hnesich@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu For   software   analyst   Barrie   Dener,   the   workday   doesn’t  end  after  her  9  to  5  job.  That’s  when  the  tech  junk-­ ie   trades   keyboards   for   keypads   and   gets   to   coding   her   newest  phone-­friendly  creation:  the  New  Paltz  App. New  Paltz  App  is  essentially  a  virtual  phone  book  for   New  Paltzians,  allowing  users  to  peruse  local  businesses   and  establishments  and  link  directly  to  their  websites. There’s   an   array   of   categories,   from   restaurants   to   farms  to  places  of  worship,  and  within  each  section  is  a   list  of  options  for  the  user  to  choose  from. The  application  can  be  downloaded  for  free  onto  An-­ droid  and  iOS  devices  and  features  one-­touch  calling  for   services   like   the   New   Paltz   Delivery   Doctor,   New   Paltz   Taxi,   a   tow   truck   service   and—most   popular—Rocco’s   Pizzeria. “I’d  like  [New  Paltz  App]  to  be  a  household  name  in   New  Paltz,  I’d  like  everyone  to  know,  sort  of  like  the  new   phone  book,”  Dener  said.  “People  don’t  use  their  phone   book  anymore  and  a  lot  of  people,  more  and  more  people   are  using  their  phone  more  than  they’re  using  computers.” Dener   markets   the   product   with   her   husband   Butch   Dener,  a  former  band  promoter.  The  entrepreneurial  duo   combine  their  unique  talents  to  promote  the  app  at  estab-­ lishments  in  town  and  collaborate  over  creative  direction. “She’s   the   genius   and   I   am   the   schmoozer,”   Butch   Dener  said.  “I  saw  how  she  envisioned  it  and  gave  input   on  the  way.  We’re  like  songwriters,  she  had  the  melody,  I   gave  her  the  words.” Barrie  agreed. “It’s  nice  for  us  to  get  more  involved  in  the  commu-­ nity  together  and  use  our  skills  together.  It’s  a  project  for   us  to  do  together,”  she  said. The   app   originated   as   a   mere   idea,   brought   on   by   boredom,  in  July  of  2013. Barrie  Dener  was  on  bed  rest  for  a  month  following   surgery.  Initially  thrilled  with  the  freedom,  she  soon  grew   restless  and  decided  to  channel  her  creativity  into  pursu-­ ing  what  had  always  been  an  interest  of  hers:  creating  her   own  app. Three  months  later,  Dener’s  labor-­of-­love  was  born,   and  since  then,  has  superseded  both  of  the  Deners’  expec-­ tations. The  pair  have  been  advertising  the  app  since  it  went   live  in  September,  when  Barrie  was  so  excited  “it  was  like   she  gave  birth  to  a  child,”  Butch  said. The  couple  initially  promoted  New  Paltz  App  at  the   annual   Taste   of   New   Paltz   Festival   and   at   SUNY   New   Paltz’s  First-­Year  Student  Businesses  Fair  in  September,  

The  New  Paltz  App  launch  screen  open  on  an  iPad.  

where  they  were  met  with  pleasant  shock  when  many  of   the  students  they  spoke  to  said  they’d  already  downloaded   the  app. ³(YHU\ IRXUWK RU ¿IWK SHUVRQ ZKR FDPH XS WR RXU table   said   they   had   downloaded   it   when   they   found   out   they  were  coming  to  New  Paltz  by  searching  ‘New  Paltz   Apps,’”  Barrie  Dener  said.  “I  thought,  ‘It’s  promoting  it-­ self.  I  love  it.’” Since  going  live,  the  app’s  corresponding  website  has   had  more  than  13,000  visitors.  The  app  itself  has  been  ac-­ cessed  by  more  than  2,000  different  phones,  has  had  more   than  340  phone  calls  made  through  it  and  averages  about   6,000  views  per  week. Barrie   Dener   said   she’s   been   discussing   the   possi-­ bility  of  developing  a  travel  app  with  her  sister,  a  travel   agent,  and  is  interested  in  extending  a  similar  application   to  surrounding  communities,  which  has  proven  to  be  more   complicated  than  she  anticipated. “I   even   thought   I   would   do   Rhinebeck   and   Wood-­ stock,”  Barrie  said.  “But  there’s  so  much  of  a  community   element  involved  in  it  that  I  didn’t  realize,  it  takes  more  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

PHOTO  BY  MAXWELL  REIDE

time.” The  Deners  also  emphasized  how  important  it  is  for   them  to  support  businesses  in  the  community,  where  many   of  their  friends  work,  and  to  help  the  town  grow  and  pros-­ per. “We  really  want  to  help  local  businesses  be  more  vis-­ ible  in  places  that  they  might  not  be,”  Butch  Dener  said.   “It  needs  to  be  a  service  to  the  local  businesses,  it  needs  to   work  well  for  them,  too.” Butch  Dener  said  he  thinks  it’s  important  for  SUNY   New  Paltz  students,  one  of  the  app’s  biggest  intended  tar-­ get  audiences,  to  realize  there  is  more  to  the  local  commu-­ nity  than  the  downtown  area,  and  that  the  New  Paltz  App   can  help  reveal  that. “Main  Street  is  all  you  really  see.  But  it’s  important   WR NQRZ WKHUH LV D PXVLF FOXE ¿YH PLQXWHV DZD\ 2U D farm  stand  where  you  can  get  incredible  local  stuff,”  he   said.  “It’s  good  to  know  about  the  community,  so  you  can   UHJLVWHU WR YRWH DW WKH WRZQ FOHUN²\RX FDQ ¿QG WKDW RQ the  app.  Just  getting  to  know  the  everyday  life  besides  the   bars  and  restaurants.”


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Features

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3B

A Glow In The Pitch Black Underground

POST-APOCALYPTIC NOVEL SHINES A LIGHT ON MANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DESTRUCTIVE NATURE By  Anthony  DeRosa Features  Editor  |  N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu The   snowy   season   inspires   romantic   thoughts   of   hot   FKRFRODWHDQG¿UHVLGHVQXJJOLQJIRUPDQ\RIXVEXWIRUPH the  crisp  blankets  of  white  outside  bring  to  mind  only  one   thing:  nuclear  winter.  So  for  this  issue,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  revisiting  a   SHUVRQDOIDYRULWHLQVRFLHWDOFROODSVH¿FWLRQ³0HWUR´ ³0HWUR ´ LV D SRVWDSRFDO\SWLF QRYHO IURP 5XV sian   author   Dmitry   Glukhovsky.   The   story   takes   place   in   WKH 0RVFRZ 0HWUR V\VWHP ZKHUH WKH ODVW VXUYLYRUV KDYH sought  shelter  20  years  after  a  global  nuclear  holocaust  has   left  the  surface  highly  irradiated  and  inhabited  by  mutated   versions  of  the  once  local  wildlife.  The  most  dangerous  of   WKHVH FUHDWXUHV DUH NQRZQ DV WKH ³'DUN 2QHV´ KXPDQRLG beings  with  telekinetic  powers  that  threaten  to  replace  homo   sapiens  as  the  dominant  species  on  Earth  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  homo  novus  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   ³1HZ0DQ´ The  plot  begins  when  the  Dark  Onesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  attacks  into  the   0HWURKDYHLQFUHDVHGLQIUHTXHQF\DQGDJJUHVVLRQDQGWKH VDIHW\ RI LWV RFFXSDQWV DW LWV GLIIHUHQW VWDWLRQV LV MHRSDU GL]HG$UW\RPD\RXQJPDQZRUNLQJDVDVHFXULW\RI¿FHU at   the   station   where   the   Dark   Onesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   attacks   have   become   PRVWSUHYDOHQWLVWDVNHGZLWKWUDYHOLQJWRWKHFHQWUDO0HWUR where   the   last   remnants   of   the   Russian   military   reside   to   UHTXHVW UHLQIRUFHPHQWV EHIRUH WKH 'DUN 2QHV¶ DUH DEOH WR

invade  the  entirety  of  the  underground.   7KHVWRU\IROORZVWKHWUDGLWLRQDOOLWHUDU\VHWXSRI³7KH +HUR¶V4XHVW´ZLWKPRGHUQWKHPHVRISROLWLFDODQGH[LVWHQ tial  philosophy  as  well  as  the  value  of  life.  Drawing  from   5XVVLDQKLVWRU\RI:RUOG:DU,,FRQWURORIWKH0HWURKDV been   divided   between   different   factions,   most   notably   the   FRPPXQLVW³5HG/LQH´DQG1HR1D]LSXULVWVWKH³)RXUWK 5HLFK´ ZKR HQJDJH LQ FRQVWDQW VNLUPLVKHV IRU FRQWURO RI WKH0HWUR$VWKHQDUUDWLYHSURJUHVVHV$UW\RPHQFRXQWHUV ]HDORWVRIERWKLGHRORJLHVZKRVHGHVLUHWR¿JKWZLWKHDFK other   in   the   wake   of   the   otherworldly   threat   of   the   Dark   2QHVSURYLGHVDSURYRFDWLYHFRPPHQWDU\RQPDQ¶VVHOIGH VWUXFWLYHQDWXUH7KLVKDVERWKWKHUHDGHUDQG$UW\RPTXHV WLRQZKHWKHURUQRWKXPDQLW\VKRXOGEHZLSHGIURPH[LV tence  especially  given  that  this  kind  of  bloodthirsty  nature   ZDVZKDWFDXVHGWKHERPEVWRIDOOLQWKH¿UVWSODFH Through  Artyomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   travel,   the   author   presents   various   H[DPSOHVRIKXPDQKLVWRU\UHSHDWLQJLWVHOILQVSLWHRIDFD ODPLWRXV HYHQW VXFK DV QXFOHDU KRORFDXVW 7KH 0HWUR DQG the   functional   condition   of   its   stations   dictate   the   stages   of  human  societal  evolution  present  from  the  cannibalistic   VDYDJHVRIPHWURVWDWLRQVZLWKRXWOLJKWRUZDWHUWRWKHIHX dalistic  class  system  of  others. 7KHUHVXOWLQJSURGXFWLVDKLJKOLJKWUHHORIKXPDQGH velopment  and  survival,  making  for  a  stellar  read.  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

 

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  BLOGSPOT.COM


  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Features

oracle.newpaltz.edu 4B

Shah Speaks On Success Story

DISTINGUISHED JOURNALIST DISCUSSES HER CAREER

Sonia  Shah,  this  semesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  James  H.  Ottaway  Sr.  Visiting  Professor  of  Journalism,  spoke  with  New  Paltz  President   Donald  Christian  Tuesday,  in  the  Honors  Center  in  his  annual  interview  event  within  the  Ottaway  program.   Shah  answered  questions  pertaining  to  her  success  in  journalism  as  well  as  her  experience  as  a  women  of  color  within   WKH¿HOG6KDK¶VQH[WSXEOLFWDONZLOOEHRQ$SULOLQWKH&R\NHQGDOO6FLHQFH%XLOGLQJ$XGLWRULXPDWSP

3+2726%<52%,1:(,167(,1 &$37,21%<$17+21<'(526$

Thursday,  February  6,  2014


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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5B

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Singing In The Key Of Victory NEW PALTZâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S A CAPPELLA GROUP PITCHSLAPS THE COMPETITION By  Suzy  Berkowitz $ ((GLWRU_Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  co-­ed  a  cappella  group  Absolut-­ely  dominated   this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  International  Championship  of  Collegiate  A  Cappella   ,&&$ 1RUWKHDVW4XDUWHUÂżQDOURXQG +HOGDW5HQVVHODHU3RO\WHFKQLF,QVWLWXWH 53, LQ7UR\1< RQ6DWXUGD\-DQWKHFRPSHWLWLRQIHDWXUHGDFDSSHOODJURXSV IURP681<3RWVGDP681<$OEDQ\DQG53,(DFKJURXSSHU-­ formed  sets  of  three  songs,  complete  with  choreography  and  mi-­ crophones,  and  the  top  two  were  chosen  to  move  onto  the  North-­ HDVW6HPLÂżQDOURXQGDW%HUNOHH&ROOHJHRI0XVLFLQ%RVWRQRQ 6DWXUGD\0DUFK :KLOHRWKHUFROOHJLDWHDFDSSHOODJURXSVVROHO\ZRUNWRZDUG ICCA,   entering   the   contest   was   an   afterthought   for   Absolut   A   &DSSHOODDFFRUGLQJWR(PLO\+ROXE â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  saw  that  the  competition  was  open  the  day  before  sub-­ PLVVLRQVZHUHGXHDQGZHVXEPLWWHGDYLGHRRIRXUÂżUVWSHUIRU-­ mance  ever  which  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  that  good  and  we  got  in,â&#x20AC;?  Holub,   a  third-­year  organizational  communications  major  and  president   RI$EVROXW$&DSSHOODVDLGÂł:HÂśYHQHYHUGRQHWKLVEHIRUH:H SXWWKLVDOOWRJHWKHULQDZHHNDQGZHGLGQÂśWWKLQNZHZHUHJRQQD ZLQ´ :KLOHWKHJURXSQRUPDOO\UHKHDUVHVRQO\WKUHHGD\VDZHHN WKH\EXPSHGLWXSWRÂżYHEHIRUHWKHFRPSHWLWLRQFKRRVLQJWRVLQJ WKHWKUHHDUUDQJHPHQWVWKH\ZHUHPRVWFRQÂżGHQWZLWK+ROXEVDLG After  narrowing  down  the  choices  of  performance  pieces  through   D YRWH $EVROXW GHFLGHG RQ Âł3DUDFKXWH´ E\ ,QJULG 0LFKDHOVRQ Âł:DLWLQJIRU<RX´E\6HDODQGÂł&RVPLF/RYH´E\)ORUHQFHDQG WKH0DFKLQH7KH\DOVRLQFRUSRUDWHGFKRUHRJUDSK\LQWRWKHLUSHU-­ IRUPDQFHZKLFKZDVQHZWRWKHP Âł:HMXVWVLQJ:HGRQÂśWSHUIRUPZLWKPLFVDQGGRFKRUHRJ-­ raphy  for  a  million  people,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  about,â&#x20AC;?  Holub   VDLGÂł7KHFKRUHRJUDSK\ZDVQÂśWWHFKQLFDOO\KDUGEXWLWZDVUHDOO\ DHVWKHWLFDOO\SOHDVLQJ´ Absolut  made  sure  not  to  get  pitchslapped  by  the  competi-­ WLRQDVWKH\SULGHWKHPVHOYHVRQHQWHULQJIRUWKHVDNHRIKDYLQJ IXQ According   to   Stephen   Kalogeras,   a   fourth-­year   sociology   and  theater  performance  double-­major  and  vice-­president  of  Ab-­ VROXWLQWKHHQGLWZDVDOODERXWGRLQJZKDWWKH\ORYH â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   feels   great   because   we   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   go   in   to   win,â&#x20AC;?   Kalogeras   VDLGÂł7RNQRZWKDWRXUKDUGZRUNSDLGRIIDQGWKDWRWKHUSHRSOH VDZWKDWZDVJUHDW(YHQLIZHGLGQÂśWZLQZHJRWWRVKDUHRXUWDO-­ HQWIRURWKHUSHRSOH´ $FFRUGLQJWR.DORJHUDVDFRPSRQHQWRI$EVROXWWKDWPDNHV them  stand  out  from  the  competition  is  their  ability  to  mimic  in-­ VWUXPHQW LQ WKHLU DUUDQJHPHQWV :KLOH RWKHU JURXSV LQFRUSRUDWH

3+272&2857(6<2)FACEBOOK86(567(3+(1.$/2*(5$6 $EVROXW$&DSSHOODSHUIRUPLQJLQ1HZ3DOW]

VWDFNHG KDUPRQLHV DQG VXVSHQGHG YRZHO VRXQGV $EVROXW DS-­ proaches  songs  by  mirroring  the  instrumentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  sounds  in  the  orig-­ inal   song   and   building   the   song   behind   their   soloist,   Kalogeras   VDLG According   to   Anthony   Amitrano,   a   Resident   Director   and   graduate  student  with  a  major  in  higher  education  administration   and  a  former  member  of  Absolut,  who  attended  the  competition  at   53,KHNQHZ$EVROXWZDVJRLQJWRZLQDVVRRQDVWKH\ÂżQLVKHG SHUIRUPLQJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  other  groups  were  good,  but  I  was  getting  bored,â&#x20AC;?  Ami-­ WUDQRVDLGÂł2QFH$EVROXWZHQWRQWKHUHZDVDFOHDUGLVWLQFWLRQ EHWZHHQWKHTXDOLW\RIWKHSHUIRUPDQFHV7KHFKRUHRJUDSK\DQG DUUDQJHPHQWVJDYHPHFKLOOV´ According  to  Kalogeras,  when  it  was  Absolutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  turn  to  per-­ IRUPWKH\ZDONHGRQVWDJHVDQJGLGDKHDUWEHDWPRYHPHQWZLWK their  hands  and  put  their  heads  down  when  the  performance  was   RYHU â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  our  performance  was  over,  the  crowd  went  silent,  and  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

then  a  girl  in  the  audience  screamed  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;oh  my  God,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  and  you  just   KHDUGDSSODXVH´.DORJHUDVVDLGÂł:HZDONHGRIIVWDJHDQG,VWDUW-­ HGK\VWHULFDOO\FU\LQJEHFDXVH,ZDVMXVWVRSURXGRIHYHU\RQH´ Special  awards  were  announced  before  overall  winners,  and   Absolut   won   two   awards   for   outstanding   arrangement   and   out-­ VWDQGLQJ FKRUHRJUDSK\ ,W ZDV RQO\ WKHQ .DORJHUDV VDLG GLG LW FOLFNZLWKKLPWKDW$EVROXWFRXOGEHSODFHGLQWKHWRSWKUHHWZRRI ZKLFKZRXOGPRYHRQWRWKH1RUWKHDVW6HPLÂżQDOURXQGLQ%RVWRQ Kalogeras   said   when   Absolutâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   name   was   called   as   the   1RUWKHDVW4XDUWHUÂżQDOVÂżUVWSODFHZLQQHUVWKHHQWLUHJURXSZDV VHQWLQWRDZDYHRIKXJVVFUHDPVDQGWHDUV Âł:KHQZHJRWR%RVWRQZHFDQÂśWOHWWKHFRPSHWLWLRQWKURZ XVRII´.DORJHUDVVDLGÂł:HKDYHWRWKLQNDERXWZKDWWKHJURXS PHDQVWRXV:HZHUHDPD]LQJEHIRUHZHKDGDWLWOHDQGZHÂśUH JRQQDEHDPD]LQJDIWHU,IZHÂśUH$EVROXWDQGZHÂśUHWKH4XDUWHUÂż-­ QDOFKDPSLRQVWKDWÂśVJUHDWLIZHÂśUHQRWWKH6HPLÂżQDOFKDPSLRQV WKDWÂśVJUHDW:HÂśUHVWLOODIDPLO\DQGZHVWLOOORYHHDFKRWKHUDQG ZHÂśUHQRWJRLQJWRZLQZHÂśUHJRLQJWRKDYHIXQ´


6B

Arts & Entertainment

oracle.newpaltz.edu

BLOWOUT BLOW UP SUNDAY NIGHT MAY HAVE FALLEN FLAT ON THE FIELD, BUT IT HIT THE HIGHS ON THE STAGE. HERE ARE OUR EDITORSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; THOUGHTS ON THIS YEARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HALFTIME SHOW. I  thought  Bruno  Mars  sounded  incredible   live,  but  I  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  tell  whether  the  bigger  blow-­ out  was  happening  during  the  game  or  on  his  head.   ²6X]\%HUNRZLW]$ ((GLWRU Between  Brunoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  footwork  and  Red  Hot  Chili   Peppersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  craziness,  it  was  perfect.  The  only  prob-­ lem  is  that  I  wish  RHCP  could  have  performed  an-­ other  song. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Robin  Weinstein,  Photo  Editor     Bruno  literally  made  me  tear  up.  Baby,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   DÂżUHZRUN+HFKDQQHOHGDOLWWOH(OYLV)UDQN=DS pa  and  James  Brown  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  doubt  he  pulled   off  an  amazing  performance.   ²=DPHHQD0HMLD&RS\(GLWRU Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   never   been   a   huge   fan  of  Bruno  Mars,  but   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   con-­ verted   after   his   p e r f o r m a n c e .   Not   so   much   his   voice,  but  his  drum   and   dance   skills   were  so  on  point.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Cat   Ta-­ copina,   Edi-­ tor-­in-­Chief

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Music Department Tunes Up

PULLING ON HEARTSTRINGS, ONE CONCERT AT A TIME By  Suzy  Berkowitz $ ((GLWRU|  Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   New   Paltz   Music   Department   is   tuning   up   for   an   emotional   semester   as   they   ring   in   the   new   year   with   their   concert   series.  Themed   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love,  Jealousy  and  Despair  in  Music,â&#x20AC;?  the  performances  will  feature  mu-­ sical  stylings  from  both  faculty  and  students,  varying  in  style  from  classical   to  jazz.   .LFNLQJRIIWKHVHPHVWHURQWKHNH\VZLOOEH$OH[3HKDVVLVWDQWSUR fessor  of  piano,  whose  time  at  New  Paltz  only  began  last  semester.  Pehâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   piano   recital,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Embraceable  Youâ&#x20AC;?   will   feature   music   that   pertains   to   the   themes  of  love  and  loss  in  different  ways  and  time  periods,  according  to   Peh  and  will  be  performed  on  Tuesday,  Feb.  11.   $FODVVLFDOSLDQLVWDWKHDUW3HKÂśVUHFLWDOZLOOIHDWXUHPXVLFE\&KR pin,  Mozart,  Liszt,  Schubert,  Stravinsky,  Verdi  and  Gershwin,  all   pieces  transcribed  to  be  played  on  the  piano.  Peh  considers   this  recital  a  way  of  introducing  himself  to  the  students  and   IDFXOW\EHLQJWKDWWKLVLVWKHÂżUVWWLPHKHÂśVSHUIRUPHGVROR at  New  Paltz.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   chose   to   have   this   recital   in   February   because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  close  to  Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Day,â&#x20AC;?  Peh  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  music  ex-­ plores  what  it  means  to  be  human.  The  point  is  to  just   inspire  people  to  make  music.â&#x20AC;?   The  concert  series,  which  also  features  perfor-­ mances   from   the   Pone   Ensemble   for   New   Music,   students   in   the   Senior   Chamber   Jazz   Ensemble   and  the  College  Youth  Symphony  and  a  guest  per-­

formance  by  Madera  Vox,  runs  mainly  on  Tuesday  nights  in  collaboration   with   Lecturer   Susan   Seligmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Introduction   to   Music   class.   Seligmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   class  discusses  the  elements  of  music  and  how  to  properly  listen  to  it.   The  class  requires  students  to  attend  the  Tuesday  night  concerts  and   then  write  about  them.  The  concerts  are  also  open  to  other  students,  faculty   and  general  community  members.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  many  students  have  been  to  this  variety  of  live  music   concerts,  and  I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  emphasize  that  these  are  live  con-­ certs,â&#x20AC;?   Seligman   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;One   of   the   strengths   of   the   music   department   is   that  the  faculty  really  does  love  to  perform,  so  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nice  to  bring  that  to  the   campus  so  we  can  show  what  we  do  and  the  students  can  also  have  a  chance   to  show  what  they  do.â&#x20AC;? Professor  Carole  Cowan  helps  organize  and  schedule  the  concert  se-­ ries.  She  said  she  believes  music  can  be  transformative  and  that  attending   a  live  concert  provides  a  somewhat  different  experience  for  everyone  than   listening  to  recorded  music.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  you  have  to  know  a  lot  about  music  to  go  to  a  concert   and  enjoy  what  is  being  performed,â&#x20AC;?  Cowan  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  students  are  always   very  enthusiastic  and  even  when  they  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  expect  to  like  the  music,  they   always  end  up  liking  it  a  lot,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  [their]  exposure  to  something  different  or   something  familiar  in  a  different  context.â&#x20AC;? Cowan  said  the  theme  of  love,  jealousy  and  despair  in  music  was  cho-­ sen  because  it  gives  the  concert  focus  and  ties  all  the  performances  together.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not  every  single  piece  is  going  to  be  related  to  it,  but  it  gives  a  little   bit  of  focus  and  it  reminds  people  that  music  can  express  these  wonderful   and  strong  emotions.â&#x20AC;?

Band of Bacchus Set To Rock Us

PROGRESSIVE GROUP BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND By  Jahna  Romano Staff  Writer  |  Romanoj3@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  time  to  get  progressive. Bacchus  Restaurant  is  hosting  progressive-­rock  band  Di-­ azepam  for  the  third  time.   Originally  part  of  a  group  show,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  invited  back   to  Bacchus  once  more  to  play  on  their  own  this  Friday,  Feb.  7   at  10  p.m.   Diazepamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  style  can  also  be  described  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;experimental   URFN´DQGKDVLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHVIURPDOOVW\OHVRIPXVLF'DQ$QGHU sen,  bassist  and  graduate  of  SUNY  Oneonta  said.   William  Burgaleta,  keyboardist  and  a  graduate  of  SUNY   Purchase  said  Diazepamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  sound  is  unique  because  of  its  ec-­ centricity.   $FFRUGLQJ WR$QGHUVHQ WKHLU VRXQG LV DOVR XQLTXH ÂłEH cause  of  two  main  factors:  the  urge  in  each  of  our  members   WRLQFOXGHLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHVDQGWRQRWFRPSURPLVHRXURUJDQLFDS proach.â&#x20AC;?   They  also  plan  on  doing  some  improvisation  at  their  show   at  Bacchus.   Âł7KLVLVUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWHGLQWKHPXVLFWKDWZHZULWH6RPHWLPHVZH play  rock  that  is  loud  and  frenetic,  sometimes  jazz  or  funkâ&#x20AC;Ś   DQGLQFRUSRUDWLQJ/DWLQRUKLSKRSUK\WKPV´$QGHUVHQVDLG

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

Inspiration   from   the   bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   music   comes   not   only   from   WKHLUPDQ\PXVLFDOLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHVEXWDOVRIURPRXWVLGHVRXUFHV %XUJDOHWD VDLG KH ÂżQGV LQVSLUDWLRQ LQ PXVLF DUW KLVWRU\ DQG ZKHUHYHUHOVHKHFDQÂżQGLW â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  commitment  to  songwriting  gives  us  something  that   people   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   typically   witness   from   a   live   band,â&#x20AC;?   Burgaleta   said.   $QGHUVHQVDLGKHIHHOVFRPSHOOHGWRPDNHDUWEXWDWWKH same  time,  he  is  also  â&#x20AC;&#x153;very  consciously  inspired  by  powerful   personalities,  politics...and  concepts  of  love.â&#x20AC;? $V IDU DV WKHLU SHUIRUPDQFH DW %DFFKXV JRHV 'LD]HSDP has  no  set  plan  at  the  moment,  though  they  are  looking  to  play   mostly  original  songs  with  some  covers.   &KULV$QGUHVNLJXLWDULVWDQGJUDGXDWHRI681<$OEDQ\ %XUJDOHWDDQG$QGHUVHQZLOODOVREHMRLQHGE\GUXPPHU5LFK Bozek,  also  a  graduate  of  Oneonta.   David  Ellison,  bar  manager  and  entertainment  booker  for   Bacchus,   said   Bacchus   looks   for   bands   that   have   the   ability   to   keep   the   restaurantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   patrons   dancing   until   early   hours   of   the  morning.  Ellison  said  Diazepam  is  also  appealing  because   â&#x20AC;&#x153;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  tight  band  with  a  good  web  presence.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  audience  is  a  mix  of  demographics,â&#x20AC;?  Ellis  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   students,   professors,   tourists,   not   just   one   part   of   the   spectrum.â&#x20AC;?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Dorsky Turns Back Time

NEW EXHIBITION PROVIDES A BLAST FROM THE PAST By  Zameena  Mejia Copy  Editor  |=PHMLD#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX

The   Dorsky   will   be   taking   a   trip   down   memory   lane   with  their  newest  exhibtion.   Named  for  the  era  from  which  the  pieces  come,â&#x20AC;&#x153;1980s   Style:  Image  and  Design  in  The  Dorsky  Museum  Collec-­ tion,â&#x20AC;?   a   new   exhibition   at  The   Dorsky,   showcases   prints,   photographs  and  jewelry  from  back  in  the  day.     Bold  geometry,  vibrant  colors  and  the  dawn  of  the  dig-­ ital  age  characterize  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s  era  from  fashion  form  to  art   form.  The  1980s  was  a  time  artists  took  it  upon  themselves   to   express   their   troubles,   according   to   exhibition   curator   Daniel  Belasco.   Belasco   said   artists   during   this   time   were   living   in   a   world   facing   issues   of   nuclear   war,   domestic   violence,   AIDS,  Apartheid  and  other  pressing  matters,   Belasco  said  he  selected  the  exhibition  pieces  to  best   portray   the   aggression,   anxiety,   anger   and   political   con-­ cerns  of  the  1980s.  As  a  child  during  the  decade,  Belasco   said   he   was   always   interested   and   immersed   in   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s   culture.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through  this  exhibition,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  able  to  take  a  more   critical  look  at  what  was  happening  in  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s,â&#x20AC;?  Belasco   said.   Having  been  recently  appointed  The  Dorskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  new  cu-­ rator  of  exhibitions  and  programs,  Belasco  said  he  started   his  time  at  the  museum  with  the  vision  of  providing  a  new   take  on  the  collection  by  having  a  collection  show. From   the   5,500   objects   in   The   Dorsky   collection,   Belasco   said   he   believed   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;arresting   qualitiesâ&#x20AC;?   of   the   selected  works  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;1980s  Styleâ&#x20AC;?  accurately  portrayed  the   emotions  of  the  day.   He  describes  the  pieces  as  straying  from  previous  art   styles  and  having  an  asymmetry  for  the  purpose  of  activ-­ ism.     Belasco   said   that   artists   during   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;80s   were   un-­ ashamed  of  expressing  their  fears  through  their  work,  un-­ like  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  artists.   Among  The  Dorsky  collection  pieces  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;1980s  Styleâ&#x20AC;?   are  artist  and  Professor  Ann  Lovettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  photography,  ceramic   work  by  New  Paltz  graduate  with  a  Masters  in  Fine  Arts,   Stephen  Ladinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  prints  donated  by  SUNY  Purchase  and  an   Andy  Warhol  screenprint.   Rachel   Beaudoin,   a   third-­year   art   history   major,   has   been  the  current  curatorial  intern  since  spring  2013  and  as-­ sisted  Belasco  in  putting  together  â&#x20AC;&#x153;1980s  Style.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   I   started   as   an   intern   at   the   Dorsky,   Belasco   shared   with   me   his   idea   of   doing   an   exhibition   of   works   from  the  collection  that  were  made  in  the  80s  and  expressed   the  mentality  of  that  time,â&#x20AC;?  Beaudoin  said.   Beaudoin   and   Belasco   started   with   a   large   list   of   po-­ tential  works  for  the  show,  according  to  Beaudoin  who  re-­ searched  the  artists  and  their  pieces.  

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Arts & Entertainment

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: MARIA CASSANO

YEAR: Fourth MAJOR: English HOMETOWN: Massapequa, N.Y.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? 'HÂżQLWHO\ JXLWDU WKRXJK , VWDUWHG ZLWK Ă&#x20AC;XWHDQGSLDQR,WMXVWOHQGVLWVHOIZHOOWR DOOVRUWVRIPXVLF

WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? ,ZDVLQWKHVFKRROEDQGIURPIRXUWKJUDGH XSXQWLOP\VRSKRPRUH\HDURIFROOHJHEXW , KDYHQœW GRQH DQ\WKLQJ FROOHFWLYH ² MXVW SOD\HGVRPHRSHQPLFQLJKWVDURXQGWRZQ

WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? 0\GDGLVDIXOOWLPHPXVLFLDQZKRVWDUWHG PHRQJXLWDUZKHQ,ZDVDERXW,œPDOVR LQWR DQ\WKLQJ FODVVLF URFN VND ¾V DQG DFRXVWLFDOWHUQDWLYH

WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? 7KH+HDGDQGWKH+HDUW %RQ,YHUDQG%HQ+RZDUG

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? :KHQ,JUDGXDWHLQ0D\,ÂśOOEHRQWKHURDG EORJJLQJDQGZULWLQJIRUDIULHQGÂśV+ROLVWLF +HDOWKFRPSDQ\EXW,ÂśOOGHÂżQLWHO\KDYHP\ JXLWDUZLWKPHLQWKH59

ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? .HHS SOD\LQJ <RX QHYHU NQRZ ZKHQ \RXÂśOO QHHG WKH UHVLOLHQFH SDWLHQFH DQG JXWV WKDW FRPHZLWKEHLQJDPXVLFLDQ Polaroid  print  from  the  exhibition  â&#x20AC;&#x153;1980s  Styleâ&#x20AC;?  in  The  Dorsky.

7KHWZRZRXOGGLVFXVV%HDXGRLQÂśVÂżQGLQJVDQGZRXOG decide  on  which  pieces  expressed  the  ideas  that  they  want-­ ed  to  get  across.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  incredible  to  see  it  come  to  life  in  the  gallery  space,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  interesting  to  see  new  connections  now  that  the  works   are  hung  next  to  one  another,â&#x20AC;?  Beaudoin  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  a  new   appreciation  for  all  the  details  that  will  be  presented  to  the   public  after  being  exposed  to  the  whole  process.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  excit-­ ed  to  see  how  people  will  receive  this  show,  what  they  get   from  it  and  the  different  connections  that  they  may  make.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;1980s  Styleâ&#x20AC;?  is  open  to  the  public  and  the  exhibitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   opening  reception  is  Saturday,  Feb.  8  from  5  to  7  p.m.  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

CHECK  OUT   MARIA  CASSANO

PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE   WITH  ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Suzy  Berkowitz  at  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  


8B

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THE  DEEP  END

The New Paltz Oracle

THIS WEEK IN

THE DEEP END CAYETANA SUZUKI Major: Graphic Design Year: Third Inspirations: Helmo, Stefan Sagmeister, Emily Hadden “My work is about finding a balance between traditional and experimental graphic elements through various multi-media. I believe that design doesn’t always have to be so serious. Having fun is typically an element in my work.”

Photos courtesy of Cayetana Suzuki | Captions by Maxwell Reide


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

SUNY  FLIPS  THE  SWITCH

CARTOON  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN  

During  SUNY  Chancellor  Nancy  Zimpherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  2014  State   of   the   University   Address   on   Jan.   14   she   introduced   the   Open  SUNY  program.    Open  SUNY  offers  eight  new  online   degree  programs  as  well  as  making  all  12,000  online  courses   offered  within  SUNY  available  to  all  SUNY  students.     The  program  was  created  to  allow  the  6.9  million  New   Yorkers   who   have   a   high   school   diploma,   but   no   college   education  able  to  receive  one.  Its  function  is  to  also  help  to   prepare  citizens  for  2025,  when  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  estimated  that  60  per-­ cent  of  jobs  will  require  a  bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree. We  at  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  applaud  SUNY  for  making   higher  education  accessible  to  those  who  might  not  have  had   an  opportunity  to  earn  one. The  rising  cost  of  higher  education  means  that  higher   education  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  always  accessible  to  potential  students.  Also,   people  have  other  responsibilities  in  life  that  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  always   allow  them  to  spend  the  necessary  to  actually  attend  classes   in  person,  so  having  online  classes  available  allows  them  the   opportunity  to  earn  an  education.     We   also   applaud   SUNY   New   Paltz   for   looking   to   in-­ FUHDVHWKHLUXVHRIRQOLQHHGXFDWLRQ,WLVRIWHQGLIÂżFXOWIRU students  to  sign  up  for  a  class  they  are  required  to  take  dur-­ ing   the   fall   and   spring   semesters,   so   having   the   ability   to   earn  this  credit  during  the  summer  or  winter  allows  students  

to  become  one  step  closer  to  earning  their  degree.  This  also   helps   students   complete   their   general   education   require-­ PHQWV ZKLFK RIWHQ EHFRPH GLIÂżFXOW WR FRPSOHWH LQ IRXU years  without  taking  an  online  class.   New   Paltz   President   Donald   Christian   said   when   fac-­ ulty  teach  an  online  class,  it  allows  them  to  learn  new  ap-­ proaches  to  educating  students,  which  then  translates  to  how   they  teach  classes  in  person.     :H EHOLHYH IDFXOW\ÂśV DELOLW\ WR GR WKLV LV EHQHÂżFLDO because   they   are   not   only   educating   students,   but   are   also   learning   new   skills   to   teach   students   in   the   most   effective   way  possible.  By  teaching  an  online  class,  faculty  have  the   ability   to   learn   a   new   way   of   reaching   students   that   they   might  not  have  ever  learned  or  thought  of  by  just  physically   teaching  in  classes.  These  skills  will  help  both  their  current   and  future  students.   While   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   great   that   SUNY   is   allowing   people   who   might  not  have  had  the  ability  to  receive  a  higher  education   the  resources  to  receive  one,  administration  has  said  that  the   primary  focus  of  the  student  body  is  on  face-­to-­face  courses,   which   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   expected   to   change   because   of   the   increase   in   online  courses.    At  the  end  of  the  day,  New  Paltz  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  going  to  become   an   online   university,   so   the   education   that   takes   place   on  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

campus   is   the   primary   focus   of   the   students   and   needs   to   remain  the  primary  focus  of  the  administration.     As   Open   SUNY   progresses,   we   hope   the   amount   of   classes   that   are   offered   to   students   increase,   while   keep-­ ing  the  costs  low  enough  to  allow  people  to  attend.    This  is   crucial  because  if  costs  do  rise,  people  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  the   money  to  pay  for  these  classes,  but  still  desire  a  higher  edu-­ cation  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  the  ability  to  earn  one.       Overall,  Open  SUNY  is  a  program  that  our  state  should   EHSURXGRIEXWLWVFUHDWLRQLVMXVWWKHÂżUVWVWHS1RZSHR ple  need  to  spread  the  world  and  tell  their  peers  who  would   EHQHÂżWWKHPRVWIURPWKHSURJUDPVRWKH\FDQUHFHLYHWKH higher  education  they  rightfully  deserve.  

Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the  majority   of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,  op-­eds  and   letters,  excluding  editorials,  are  solely  those  of   the  writers  and  do  not  necessarily  represent   the  views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,  its  staff   members,  the  campus  and  university  or  the   Town  or  Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS

ANDREW  LIEF

Managing  Editor  

N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

My  Happy  Place

Everyone  has  that  one  place.  That  one  special  place   where  they  are  happy  no  matter  what.    For  me,  that  place   happens  to  be  called  My  Place.     My   Place   is   a   resturant   where   dreams   come   true.     Where   food   is   just   not   a   part   of   life,   it   is   life.   Where   wings  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just  crispy,  but  extra  crispy.     For   almost   30   years,   My   Place   has   been   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Serving   food  all  the  time.â&#x20AC;?  I  can  only  speak  for  the  limited  por-­ tion  of  time  that  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  eating  there,  but  I  have  never   had  a  negative  experience  with  my  food.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nothing   better   than   sitting   down   with   your   closest  friends  and  enjoying  a  meal  at  the  best  restaurant   in  all  the  land.     My   favorite   day   to   go   is   Monday   when   they   serve   $1  burgers  at  the  bar  all  day.    You  might  say,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why  do   they  have  $1  burgers  on  Monday?â&#x20AC;?  To  be  honest,  I  have   no  idea.     I  think  they  do  this  because  they  know  Mondays  are   the   toughest   day   of   the   week   for   people,   so   they   know   by  having  $1  burgers  they  can  put  a  smile  on  the  faces  of   their  glorious  customers.    I  love  sitting  down  and  order-­ LQJÂł1RWRQHQRWWZRQRWWKUHHQRWIRXUQRWÂżYHQRW

ZAMEENA  MEJIA Copy  Editor

Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu 2Q'HF,WRRNDVWUDLJKWHLJKWKRXUĂ&#x20AC;LJKWDFURVV the  Atlantic   Ocean   from   Madrid   to   New  York   City.   With   my   family,   my   three   adorable   dogs   and   my   new   beautiful   baby   niece  to  welcome  me  back  home,  everything  felt  right.   Come  Christmas  Day,  my  family  surprised  me  by  saying   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  off  to  the  Dominican  Republic  right  after  ringing  in  the   New  Year.  My  last  couple  of  weeks  in  Madrid  were  riddled  with   ÂżQDOVDQGODVWPLQXWHUXQVDURXQGWKHFLW\VRKHDULQJ,ZRXOG VSHQGWKHÂżUVWFRXSOHRIZHHNVRILQWKH'RPLQLFDQ5H public  was  a  huge  relief.  After  spending  an  amazingly  relaxing   15  days  on  the  island,  it  was  already  time  to  return  home  and   pack  for  my  move  back  to  New  Paltz. Within  the  past  year,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  left  the  country  three  times  and   traveled  countless  miles  by  land,  sky  and  sea.  For  someone  who   likes  to  be  on  her  feet,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  very  lucky,  but  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  also  come   to  terms  with  something  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  tried  to  run  from  for  a  long  time   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  everything  changes.  In  the  past,  I  often  turned  my  comfort   zone  into  this  lovely  lounge  space  where  I  wanted  my  emotions,   friends  and  memories  to  stay.  

sixâ&#x20AC;?  cheeseburgers.     A  phenomenon  that  I  became  a  part  of  last  summer   was  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twin  Clam  Roll  Friday  Night  Party.â&#x20AC;?  I  would   get   it   every   Friday   night   and   they   were   amazing.  They   were   so   good   that   you   would   think   you   were   eating   in   New  England  and  not  Schodack,  N.Y.,  in  the  foothills  of   the  Berkshires.   Upon   entering,   I   love   checking   out   the   soups   sign   where   they   list   the   soups   that   are   being   served   on   that   particular  day.    The  soups  range  from  the  Cheeseburger   Chowder  to  the  Italian  Wedding.    Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  a  soup  connois-­ VHXUOLNHP\IULHQG$GDP2IÂżW]HUVR,ÂśPQRWJRLQJWRJR too  in-­depth  about  the  soups. Pretty  much  all  of  the  people  I  go  with  partake  in  the   eating  of  wraps.  The  two  most  popular  wraps  among  my   peers  are  the  chicken  caesar  and  buffalo  wraps.  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   eat  the  wraps  because  of  the  healthy  items  inside  of  them,   but  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  heard  nothing  but  good  things  about  them.     I   can   be   seen   on   cold   days   wearing   my   fresh   My   Place   &   Co.   beanie   that   keeps   me   warm,   while   stylish   at   the   same   time.  Also,   during   the   fall   and   spring   sea-­ sons,  I  can  be  seen  wearing  my  My  Place  and  Co.  zip-­up  

sweatshirt.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  still  praying  that  one  day  there  will  be  My   Place  and  Co.  sweatpants.    What  do  you  say,  My  Place?   Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  make  it  happen! After  reading  my  thoughts  on  My  Place,  if  you  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  great  restaurant  than  you  are  dead  wrong.    My   Place  is  and  will  always  be  my  favorite  place  to  eat.    It   has   such   a   wide   variety   of   options   on   the   menu   that   I   JXDUDQWHHDQ\RQHZLOOÂżQGVRPHWKLQJWKDWLQWULJXHVWKHP and  that  they  will  love.     If   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   take   anything   from   this   column,   remember  this,  friends;Íž  there  are  three  guarantees  in  life:   Death,   taxes   and  Andrew   Lief   liking   My   Place   &   Co.   Schodackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Facebook  status.    

Andrew  Lief  is  a  third-­year  journalism  major   who  twice  ate  eight  cheeseburgers  and  four   orders  of  fries  in  one  sitting.  During  his  free   time  he  enjoys  watching  basketball,  playing   Xbox,  watching  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Friday  Night  Lightsâ&#x20AC;?  and   listening  to  sports  radio.

Traveling  Change Then   spring   2013   came   around.   I   spread   myself   thin   be-­ tween   work,   classes,   extracurriculars,   friends   and   weird   re-­ lationships.   The   fear   of   missing   out   on   things   while   studying   abroad  loomed  around  me.  My  best  friend  since  the  beginning   of  college  was  transferring  and  I  felt  like  I  was  losing  him.  I  felt   like  I  was  losing  a  lot.  Life  was  sort  of  swirling  around  me. At   the   spring   study   abroad   pre-­departure   orientation,   the   fact  I  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  in  New  Paltz  the  following  semester  became   DUHDOLW\%\WKDWWLPH,DFFHSWHGWKDWDOO,FRXOGGRZDVÂżQLVK the  semester  in  the  best  way  possible  for  myself.    I  woke  up  and   allowed   myself   to   enjoy   the   rest   of   the   semester.   I   spent   one   QLJKWLQWKHVRFFHUÂżHOGVZDWFKLQJDPHWHRUVKRZHUZLWKJRRG friends,  another  night  running  through  the  rain.  As  the  semester   came  to  an  end,  I  slowly  said  my  goodbyes  to  graduating  Oracle   staff,  faculty  on  campus  and  dear  friends.  Soon  enough,  I  was   off  and  away.   Literally.  I  spent  a  few  weeks  down  in  the  Dominican  Re-­ SXEOLFLQWHUQHGIRUDFRXSOHPRQWKVWKHQĂ&#x20AC;HZRIIWR0DGULGLQ August  for  a  whole  other  growing  experience.  Not  even  a  month  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

into  my  time  there,  my  iPhone  5  was  stolen.  Siestas  were  at  1   p.m.,  dinner  at  9  p.m.,  people  went  out  at  1  a.m.  and  I  clocked   out  at  crazy  a.m.  Here  it  was  again,  that  thing  I  fear  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  change.   Yet  again  I  had  no  reason  to  worry.  I  quickly  made  Spanish   and  international  friends,  became  close  with  my  Spanish  room-­ mate,  learned  the  public  transportation  system,  stayed  in  a  hostel   IRUWKHÂżUVWWLPHH[SORUHG0DGULG%DUFHORQD=DUDJR]D7ROHGR and  Granada,  got  along  with  my  professors  and  the  list  goes  on.     Life  is  unpredictable  and  you  shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  hard  on  yourself   when  things  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  go  your  way.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  let  yourself   go  but  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  lose  yourself.  It  took  a  lot  of  ups  and  downs  to  get   where  I  am  today,  but  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  so  happy  to  be  back. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  a  junior  back  in  America.

Zameena  Mejia  is  a  third-­year  public  rela-­ tions  and  Spanish  major.  She  loves  travel-­ ling,  making  new  friends,  staring  at  night   skies  and  writing  (21  diaries  and  counting).    


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

11

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

NEW RECORD 3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

Chelsea  Allocco  set  the  Eliting  Pool  record  in  the  1,000  freestyle.                                        

By  Jennifer  Newman   Assistant  Copy  Editor  |  JNewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

With   their   eye   on   the   SUNYAC   Championship,   the   SUNY   New   Paltz   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Swimming  team  won  the  six-­ team  Skidmore  Sprint  Invitational. The  Lady  Hawks  won  the  Saturday,   Feb.   1   invitational   with   a   score   of   580   points,   towering   over   the   competition   with  Vassar  coming  in  second  with  384   points. $IWHUWKLVÂżQDOODSEHIRUHWKHFKDP pionships,   Head   Swimming   Coach   Scott   Whitbeck   called   the   Sprint   Invi-­ WDWLRQDOD³¿QDOWXQHXS´IRUWKHWHDPWR see   how   they   were   progressing   and   to   gage  where  they  were  heading.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  starting  to  come  together  as   D WHDP´ :KLWEHFN VDLG Âł2XU IRFXV LV all  about  training.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  all  about  the  end   of   the   season,   the   championships   and   how  we  do.  I  think  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  starting  to  get   FORVHUWRZKHUHZHZDQWWREH´ The  Lady  Hawks  beat  Mount  Saint   Mary   College   125-­52   on   Jan.   24   in  

WKHLUÂżQDOKRPHPHHWRIWKHVHDVRQDQG DJDLQ DJDLQVW 681< 2QHRQWD  in   a   dual   meet   on   Jan.   25.   Whitbeck   said  these  meets  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mean  much  in  the   long  run,  but  are  important  training  for   the  championships.   Âł2XUIRFXVWKLV\HDUKDVEHHQPRUH about   swimming   through   these   meets,   training  really  hard  and  hoping  we  can   ÂżQLVK KLJKHU WKLV \HDU´ KH VDLG Âł7KLV WHDP KDV KDG WR ÂżQG LWVHOI DQG , WKLQN theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  done  a  nice  job.   Whitbeck   cited   the   leadership   of   fourth-­year   distance   free   swimmer   Chelsea   Allocco   and   fourth-­year   free-­ style   swimmer   Victoria   Scalise   as   the   driving  force  of  a  team  with  10  second-­ year  swimmers.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   really   develop-­ LQJ DQG JHWWLQJ EHWWHU´:KLWEHFN VDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   we   have   an   opportunity   to   do   something   special   during   the   season.   +RSHIXOO\ZHÂśOOÂżQLVKRXWVWURQJ´ $OORFFRVDLGVKHLVDLPLQJWRÂżQLVK RXWKHUÂżQDOVHDVRQVWURQJDVZHOO6KH set  the  Eliting  Pool  record  in  the  1,000  

IUHHVW\OHZLWKDWLPHRIEHDW ing   the   previously   held   record   by   six   seconds.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   feels   great   to   have   gotten   this   UHFRUG´$OORFFRVDLGÂł,WÂśVEHHQVRPH thing  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  working  for  since  I  was   a   freshman,   so   it   was   nice   to   be   able   to   accomplish   my   goal   before   I   gradu-­ DWHG´ Allocco   said   her   coach   helped   her   achieve  this  record. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scott   has   helped   by   providing   me   with   awesome   practices   every   day   which   allow   me   to   reach   my   true   po-­ tential  as  a  swimmer,  and  by  telling  me   when  I  need  to  pick  up  the  pace  to  reach   WKHWLPH,ZDQW´VKHVDLG Allocco   holds   the   school   record   already   in   all   of   the   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   distance   events,  Whitbeck  said.   According  to  the  New  Paltz  Hawks   website,   Allocco   is   last   seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   SU-­ NYAC  champion  in  the  400  individual   medley   and   the   1,650   freestyle.   Whit-­ beck  cited  her  hard  work  and  talent  re-­ sponsible  for  her  accomplishments.  

Thursday,  Februrary  6,  2014

â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   is   quite   simply   the   greatest   female  distance  swimmer  that  has  ever   VZDPLQWKLVFRQIHUHQFH´KHVDLGÂł,WÂśV been  a  real  pleasure  to  have  coached  her   for  four  years.  Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  made  me  look  like   a  great  coach.  Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  got  this  certain  vet-­ HUDQFRQÂżGHQFHWKDW\RXMXVWGRQÂśWVHH from   other   swimmers.   She   knows   that   when  she  goes  out  there  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to   win   and   when   she   puts   her   mind   to   it   VKHFDQGRDQ\WKLQJVKHZDQWV´ Allocco  said  she  will  miss  her  team-­ mates   the   most   when   she   graduates   at   WKH HQG RI WKH VHDVRQ EXW LV FRQÂżGHQW the  team  will  continue  to  get  better  even   after  she  leaves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having  people  who  you  see  every   day  without  fail,  who  work  out  with  you   and  who  share  the  same  pain  as  you  will   EHLUUHSODFHDEOHDIWHUFROOHJH´VKHVDLG The  Lady  Hawks  return  to  competi-­ tion   from   Thursday-­Saturday,   Feb.   20-­ 22,   for   the   2014   SUNYAC   Swimming   &  Diving  Championships  hosted  at  Erie   Community   Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Burt   Flickinger   Athletic  Center.  


12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Lady  Hawks  Keep  on  Fighting By  Abbott  Brant Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Basketball   team   won   two  of  their  three  games  this  week,  im-­ proving  their  conference  record  to  3-­10.   The   team   defeated   SUNY   Potsdam   76-­66   Friday   before   losing   to   SUNY   Plattsburgh   84-­53   the   following   day.   But   the   Lady   Hawks   bounced   back,   and  Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   matchup   against   SUNY   Cortland  ended  in  a  58-­48  win.  The  two   victories   were   against   teams   that   had   defeated  the  Lady  Hawks  previously  in   the  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Against   Potsdam   we   really   pushed   the   ball   well   in   transition   to   get   easier   baskets   for   us,â&#x20AC;?   third-­year   Captain   Shannan   Walker   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   also   were   getting  the  ball  inside  to  our  posts  which   created  more  opportunities  on  offense.â&#x20AC;? Against  Cortland,  Head  Coach  Jamie   Seward  said  the  difference  lay  in  adjust-­ ing  to  the  Lady  Red  Dragons  the  second   half.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   really   happy   because   for   the   ÂżUVWWLPHDOO\HDUWKHSOD\HUVZHQWRXW and  executed  the  adjustment  we  imple-­

mented  at  half  time  very  well,â&#x20AC;?  Seward   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   came   back   out   and   really   FRPSHWHGRQWKHJODVV7KHÂżUVWKDOIZH got  beat  up  pretty  good  on  the  glass,  but   the   second   half   they   really   held   their   own   and   I   think   that   was   a   big   differ-­ ence.â&#x20AC;? Seward   said   Walkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   strength   in   shooting   and   Captains   Jeanette   Scott   and   Goldie   Harrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   presence   on   de-­ fense   were   key   elements   in   Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   win,  and  said  the  experience  this  season   has  brought  his  young  team  to  become   more  apparent  on  both  the  court  and  the   scoreboard.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   much   as   this   season   has   been   a   struggle  from  the  wins  and  losses  stand-­ point,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  enjoyable  coaching  this   team,â&#x20AC;?   Seward   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since   January   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  come  back  from  the  break  and   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   really   learned   how   to   practice   and  work  in  that  extra  gear,  and  compete   more  consistency  at  a  higher  level.â&#x20AC;? Seward  said  looking  out  on  the  court   and   seeing   a   predominantly   under-­ classmen   Lady   Hawks   squad   compete   against  the  other  conference  teams  with  

a   majority   of   seasoned   players   helps   him  stay  positive  about  the  future  of  the   team.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  the  inexperience  set  us  back   early,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   help   us   long   term,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.   Walker   said   the   playersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   closeness   with  one  another  is  a  big  factor  in  how   they   keep   their   spirits   up   and   will   re-­ main  positive  the  remainder  of  the  sea-­ son.   The  Lady  Hawks  will  have  to  win  all   of  their  remaining  conference  games  to   have   a   shot   at   the   SUNYAC   Tourna-­ ment,   Seward   said.   But   the   team   will   not   stray   from   their   season-­long   game   plan.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  done  as  much  for  prepar-­ ing   for   a   particular   opponent,   more   so   focusing   on   us   and   growing   ourselves   as  a  team,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  we  will   continue  to  do  that.â&#x20AC;? The   Lady   Hawks   will   have   back-­to-­ back  match-­ups  at  the  Hawk  Center  as   they  take  on  Buffalo  State  Friday,  Feb.   7  before  vying  against  SUNY  Fredonia   Saturday,  Feb.  8.

 PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN              

Hawks  Looking  to  Rebound   By  Abbott  Brant Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Basketball   team   dropped   three  games  this  week  on  the  road,  giv-­ ing  them  a  conference  record  of  3-­10.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Playoffs   are   still   possible   if   we   get   on   a   run,â&#x20AC;?   Head   Coach   Mike   Rejniak   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   just   made   it   a   heck   of   a   lot   harder  for  ourselves.â&#x20AC;?   The   team   suffered   a   86-­81   loss   to   SUNY  Potsdam  Jan.  31  before  dropping   a  contest  against  SUNY  Plattsburgh  90-­ 78  the  following  day.  The  Red  Dragons   of  SUNY  Cortland  trumped  the  Hawks   84-­56  on  Feb.  4.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  last  few  games  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  bat-­ WOLQJWKHĂ&#x20AC;XEXJEXWZHÂśYHEHHQGRLQJ the  best  with  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got,â&#x20AC;?  Rejniak   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   long   travel   to   Potsdam   and   Plattsburgh  was  not  ideal.â&#x20AC;? Rejniak   said   Potsdam   and   Platts-­ burghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ability  to  come  out  of  the  gates   swinging   by   establishing   their   tempo   right   at   the   beginning   of   the   game   led  

to  their  early  success,  and  a  loss  for  the   Hawks.  Setting  the  pace  was  a  strength   the   team   had   at   the   beginning   of   the   season,   he   said,   but   is   something   the   Hawks   have   been   struggling   with   re-­ cently.     Âł/DVWZHHNHQGZDVGHÂżQLWHO\QRWRXU best  weekend,â&#x20AC;?  third-­year  Captain  Tay-­ lor   Sowah   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   team   lacked   the   energy   in   the   opening   minutes   in   both   games  which  lead  to  a  big  lead  by  both   teams.â&#x20AC;?   Sowah  said  the  team  came  out  stron-­ ger   in   the   second   half   of   both   games,   EXW UHDOL]HG WKDW D OHWKDUJLF ÂżUVW KDOI couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  made  up  for.     To   remedy   this,   Rejniak   said   the   Hawks  are  going  back  to  the  basics.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   doing   in   practice   is   really   establishing   our   swag   again,   DQG JHWWLQJ PRUH FRQÂżGHQW E\ JRLQJ right   back   to   the   fundamentals,   which   we  had  at  the  beginning  of  the  year  just   to  re-­center  our  focus  going  into  these   next  two  home  games,â&#x20AC;?  Rejniak  said.

At   this   point   in   the   season,   Rejniak   said   he   aims   to   hold   practices   that   are   more   intense   than   the   games,   in   order   to  help  players  push  through  any  men-­ tal  and  physical  barriers  that  may  stop   them  from  performing  at  their  best.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  will  give  a  lot  of  credit  to  this  group   for  having  dealt  with  a  lot  of  adversity   this  year  from  many  different  areas  -­  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just  a  whole  learning  process,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   continue   to   stick   together   and   they   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   given   up   yet.   They   just   continue  to  elevate  their  game.  Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   still  hungry,  which  goes  to  say  a  lot  for   a   team   of   primarily   sophomores   and   freshmen.â&#x20AC;? Looking   forward,   Sowah   said   the   team  has  nothing  to  lose.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   just   going   to   give   it   all   we   got  for  a  full  40  minutes  to  try  and  still   make  playoffs,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   The   Hawks   will   return   to   the   Hawk   Center  Friday,  Feb.  7  to  take  on  Buffalo   State   and   Saturday,   Feb.   8   to   contend   against  SUNY  Fredonia.

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

 PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN              


SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

13    

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Swimming  Preps  for  Tournament  

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Swimming  team  is  getting  ready  for  the  SUNYAC  Championships.  

By  Melissa  Kramer Copy  Editor  |  Kramerm2@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Swimming  team  compet-­ ed   in   the  Vassar   Sprint   Invitational   title   on   Sunday   afternoon   in   Poughkeepsie,   1<LQLWVÂżQDOWXQHXSEHIRUHWKH State   University   of   New   York   Athletic   Conference   (SUNYAC)   Swimming   &   Diving  Championships. With  two  weeks  remaining  until  the   SUNYACs,  Head  Coach  Scott  Whitbeck   said   the   team   is   beginning   to   move   to-­ wards  tapering,  resting  and  getting  ready   to   start   peaking   physically   at   the   right   time.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swimming   has   one   of   the   longest   seasons,â&#x20AC;?   Whitbeck   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   all   com-­

 

bined   into   one   big   season.   Swimming   is  a  training  sport,  as  opposed  to  a  game   sport.  We  are  focused  on  peaking  at  the   end   of   the   season   at   our   Conference   Championships,  and  tapering  and  things.   We   spend   our   fall   and   into   the   winter   training   hard.   Competitions   are   just   op-­ portunities  to  see  where  we  are.â&#x20AC;? :KLWEHFN VDLG WKH ÂżUVW\HDUV RQ the   team   have   developed   in   a   big   way   throughout  the  season.  He  believes  they   ZLOO EH D VLJQLÂżFDQW SDUW RI WKH WHDPÂśV success  at  SUNYACs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Swim  team  has  just  be-­ gun   tapering   for   our   SUNYAC   meet,â&#x20AC;?   ÂżUVW\HDU IUHHĂ&#x20AC;\ VZLPPHU /XNH =HQLU said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   excited   for   SUNYACs.   Our   in-­season   record   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   representa-­

 

 

tive  of  how  well  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  do  at  the   championship  meet.â&#x20AC;? The  team  believes  in  making  the  best   of  their  off-­days  and  workouts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since   we   lift   more   and   have   more   intense   swimming   workouts   than   most   of   the   other   schools   in   our   conference,   the   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   team   was   broken   down   for   most   of   its   dual   meets,   so   we   have   yet   WRVZLPDWRXUIXOOSRWHQWLDO´=HQLUVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because   we   train   so   hard   during   the   season,  the  effects  of  our  taper  are  going   WREHPXFKPRUHQRWLFHDEOHDQGEHQHÂż-­ cial  than  some  other  teams.â&#x20AC;? Despite   having   a   losing   record   of   2-­6,  the  team  continues  to  be  optimistic   and  focused  on  their  ultimate  goal.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   went   into   this   year   knowing  

Thursday,  February  6,  2014

 

                             PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN    

it   was   a   rebuilding   year   being   a   young   WHDP´ VHFRQG\HDU IUHHEUHDVW VWURNH VZLPPHU 5\DQ /LQGJUHQ VDLG Âł:H didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   put   much   weight   on   dual   meets.  Our  whole  year  training-­wise  has   been   going   towards   SUNYACs.   Obvi-­ ously   losing   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   fun,   but   it   will   all   be   worth   it   when   we   show   up   at   SUNY-­ ACs.â&#x20AC;? The   Hawks   return   to   competition   from  Thursday-­Saturday,  Feb.  20-­22,  for   the  2014  SUNYAC  Swimming  &  Diving   Championships   hosted   at   Erie   County   Community   Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Burt   Flickinger   Athletic  Center  in  Buffalo,  N.Y.  The  pre-­ liminary   heats   are   set   for   10   a.m.   each   GD\ ZLWK WKH FKDPSLRQVKLS ÂżQDO VHV-­ sions  set  for  6  p.m.


14 The  New  Paltz  Oracle LAGGED N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Well,   that   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   the   most   exciting   Super  Bowl. Despite  the  fact  that  the  game  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   very   competitive,   it   was   extremely   im-­ pressive  how  well  the  Seahawks  defense   played.     Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what   should   be   remem-­ bered  about  this  game.    Not  Peyton  Man-­ ning   coming   up   short   yet   again,   but   the   Seahawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   defense   putting   on   a   defen-­ sive  clinic.    Their  defensive  performance   was  up  there  with  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;85  Chicago  Bears,   2000  Baltimore  Ravens,  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;02  Tampa  Bay   Bucaneers  and  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;07  New  York  Giants.   5LJKWIURPWKHÂżUVWSOD\RIWKHJDPH when   the   Seahawks   scored   on   a   safety,   you   could   just   tell   the   Broncos   werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   completely  focused  for  a  game  they  had   two  weeks  to  prepare  for.     The   Seahawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   defense   was   clearly   the   more   aggressive   and   physical   team   compared   to   the   Broncosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   offense.    The   best   way   to   disrupt   a   great   quarterback  

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Seahawks  Prove  Superb   is  by  getting  pressure  on  him,  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   exactly  what  the  Seahawks  did.     The   reason   the   Seahawks   are   such   an   aggressive   and   emotional   team   is   because   they   take   on   the   image   of   their   head  coach,  Pete  Carroll.     &DUUROOLVWKHGHÂżQLWLRQRIDSOD\HUÂśV coach.    He  will  do  whatever  he  has  to  to   ensure  that  his  players  are  loose  and  ready   for  the  game  each  week.    Going  back  to   his  days  as  the  head  coach  at  USC,  Car-­ roll  would  constantly  play  music  and  pull   pranks.   Because   of   this,   he   is   now   one   of  three  coaches  in  history  to  have  won   both   a   Super   Bowl   and   a   NCAA   cham-­ pionship.     People  are  going  to  knock  Manning   and   say   his   performance   in   the   Super   Bowl   was   just   another   choke   job   and   how   this   is   going   to   tarnish   his   rĂŠsumĂŠ,   which   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   can   be   any   further   from  the  truth.    

He   is   one   of   the   greatest   quarter-­ backs  of  all  time  and  people  need  to  ap-­ preciate   his   greatness,   rather   than   just   soil   his   reputation   because   he   met   a   far   superior  team  in  the  Super  Bowl.  He  has   one  Super  Bowl  ring.  There  are  so  many   quarterbacks   who   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   any   rings,   so  he  should  not  be  criticized  for  failing   to  win  the  big  game  for  a  second  time.     Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no   set   of   requirements   that   determine  if  one  player  is  better  than  an-­ other.    Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  all  based  on  a  personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  beliefs   and  opinion.    Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  fun  thing  about   sports.     While   these   debates   go   on   for-­ ever,   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no   correct   answer,   which   makes  having  these  arguments  and  hear-­ ing  all  the  different  viewpoints  extremely   interesting.     Looking   forward,   I   believe   the   Se-­ ahawks  have  a  tremendous  chance  of  re-­ peating   as   long   as   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   able   to   keep   their   players,   who   will   become   free  

agents   this   offseason.   They   have   a   sys-­ tem  in  place  that  is  dominant  and  one  of   the  youngest  teams  in  the  league.     I  think  the  Broncos  are  going  to  have   a   major   drop   off   next   season.   I   think   a   team  will  overpay  for  wide  receiver  Eric   Decker,  so  he  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  returning.    Wide   receiver  Wes  Welker  will  be  another  year   older  and  past  his  prime.    Another  big  is-­ sue  is  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  defense.  Vice  President   of   Football   Operations   John   Elway   will   KDYHWRÂżQGVRPHGHIHQVLYHEDFNVWRVH cure  up  the  back  end  of  their  defense.     Overall,   it   was   another   great   NFL   season.   The   NFL   is   continuing   to   grow   and   build   its   empire   as  Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   popular   sport.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   excited   for   what   should   be   a   very   exciting   offseason,   as   there   will   be   some   very   interesting   sto-­ rylines.     And   most   importantly   I   was   right,   Bruno  Mars  absolutely  killed  it.  

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15

Sochi  Olympic  Preview

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"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 85, Issue 13