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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  85,  Issue  XII

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHN OLES

Breaking Ground

Construction of New Residence Hall Commences;; Anticipated Opening for Fall 2015 STORY ON PAGE 3

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡6WDUEXFNV5HSODFHV6HDWWOH¶V%HVW3J‡6$36HQGV2XW6XUYH\3J ‡6RQLD6KDK,QWURGXFHG$V1HZ2WWDZD\3URIHVVRU3J‡6HQDWH%HJLQV1HZ6HPHVWHU3J


Cat  Tacopina EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Andrew  Lief

MANAGING Â EDITOR _________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

Anthony  DeRosa FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF

Abbott  Brant

FEATURES         PG.  3B A&E                      PG.  5B

_________________

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS Â EDITOR

Maxwell  Reide Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Madeline  Anthony Melissa  Kramer Zameena  Mejia .ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG COPY  EDITORS

Hannah  Nesich Jennifer  Newman ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITORS

The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI SUNY  New  Paltz.  Our  circulation  is  2,500.  The  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG by  the  business  manager.  Community  announcements  are  published  gratuitously,  but  are   subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   of  this  paper  cannot  be  reproduced  without  the  written  permission  of  the  Editor-­in-­Chief. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  published  weekly  throughout  the  fall  and  spring  semesters   on  Thursdays.  It  is  available  in  all  residence  halls  and  academic  buildings,  in  the  New  Paltz   community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu.  For  more  information,  call  845-­257-­3030.  The   fax  line  is  845-­257-­3031.

Volume  85 Issue  XII

_________________

Nicole  Brinkley WEB  CHIEF

Rosalie  Rodriguez MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

THE  GUNK  

1B-­8B

_________________

THE  DEEP  END

Maya  Slouka

EDITORIAL Â

John  Sweet

LETTERS

BUSINESS Â MANAGER

8B 9

April  Castillo,  Kelsey  Damrad,  Nick  Fodera,  Ben  Kindlon  Sally  Moran,   Eileen  Liebler,  Jahna  Romano,  Kaycia  Sailsman,  Dana  Schmerzler,   Shelby  Seip,  Kelly  Seiz,  Jack  Sommer,  Katherine  Speller,  Ryan  Walz,  

STAFF

Incident:  None   Date:  1/27/14 Location:   No  Criminal  Incidents  were  reported  for  this   date. Incident:  Drugs Date:  1/26/14 Location:  Bevier  Hall Residence  Life  reported  an  odor  of  marijuana   in  the  building.  Call  unfounded.  

11-­15

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

@NewPaltzOracle

Thursday,  Jan.  30 Sunny High:  28  Low:  19

Friday,  Jan.  31

Cloudy  High:  37  Low:  25

Saturday,  Feb.  1

Sunday,  Feb.  2

Cloudy High:  40  Low:  23 WANT  TO  WRITE  FOR  THE  ORACLE?

Contact  us  at   Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   for  more  information! The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Five-­Day  Forecast

Cloudy High:  40  Low:  31

10

DISTRIBUTION Â MANAGER

SPORTS Â

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­8

NEWS

VISIT “THE ORACLE� ONLINE:

University  Police  Blotter

Index

SPORTS                 PG.  13

Monday,  Feb.  3

Partly  Cloudy High:  31    Low:  21


3 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

The New  Paltz  Oracle

New Residence  Hall  Breaks  Ground

Left: Parking  lot  37A,  site  of  the  new  residence  hall.  Right:  A  rendering  of  what  the  new  hall  will  look  like  in  August  2015.  

By John  Tappen News  Editor  |  John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

An hour-­long   groundbreaking   ceremony   took   place   on   Thursday,   Dec.   19   at   parking   lot   37A,   next   to  the  Athletic  and  Wellness  Center  —  the  site  of  what   will  be  the  newest  residence  hall.   Vice   President   of   Student  Affairs   David   Rooney   spoke  at  the  ceremony  to  a  crowd  that  included  Hudson   Valley  politicians,  such  as  assemblyman  Kevin  Cahill. “Local   politicians   have   supported   our   campus   well,”  Rooney  said.   Construction  of  the  new  69,000  square  foot  build-­ ing   commenced   in   December   and   is   expected   to   be   completed   by   August   2015,   in   time   for   students   to   move  into  rooms  for  the  2015-­16  academic  year.   The   estimated   cost   for   the   project   is   now   $30.5   million,  according  to  the  New  Paltz  website. Director   of   Facilities   Design   and   Construction   John  McEnrue  said  the  decision  to  construct  the  new   residence  hall  next  to  Lenape  Hall  was  a  logical  choice   when  taking  into  account  the  limited  space  to  build  in  

the areas  of  Hasbrouck  and  Parker  quads.   The   new   hall   will   add   another   225   students   to   the   South   Complex   area,   which   includes   Esopus   and   Lenape  Hall,  the  two  most  recent  residence  halls.  Be-­ tween  the  three  halls,  there  will  be  nearly  700  students   housed  in  that  corner  of  campus  —  a  “critical  mass,”   Rooney  said,  that  would  require  the  school  to  imple-­ ment   changes   to   the   area,   in   particular   an   additional   eating  area.   “The  most  interesting  feature  will  be  the  new  cafe   that   will   be   added   to   the   facility,”   McEnrue   said.   “It   will  be  close  to  the  building’s  entrance  so  that  it  is  ac-­ cessible  to  all  students  on  campus,  not  just  the  students   living  in  the  new  residence  hall.  This  will  provide  din-­ ing  options  for  students  in  this  section  of  the  campus   IRUWKH¿UVWWLPH´ Rooney  said  the  school  wants  to  enable  students  to   “spread  out  the  convenience  of  using  their  meal  plans.”   The  new  hall  will  include  a  2,000  to  3,000  square   foot  café,  a  more  convenient  dining  option  for  students   living  in  the  South  Complex.  The  new  café  will  keep  

Thursday, January  30,  2014

           PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  JOHN  OLES  AND  SUNY  NEW  PALTZ

residents from   feeling   restricted   to   going   to   Hasb-­ rouck  Dining  Hall  and  the  Student  Union  all  the  time,   Rooney  said. The   new   café,   as   well   as   a   small   gym   inside   the   residence  hall,  will  help  students  in  that  section  to  not   feel  disconnected  from  the  rest  of  campus.   The  design  of  the  building  will  mirror  the  ones  in   its  complex,  and  resemble  a  hybrid  of  both  Esopus  and   Lenape,  Rooney  said.   There  will  be  quads  and  clusters  of  two  bed  rooms   surrounding   bathrooms,   as   opposed   to   the   long   and   narrow  corridor  hallways  in  Parker  Quad  and  the  suite   RUDSDUWPHQWFRQ¿JXUDWLRQRIWKH+DVEURXFNTXDGUHVL-­ dence  halls.   Architecture   Plus,   the   company   that   has   headed   up  the  renovations  of  Crispell  and  LeFevre  Halls,  was   also  hired  to  design  the  new  residence  hall.   As  mandated  by  SUNY,  the  building  will  have  at   PLQLPXPDVLOYHUFHUWL¿FDWLRQLQ/HDGHUVKLSLQ(QHU-­ gy  and  Environmental  Design  (LEED)  from  the  U.S.   Building  Council.


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

BASHAR ASSAD Syrian  President  Bashar  Assad’s  advis-­ er   on   Wednesday   rejected   the   opposi-­ tion’s   call   for   a   transitional   governing   ERG\ DQG VXJJHVWHG IRU WKH ¿UVW WLPH that   a   presidential   election   scheduled   WREHKHOGODWHUWKLV\HDUPD\QRWWDNH SODFHDPLGWKHUDJLQJYLROHQFH SYRIAN  CIVIL  WAR The   bitterness   and   rancor   stirred   by   Syria’s   civil   war   were   on   full   display   WKLVZHHNDWSHDFHWDONVLQ6ZLW]HUODQG DQGQRWMXVWLQWKHFORVHGURRPZKHUH ULYDO GHOHJDWLRQV DUH VHHNLQJ D ZD\ WR HQGWKHWKUHH\HDUFRQÀLFW EGYPT Egypt   said   20   journalists,   including   IRXUIRUHLJQHUVZRUNLQJIRU$O-D]HHUD will  face  trial  on  charges  of  joining  or   aiding  a  terrorist  group  and  endanger-­ ing   national   security   -­   an   escalation   WKDW UDLVHG IHDUV RI D FUDFNGRZQ RQ IUHHGRPRIWKHSUHVV UKRAINE 8NUDLQH¶V SDUOLDPHQW RQ :HGQHVGD\ SDVVHG D PHDVXUH RIIHULQJ DPQHVW\ WR WKRVH DUUHVWHG LQ WZR PRQWKV RI SUR-­ WHVWV EXW RQO\ LI GHPRQVWUDWRUV YDFDWH PRVWRIWKHEXLOGLQJVWKH\RFFXS\7KH PRYH ZDV TXLFNO\ JUHHWHG ZLWK FRQ-­ WHPSWE\WKHRSSRVLWLRQ MONACH  BUTTERFLIES The   stunning   and   little-­understood   DQQXDO PLJUDWLRQ RI PLOOLRQV RI 0RQ-­ DUFK EXWWHUÀLHV WR VSHQG WKH ZLQWHU LQ 0H[LFR LV LQ GDQJHU RI GLVDSSHDULQJ H[SHUWVVDLG:HGQHVGD\DIWHUQXPEHUV dropped  to  their  lowest  level  since  re-­ FRUGNHHSLQJEHJDQLQ OLYMPICS $IWHU DOO WKH WDON RI WHUURU WKUHDWV corruption,   overspending   and   anti-­ gay   legislation,   the   head   of   the   Sochi   2O\PSLFV LV GHWHUPLQHG WR VKRZ WKH ZRUOG WKH JDPHV ZLOO EH D KXJH VXF-­ FHVV OLYHU VDIH IULHQGO\ DQG ZHOOUXQ JDPH Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

The New  Paltz  Oracle

Starbucks Replaces  Seattle’s  Best %\.ULVWHQ:DU¿HOG &RS\(GLWRU_  :DU¿HON#KDZNPDLOQHZSDOW]HGX

$WWKHVWDUWRIDZLQWU\VHPHVWHUVWXGHQWV were greeted   with   a   hot   new   change   in   the   6WXGHQW8QLRQ¶V 68 IRRGYHQGRUOLQHXS2Q -DQ6WDUEXFNVRSHQHGIRUEXVLQHVVLQWKH IRUPHU ORFDWLRQ RI 6HDWWOH¶V %HVW DQG ZLWKLQ LWV ¿UVW ZHHN KDV VKRZQ QRWLFDEOH VXFFHVV DFFRUGLQJ WR ([HFXWLYH 'LUHFWRU RI &DPSXV $X[LOLDU\6HUYLFHV &$6 6WHYH'HXWVFK In  addition  to  the  popularity  of  the  Star-­ EXFNVEUDQGDQGWKHVXFFHVVRILWVORFDWLRQVRQ RWKHU681<FDPSXVHVWKLVVHPHVWHU¶VFRIIHH VKRSVZDSZDVDOVRGXHLQSDUWWRFRPSOLFD-­ WLRQVWKDW&$6IDFHGZLWK6HDWWOH¶V%HVW 'HXWVFKVDLGWKDWVLQFHWKHORFDWLRQLQWKH SU   was   a   fully-­licensed   Seattle’s   Best   store,   WKH\ ZRXOGQ¶W DOORZ &$6 WR PDNH PRGL¿FD-­ WLRQVWRWKHVHUYLFHOLQHLQRUGHUWRPRYHFXV-­ WRPHUVDORQJTXLFNHULQWKHPRUQLQJV “Because  we  had  a  contract  with  Seattle’s   Best,  the  only  way  they  would  allow  us  out  of   LWZRXOGEHWRJRWRWKHLUVLVWHUFRPSDQ\6WDU-­ EXFNV´'HXWVFKVDLG³6HDWWOH¶V%HVWDOORZHG XVRXWRIWKHFRQWUDFWDQGLW¶VVRUWRIOLNHWKH SHUIHFWVWRUP:HNQHZ6WDUEXFNVZDVJRLQJ WREHVXFFHVVIXODQGZHZRXOGKDYHPRUHÀH[-­ LELOLW\´

Since the   new   addition   isn’t   a   fully   li-­ FHQVHG 6WDUEXFNV ORFDWLRQ &$6 FDQ GHFLGH which   products   they   will   and   will   not   have   DYDLODEOHIRUSXUFKDVH ³:H GRQ¶W FDUU\ D ORW RI WKH RWKHU LWHPV \RXZRXOG¿QGDWDUHJXODU6WDUEXFNVZKLFK DFWXDOO\ JLYHV XV D ORW PRUH ÀH[LELOLW\ WR VHW XSWKHVWRUHWKHZD\WKDWZHZDQWLW´'HXWVFK VDLG 'HVSLWH LW QRW EHLQJ IXOO\ OLFHQVHG WKH 6WDUEXFNV LQ WKH 68 RIIHUV DOO RI WKH W\SLFDO VWDSOH SURGXFWV RI WKH FRPSDQ\ LQFOXGLQJ coffee,   teas,   blended   frappuccino   beverages,   VPRRWKLHVDQGKRWFKRFRODWH Psychology   graduate   student   Jeysa   Wil-­ OLDPVVDLGKHUFDUDPHOPDFFKLDWRWDVWHGEHWWHU WKDQHYHU ³,¶P VXUSULVHG WKDW LW WDVWHV MXVW OLNH D UHJXODU6WDUEXFNV´VKHVDLG³,DPVRKDSS\ DERXWWKHVZLWFK²LW¶VJUHDWKHUH´ 7KH FDPSXV ¿UVW JRW D JOLPSVH RI WKH JUHHQ DQG ZKLWH 6WDUEXFNV FRIIHH FXSV ODVW IDOOZKHQDVPDOO6WDUEXFNVNLRVNZDVRSHQHG LQ WKH OREE\ RI 6RMRXUQHU7UXWK /LEUDU\$F-­ FRUGLQJ WR 'HXWVFK WKLV GLGQ¶W UHSODFH WKH -D]]PDQ¶VFRIIHHVWDQGWKDWRQFHRFFXSLHGWKH space   —   it   was   already   closed   down   during   renovations  of  the  library  and  the  decision  was   PDGHWRWU\DGLIIHUHQWEUDQGLQVWHDG

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Thursday, January  30,  2014

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Ottaway  Professor  To  Be  Introduced

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

UNIDENTIFIED  MURDER   VIC-­ TIM  IN  WYOMING 7KHGLVFRYHU\RIDQXQLGHQWLÂżHGPXU-­ der  victimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  headless  body  nearly  three   weeks   ago   on   a   remote,   dead-­end   dirt   road  in  Wyoming  has  stymied  investi-­ gators  and  led  some  residents  to  specu-­ late   that   big-­league   drug   violence   has   reached  a  rural  county  just  east  of  Yel-­ lowstone  National  Park. SHOPPING  MALL  ATTACK The   gunman   in   a   deadly   attack   at   a   Maryland  shopping  mall  wrote  in  gen-­ eral   terms   about   killing   people   in   his   journal   and   said   that   he   was   ready   to   die,  police  said  Wednesday  in  releasing   new   details   about   writings   the   shooter   left  behind.

Sonia  Shah  will  be  introduced  to  the  campus  as  the  James  H.  Ottaway  Sr.  Visiting  Professor  Tuesday,  Feb.4  in  the  Honors  Center.

By  John  Tappen News  Editor  |  John.tappen@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Award-­winning  journalist   Sonia   Shah  has  been  named  SUNY  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   2014  James  H.  Ottaway  Sr.  Visiting  Pro-­ fessor  of  Journalism.  This  spring  semes-­ ter,   Shah   began   teaching   a   course   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science,   Environment   and   Disease:   New  Approaches  to  Science  Journalism.â&#x20AC;? Shah   has   written   extensively   on   the   topics   of   science   and   politics   and   is   the   author  of  three  books,  including  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Fe-­ ver:  How  Malaria  Has  Ruled  Humankind   for   500,000   Years,â&#x20AC;?   which   was   the   cul-­ PLQDWLRQRIÂżYH\HDUVRILQYHVWLJDWLYHUH-­ search  and  reportage  from  her  time  spent   in  Cameroon,  Malawi  and  Panama.   For   Journalism   Professor   and   Head   of   the   Ottaway   Search   Committee   Lisa   3KLOOLSV 6KDK W\SLÂżHG DQ 2WWDZD\ SUR-­ fessor   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   a   distinguished   journalist   at   a   high   point   in   her   career   that   can   offer   a   perspective  that  students  have  likely  not   been  exposed  to  yet. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   never   had   a   journalist   with   the   particular   combination   of   things   she   has,â&#x20AC;?   Phillips   said   about   Shahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   unique   orientation   in   both   science   and   human   rights.   Her   seminar   course   will   focus   on  

Lyme  disease.   Shah   said   the   class   will   help   her   with   her   research   of   emerging   diseases,   a   topic   that   she   has   spent   the   last   nine   months   writing   about   for   her   upcoming  book.   Âł/\PH GLVHDVH H[HPSOLÂżHV DOO WKHVH changes  in  society  that  I  think  are  inter-­ esting,   like   deforestation,   spillovers   be-­ tween  people  and  other  animals,  the  facts   that  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  focused  on  deer  as  sort  of  the   bad   guys.   That   may   or   may   not   be   true   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  whole  vagueness  of  diagnosis  and   treatment.â&#x20AC;?  Shah  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  all  of  those   things  exemplify  how  confusing  and  dis-­ ruptive   new   disease   can   be   because   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  understand  them  very  well.  It  really   exposes   all   the   weakness   in   our   society   and  all  the  changes  that  are  happening.â&#x20AC;?   Phillips,  who  has  covered  Lyme  dis-­ ease   in   the   past   for   a   neurology   orien-­ tated  publication,  said  Shahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  decision  to   make  Lyme  disease  the  focal  point  of  the   course  is  both  brave  and  important.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  A   GLIÂżFXOWWRSLFEHFDXVHLWZLOOSXWVRPHRI the   biggest   challenges   in   journalism   to   practice.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;People   have   very   strong   feelings   about  it  [Lyme  disease],  and  how  to  get   to  the  facts  beyond  the  feelings  is  an  im-­ portant  part  of  the  journey  when  covering  

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

Lyme  disease,â&#x20AC;?  Phillips  said. Philips  said  that  the  course  will  pres-­ HQW VWXGHQWV ZLWK VLJQLÂżFDQW TXHVWLRQV such   as:   what   constitutues   being   an   ex-­ pert,  who  is  a  good  source  and  what  can   be  considered  a  good  source  of  informa-­ tion.   Shah,   who   graduated   from   under-­ graduate  studies  alongside  Phillips  from   Oberlin  College  in  1990,  has  experience   teaching  copy  editing  classes  and  classes   for  new  reporters,  as  well  as  giving  about   a   half   dozen   lectures   at   colleges   every   year  for  the  past  10  years.  She  also  gave   a  TED  Talk  on  Malaria  at  TEDGlobal  in   2013.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   really   excited   to   be   able   to   design   a   course   myself,â&#x20AC;?   Shah   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   also   love   interacting   with   college   stu-­ dents.   I   think   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   such   an   amazing   time   of  life  where  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  so  open  to  new  ideas   and   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   becoming   accomplished,   but   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   still   really   open   minded   and   DEVRUELQJ HYHU\WKLQJ , ÂżQG LW UHDOO\ UH-­ warding  to  work  with  undergraduate  stu-­ dents.â&#x20AC;? Shah  will  give  a  speech  and  answer   questions   from   President   Don   Christian   on  Tuesday,  Feb.  4  at  6  p.m.  in  the  Hon-­ ors  Center.

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

SOUTHERN  SNOW The  Deep  South  is  still  digging  out  of   the  not-­so-­deep  snow  that  nonetheless   paralyzed   the   region,   forcing   school-­ children  to  spend  the  night  at  schools,   stranding   motorists,   and   extending   commutes   normally   counted   in   min-­ utes  to  hours. SUPER  BOWL  ADS  MATURE Forget   slapstick   humor,   corny   gim-­ micks  and  skimpy  bikinis.  This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Super   Bowl   ads   promise   something   surprising:   Maturity.   There   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   any   close-­up   tongue   kisses   in   Godad-­ dyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ad.   Nor   will   there   be   half-­naked   women  running  around  in  the  Axe  body   spray  spot.   ATLANTA  SCHOOLS Thousands   of   Atlanta   students   strand-­ ed  all  night  long  in  their  schools  were   reunited   with   their   parents   Wednes-­ day,   while   rescuers   rushed   to   deliver   blankets,  food,  gas  and  a  ride  home  to   countless   shivering   motorists   stopped   cold  by  a  storm  that  paralyzed  the  busi-­ ness  capital  of  the  South  with  less  than   3  inches  of  snow. MISSUORI  EXECUTION   A  Missouri  who  killed  a  jeweler  dur-­ ing  a  1991  robbery  was  executed  for   the  crime  late  Wednesday,  marking   the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  third  lethal  injection  in  as   many  months. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire


 6 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Daniel  Torres  Elected  to  Town  Council By  Andrew  Lief

Last  fall,   23-­year-­old   New   Paltz   resident   and   Marist  College  graduate  Daniel  Torres  was  elected  to   the  New  Paltz  Town  Board  as  a  councilman.     Torres,   who   graduated   from   New   Paltz   High   School  in  2009,  said  he  values  the  community  where   he  grew  up  and  wanted  to  give  back. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People   give   back   to   the   community   in   various   ways,â&#x20AC;?   Torres   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some   people   volunteer,   some   MRLQWKHPLOLWDU\)RUPHWKDWZDVUXQQLQJIRURIÂżFH´ Torresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  role  as  councilman  entails  helping  to  create   the  budget  for  the  town  and  to  act  as  a  legislature  on   behalf  of  Ulster  County.    He  said  he  views  his  position   as  a  way  to  be  a  community  advocate  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one  who  helps   his  neighbors  regardless  of  the  situation.     Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  also  taken  on  the  responsibility  of  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   communication   and   utilizing   social   media,   which   he   said   is   a   useful   tool   because   it   fosters   open-­govern-­ ment.     Ulster   County   Comptroller   Elliott  Auerbach   said   he   has   known  Torres   from   when   he   was   an   intern   in   KLVRIÂżFHZRUNLQJRQKLVWKLUGUHHOHFWLRQFDPSDLJQ While   working   as   an   intern   Torres   was   involved   in   writing  and  doing  public  research  for  Auerbach.    For   WKHFDPSDLJQKHZDVDÂżHOGFRRUGLQDWRU He  said  he  views  Torres  as  a  multi-­talented  person.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seeing   Dan   really   in   both   worlds   I   recognized   that  he  had  the  skill  and  ability  to  make  the  big  deci-­ sions,  handle  the  tough  problems,  handle  himself  and   convey  his  message  well  to  the  public  and  truly  be  the   representative  on  the  town  board  that  has  the  ear  of  the   public,â&#x20AC;?  Auerbach  said.     Being  23-­years-­old,  Torres  said  he  brings  a  unique   perspective  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  be  represented  in  gov-­ ernment.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   bring   something   from   the   perspective   from   someone  who  is  younger  and  would  like  to  start  a  fam-­ ily  and  I  see  the  challenges  that  make  it  hard  for  some-­ one  my  age  to  do  that,â&#x20AC;?  Torres  said.     Torres  said  New  Paltz  is  a  unique  community  and   is  accepting  of  different  kinds  of  people.    He  said  he   believes   this   contributed   to   his   election,   and   said   he   thinks  citizens  in  a  lot  of  other  towns  would  have  not   voted  for  a  23-­year-­old  candidate.     Auerbach  said  he  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  people  should  be   paying  attention  to  Torresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  age  because  of  how  talented   he  is.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  youth  is  a  secondary  in  this  respect,â&#x20AC;?  Au-­ erbach   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dan   has   the   maturity   and   the   wisdom   beyond  his  age.â&#x20AC;? Torres  said  SUNY  New  Paltz  is  a  weird  entity  be-­ cause  of  how  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  affected  by  both  the  town  and  village.     Since  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  so  close  in  age  with  most  students,  he  said   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  willing  to  listen  to  and  help  students  because  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   able  to  relate  with  them.     Auerbach  said  he  thinks  Torres  has  a  long  career   ahead  of  him  in  serving  the  community.

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  DAN  TORRES  FACEBOOK  PAGE

Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Daniel  Torres,  23,  was  elected  councilman  last  fall.  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  the  New  Paltz  town  board  will  be  the   last  stop  on  Danâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  public  service  train,â&#x20AC;?  Auerbach  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  would  say  political  train,  but  that  may  be  broadened   to  him  keeping  himself  involved  in  some  sort  of  public   service.â&#x20AC;?   Looking  forward,  Torres  said  he  is  looking  at  ways   to   help   New   Paltz   become   a   more   environmentally-­  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

friendly  community.     Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   also   like   to   start   the   dis-­ FXVVLRQ RI LPSOHPHQWLQJ D ÂżUVWWLPH KRPHEX\HU WD[ H[HPSWLRQEHFDXVH1HZ3DOW]KDVDYHU\\RXQJFRP-­ munity  and  not  everyone  can  afford  to  stay  there.     In  addition  to  working  as  a  councilman,  Torres  is   an  integrated  marketing  communications  graduate  stu-­ dent  at  Marist.  


NEWS

The New  Paltz  Oracle

 7

oracle.newpaltz.edu

SAP Spring  Concert  Survey  Offers  Female  Choices Survey Options:

PHOTO BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

Azealia Banks

Chrisette Michele

By Andrew  Lief Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Jheno Aiko,   Chrisette   Michele,   Azealia   Banks,   RUBBLEBUCKET,   Rita   Ora,   Dev   and   Estelle   are   the   art-­ ists  included  in  the  2014  Spring  Con-­ cert  survey,  released  on  Jan.  17.   Vice   President   of   Programming   Yaritza  Diaz  said  she  wanted  to  bring   in   a   female   artist   because   the   school   KDVQ¶WKDGRQHLQ¿YH\HDUV “I’m  not  bringing  artists  based  on   my   liking   so   much,   it’s   more   on   the   fact  that  I  want  to  bring  something  dif-­ ferent   that   hasn’t   been   done   here   be-­ fore,”  Diaz  said.     Diaz   ran   for   Vice   President   of   Programming  on  the  platform  that  she   would   try   and   bring   in   a   female   art-­ LVW 6KH KDG LW RQ KHU À\HUV DQG VRPH people  don’t  remember  that,  Diaz  said.     Student   Association   (SA)   Presi-­ dent  Manuel  Tejada  said  the  budget  for   the   concert   is   approximately   $80,000.     $50,000   of   it   is   used   to   pay   the   artist   and   the   remaining   money   is   used   for   the  production  of  the  concert  and  pro-­ viding  food.    

Dev

Estelle

Diaz said  the  process  of  picking  an   artist   is   done   by   the   production   com-­ mittee’s   board   of   10   people,   which   LV FRPSRVHG RI ¿YH VHQDWRUV DQG ¿YH members   of   the   council   of   organiza-­ tions.     The   committee   met   every   other   week  during  the  fall  semester  and  were   each  assigned  a  different  genre  of  mu-­ VLF 2QFH ¿YH DUWLVWV ZHUH FKRVHQ IRU each  genre,  the  committee  had  a  week   to  listen  to  the  music  and  decide  their   opinion   on   the   artists   prior   to   a   vote   that   narrowed   it   down   to   10   artists.     Once   the   list   was   cut   down   to   10   art-­ ists,  it  was  then  shaved  down  again  to   seven   artists   before   it   was   sent   out   to   the  students.     This  is  different  than  what  previous   vice  presidents  of  programming  would   do,  Diaz  said.  Diaz  said  they  would  ei-­ ther   come   up   with   the   list   themselves   or  just  choose  music  from  one  genre.     Director  of  Student  Activities  and   Union   Services   Mike   Patterson   said   SA  Productions  (SAP)  checks  to  see  if   artists  have  done  shows  at  colleges  in   WKHSDVWDVD¿UVWOLQHRILQWHUHVW7KH\

Jhene Aiko

Rita Ora

don’t take  the  size  of  the  schools  where   the  artist  has  performed  in  the  past  into   consideration   because   the   majority   of   artists   don’t   know   the   differences   be-­ tween  schools,  besides  the  large  insti-­ tutions. Diaz   said   the   options   for   pick-­ ing  a  female  artist  are  limited  because   popular   artists   are   either   extremely   overpriced,  or  underpriced  and  nobody   knows  who  they  are.     Patterson   said   if   students   aren’t   happy   with   the   choices   on   the   survey   they   shouldn’t   keep   their   opinions   to   themselves.   Instead,   they   should   be   contacting  SAP  and  senate  to  let  them   know  how  they  feel.     “I   think   that   the   SAP   were   think-­ ing   thoughtfully   in   terms   of   trying   to   diversify  the  entertainment  that  comes   every  year,”  Patterson  said.     Tejada   said   not   everyone   is   going   to  agree  on  the  gender  and  genre  of  the   artist,  but  it’s  important  that  the  school   is   diverse   and   branches   out   to   all   as-­ pects  of  the  community.     The   survey   received   mixed   reac-­ tions,  Diaz  said.    

Thursday, January  30,  2014

Rubblebucket

³$W ¿UVW , NLQG RI WRRN LW SHUVRQ al,” Diaz  said.  “At  the  end  of  the  day  I   can’t  get  angry  because  it’s  not  a  per-­ sonal  thing.    I’m  doing  my  job.    I  have   to  deal  with  the  fact  that  I  can’t  please   everybody.” 7KLUG\HDUDFFRXQWLQJDQG¿QDQFH double  major  Kelly  Pry  said  she  wasn’t   pleased   with   the   choices   because   she   has   never   heard   of   any   of   the   artists   and   believes   now   she   won’t   get   her   hopes  up  that  a  popular  artist  will  per-­ form. “I  don’t  have  time  to  sit  down  and   listen  to  a  list  of  artists  to  decide  which   one  I  would  like  to  hear  perform,  when   I  ultimately  don’t  believe  that  my  opin-­ ion  will  affect  the  decision,”  Pry  said.     “None   of   my   top   choices   have   been   picked  so  far  so  I  don’t  think  it  would   matter  too  much  either  way.” Third-­year   communications   ma-­ jor  Ilana  Kantor  said  she  liked  Azealia   Banks   was   one   of   the   options   on   the   survey,   but   at   the   same   time   would   have  liked  to  have  seen  a  wider  selec-­ tion  of  artists  that  she  knows.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

  8

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Senate  Holds  First  Meeting  of  Semester

/HIW 6$ 3UHVLGHQW0DQQXHO7HMDGD5LJKW 6$ ([HFXWLYH9LFH3UHVLGHQW=DFKDU\5RXVVHDV By  Maddie  Anthony

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Thursday,  January  30,  2014

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THE GUNK T h ursday, J an uary 30t h , 2014

M o n o c h r o m at i c M u lt i m e d i a In Motion

Story on page 5B

Photo by Maxwell Reide


2B

FEATURES

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The New  Paltz  Oracle

Teaching Through the Trauma NEW PALTZ GRAD STUDENT TRAVELS TO ISRAEL

The Institute  for  Disaster  Mental  Health  group  poses  in  Israel.

By Maddie  Anthony   Copy  Editor  |  n02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

A few  weeks  ago,  a  team  of  trauma  ex-­ perts   including   alumni   and   mental   health   couseling  graduate  student  Rebecca  Rodri-­ guez  traveled  to  Israel  as  part  of  the  Institute   for   Disaster   Mental   Health   at   SUNY   New   Paltz. Rodriguez  began  her  time  at  New  Paltz   as  a  psychology  major  and  a  disaster  stud-­ ies  minor.  As  a  graduate  student  she  works   as  part  of  the  mental  health  counseling  pro-­ gram.   “It   sounds   cliché   but   when   do   people   need  help  the  most?”  Rodriguez  said.  “It’s   something   about   disasters   that   make   you   want  to  help.”   The  purpose  of  the  trip  was  to  train  the  

PHOTO COURTESY  OF  JAMES  HALPERN

30 Israeli  and  Palestinian  mental  health  pro-­ fessionals  who  attended  the  session  on  how   to   deal   with   the   psychological   aspects   that   come   with   trauma   so   they   could   then   pass   it  on  and  train  members  of  their  own  com-­ munities. Rodriguez   described   the   training   ses-­ VLRQDVDVRUWRISV\FKRORJLFDO¿UVWDLG “I  feel  like  it’s  being  human.  You  try  to   get   people   to   develop   their   natural   coping   mechanisms   whether   that   means   social   or   practical  support,”  Rodriguez  said.  “If  you   are  trained,  it  means  you  know  how  to  get   someone   in   a   stable   place.   You   are   really   promoting  being  calm  and  empathetic  with   them.” All  of  the  attendees  of  the  training  ses-­ VLRQZHUHLQWKHPHQWDOKHDOWK¿HOGLQRQH

way or  another. Rodriguez  felt  initially  the  Israelis  and   Palestinians   were   a   bit   closed   off   to   each   other   but   had   some   basic   level   of   comfort   already   in   place.  The   groups   were   split   up   and  then  put  back  together.     While   everyone   had   come   together   to   learn   how   to   deal   with   crisis   and   disaster   mental   health,   the   two   sides   still   had   their   reservations,  Rodriguez  said.   “I  noticed  that  the  Palestinians  and  Is-­ raelis  had  a  willingness  to  discuss,  but  they   also   held   back,”   Rodriguez   said.   “There   were  certain  things  they  didn’t  want  to  get   into.  With  politics  there  was  a  sort  of  self-­ regulation.” Rodriguez  said  that  topics  would  come   up   and   someone   would   say   they   “didn’t  

Thursday, January  30,  2014

want to  get  into  it,”  in  order  to  avoid  poten-­ tial  arguments.   The  two  sides  began  a  discussion  about   the   challenges   they   face,   which   proved   to   show  that  many  of  their  problems  were  very   similar.   A   survey   at   the   end   of   the   session   showed  that  attitudes  toward  one  another’s   national  origins  had  changed,  and  that  they   felt  they  now  had  a  better  understanding  of   each  other. The  experience  of  turning  a  population   of  people  into  individual  stories  was  some-­ thing  Rodriguez  also  felt.   “Organizationally,  we  conceptionalized   the  two  groups  as  Israelis  and  Palestinians,”   Rodriguez  said.  “But  by  the  end  of  the  trip   they  all  had  a  face  and  all  had  story.”  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Features

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3B

History Still Standing ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIAN FINDS A STORY ON EVERY CORNER By  Anthony  DeRosa Features  Editor  |  n02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

PHOTO BY MAXWELL REIDE

History  is  not  found  solely  in  textbooks.  In  fact  it  ex-­ ists  all  around  us  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  in  the  earth,  in  our  technology  and  in   each  other.  But  history  in  its  most  tangible  form  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  as  well   as  its  most  vulnerable  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  exists  closer  to  home,  sometimes   literally.   Nearly  60  people  gathered  in  Deyo  Hall  on  Jan.  26  on   New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   historically   renown   Huguenot   Street   to   hear   Dr.  Bill  Rhoads,  an  architectural  historian  and  former  pro-­ fessor  of  art  history  at  SUNY  New  Paltz,  discuss  the  suc-­ cessful  efforts  to  preserve  the  old  stone  houses  of  Historic   Huguenot  Street,  as  well  as  ongoing  work  to  preserve  and   SURWHFW KLVWRULFDOO\ DQG DUFKLWHFWXUDOO\ VLJQLÂżFDQW EXLOG-­ ings  from  various  periods  in  the  Village  and  Town  of  New   Paltz.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   sing   the   praises   of   Historic   Huguenot   Street   in   terms  of  historic  preservation  but  there  are  a  lot  of  anony-­ mous  preservers  of  New  Paltz,â&#x20AC;?  Rhoads  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lots  of  peo-­ ple  who  own  private  houses  have  maintained  these  houses   over  the  years.â&#x20AC;?   8VLQJ D ÂżOP VOLGH SURMHFWRU WKHPDWLFDOO\ DSSURSULDWH for   the   evening,   Rhoads,   a   resident   of   New   Paltz   since   1970,  presented  to  the  audience  what  he  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  personal   look  at  the  archeological  history  of  New  Paltz,â&#x20AC;?  display-­ ing  photos  he  had  collected  of  the  late  19th  and  early  20th   century  structures  that  still  populate  the  surrounding  com-­ munity  in  varying  stages  of  their  existence.   5KRDGV DOVR KLJKOLJKWHG PDQ\ VLJQLÂżFDQW VWUXFWXUHV WKDW KDYH EHHQ ORVW WR ÂżUH DOWHUDWLRQ DQG GHPROLWLRQ Among  those  was  the  New  Paltz  State  Normal  School,  the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;ancestorâ&#x20AC;?  of  SUNY  New  Paltz  built  on  the  shores  of  the   Wallkill  River.  The  school  would  later  move  to  its  current   ORFDWLRQDIWHUEHLQJORVWWRÂżUHLQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  recent  years  both  the  village  and  town  have  cre-­ ated  Historic  Preservation  Commissions,  which  have  been   effective  in  advocating  the  cause  of  historic  preservation   and  landmarking  districts  and  individual  buildings,  includ-­ LQJVLJQLÂżFDQWWKFHQWXU\DQGPRGHUQVWUXFWXUHVEXWWKH local   commissions   have   no   authority   over   actions   by   the   state  on  the  SUNY  campus,â&#x20AC;?  Rhoads  said.   Rhoads   said   state   experts   had   recently   declared   that   the  Hanmer  House,  located  behind  College  Hall  and  uti-­ lized  as  the  international  student  affairs  building,  had  no   â&#x20AC;&#x153;special  historical  valueâ&#x20AC;?  and  is  expected  to  be  demolished   in  the  next  few  weeks,  contributing  to  a  prevailing  concern   over   the   SUNY   campusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   treatment   of   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   historic   build-­ ings. Rhoads  addressed  the  renovation  of  the  Wooster  Sci-­ ence  Building,  lamenting  the  loss  of  what  he  described  as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  powerful  example  of  Brutalism  in  architecture,  with  its  

One  of  the  preserved  stone  houses  on  Historic  Huguenot  Street.  

EROGSURMHFWLRQVDQGKDUGFRQFUHWHVXUIDFHV´ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winner  of  a  Progressive  Architecture  design  award  in   1966  but  always  controversial,  Wooster,    in  2013  called  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;a   monstrosityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  by  some  campus  sophisticates,  will  now  be-­ come  something  more  pleasantâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;for  someâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to  gaze  upon,   DVZHOODVPRUHHQHUJ\HIÂżFLHQWDQGDGDSWHGWRQHZXVHV But  a  landmark  of  modern  design  has  been  lost,â&#x20AC;?  Rhoads   said.   However,   Rhoads   said   SUNY   New   Paltz   should   not   be  benighted  for  their  actions.  Rhoads  showed  before  and   after   slides   of   stone   structures   on   both   the   Harvard   and   Princeton   campuses   that   had   been   demolished   or   reno-­ vated  to  include  aesthetically  uncomplimentary  additions   such   as   a   modern   designed   observatory   deck   in   the   case   of  the  latter.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  anytime  you  feel  mildly  inclined  to  be  critical  of   SUNY   New   Paltz,   be   reminded   that   some   of   these   out-­ standing  American  institutions  have  done  unwise  things  in   regards  to  historical  architecture,â&#x20AC;?  Rhoads  said.  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

Rhoads  applauded  what  he  believed  to  be  successful   efforts  of  preservation  on  the  New  Paltz  campus.  Rhoads   used  the  example  of  the  Lefevre  House  located  on  Route   DQG9DQGHQEHUJ+DOOERWKORVWWRÂżUHDQGUHVWRUHGWR their  original  design  with  the  former  being  re-­purposed  as   WKH$OXPQL DQG$GPLVVLRQV RIÂżFH DQG WKH ODWWHUÂśV LFRQLF FXSRODEHLQJUHSODFHGDQGUHEXLOWWRLWVRULJLQDOVSHFLÂżFD-­ tion.   While  Rhoads  touted  historical  preservation  he  noted   that   demolition   and   change   was   an   inevitable   means   of   progress  but  should  be  considered  with  regards  to  histori-­ FDOVLJQLÂżFDQFH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Change   is   inevitable   but   we   do   like   to   think   that   change   should   be   made   with   good   information,   good   awareness  of  the  history  of  these  buildings  and  we  need  to   be  vigilant  when  these  changes  arise,â&#x20AC;?  Rhoads  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;[His-­ torical]   houses   have   been   removed   to   put   up   a   fast-­food   restaurant  or,  more  often,  to  create  a  parking  lot,  both  dam-­ aging  the  character  of  New  Paltz.â&#x20AC;?


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Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

The Allure of the Ink

DYSTOPIAN COMIC QUESTIONS HUMAN CONDITION

By  Anthony  DeRosa Features  Editor  |  n02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Winter  break  gave  me  a  lot  of  time  to  do  all  sorts  of   productive  things.  Thankfully,  I  chose  none  of  those  and   instead  decided  to  sleep,  watch  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bonesâ&#x20AC;?  on  TNT,  eat  salty   foods,  and  generally  run  up  my  parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  electric  and  heat-­ ing  bill.  One  slightly  constructive  activity  I  spent  my  time   on  was  reading  ...comic  books.  From  Japan.  I  also  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have  shame  glands,  so  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  that.   So   yes,   the   majority   of   my   time   wrapped   in   about   twenty  different  blankets,  unwashed  and  unshaven,  avoid-­ ing   the   sun   and   trying   to   solve   murders   before   Brennan   and   Booth   reached   the   58   minute   mark,   were   actually   spent  amidst  the  black-­and-­white  pages  of  volumes  1-­12   RI Âł$WWDFN RQ7LWDQ´ LQ WKH KLJKGHÂżQLWLRQ JORU\ RI P\ phoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  4.7-­inch  super  LCD  2  display.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Attack   on   Titan,â&#x20AC;?   or   as   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   known   in   its   language   of  origin,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shingeki  no  Kyojin,â&#x20AC;?  is  the  comic  written  and   illustrated  by  Hajime  Isayama  that  has  inspired  the  Japa-­ nese  serial  animation  of  the  same  name  whose  popularity   has  spread  quickly  overseas.  If  you  have  a  friend  on  Tum-­ blr  who  likes  anime,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  good  chance  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  seen  a   GIF  or  two  from  the  show.   One  hundred  years  prior  to  the  beginning  of  the  story,   giant,   grotesque   and   near-­indestructible   humanoid   crea-­ tures  called  Titans  suddenly  appeared  as  natural  predators   to  humans.  As  a  result,  humanity  teeters  on  the  brink  of   extinction  and  has  hidden  itself  within  the  safety  of  three   50-­meter   concentric   stone   walls   of   a   medieval-­esque   monarchy  ruled  city-­state.  When  a  sixty  meter  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Colossal   Titanâ&#x20AC;?   mysteriously   appears   and   breaches   the   outermost   ZDOOVPDOOHU7LWDQVĂ&#x20AC;RRGWKHRXWHUWHUULWRU\DQGKXPDQLW\

LVIRUFHGWRÂżJKWRUGLHDJDLQVWLWVJUHDWHVWWKUHDW â&#x20AC;&#x153;Attack  on  Titanâ&#x20AC;?  is  a  dark,  dystopian  work  of  fanta-­ sy  that  is  a  welcome  breath  of  fresh  air  to  a  genre  that  has   recently  begun  to  feel  stagnant.  The  author  quickly  estab-­ lishes  that  nothing  is  sacred,  everyone  can  and  probably   will   die,   and   every   familiar   clichĂŠ   used   to   inspire   hope   DQGV\PEROL]HDVKLIWLQFRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWPRPHQWXPLVDGHFHS-­ tive  plot  device  used  to  rip  your  heart  out  straight  from   \RXUFKHVW6XIÂżFHWRVD\,GLGQÂśWKDYHHQRXJKUHVROYH stored  in  the  Feels  Bank  to  cover  such  a  hefty  emotional   investment.   The   writing   effectively   has   the   reader   empathizing   with  the  main  charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  confusion,  fear  and  frustration   primarily  due  to  their  shared  ignorance  of  what  exactly   KDVFDXVHGWKH7LWDQVWRDSSHDU:RUNVRIÂżFWLRQZKHUH humans   are   knocked   from   the   top   of   the   food   chain   by   a  foreign  entity  is  not  a  new  idea  by  any  means,  but  not   since   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Walking   Deadâ&#x20AC;?   comics   have   I   seen   such   a   thoughtful  portrayal  of  the  emotional  impact  it  plays  on   the  characters,  though  the  two  series  are  extremely  differ-­ ent  for  each  other  in  most  other  regards.   Thematically,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Attack  on  Titanâ&#x20AC;?  is  at  once  a  revenge   story,  a  commentary  on  the  persistent  nature  of  humans,   DQGFRQVHTXHQFHVRIVDFULÂżFH,WPLJKWMXVWEHWKHMRXU-­ nalist  in  me  talking,  but  in  the  charactersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  motivations  I   saw  that  fanatical  drive  for  the  truth  that  puts  a  desperate   ORRNLQ\RXUH\HVDQGKDV\RXÂżJKWDQGEOHHGXQWLO\RXU body  is  dry  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  all  too  familiar  with.  The  fear  that  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   die  before  you  get  answers  and  questioning  your  convic-­ tion  to  faces  the  horrors  before  you  to  get  them.   Maybe  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  being  melodramatic,  but  underneath  the   seriesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  surface,  the  message  I  get  is  one  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  all  familiar   with  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  reaching  out  to  the  truth.  

PHOTO COURTESY OF BLOGSPOT.COM

Want to write for The Oracle? Email Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  January  30,  2014


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Monochromatic Multimedia In Motion DORSKY EXHIBITS HUDSON VALLEY ARTISTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TRAVEL THROUGH TIME

Artwork  on  display  from  the  exhibition  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary  Reid  Kelley:  Working  Objects  and  Videos.â&#x20AC;?  

By  Suzy  Berkowitz A&E  Editor  |  N02007890@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Dorsky   will   be   springing   into   this   semes-­ ter  head-­on  with  their  newest  exhibition  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary  Reid   Kelley:  Working   Objects   and  Videos.â&#x20AC;?  A   multimedia   PL[WXUHRISDLQWLQJÂżOPKLVWRU\DQGWKHDWULFDOSHUIRU-­ mance,  the  exhibition  opened  on  Wednesday,  Jan.  22   and  will  run  until  Sunday,  April  13.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  were  interested  in  showing  Mary  Reid  Kel-­ ley   and   her   husband,   Patrick   Kelleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   work   because   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   extraordinary   artists   who   are   just   beginning   to   receive   acclaim   for   their   work,â&#x20AC;?   Sara   Pasti,   Neil   Trager  Director  at  The  Dorsky,  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  encompasses   so   many   different   disciplines.   The   narrative   is   intel-­ lectually  interesting,    funny,  serious  and  sensitive  and   it  covers  a  lot  of  different  emotions.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  very  rich  in   what  it  offers  to  the  viewer.â&#x20AC;? Mary   Reid   Kelley   and   her   husband   collaborated   on  the  exhibition,  using  everyday  and  found  objects,   as  per  the  exhibitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  name,  painted  them  black  and   white  and  used  them  as  props  for  their  videos.   The   videos   reenacted   historical   events   or   time   periods   from   a   different   lens   than   most   commonly   viewed,  be  it  feminist,  comedic  or  with  a  contempo-­ rary  twist.   Exhibition   curator   Daniel   Belasco   brought   this   exhibition   to   New   Paltz   because   he   said   it   would   be  

interesting  for   a   Hudson   Valley-­based   artist   to   gain   recognition  in  her  own  area.   %HLQJWKDWWKLVLVWKHÂżUVWWLPHWKHSURSVXVHGLQ Mary  and  Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  videos  will  be  on  display,  Belasco   said  the  exhibition  will  be  of  particular  interest  to  stu-­ dents  because  it  shows  the  artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  creative  process.   He   said   although   The   Dorsky   has   shown   many   multimedia  exhibitions  before,  this  one  might  be  a  dif-­ ferent  take  on  an  average  Dorsky  exhibition  and  will   EHVRPHWKLQJÂżOPDQGDUWVWXGHQWVZLOODSSUHFLDWH â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   museum   has   a   strong   program   of   showing   FRQWHPSRUDU\ DUW WKDWÂśV VLJQLÂżFDQW´ %HODVFR VDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   work   has   rich   content   that   relates   to   history   and  gender  studies,  literature  and  theater,  so  it  would   be  of  interest  to  a  wide  variety  of  students.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  as  much   an   intellectual   literary   experience   as   it   is   a   visually   aesthetic  experience.â&#x20AC;? The  exhibition  will  also  be  on  display  at  the  Uni-­ versity  at  Albany  Art  Museum  on  the  SUNY  Albany   campus  beginning  this  July.   Representatives  from  Albany  had  been  interested   in  Mary  and  Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  work  for  a  while  and  took  up  the   opportunity   to   exhibit   it   with   Belasco   as   the   curator   after  hearing  about  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  involvement  in  it.   Curator  and  Associate  Director  of  the  University   at   Albany   Art   Museum,   Corinna   Ripps,   interviewed   both  artists  about  their  work  and  said  she  loved  talk-­

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

PHOTOS  BY  MAXWELL  REIDE

ing  with   them   because   it   showed   her   how   immersed   they  are  in  their  work.  She  said  they  incorporate  their   family   into   their   videos   and   are   â&#x20AC;&#x153;real   role   models   to   students  and  curators  to  have  that  level  of  dedication   to  their  vision.â&#x20AC;? Because   of   the   different   nature   of   the   museum   space   at  Albany,   the   exhibition   will   have   a   different   feel   when   it   is   shown   on   the  Albany   campus,   Ripps   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   work   is   compelling   and   multi-­layered   and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  magical  no  matter  where  it  is  but  we  have  an   open  space,â&#x20AC;?  Ripps  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  almost  theatrical  when   you  come  into  the  space,  you  see  everything  at  once.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  like  a  stage  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  one  of  the  things  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be   working  on.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  kind  of  use  our  space  to  create  an   exciting  and  dramatic  backdrop  in  Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  videos.â&#x20AC;? Ripps   is   currently   working   on   compiling   a   cata-­ logue   about   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Working   Objects   and   Videos,â&#x20AC;?   which   will  include  her  interview  with  Mary  and  Patrick,  an   essay  by  Belasco  and  basic  information  on  the  nature   of  the  exhibition.  It  will  be  released  while  the  show  is   still  open  in  The  Dorsky.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   exhibition   brings   an   appreciation   of   his-­ tory  and  contemporary  art,â&#x20AC;?  Pasti  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  includes  a   heightened  sense  of  the  past  to  bring  awareness  to  the   future.   I   have   not   appreciated   Sophocles   until   I   saw   her  videos.â&#x20AC;?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Grammy-atically Correct

FLATS AND SHARPS OF A NIGHT IN MUSIC HISTORY Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  a  little  surprised  and  disappoint-­ ed   that   Janelle   Monaeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Electric   Ladyâ&#x20AC;?   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   receive   a   single   nomi-­ nation.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   complete,   phenomenal   album   that   deserved   so   many   acco-­ lades.  J-­Monae  was  cheated,  plain  and   simple. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Cat  Tacopina,  Editor-­in-­Chief  

After  Daft   Punk   won  Album  of  the  Year,   I  gave  Random   I  gave  Random  Access   Memories   Memories   a   listen   and   ended   up   really   enjoying  it.  However,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   still   Taylor   Swift   in   that   .gif   of   her   when   she   thought   Red   won   the   Grammy. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Robin   Weinstein,   Photo  Editor    

oracle.newpaltz.edu 6B

Breaking Boundaries

CONCERT SERIES SEEKS TO STRIKE A DIFFERENT CHORD By  Zameena  Mejia

Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

While  bars   and   basements   currently   set   the   scene   for   live  music  shows  in  New  Paltz,  Musicians  Sans  Frontières   seeks  to  break  these  boundaries  with  its  new  concert  series. Musicians   Sans   Frontières   (MSF),   a   play   on   the   world-­renown   Medicièns   Sans   Frontierès   (doctors   without  borders),  is  an  organization  that  aims  to  make   the   New   Paltz   music   scene   available   to   everyone   by   setting  up  all-­ages  venues  where  musicians  who  com-­ pose  original  music  can  play. Âł,WKLQN>06)@LVGHÂżQLWHO\DQDWWHPSWWRVWDUWDQHZ community  of  bands  both  in  and  outside  of  New  Paltz   that  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  to  worry  about  playing  at  a  bar  or  paying   heavy   fees   in   the   school,â&#x20AC;?  Andy   Lawson,   a   third-­year   sociology  major,  said.   Lawson  is  part  of  the  hardcore  rock  band  Cygnus,   which  will  kick  off  MSFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  monthly  concert  series  at  St.   Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church.   Other   musicians   performing   include   solo   song-­ writer   Jake   Harms,   indie/punk   rock   band   DIA   from   Carmel,  N.Y.  and  the  melodic  post-­punk  band  Oswald   from  New  Paltz.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;MSF  plans  to  brand  New  Paltz  as  a  destination  for  bands   and  music  enthusiasts  from  across  the  country,â&#x20AC;?  Joseph  Ruoto-­ lo,  the  founder  and  coordinator  of  the  organization,  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   mission  of  MSF  is  to  meet  this  need  for  the  performers  and  the   arts  and  music  community  at  large.â&#x20AC;? Currently  pursuing  his  second  bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree  in  math,   Ruotolo  founded  Musicians  Sans  Frontières  as  a  way  to  pro-­ mote  new  avenues  of  music. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  been  playing  shows  in  the  New  Paltz  music  scene   for  years;Íž  the  venues  have  been  mostly  in  bars  where  the  audi-­ HQFHFDQEHGLIÂżFXOWWRHQJDJH´5XRWRORVDLGÂł7KLVLGHDIRUD concert  series  was  born  out  of  the  desire  to  have  a  space  where   musicians  who  compose  original  music  can  play  for  an  excited   audience.â&#x20AC;?     Max   Narotsky,   a   third-­year   secondary   education   major   with  a  concentration  in  social  studies,  not  only  performs  in  Os-­ wald  but  also  helped  form  Musicians  Sans  Frontières. Narotsky  said  MSF  is  both  a  great  way  to  meet  likeminded   musicians  from  the  Hudson  Valley  and  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;great  way  to  network   with  other  creative  people  in  positive  outlets.â&#x20AC;?   Narotskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   connection   with   MSF   includes   booking   and   advertising   for   the   organization   and  acting  as  the  liaison  between  MSF  and  the   student-­run  club,  The  New  Paltz  Music  Collec-­ tive.     Âł:H ÂżQG WKDW WKH FXUUHQW PXVLF VFHQH LQ New   Paltz   is   held   predominantly   at   houses   and   bars,  restricting  access  to  people  under  21  or  those   that  want  to  see  music  in  a  friendly  and  safe  envi-­ ronment,â&#x20AC;?  Narotsky  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  aim  is  to  create  a  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

PHOTO  BY  MAXWELL  REIDE

Macklemore  politics   aside,   I   love   the  song  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Same  Loveâ&#x20AC;?  and  I   thought  the  performance  was  heartfelt.  How-­ ever,  I  did  think  Madonna  looked  a  bit  out  of   place.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Suzy  Berkowitz,  A&E  Editor

Arts & Entertainment

Joseph  Ruotolo  stands  in  front  of  the  new  concert  venue,  St.  Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church.

non-­exclusive  concert  experience  in  a  town  oversaturated  with   bar  and  basement  shows  going  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;till  2  a.m.â&#x20AC;?   Musicians   Sans   Frontièresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   concert   series   will   begin   this   Friday,  Jan.  31  at  7  p.m.  at  St.  Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church  and  will  run  on   the  last  Friday  of  every  month.   The   upcoming   concert   will  be   sponsored  by   St.   Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church   and   Musicians   Sans   Frontières.  All   proceeds   beyond   production  costs  will  go  directly  toward  supporting  the  musi-­ cians.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

Springing Into The Spotlight

oracle.newpaltz.edu 7B

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: JAMIE PAGIRSKY

THEATER DEPARTMENT SETS THIS SEMESTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S STAGE YEAR: Fourth MAJOR: Sociology HOMETOWN: Belle Harbor, N.Y.

By  Hannah  Nesich   Asst.  Copy  Editor  |  Hnesich@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buried Childâ&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;On The Vergeâ&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eurydiceâ&#x20AC;? WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY?

The  Theater   Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mainstage   production   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buried   Child,â&#x20AC;?   written   by   Sam  Shepard,  is  not  about  the  grueling  climb   toward   achieving   the   American   Dream,   rather  the  devastating  plummet  of  those  who   once  lived  it  but  lost  their  grasp. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  plot  centers  around  a  family  who   emphasizes  this  theme  [of  deterioration]  by   consisting  of  those  who  were  once  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;classical-­ ly  American,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  but  who,  after  a  family  scandal   and  tragedy,  completely  fell  apart  mentally,â&#x20AC;?   Julia  Fell,  the  productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  costume  design-­ er,  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Buried  Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  is  a  play  about  the   destruction   and   corruption   of   the  American   Dream.â&#x20AC;? Fell,   a   fourth-­year   theater   major   with   a   concentration   in   costume   design,   said   her     most   challenging   costume   design   will   be  for  a  character  who  has  a  false  leg  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   removed  during  the  show. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Since   the   actor   cast   in   this   role   has   ERWK OHJV ÂżJXULQJ RXW D ZD\ WR PDNH KLP ORRNOLNHDQDPSXWHHLVJRLQJWREHLQWHUHVW ing.â&#x20AC;? For  Sara  Lyons,  a  third-­year  theater  and   history  double-­major  and  the  showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drama-­ turg,  the  production  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  biggest  obstacles   will   be   adhering   to   a   strict   schedule   and   maintaining   a   healthy   mindset,   despite   the   PHQWDO VWUHVV WKDW FRPHV IURP ZRUNLQJ RQ VXFKDKHDUWEUHDNLQJO\WUDJLFSOD\ Lyons  said  she  researches  many  aspects   of  the  production,  offers  advice  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  new   pair  of  eyesâ&#x20AC;?  to  certain  scenes  and  discusses   KHUÂżQGLQJVZLWKGLUHFWRUDQG$VVRFLDWH3UR IHVVRU)UDQN7UH]]DUHJXODUO\WRKHOSGHYHORS the  trajectory  and  vision  of  the  production. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  of  [us]  are  bearing  a  heavy  psycho-­ logical  load,â&#x20AC;?  Lyons  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  all  been   developing  ways  to  ensure  that  the  rehearsal   spaces  stay  safe  spaces,  and  each  of  us  is  de-­ YHORSLQJ RXU RZQ ZD\ RI VKDNLQJ WKH SOD\ off  our  shoulders  as  we  leave  meetings  and   research  sessions.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buried  Childâ&#x20AC;?  will  run  from  Thursday,   )HEWKURXJK6XQGD\0DUFKLQ3DUNHU Theatre.  

Those  whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   bitten   by   the   travel   bug   will   be   able   to   live   vicari-­ ously  through  the  adventurous,  wayfar-­ ing   characters   of   the   Theater   Depart-­ mentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mainstage  production  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;On  the   Verge.â&#x20AC;?   Written   by   Eric   Overmyer,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;On   The  Vergeâ&#x20AC;?  is  about  three  women  from   1888  who  set  off  on  a  journey  to  explore   WKHODVWXQNQRZQSDUWVRIWKHZRUOGDF FRUGLQJWRGLUHFWRUDQG$VVLVWDQW3URIHV sor  Connie  Rotunda.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   [the   women]   travel   further,   they   realize   that   they   are   not   only   traveling   through   space,   but   they   are   also   traveling   through   time,â&#x20AC;?   Rotunda   VDLGÂł7KHLUMRXUQH\LVWDNLQJWKHPLQWR the  future.  Terra  Incognita.â&#x20AC;? Besides  the  three  women,  there  are   eight  additional  characters,  who  are  all   portrayed  by  one  diverse,  if  not  exhaust-­ ed,  actor.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   man   plays   eight   different   roles   ranging   from   a   German   dirigible   pilot   to   a   smooth   nightclub   crooner,â&#x20AC;?   Rotunda  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  requires  an  actor  with   a  good  ear  who  has  a  comedic  sensibil-­ ity   who   can   also   ground   themselves   in   reality  and  truth.â&#x20AC;?     $VVLVWDQW3URIHVVRUDQGWKHSURGXF tionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  costume  designer,  Andrea  Varga,   said   the   show   has   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;wonderful   sense   and  humor  and  explores  character,  lan-­ guage  and  movement  in  really  delight-­ ful  ways.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;On   the  Vergeâ&#x20AC;?   will   be   performed   LQ 3DUNHU 7KHDWUH ZKLFK 9DUJD VDLG LV an  advantage  because  designers  are  able   to  indulge  in  small  details  the  audience   wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   otherwise   see   in   any     of   the   larger  campus  venues.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  has  period  clothing  that  has  been   a  lot  of  fun  to  research  and  will  be  excit-­ ing  to  recreate  for  the  stage,â&#x20AC;?  Varga  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;On   The   Vergeâ&#x20AC;?   will   run   from   Thursday,   April   24   through   Sunday,   May  5.  

*UHHNWUDJHG\ZLOOEHIURQWDQGFHQWHU GXULQJWKLVVHPHVWHUÂśVEODFNER[SURGXFWLRQ of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eurydice,â&#x20AC;?   bringing   the   dramatic   love   story  of  Orpheus  and  his  wife  to  the  stage  of   3DUNHU7KHDWUH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eurydice,â&#x20AC;?   written   by   Sarah   Ruhl,   LV D ORRVH UHWHOOLQJ RI WKH *UHHN VWRU\ RI Orpheus     that   focuses   on   the   viewpoint   of   his  wife  and  her  trip  to  the  underworld  im-­ mediately  after  their  wedding,  according  to   the   productionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   costume   designer   Jamie   Kracht. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  the  underworld,  she  encounters  her   father  and  ultimately  has  to  choose  between   staying  in  the  land  of  the  dead  with  him  or   returning  to  the  mortal  world  with  her  hus-­ band,â&#x20AC;?   Kracht,   a   fourth-­year   theater   major   with  a  performance  concentration,  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eurydiceâ&#x20AC;?   features   a   prominent   fe-­ male   lead   and   a   strong   ensemble,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;some-­ thing   that   the   Theater   Department   is   al-­ ZD\VORRNLQJIRULQWKHLUVHDVRQVHOHFWLRQ´ according   to   director   Adam   Harrison,   a   fourth-­year  theater  major  with  a  concentra-­ tion  in  performance  and  directing. Harrison  said  there  will  also  be  some   surprises   for   the   audience,   including   some   imaginative  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;dauntingâ&#x20AC;?  stage  directions   that  he  said  will  provide  an  interesting  chal-­ lenge  for  the  production  team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  of  these  technical  elements,  such   as   Eurydice   entering   the   underworld   in   a   raining  elevator...either  happen  onstage,  or   will  be  represented  onstage  by  some  action   or  device  that  gives  the  same  message  to  the   audience,â&#x20AC;?  Harrison  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finding  creative   and  clever  solutions  to  these  technical  needs   is  not  only  the  most  challenging  component   in  a  student  production,  but  the  most  fun  as   well.â&#x20AC;? For   Harrison,   he   hopes   the   audience   can  appreciate  the  playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  timeless  and  sim-­ ple  message,  and  that  they  leave  the  theater   feeling   connected   to   the   story   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   just   been  told. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eurydiceâ&#x20AC;?  will  run  from  Friday,  April   5  through  Sunday,  April  6.  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  had   the   most   experience   with   drums   and  playing  is  a  very  physical,  tangible  re-­ lease.  Guitar  also  allows  greater  room  for   creativity  and  authenticity. WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? I  was  in  a  band  called  Year  on  a  Mountain,   but   it   dissolved   after   a   while.   I   currently   drum  for  Mamahuhu,  the  punk-­y,  abrasive   offspring  of  YOAM. WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? Brand   New,   Thrice   and   Title   Fight.   Their   drummers  have  a  common  theme  of  know-­ ing  what  to  play  and  when. WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? Jawbreaker,   Yo   La   Tengo,   Dinosaur   Jr.,   Sonic  Youth,  Pavement,  Yuck,  Title  Fight,   Ovlov,  Basement,  Speedy  Ortiz   and  Pity  Sex. WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? Ideally,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  love  to  drum  for  a  touring  band.   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   travel   enough   and   playing   music   is  easily  one  of  my  biggest  passions,   so  to   combine  the  two  would  be  truly  righteous. ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? Find   others   who   share   the   same   adoration   and   appreciation   for   music   that   you   do   and   jam  your  hearts  out. CHECK  OUT   JAMIE  PAGIRSKY

PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE  WITH   ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                         W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Suzy  Berkowitz  at  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  


8B

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THE DEEP  END

The New Paltz Oracle

THIS WEEK IN

THE DEEP END PAIGE MUNROE

Major: Metals Year: Fourth

“The intimate bond that occurs between people and personal objects fascinates me as a user and maker. I am interested in emphasizing this bond through the creation of functional medicine containers that act in service of habitual actions. I use geometric patterns to signify rhythm, repetition and visually represent the ritual of self-medicating. In collaboration with individuals, I personalize the containers to reflect the life and character of the user. I pursue the craft tradition of creating objects of utility that serve a need while beautifying that need’s execution in attempts to better understand habituation.”

Photos courtesy of Paige Monroe | Captions by Maxwell Reide


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL Â

  9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

RESULTS  ON   REPEAT

CARTOON  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN  

Days  before  the  start  of  the  spring  semester,  a  survey   was  sent  out  to  the  student  body  regarding  the  annual  Stu-­ dent  Association  Production  (SAP)  spring  concert.  The  sur-­ vey  asked  students  to  rank  seven  different  artists  based  on   how  desirable  they  were  as  the  concertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  headlining  act. The  choice  of  artists  has  been  met  with  criticism  by  the   student  body.  When  the  survey  came  out,  Facebook  feeds   ZHUHĂ&#x20AC;RRGHGZLWKVWXGHQWVFRPSODLQLQJDERXWWKHFKRLFHRI artists  being  similar  to  artist  selections  in  the  past,  as  well  as   complaints  about  how  unknown  the  artists  were.   We  at  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  believe  the  student  body   has   every   right   to   complain   about   the   choice   of   artists   picked  for  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  concert  and  that  the  current  system  of   artists  selection  needs  a  complete  makeover.   In  the  past  couple  of  years,  SAP  has  picked  a  diverse   crop   of   artists   for   the   survey,   which   normally   comes   out   near   the   end   of   the   fall   semester.   However,   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   choice   of   artists   are   all   similar   enough   that   it   may   alien-­ ate  a  large  amount  of  the  student  body.  This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  choice   of  artists  all  have  similar  music  styles,  not  to  mention  that   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   similar   to   artists   that   have   been   selected   the   past   several  years.   This  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  to  say  these  artists  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  talented  or  unde-­ serving  of  the  money  that  comes  from  the  activity  fee  we  

pay  for  as  part  of  our  tuition;Íž  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  just  disappointed  that   there  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  more  of  a  selection  given. As   students   ourselves,   we   empathize   with   the   senti-­ ment  that  there  are  no  major  mainstream  artists  on  the  list.   Students  at  SUNY  schools  are  likely  to  have  friends  at  other   SUNYs,  and  are  probably  familiar  with  the  artists  that  visit   their  friendsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  schools.  While  we  obviously  cannot  compete   with  the  size  and  budget  of  schools  like  Binghamton,  Buf-­ falo  and  Albany,  we  can  be  competitive  with  schools  like   SUNY  Oneonta,  SUNY  Oswego  and  SUNY  Fredonia.   Oswego   alone   has   had   acts   such   as   The   Goo   Goo   Dolls,  Sam  Adams  and  Lupe  Fiasco  as  headliners.  Fredonia   has  also  had  Fiasco,  along  with  Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Mannequin  within   WKHSDVWIHZ\HDUV:HÂżQGLWGLIÂżFXOWWREHOLHYHWKDWWKHVH schools   have   that   much   larger   of   a   budget   than   ours   that   they  are  able  to  afford  larger  and  different  types  of  artists   as  opposed  to  us.   We  always  encourage  students  to  get  involved  if  they   wish  to  see  change,  but  that  is  much  easier  said  than  done.   And   when   it   comes   to   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   SAP   process   alone,   we   believe  the  committee  could  have  done  much  more  to  pick   a   more   diverse   section   of   artists.   In   our   coverage   of   Stu-­ dent  Senate  this  past  year,  we  noticed  that  discussion  of  the   spring  concert  was  mum  in  compared  to  years  recent.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

troubled  by   the   possibility   that   the   desire   was   not   a   high   priority  of  SAPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.   We  believe  that  the  current  survey  format  needs  a  com-­ SOHWH RYHUKDXO DQG KDV WR EH Âż[HG )RU WRR ORQJ QRZ ZH have  seen  nothing  but  discontent  and  animosity  as  products   of  the  survey.  There  needs  to  be  increased  dialogue  before   WKHÂżQDOVXUYH\FRPHVRXWDQG6$3QHHGVWREHPRUHRSHQ DERXWWKHVHOHFWLRQVIRUWKHÂżQDOVXUYH\ :H DUH FRQÂżGHQW LQ WKH DELOLW\ RI 6$3 WR SURGXFH D concert  students  will  be  enthusiastic  about,  and  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  sure   WKHÂżQDOFKRLFHPDGHZLOOEHFRQVLGHUDWHRIZKDWVWXGHQWV hope  to  see.  

Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the  majority   of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,  op-­eds   and  letters,  excluding  editorials,  are  solely   those  of  the  writers  and  do  not  necessarily   represent  the  views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,   its  staff  members,  the  campus  and  university   or  the  Town  or  Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The New  Paltz  Oracle

LETTERS A Call   to  Action:   Building   Student   Power  at  SUNY  New  Paltz Greetings   brothers,   sister   and   com-­ rades, Last  year,  as  the  Student  Association   vice  president  of  academic  affairs,  I  sub-­ mitted  two  Op-­Eds  [1]  [2]  which  aimed   to  highlight  the  fact  that  the  Black  Stu-­ dent  population  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  has   been   steadily   declining   for   more   than   ten   years,   resulting   in   a   racial   diversity   crisis.   I   hope   to   now   provide   some   en-­ couraging  words  to  push  the  struggle  for   student  power  forward.   To   student   senators:   Congratula-­ tions  to  you  all  for  joining  the  New  Paltz   Student  Association;;  now  it’s  time  to  do   work.  Student  government  is  not  some-­ thing  you  simply  put  on  your  résumé.  It   is  your  opportunity  to  exercise  your  col-­ lective  power  as  students  to  create  social   change   for   the   advancement   of   society   in   general   and   historically   underrepre-­ sented  people  in  particular. To  all  students:  What  are  you  doing   about  the  decisions  made  and  not  made   by   the   New   Paltz   administration   which   possess  your  tuition  money?  Does  your   college   administration   represent   you?   What   are   you   doing   about   the   fact   that   the   Black   student   population   at   New   Paltz  has  been  decreasing  for  more  than   ten  years  and  about  racist  vandalism  on   campus?  What   are   you   doing   about   the   fact  that  students  and  faculty  now  have  a   JDJRUGHUIRU¿YH\HDUVDQGFDQQRWPRYH to  transform  the  Women’s,  Gender,  and   Sexuality   Studies   Program   into   a   full   department?   What   are   you   doing   about   Dear  Editor: Hello   and   welcome   back   to   campus!   We  would  like  to  take  a  moment  to  update   you   on   events   and   activities   happening   at   NYPIRG.  For  those  of  you  may  be  unfamil-­ iar  with  us,  NYPIRG,  the  New  York  Public   Interest  Research  Group,  is  the  state’s  larg-­ est  and  most  effective  student-­directed  orga-­ nization  on  20  college  campuses  across  the   state.   For   the   past   40   years,   NYPIRG   has   built  student  power  through  grassroots  orga-­ nizing   and   advocacy,   public   education   and   offering  students  countless  opportunities  to   become   civically   engaged   members   of   the   campus,  off-­campus  and  in  the  community   to   develop   the   skills   needed   to   become   ef-­ fective   student   activists.   As   the   returning   Project  Coordinator  for  SUNY  New  Paltz’s   chapter   of   NYPIRG,   I   urge   every   member   of  the  campus  community  to  help  build  stu-­

queerphobic vandalism   on   campus?   What   are   you   doing   about   the   fact   that   adjunct  professors  get  paid  less  than  the   poverty   line   to   teach   you   classes?   Are   you  defending  your  public  higher  educa-­ tion,  or  are  you  allowing  the  administra-­ tion  to  continue  business  and  status  quo   as  usual?  What  are  you  doing  to  develop   true  political  solidarity  and  unity  among   students  to  build  STUDENT  POWER? For  four  years  at  New  Paltz,  I  heard   people   constantly   complain   about   the   lack  of  unity  on  campus.  What  we  must   realize  is  that  unity  is  achieved  not  only   socially,   but   also   politically.   We   need   the   capacity   as   students   and   alumni   to   make   demands   that   will   create   real   so-­ cial   change.   We   can   not   just   sit   on   our   hands  and  wait  for  the  administration  to   do  it  for  us.  And  I’m  not  referring  to  pet-­ ty  demands  like  more  color  printing.  I’m   talking  about  real  demands  that  are  tied   to   a   broader   struggle   for   self-­determi-­ nation,  like  those  happening  in  colleges   throughout  the  United  Kingdom,  the  City   University   of   New   York,   Puerto   Rico,   Mexico,  Quebec,  Chile,  and  Egypt.  I’m   talking   about   defending   those   poor   and   working  class  people,  women,  people  of   color,  and  LGBTQ  people  who  are  mar-­ ginalized  at  New  Paltz  and  who  are  op-­ pressed  by  a  society  that  doesn’t  want  us   here.  Spoiled  students,  do  not  be  blinded   by  your  privilege.  You  are  not  to  watch   on  the  sidelines  as  you  wait  for  the  next   woman   to   get   raped,   or   the   next   young   Black  male  to  be  beaten  by  police,  or  the   next  LGBTQ  person  to  be  called  a  fag-­ got.   dent   power   by   attending   our   Higher   Edu-­ cation  Day  of  Action.  On  Wednesday,  Feb.   26,  NYPIRG  will  be  bringing  students  from   across  that  state  to  head  to  our  state  capitol   to   meet   with   lawmakers   and   demand   that   they  invest  in  access  to  higher  education.   To  learn  more  about  Higher  Education   Action  Day  and  all  of  our  other  campaigns   including   Environmental   Protection,   Hun-­ ger   and   Homelessness   Outreach,   and   Con-­ sumer   Protection,   stop   by   our   Student  Ac-­ tion  Meeting:  Wednesday,  Feb.  19,  at  6  p.m.,   in  Student  Union  Building  401/405.   Have  a  great  semester! Eric  Wood NYPIRG  Project  Coordinator @nypirg.org SUB  426 X3085    

Students at   New   Paltz   need   to   re-­ alize   their   potential   as   a   collective,   as   a   community,   and   build   solidarity.   Programs,   events   and   parties   are   not   enough.   We   need   to   BUILD   political   power  that  gives  purpose  to  these  social   gatherings.  That  New  Paltz  is  considered   a  liberal  school  is  not  proof  of  progress,   only   the   illusion   of   it.   As   Malcolm   X   said,  “A  [person]  who  stands  for  nothing   will  fall  for  anything.”  So  where  do  you   stand?   If   student   senate   isn’t   working   for  you,  then  join  a  student  organization   on  campus,  or  create  your  own  political   organization,   and   pressure   both   student   government  and  the  administration  with   social  justice  demands  and  hold  them  ac-­ countable.   I  understand  the  desire  to  enjoy  the   frills  of  college,  but  we  need  to  balance   these   with   the   realities   of   our   lives.  As   Na’Im  Akbar   said   when   discussing   the   power  of  education  and  self-­knowledge,   “Each   generation   has   the   responsibility   of   maintaining   the   level   of   conscious-­ ness   attained   by   the   previous   genera-­ tions,   and   of   advancing   the   community   to  even  higher  levels  by  the  development   of  their  own  consciousness  [3].”  Realize   that   there   were   people   who   risked   and   gave  up  their  LIVES  for  you  to  be  in  col-­ lege,  people  who  had  to  think  about  very   similar   questions   I   ask   and   who   had   to   decide  if  they  wanted  to  live  in  a  world   that  continued  to  oppress  them  and  their   communities.  They  had  to  STRUGGLE   for   you   to   see   that   acceptance   letter   in   the   mail.   So,   how   will   you   make   a   dif-­ ference  and  continue  the  legacy  that  was  

built at  New  Paltz  by  warriors  who  sac-­ UL¿FHG WKHLU WLPH DQG HQHUJ\ IRU IXWXUH students   like   you   all   to   receive   public   education?   What   legacy   will   you   leave   behind?   What   contribution   will   you   make   to   the   New   Paltz   campus   and   in   this  world? We   need   to   remember   our   ances-­ tors,   especially   Warrior   Dr.   Margaret   Wade-­Lewis.   New   Paltz   Alumni   are   watching   you   all,   and   we   expect   much   of  you.  When  we  return  to  visit,  we  ex-­ pect  students  and  faculty  to  continue  this   legacy   of   struggle   passed   down   to   us   by   those   who   came   before   us.   We   will   not   succeed   as   individuals.  We   will   not   make  a  difference  if  we  only  look  out  for   ourselves.   Victory   is   achieved   through   collective   struggle.   Education   is   a   right   not   a   privilege.  ALL   POWER  TO  THE   PEOPLE!   Much   love   to   you   all.   Good   luck  this  semester.  Peace. [1]   Espinosa,   Jonathan.   “Op-­Ed:   A   CALL   TO   SUNY   NEW   PALTZ:   TO-­ WARD   A   STRATEGIC   ENVIRON-­ MENT   OF   RACIAL   EQUITY.”   New   Paltz  Oracle.  May  2,  2013. <   http://oracle.newpaltz.edu/op-­ed-­ jonathan-­espinosa/> [2]   Espinosa,   Jonathan.   “Op-­Ed:   A   CALL   TO   SUNY   NEW   PALTZ:   SO-­ LUTIONS   TOWARDS  A   STRATEGIC   ENVIRONMENT   OF   RACIAL   EQUI-­ TY.”  New  Paltz  Oracle.  May  9,  2013. <   http://oracle.newpaltz.edu/op-­ed-­ jonathan-­espinosa-­2/> [3]  Akbar,  Na’Im.  1998.  Know  Thy-­ self.  Tallahassee:  Mind  Productions  and   Associates,  Inc.  p.  1.

Do you want to send a letter to the editor? Send it to Oracle@ hawkmail.newpaltz.edu!

Thursday, January  30,  2014


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS

 11

oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volleyball  team  defeated  pulled  out  a  win  against  UVC  rival  Vassar  College  Jan.  29.                                                                      

By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Ctacopina92@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  SUNY  New  Paltz  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volley-­ ball  team  have  taken  off  this  season,  and   have  soared  to  a  5-­0  record  to  begin  their   2014  campaign.   The  team  started  off  the  season  with   a  Tournament  Title  at  the  Roadrunner  In-­ vitational,  with  a  4-­0  undefeated  record.   They   defeated   Brooklyn   College,   host   Ramapo   College   and   United   Volleyball   Conference   (UVC)   rival   No.   9   Stevens.   The   Hawks   maintained   a   perfect   12-­0   match  record  during  the  tournament.   The  Hawks  continued  their  undefeat-­ ed   streak   with   a   3-­2   come-­from-­behind   win   over   UVC   and   Hudson  Valley   rival   Vassar  College  on  Wednesday,  Jan.  29.   Though  the  season  is  still  young,  the   team   is   looking   to   maintain   and   expand   the  dominance  they  have  shown  the  past   several  seasons,  fourth-­year  Captain  Bri-­

an  Smith  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   one   of   the   most   talented   teams  in  the  nation,â&#x20AC;?  Smith  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   we  all  play  together,  when  everything  is   FOLFNLQJ DQG ZH ÂżUH IURP DOO F\OLQGHUV we  are  a  very  scary  team  to  play  against.â&#x20AC;? Training  for  the  season  began  on  Jan.   2,  with  the  team  coming  back  for  two-­a-­ day  practices.  Fourth-­year  Captain  Victor   Tuminelli   said   the   team   would   practice   once   in   the   morning,   and   then   practice   again  in  the  afternoon.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It's   really   intense,â&#x20AC;?   Tuminelli   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It's  a  lot  of  intense  conditioning  that  in-­ volves   sprints   and   doing   olympic   lifts.   <RX FDQ W IHHO \RXU DUPV DIWHU WKH ÂżUVW week.â&#x20AC;? The   team   comes   into   the   2014   sea-­ son  having  only  graduated  one  senior  in   2013.  Tuminelli  and  Smith  both  said  the   chemistry   and   experience   the   team   has   playing   with   one   another   gives   them   an  

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                                                                                                                                                PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN          

advantage  over  other  UVC  teams.   Preseason   Rankings   from   the   UVC   ranked  them  as  No.  2  in  the  15-­member   conference,  with  the  American  Volleyball   Coaches   Association   (AVCA)   putting   them  at  the  No.  4  spot.  Head  Coach  Radu   Petrus   said   the   rankings   give   the   team   FRQÂżGHQFHDQGSUHVVXUHWRSHUIRUPZHOO â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  team  is  very  good  and  does  de-­ serve  to  be  among  the  top  teams,â&#x20AC;?  Petrus   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  they  have  to  prove  it  and  live   up  to  the  preseason  expectations.â&#x20AC;? The  team  lost  in  the  2013  UVC  semi-­ ÂżQDOV WR 6WHYHQV ZKRP WKH\ DOUHDG\ defeated   3-­0   this   season.   Stevens,   along   with   UVC's   No.   1   Nazareth,   are   two   of   the  teams  Smith  said  the  team  was  look-­ ing  forward  to  playing  most  this  upcom-­ ing  season. Âł7KH\ UH GHÂżQLWHO\ GDWHV \RX FLUFOH on   the   calendar,â&#x20AC;?   Smith   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   we   want   to   take   it   one   game,   one   set   at   a  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

time.  There   are   four   graduating   seniors,   and   it   sounds   scary,   but   this   is   the   last   time  all  of  us  will  play  together  as  a  team,   so  we  have  to  enjoy  it.â&#x20AC;? Tuminelli   said   games   against   teams   like   Stevens   and   Nazareth   are   check   points   for   the   Hawks,   and   are   games   where  they  further  intensify  practices  by   scrimmaging  more  with  one  another.   He  also  said  while  the  UVC  playoffs   are   weeks   away,   he   and   his   teammates   are  already  thinking  of  the  possibility  of   winning  a  championship.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   key   idea   is   to   always   have   championships  in  the  back  of  your  mind,   but  to  never  look  too  far  into  the  future,â&#x20AC;?   Tuminelli   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   make   sure   we   al-­ ways  focus  in  practice.  If  we  look  too  far   ahead,  we  can  fall  apart  in  big  games  and   get  too  cocky.â&#x20AC;? 7KH WHDP V ÂżUVW KRPH JDPH ZLOO EH RQ )HE  DJDLQVW 6SULQJÂżHOG &ROOHJH


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SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Lady  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Spirits  Still  Soar   By  Andrew  Lief Managing  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After  losing   to   SUNY   Geneseo   and   The   College  at  Brockport  on  Jan.  24  and  Jan.  25,   the   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Basketball   team   now   has   an   overall  record  of  3-­14. Head  Coach  Jamie  Seward  said  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mindset  hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  changed  even  though  their  re-­ cord  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  what  they  expected  it  to  be  going   into  the  season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  just  been  trying  to  establish  a  com-­ petitive   culture   with   a   young   team   and   are   trying  to  get  better  everyday,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.     Despite   losing   10   of   their   last   11   games,   third-­year  Captain  Shannan  Walker  said  she   still  sees  that  the  team  has  a  positive  attitude   and   is   continuing   to   work   hard   in   order   to   improve.     Seward   said   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lone   win   during   that  stretch,  a  68-­62  win  over  SUNY  Oswe-­ go  on  Jan.  21  was  a  nice  result  for  the  team   to   show   them   that   their   hard   work   in   prac-­ tice  is  paying  off.    He  also  said  the  team  can   learn   from   that   game   and   build   on   it   going   forward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   the   type   of   program   who   is   happy  getting  a  win,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  any-­

thing,  this   has   made   us   appreciate   the   win-­ ning  that  much  more.â&#x20AC;?     Third-­year   guard   Ashley   Riefenhauser   said  Seward  has  been  positive  with  the  team   because  he  knows  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  young  and  inexperi-­ enced  team  that  has  lost  a  lot  of  players  from   last  season.     ,Q SUDFWLFH WKH WHDP LV VSHFLÂżFDOO\ ZRUN-­ ing  on  defense  by  trying  different  things  that   they  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  been  doing  in  the  past,  Walker   said.     Seward  said  a  bright  spot  of  the  team  has   been   second-­year   Captain   Goldie   Harrison   because  of  how  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  grown  as  a  player  and   leader.     He   said   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   starting   to   hold   her   teammates   more   accountable   and   starting   demand  more  out  of  them. He   also   said   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   been   impressed   with  the  productivity  the  team  has  received   IURP ÂżUVW\HDU IRUZDUG &RXUWQH\ ,UE\ DQG ÂżUVW\HDUJXDUGDQGIRUZDUG.LW6PDOO+H is  proud  of  Irbyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  tremendous  progress  from   the   beginning   of   the   season   until   now   and   believes  that  Small  is  going  to  be  a  special   player  for  the  program  in  the  future.     Walker  said  she  hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  been  playing  up  to   her  potential.    She  thinks  in  order  to  elevate   her   game,   she   has   to   become   more   aggres-­

sive  by   trying   to   get   to   the   basket   and   free   throw   line   more   often.     She   also   said   she   wants  to  become  a  better  leader  on  the  court. Seward  said  would  like  to  see  Walker  play   consistently   like   she   did   in   the   win   against   Oswego,   where   she   scored   19   points   and   made  three  three-­pointers.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   would   like   to   see   her   get   to   a   point   ZKHUH VKHÂśV PRUH FRQÂżGHQW DQG SOD\LQJ more  to  the  level  that  we  really  believe  she   can  be,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.     With   eight   games   left   in   the   regular   sea-­ son,  Riefenhauser  said  she  wants  the  team  to   keep  competing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   great   about   our   team   is   that   re-­ gardless  if  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  winning  or  losing  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  do-­ ing  this  together,â&#x20AC;&#x153;  Riefenhauser  said. Seward  said  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  main  goal  for  the   remainder  of  the  season  is  to  keep  working   hard  and  develop  a  high  level  of  competive-­ ness.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Until   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   mathematically   eliminated   ZHÂśUHJRLQJWRFRQWLQXHWRÂżJKWDQGEHOLHYH that  we  have  a  shot  to  get  better  and  get  in   that  tournament,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.     The   Lady   Hawks   will   hit   the   road   this   weekend  as  they  play  at  SUNY  Potsdam  on   Jan.  31  and  at  SUNY  Plattsburgh  on  Feb.  1.    

                                     PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN                                                                                                                        

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  Aims  to  Bounce  Back By  Abbott  Brant

Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  is  look-­ ing   to   bounce   back   from   a   three   game   home  court  losing-­streak  last  week.   The  6-­11  Hawks  (3-­7  in  conference   play)   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   keep   a   lead   Jan.   21,   as   SUNY   Oswego   scored   11   consecutive   SRLQWVWRHQGWKHÂżUVWKDOIEHIRUH continuing   their   momentum   into   the   second   half   and   defeating   the   Hawks   64-­52.   The   team   fell   to   the   same   fate   against   SUNY   Geneseo   on   Jan.   24,   as   WKH %OXH .QLJKWV ZHQW RQ D  UXQ with  7:57  left  in  the  contest  to  force  the   game  into  overtime,  ultimately  winning   92-­82.  The  next  day  the  Hawks  suffered   from  an  array  of  turnovers  in  the  second   half,  allowing  SUNY  Brockport  to  capi-­ talize  and  turn  the  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  43-­36  lead  at   the  half  into  a  78-­69  win  for  the  Golden   Eagles.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  team  was  the  polar  op-­ posite  in  the  fact  that  we  played  well  at   home   and   we   started   games   out   slow   DQGÂżQLVKHGVWURQJ´+HDG&RDFK0LNH

Renjiak  said,   referring   to   this   seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   1-­8  home  record  and  tough  time  closing   out  teams  in  the  second  half.  During  the   2012-­13   season,   the   Hawks   boasted   a   7-­5   home   record,   with   nine   of   their   11   wins  on  the  season  aided  by  a  halftime   lead.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   could   be   a   matter   of   youth   be-­ ing   that   we   only   have   two   seniors,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   more   of   a   mental   thing,â&#x20AC;?   graduate   student   Captain   Nick   Taldi   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  how  to  play  with  a  lead  and   not  force  the  issue  when  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  winning.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  frustrating,  but  unfortunately  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   learning  the  hard  way.â&#x20AC;?   Rejniak  agreed,  and  said  the  answer   the  team  is  looking  for  is  not  a  physical   one,  but  a  mental  one  aimed  to  execute   certain  crunch  time  situations  in  games. The  Hawks  have  also  been  suffering   from   the   absence   of   key   players   since   their   loss   against   SUNY   Plattsburgh   -DQÂąDQLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHWKDWXQGHQLDEO\LV taking  its  toll  on  the  team,  Rejniak  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   losses   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   you   can   get   over   those  because  as  a  player  you  deal  with   those.   But   when   you   lose   a   teammate,  

two  teammates,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   more   demoralizing   sometimes   than   what   you   anticipate,â&#x20AC;?   Rejniak   said   of   losing   third-­year   for-­ ward   and   guard   R.J.   Rosa   as   well   as   ÂżUVW\HDUJXDUG.HZDQ%HHEHWRDKDQG LQMXU\VXVWDLQHGGXULQJWKHÂżUVWDJDLQVW the  Cardinals.   With  Rosaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  9.4  point  average  with   a   career   high   of   20   against   both   Ham-­ ilton   College   and   Oneonta,   along   with   Beebeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   83.3   percent   from   the   char-­ LW\VWULSHWKHGHÂżFLHQF\RIERWKRQWKH FRXUWLVIHOWVHFRQG\HDUJXDUG.HHJDQ Donovan  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;R.J.   was   a   starter   and   did   a   lot   for   us,â&#x20AC;?   Donovan   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not   only   from   a   scoring   aspect   but   just   as   an   overall   presence,   he   brought   a   lot   of   energy.   +H ZDV ORQJ DQG DWKOHWLF .HZDQ ZDV starting  to  get  a  lot  more  burn  and  really   VWDUWLQJ WR ÂżQG KLV UROH:KHQHYHU \RX lose  players  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  blow  to  the  team.â&#x20AC;? But   Rejniak   and   the   players   alike   said   they   are   not   discouraged   as   they   look  toward  the  rest  of  the  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  know  exactly  what  they  have   to   do,â&#x20AC;?   Rejniak   said.   Learning   to   keep  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

constant  pressure  on  their  opponents,  he   said,  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;turning  the  screw,  rather  than   just  relinquish  that  graspâ&#x20AC;?  like  they  have   done  in  many  games  this  season,  will  be   the  key  to  success.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   turn   this   around   and   go   on   a   run,â&#x20AC;?   Taldi   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   whatever   bizarre   reason   we   per-­ form   better   on   the   road   than   we   do   on   our   home   court,   so   maybe   these   next   three   road   games   are   a   blessing   in   dis-­ guise.  Basketball  is  a  game  of  runs  and   streaks,  hopefully  we  see  some  positives   this  week.â&#x20AC;? An  upcoming  streak  is  necessary  to   the  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  SUNYAC  playoff  hopes,  as   the  team  must  win  six  out  of  their  next   eight  games  in  order  to  secure  a  .500  re-­ cord  for  the  season  and  obtain  the  sixth   spot  in  the  tournament,  Donovan  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   have   high   hopes   and   full   inten-­ tions  of  making  the  playoffs,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   The   Hawks   will   begin   the   second   half   of   regular   season   play   on   Friday,   Jan.   31   against   Potsdam   before   taking   on   Plattsburgh   Saturday,   Feb.   1   and   SUNY  Cortland  Tuesday,  Feb.  4.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

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13   

Scoring  For  a  Charitable  Cause  

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The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  raised  money  for  the  Wounded  Warrior  Project  during  their  game  againt  Brockport.

 By  Melissa  Kramer  Copy  Editor  |  kramerm2@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and   Women's   Basketball   teams   hosted   a   duo   of   philanthropic   games   last  weekend  in  support  of  both  the  Ameri-­ can   Cancer   Society   and   the  Wounded  War-­ riors  Project. The   Women's   Basketball   team   played   host  to  SUNY  Geneseo  in  their  annual  Think   Pink  game  on  Jan.  24.  Though  defeated  62-­ 41   by   the   Lady   Knights,   the   team   raised   awareness   for   breast   cancer   research   and   all   revenue   from   ticket   sales   was   donated   to  the  American  Cancer  Society.  Fans  in  at-­ tendance  also  had  the  opportunity  to  donate   toward  the  cause.  The  team  wore  pink  tops   during  the  pregame  shoot-­around  in  honor  of   the  event. 7KLVJDPHKDGVLJQLÂżFDQWDQGHPRWLRQ-­ al  meaning  for  Head  Coach  Jamie  Seward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   everyone   has   been   affected   by   this   terrible   disease,â&#x20AC;?   Seward   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   mother's   best   friend   who   was   basically   my   other  mother  growing  up  was  a  breast  cancer   survivor.   Everybody   has   someone   that   has   been   affected   by   cancer   so   it   hits   home   on  

an  individual  level.  Any  time  where  you  can   put  yourself  in  a  position  where  you  can  help   a   very   worthy   cause   and   potentially   raise   VRPHPRQH\WRJHWULGRIWKLVRUÂżQGDFXUH or  something  to  alleviate  this  disease,  you're   doing  something  good.â&#x20AC;? Seward   said   Think   Pink   games   origi-­ nated  when  North  Carolina  State's  Women's   Basketball   Head   Coach,   Kay  Yow,   was   di-­ agnosed   with   breast   cancer   and   have   been   relevant   in   the   WBCA   for   a   long   time.   He   said  although  the  Lady  Hawks  did  not  have   WKHDELOLW\WRÂżOORXWDVHDWDUHQDZLWK so  many  colleges  holding  events  for  the  so-­ ciety,  the  team  just  wanted  to  do  their  small   part  to  bring  an  end  to  this  disease. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   personally   felt   good   playing   in   the   7KLQN 3LQN JDPH´ ÂżUVW\HDU FHQWHU &RXUW-­ ney  Irby  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  had  a  strong  start  which   was  due  to  preparing  for  the  game.  But  with   the   lack   of   urgency   and   intensity   we   were   unable  to  get  the  win.â&#x20AC;? During   the   game   second-­year   guard   Christine   Rivera   led   the   Hawks   with   11   points,   matching   her   season-­   and   career-­ high.   First-­year   forward   Kit   Small   had   her  

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IRXUWK VWUDLJKW JDPH LQ GRXEOH ÂżJXUHV ZLWK 10  points.  Irby  and  third-­year  Captain  Shan-­ nan  Walker  each  had  six  rebounds. On  the  other  side  of  the  charitable  week-­ end,   the   Men's   team   played   host   to   No.   23   SUNY   Brockport   Jan.   25   in   support   of   the   Wounded  Warrior  Project  and  were  defeated   LQDÂżQDOVFRUHRI6DWXUGD\ VFRQWHVW ZDVWKHSURJUDP VÂżUVWHYHU:RXQGHG:DU-­ rior  Project  game,  and  all  revenue  from  tick-­ ets   sold   were   donated   to   the   organization,   which  aims  to  meet  the  needs  of  injured  ser-­ vuce  nenbers,  Fans  in  attendance  had  the  op-­ portunity  to  donate  toward  the  cause  as  well.   7KH WHDP ZRUH FDPRXĂ&#x20AC;DJH WRSV GXULQJ WKH pregame  shootaround  to  celebrate  the  event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  involvement  with  the  organization   started   with   a   partnership   that   we   started   last  year  with  athletic  director  Stuart  Robin-­ son,â&#x20AC;?  Head  Coach  Mike  Rejniak  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Wounded  Warrior  Project  is  an  organization   that  has  really  gained  steam  and  we  wanted   to   get   involved.   Especially   during   the   past   few   years,   it   has   been   sponsored   by   all   of   these   kinds   of   races   and   fundraisers.   With   all  the  happenings  going  on  in  the  world,  we  

Thursday,  January  30,  2014

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                            PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN            

need  help  now  for  veterans  now  more  than   ever.â&#x20AC;? Rejniak   said   the   athletic   department   aims   to   hold   a   Wounded   Warrior   Project   game  once  a  season,  with  Men's  Soccer  hav-­ ing  held  one  in  the  fall  and  the  baseball  team   to  host  one  in  the  spring.  The  athletic  depart-­ ment   also   holds   a   sports   camp   during   the   summer  for  veterans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It's  a  great  opportunity  for  my  players,â&#x20AC;?   Rejniak  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every  game  matters,  but  from   a  different  angle,  this  one  mattered  more.â&#x20AC;? During   the   game   third-­year   Captain   Taylor   Sowah   led   the   team   in   scoring   with   SRLQWVVHYHQUHERXQGVWKUHHDVVLVWVDQG three  steals.  Second-­year  guard  Zach  Cone-­ Douglas  scored  a  career  high  11  points,  all  in   DFDUHHUKLJKRIPLQXWHVFRPLQJRIIWKH bench. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having   the   opportunity   to   play   in   the   :RXQGHG :DUULRU 3URMHFW JDPH ZDV GHÂż-­ nitely  really  cool,â&#x20AC;?  Cone-­Douglas  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   service  men  and  women  do  and  go  through   so  much  so  we  can  maintain  how  we  live  to-­ day.  I  believe  it  is  important  to  show  grati-­ tude  to  these  brave  service  members.â&#x20AC;?


SPORTS

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The  Sochi  Olympics  are  just  a  week   away,  which  means  the  NHL  is  close  to   commencing  its  two  week  hiatus.   I  personally  love  the  olympics,  and  I   especially   love   Olympic   hockey   (and   ÂżJXUHVNDWLQJWRREXWWKLVLVDKRFNH\ column  so  I  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  go  into  my  love  for   ÂżJXUHVNDWLQJ KHUH  +RZHYHU 5DQJ HUVIDQVVKRXOGIHHODQRXQFHRIGLVDS SRLQWPHQWDERXWWKH1+/KLDWXV$IWHU DQLJKWPDUHEHJLQQLQJWKH5DQJHUVEH JDQWRSLFNXSVRPHPXFKQHHGHGPR PHQWXPDWWKHHQGRI'HFHPEHUZKLFK continued  to  swell  throughout  January.   ,WÂśV EHHQ DQ HYHQWIXO PRQWK IRU WKH 5DQJHUV VR OHWÂśV JR RYHU ZKDW ZHÂśYH missed  and  what  we  can  expect  of  the   5DQJHUVRQFHWKH1+/JHWVEDFNIURP the  Olympic  holiday.   January  Record 7KH5DQJHUVDUHVHWWRFORVHRII-DQX DU\ZLWKDQZLWKDJDPHOHIWWKLV upcoming  Friday  against  the  New  York   Islanders.   Even   more   impressive   than   the   January   record,   however,   is   how   strong   the   team   has   looked   in   a   large   PDMRULW\RIWKHLUJDPHV,WGLGQÂśWPDW ter   if   they   were   facing   the   St.   Louis   %OXHV RQHRIP\FKRLFHVIRUWKH6WDQ OH\ &XS WKLV \HDU  RU WKH 1HZ -HUVH\ Devils   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   they     looked   competitive   in  

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Rangers  in  Review HYHU\ VLQJOH JDPH WKH\ ZHUH LQ 3OD\ HUV OLNH %UDG 5LFKDUGV DQG 5LFN 1DVK DUHFRQWULEXWLQJLQZD\VZKLFKWKH\ÂśUH suppose   to,   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   making   all   of   the   difference  in  the  world.  If  they  keep  it   up,  making  the  playoffs  is  realistic.   Michael  Del  Zotto Last   week,   Michael   Del   Zotto   was   traded   to   the   Nashville   Predators   for   defenseman  Kevin  Klein.  News  of  Del   =RWWRÂśV GHSDUWXUH KDG EHHQ UXPRUHG for  months,  and  it  was  iffy  whether  or   QRWWKH5DQJHUVZRXOGHYHQEHDEOHWR trade  him.   ,ÂśYH DOZD\V EHHQ D 'HO =RWWR IDQ DQG VHHLQJ KLP JR LV VDG EXW HYHQ , can   acknowledge   that   his   growth   as   a   player  in  New  York  had  stunted  a  long   WLPH DJR +H FRXOG KDYH EHHQ D JRRG WKLUGOLQHFHQWHUEXWQRWHYHQ$ODLQ9L gneault  was  going  to  move  him  off  of   WKHEOXHOLQH,ZRXOGQÂśWEHVXUSULVHGLI 'HO=RWWREHFRPHVDPXFKEHWWHUSOD\ er  in  the  next  couple  of  years.  But  that   growth  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  going  to  happen  here. Henrik  Lundqvist 7KH .LQJ KDV FRPH EDFN WR UHFODLP his   throne   and   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   playing   the   way   he   normally   plays.   Sure,   the   soft   goal   KDV FRPH XS QRZ DQG DJDLQ LWÂśV EHHQ DOLWWOHPRUHIUHTXHQWWKDQZKDWZHH[

SHFW EXW ZH VKRXOG KDYH DOO NQRZQ D lackluster  season  was  going  to  come  up   DWVRPHSRLQW$QGLQWKHORQJUXQLWÂśV almost  a  good  thing.   7KHUH DUH VRPH VHULRXV SUREOHPV WKHWHDPQHHGVWRÂż[EXWWKH\KDYHQÂśW FRPH XS EHFDXVH /XQGTYLVW KDV WLUH OHVVO\EDLOHGWKHPRXWRIVRPDQ\GLUH situations.  But  now  that  we  know  what   happens  when  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  on  his  game,  we   have   a   more   clear   picture   on   what   we   QHHG WR GR WR EHFRPH WKH FRQWHQGHUV we  were  two  seasons  ago.     Who  Will  Get  Contracts? %RWK5\DQ&DOODKDQDQG'DQ*LUDUGL ZLOO EH 8)$V WKLV VXPPHU DQG ERWK ZLOO EH ORRNLQJ IRU VL]HDEOH VDODU\ LQ FUHDVHV (DUOLHU LQ WKH VHDVRQ WKH UX PRUV ZHUH Ă&#x20AC;\LQJ DERXW ZKHUH *LUDUGL would  end  up  and  that  it  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  going   WREH1HZ<RUN+RZHYHUUHFHQWWDONV KDYH VKRZQ WKDW LW ORRNV OLNH *HQHUDO 0DQDJHU *OHQ 6DWKHUÂśV REMHFWLYH LV WR NHHS KLP DURXQG:KLOH LWÂśV GHEDWDEOH ZKHWKHURUQRWKHÂśVJRLQJWRÂżWLQWR9L gneaultâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  system  perfectly,  there  should   EHDQHIIRUWPDGHWRPDNHVXUH*LUDUGL VWD\V LQ WKH %LJ$SSOH ,WÂśV EHFRPLQJ PRUH DQG PRUH GLIÂżFXOW WR ÂżQG WRS OLQHGHIHQVHPHQDQG*LUDUGLLVRQHRI them.  

$V&DOODKDQLVWKHWHDPÂśV&DSWDLQ, ÂżQGLWKDUGWREHOLHYHWKDWWKHUHZDVQÂśW DOUHDG\ PRQH\ SXW DVLGH WR UHVLJQ him.  The   team   is   currently   lacking   an   LGHQWLW\ DQG LI WKH\ÂśUH JRLQJ WR EXLOG RQHWKHEHVWEHWLVWRGRLWDURXQG&DO ODKDQ,NQRZWKHVKRWEORFNLQJDQGKLV RYHUDOOVW\OHRISOD\LVQÂśWWKHEHVWÂżWIRU 9LJQHDXOWÂśV V\VWHP EXW ZH GR QHHG LW DQG&DOODKDQLVWKHEHVWRIIHQVLYHVKRW EORFNHULQWKHOHDJXH,H[SHFWERWKZLOO EHDURXQGIRU\HDUVWRFRPH How  the  Rangers  should  look  com-­ ing  back.   ,WÂśV DOZD\V D  JDPEOH DV WR whether   or   not   a   player   is   going   to   FRPH EDFN EHWWHU RU ZRUVH DIWHU WKH Olympics.   There   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   an   exact   IRUPXOD WR ÂżJXUH RXW ZKR LV JRLQJ WR do  well  once  the  NHL  starts  again.  The   RO\PSLFV DUH LQWHQVH DQG EUXWDO DQG LWÂśV WKH EHVW KRFNH\ \RXÂśOO ZDWFK LQ your   entire   life.   On   the   one   hand,   the   stop  in  the  season  can  completely  ruin   the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  momentum.  On  the  other,  it   FRXOG ÂżUH SOD\HUV XS RQFH WKH VHDVRQ VWDUWV XS DJDLQ 7LPH ZLOO WHOO EXW WKH Olympics   is   the   perfect   time   to   regain   FRQÂżGHQFHDQGEXLOGXSH[FLWHPHQWIRU the  second  half  of  the  season.

Coaching  Change-­Up By  Abbott  Brant Sports  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

7KHVRIWEDOOWHDPKDVDQHZKHDGFRDFKLQ IRUPHU8QLYHUVLW\RI1RUWK&DUROLQD&KD SHO+LOOSOD\HU%ULWWDQ\5RELQVRQ 5RELQVRQZLOOUHSODFHIRUPHU+HDG&RDFK Tony  Ciccarello   who   exchanged   a   second   year  at  the  helm  of  the  Lady  Hawks  for  the   VDPHSRVLWLRQDW681<)UHGRQLDZHHNVEH fore  the  start  of  the  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach  Ciccarello  taking  another  position   FDXJKWHYHU\RQHRIIJXDUG´$WKOHWLF'LUHF WRU 6WXDUW 5RELQVRQ VDLG Âł1R RQH VDZ WKLV coming   or   knew   this   was   going   to   happen   GXULQJ WKH WLPH LW GLG 7KH DWKOHWLF GHSDUW PHQWPRYHGTXLFNO\VRWKHUHZDVQRGLVUXS tion  to  the  season.â&#x20AC;? 7KLUG\HDU&DSWDLQ0HJ%UHZHUVDLG&LF FDUHOOR V SRVLWLRQ DW 1HZ 3DOW] SXW KLP VL[ hours  from  his  family  and  he  wanted  to  take   DMREFORVHUWRKLVKRPH Âł,WJHWVGLVFRXUDJLQJEHFDXVHVRPHWHDPV get  lucky  and  have  a  coach  that's  like  a  third   parent  for  four  years  and  you  get  really  close  

DQGIRUPDUHODWLRQVKLS´%UHZHUVDLGUHIHU ULQJ WR ORVLQJ ERWK &LFFDUHOOR DQG IRUPHU +HDG &RDFK 'HQLVH 0DUFKHVH ZKR &LFFD rello  replaced,  within  the  last  three  seasons.   Âł,QVWHDGRIIRUPLQJDVWURQJHUERQGZHKDYH a  trial  every  year.  We  just  think  it's  hard  to   play  up  to  your  potential  when  you  cant  say   'ok  we're  going  to  pick  up  where  we  left  off'   EHFDXVHZH UHDOZD\VSLFNLQJXSVRPHZKHUH new.â&#x20AC;? %XW 6WXDUW 5RELQVRQ VDLG KH LV FRQÂżGHQW 5RELQVRQLVWKHULJKWÂżWIRUWKHSURJUDP :HPDGHSKRQHFDOOVDURXQGWKHVRIWEDOO FRPPXQLW\DQGWKDWEURXJKW%ULWWDQ\WRWKH VXUIDFH´6WXDUW5RELQVRQVDLGÂł:HDUHPRUH WKDQVDWLVÂżHGDQGPRUHWKDQH[FLWHGRYHUWKH IDFWWKDW%ULWWDQ\ZLOOEHMRLQLQJXV´ Brewer   said   during   the   team's   meeting   with   the   coaching   prospects   the   players   JHOOHG ZHOO ZLWK 5RELQVRQ ZKR SUHYLRXVO\ PDQQHGVHFRQGDQGWKLUGEDVHIRUWKH/DG\ Tar  Heels.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  are  pretty  excited,â&#x20AC;?  Brewer  said.   Âł,WKLQNLW OOEHDIXQVHDVRQ´

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LAGGED N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After  21   weeks,   there   is   only   one   game   left   of   the   2013-­14   NFL   season.     The   Denver   Broncos   will   be   playing   the  Seattle  Seahawks  on  Sunday  in  New   Jersey   to   see   who   will   become   the   new   world  champions.     Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   extremely   rare   that   the   two   pre-­ season  favorites  will  actually  meet  in  the   Super   Bowl.  The   leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   No.1   offense,   the   Broncos   and   the   No.1   defense,   the   Seahawks   both   have   had   dominant   sea-­ sons.     Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   take   a   look   at   how   these   two   teams  matchup  for  the  big  game: For   the   Broncos,   Peyton   Manning   has  had  the  greatest  regular  season  by  a   quarterback  in  NFL  history  by  throwing   for   a   record   5,477   yards   and   55   touch-­ downs.    His  weapons,  wide  receivers  De-­ maryius   Thomas,   Eric   Decker   and   Wes   Welker,  running  back  Knowshon  Moreno   and  tight  end  Julius  Thomas  have  all  been   incredible  this  year.     The   Seahawks   offense   hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   been   that  explosive  this  season  because  of  Per-­

SPORTS

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Super  Bowl  Spoilers cy  Harvinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  injuries.  Quarterback  Russell   Wilson   has   been   able   to   make   big-­time   plays  when  needed,  but  for  the  most  part   he  has  just  been  a  solid  player.  Marshawn   Lynch  continued  to  be  a  beast  this  season   running   for   1,257   yards   and   12   touch-­ downs.    Doug  Baldwin  and  Golden  Tate   are   solid   secondary   receivers.   If   they   played   with   Harvin   throughout   the   sea-­ son  then  their  numbers  would  have  been   much   better   since   opposing   defenses   would  pay  less  attention  to  them.     The   Broncos   defense   hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   been   incredible   this   season,   but   they   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   needed  to  be  because  they  have  the  great-­ est  offense  of  all-­time  on  their  team.    Their   pass  rush  has  been  pretty  much  nonexis-­ tent  due  to  the  loss  of  Elvis  Dumervil  to   the  Ravens  and  Von  Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ACL  injury.     Cornerback  Chris  Harris  tearing  his  ACL   is  a  huge  loss  for  their  secondary  because   now  a  past  his  prime  Champ  Bailey  will   KDYHWRSOD\VLJQLÂżFDQWWLPH The  Seahawks  defense  has  been  the   best  in  the  league  all  season  because  their  

dominant  secondary  composed  of  Byron   Maxwell,  Earl  Thomas,  Kam  Chancellor   and  Richard  Sherman.    Michael  Bennett   and  Cliff  Avril  have  been  solid  pass  rush-­ ers  with  8.5  and  8  sacks,  respectively.     In   regards   to   special   teams,   I   give   the   edge   to   the   Broncos.   They   have   the   best  kicker  in  the  league  this  season,  Matt   Prater,   who   set   the   NFL   record   for   the   ORQJHVW¿HOGJRDO7KH\DOVRKDYHRQHRI the  fastest  players  in  the  league,  Trindon   Holliday,  returning  kicks.     For   the   Seahawks,   if   Harvin   was   healthy   all   season,   then   I   think   the   Se-­ ahawks   would   have   had   a   much   better   return   team   than   they   did.     Steve   Haus-­ chka   has   been   very   consistent   kicking   ¿HOGJRDOVDOOVHDVRQ2YHUDOOWKH\ZHUH a  solid  unit,  but  nothing  that  special. 2QGHIHQVHWKH6HDKDZNVKDYHEHHQ dominant,   allowing   their   opponents   to   gain  only  273.6  yards  per  game,  which  is   almost  30  yards  better  than  the  next  best   team.     Prediction:  24-­17  Seahawks

I  think  the  Seahawks  are  much  more   suited   to   win   in   the   cold   and   wet   envi-­ ronment   that   is   expected   on   Sunday   night.     Lynch   will   have   at   least   25   car-­ ries  and  will  be  able  to  move  the  chains   consistently   to   give   the   Seahawks   the   edge  in  time  of  possession.    Harvin  will   stay  healthy  for  the  entire  game,  allowing   Baldwin   and   Tate   to   have   a   lot   of   free-­ dom.  Wilson  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  put  up  huge  numbers,   EXW KH ZLOO SOD\ DQ H[WUHPHO\ HIÂżFLHQW game  allowing  his  team  to  win.    The  Se-­ ahawks  defense  will  give  up  a  couple  of   touchdowns,  but  for  the  most  part  will  be   able  to  contain  Manning  and  Co.  because   of  how  physical  of  a  defense  they  are.    I   think  Head  Coach  Pete  Carroll  will  have   Harvin  returning  kicks  as  long  as  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ca-­ pable,   because   he   realizes   that   in   a   one   game   scenario   such   as   the   Super   Bowl   having   someone   as   dynamic   as   Harvin   EDFN WKHUH FRXOG EH KXJH IRU ÂżHOG SRVL tion.     And   most   importantly,   Bruno   Mars   will  kill  it.

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SPORTS THE NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

EARLY SUCCESS

Women’s Basketball Struggles PAGE 12

Men’s Basketball Looking to Improve PAGE 12

PHOTOS BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN  

Men’s Volleyball Begins Season 5-­0: PAGE 11

"The New Paltz Oracle" Vol. 85, Issue 12  

Printed on January 30, 2014