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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  85,  Issue  X

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RALLY CALL

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

‡  Rally held to show student support for Women’s Equality Agenda.

‡Campus community and locals come to-­ gether to discuss Women’s Rights.

STORY ON PAGE 3 | EDITORIAL ON PAGE 9 PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡Queer  Faculty  Host  Panel............................3J‡  Winter  Session  Courses  Expanded.................Pg  6 ‡  Train  Derailment  Hurts  Locals..............Pg  5                                    ‡:RPDQ&KDUJHG:LWK$QLPDO&UXHOW\3J


Cat  Tacopina EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Katherine  Speller   MANAGING  EDITOR

_________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

John  Tappen NEWS  EDITOR

Ben  Kindlon FEATURES  EDITOR

Suzy  Berkowitz

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF

Andrew  Lief

FEATURES          PG.  3B A&E                      PG.  5B

SPORTS  EDITOR

_________________

Dana  Schmerzler Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Rosalie  Rodriguez

Assistant  PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITOR

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Madeline  Anthony Abbott  Brant Anthony  DeRosa   Roberto  LoBianco Jennifer  Newman COPY  EDITORS

Hannah  Nesich

ASSISTANT  COPY  EDITOR _________________

Nicole  Brinkley WEB  CHIEF

Maxwell  Reide MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

_________________

Maya  Slouka

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI 681<1HZ3DOW]2XUFLUFXODWLRQLVThe  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG E\WKHEXVLQHVVPDQDJHU&RPPXQLW\DQQRXQFHPHQWVDUHSXEOLVKHGJUDWXLWRXVO\EXWDUH subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH ID[OLQHLV

Volume  85 Issue  X THE  GUNK  

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Incident:  Suspicious  Person   Date:  12/2/13 Location:  Old  Main Anonymous  tip  from  caller  reported  as  suspi-­ cious  individual. Incident:  DMV  Suspension Date:  12/3/13 Location:  Hasbrouck  and  Tricor  Avenues F/S  arrested  for  a  suspended  vehicle  registra-­ tion.

11-­16

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Students  Gather  For  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Equality

Students  rallied  outside  of  the  Student  Union  (SU)  to  voice  their  support  for  the  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Equality  Agenda.

By  Katherine  Speller Managing  Editor  |  Katherine.Speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Nearly  50  students  gathered  at  noon  on  Thursday,   Nov.  21  on  the  Student  Union  (SU)  concourse  for  a  ral-­ ly  in  support  of  the  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Equality  Agenda  (WEA),   a  10  point  piece  of  legislation  strengthening  language   in  laws  against  sexual  harassment,  pay  inequality,  hu-­ PDQ WUDIÂżFNLQJ DQG YDULRXV IRUPV RI GLVFULPLQDWLRQ against  women  that  failed  to  pass  into  law  last  year.   Professor   of   Political   Science   and   International   Relations   Kathleen   Dowley   said   the   event   was   orga-­ QL]HGTXLFNO\DIWHUVKHUHFHLYHGDSKRQHFDOOIURP7LI-­ fany  Card,  the  director  of  public  affairs  and  communi-­ cations  at  the  Planned  Parenthood  of  the  Mid-­Hudson   Valley,  who  was  interested  in  setting  up  an  additional   rally  stop  in  New  Paltz.   Âł,WZDVDOOSXOOHGWRJHWKHUYHU\TXLFNZKHQ,JRW the  call,â&#x20AC;?  Dowley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  it  was  a  good,  solid  turn   out  for  an  event  of  its  size  and  students  really  connect-­ HGZLWKWKHVSHDNHUV´ 7UDFH\%URRNVWKHSUHVLGHQWDQG&(2RI)DPLO\ 3ODQQLQJ$GYRFDWHVRI1HZ<RUN6WDWHZDVLQWURGXFHG by  Card  during  the  rally  to  discuss  the  importance  of   mobilizing  in  support  of  the  legislation  during  the  next   few  months.   Âł2QHRIP\VWXGHQWVVDLGÂľ,ZDQWWREHKHU>%URRNV@ when  I  grow  up,â&#x20AC;?  Dowley  said. Dowley   said   that   the   group   in   attendance   was   a   collection  of  students  from  the  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  Gender  and   Sexuality   Studies   (WGSS)   program   and   other   stu-­ dents  less  familiar  with  activism.  Some  students  from  

Âľ:RPHQ,PDJHVDQG5HDOLWLHVÂśWKHJHQHUDOHGXFDWLRQ introductory   course   within   the  WGSS   program,   were   WKHUHDVSDUWRIWKHLUÂżQDOSURMHFWDÂłOLEHUDWLQJDFWLRQ´ using  the  information  learned  in  their  studies.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   can   sometimes   be   intimidating   for   someone   >QHZWRDFWLYLVP@WRJHWVWDUWHG´'RZOH\VDLGÂł%XW WKLVLVDVPDOOVWHSWRGLVPDQWOLQJWKLQJVOLNHSDWULDUFK\ DQGPDNLQJWKRVHVRFLDOFKDQJHV´ $FFRUGLQJWRWKHVSHFLÂżFODQJXDJHRIWKHELOOWKH :($ÂłZRXOGEUHDNGRZQEDUULHUVWKDWSHUSHWXDWHGLV-­ crimination   and   inequality   based   on   genderâ&#x20AC;?   through   SRLQWVVHHNLQJWRVWRSDYDULHW\RIIRUPVRIGLVFULP-­ ination  and  protect  victims  of  certain  crimes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  update  of  the  language  and  policies  that  are   outdated,â&#x20AC;?  Dowley  said.   7KHDFWVHHNVLQSDUWWRFKDQJHWKHSKUDVLQJRISD\ equality   laws.   Through   replacing   an   exception   that   prohibits  differences  in  pay  for  â&#x20AC;&#x153;any  factor  other  than   VH[´ ZLWK RQH WKDW ZDV ÂłEDVHG RQ D ERQD ÂżGH IDFWRU other   than   sex   such   as   education,   training   or   experi-­ HQFH´WKHELOOZRXOGHQVXUHIDFWRUVDUHMREUHODWHG,W also  includes  provisions  that  would  â&#x20AC;&#x153;forbid  employers   from  prohibiting  employees  from  sharing  wage  infor-­ mation.â&#x20AC;? 2WKHU SRLQWV LQ WKH DFW ORRN WR DSSO\ WKH FXUUHQW Human  Rights  Law  provisions  on  sexual  harassment  to   employers  with  fewer  than  four  employees;Íž  amend  the   3HQDO/DZWRDGGUHVVKXPDQWUDIÂżFNLQJYLRODWLRQVDQG PDNHRWKHUFKDQJHVWRWKH6RFLDO6HUYLFHV/DZ3XEOLF Health  Law,  Labor  Law  and  Executive  Law. Dowley  said  the  parts  of  the  bill  that  faced  opposi-­

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

tion  dealt  with  matters  of  reproductive  rights.   7KHVHFWLRQODEHOHGÂł3URWHFWLQJD:RPDQÂśV)UHH-­ dom   of   Choiceâ&#x20AC;?   proposes   to   align   State  law  with   the   existing  federal  law  which  â&#x20AC;&#x153;protects  a  womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  right   to  terminate  her  pregnancy  when  necessary  to  protect   the  health  and  life  of  the  woman.â&#x20AC;? However,  the  bill  explicitly  states  the  section,  la-­ EHOHGÂł3DUW-´ZRXOGQRWÂłFRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWZLWKDQ\DSSOLFDEOH state  or  federal  law  or  regulation  permitting  a  health-­ care  provider  to  refrain  from  providing  abortions  due   to   the   providerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   religious   or   moral   beliefsâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;?   or   ex-­ tend  anything  beyond  the  federal  laws  already  in  place. Âł,W FRGLÂżHV WKH IHGHUDO ODZV RQ WKH VWDWH OHYHO´ Dowley  said. Dowley  said  those  unfamiliar  with  the  WEA  legis-­ lation  would  be  surprised  at  how  â&#x20AC;&#x153;basicâ&#x20AC;?  many  compo-­ QHQWVRIWKHDFWDUHGHVSLWHWKHFXUUHQWODZODFNLQJWKH VSHFLÂżFODQJXDJH Âł6RPH RI P\ >:RPHQÂśV *HQGHU DQG 6H[XDOLW\ VWXGLHV@ VWXGHQWV ZHUH RI FRXUVH GLVDSSRLQWHG WKDW >WKHOHJLVODWLRQ@ZDVQÂśWPRUHUDGLFDORULQFOXGLQJODQ-­ guage  about  trans  women...â&#x20AC;?  Dowley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  impor-­ tant,  though,  to  recognize  the  small  victories  and  steps   to  that  social  change.â&#x20AC;? Dowley   said   the   goal   of   the   rally   was   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;mobi-­ lizeâ&#x20AC;?  and  garner  support  for  the  act  when  it  is  up  for   consideration  again  in  January.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women   are,   after   all,   a   force   in   the   polling   booths,â&#x20AC;?  Dowley  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  we  especially  need  to  mo-­ bilize  come  spring.â&#x20AC;?


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NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

Faculty  Panel  Focuses  On  LGBTQ  Issues

PHOTO  BY  ANTHONY  DEROSA

RADIOACTIVE   COBALT-­60   FOUND  IN  MEXICO A   missing   shipment   of   radioactive   cobalt-­60   was   found   Wednesday   near   where   the   stolen   truck   transporting   the  material  was  abandoned  in  central   Mexico   state,   the   countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nuclear   safety   director   said.  The   highly   radio-­ active  material  had  been  removed  from   LWV VKLSSLQJ FRQWDLQHU RIÂżFLDOV VDLG and  one  predicted  that  anyone  involved   in  opening  the  box  would  be  dead  with-­ in  three  days. REIGNING   HEAVEYWEIGHT   AS-­ PIRES  TO  BE  PRESIDENT Towering   over   his   fellow   protest   leaders,   Vitali  Klitschko,  the  reigning  world  heavy-­ weight   boxing   champion,   has   emerged   as   8NUDLQHÂśV PRVW SRSXODU RSSRVLWLRQ ÂżJXUH and  has  ambitions  to  become  its  next  presi-­ dent. U.S.   ENGAGEMENT   WITH   MY-­ NAMARâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  MILITARY The   Obama   administration   faced   strong   bipartisan   opposition   Wednes-­ day   to   plans   for   limited   U.S.   engage-­ ment   with   Myanmarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   powerful   mili-­ tary  due  to  concerns  over  human  rights   and  its  lingering  ties  with  North  Korea. TORONTO  MAYOR New   court   documents   released  Wednesday   suggest  Toronto  Mayor  Rob  Ford  may  have   offered  $5,000  and  a  car  to  suspected  drug   dealers  in  exchange  for  a  video  that  appears   to  show  him  smoking  crack. CELEBRITY  CHEF Celebrity   chef   Nigella   Lawson   admit-­ ted   in   court   Wednesday   that   she   had   taken   cocaine,   but   denied   being   a   ha-­ bitual   user.   She   accused   her   ex-­hus-­ band  of  trying  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;destroyâ&#x20AC;?  her,  during   a  lacerating  day  of  testimony  that  laid   EDUH D PDWHULDOO\ DIĂ&#x20AC;XHQW EXW GHHSO\ troubled  marriage. HASSAN  AL-­LAQIS The   killing   early   Wednesday   of   Has-­ san   al-­Laqis,   described   as   a   member   of  the  inner  circle  of  Hezbollah  leader   Sheik  Hassan  Nasrallah,  was  the  latest   in  a  series  of  recent  attacks  against  the   Iranian-­backed  group.   Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

By  Anthony  DeRosa                                                                 Copy  Editor  |  N02385288@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Students   and   faculty   gathered   in   Lecture   Center   108   on   Monday   in   attendance   of   the   Queer  Faculty  Panel,  where  four  queer-­identi-­ fying  faculty  members  sat  to  discuss  their  ex-­ periences   as   members   of   higher   education   to   the  audience.   The  panel  was  composed  of  Dean  of  Aca-­ demic   Advising   Mary   Beth   Collier,   Director   RIWKH2IÂżFHRI6WXGHQW$FWLYLWLHVDQG6WXGHQW Union  Services  Mike  Patterson,  Assistant  Pro-­ fessor   of   sociology   and   Women,   Gender   and   Sexuality   Studies   Karl   Bryant   and   Assistant   Professor  of  history  Andrea  Gatzke.   Each   panelist   spoke   about   their   personal   experiences  and  career  in  academia  that  lead  to   their  employment  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  as  well   as  how  they  have  incorporated  their  sexual  ori-­ HQWDWLRQLQWRWKHLUÂżHOGRIVWXG\DQGZKDWWKH IXWXUHRITXHHUVWXGLHVLQWKHLUÂżHOGVZLOOEH Collier  began  the  discussion  recalling  her   life   as   a   psychology   graduate   student   in   the   mid-­80s  at  SUNY  Albany  where  she  ran  a  sup-­ port  group  for  gay  men  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  a  time  when  HIV  and   AIDS  cases  were  just  beginning  to  emerge.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  was  this  disease  killing  [gay  men]   off,â&#x20AC;?  Collier  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  why,  they   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   how   it   was   transmitted.   So   this   was  a  terrifying  time  for  all  of  us.  They  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know  what  was  going  on  but  they  were  dying.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  were  a  couple  of  jobs  where  I  was   DÂżQDOLVW,VHHPHGWREHWKHOHDGÂżQDOLVWWKH\ were   loving   me   and   then   suddenly   the   call   backs   stopped.   I   was   amazingly   off   the   list,â&#x20AC;?   Collier  said.   Collier  said  that  as  a  queer  individual  she   learned  to  decide  before  applying  for  employ-­ ment  with  a  college  if  it  â&#x20AC;&#x153;was  a  place  you  could   possibly  survive  workingâ&#x20AC;?  and  said  that  there   were   certain   places   where   â&#x20AC;&#x153;you   just   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even  apply.â&#x20AC;?  

Patterson  said  he  was  not  an  â&#x20AC;&#x153;outâ&#x20AC;?  student   at   his   undergraduate   university.   So   as   a   psy-­ chology  graduate  student  at  an  Ohio  Lutheran   college  in  the  late-­90s,  he  started  a  queer  stu-­ dent  alliance  already  having  a  frame  of  refer-­ ence   for   the   student   development   process   of   exploring  sexuality.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  sort  of  a  hush-­hush  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  meet  but   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  going  to  tell  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  type  of  conver-­ sation,  but  it  was  a  really  powerful  experience   for   the   students   who   participated,â&#x20AC;?   Patterson   said.   Patterson  said  the  lack  of  LGBTQ  aware-­ ness   at   the   universities   he   had   previously   worked  at  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;eye-­opening.â&#x20AC;?  Because  of  this,   Patterson   said   he   made   it   a   point   to   include   LGBTQ  issues  in  his  work  even  it  was  not  part   of  his  job.   When   Patterson   applied   to   New   Paltz,   it   ZDV WKH ÂżUVW WLPH KH PDGH WKH FKRLFH WR SXW his   association   with   LGBTQ   advising   on   his   resume.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   not   knowing   whether   or   not   if   I   should  make  [LGBTQ  advising  work]  part  of   my   interview   process,   I   was   really   glad   that   I  did  because  I  came  into  the  institution  with   nothing   to   hide,â&#x20AC;?   Patterson   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;That   was   a   novel   experience   that   was   new   for   me   that   would  not  have  been  advisable  ten  years  prior.â&#x20AC;?     Bryant  recalled  his  undergraduate  experi-­ ence  in  the  early  1980s  as  being  â&#x20AC;&#x153;horribleâ&#x20AC;?  in   that  there  was  no  support  of  queer  identifying   students  and  a  complete  lack  of  personal  iden-­ tity  development  studies.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   idea   that   [sexual   identity]   issues   could   be   studied   and   that   you   could   have   an   intellectual  life  built  around  these  was  nothing   that   was   ever   suggested   to   me   by   any   of   the   professors  or  mentors  I  had  at  the  time  because   none  of  them  were  thinking  that  way,  at  least   where  I  was,â&#x20AC;?  Bryant  said.     When  Bryant  returned  to  college  for  grad-­

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

uate  school,  LGBTQ  issues  were  available  for   VWXG\ZKLFKKHOSHGKLP³¿JXUHRXWKRZ,ZDV going  to  be  in  my  own  skin.â&#x20AC;?  Bryant  said  that   by  taking  courses  in  queer  studies  he  was  given   a  space  to  learn  about  issues  that  he  had  strug-­ gled  with  personally.   Bryant   said   that   he   had   a   delayed   expe-­ rience   of   acceptance   as   a   queer   individual   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   ÂżQGLQJ D OLNHPLQGHG DQG RSHQ FRPPXQLW\ of  peers  as  a  graduate  student  in  his  30s  when   PDQ\ TXHHU SHRSOH WRGD\ ÂżQG DQ DFFHSWLQJ community  as  an  undergraduate.     Gatzke  said  during  her  undergraduate  col-­ lege  years  she  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;deeply  closetedâ&#x20AC;?  and  that   although  friends  that  knew  she  was  queer  did   not  care,  she  herself  felt  â&#x20AC;&#x153;pressureâ&#x20AC;?  about  her   sexual  identity.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  living  in  the  basement  apartment  of   someone  I  worked  with  and  my  partner  from   college   was   still   in   New   York   at   the   time,â&#x20AC;?   Gatzke  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  miserable.  It  was  the  most   miserable  year  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  ever  had.  I  think  I  had  it  in   my  head  that  once  I  graduated  college  and  got   away  from  my  girlfriend  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  turn  straight  again   and  that  just  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  happen.â&#x20AC;?   Gatzke   decided   to   apply   to   graduate   school   at   Penn   State,   where   she   made   a   con-­ scious  decision  to  be  â&#x20AC;&#x153;out,â&#x20AC;?  having  been  miser-­ able  in  an  environment  where  she  could  not  be   herself.   Âł,QP\ÂżUVWIHZPRQWKV,FDPHRXWWRWKH people  I  got  to  know  well  and  then  gradually,   over   the   course   of   the   next   year,   everyone   in   the   program   knew   I   was   gay,â&#x20AC;?   Gatzke   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  nobody  cared.  That  was  the  thing,  I  was   the  one  that  cared.  A  lot  of  that  was  my  own   homophobia  that  I  was  ironing  out.â&#x20AC;?   Gatzke  said  that  she  learned  to  be  â&#x20AC;&#x153;com-­ fortable  in  her  own  skinâ&#x20AC;?  from  undergraduate   students  at  Penn  State  who  were  far  more  â&#x20AC;&#x153;outâ&#x20AC;?   and  comfortable  with  their  identity  than  her.


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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Senate  Discusses  Park  Point  And  Drug  Policy By  Abbott  Brant Copy  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  56th  student  senate  met  on  Wednesday,   Dec.  4  to  discuss  Park  Point  and  the  results  of  the   Senate-­composed  drug  survey.   The  meeting  opened  with  Dan  Torres,  recent-­ ly  elected  to  New  Paltz  Town  Council,  introducing   himself  to  the  student  senate  and  opening  up  a  line   of   communication   that   he   hopes   will   be   used   to   form  a  stronger  connection  between  the  town  and   student  body.   Fourth-­year   student   Kenny   Satterlee   pre-­ sented  the  senate  with  a  website  he  created,  new-­ paltzoffcampushousing.wordpress.com,   in   order   to  gain  support  and  a  possible  endorsement.  The   website  offers  off  campus  students  a  place  to  voice   their  testimony  about  their  off-­campus  housing  in   order   for   other   students   to   make   better   decisions   when  choosing  where  to  live.  The  website  also  in-­ FOXGHVVSHFL¿FVDERXWODQGORUGVDQGUHQWLQJODZV “It’s  a  project  that  can  build  upon  itself  and   continue  to  work  for  students  in  the  future,”  Sat-­ terlee  said.   The   website   was   met   with   positive   reaction   from  the  senate,  and  they  are  looking  to  endorse   the  project  and  create  a  statement  of  endorsement   to  be  placed  on  the  website  sometime  within  the  

next  semester.   Village   of   New   Paltz   Trustee  Ariana   Basco   presented   the   senate   with   apprehensions   voiced   from  attendees  at  the  most  recent  Park  Point  hous-­ ing  meeting  on  Nov.  25  at  the  town  hall.  As  a  pro-­ spective   housing   complex   catered   toward   trans-­ fers,   commuters   and   faculties,   Basco   expressed   multiple  concerns  she  urged  the  senate  to  take  into   consideration  before  developing  a  formal  opinion   to   the   proposed   project.   Concerns   included   the   EXLOGLQJ FRPSDQ\ :LOPRULWH ¿OLQJ WKH SURSHUW\ a  PILOT,  which  would  allow  the  complex  to  not   have  to  pay  taxes.   “Seventy-­four   percent   of   properties   in   New   Paltz  are  non-­taxable  entities,”  Basco  said.  “There   is  already  a  large  burden  of  taxes  placed  on  prop-­ erty  owners  that  do  pay  taxes.”   Basco  stressed  that  Park  Point  would  only  in-­ crease  those  taxes.   Another  issue  was  the  cost  of  staying  in  the   “luxury”   facility,   where   Basco   said   the   average   amount  a  student  or  faculty  member  would  pay  is   $775,  adding  this  is  more  than  most  renters  pay  to   live  in  New  Paltz  and  that  statistics  show  the  aver-­ age  faculty  member  would  not  be  able  to  afford  to   stay  there.   Other  issues  included  the  worry  of  transpor-­ tation  for  residents  from  Park  Point  into  town  and  

the  lack  of  police  accountability  for  patrolling  and   securing  the  area.   Student   Association   (SA)   Vice   President   Zachary  Rousseas  asked  if  the  planned  use  of  natu-­ ral  gas  at  Park  Point,  as  opposed  to  green  energy,   could  be  changed.  Basco  said  if  changes  were  to   be   made,   they   would   be   done   by   advocating   for   such  changes  to  the  town  planning  board.   Senators  Annie  Courtens  and  Rebecca  Berlin   restated  some  of  the  issues  brought  up  by  Basco,   and   urged   the   E-­board   to   include   building   stan-­ dards,  student  opinion  and  keeping  costs  low  when   writing  their  formal  opinion  on  Park  Point,  which   will  be  written  Friday.   Responses  to  the  senate-­created  drug  survey   were  revealed  to  the  senate  by  Tejada.  Ten  percent   of  the  student  population  took  the  survey.  Seventy-­ two   percent   said   they   have   used   of   both   alcohol   and  marijuana  at  some  point  during  college,  with   varying  responses  to  how  often.  Sixty-­one  percent   of  them  said  they  have  not  used  any  other  drugs   besides  alcohol  or  marijuana.  The  majority  of  stu-­ dents  interviewed  feel  comfortable  using  marijua-­ na  is  residence  halls.  For  79.9  percent  of  students,     a   verbal   warning   was   considered   adequate   for   a   VWXGHQW¶V¿UVWPDULMXDQDRIIHQVH Senate  will  reconvene  next  semester.

Train  Derailment  Causes  Local  Travel  Troubles By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

In   the   days   after   the   Metro-­North  Train   derailment,   upstate   locals   are   feeling   the   af-­ termath  of  the  train’s  chaos.   After   the   train’s   derailment   on   Sunday,   Dec.   1,   commuters   from   the   Hudson   Valley   and  Westchester  area  have  noticed  frustrating   changes  in  their  daily  travels  to  the  city.  Cor-­ tlandt  resident  Domenick  Scolpini  said  as  of   Tuesday,  there  is  only  one  track  up  and  run-­ ning  for  his  commute  to  the  city. Scolpini  said  since  the  accident,  his  com-­ mute  has  been  longer  and  more  crowded  than   he  is  used  to. “My   commute   has   been   an   hour   longer   in   each   direction   bringing   my   daily   time   to   about   14   hours   a   day,”   Scolpini   said.   “I   left   my  house  at  5:30  a.m.  [Monday]  and  I’ll  be   home  around  7:30  p.m.  It’s  exhausting  having   to   squish   into   a   crowded   subway   then   stand   on  a  crowded  bus  then  transfer  to  a  crowded   train   for   the   rest   of   the   way,   not   to   mention   having  to  drive  home  after.” According   to   a   New   York   Times   report,   the   train   had   been   going   82   miles   per   hour  

in   an   area   that   was   designated   30   miles   per   hour.   So   far,   there   have   been   four   fatalities   and  more  than  70  passengers  injured,  with  the   injuries  ranging  from  minor  to  severe. There  is  no  conclusion  as  to  what  caused   the   accident,   The   New   York   Times   reported.   However,  the  National  Transportation  Safety   Board  in  leading  an  investigation  as  to  what   caused  the  accident. So   far,   the   board   is   reported   to   have   been  investigating  both  the  train  engineer  and   whether  or  not  the  equipment  of  the  train  was   faulty.   Scolpini   said   although   the   time   of   the   commute  has  changed  drastically,  the  attitude   and   behavior   of   fellow   commuters   haven’t   changed   since   the   train’s   derailment.     He   said   he’s   heard   several   other   commuters   say   WKH\¶UH¿QHZLWKWKHFRPPXWHDIWHUWKHDFFL-­ dent. “Commuters  are  the  same  they’ve  always   been,”  Scolpini  said.  “I’ve  seen  a  ton  of  news   reports  with  people  saying  its  not  that  bad,  it’s   only  a  minor  inconvenience.  But  people  com-­ plain  about  everything  anyway,  so  this  is  no   different...minor  inconvenience  is  something  

I’ve  learned  to  expect  from  the  MTA.” New   Paltz   resident   James   Leo   said   us-­ ing   the     Metro-­North   isn’t   his   usual   way   of   commuting,  but  that  his  experience  using  it  on   Monday  was  longer  than  his  usual  commute.   “I  normally  use  Trailways  to  get  to  New   York   City,     but   Monday   I   took   Metro-­North   to  go  to  the  Bronx  and  it  took  me  three  hours   each  way,”  Leo  said.   Scolpini   said   the   aftermath   of   the   acci-­ dent  made  him  more  frustrated  with  the  MTA   than  he  has  been  in  the  past,  and  that  the  ac-­ cident  highlights  the  faults  he  has  found  with   the  MTA  in  the  past. “I’m   paying   $343   every   month   to   ride   the   train,   on   top   of   parking   costs   at   the   sta-­ tion,”  Scolpini  said.  “Where  does  my  money   go?  It’s  not  to  train  the  drivers  so  they  don’t   drive   82   miles   per   hour   around   a   turn   when   they   should   be   going   30.   It   doesn’t   stop   my   trains  from  breaking  down  requiring  me  to  get   off  at  a  stop  in  the  morning,  sometimes  every   day  for  weeks  straight,  and  transfer  to  a  differ-­ ent  train,  and  it  doesn’t  go  towards  improving   the   technology   (or   cleanliness)   of   the   trains   themselves.”

oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

RENEWABLE  ENERGY President   Barack   Obama   is   ordering   the   federal   government   to   nearly   tri-­ ple  to  20  percent  its  use  of  renewable   sources  for  electricity  by  2020.  Obama   says  the  plan  will  help  reduce  pollution   that   causes   global   warming,   promote   American   energy   independence   and   boost   domestic   energy   sources   such   as   solar   and   wind   power   that   provide   thousands  of  jobs. TRAIN  DERAILMENT The  man  driving  the  Metro-­North  loco-­ motive  that  went  off  the  rails  this  week   in  New  York  City,  killing  four  passen-­ gers,  experienced  a  momentary  loss  of   awareness  as  he  zoomed  down  the  rails,   according  to  his  lawyer  and  union  rep-­ resentative,   who   called   the   episode   a   “nod,”  a  “daze”  or  highway  hypnosis. TEMPERATURES   DIP   TO   20-­BE-­ LOW The   jet   stream   hunkered   to   the   south   Wednesday,  promising  to  bring  nearly   a  week  of  temperatures  that  could  dip   to   20-­below   or   worse   in   the   northern   midsection  of  the  country,  and  forcing   much   of   the   rest   of   the   nation   to   deal   with  unexpectedly  cool  temperatures.   TSA  SHOOTING   The  man  charged  with  killing  a  Trans-­ SRUWDWLRQ6HFXULW\$GPLQLVWUDWLRQRI¿-­ cer  and  wounding  two  other  agents  and   a  civilian  during  a  shooting  rampage  at   Los  Angeles  International  Airport  made   KLV¿UVWFRXUWDSSHDUDQFH:HGQHVGD\ UNIONS   AND   PENSION   FUNDS   PLEDGING  TO  APPEAL Unions  and  pension  funds  are  pledging   to   appeal   a   historic   decision   by   Judge   Steven   Rhodes   that   found   Detroit   is   broke   and   public   pensions   in   a   bank-­ ruptcy  aren’t  protected  by  the  Michigan   Constitution.   UTAH  SAME-­SEX  BAN A  federal  judge  should  strike  down   Utah’s  same-­sex  marriage  ban  be-­ cause  the  precedent  has  been  set  by   the  U.S.  Supreme  Court  and  discrimi-­ nation  has  gone  on  long  enough,  an   attorney  for  three  gay  couples  chal-­ lenging  the  2004  voter-­passed  law   argued  Wednesday.   Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

Thursday,  Decemebr  5,  2013

 5


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 6 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

3DOW] &KDPEHU Administrators  Promoted   1HZ 6HHV/HDGHUVKLS6KLIW By  Andrew  Lief

Sports  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY   New   Paltz   recently   announced   WZRSURPRWLRQVLQWKHDGPLQLVWUDWLRQDQGÂż-­ nance  divisions.     Julie  Majak  was  named  the  assistant  vice   president  for  administration  and  Julie  Chiari-­ to  was  named  the  assistant  vice  president  for   budget.     Vice  President  for  Finance  and  Admin-­ istration   Michele   Halstead   said   Chiarito   and   0DMDNZHUHWKHÂżUVWFKRLFHVIRUWKHSRVLWLRQV DQGKDYHDÂłPDVWHU\´LQWKHLUÂżHOGRIZRUN â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being   able   to   promote   good   people   from   within   saves   a   lot   of   time   in   the   long   run,â&#x20AC;?  Halstead  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  of  the  training  one   would  have  to  do  with  individuals  who  may   come  from  off  campus  would  take  years.â&#x20AC;? Majak,  who  has  worked  at  the  college  for   more  than  20  years,  has  served  as  the  contract   administrator   in   purchasing,   associate   direc-­ tor  of  administrative  services  and  telecommu-­ nications,  director  of  administrative  services,   GLUHFWRU RI IDFLOLWLHV ÂżQDQFH  DVVLVWDQW YLFH president  for  research  foundation  and  opera-­ tions  manager  for  research  foundation. Majak  said  she  did  not  apply  for  this  pro-­ motion  and  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;pleasantly  surprisedâ&#x20AC;?  when   Halstead  discussed  the  job  with  her  and  ulti-­ mately  offered  her  the  position. She   said   her   previous   work   experience   in   administrative   areas   will   help   her   in   her   new  role. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   worked   with   faculty,   staff,   stu-­ dents,   administration   and   state   central   agen-­

cies   and   I   believe   that   communication   and   compromise   is   the   basis   for   understanding   different  perspectives  and  achieving  results,â&#x20AC;?   Majak  said.     Now,  Majak  will  be  in  charge  of  the  of-­ ÂżFHV RI $FFRXQWLQJ 6HUYLFHV ,QWHUQDO &RQ-­ trols,   Receiving   &   Property   Control   and   act   as  the  campus  controller. Majak   said   the   promotion   shows   that   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  recognized  for  her  hard  work  and   Halstead   believed   her   skills   translate   to   a   higher  position. She  needs  to  now  be  aware  of  the  state   regulations  in  her  new  role,  Majak  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   biggest   challenge   will   be   walking   WKH ÂżQH OLQH RI VWUHDPOLQLQJ SURFHGXUHV DQG following  multiple  state  guidelines,  rules  and   regulations,â&#x20AC;?  Majak  said.     $IWHUZRUNLQJIRUVL[\HDUVDVWKHÂżQDQ-­ FLDODQDO\VWLQWKH2IÂżFHRI,QVWLWXWLRQDO5H-­ search,  Chiarito  will  now  be  in  charge  of  the   3D\UROO 2IÂżFH DQG ZLOO VHUYH DV WKH FDPSXV EXGJHWRIÂżFHU She   said   her   responsibilities   will   be   to   all-­funds  college  budgeting,  track  faculty  and   staff  vacancies  on  campus,  approve  all  hires   to   ensure   the   college   remains   â&#x20AC;&#x153;on-­budget,â&#x20AC;?   provide   an   Economic   Impact   study   to   the   college   President   every   three   years,   provide   yearly  data  on  instructional  cost  through  Na-­ tional  Study  of  Instructional  Cost  &  Produc-­ tivity  (Delaware  Study),  enrollment  planning   in  consultation  with  Enrollment  Management   and  to  continue  her  role  as  the  liaison  between   ÂżQDQFHDQG,QVWLWXWLRQDO5HVHDUFK Chiarito   said   working   with   the   institu-­

WLRQDO UHVHDUFK DQG ÂżQDQFH GHSDUWPHQWV RI the  college  has  allowed  her  to  develop  a  large   understanding   of   the   data   from   the   student   and  collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  perspective.  This  allowed  her  to   have  an  understanding  from  both  sides,  which   she  said  is  unusual  because  there  is  no  con-­ nection  on  most  colleges.     Before   working   at   New   Paltz,   Chiarito   said   she   worked   at   IBM   for   more   than   17   years   as   a   cost   accountant,   general   and   ad-­ PLQLVWUDWLYHDQDO\VWDQGDVWKHOHDGÂżQDQFLDO analyst  for  Sales,  General  &  Administrative. She  said  being  able  to  learn  how  to  com-­ PXQLFDWH EXGJHW DQG ÂżQDQFH GDWD WR QRQÂż-­ nancial  constituents  while  at  IBM  has  helped   her   on   many   occasions   when   dealing   with   budget  related  issues  at  New  Paltz. In  her  previous  role  on  campus,  Chirari-­ to  said  she  worked  closely  with  the  state  side   of   the   budget,   but   had   little   exposure   to   the   residence  hall  budget,  which  she  will  now  be   working  with. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   biggest   challenge   in   my   new   role   will  be  to  learn  the  all-­funds  campus  budget,â&#x20AC;?   Chiarito  said. Halstead   said   Chirarito   is   a   smart   and   talented   accountant,   who   impressed   her   be-­ cause   of   how   fast   she   picked   up   the   SUNY   budgeting  system.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  is  a  wizard  with  a  spreadsheet  and   her   attention   to   detail   is   unparalleled,â&#x20AC;?   Hal-­ stead  said.     Barely   a   month   into   their   promotions,   Halstead   said   she   is   pleased   with   the   work   Charito   and   Majak   have   done   in   their   new   roles  thus  far.

Winter  Session  Courses  Expanded %\.ULVWLQ:DU¿HOG Staff  Writer  |  :DU¿HONO@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

To  give  students  the  chance  to  catch  up   or  get  ahead  in  their  studies  over  winter  break,   the  college  will  be  offering  20  three-­credit  on-­ line  courses.   Between   Dec.   27   and   Jan.   17,   students   enrolled   in   these   courses   will   have   the   op-­ portunity  to  gain  a  semesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  worth  of  class   credit  in  three  weeks. In  developing  the  schedule  of  classes  for   the  winter  session,  campus  faculty,  in  conjunc-­ WLRQ ZLWK WKH 2IÂżFH RI ([WHQGHG /HDUQLQJ gathered  information  about  course  popularity   and  enrollment,  among  other  criteria. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter   session   was   developed   to   help   our  students  graduate  on  time,  so  we  put  a  spe-­ cial  focus  on  offering  courses  that  could  help   students   overcome   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bottlenecksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   not   get-­

ting  into  classes  needed  to  graduate,â&#x20AC;?  SUNY   New  Paltz  Provost  Philip  Mauceri  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most   of  our  offerings  this  winter  are  general  educa-­ tion  courses  that  are  often  over-­enrolled.â&#x20AC;? 7KHVFKRROÂśVÂżUVWWULDOZLWKDZLQWHUVHV-­ sion  was  with  four  courses  last  year.   Âł/DVW \HDU ZDV WKH ÂżUVW WLPH ZH KDG D ZLQWHU VHVVLRQ ² DOO >ZKLFK@ ÂżOOHG TXLFNO\ UHTXLULQJXVWRDGGDGGLWLRQDOVHFWLRQV´3UR-­ vost  Mauceri  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  year  we  are  offering   20  classes,  almost  all  of  which  [were]  full  or   FORVH WR IXOO E\ WKH HQG RI WKH ÂżUVW ZHHN RI registration.â&#x20AC;? According   to   President   Donald   Chris-­ tian,  these  online  courses  are  designed  to  ben-­ HÂżWERWK681<1HZ3DOW]VWXGHQWVDVZHOODV students  on  other  campuses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  goal  here  is  not  to  drift  away  from   being  a  residential  campus,  but  to  the  degree   that   we   could   help   students   progress   aca-­

demically   in   a   faster   way,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   also  looking  at  ways  that  we  can  offer  online   courses   that   might   help   transfer   students   at   community   colleges   that   would   ultimately   come  here.â&#x20AC;? Although  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  winter  session  was  a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;test  runâ&#x20AC;?  according  to  President  Christian,  the   TXDOLW\RIWKHWKUHHZHHNFRXUVHVPDWFKHGWKDW of  a  full  semester  class. Second-­year   painting   major   Erica   Mel-­ ville  took  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Art  of  the  Western  Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  as  a  win-­ ter  course  last  year  and  overall,  she  said  she   was  very  pleased. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   the   workload   ended   up   being   about  a  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  worth  of  class  every  weekday,   some  days  less,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know  a  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   worth  of  work  every  day  sounds  like  a  ton  but   it  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  that  bad  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  I  would  do  it  again   if  there  was  a  class  I  needed  available.â&#x20AC;?

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

By  Cat  Tacopina Editor-­In-­Chief  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

New   Paltz   Regional   Chamber   of   Commerce   (NPRCC)  Director  of  Membership  and  Development   Chair  Peter  Ingellis  has  extended  his  duties  to  the  posi-­ tion  of  Interim  President.   Having  started  in  early  November,  Ingellis  takes   over  the  position  formally  held  by  Michael  Smith,  who   served  as  president  of  the  NPRCC  the  past  two  years.   Ingellis  said  his  tenure  with  the  NPRCC  was  a  decid-­ ing  factor  in  his  role  as  interim  president. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  still  working  as  membership  director  and  I   had  been  involved  with  the  NPRCC  as  a  member  for   several  years,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know  the  membership  of  the   chamber  very  well,  and  I  think  that  made  me  an  ap-­ pealing  choice  for  the  position.â&#x20AC;? As  someone  who  used  to  be  an  NPRCC  member,   he  also  said  his  knowledge  of  the  NPRCC  as  a  whole   ZRXOGEHEHQHÂżFLDOIRUWKHJURZWKRIWKHRUJDQL]DWLRQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  a  member  from  2008  to  2011,  and  I  un-­ derstand  the  inner-­working  of  the  chamber,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  having  someone  who  has  gone  through  as  a   chamber  member  and  will  provide  continuity  is  valu-­ able.â&#x20AC;? As   interim   president,   Ingellis   will   oversee   all   operations   of   the   NPRCC,   along   with   his   duties   as   membership  committee  chair.  In  a  press  release  issued   on  Nov.  12,  Board  Chair  Frank  Curcio  said  the  board   LVFRQÂżGHQWWKDW,QJHOOLVZLOOFRQWLQXHWREXLOGRQWKH success  of  his  predecessor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   very   fortunate   that   Peter   can   step   up   DVLQWHULPSUHVLGHQW´&XUFLRVDLGÂł:HDUHFRQÂżGHQW that   under   his   leadership,   the   chamber   will   continue   to  move  forward  and  grow  stronger  for  our  members.â&#x20AC;? Curcio  also  acknowledged  the  work  Smith  put  in,   and  said  he  had  only  improved  the  NPRCC  in  his  time   as  president. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  wish  to  thank  Michael  for  all  his  hard  work   over  the  past  two  years,  as  he  leaves  the  Chamber  bet-­ ter  than  how  he  found  it,â&#x20AC;?  Curcio  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  has  accom-­ plished  so  much  and  we  wish  him  well.â&#x20AC;? Ingellis  said  he  is  excited  to  continue  the  work  the   NPRCC  has  already  done  this  year,  and  that  as  interim   president   he   looks   forward   to   having   more   involve-­ ment  in  the  projects  that  are  already  in  the  works.   Ingellis  also  said  he  is  looking  forward  to  expand-­ ing  the  NPRCC  to  different  members  of  the  commu-­ nity. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  starting  initiatives  for  groups  of  younger   people   and   women   in   the   community,â&#x20AC;?   Ingellis   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Different  groups  of  people  need  to  maneuver  through   business  in  different  ways,  and  we  want  to  help  people   as  much  as  we  can.â&#x20AC;? According  to  the  press  release,  the  NPRCC  has   initiated   a   search   for   a   permanent   replacement   for   Smith.  


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Flood  Project  Provides  Support By  Suzy  Berkowitz A&E  Editor  |  Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   New   York   Rising   Flood   Control   project   under   the   supervi-­ sion   of   Gov.   Andrew   Cuomo   pro-­ vides  communities  in  the  New  York   State  area  the  opportunity  to  rebuild   and   restore   the   local   damage   done   by  recent  natural  disasters.   Communities   are   encouraged   to   work   both   individually   and   col-­ laboratively   on   brainstorming   both   remedial   and   preventative   methods   WR FRPEDW Ă&#x20AC;RRGLQJ RI WKH :DOONLOO River  as  a  result  of  Hurricane  Irene   and  Superstorm  Sandy.   Cuomo   has   awarded   the   town   and   village   of   New   Paltz   $3   mil-­ lion   each   to   carry   out   project   ideas   once   approved   by   stakeholders   in   Albany.  If  both  the  town  and  village   collaborate  on  projects,  they  will  be   awarded  an  extra  $3  million  to  carry   out  these  plans.   New  Paltz  Town  Supervisor  Su-­ san  Zimet  has  been  working  to  bring   together   the   town   and   village   of   New   Paltz   to   try   to   maximize   their   potential   earnings   from   Cuomo,   as   she  said  the  New  York  Rising  Flood   Control  project  provides  an  â&#x20AC;&#x153;incred-­ ible  opportunityâ&#x20AC;?  for  the  community   to  rebuild  its  resources.   Âł:LWK WKH HOHFWLRQ DQG EXG-­ get  behind  me,  I  have  more  time  to   get   really   involved   in   making   sure   we   have   the   biggest   and   best   ideas   and  we  will  qualify  for  the  money,â&#x20AC;?   Zimet   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   hope   to   be   more   in-­ volved   on   a   local   level   and   for   the   entire  region.â&#x20AC;? Since   the   project   incorporates   individual   and   collaborative   work   within   the   Ulster   County   region,   two   leaders   have   been   designated   co-­chairs   in   charge   of   bringing   to-­ gether  communities  within  the  area   in   an   effort   to   produce   long-­term   storm  solutions  and  maximize  gov-­ ernment  funding.   Steven   Kelley,   an   employee   at   Ellenville   Regional   Hospital,   has   been   assigned   the   group   leader   in   charge   of   bringing   together   com-­ munities  in  the  Village  of  Ellenville   DQGWKH7RZQRI:DUVLQJ5RFKHVWHU and  Rosendale  to  collaborate  on  re-­

building  the  damage  done  by  recent   natural  disasters. Julie   Robbins,   Kelleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   co-­ chair  for  Ulster  County,  is  in  charge   of   bringing   together   communities   from   both   the   town   and   village   of   New   Paltz,   the   town   and   village   of   Saugerties,   the   town   and   village   of   6KDQGDNHQDQGWKH7RZQRI:RRG-­ stock.   Although   Robbins   was   not   available   for   comment   as   of   press   time,   Kelley   said   she   is   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;skilled   leaderâ&#x20AC;?   and   has   been   instrumental   in  bringing  together  local  communi-­ ties  to  form  remedial  solutions  to  the   problems  at  hand.   Many  of  the  projects  being  pro-­ SRVHG LQ .HOOH\ÂśV UHJLRQ DUH Ă&#x20AC;RRG mitigation-­based   and   have   to   do   with  protecting  wetland  barriers  and   alleviating  the  erosion  and  sediment   composition   caused   by   water   and   wind   damage   in   both   steeper   and   valley-­structured  areas  in  the  region.   Kelley  also  said  one  of  his  main   considerations   when   proposing   so-­ lutions  is  to  consider  what  will  pro-­ tect  those  in  the  community  who  are   more   vulnerable   than   others,   both   the   elderly   and   medically   handi-­ capped.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;After  some  of  the  recent  natu-­ ral  disasters  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  faced,  Ellenville   ZDV MXVW Ă&#x20AC;RRGHG DQG FRPSOHWHO\ obliterated.   It   was   truly   a   disaster,â&#x20AC;?   Kelley   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Houses   were   washed   away  and  people  were  left  homeless   DQG Ă&#x20AC;RRGHG RXW ,WÂśV GXULQJ WKHVH times  of  crisis  that  you  really  see  the   community  pull  together  to  help  the   people  who  need  to  be  taken  care  of   and   brought   to   safety.   The   purpose   of  this  funding  is  to  help  communi-­ ties  rebuild  better  through  coopera-­ tion  and  resiliency.â&#x20AC;? Kelley  said  that  while  some  ar-­ eas  were  more  affected  by  the  wind   than   the   water   after   recent   natural   disasters,   all   the   areas   he   was   as-­ signed   to   bring   together   in   the   re-­ gion   share   the   same   watershed   and   are  thus  similarly  devastated  when  a   storm  hits.   Because   of   these   communi-­ tiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  shared  resources,  there  is  much   room  for  a  collaborative  effort  when   attempting   to   rebuild   a   more   resil-­

ient   environment   prepared   to   with-­ stand   the   next   natural   disaster,   he   said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even   though   these   commu-­ nities   have   historically   not   been   able   to   work   well   together,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   seeing   a   lot   of   good   municipal   co-­ operation   with   this   project,â&#x20AC;?   Kel-­ ley   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even   though   each   region   has  their  own  boundaries,  the  rivers   DQG VWUHDPV LQ 8OVWHU &RXQW\ Ă&#x20AC;RZ through   these   boundaries   and   the   problems  that  happen  as  a  result  of   these  natural  disasters  are  our  com-­ mon   link.  This   is   a   situation   where   these  rivers,  streams  and  tributaries   DOOĂ&#x20AC;RZWRJHWKHUZKLFKFUHDWHDUH-­ markable  amount  of  discussion  and   cooperation  about  the  best  kinds  of   solutions.  This  is  a  tremendous  pro-­ gram   and   I   salute   the   governor   for   creating   a   ground-­up   approach   as   opposed  to  a  top-­down  approach.â&#x20AC;?    Kelley  said  now  that  problems   DQG VROXWLRQV KDYH EHHQ LGHQWLÂżHG itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  up  to  the  communities  and  their   leaders  to  work  with  consultants  on   prioritizing  which  remedies  to  push   forward.   Factors   that   will   be   con-­ sidered  when  prioritizing  each  solu-­ tion   include   monetary   estimations   and  the  substance  and  value  of  each   project.   Consultants   will   present   ideas,   solutions   and   perceived   cost   in  Al-­ EDQ\ GXULQJ D ÂżQDO SURSRVDO DQG presentation  in  March.  In  the  mean-­ time,  communities  are  continuing  to   publicly   meet   on   a   weekly   basis   to   provide   an   inclusive   environment   for  residents  to  voice  their  concerns   and   solutions   to   the   problems   they   have  faced  because  of  recent  natural   disasters.   Zimet  said  some  of  the  ideas  be-­ ing   proposed   are   big,   but   rightfully   so.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   governor   is   encouraging   people  to  think  bigger,  and  at  the  end   of  the  day,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  fund  the   big  ideas,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  wants  you   to  take  a  natural  disaster  and  build  a   resiliency   so   if   that   disaster   comes   again,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be   better   prepared   and   protected   instead   of   being   devas-­ WDWHG :H GRQÂśW ZDQW WR EXLOG EDFN the  same,  we  want  to  build  back  bet-­ ter.â&#x20AC;?    

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

   7

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Woman  Charged   With  Animal  Cruelty By  Ben  Kindlon Features  Editor  |  N02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

A  66-­year-­old  New  Paltz  woman  has  been  charged  with   failing   to   properly   care   for   animals   including   an   emaciated   donkey   that   was   found   on   her   property,   according   to   the   Ul-­ ster   County   Society   for   the   Prevention   (SPCA)   of   cruelty   to   animals.     Camille   Frarachi,   the   former   pet   owner,   was   charged   Thursday  with  eight  counts  of  failure  to  provide  proper  suste-­ nance,  a  misdemeanor,  according  to  Director  of  the  SPCA  in  the   town  of  Ulster  Adam  Saunders.   2IÂżFLDOVIRXQGJRDWVFDWVDGRQNH\DQGDGXFNWKDW6DXQ-­ ders  said  was  â&#x20AC;&#x153;in  pretty  bad  shape.â&#x20AC;?    One  of  the  goats  that  of-­ ÂżFLDOV H[SURSULDWHG GLHG GXULQJ YHWHULQDU\ WUHDWPHQW VHYHUDO hours  after  the  animals  were  found,  Saunders  said.   3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1 Frarachi  was  arrested  in  April  2012  on  six  counts  of  mis-­ demeanor  animal  cruelty  and  failure  to  provide  proper  suste-­ nance  and  again  in  May  on  19  charges  of  misdemeanor  animal   cruelty,  according  to  the  Daily  Freeman. $FFRUGLQJWRWKHUHSRUWLQWKHSDVWRIÂżFLDOVUHPRYHG dogs,  four  goats,  seven  barn  fowl,  a  horse  and  two  cats.    One  of   the  cats  was  found  with  a  litter  of  dead  kittens.    Upon  evalua-­ tion,  veterinarians  determined  that  the  animals  had  open  sores,   mites,  Lyme  disease  and  various  other  health  issues.     Frarachi   was   charged   and   released   on   her   own   recogni-­ zance  pending  court  action,  according  to  the  Daily  Freeman. Saunders  said  the  most  recent  issues  were  brought  to  light   following  an  ongoing  dispute  between  Frarachi  and  her  neigh-­ bor.    The  neighbor  contacted  local  police  who  noticed  the  in-­ digent  conditions  the  animals  were  subjected  to  and  contacted   63&$RIÂżFLDOV$ORQJZLWKWKHRULJLQDOFKDUJHV6DXQGHUVDOVR noted  that  these  issues  were  in  violation  of  the  court  order  Fra-­ rachi  received  in  2012. Aside   from   the   goat   that   died   during   treatment,   the   re-­ maining  animals  are  recovering  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;are  doing  well,â&#x20AC;?  Saunders   said. Saunders   said   animal   cruelty   is   a   reoccurring   problem,   with  100  to  150  cases  of  animal  cruelty  reported  to  the  Ulster   SPCA  annually.    Saunders  said  that  there  have  been  20  arrests   in   regards   to   animal   cruelty   cases   the   Ulster   SPCA   was   in-­ volved  in  this  year. :KHQLGHQWLI\LQJDQLPDOFUXHOW\6DXQGHUVVDLGLWÂśVLPSRU-­ tant  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;keep  an  eye  outâ&#x20AC;?  for  signs  that  indicate  an  ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lack   of  care.  Signs  may  include  emaciation,  meaning  the  animal  is   visibly  malnourished.    Pets  with  their  ribs  showing  or  unable  to   move  properly  are  signs  of  emaciation.      Saunders  said  keeping   DQLPDOVÂłWUDSSHG´RUFRQÂżQHGLQVSDFHVZLWKZDVWHGHEULVDQG RWKHUJDUEDJHLVDQRWKHUVLJQRILQVXIÂżFLHQWFDUHRISHWV The   Ulster   County   SPCA   is   a   private,   no-­kill   shelter   whose  mission  is  to  prevent  animal  cruelty  by  providing  tempo-­ UDU\VKHOWHUDQGÂżQGLQJDGRSWLYHKRPHVIRUQHJOHFWHGDQLPDOV according  to  their  website.  Saunders  said  people  interested  in   helping  animals  can  donate  food  for  the  dogs  they  shelter  and   in  addition  to  being  mindful  of  any  signs  of  animal  cruelty  in   their  communities.  


NEWS

 8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Workshop  Held  To  Discuss  Trailways  Bus  Station  

PHOTOS  BY  ROSALIE  RODRIGUEZ

A  workshop  and  discussion  on  the  Trailways  station  on  Main  Street  was  held  on  Thursday,  Nov.  21  at  7  p.m.  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)  room  62/63.  The  workshop,  hosted  by  the   Ulster  County  Planning  Department,  centered  on  the  possibility  for  construction  of  a  bus  station  on  Route  32,  to  either    replace  or  supplement  the  current  station.

Authors, Poets, Playwrights M.F.A. in Creative Writing Hofstra’s M.F.A. in Creative Writing program offers a challenging and exciting program of study integrating literary scholarship and focused instruction in writing. Students may concentrate in playwriting, fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction, exploring the art and craft of writing while grounding themselves in the rich literary traditions that offer exemplary models of these forms. Core Faculty

Erik Brogger Playwriting

Phillis Levin Julia Markus Poetry Fiction

Martha McPhee Fiction

! Find out about these graduate programs and more. Graduate Open House, November 24 hofstra.edu/GradEnglish

Thursday,  December  5,  2013


The GUNK Thursday, DECEMBER 5, 2013

Fine Furnishings From

Poverty Barn Story on page 2b PHOTO  BY  RICHARD  SCHLEIDER


2B

FEATURES

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Second-Hand Pickings, First-Class Pricing LOCAL THRIFT SHOP USES DISTINCT STYLE TO ATTRACT CUSTOMERS

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By  Katherine  Speller 0DQDJLQJ(GLWRU_katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

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Thursday,  December  5,  2013

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  Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

3B

From Warring to Quilting

TONI MORRISONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOVEL HIGHLIGHTED BY COMMUNITY BOOK GROUP By  Roberto  LoBianco Copy  Editor  |  Rlobianco83@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu This  year  the  eighth-­annual  One  Book,  One  New  Paltz  pro-­ gram  used  Toni  Morrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  novel  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Homeâ&#x20AC;?  to  explore  issues  relat-­ ing  to  race,  war  and  the  power  of  healing  through  quilting. 7KHSURJUDPIHDWXUHGÂżIWHHQHYHQWVIURP1RYWRWKDW drew  hundreds  of  community  members  together  to  discuss  Nobel   laureate  Toni  Morrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  2012  book. Âł+RPH´WHOOVWKHVWRU\RI)UDQN0RQH\D\HDUROG$IUL-­ FDQ$PHULFDQPDQDIĂ&#x20AC;LFWHGZLWK3RVW7UDXPDWLF6WUHVV'LVRUGHU after  returning  from  the  Korean  War  in  the  1950s. 7URXEOHGE\WKHPHPRULHVRIDGLIÂżFXOWXSEULQJLQJ)UDQN chooses  to  move  to  California  rather  than  return  to  his  hometown   of  Lotus,  Ga.  He  is  tortured  by  the  memories  of  violence  he  wit-­ nessed  during  the  war.  When  his  sister,  Cee,  becomes  deathly  ill,   Frank  is  forced  to  begin  a  cross-­country  journey  home. $FFRUGLQJWR/LQGD:HOOHVRQHRIWKHFRPPLWWHHPHP-­ bers   and   a   former   New   Paltz   elementary   school   principal,   the   JURXSZHHGHGWKURXJKDVPDQ\DVERRNVEHIRUHWKH\GHFLGHG on  the  160-­page  novel. Âł,WWDNHVZHHNVDQGZHHNVWRÂżQGDZHOOZULWWHQERRNWKDWLV accessible  to  a  broad  variety  of  community  members  and  that  will   encourage  discussion,â&#x20AC;?  Welles  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toni  Morrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  book  met   all  the  criteria  very  easily.â&#x20AC;? Welles  said  the  story  was  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;heroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  journeyâ&#x20AC;?  that  drew  from   themes  in  Homerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Odyssey.  For  example,  Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hometown  is   Lotus,  Ga.,  while  the  lotus  plant  plays  a  role  in  Odysseusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  journey,   serving  as  a  delicious  distraction  that  threatened  his  crewâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  return   home  from  battle. On  Nov.  23  the  Elting  Memorial  Library  hosted  a  screening   RIWKHGRFXPHQWDU\ÂżOPÂł7KH4XLOWVRI*HHÂśV%HQG´DQGIRFXVHG on  an  important  theme  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Home,â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  the  healing  power  of  quilt-­ ing. 7KHÂżOPWHOOVWKHVWRU\RIWKHTXLOWLQJWUDGLWLRQRIDJURXSRI $IULFDQ$PHULFDQZRPHQLQ*HHÂśV%HQG$ODWKDWGDWHVEDFNWR the  19th  century  when  the  area  was  the  site  of  a  cotton  plantation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Geeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Bend   has   an   amazing   beautifully   artistic   quilting   tradition,â&#x20AC;?  Welles  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  camaraderie  and  singing  that  goes   along   with   it   created   a   community   that   helped   them   make   it   through  a  distressful  period  of  time.â&#x20AC;?

3+272&2857(6<2)FLICKR86(50$8//(,*+    

3+272&2857(6<2)WORDPRESS  86(5+20(%(7:((17+(3$*(6

6KDURQ:DGGHOODTXLOWKLVWRULDQDQGDSSUDLVHUVSRNHRQWKH UROHRITXLOWLQJLQWKHOLYHVRI$IULFDQ$PHULFDQZRPHQDQGRI the  connection  between  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  quilting  groups  and  the  book.   4XLOWLQJDFFRUGLQJWR:DGGHOOKDVEHHQXVHGDVWKHUDS\IRUUH-­ turning  soldiers  in  a  number  of  wars. $W WKH HYHQW :DGGHOO DOVR GLVSOD\HG VHYHUDO H[DPSOHV RI TXLOWLQJWKURXJKGLIIHUHQWWLPHSHULRGVLQ$PHULFDQKLVWRU\ In  the  novel,  quilting  plays  a  central  role  in  the  recovery  of   Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  sister  Cee,  the  female  protagonist,  who  is  taught  the  art  by   a  group  of  women  who  lived  through  the  Depression. Âł)RUVRPHRIXVWKHERRNLVÂżOOHGZLWKWKLQJVWKDW\RXFDQEH

KRUULÂżHGZLWKDFWVRIUDFLVPYLROHQFHWKHSRVWWUDXPDWLFVWUHVV experience  of  the  main  character.  But  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  also  a  lot  of  hope  in   the  book,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  sense  of  redemption,  community,â&#x20AC;?  Welles  said. Welles   is   already   looking   forward   to   choosing   next   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   One  Book  selection.  The  process,  she  said,  is  set  to  begin  in  Feb-­ ruary   and   committee   members   are   already   talking   informally   about  potential  books. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   always   looking   for   ways   of   bringing   different   ele-­ ments  of  the  community  into  the  process  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  love  to  have  col-­ lege  students  on  the  One  Book,  One  New  Paltz  committee  next   year,â&#x20AC;?  Welles  said.

Do  You  Want  to  Write  For  The  Oracle? Email  Oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  December  5,  2013


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Remembering The Forgotten STUDENTS HOLD VIGIL FOR TRANSGENDER VICTIMS OF VIOLENCE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicken Dinnerâ&#x20AC;?

Each week, one of the members of our Copy Desk will share their culinary chops with you. Bon appetit! ,ÂżQGWKDWHYHU\ERXWRIFRRNLQJLVEHVW preceded   and   accompanied   by   a   bout   of   drinking.  What  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  drinking  depends  on   what   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   cooking,   but   I   prefer   wine   or   whiskey. In  this  case  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  cooking  a  whole  roast   FKLFNHQDVLPSOHJRWRPHDOWKDWVDWLVÂżHV especially   in   the   winter   months.   My   drink   recommendations  are  either  a  Pinot  Noir  or   a  Bourbon. While   cooking   a   whole   roast   chicken   sounds   time   consuming,   the   preparation   is   simple   and   the   payoff   (in   the   form   of   leftovers   and   soup   ingredients)   will   allow   you   to   save   time   on   future   meals   for   the   week. Pre-­heat   the   oven   to   400   degrees.   You   can  start  drinking  now. While   your   ovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   heating   up,   prepare   the   chicken   by   salting   thoroughly   on   all   sides.  This  ensures  a  crisp  browning  of  the   skin.  You  can  also  add  pepper  and  thyme,  if   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  into  that  sort  of  thing. Place   the   salted   chicken   into   a   large   oven-­safe   pan.   You   can   also   chop   up   garlic,  onions  and  yams,  toss  them  together   with   some   olive   oil   and   salt   and   nestle   the   potatoes  alongside  the  chicken. Leave   the   chicken   and   potatoes   in   the   oven  for  an  hour  and  a  half. This  part  is  important:  once  the  chickenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   out  of  the  oven  let  it  sit  in  the  pan  covered   with   aluminum   foil   for   15   minutes.   The   chicken  will  reabsorb  some  of  the  moisture   released   into   the   pan   while   roasting   and   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   end   up   with   a   juicier,   better   tasting   meal. Done. You   can   use   the   leftover   chicken   over   the  next  week  in  omelettes,  sandwiches,  or   on   its   own.   At   the   end   of   the   week,   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   toss  the  carcass.  Boil  it  in  some  salted  water   and   you   have   the   basic   stock   you   need   for   chicken  soup.

PHOTO    COURTESY  OF  FLICKR  USER  KOMUnews

By  Roberto  LoBianco Rlobianco83@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Students  gathered  for  LGBTQ  symposium  held  on  the  SUNY  New  Paltz  campus. By  Maddie  Anthony importance  of  acknowledging  and  supporting  transgender   Copy  Editor  |  N02436976@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu individuals,â&#x20AC;?  Williams  said.   While  the  vigil  focused  on  those  who  lost  their  lives   Nearly  40  people  stood  in  a  circle  outside  the  Student   due  to  discrimination,  people  in  the  transgender  commu-­ Union  (SU)  on  Wednesday,  Nov.  20,  each  holding  a  candle.   Facing  the  cold  evening  air,  participants  stayed  to  demon-­ nity  face  that  same  discrimination,  marginalization,  invali-­ strate  their  support  of  a  worldwide  event  that  honors  the   dation  and  prejudice  in  daily  life,  Williams  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  of  the  trans  people  I  have  spoken  to  about  these   victims  of  violence  against  transgender  people;Íž  an  effort  to   issues   have   been   deeply   affected   by   the   prevalent   hatred   pay  tribute  and  remember  those  who  have  been  victims  of   around  us,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  trans  people  go  through  is  an   violence  against  those  in  the  community.   The  vigil  was  held  by  the  Queer  Student  Union  (QSU),   intense   mixture   of   invalidating   attitudes   and   discrimina-­ a  student-­run  organization  that  aims  to  bring  queer  people   tory  behaviors  from  others.  We  go  through  this  on  a  daily   together,   create   a   supportive   environment   and   work   to-­ basis,  and  it  can  make  the  world  very  hostile.â&#x20AC;? According  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Injustice  at  every  turn:  A  Report  on  the   gether  towards  a  positive  change  in  the  larger  community,   National  Transgender  Discrimination  Surveyâ&#x20AC;?  by  the  Na-­ QSU  E-­board  member  Kal  Williams,  a  third-­year  linguis-­ tional   Center   for   Transgender   Equality   and   the   National   tics  major,  said.   Many  of  these  victims  who  died  as  a  result  of  preju-­ Gay  and  Lesbian  Task  Force,  78  percent  of  transgendered   dice  violence  lost  their  dignity  with  their  death,  with  their   Americans  faced  severe  harassment  during  childhood.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  should  use  the  vigil  to  not  only  honor  those  who   names  erased  or  ignored,  dehumanizing  them  and  remov-­ arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   with   us   anymore   but,   to   take   it   as   a   lesson   to   cre-­ ing   their   identity,   Williams   said.   Holding   the   vigil   and   ate  a  safe  space  for  Trans  people  in  our  community,â&#x20AC;?  Zach   reading  the  names  of  these  sometimes  faceless  victims  was   Rousseas,  a  QSU  E-­board  member  and  a  double  major  in   an  effort  to  counteract  this. The  vigil  was  also  a  way  to  show  solidarity  with  the   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Gender  and  Sexuality  Studies  and  history  said. Rousseas  said  that  discourse  on  the  subject  is  crucial.   larger   community.   Williams   said   it   strengthens   the   com-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   really   no   space   for   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Transâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   people   to   even   munity   and   brings   about   awareness   to   the   issue   of   anti-­ be  thought  about,  so  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  let  cisgender  people   trans  violence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[This  vigil  is  necessary]  so  that  people  recognize  the   know  that  violence  like  that  exists,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  

Thursday,  December  5,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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5B

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Filmmakers Get A Taste Of Success

HUNTERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S MEATY MOTION PICTURE LEAVES MARK By  Jahna  Romano Staff  Writer  |  Romanoj3@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   four   most   important   components   of   life,   ac-­ cording  to  Matthew  Hunter,  are  friendship,  unexpect-­ edness,  love  and  sandwiches.   A  New  Paltz  alum  and  founder  of  Business  Lunch   Productions,  Hunter  took  one  of  his  lifelong  priorities   to  the  screen  this  past  August  when  he  wrote  and  di-­ rected    the  original  story  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sandwich  Girl:  The  Mov-­ ie.â&#x20AC;?   $ QLQHW\ PLQXWH ORQJ ÂżOP Âł6DQGZLFK *LUO 7KH Movieâ&#x20AC;?   gives   viewers   a   taste   of   Dylan,   played   by   Nicholas  Guastella,  a  fourth-­year  theater  performance   major  at  SUNY  Purchase.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sandwich   Girl:   The   Movieâ&#x20AC;?   is   described   as   a   comedy  about  three  inevitable  things:  death,  love  and   VDQGZLFKHVDFFRUGLQJWRWKHÂżOPÂśVFacebook  page. The  meat  of  the  movie  follows  Dylan  and  his  gang   of  friends  â&#x20AC;&#x153;as  they  go  on  an  other-­worldly  adventure  of   unexpected   proportions   after   Dylan   meets   the   girl   of   his  dreams,  Caroline,â&#x20AC;?  also  according  to  its  Facebook   page.   &DUROLQHÂśVFKDUDFWHULVSOD\HGE\$PDQGD%URRN-­ lyn,   an   alum   of   Fordham   University   with   a   major   in   theater  performance.   7KH ÂżOPÂśV VFUHHQSOD\ ZDV D FROODERUDWLYH HIIRUW EHWZHHQ+XQWHUDQGÂżOPPDNLQJIULHQGV+DUULVRQ%U\-­ an,   a   fourth-­year   acting   major   at   Boston   University,   Ben  Stanton,  also  a  fourth-­year  acting  major  at  Boston   University  and  Mike  Blandino,  a  third-­year  music  ma-­ jor  at  Brooklyn  College.   The  movie  also  featured  Brandon  Zelman,  an  alum   of  Fordham  University  with  a  major  in  theater  perfor-­ PDQFHZKRDFWHGDVWKHÂżOPÂśVSURGXFHUDQGDVVLVWDQW director  as  well. 2Q7XHVGD\1RYWKHJURXSRIÂżOPPDNHUVUH-­ WXUQHGWRWKHPRYLHÂśVELUWKSODFHDQGVWRSSHGRIIDWDQ-­ other  location  on  their  tour  of  colleges  along  the  east   FRDVWZKHQWKH\VFUHHQHGWKHÂżOPLQ1HZ3DOW]ÂśV/HF-­ ture  Center.   New  Paltz  was  able  to  sample  a  taste  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sandwich   Girl:  The  Movieâ&#x20AC;?  because  of  the  interest  it  sparked  in   Media   and   Journalism   Society   Co-­Presidents   Miriam   Ward,  a  third-­year  digital  media  production  and  history   double-­major  and  Sasha  Ribowsky,  a  fourth-­year  digi-­ tal  media  production  and  French  double-­major.   The  Media  and  Journalism  Society  chose  to  screen  

:ULWHUDQG'LUHFWRURI³6DQGZLFK*LUO7KH0RYLH´SRVHVQH[WWRWKHIRRGRIWKH¿OP

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sandwich   Girl:   The   Movieâ&#x20AC;?   in   particular   because   they   were   interested   in   supporting   a   recent   graduate   within  the  department,  according  to  Ward. 6XSSRUWIRUWKHÂżOPDOVRFDPHIURP$VVLVWDQW3UR-­ fessor   of   Communications   and   Media,   Gregg   Bray,     who  kept  in  touch  with  Hunter  after  his  graduation  last   \HDU DQG HQFRXUDJHG WKH ÂżOPPDNHUV WR VFUHHQ WKHLU PRYLH LQ 1HZ 3DOW] IRU WKH EHQHÂżW RI ERWK VWXGHQWV and  movie-­makers  alike.   Ward  also  said  the  Media  and  Journalism  Society   WKRXJKWVKRZLQJDPRYLHPDGHE\\RXQJÂżOPPDNHUV would   be   a   great   way   for   current   students   to   see   the   success  gained  from  working  on  such  a  project.   $FFRUGLQJWR:DUGH[SRVXUHWRWKHÂżOPJDYHVWX-­ dents  a  chance  to  see  behind-­the-­scenes  work  and  the   ÂłLPPHQVHHIIRUWLWWDNHVWRPDNHDIHDWXUHÂżOP´ Both   Ward   and   Ribowsky   were   pleased   and   im-­ SUHVVHG E\ WKH VFUHHQLQJÂśV DWWHQGDQFH DQG ZHUH DOVR glad  to  see  how  many  students  came  together  to  sup-­

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  MATTHEW  HUNTER

SRUWDIRUPHU1HZ3DOW]VWXGHQWÂśVZRUN Hunter   was   also   happy   about   how   the   screening   went,  and  said  while  he  expected  ten  to  twenty  people   to  show  up,  he  ended  up  losing  count  at  eighty  audi-­ ence  members.   7KH ÂżOPPDNHUV KHOG D TXHVWLRQ DQG DQVZHU VHV-­ sion  after  the  movie  screening,  through  which  the  au-­ dience  learned  more  about  the  production  as  a  whole.     7KHFUHDWRUVRIWKHÂżOPEHQHÂżWWHGIURPWKHVFUHHQ-­ ing  as  much  as  the  students  who  attended  it  by  gaug-­ ing   how   well   audience   members   digested   the   movie   WKURXJK D TXHVWLRQQDLUH WKH DQVZHUV WR ZKLFK WKH\ ZLOOWDNHLQWRFRQVLGHUDWLRQGXULQJWKHÂżOPÂśVÂżQDOSUR-­ duction  stages.     As  far  as  the  future  goes,  Business  Lunch  Produc-­ tions,  the  company  that  produced  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sandwich  Girl:  The   Movie,â&#x20AC;?   are   already   working   up   an   appetite   for   suc-­ cess,  as  they  are  currently  collaborating  with  different   companies  to  develop  scripts  for  future  endeavors.  


  6B

oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE DOCTOR IS IN: KATIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x153;DOCTOR WHOâ&#x20AC;? CONFIDENTIAL

Arts & Entertainment

High School Takes The Stage

BLACKBOX MUSICAL TUNES INTO ADOLESCENCE By  Suzy  Berkowitz A&E  Editor  |  Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

By  Katherine  Speller Managing  Editor  |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a while since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve really sat down to watch â&#x20AC;&#x153;Doctor Who.â&#x20AC;? My reasons are numerous. Beetween the time I am capable of/ willing to dedicate to a T.V. show that is not â&#x20AC;&#x153;Supernaturalâ&#x20AC;? hitting an all time low and my disillusioned feelings on show-runner Stephen Moffattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s approach to the canon, it hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been at the top of my to-watch list. But the 50th anniversary of the show was something even I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pass up. So, I tuned in. Oddly enough, I was reminded of all the things that attracted me to the show years ago. While I have my complaints with certain choices, particularly the manner in which Queen Elizabeth I was characterized, my feelings are overwhelmingly positive. Despite an incredibly explosive opening  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  featuring the Time War, no less    â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the episode serves as an interesting interruption of the showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premise. The very situation that fuels the characterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s violent self-loathing in the post-war arc is averted; the blood on his KDQGVWKDWKDGORQJGHĂ&#x20AC;QHGKLPDV´WKH oncoming stormâ&#x20AC;? hero is removed. He becomes the healer, the Doctor, again. That, to me, is the most interesting and effective rebirth Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen on the show which is quite the feat for a show where the title character is reborn every few years. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s action, sure, but more apparent and more distinct is the heart and soul at the core of the show. Explosions and effects are secondary really to the parts of the program that manage to remind you what it means to be human: something pretty fantastic coming from a show about an alien.

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

A  Catholic  high  school  will  set  the  stage  for  the  up-­ coming  blackbox  production,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spirit.â&#x20AC;?   A  classic  story  with  a  twist,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spiritâ&#x20AC;?  is  an  original  mu-­ sical  that  features  20  songs  in  classic  musical  theater  style   ZLWKURFNDQGSRSLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHV Mallary   Walton,   a   fourth-­year   theater   performance   and   biology   double-­major   and   the   showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   director   and   musical  director,  was  introduced  to  the  musical  after  at-­ tending  a  production  at  her  sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  school,  SUNY  Fredo-­ nia,  where  one  of  the  showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  writers  got  his  education.   :DOWRQ VDLG WKH VKRZ KDVQÂśW OHIW KHU VLQFH WKH ÂżUVW time  she  saw  it,  and  knew  she  wanted  to  bring  the  show  to   the  stage  herself  as  soon  as  she  was  given  the  opportunity.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   moved   by   the   music,   which   is   fantastic,   and   touched  by  the  message  of  the  musical,â&#x20AC;?  Walton  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   became  interested  in  directing  just  last  fall  when  I  trans-­ fered  to  New  Paltz.  When  I  was  told  about  the  opportu-­ nity  students  have  here  to  submit  a  blackbox  proposal,  I   knew  I  wanted  to  give  myself  and  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Spiritâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  a  chance.â&#x20AC;? This  production  being  Waltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  directoral  debut  out-­ side   of   a   classroom   setting,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spiritâ&#x20AC;?   is   completely   stu-­ dent-­run  and  participated,  consisting  of  a  band  of  musi-­ cians   and   a   cast   of   21   performers,   a   considerably   large   amount   for   a   mainstage   production,   let   alone   one   being   performed  in  a  setting  as  intimate  as  Parker  Theatre,  Wal-­ ton  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spiritâ&#x20AC;?   represents   classic   cliques   portrayed   in   the   stereotypical   high   school   environment,   including   jocks,   nerds,  drama  kids  and  preps.  Common  problems  students   in  high  school  face  are  explored  throughout  the  produc-­ tion  as  well.   Walton   hopes   that   if   audience   members   walk   away   from  the  show  with  anything,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  newfound  acceptance   for  those  different  from  them.  

UPCOMING BFA/MFA THESIS SHOWS: opening reception: FRIDAY, DEC. 6, 5-7 P.M. SPECIAL EXHIBITION HOURS: frIDAY, DEC. 6- TUESDAY, DEC. 10 11 a.m.-5 p.m.

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   show   reveals   to   the   audience   that   there   is   so   much   more   to   a   person   than   what   is   on   the   surface   and   if   we   spend   some   time   looking   just   a   little   deeper,   we   PLJKWÂżQGWKDWZHDUHQRWVRGLIIHUHQWDIWHUDOO´VKHVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Spiritâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  also  teaches  that  we  are  not  alone,  no  matter  how   alone  we  may  feel.â&#x20AC;? Since  the  production  features  so  many  cast  members,   it  is  important  for  each  actor  to  be  able  to  bond  with  their   character  in  order  to  properly  portray  them  onstage.   Jessica   Contino,   a   third-­year   performance   major,   SOD\V(PLO\DFKDUDFWHUZKRLVWU\LQJWRÂżQGWKHEDODQFH between  obtaining  popularity  and  true  friendship.   Contino   said   a   lot   of   her   preparation   for   the   show   came   from   thinking   about   what   her   character   says   and   ZK\ VKH VD\V LW LQFOXGLQJ ÂżJXULQJ RXW WKH SUHVWRU\ WR Emilyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  life  before  she  appears  onstage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Understanding  who  the  character  is  before  he  or  she   has  any  lines  onstage  grounds  the  actor  to  be  nothing  but   truthful  while  telling  the  story,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   Contino  said  being  involved  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spiritâ&#x20AC;?  has  taught  her   that  everyone  is  struggling  with  something  stressful  and   emotional,   and   that   conversations   within   a   showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   cast   can  teach  just  as  much  as  the  script  of  the  show  itself.   For  Paul  Lander,  a  second-­year  theater  performance   major,  who  plays  an  ensemble  member  and  understudies   two  lead  male  roles,  getting  into  character  was  easier  than   he  thought.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  fact  that  the  show  is  so  real  it  was  very  interest-­ ing  and  fun,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  brought  me  back  to  high  school   in   some   very   emotional   ways.   It   makes   you   remem-­ ber   how   despite   everyone   being   unique,   everyone   goes   through  the  same  or  similar  problems.â&#x20AC;? The  production  will  open  on  Friday,  Dec.  6  and  will   run  through  Sunday,  Dec.  8  in  Parker  Theatre  with  perfor-­ mances  at  8  p.m.  on  Friday  and  Saturday  and  a  matinee   performance  at  2  p.m.  on  Sunday.  


Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

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MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: ROBIN KHATSERNOV

An Oracular Spectacular Hit List TUNES TO RING IN THE HOLIDAY SEASON Bing Crosby

Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins

“Silver Bells”

“Goblins’ Freestyle”

I  don’t  know  who  originally  wrote  the  song,  but  whenever   I  hear  “Silver  Bells,”  I  think  of    Christmas  in  New  York  City.   It’s  understated.  I  love  how  it’s  able  to  make  the  biggest,  most   disgusting  city  in  the  world  seem  tranquil  and  quaint.       —John  Tappen,  News  Editor

A  wildly  underrated  group,  Hershel  and  the  Hanukkah   Goblins  never  really  made  it  big.  Reppin’  upstate  N.Y.’s   B’Nai  Shalom,  these  boys  were  known  to  make  shabbat   pretty  gimel.    This  group  puts  the  “high”  in  high  holidays.     —Benjamin  Shanks  Kindlon,  Features  Editor

Mariah Carey

Adam Sandler

“O Holy Night”

“The Hanukkah Song”

This  is  my  absolute  favorite  holiday  song,  but  only  when   Queen  Mariah  sings  it.  I  can’t  even  listen  to  anyone  else’s  ver-­ sion.  Her  range  is  incredible,  and  that  notorious  high  note  at   the  end  restores  my  faith  in  humanity.  Hallelujah!       —Suzy  Berkowitz,  A&E  Editor

There’s  nothing  that  gets  me  more  excited  for  the  festival   of  lights  than  listening  to  Adam  Sandler  sing  his  heart  out   about   Hanukkah.   It   really   makes   make   feel   great   that   I’m   like  Hall  of  Famer  Rod  Carew.     —Andrew  Lief,  Sports  Editor

YEAR: Third MAJOR: Psychology HOMETOWN: Oceanside, N.Y.

WHAT’S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? Guitar,  because  I  grew  up  listening  to  rock   bands  and  I  thought  it  was  the  coolest  instrument.   WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? I’ve  been  in  various  bands  and  I   also  write  music. WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? Jimi   Hendrix,   Jimmy   Paige,   The   Beatles,   John  Mayer  and  Keith  Richards. WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? The   Dave   Matthews   Band,   The   Beatles,   Neil   Young,   Aphex   Twin,   The   Rolling   Stones  and  Led  Zepplin. WHAT’S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? Get  a  job  in  which  I  help  people  and  make   the  most  of  my  ability  —  no  matter   ZKLFK¿HOG,JRLQWR ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? Play  the  kind  of  music  you  love  and  not  what   other  people  want  you  to  play  and  practice  as   much  as  you  want  to.  

CHECK  OUT   ROBIN  KHATSERNOV

PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE  WITH   ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Suzy  Berkowitz  at  sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  

Thursday,  December  5,  2013


8B

oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  DEEP  END

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END CASEY ROBERTSON Major: Photography Year: Third

Inspirations: Alec Soth, Stephen Shore, Robert Frank, Walker Evans, Larry Sultan, Kelly Surdo

“I am currently working on two bodies of work. My primary work is a subjective documentation of Upstate New York as someone who was raised in a rural town of Orange County. My other work is self-portraiture that stems from sudden feelings I’ve experienced due to my parents separation eighteen years ago. “

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  CASEY  ROBERTSON.  CAPTION  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

A  REASON  TO   RISE  AND  RALLY

CARTOON  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN Last  week,  SUNY  New  Paltz  played   host  to  a  rally  in  support  of  the  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Equality  Agenda  (WEA),  a  ten  point  bill   looking  to  strengthen  language  in  New   York   State   laws   to   be   consistent   with   federal   ones   and   prevent   gender-­based   discrimination.   The   bill   was   stalled   in   Senate   last   session   due   to   its   compo-­ nents  related  to  abortion  rights  and  will   be  up  for  consideration  again  in  2014.   Students   and   faculty   members   in   support  of  the  agenda  have  encouraged   others   to   educate   themselves,   mobilize   and  campaign  in  the  oncoming  months   to  see  the  bill  pass.                   We   at   The   New   Paltz   Oracle   com-­ mend   the   students,   faculty   and   organi-­ zations  that  came  together  in  support  of   this  cause  and  cannot  help  but  echo  their   call-­to-­action.   The  WEA  seeks  to  codify  language   that   is   already   present   federally   on   the  

state  level,  through  promoting  progres-­ sive  ideals  and  replacing  tired  and  out-­ dated  language  in  our  laws.   The   provisions   would   remove   an   exception   within   the   current   laws   that   prohibits   pay   differences   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;any   fac-­ tor   other   than   sexâ&#x20AC;?   and   replace   it   with   one  that  only  uses  â&#x20AC;&#x153;job-­relatedâ&#x20AC;?  factors   to  make  informed  pay  decisions.   It   really   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   seem   like   a   lot   to   ask   for,   to   have   our   language   match   our  ideals  that  women  are  deserving  of   equal  pay  for  equal  work.    It  just  seems   decent   to   combat   oppressive   policies   tha  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  likely  to  look  back  on  as  dra-­ conian  years  down  the  line. The   agenda   also   looks   to   offer   stronger   protections   to   victims   of   do-­ PHVWLFYLROHQFHDQGKXPDQWUDIÂżFNLQJ to  ensure  people  are  held  accountable  to   the  extent  the  laws  can  allow  after  com-­ mitting  such  atrocities.  

And,   to   address   one   of   the   more   common  complaints  regarding  the  agen-­ da:  it  does  not  seek  to  expand  abortion   rights   within   the   state.   It   simply   looks   to  put  the  same  language  that  has  been   acknowledged   as   federal   law   since   the   Supreme   Court   ruling   of   Roe   v.   Wade   into  the  New  York  State  law  books.     It   would   not   interfere   with   or   take   away  from  the  lives  or  freedoms  of  peo-­ ple  within  our  state  to  see  this  law  come   WRSDVVLWZRXOGKRZHYHUVLJQLÂżFDQWO\ better   the   lives   of   women   within   our   state.   We  believe  the  students  and  faculty   who   took   part   in   the   rally   were   taking   WKH ÂżUVW QHFHVVDU\ VWHSV WRZDUG WKLV goal.  We  encourage  our  fellow  students   to   come   out   in   support   of   the   agenda   and  to  take  part  in  the  activism  they  are   comfortable  with,  whether  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  signing  a   petition,  attending  or  organizing  a  rally  

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

or  simply  making  your  voices  heard  by   their  representatives.  Every  act  matters,   no  matter  how  small. The   large-­scale,   institutional   social   problems  tend  to  seem  like  the  monsters   that   cannot   be   defeated.   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   often   intimidating,  overwhelming  and  dispar-­ aging  to  veterans  and  those  getting  their   feet  wet  in  activism  alike.   +RZHYHUWKHEHQHÂżWVRIFRQVLVWHQW language  in  our  laws  are  too  important   to  ignore.   Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the   majority  of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,   op-­eds  and  letters,  excluding  editorials,   are  solely  those  of  the  writers  and  do  not   necessarily  represent  the  views  of  The   New  Paltz  Oracle,  its  staff  members,  the   campus  and  university  or  the  Town  or   Village  of  New  Paltz.


10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

OPINION

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS BEN  KINDLON Features  Editor n02182316@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

CAT  TACOPINA Editor-­In-­Chief

ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s     marijuana   policy   has   been   a   topic   of   heated   debate   throughout   the   fall   2013   semester.   Despite   more   lenient   rules   regarding   the   dankness  on  other  campuses  in  the  SUNY  system,  the   DGPLQLVWUDWLRQKHUHKDVVWRRGÂżUPO\EHKLQGWKHLUWZR strike  policy. The  Student  Association  (SA)  has  been  spending   an   excessive   amount   of   time   working   to   change   the   policy   to   students   three   strikes   before   expulsion   as   opposed  to  only  two. As  an  advocate  for  the  legalization  of  marijuana,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  all  for  changing  or,  as  I  see  it,  updating  the  policy,   but  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  that  it  is  as  prevelant  an  issue  as  many   students  and  especially  SA  have  made  it  out  to  be.     By   giving   this   much   creedence   to   the   sticky-­ icky-­green-­green   issue   distracts   the   SA   from   more   important   matters.   Their   efforts   are   not   worth   the   exorbitant  energy  expended  on  the  issue,  and  could  be   EHWWHUGLUHFWHGDWPRUHSODXVLEOHDQGEHQHÂżFLDOJRDOV If,  after  all  the  work  the  SA  has  put  into  changing   the  policy,  they  do  succeed,  all  that  will  change  is  that   students  will  be  able  to  be  caught  smoking  pot  in  their   dorm  rooms  one  more  time  before  getting  booted  for   their  getting  zooted.     ,VRQHPRUHVWULNHUHDOO\ZRUWKDOOWKLVWURXEOH" Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   always   been   a   bit   bothered   by   these   â&#x20AC;&#x153;efforts,â&#x20AC;?   and   even   more   so   by   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;workâ&#x20AC;?   done   by   the   Students   For   Sensible   Drug   Policy   (SSDP)   and   National   Organization   for   the   Reform   of   Marijuana   laws  (NORML)  clubs  and  associations  on  campus.     Both   of   my   parents   are   defense   attorneys   and   ERWK DUH DIÂżOLDWHG ZLWK 1250/ 1HLWKHU RI P\ SDUHQWVVPRNHJDQMDEXWWKH\ÂżJKWWRIUHHQRQYLROHQW drug  offenders,  i.e.  potheads.   To   SSDP   and   NORML   club   members:   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one   thing  if  you  want  to  blaze  up  in  the  privacy  of  your   own   home   and   mind   your   own   business,   not   many   people  have  a  problem  with  it,  from  what  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  heard   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  not  even  really  the  cops.    But  if  you  are  going  to   put  yourself  in  the  public  spotlight  as  an  advocate  for   the  legalization  of  marijuana  and  argue  that  its  effects   DUHPRUHEHQHÂżFLDOWKDQKDUPIXOÂąGRQÂśWXQGHUPLQH your  argument  with  demon-­red  eyes,  a  skunky  smell   and  a  Facebook  page  full  of  drug  fueled  heady-­festival   pictures.   NORML  club  meetings  usually  consist  of  half-­ baked   discussions   that   lead   to   no   actual   action.   To   disprove  the  allegations  that  marijuana  makes  people   lazy  couch  dwellers,  those  advocating  its  legalization   need  to  do  more  than  sit  on  their  couches  and  smoke   weed  while  complaining  about  its  illegality.   Ben  Kindlon  is  a  fourth-­year  journalism   major.  He  just  wants  to  hit  gnarly  drops  on   his  shredstick.  He  is  Albany.  Albany  is  him.  

If  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  one  thing  I  know  as  a  Long   Island-­native,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no-­homoâ&#x20AC;?  culture   LQWHUQDOL]HG LQ HYHU\ VWUDLJKWLGHQWLÂżHG man  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  come  across. I  know  more  than  half  of  you  read-­ ing   this   column   are   from   Long   Island   and   know   exactly   what   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   talking   about.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  that  hyper-­conformist  mascu-­ line  identity  which  refuses  to  show  any   sign   of   dancing   along   the   lines   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;ef-­ feminateâ&#x20AC;?   and   being   irrationally   afraid   of   sexuality   coming   into   question.   This   includes  a  refusal  to  acknowledge  liking   any  female  entertainer  on  the  basis  of  tal-­ ent  alone,  but  instead  always  bringing  in   appearance,  as  if  that  is  the  be-­all-­end-­all   to  whether  or  not  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  worth  your  time. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  exhausting.  Long  Island  is  frus-­ trating.   But   over   Thanksgiving,   I   found   myself   pleasantly   surprised.   Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Talk   about  Catching  Fire.   I   am   21   years   old   and   have   seen   the   newest   installment   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Hunger   Gamesâ&#x20AC;?     trilogy   once.   My   24-­year-­old   brother   has   seen   it   twice   and   has   only   seen  it  with  his  guy  friends.   Several   kids   I   know   who   bask   in   masculinity  as  if  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  fountain  of  youth   have  seen  it  in  groups  with  just  their  guy   friends.   My   15-­year-­old   brother   has,   to   P\ NQRZOHGJH UHDG WKH ÂżUVW ERRN DQG actually  enjoyed  it.   I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  about  you,  but  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  see-­ ing  more  and  more  men  openly  admit  to   seeing  it  and,  even  moreso,  loving  it.  

Have  We  Everdone  It? After   seeing   enthusiastic   responses   to   the   movie,   and   even   the   franchise   as   the   whole,   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   help   but   be   elated.   It   leaves   me   to   beg   the   question;Íž   have   ZRPHQ FKDUDFWHUV ÂżQDOO\ GRQH LW" $UH ZHQRZÂżQDOO\VHHLQJWKHVKLIWLQDFFHSW ing   female   characters   as   more   than   an   H[WHQVLRQRIPHQ" Of   course,   there   is   a   romantic   sub-­ plot   in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Hunger   Gamesâ&#x20AC;?   which   in-­ volves  the  love  triangle  between  Katniss,   Peeta  and  Gale.  On  the  surface,  and  how   the   story   is   sold   to   audiences,   it   would   seem   there   is   more   of   a   focus   on   that   storyline   than   their   should   be.   But,   for   anyone   who   really   knows   The   Hunger   Games,  they  know  that  storyline  is  fairly   minuscule   in   regards   to   the   story   as   a   whole.   The   reason   I     ask   whether   or   not   IHPDOH FKDUDFWHUV KDYH ÂżQDOO\ EURNHQ ground  as  leading  roles,  capable  of  car-­ rying  a  movie  on  their  back,  is  because   of  the  story  of    the  series.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Hunger   Gamesâ&#x20AC;?   is   Katnissâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   story.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   about   her   WUDQVIRUPDWLRQ DQG VDFULÂżFH DQG XQUDY eling   as   a   person   put   through   extreme   circumstances.   I   saw   it   the   day   it   came   out  and  I  was  so  pleasantly  surprised  by   how   this   installment   of   the   series   took   into   account   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Hunger   Gamesâ&#x20AC;?   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   about   some   silly   love   triangle   that   has   been   blown   out   of   proportion.,   but   rather   about   how   Katniss   changes   and   navigates  through  a  world  where  her  sur-­ vival  is  constantly  under  threat.  

I   think   what   I   love   so   much   about   .DWQLVVLVKHUVHOIVXIÂżFLHQF\DQGYDOXH on   self-­reliance.   Katnissâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   only   goal   and   REMHFWLYH LQ WKH ÂżUVW LQVWDOOPHQW  RI WKH series  is  survival,  which  eventually  leads   to   returning   to   her   sister.   In   the   second   installment   we   see   the   same   thing,   but   the   stakes   are   higher   and   the   love   tri-­ angle  grows  organically.    Director  fran-­ cis   Lawrence   did   an   exceptional   job   in   showing   the   story   was   about   campus,   and   the   relationships   she   has   with   both   Peeta   and   Gale   are   organic   and   make   sense  in  the  context  of  Katnissâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  situation.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  going  to  go  on  an  say  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   done  it  and  Katniss  is  the  end-­all-­be-­all   RIÂżFWLWLRXVKHURLQHV+RZHYHUKHUVXF FHVV DW WKH ER[ RIÂżFH LV D PHVVDJH DX diences   invested   in   female   characters     need   to   reinforce.   For   too   long   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   told   that   a   heroine   who   is   the   star   of  a  movie  would  never  sell  and  that  this   would  never  work  for  mainstream  audi-­ ences.   Katniss   is   proof   that   not   only   are   heroines  carrying  a  movie  are  capable  of   being  interesting,  but  that  they  can  be  the   PRVWVXFFHVVIXOLQWKHER[RIÂżFHJDPHV

Cat  Tacopina  is  a  fourth-­year   journalism  major  who  thinks   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  the  worst  if  you  shaved   your  facial  hair  once  November   ended.  But  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  over  it.  Kind  of.

Send Us A Letter! oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  December  5,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS

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11

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

BACK ON TRACK

3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

7KH:RPHQÂśV%DVNHWEDOOWHDPKDVDUHFRUGKHDGLQJLQWR681<$&SOD\

By  Abbott  Brant Copy  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After   starting   the   season   0-­4,   the   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  is  now  on  a  two   game  winning  streak. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last  week  we  started  to  take  a  more   visible   step   forward,â&#x20AC;?   Head   Coach   Jamie   Seward  said.   7KHWHDPUHFRUGHGWKHLUÂżUVWZLQ1RY 26,  beating  Mount  Saint  Mary  College  69-­ 47  and  then  again  on  Dec.  3  against  East-­ ern  Connecticut  State  46-­43.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   biggest   change   is   that   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   gotten   less   tolerant   with   our   mistakes,â&#x20AC;?   Seward  said. With  a  discouraging  start,  Seward  said   the  losses  had  a  positive  effect  on  the  team   and  showed  the  Lady  Hawks  they  needed  

to  start  doing  things  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;right  way.â&#x20AC;?  After  the  Lady  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  69-­59  loss  on   1RYWR6WHYHQV,QVWLWXWHRI7HFKQRORJ\ Seward   said   fourth-­year   Captain   Jeanette   6FRWWZKRLVDYHUDJLQJÂżYHSRLQWVDQG rebounds   per   game,   approached   him   and   wanted  the  team  to  be  held  more  account-­ able  for  their  short  comings.   After   that,   Seward   said,   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;line   was   GUDZQ´ DV WR ZKDW 1HZ 3DOW] %DVNHWEDOO stands   for   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   a   standard   that   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   being   met  at  the  beginning  of  the  season.   Âł, WDNH IXOO UHVSRQVLELOLW\ RI EHLQJ too  patient  with  the  new  players,â&#x20AC;?  Seward   VDLG Âł, JDYH WKHP WRR PXFK WLPH WR DG just  to  college  play,  when  what  they  really   needed    was  to  be  held  accountable  for  our   downfalls.â&#x20AC;?  

The   players   said   they   are   responding   well  with  this  new  pressure.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  a  very  competitive  team  and   every  day   is   a   battle  on   the  court,â&#x20AC;?  third-­ year  guard  Ashley  Riefenhauser.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  push   one  another  in  various  aspects,  whether  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   GLYLQJRQWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRUIRUDORRVHEDOORUÂżJKW ing  for  the  offensive  rebound.â&#x20AC;?   Riefenhauser   said   regardless   of   the   challenges   the   Lady   Hawks   have   already   faced  and  the  contests  that  lay  ahead  in  re-­ maining   19   games   of   the   regular   season,   the  team  remains  positive  and  aims  to  push   through  each  game  they  play.   Third-­year   Captain   Shannan   Walker   said   even   though   the   season   began   with   a  slow  start,  the  Lady  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  main  goals   can  still  be  reached.  

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  trying  to  play  our  best  bas-­ NHWEDOOLQ1RYHPEHUDQG'HFHPEHUZHÂśUH going   to   be   playing   our   best   basketball   in   February   during   our   conference   tour-­ nament   and   in   the   national   tournament,â&#x20AC;?   Walker  said.   But   before   that,   the   team   will   begin   681<$&SOD\WKLV)ULGD\DJDLQVW681< Fredonia.   Seward  said  this  provides  a  fresh  start   IRU WKH WHDP ZLWK HYHU\ 681<$& WHDP starting  off  with  a  blank  conference  record   for  the  season.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  is  why  we  play  non-­conference   matches,   to   prepare   for   when   we   do   play   these   conference   teams,â&#x20AC;?   Seward   said.   Âł:H DUH GHÂżQLWHO\ EHWWHU SUHSDUHG QRZ than  we  were  two  weeks  ago.â&#x20AC;?


12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

SPORTS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Field  Hockey  and  Volleyball  Coaches  Honored By  Abbott  Brant Copy  Editor  |  N02167035@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Women’s   Volleyball   Head   Coach   Matt   Giufre   DQG ¿HOG KRFNH\ +HDG &RDFK 6KDQQD 9LWDOH ZHUH ERWKDZDUGHG681<$&&RDFKRIWKH<HDUDIWHUOHDG-­ LQJWKHLUUHVSHFWLYHWHDPVWRWKH1&$$7RXUQDPHQW Giufre  spent  his  12th  year  as  head  coach  of  the   /DG\+DZNVVHFXULQJDQRYHUDOOVHDVRQUHFRUGRI LQFOXGLQJDUHJXODUVHDVRQUHFRUGLQ681<$& SOD\$OWKRXJK1HZ3DOW]IHOOLQWKH681<$&&KDP-­ SLRQVKLSWR%XIIDOR6WDWH*LXIUH¶VIHOORZFRDFKHVLQ WKH FRQIHUHQFH DZDUGHG KLP KLV IRXUWK 681<$& &RDFKRIWKH<HDUWLWOH *LXIUHVDLGKHLQLWLDOO\WKRXJKWWKHDZDUGZRXOG JRWR0DULD'H3HWHUVKHDGFRDFKRIWKH/DG\%HQ-­ JDOV ³,ZDVSUHWW\VXUSULVHG´*LXIUHVDLGZKR¿UVW UHFHLYHGWKHDFFRODGHLQDQGWKHQDJDLQLQ DQG³7KH¿UVWWLPH,JRWLW,ZDVH[FLWHGEH-­ FDXVH,WKRXJKWµ:RZP\FROOHDJXHVWKLQN,EHORQJ KHUHDQG,¶PJRLQJLQWKHULJKWGLUHFWLRQ¶1RZLW¶V PRUHRIDUHFRJQLWLRQRIZKHUHZH¶UHVWLOOJRLQJ´ *LXIUHVDLGWKLVKRQRUGRHVQRWMXVWVSHDNWRKLV DFKLHYHPHQWVDVDFRDFKEXWLVDUHÀHFWLRQRIWKHWDO-­ HQWWKHWHDPSRVVHVVHGWKLV\HDU ³*HWWLQJ DQ\ DZDUG ZKHWKHU LW¶V D FRDFKLQJ DZDUG RU DOOFRQIHUHQFH RU DOOUHJLRQ DZDUGV LW¶V D UHFRJQLWLRQWKDWVKRZVRXUSURJUDPKDVQ¶WVWD\HGDW RQHSODFHDQGFRQWLQXHVWRJURZ´KHVDLG 3OD\HUV VDLG WKH SURJUDP¶V GHYHORSPHQW LV D product  of  Giufre’s  commitment  to  the  improvement   RIWKHWHDP ³+H¶VDOZD\VZDQWLQJPRUH´VHFRQG\HDURXW-­ VLGH KLWWHU %HFFD %RUTXLVW VDLG ³*RRG LVQ¶W JRRG HQRXJKDQGKHDOZD\VKDVDJUHDWZD\WRJHWWKHWHDP PRWLYDWHG +H¶V JUHDW DW JHWWLQJ WKH EHVW RXW RI KLV SOD\HUVZKLFKDOORZVRXUWHDPWREHSUHWW\VXFFHVV-­ IXO´ Giufre  isn’t  only  devoted  to  pushing  players  to   WKHLU IXOOHVW SRWHQWLDO EXW SURYLGLQJ SOD\HUV ZLWK D VRXQGLQJERDUGDQGH[WUDWLPHRQWKHFRXUW “I’ve   heard   about   other   coaches   at   different   VFKRROVZKRZLOOSODQRXWDSUDFWLFHWHDFKWKHWHDP ZKDW WKH\ QHHG WR NQRZ SUDFWLFH LW ZLWK WKHP DQG WKHQ MXVW JR KRPH DQG GR LW DOO RYHU WKH QH[W GD\´ &DSWDLQ0DULVVD.LQJVDLG *XLIUH JRHV DERYH DQG EH\RQG ZKDW WKH DYHU-­ DJHFRDFKGRHV.LQJVDLGWDNLQJWLPHWRWDONZLWK players  about  practice,  school,  friends,  or  family  and   LVZLOOLQJWRZRUNZLWKDQ\SOD\HUZKR¶VHDJHUWRLP-­ SURYH “He  is  honestly  one  of  the  most  giving  and  un-­ derstanding  coaches  I  have  ever  met  and  I’m  glad  I   JRWWREHDSDUWRIKLVWHDPIRUIRXU\HDUV´.LQJVDLG But  Giufre  said  complacency,  for  both  the  play-­ HUVDQGKLPVHOILVQRWDQRSWLRQLIWKHWHDPORRNVWR LPSURYH:KLOH*LXIUHORRNVWROHWWKH/DG\+DZNV

NQRZZKDWWKH\QHHGWRZRUNRQIRUQH[WVHDVRQKH H[SHFWVWKHVDPHIHHGEDFNIURPKLVSOD\HUVDVWRZKDW WKH\WKLQNZRXOGPDNHKLPSURJUHVVDVDKHDGFRDFK ³%RWKRIWKHPDUHH[WUHPHO\GHWDLOHGFRPSHWL-­ WLYHSHRSOH´$WKOHWLF'LUHFWRU6WXDUW5RELQVRQVDLG ³$VFRDFKHVWKH\ZDQWWKHEHVWIRUWKHLUSOD\HUV7KH\ VHWKLJKVWDQGDUGVDQGWKH\GRQ¶WZDYHUIURPWKHP´ :LWKPXOWLSOHFRDFKRIWKH\HDUDZDUGV*LXIUH and  Vitale  have  proven  they  have  distinguished  them-­ VHOYHVLQWKH681<$&FRQIHUHQFHDQGDUHEHJLQQLQJ WR GLVWLQJXLVK WKHPVHOYHV UHJLRQDOO\ ZLWK DGYDQFH-­ PHQWV LQ WKHLU UHVSHFWLYH 1&$$ 'LY ,,, 7RXUQD-­ PHQWV5REVLQVRQVDLG ³7KLVLVDIHDWWKDWVSHDNVKLJKO\DERXWWKHTXDO-­ LW\RIFRDFKHVWKDWZHKDYHKHUH´5RELQVRQVDLG ,QKHU¿IWK\HDUDWWKHUHLJQVRIWKH¿HOGKRFNH\ SURJUDP 9LWDOH UHFHLYHG KHU WKLUG FRQVHFXWLYH 68-­ 1<$& &RDFK RI WKH <HDU RI DZDUG DIWHU WKH WHDP FOLQFKHGWKH681<$&)LHOG+RFNH\&KDPSLRQVKLS IRUWKHVHFRQG\HDULQDURZ “It’s  an  honor,  and  it’s  something  that  happens   EHFDXVH RI WKH JURXS WKDW \RX KDYH´ 9LWDOH VDLG ³:KHQ\RXKDYHDWHDPWKDWZRUNVUHDOO\KDUGDQG EHOLHYHVLQ\RXUSKLORVRSK\LWPDNHV\RXUMREDVD FRDFKHDVLHU´ 7KHWHDPSRVWHGDRYHUDOOUHFRUGZKLOHJR-­ LQJLQFRQIHUHQFH ³7R VHH D FRDFK SXW FRXQWOHVV KRXUV RI KDUG ZRUN GHGLFDWLRQ DQG VXSSRUW LQWR D WHDP LV WUXO\ DPD]LQJ´VHFRQG\HDUIRUZDUG'DQL$FNHUPDQVDLG “Coach  Vitale  puts  everything  into  coaching  and  re-­ IXVHVWRVHHKHUWHDPIDLO6KHDOZD\VGHPDQGVPRUH IURPXVDQGKROGVXVWRDKLJKVWDQGDUGWKDWNHHSVXV PRWLYDWHG´ /LNH*LXIUH9LWDOHUHFHLYHGKHU¿UVW681<$& &RDFKRIWKH<HDUDZDUGGXULQJDVHDVRQWKHWHDPIHOO VKRUW RI WKH 681<$& &KDPSLRQVKLS WLWOH EXW VWLOO UHFHLYHGUHFRJQLWLRQIURPKHUIHOORZFRDFKHV 9LWDOH VDLG DOWKRXJK VKH ZDV HTXDOO\ H[FLWHG DERXWWKLV\HDU¶V&RDFKRIWKH<HDUKRQRUKDYLQJWKH WHDPZRUNWRZDUGWKHLUJRDORIZLQQLQJ681<$&V and  seeing  the  smiles  after  achieving  it  is  the  real  re-­ ZDUGVKHJRWWKLVVHDVRQ*HWWLQJHYHU\RQHWRSOD\ WKHLU EHVW ZKHQ LW FRXQWHG WKH PRVW 9LWDOH VDLG LV something  that  stood  out  to  the  other  coaches  and  ac-­ WXDOO\OHDGWRUHFHLYLQJWKLVDZDUG ³0\ IDYRULWH PHPRU\ ZLWK FRDFK 9LWDOH ZDV ZLQQLQJ WKH 681<$& &KDPSLRQVKLS WKLV \HDU´ $FNHUPDQVDLG³6KHNQHZZHGHVHUYHGWRZLQWKDW JDPH,UHPHPEHUKXJJLQJKHUWHDUVRIKDSSLQHVVLQ ERWKRXUH\HV<HWWKHORRNLQKHUH\HVZDVEHOLHI² VKH NQHZ ZH FRXOG GR VR PXFK PRUH /LNH VKH DO-­ ZD\VVD\VµZHZLOOEHFDXVHZHFDQ¶´ /RRNLQJ IRUZDUG 9LWDOH VDLG VKH KDV VWDUWHG UHFUXLWLQJSURVSHFWLYHVWXGHQWDWKOHWHVZKRZLOOFRQ-­ WLQXHWRKHOSDLGLQWKHWHDP¶VVXFFHVVDQGLVZRUN-­ LQJZLWKUHWXUQLQJSOD\HUVWRVHWLQGLYLGXDODQGWHDP JRDOVIRUQH[WVHDVRQ

3+2726%<52%,1:(,167(,1 0DWW*LXIUHDQG6KDQQD9LWDOHZHUHQDPHGFRDFKRIWKH\HDULQWKHLUUHVSHFWLYHVSRUWV                                    

7KXUVGD\'HFHPEHU


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 13

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Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  On  The  Rebound By  Andrew  Lief Sports    Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After   starting   the   season   with   two   consecutive   wins,   the   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Basketball   team  has  lost  their  last  four  games.     Since  returning  from  their  west  coast   trip,  the  Hawks  have  lost  to  Vassar  Col-­ lege  73-­61,  Delaware  Valley  College  85-­ 58,  Mount  Saint  Mary  College  71-­57  and   Eastern  Connecticut  State  77-­53. Head   Coach   Mike   Rejniak   said   the   common   theme   in   their   losses   is   that   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   displayed   a   strong   effort   on   de-­ fense,  but  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  just  not  scoring  enough   points.     Being  a  young  team,  the  players  are   in   their   own   heads   right   now,   Rejniak   VDLG7KHWHDPÂśVÂżYHVHFRQG\HDUSOD\HUV have  â&#x20AC;&#x153;shown  moments  of  great  play,â&#x20AC;?  but   are   not   playing   consistently   enough   and   while   they   take   the   same   shots   in   prac-­ tice,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  just  not  translating  to  the  games.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  trying  to  get  our  swag  back,â&#x20AC;?   Rejniak   said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once   that   happens   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be  great.â&#x20AC;?   Graduate   student   Captain   Nick   Tal-­ di   said   the   team   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   playing   like   they   were  during  their  California  trip  because   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   relying   too   much   on   isolation   plays  on  offense.    Instead,  the  team  needs   WR PRYH WKH EDOO DQG ÂżQG WKH RSHQ PDQ to  ensure  they  take  the  best  possible  shot   during  each  possession. He  said  he  has  been  telling  the  team   to  stay  positive  despite  the  losses  because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  long  season  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  play-­ ing  tough  opponents.     Rejniak  said  he  is  pleased  with  how   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   defense   has   been   doing   so   far,  allowing  their  opponents  to  score  72   points   per   game   while   shooting   44   per-­ IHFWIURPWKHÂżHOGEXWDOVRVDLGWKH\QHHG to  knock  down  shots  on  offense  in  order   to  get  back  on  the  winning  side.    

â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   can   say   defense   wins   champi-­ onships,   but   defense   only   goes   so   far,â&#x20AC;?   Rejniak  said. The  team  has  to  be  more  disciplined   on  both  sides  of  the  court,  which  is  cost-­ ing  them  points  throughout  the  game  and   giving  the  other  team  a  swing  in  momen-­ tum,  Rejniak  said. Taldi   said   he   has   to   become   more   involved  with  the  offense  and  play  more   FRQVLVWHQWO\ZKLFKZLOOEHQHÂżWWKHWHDP Rejniak   said   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   pleased   with   ÂżUVW\HDUIRUZDUG$QGUHZ6HQLXNZKRÂśV averaging   10.3   points   per   game   and   shooting  67  percent  on  his  three-­point  at-­ tempts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  a  surprise,  quite  frankly,   and  he  knows  that,â&#x20AC;?  Rejniak  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   very   consistent   and   has   been   play-­ ing  with  a  high  IQ.â&#x20AC;? Rejniak   said   the   tough   competition   the  Hawks  have  faced  so  far  has  allowed   his  team  to  prepare  for  conference  play.     All  four  of  the  teams  they  have  lost   to   are   expected   to   win   their   conference,   so  he  said  they  will  be  no  different  than   the   competition   in   the   SUNYAC,   which   will  be  strong  top-­to-­bottom  this  season. The  Hawks  will  open  SUNYAC  play   this  weekend  at  SUNY  Fredonia  on  Dec.   6  and  at  Buffalo  State  on  Dec.  7. Taldi   said   road   trips   are   tough   and   WKHWHDPQHHGVWRÂżQGDZD\WRVSOLWWKHVH games,  and  if  they  can  win  both  games  it   would  be  a  huge  boost  to  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  sea-­ son. Rejniak  said  he  is  expecting  two  dif-­ IHUHQW VW\OHV LQ WKHLU ÂżUVW WZR 681<$& games.     Fredonia   will   be   organized   and   play   a   slower   tempo   under   new   coach   Phillip   Seymore.     Buffalo   State,   on   the   other  hand,  plays  a  run  nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  gun  style  and   tries  to  turn  the  game  into  a  track  meet.     Rejniak  said  the  team  will  need  to  have  a   different  mindset  for  each  game.    

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  has  lost  four  games  in  a  row.                                                          

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN            

Visit  Our  Award-­Winning  Website!   Oracle.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  December  5,  2013


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N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Calm  down,  Jets  fans. The  past  three  weeks  have  been  what   everyone  has  expected  from  them  all  sea-­ son.    As  usual  though,  they  gave  the  fans   high  expectations  and  then  just  shattered   their  little  hearts.     The   5-­4   record   going   into   the   bye   made  everyone  optimistic  that  they  had  a   legitimate  chance  to  make  the  playoffs  in   the  weak  AFC.     But,  then  came  the  Jets  we  all  know   and   loathe.    A   37-­14   loss   to   the   Buffalo   Bills,  a  19-­3  loss  to  the  Baltimore  Ravens   and   a   23-­3   loss   to   the   Miami   Dolphins.     These  types  of  performances  are  what  ev-­ eryone  thought  would  happen  all  season,   but  they  just  decided  to  wait  nine  games.     If  you  thought  the  Jets  would  be  5-­4   going  into  the  bye  week  then  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  liar.     Okay  enough  of  that.  Now  what  ev-­ eryone   is   wondering   is   what   Rex   Ryan   should  do  with  Geno  Smith. Smith  should  continue  to  be  the  start-­ ing  quarterback  over  Matt  Simms.   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   care   that   Smith   has   been   in-­

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Bet  on  the  Jets consistent  all  season  and  has  been  abso-­ lutely  awful  the  past  three  weeks.    I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   care   that   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   thrown   eight   touch-­ downs  compared  to  19  interceptions  this   season.    I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  care  that  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  thrown  less   than  10  completions  the  last  three  weeks. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  rookie.    The  team  spent  a  sec-­ ond-­round   pick   on   him   in  April,   he   de-­ serves  to  have  the  chance  to  play  for  the   rest  of  the  season.     Even   though   the   Jets   are   currently   in   11th   place   and   only   one   game   out   of   the   second   wildcard   spot   in   the  AFC,   it   seems   extremely   unlikely   that   they   will   make  the  playoffs  because  of  how  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   playing. Because   of   all   the   circumstances,   Smith  should  play.  The  Jetsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  management   and  coaching  staff  need  to  further  evalu-­ ate  him  and  see  if  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  quarter-­ back  of  the  future.     Smith   has   some   great   games,   but   more  terrible  ones.    Right  now,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  look-­ LQJOLNH-RKQ,G]LNZLOOKDYHWRÂżQGDQHZ quarterback   this   spring.   With   the   new  

Collective   Bargaining   Agreement   that   was   signed   in   2011,   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   paying   Smith   a   ton   of   money,   so   they   have   the   ability   to   pay   another   quarterback.     Es-­ pecially   with   Mark   Sanchez   most   likely   coming  off  the  books  after  the  season. Smith  has  to  play  the  last  four  games   and   these   games   ultimately   have   to   de-­ cide  what  his  future  with  the  Jets  will  be,   but   who   knows?   He   may   be   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   quarterback   of   the   future   regardless   of   how  he  does  the  remainder  of  the  season. On   the   defensive   side   of   the   ball,   I   have  to  admit  I  was  wrong.     I   was   all   for   drafting   Dee   Millner   with  the  ninth  overall  pick.    I  thought  he   was   going   to   be   a   shutdown   cornerback   IRUWKHQH[WGHFDGHDQGÂżOOWKHYRLGWKDW Darelle  Revis  left.     Unfortunately,  I  was  wrong.    Yes,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only  been  12  games,  but  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  completely   lost.    He  gets  beaten  every  time  the  oppo-­ sition  goes  long  on  him.    Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  had  plenty   of   chances   to   intercept   a   pass,   but   from   what  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  seen,  he  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  catch  at  all.

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On   the   other   side,   I   was   so   wrong   about  Sheldon  Richardson.     I  hated  the  pick  at  the  time.    I,  along   with  most  Jets  fans,  were  hoping  that  they   ZRXOG ÂżQDOO\ WDNH DQ RIIHQVLYH OLQHPDQ or   offensive   skilled   player   to   improve   their   awful   offense,   but   they   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   and   I  was  pissed.     They  have  no  offensive  talent  and  of   course   there   was   Rex   trying   to   improve   his  defense,  but  this  pick  actually  turned   out   to   be   great.   Richardson   has   been   a   dominant   force   on   the   defensive   line   all   season  and  is  one  of  the  lone  bright  spots   on  this  terrible  team.     Richardson   along   with   Muhammed   Wilkerson  and  Quinton  Coples  will  give   the  Jets  a  solid  defensive  front  for  the  fu-­ ture.    Now,  Idzik  just  needs  to  get  a  sec-­ ondary  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  up  to  the  NFLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  standard.     And   hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one   last   thought,   Jets   fans: Stop  booing.    They  suck.    Stop  wast-­ ing   your   energy   and   booing   just   sounds   stupid.  

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Finally,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   certain;Íž   the   King   will   stay  on  his  throne. Go   ahead,   take   a   collective   sigh.   The   New   York   Rangers   announced   on   Wednesday   they   have   extended   Goal-­ tender  Henrik  Lundqvistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  contract  until   the  2020-­21  season,  resigning  the  goal-­ tender  for  $59.5  million.   Answering   to   the   speculation   he   faced   over   the   summer,   Lundqvist   ad-­ mitted   during   a   Wednesday   press   con-­ ference   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;leaving   New   York   was   never  an  option.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   want   to   be   a   Ranger   for   life,â&#x20AC;?   Lundqvist  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;To  picture  myself  any-­ where  else  was  just  wrong  and  was  never   an  option.  I  know  there  was  some  specu-­ lation   over   the   summer,   but   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   from   the   heart   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   it   was   never   an   option   to   leave   this  club.â&#x20AC;? And  then  my  heart  stopped  and  I  al-­ most  had  an  emotional  moment  in  front   of  my  computer. In   all   seriousness,   Blueshirts   fans   should   be   ecstatic   and   over   the   moon   with   this   news.   This   was   mentioned   in   the   past,   but   the   idea   of   trading   Lun-­ dqvist   so   that   a   hot   Cam   Talbot   could   take  on  the  No.  1  Goaltending  duties  for   the   New   York   Rangers   were   impulsive   and  unfair.  To  pseudo-­quote  an  infamous   ÂżOP IUDQFKLVH /XQGTYLVW LV WKH KHUR New  York  needs,  and  the  one  it  deserves. This  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  to  say  Cam  Talbot  is  unde-­ serving  of  the  praise  he  has  been  given.   Aside  from  that  blip  on  Monday  against   the  Winnipeg  Jets,  Talbot  has  been  play-­ ing   very   well   and   has   given   Lundqvist   competition   and,   at   the   same   time,   a   little  relief.   But   it   is   way   too   early   to   say   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   capable  of  being  a  No.  1  goaltender,  es-­ pecially   for   a   team   that   is   consistently   considered  a  threat. However,  this  column  is  about  why   Lundqvist   is   so   deserving   of   this   con-­ tract  extension.   I   understand   the   various   concerns   over   Lundqvist   this   season,   but   only   because   it   is   indicative   of   Ranger   fans.   They   are,   without   a   doubt,   among   the   most   loyal   fans   in   all   of   sports.   The   Rangers   could   be   bottom   of   the   table   right  now  and  regardless  of  how  frustrat-­ ed  they  may  be  with  the  team,  they  will   still  show  up  at  Madison  Square  Garden  

15

Seven  More  Years

in  support  of  the  team. With   that   being   said,   Ranger   fans   are  among  the  most  critical,  and  no  one   is   spared   from   the   wrath   of   New   York   criticism.   Lundqvistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   start   to   the   season   is   among,  if  not,  his  worst.  He  has  an  8-­11-­ 0   record,   with   a   .917   save   percentage   a   2.51   GAA.  These   certainly   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   the   numbers  you  would  expect  of  someone   who  has  won  a  Vezina  and  a  gold  medal   at   the   Olympic   games.   And   of   course   these   numbers   are   troubling,   but   really,   the  worry  and  doubt  hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  been  fair.   Just  like  how  Talbot  has  been  having   a  hot  streak,  Lundqvist  is  going  through  

a   cold   spell.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   rare   of   his   caliber,   but   it  happens.  Everything  we  know  and  are   told   about   Lundqvist   is   that   there   is   no   one  harder  on  him  than  himself  and  that   there  is  no  one  more  desiring  of  victory   than   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   King.â&#x20AC;?   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   sure   that   every   criticism  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  given  him,  he  had  given   himself  long  before. Any  New  Yorker  would  be  lying  to   themself  though  if  they  said  they  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   still   believe   in   Lundqvistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   capability   and  talent.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  apparent,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  appar-­ HQWWRWKRVHLQWKHIURQWRIÂżFH7KHH[ tension  should  do  Lundqvist  a  world  of   JRRG IRU KLV FRQÂżGHQFH ,WÂśV SURRI DQG evidence  of  the  fact  that  they  know  he  is  

Thursday,  December  5,  2013

PHOTO  COURTEST  OF  FLICKR  USER  MR_53                                    

talented  and  he  is  the  goaltender  who  is   most  able  to  bring  the  Rangers  to  a  Stan-­ ley  Cup.  Lundqvist  is  the  best  goaltender   in   the   world,   and   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   eight-­seasons   worth  of  proof  and  an  Olympics  to  back   it  up.   And   letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   face   it     â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Lundqvist   ZRXOGQÂśW JHW WKLV NLQG RI Ă&#x20AC;DFN LI WKH players  who  are  supposed  to  score  would   score   more.   Lundqvist   has   had   a   slow   start   to   this   season,   but   that   shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   erase   everything   he   has   done   for   this   club.  He  is  the  reason  we  make  it  to  the   postseason   every   year,   and   he   deserves   to   take   his   place   on   the   throne   of   New   <RUNXQWLOKHKDVÂżQLVKHGKLVFDUHHU

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HYTHM & LUESHIRTS

SPORTS


SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

BACK

TO BACK Men’s Basketball Looking To End Their Losing Streak PAGE 13

Geno Smith Continues to Struggle For the Jets PAGE 14

MAIN  AND  TOP  PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN   BOTTOM  PHOTO  COURTESTY  OF  FLICKR  USER  SLGCKGV

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL WINS TWO GAMES IN A ROW : PAGE 11


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 85, Issue 10  

Originally printed on December 5, 2013.

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