Issuu on Google+

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  84,  Issue  XXII

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

oracle.newpaltz.edu

SEEKING ELECTION Student Association Voting To Begin Next Week

STORY ON PAGE 7

SWEETEST SPOT

Popular Cupcake Store Attempts To Move To New Location

STORY ON PAGE 5

NEXT STEP PHOTO BY ROBIN WEINSTEIN

Three New Gender-­Neutral Suites To Be Offered In Bevier Hall Next Semester As Trial Run STORY ON PAGE 6 | EDITORIAL ON PAGE 9

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡5HVLGHQWV'HEDWH3DUN3RLQW3,/273J‡&RXQFLORI2UJV'LVFXVVHV&DPSXV,VVXHV3J ‡&DPSXV7R+RVW+XGVRQ5LYHU6\PSRVLXP3J‡7RZQ2I1HZ3DOW]7R'HVLJQ1HZ:HEVLWH3J


Andrew  Wyrich   EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Cat  Tacopina   MANAGING  EDITOR

_________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

Rachel  Freeman

NEWS  EDITOR ASSISTANT  MANAGING  EDITOR

Katherine  Speller   FEATURES  EDITOR

Carolyn  Quimby   Angela  Matua  

FEATURES          PG.  4B A&E                          PG.  7B SPORTS                  PG.  12

_________________

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SPORTS  EDITOR

Samantha  Schwartz   Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Suzy  Berkowitz   April  Castillo   Caterina  De  Gaetano   Andrew  Lief Zameena  Mejia   Jennifer  Newman John  Tappen   Matt  Tursi   COPY  EDITORS _________________

Katie  Truisi WEB  CHIEF

Joe  Neggie

MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

Suzy  Berkowitz   SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF  

Lauren  Yaro  

GRAPHICS  CONSULTANT   _________________

Megan  Ehrlich BUSINESS  MANAGER

Mark  Carroll  

DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER

The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI 681<1HZ3DOW]2XUFLUFXODWLRQLVThe  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG by  the  business  manager.  Community  announcements  are  published  gratuitously,  but  are   subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH ID[OLQHLV

Volume  84 Issue  XXII

oracle.newpaltz.edu

University  Police  Blotter Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

Index

THE  GUNK  

1B-­12B

THE  DEEP  END EDITORIAL   COLUMN -­  APRIL  CASTILLO  

SPORTS  

Mostly  Cloudy   High:  60  Low:  54

3-­7

NEWS

12B

Incident:  Alchohol  /  Drugs   Date:  4/14/13 Location:  Tricor  /  Mohonk  Aves M/S  intoxicated,  evaluated  by  mobile  life  and   transported  back  to  R/H  by  M/S.  

9

11-­15

Showers  High:  68  Low:  49

Cloudy   High:  56  Low:  35

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

Sunday,  April  21 Partly  Cloudy   High:  54  Low:  37

WANT  TO  WRITE  FOR  â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE  ORACLE?â&#x20AC;?

2XU/$676WRU\0HHWLQJ:LOO%H+HOG2Q Sunday,  April  28  at  7  p.m. @NewPaltzOracle

Friday,  April  19

Saturday,  April  20

10

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Five-­Day  Forecast Thursday,  April  18

Jaleesa  Baulkman,  Nicole  Brinkley,  Greg  Bruno,  Jimmy  Corrao,   Beth  Curran,  Kelsey  Damrad,  Nick  Fodera,  Ethan  Genter,  Roger  Gilson,   )DLWK*LP]HN(OH[LV*ROGEHUJ5LFDUGR+HUQDQGH]0DWKHZ-RKQ Ben  Kindlon,    Eileen  Liebler,  Adi  McHugh,  Kaycia  Sailsman, -DFN6RPPHU(PLO\6XVVHOO5\DQ:DO]+RZDUG<HZ

STAFF

VISIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ORACLEâ&#x20AC;? ONLINE:

Monday,  April  22 Partly  Cloudy   High:  55  Low:  42


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Locals  Protest  Possible  Park  Point  PILOT By  Carolyn  Quimby A&E  Editor  |  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Recently,   lawns   throughout   New   Paltz   became  home  to  red  signs  reading  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tax  Park   Point,  Not  the  Childrenâ&#x20AC;?  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;parkpointpeti-­ tion.com.â&#x20AC;?    The  signs  were  put  up  in  protest  of   Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   recent   payment-­in-­lieu-­of-­taxes   (PILOT)   request   from   the   Ulster   County   In-­ dustrial  Development  Agency  (UCIDA).   According  to  the  Wilmorite  website,  the   PILOT  agreement  would  cover  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  incurred   H[SHQVHV E\ WKH7RZQ IRU ÂżUH SROLFH HPHU-­ gency  and  other  services  provided,â&#x20AC;?  and  pro-­ vide  an  â&#x20AC;&#x153;increased  tax  base...as  opposed  to  the   current  tax  exempt  status.â&#x20AC;? Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   website   outlines   that   the   Universal  Tax   Exempt   Policy   offered   by   the   UCIDA  would  â&#x20AC;&#x153;provide  a  25-­year  tax  abate-­ ment  program  for  which  the  project  will  pay   a   range   of   $450-­750   per   unit.â&#x20AC;?   The   UCIDA   would   determine   the   exact   PILOT   payment   and  annual  increases  based  on  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;reassess-­ ment   of   local   impacts   plus   the   Consumer   Price   Indexâ&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;     and   in   the   26th   year,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   project  would  pay  full  property  taxes  for  the   remainder  of  the  lease  term,â&#x20AC;?  which  is  a  46-­ year  ground  lease.   However,  the  petition  launched  by  â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   Paltz   Taxpayersâ&#x20AC;?   on   Change.org   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   shares   the   same   slogan   as   the   sign   and   cur-­ rently  has  236  signatures  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  says  if  IDA  ap-­ proves  Park  Point  as  a  pilot  project,  Wilmorite   â&#x20AC;&#x153;will  not  have  to  pay  any  property  taxes,  sales   taxes  or  mortgage  recording  taxes.â&#x20AC;?

The  petition  states  that  if  the  UCIDA  re-­ jects   Park   Pointâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   PILOT   request,   Wilmorite   would  be  required  to  pay  taxes  â&#x20AC;&#x153;based  on  their   assessed   valueâ&#x20AC;?   like   other   property   owners.   The   â&#x20AC;&#x153;taxpayersâ&#x20AC;?   against   the   project   said   the   property  taxes  alone  could  give  the  New  Paltz   school   district   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   has   sustained   bud-­ get   and   program   cuts   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;approximately   $1   million   per   year   and   an   additional   $400,000   per  year  to  the  town  of  New  Paltz  and  Ulster   County.â&#x20AC;? Gerald   Benjamin,   director   of   the   Center   for   Research,   Regional   Education   and   Out-­ reach,   said   the   size   of   tax   abatement   is   the   issue,  not  the  actual  abatement,  as  it  is  a  com-­ mon  practice  and  policy  in  New  York  State. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  also  think  there  has  been  some  exag-­ geration   of   the   cost   to   the   community,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   arguing   that   the   costs   should   be   ZHLJKHG DJDLQVW WKH EHQHÂżWV 7KH DUJXPHQW needs  to  be  a  little  more  joined  on  real  sound   issues   and   less   on   exaggeration   and   the   rhe-­ torically  attractive.â&#x20AC;? According   to   Change.org,   those   who   have  signed  the  petition  include  Town  Coun-­ cilman   Jeff   Logan   and   Donald   Kerr,   a   New   Paltz   resident   and   prominent   community   member.  Kerr  said  the  signs  have  brought  the   topic   of   Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   PILOT   into   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;main-­ stream  discussion.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  lawn  signs  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  the  strained  refer-­ ence  to  taxing  children  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  were  a  bit  over  the   top,  but  served  a  purpose  to  bring  the  issue  to   folks  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  often  read  the  paper,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Benjamin  said  the  signs  are  â&#x20AC;&#x153;opaqueâ&#x20AC;?  in  

their   explicit   message,   but   he   thinks   people   are   most   â&#x20AC;&#x153;worriedâ&#x20AC;?   about   their   economic   well-­being.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   people   think   that   if   housing   is   built  near  the  campus,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  economically   harmed,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   lot,   but   not   all,   of   the   signs  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  seen  are  on  houses  for  people  who   currently  rent  housing  to  students.â&#x20AC;? While  he  is  in  favor  of  the  project,  Benja-­ min  said  he  thinks  a  lot  of  people  are  opposing   the  project  because  Wilmorite  is  a  large  cor-­ poration  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  he  sees  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;irrelevant.â&#x20AC;?  He   said  the  town  and  village  should  be  weighing   the  values  of  Park  Point  versus  the  concerns.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   project   is   important   to   the   college   and   future   vitality   of   the   college   in   a   very   competitive   environment   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   community   has  thrived  because  the  college  is  a  large  pres-­ ence  in  the  village,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not  a  full  understanding  that  the  vitality  of  the   community  is  contingent  on  the  vitality  of  the   university.â&#x20AC;? Kerr  said  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  against  Wilmoriteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  PILOT   UHTXHVWV IRU WZR UHDVRQV ² WKH ÂżUVW LV WKDW 3DUN3RLQWZLOOUHTXLUHSROLFHDQGÂżUHVHUYLFH which  costs  taxpayers  money,  and  the  second   is  that  80  percent  of  the  land  in  New  Paltz  is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;off   the   tax   rolls,â&#x20AC;?   making   the   remaining   20   percent  â&#x20AC;&#x153;very  highâ&#x20AC;?  in  local  taxes.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   welcome   Park   Point   as   long   as   they   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   want   to   crash   on   my   (tax)   couch,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   PILOT   request   is   not   required   to   make   this   project   viable.   Canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   blame   Wil-­ morite   for   being   greedy,   but   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   blame   the   residents  from  stopping  them  either.â&#x20AC;?

Planning  Board  Makes  Non-­Residential  Parking  Changes By  Caterina  De  Gaetano Copy  Editor  |  Cdegaetano64@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The   New   Paltz   Village   Planning   Board   changed   the   required   Schedule   C   Amendment,   which   deals   with   non-­residential   parking,   to   serve   as   guidelines   in   the   boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   evaluation   of   commercial  parking  applications. The   existing   requirements,   according   to   Planning  Board  Chairman  Maurice  Weitman,  are   XQDEOHWRFRQVLGHUVLWHVSHFLÂżFFRQGLWLRQVVXFK as  the  area,  business  hours  and  use,  which  make   the  requirements  either  too  relaxed  or  strict.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consideration  of  particular  knowledge  of   WKHLPPHGLDWHDUHDWKHVSHFLÂżFXVHRIWKHEXVL-­ ness   [and]   its   hours   of   operation,   etc.   was   not   able  to  be  given  in  making  our  decision,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   problem   has   existed   for   many   years   and   has  been  discussed  many  times  by  the  planning   boards  over  the  years,  its  attorney  and  our  plan-­ ner,  Curt  Lavalla.â&#x20AC;? Currently,   the   Schedule   C   212-­47  Amend-­

   3

NEWS

ment  states  that  the  minimum  off-­street  parking   requirements  for  public  places  including  assem-­ bly   halls,   churches,   auditoriums   and   theaters   is   one   space   for   each   six   seats.   In   the   case   of   schools,  a  minimum  of  one  space  for  each  nurs-­ ery   school   employee   and   two   spaces   for   each   classroom   is   allotted,   as   well   as   two   spaces   for   HDFK HOHPHQWDU\ VFKRRO FODVVURRP DQG ÂżYH IRU each  high  school  and  college  classroom. In  regards  to  businesses,  a  minimum  of  one   space  is  given  to  restaurants  for  each  three  seats   devoted  to  service  and  one  space  for  every  two   washing   machines   is   devoted   for   self-­service   laundry  establishments.   The   changes   made   to   Schedule   C,   titled   212-­44,   make   it   clear   that   minimum   off-­street   parking  spaces  are  recommended.     According  to  the  new  document,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  num-­ ber  of  off-­street  parking  spaces  required  for  any   use  shall  be  determined  by  reference  to  Schedule   C,  the  Guidelines  for  minimum  off-­street  parking  

schedule.â&#x20AC;?    It  also  states  that  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;guidelines  shall   consist   of   the   sum   of   the   spaces   recommended   for  each  individual  non-­residential  use  unless  it   can  be  demonstrated  that  staggered  hours  of  use   ZRXOGSHUPLWPRGLÂżFDWLRQ´ Previous   requirements   were   removed   from   the  original  amendment  such  as  the  use  of  a  per-­ mit  from  the  Planning  Board  to  have  spaces  ex-­ ceeding  400  ft. Weitman  said  that  the  changes  to  the  amend-­ ment  will  allow  the  board  to  make  fair  and  bal-­ anced   decisions   considering   all   factors   of   each   application. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Businesses  need  as  much  consideration  as   possible   without   unduly   impacting   nearby   resi-­ dents   and   other   businesses,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   cur-­ rent   requirements   can   unfairly   limit   a   prospec-­ tive  business  use  and  unduly  burden  neighboring   residents.  This   proposed   amendment   allows   the     Planning  Board  to  consider  all  impacts  and  fac-­ tors.â&#x20AC;?

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Council Discusses Issues By  April  Castillo Copy  Editor  |  Acastillo@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Council  Chair  Rose  Faber  opened  up  the   penultimate  Council  of  Organizations  meeting   on  Monday,  April  15.   Vice   President   of   Academic   Affairs   and   Governance   Jonathan   Espinosa   reminded   the   organizations  that  senate  elections  are  running   April  30  through  May  2  on  my.newpaltz.edu. The   two   main   topics   discussed   in   the   E-­ board  reports  were  the  new  option  of  truly  gen-­ der-­neutral  housing  as  well  as  police  involve-­ ment  in  student  affairs. Espinosa   spoke   enthusiastically   of   the   new  gender-­neutral  housing  that  will  be  avail-­ able   in   Bevier   Hall.   He   stressed   the   need   for   such  housing  on  a  permanent  basis  and  hopes   the  administration  will  move  forward  with  ad-­ ditional  gender-­neutral  housing  in  the  future. SA  Executive  Vice  President  Manuel  Te-­ jada   said   he   is   working   on   a   student   survey   about   drug   use   and   drug   policy.   The   survey   will   be   distributed   through   email   either   next   fall  or  spring.   Tejada   also   spoke   of   police   involvement   on  campus,  including  an  increased  police  pres-­ ence.   He   said   police   have   been   very   vigilant,   but   students   have   become   wary   of   their   pres-­ ence  in  residence  halls  at  night  and  have  ques-­ tioned  their  rights  to  privacy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things   are   changing,   and   maybe   they   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   see   that,â&#x20AC;?   Tejada   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   spoke   with   the   chief.   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   ask   something,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   ask   something  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  educating  each  other.â&#x20AC;? One  member  of  the  LARP  Club  discussed   police   harassment   during   which   the   clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   members  were  spoken  to  and  were  not  allowed   to  leave  the  emergency  access  road  in  front  of   Old  Main.   It  was  announced  that  the  budget  for  gen-­ eral  programming  was  almost  depleted.   Student   Senator   Mary   Bacorn   said   she   passed   legislation   to   work   toward   the   depart-­ mental  status  of  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  Gender  and  Sexual-­ ity   Studies.   Bacorn   brought   the   legislation   to   the  Academic  Affairs  Committee,  which  she  is   a  part  of,  and  stressed  bringing  it  to  faculty.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  faculty  and  students  are  behind  it,  how   can   they   say   no?â&#x20AC;?   Bacorn   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   they   do,   ZHÂśOO ÂżJKW EDFN (YHU\ IDFXOW\ PHPEHU LV DI-­ fected.â&#x20AC;? The  last  affair  to  be  discussed  at  the  meet-­ ing   was   the   election   of   council   chair.   When   WKHÂżUVWURXQGRIYRWLQJFDPHWRDQH[DFWWLHD re-­vote  was  conducted  and  Matt  LaSpada  won   with  a  close  majority. The  remainder  of  the  E-­board  candidates   and  senators  will  campaign  at  the  next  meeting   on  April  29  at  7  p.m.  in  SU  62/63.


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

PRISONERS  HUNGER  STRIKE Days   after   a   violent   clash   between   guards  and  prisoners,  the  U.S.  military   says  a  hunger  strike  at  Guantanamo  Bay   is   on   the   rise.   A   military   spokesman   VD\V  SULVRQHUV KDYH EHHQ FODVVLÂżHG as  hunger  strikers  as  of  Wednesday.   VOTE  RECOUNT  REJECTED 9HQH]XHODÂśV RSSRVLWLRQ ZDWFKHG LWV RS tions  dwindle  Wednesday  after  the  head  of   the   Supreme   Court   said   there   could   be   no   UHFRXQW RI WKH UD]RUWKLQ SUHVLGHQWLDO HOHF WLRQ YLFWRU\ E\ +XJR &KDYH]ÂśV KHLU OHDY ing  many  government  foes  feeling  the  only   chance  at  power  is  to  wait  for  the  ruling  so-­ cialists  to  stumble. GAY  MARRIAGE  LEGALIZED Hundreds   of   jubilant   gay-­rights   ad-­ vocates   celebrated   at   New   Zealandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Parliament  as  the  country  became  the   WK LQ WKH ZRUOG DQG WKH ÂżUVW LQ WKH $VLD3DFLÂżF UHJLRQ WR OHJDOL]H VDPH sex  marriage.  Lawmakers  voted  77  to   44  in  favor  of  the  gay-­marriage  bill  on   LWV WKLUG DQG ÂżQDO UHDGLQJ:HGQHVGD\ night.   DOCTORS  LEAVE  FOR  U.S.  Going  to  the  doctor  in  Puerto  Rico  has  for   years   often   meant   getting   in   line.   Now,   it   might   mean   getting   on   a   plane.  A   medical   exodus  is  taking  place  in  the  Caribbean  ter-­ ULWRU\DVGRFWRUVDQGQXUVHVĂ&#x20AC;HHIRUWKH86 mainland,  seeking  higher  salaries  and  better   reimbursement  from  insurers.   HOMELESS  MAN  CHARGED    Los  Angeles  County  prosecutors  say   a  38-­year-­old  homeless  man  suspected   RIVHWWLQJDPDQRQÂżUHLQDFDURXWVLGH a   convenience   store   has   been   charged   with  murder.   CHINESE  STUDENT  KILLED /X /LQJ]L ZDV NLOOHG 0RQGD\ LQ WKH %RVWRQ 0DUDWKRQ H[SORVLRQV DFFRUG ing   to   a   statement   from   Boston   Uni-­ versity.   She   was   a   graduate   student   studying   mathematics   and   statistics   and   scheduled   to   receive   her   graduate   degree  in  2015. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Symposium  To  Educate  On  The  Hudson  River By  Jennifer  Newman

There   will   be   several   presentations   made   E\PRUHWKDQKDOIDGR]HQVSHFLDOLVWVWKURXJK out  the  day,  which  will  be  followed  by  a  poster   The  Hudson  River  Environmental  Society   session  for  visual  aid    and  a  reception,  according   ZLOO EH SUHVHQWLQJ WKHLU ODWHVW VFLHQWLÂżF XQGHU to  the  Conference  Program.  Some  guest  speak-­ standings  of  the  Hudson  River  during  a  science   ers  include  several  distinguished,  doctrine-­level   symposium  next  week. H[SHUWVLQWKHÂżHOGZKRZLOOGLVFXVVDUDQJHRI This  2013  Hudson  River  Science  Sympo-­ WRSLFVVXFKDV+XGVRQ5LYHUÂżVKFRQWDPLQDQWV sium:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  State  of  Hudson  River  Scienceâ&#x20AC;?  is   ecology  and  science.   WKHÂżUVWRIWKLVQDWXUHVLQFHDFFRUGLQJWR â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   honored   to   be   part   of   [the   sympo-­ Biologist   for   New  York   State   De-­ sium].  A  lot  of  the  speakers  there  are   partment   of   Environmental   Con-­ WRS QRWFK VFLHQWLVWV´ 6XV]NRZVNL servation,  Chuck  Nieder.   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;From  the  science  end  of  things,   Nieder   said   the   symposium   it   really   is   an   excellent   opportunity.   will  cover  an  array  of  important  en-­ Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  good  group  of  people.â&#x20AC;?   vironmental  topics  including  scien-­ Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  lot  to  celebrate  -­  the  river  is  a  lot   The   Center   for   Research,   Re-­ WLÂżF XQGHUVWDQGLQJ RI WKH +XGVRQ FOHDQHUWKDQLWZDVDOWKRXJK\RXZLOOÂżQG gional   Education   and   Outreach   River   and   environments,   the   driv-­ problems.   (CRREO),  host  and  co-­sponsor  of  the   ers   behind   the   science   and   future   event,  has  been  planning  this  sympo-­ challenges.   There   will   also   be   an   sium   with   Neider   since   June   2012,   D ENNIS  S USZKOWSKI opportunity  for  scientists,  resource   according   to   Janis   Benincasa,   assis-­ managers,   educators   and   students   tant  director  of  CRREO. to  share  ideas,  he  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Independently   and   in   collabo-­ One   of   the   guest   speakers,   Dr.   Dennis   standing  the  issues.   ration   with   local   governments,   business   and   6XV]NRZVNL GLUHFWRU RI WKH +XGVRQ 5LYHU â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  lot  to  celebrate  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  the  river  is  a   QRWIRUSURÂż WVLQWKH+XGVRQ9DOOH\&55(2ÂśV Foundation,  will  be  talking  about  the  future  of   WKH+XGVRQ5LYHUVSHFLÂżFDOO\WKHFXUUHQWHFR ORW FOHDQHU WKDQ LW ZDV DOWKRXJK \RX ZLOO ÂżQG research  mission  is  to  conduct  studies  on  topics   nomic  situation  affecting  environmental  efforts   problems,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  still  have  PCBs,  but  at   of  regional  interest,  bring  visibility  and  focus  to   and  whether  or  not  funds  will  be  available  for   the  same  time,  the  levels  of  classic  contaminants   these   matters,   foster   communities   working   to-­ are  down.â&#x20AC;? JHWKHUWREHWWHUVHUYHFLWL]HQU\DQGDGYDQFHWKH the  kinds  of  science  needed  for  the  future.   $FFRUGLQJWR6XV]NRZVNL1HZ<RUN+DU public  interest  in  our  region,â&#x20AC;?  Benincasa  said. Âł, WKLQN LWÂśV EHHQ D ORW RI WHUULÂżF VFLHQFH bor   h as   l ost   8 0   p ercent   o f   w etlands   o ver   t he   p ast   The  symposium  will  take  place  in  the  Stu-­ WKDW KDV JRQH LQWR WKH +XGVRQ 5LYHU´ 6XV] few   centuries,   which   the   symposium   will   also   dent  Union  on   Wednesday,  April  24  from  8  a.m.   kowski  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  learned  a  lot  about  it.  A  lot   cover. to  5:30  p.m. of  the  science  that  has  been  generated  has  been   Copy  Editor  |  Jnewman46@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

very   useful   for   management   and   public   policy   decisions.â&#x20AC;? In  general,  the  Hudson  River  has  had  a  re-­ markable   recovery   over   the   last   three   years   in   terms   of   the   amount   of   pollution   being   added   to  it  and  the  water  quality  has  been  much  better   than  in  the  past,  he  said. 6XV]NRZVNL VDLG WKH WZR PDLQ LVVXHV KH worries  about  for  the  future  are  maintaining  the   water  quality  with  the  funding  and  fully  under-­

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Town  Of  New  Paltz  To  Launch  New  Website By  John  Tappen Copy  Editor  |  N02288261@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

7KH 7RZQ RI 1HZ 3DOW] ZLOO KDYH D QHZ website  in  the  next  four  to  six  weeks,  according   to  Town  Supervisor  Susan  Zimet.   The   Town   Board   approved   Virtual   Towns   and  Schools  to  design  a  new  website  for  the  town.   Zimet   said   the   current   website   is   not   user   friendly  and  has  given  town  board  members  dif-­ ÂżFXOW\ZKHQWU\LQJWRSRVWLQIRUPDWLRQ According   to   Zimet,   Secretary   Carol   Con-­ QROO\DQG+LJKZD\6XSHUYLVRU&KULV0DU[KDYH tried   to   update   the   site   a   number   of   times   with   minimal  results. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  has  been  a  problem  for  a  long  time,â&#x20AC;?  she   said. Zimet   went   to   the   Association   of   Towns   H[SR²DQH[KLELWLRQIRUWRZQSODQQLQJ]RQLQJ DQGHPHUJHQFLHV²LQWHQWRQÂżQGLQJDFRPSDQ\

who  could  design  a  new  website. She  said  she  wanted  to  hire  a  company  that   worked  primarily  on  government  websites,  as  op-­ posed  to  one  that  works  for  businesses  in  the  pri-­ vate  sector. She   found   Virtual   Towns   and   Schools,   a   EXVLQHVVKHDGTXDUWHUHGLQ0D\QDUG0DVVZKRVH clients   include   cities,   towns,   villages,   counties,   school   districts,   libraries,   utilities,   public   safety   departments  and  municipal  associations  across  15   states,  according  to  their  website. The   cost   of   a   new   site   concerned   Zimet,   who   said   she   had   been   told   the   cost   of   hiring   a   company  to  design  a  website  would  cost  between   $18,000  and  $25,000.  However,  it  will  only  cost   IRU9LUWXDO7RZQVDQG6FKRROVWRGHVLJQ a  new  site. Because   Virtual   Towns   and   Schools   works   predominantly  for  municipalities,  public  and  pri-­ vate   schools   and   are   â&#x20AC;&#x153;service-­centric,â&#x20AC;?   they   rec-­

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

RJQL]HWKHÂłUHDOLWLHVRIFOLHQWVÂśUHGXFHGVWDIIUH sources  [and]  limited  available  time,â&#x20AC;?  according   to  their  website.   Zimet  said  the  goal  is  to  have  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;workable   site  that  gets  information  to  the  public.â&#x20AC;?   The  new  website  will  be  â&#x20AC;&#x153;more  responsive   to   the   public,â&#x20AC;?   encompassing   all   of   the   Town   Board   and   committee   meetings,   which   are   not   easily  accessible  at  the  moment,  she  said. =LPHWVDLGXVHUVZLOOEHDEOHWRÂżQGRXWHY erything  that  happens  each  month  at  Town  Hall.   Virtual  Towns  and  Schools,  which  has  oper-­ DWHGVLQFHRIIHUVÂżYHGLIIHUHQWZHEVLWHWHP SODWHVDQGDQRSWLRQIRUFOLHQWVWRFXVWRPL]HWKHLU own.  Zimet  said  she  wants  a  simple  site,  that  is   easy  to  access  and  navigate  and  the  board  is  cur-­ UHQWO\GHFLGLQJRQRQHRIWKHÂżYHWRXVH Zimet  said  she  also  hopes  to  add  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;creativeâ&#x20AC;?   element  to  the  site  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  place  that  will  â&#x20AC;&#x153;highlight   HYHQWVDQGJUHDWWKLQJVKDSSHQLQJLQ1HZ3DOW]´


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

 5

Moxie  Cupcake  Struggles  With  Desired  Move NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

By  Cat  Tacopina Managing  Editor  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Even   with   a   number   of   community   members   behind  their  cause,  Moxie  Cupcakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  plan  to  move   location  is  currently  on  hold. Moxie   Cupcakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   application   to   move   from   215  Main  St.  to  184  Main  St.  is  currently  suspended   by  the  Village  of  New  Paltz  Planning  Board  due  to   $1,600  worth  of  consultant  work  not  being  paid.   Moxie   Cupcake   Owner   Josie   Eriole   said   she   has  not  paid  the  money  for  the  consultant  work  be-­ cause  of  the  boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  use  of  an  engineer  consultant.   Eriole  said  the  engineering  consultant  was  unneces-­ sary  and  has  only  been  used  to  increase  the  price  of   what  has  already  been  a  costly  process. Âł$WWKHYHU\ÂżUVWPHHWLQJWKHERDUGVDLGWKH\ hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even   looked   at   my   application   or   site   plan,   but  had  already  charged  me  $1,700  for  my  applica-­ tion,â&#x20AC;?  Eriole  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  they  told  me  I  needed  to   pay  more,  I  asked  them  why  they  needed  it  and  they   told   me   it   was   non-­negotiable.   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   essentially   holding  my  application  hostage  at  this  point.â&#x20AC;? :KHQ(ULROHÂżUVWDSSOLHGWRRSHQ0R[LH&XS-­ cake  in  2011  at  its  current  location,  she  said  it  took   two  meetings  and  between  $400  to  $500  to  get  ap-­ proval   from   the   board.   Now   in   2013,   Eriole   said   aside  from  the  money  the  board  is  asking  for  her  to   pay,  she  is  also  paying  rent  for  Moxieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  current  loca-­ tion  and  their  prospective  one. Chair   of   the   Village   of   New   Paltz   Planning   Board  Maurice  Weitman  said  the  board  has  provided   Eriole  with  multiple  ways  for  her  to  move  forward  in   her  goal  to  relocate,  but  her  refusal  to  pay  for  costs   already  incurred  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  great  disservice  to  herself.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  nothing  more  for  her  than  to  move   into  that  building,â&#x20AC;?  Weitman  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  let  her   take  shortcuts  and  have  extended  deadlines  for  her.   The  ball  is  in  her  court  and  if  she  would  just  pay  the   money,  we  could  all  move  forward.â&#x20AC;? 7RPRYHWRWKHQHZORFDWLRQ(ULROHKDGWRÂżOO RXWDVSHFLDOXVHDSSOLFDWLRQDVWKHUHLVÂłQRVSHFLÂżHG use  for  a  bakery  or  cafe  in  the  village,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. The   special   use   application   requires   Eriole   to  have  a  site  plan  where  she  lists  the  changes  she   would   make   to   184   Main   St.   if   she   were   to   move   shop  there.  She  said  the  board  asked  her  to  add  light-­ ing,   the   use   of   a   planter   and   parking   designations,   among  other  landscaping  and  space  changes  she  may   need.   Eriole  said  the  changes  she  would  be  making   are  cosmetic  and  do  not  require  the  consulting  of  an   engineer.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   [the   board]   keep   saying   they   need   to   consult  an  engineer  to  look  at  the  latest  site  plan  and   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  engineering  going  on,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one   board   member   who   says   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   need   to   do   more  consultant  review,  and  asking  why  do  we  need   this  extra  money,  but  he  has  been  shot  down  every   time.â&#x20AC;?

FERTILIZER  PLANT  EXPLODES A  massive  explosion  at  a  fertilizer  plant   near   Waco   on   Wednesday   night   in-­ MXUHGGR]HQVRISHRSOHDQGVHQWĂ&#x20AC;DPHV shooting  into  the  night  sky,  leaving  the   factory   a   smoldering   ruin   following   a   blast  that  damaged  buildings  for  blocks   in  every  direction.

PHOTO  BY  DANA  SCHMERZLER Moxie  Cupcakeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  application  to  move  locations  is  currently  suspended  by  the  Village  Planning  Board.

The  building  at  184  Main  St.  has  been  vacant   for   two   years   and   Eriole   said   she   wanted   to   move   Moxieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  location  there  to  increase  visibility.  She  also   said  the  spot  will  allow  her  the  space  she  needs  to   continue  her  businessâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  success. The  desired  move  has  received  a  large  amount   of  support  from  community  members  and  Eriole  said   public  comment  has  been  in  her  favor  at  the  past  two   planning  board  meetings. While   Weitman   said   he   and   the   other   board   members  want  Moxie  Cupcake  to  occupy  the  space,   the  law  does  not  permit  them  to  move  forward  unless   the  proper  renderings  to  the  site  plan  are  made  and   the  money  needed  to  pay  consultants  is  paid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  need  to  make  sure  we  as  a  board  review   the  application  for  legality  and  that  it  is  suitable  for   someone  to  move  in  there,â&#x20AC;?  Weitman  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  law   says  we  cannot  move  any  further  unless  the  money   needed  for  the  consultation  is  paid  into  the  escrow.â&#x20AC;? Eriole   said   despite   the   boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   refusal   to   ap-­ prove   her   application   due   to   her   site   plan   and   the   money  she  owes,  they  have  allowed  other  venues  to   move  forward  in  their  applications  even  though  they   have   had   less   consultation   and   site   planning   done   than  she  has  had  to  do.

She   said   a   cafĂŠ   looking   for   a   spot   downtown   was  brought  up  at  a  previous  board  meeting  and  even   though  they  had  done  less  than  her  in  regards  to  the   site  plan,  she  said  they  were  given  the  go  ahead  â&#x20AC;&#x153;on   the  spot.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;No   site   plan   review   was   done   on   this   appli-­ cation  and  there  are  changes  to  the  site,  which  ap-­ parently   no   one   has   seen,â&#x20AC;?   Eriole   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nobody   has  bothered  to  look  at  this  site.  There  are  multiple   things  required  that  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  there.  Apparently  that  is   how  things  roll.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  completely  unfair,  and  all  I  have   ever  asked  is  to  be  treated  fairly.â&#x20AC;? Weitman   said   the   reason   the   board   approved   the  cafĂŠ  so  quickly  is  because  they  are  making  few   changes   and   handed   in   all   of   their   paperwork   â&#x20AC;&#x153;on   time  and  according  to  the  process.â&#x20AC;? Even  with  the  back  and  forth  between  her  and   the  board,  Eriole  said  she  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;fairly  optimisticâ&#x20AC;?  she   will  be  able  to  move  into  her  desired  location. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  anything  to  base  it  on  and  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know  why  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  feeling  so  good  about  this,  but  I  think   it  will  work  out,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE TO WATCH OUR VIDEO ON MOXIEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S POTENTIAL MOVE AT ORACLE.NEWPALTZ.EDU

LIKE WHAT YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;RE READING?

! N I UNE

T

LOCAL NEWS STARTS EVERY WEEKDAY AT 7 P.M.

MARATHON  INVESTIGATED    In  what  could  be  a  major  break  in  the   Boston   Marathon   case,   investigators   are  on  the  hunt  for  a  man  seen  in  a  de-­ partment  store  surveillance  video  drop-­ ping  off  a  bag  at  the  site  of  the  bomb-­ ings,  a  local  politician  said  Wednesday. RICIN  SUSPECT  ARRESTED A  Mississippi  man  accused  of  mailing   letters   with   suspected   ricin   described   uncovering   a   conspiracy   to   trade   hu-­ man   body   parts   on   the   black   market   and   sometimes   performed   as   an   Elvis   Presley  impersonator. SENATE  DISAPPOINTS  OBAMA  A   visibly   infuriated   President   Barack   Obama   surrounded   himself   with   tear-­ stained   parents   of   Connecticut   school   shooting   victims   Wednesday   and   de-­ clared   it   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;pretty   shameful   day   for   Washingtonâ&#x20AC;?   after   the   Senate   rejected   a  measure  designed  to  make  it  tougher   for  criminals  to  get  their  hands  on  guns. TEEN  BOYS  NOT  EXPELLED 6FKRRO RIÂżFLDOV FRXOG QRW H[SHO WKUHH teenage   boys   charged   with   sexually   battering   a   classmate   at   a   party   last   fall,  even  after  she  hanged  herself  and   her   family   complained   that   a   humili-­ ating   photo   of   the   alleged   assault   was   being   circulated,   the   superintendent   said  Wednesday  -­  a  statement  that  was   quickly  disputed  by  the  lawyer  for  the   girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  family. SENATE  FAILS  NEWTOWN Emotionally  drained  and  weary  family   members  of  the  Newtown  shooting  vic-­ tims,  thrust  into  a  new  role  as  gun  con-­ trol  lobbyists,  said  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  disappointed   but  undaunted  by  the  U.S.  Senateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  re-­ jection   Wednesday   of   an   amendment   expanding   background   checks   for   gun   purchases. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

Thursday,  April  18,  2013


 6 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Gender-­Neutral  Suites  To  Open  In  Fall  2013 By  Rachel  Freeman News  Editor  |  Rachel.freeman17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Beginning  next  semester,  there  will  be  three  gen-­ der-­neutral  suites  in  Bevier  Hall,  according  to  Coordi-­ nator  for  Housing  Options  Rafael  Calderon. The   suites   will   differ   from   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;gender-­mixedâ&#x20AC;?   suites  currently  available  in  LeFevre  Hall,  which  will   be   moved   to   Dubois   Hall   in   the   fall,   and   the   co-­ed   Ă&#x20AC;RRULQ*DJH+DOO&DOGHURQVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   have   real   gender-­neutral   suites   where   guys   and   girls,   trangender   students,   whoever,   any  gender,  any  gender  identity,  they  can  live  in  the   same  bedrooms  together,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. As  of  now,  Calderon  said  there  will  probably  be   two   six-­person   suites   and   either   a   four   or   an   eight-­ person  suite.  He  said  there  was  an  interest  in  the  suites   HYHQEHIRUHWKH\ZHUHÂżQDOL]HGDQGDVVXFKWKH\DUH HVVHQWLDOO\DOUHDG\ÂżOOHGIRUQH[W\HDU Though   student   voices   played   a   part   in   the   de-­ velopment   of   gender-­neutral   housing,   at   this   point,   Calderon  said  they  have  been  discussing  the  possibil-­ ity  for  three  or  four  years. Because  there  are  not  many  â&#x20AC;&#x153;good  examplesâ&#x20AC;?  of   how  to  coordinate  gender-­neutral  housing  within  the   681< V\VWHP &DOGHURQ VDLG WKHVH ÂżUVW WKUHH VXLWHV will  test  the  success  of  the  new  option. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  lot  of  the  decisions  we  make  we  have  to  make   based   on   what   the   four-­year   SUNY   schools   do,â&#x20AC;?   &DOGHURQVDLGÂł,IZHÂżQGWKDWLWZRUNVRXWDQGWKHUH are  no  issues  and  we  end  up  expanding  then  it  will  be   open  to  everybody,  but  another  thing  that  needs  to  be   made  clear  is  that  this  is  just  a  trial  run  to  see  if  this  is   feasible  on  this  campus.â&#x20AC;? )RXUWK\HDU:RPHQV*HQGHUDQG6H[XDOLW\6WXG-­ ies  major  Cody  Hill  said  even  if  the  housing  does  not   work  well  for  all  students,  he  hopes  the  administration   will  not  overlook  the  pressing  need  that  will  still  exist. Âł*HQGHUQHXWUDOKRXVLQJLVVWLOOJRLQJWREHQHF-­ essary   for   transgender   students,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   debatable   or  excusable,  and  even  if  it  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  work  out  perfectly   with   cisgender   students,   I   would   hope   the   adminis-­ tration  would  have  enough  sense  not  to  revoke  truly   gender-­neutral  housing  once  it  is  given  to  us  next  se-­ mester,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  it  is  not  accessible  to  all  transgen-­ der  students  living  on  campus,  then  the  point  has  been   sorely  missed.â&#x20AC;? Student   Senator   Zachary   Rousseas   said   he   saw   the  current  gender-­mixed  suites  as  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;failed  attemptâ&#x20AC;?   at  gender-­neutral  housing  because  they  do  not  go  by   what   gender   the   students   identify   with   and   are   not   available  to  freshmen.  However,  he  said  he  is  happy   this  next  step  is  being  taken  and  hopes  it  will  be  open   to  more  students  who  need  it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   really   glad   that   there   will   be   some   actual   JHQGHUQHXWUDO KRXVLQJ RSWLRQV DQG , KRSH /*%74 students   will   be   given   priority   here,   especially   trans  

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN There  will  be  three  gender-­neutral  suites  in  Bevier  Hall  next  semester.

students,â&#x20AC;?  Rousseas  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  hope  that  these  housing   RSWLRQVZLOOEHRIIHUHGWRÂżUVW\HDUVWXGHQWVEHFDXVH LWLVDEVROXWHO\FUXFLDOWKDWÂżUVW\HDUVIHHOOLNH681< 1HZ3DOW]FDQEHDVDIHVSDFHIRUWKHP%HFDXVHWKH\ are  young,  college  is  a  whole  new  transition  for  them,   and  their  place  of  residence  may  not  be  a  safe  space   for  them,  so  they  need  these  options.â&#x20AC;? Hill  said  he  believes  it  is  paramount  to  have  hous-­ ing   where   gender   is   irrelevant   for   transgender   stu-­ GHQWVZKRKHVDLGPXVWFRQVWDQWO\ÂżJKWWRVHOILGHQ-­ tify  and  struggle  with  living  in  a  place  that  discredits   who  they  are.     It   is   a   lack   of   understanding   and   urgency   that   contributes  to  the  challenge  of  having  gender-­neutral   housing  instated,  as  well  as  the  small  population  af-­ fected  by  these  issues  Hill  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  think  that  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  exaggerating  when  we  say   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  in  physical  danger  to  be  a  visibly  trans  person  in   gendered  space.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  only  uncomfortable,  but  it  is   psychological  violence  to  constantly  have  our  gender   identities  invalidated  and  people  who  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  trans  can   never   understand   the   severity   of   that,â&#x20AC;?   Hill   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  a  handful  of  outspoken  trans  activists  and   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  the  same  people  that  have  outspoken  on  other   issues,  then  they  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  see  it  as  that  important  because   it  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  necessarily  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;serve  the  whole  student  body.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Executive  Director  for  Compliance  and  Campus   &OLPDWH7DQKHQD3DFKHFR'XQQVDLGWKH/*%74VXU-­ vey  done  a  little  more  than  a  year  ago  really  showed   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;at   least   a   segment   of   our   campus   populationâ&#x20AC;?   does   not   feel   they   have   enough   institutional   support   for  the  way  they  live  their  lives.

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

Although  she  does  not  feel  the  new  housing  will   be  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;silver  bulletâ&#x20AC;?  that  deals  with  all  the  issues  of     the  affected  community,  she  said  it  is  important  that  a   VWHSLVWDNHQVRLWFDQEHEXLOWXSRQLQRUGHUWRIXOÂżOO that  need. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   this   starts   to   help   to   answer   those   concerns   and  provide  a  better  environment  for  our  students,  all   over,  if  it  makes  everybody  feel  a  little  safer,  a  little   better   about   being   here,   more   productive   in   doing   their  work,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  good  step,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. In   regards   to   gender   or   sexual   identity   harass-­ ment,  Pacheco-­Dunn  said  she  does  not  think  one  act   ZLOOVWRSWKHVHW\SHVRISUREOHPVEXWLQUHFRJQL]LQJ actions   that   can   be   taken   against   them,   they   can   be   helped.   While   not   all   attempts   will   better   the   situa-­ tion,  doing  nothing  is  not  a  solution  either,  she  said. Similar   to   issues   surrounding   communities   that   feel  a  racial  or  ethnic  bias,  she  said  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;one  victory  at   a  timeâ&#x20AC;?  and  it  all  comes  down  to  education  and  help-­ ing  others  to  respect  your  belief,  rather  than  changing   theirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   a   lot   of   people   that   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   why   this  is  of  a  concern  to  this  population  and  if  they  knew   it   they   might   better   understand   it.   They   might   not   agree  with  it,  but  they  need  better  understanding  and  I   think  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ultimately  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  here  for,â&#x20AC;?  Pacheco-­ Dunn   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   whole   concept   of   going   to   college   is  to  get  a  better  understanding  about  what  you  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know  and  about  who  you  want  to  be  as  a  person  and  I   think  that  every  time  you  reach  out  on  these  types  of   issues,  which  are  deeply  personal,  you  educate  people   and  I  think  you  make  great  strides.â&#x20AC;?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

   7

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Student  Association  Election  Season  Gets  Into  Gear

3+2726%<52%,1:(,167(,1 Student  senators  Jesse  Ginsburg,  Zachary  Rousseas  and  Mary  Bacorn  will  all  be  running  for  the  position  of  executive  vice  president.

By  Andrew  Wyrich Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Andrew.wyrich63@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Applications   have   been   handed   in,   meaning   elections   for   the   fall  2013  Student  Association  (SA)  senate  and  E-­board  will  soon  be   underway.   While  the  SA  president  position  will  be  uncontested  in  this  se-­ mesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  election,  three  students  have  cast  their  names  into  the  fray   for  the  role  of  executive  vice  president.   Current  senators  Zachary  Rousseas,  Jesse  Ginsburg  and  Mary   Bacorn  will  all  be  choices  for  the  second-­highest  ranking  member  of   student  government  when  voting  begins  on  the  morning  of  Tuesday,   April  30.   The  three  competing  senators  have  various  issues  they  hope  to   address  should  they  be  elected  to  the  position.   Ginsburg,  a  second-­year  student  and  third-­term  senator,  said  the   three  key  things  he  would  focus  on  as  executive  vice  president  are   helping  adjunct  faculty,  continuing  to  push  for  the  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Gender   and   Sexuality   Studies   program   to   gain   departmental   status   and   re-­ searching  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;spikeâ&#x20AC;?  in  drug-­related  arrests  on  campus.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  critically  about  a  lot  of  different  things  and  come  up   with  creative  solutions  to  problems,â&#x20AC;?  Ginsburg  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  feel  like  I  am   UHDOO\RXWKHUHÂżJKWLQJWKHJRRGÂżJKWÂąP\SULRULWLHVDUHVWUDLJKWDQG Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  doing  this  for  the  right  reasons.â&#x20AC;?   Ginsburg  said  adjunct  faculty  members  are  treated  unfairly  on   campus,  which  he  believes  leads  to  a  decrease  in  the  quality  of  edu-­ cation   students   receive.   He   said   any   movement   toward   improving   adjunct-­related  issues  would  be  his  â&#x20AC;&#x153;number  one  priority.â&#x20AC;?   The  other  issue  Ginsburg  said  he  would  like  to  focus  on,  drug-­ related  arrests,  is  shared  by  other  candidates  as  well.   5RXVVHDVDÂżUVW\HDUVWXGHQWDQGVHFRQGVHPHVWHUVHQDWRUVDLG he  would  push  for  SUNY  New  Paltz  to  adopt  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;three-­strikeâ&#x20AC;?  system   for  drug-­related  crimes  on  campus,  similar  to  comparable  schools.  He   said  students  have  felt  â&#x20AC;&#x153;wronglyâ&#x20AC;?  persecuted  and  as  such  would  work   to  rectify  the  problem.   However,  Rousseas  said  the  major  issue  he  would  hope  to  tackle   if  elected  would  be  making  sure  all  students  on  campus  â&#x20AC;&#x153;feel  safe.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  would  want  to  make  students  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  feel  that  New  Paltz   is   a   safe   place   feel   welcomed;Íž   whether   that   be   a   person   of   color,   /*%74VWXGHQWVRUZRPHQÂąWRQDPHDIHZ´5RXVVHDVVDLGÂł7KH increase  in  sexual  assaults  I  feel  has  gone  basically  unnoticed  and  I  

want  to  make  all  community  members  feel  safe  here.â&#x20AC;?   Rousseas   said   he   believes   he   would   be   able   to   best   represent   WKHVWXGHQWERG\EHFDXVHKHKDVDWUDFNUHFRUGRIÂżJKWLQJIRUVWXGHQW concerns  and  has  stood  his  ground  on  various  debates  during  his  time   on  senate.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  passionate  and  dedicated,  and  I  invest  what  seems  like  all   my  time  in  SA,â&#x20AC;?  Rousseas  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know  I  would  do  a  good  job.â&#x20AC;?   %DFRUQDWKLUG\HDUVWXGHQWDQGÂżUVWVHPHVWHUVHQDWRUVDLGVKH originally  intended  to  run  for  vice  president  of  programming,  but  af-­ ter  hearing  of  the  responsibilities  that  come  with  being  executive  vice   president,  she  decided  to  change  her  course  of  action.   Bacorn  said  being  elected  into  the  position  would  allow  her  to   continue  her  work  on  making  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Gender  and  Sexuality  a  de-­ partment,  and  by  being  in  a  position  on  the  SA  E-­board,  she  would   have  more  of  a  voice.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  spearheading  [Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Gender  and  Sexuality  gaining  de-­ partmental  status],  and  by  being  on  the  E-­board  I  would  have  more   say  and  delegate  more  jobs  to  people  as  opposed  to  just  being  a  sena-­ tor  and  doing  my  own  thing,â&#x20AC;?  Bacorn  said.   Working  on  ways  to  better  integrate  transfer  students  upon  their   arrival  at  SUNY  New  Paltz  is  another  change  Bacorn  said  she  would   like  to  make  if  she  were  elected  to  the  position.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  talked  to  numerous  students  and  they  all  have  negative   WKLQJVWRVD\DERXWWKHLUÂżUVWVHPHVWHUKHUH´%DFRUQVDLGÂł2QO\ transfer  students  lived  on  campus  this  past  year,  but  I  want  to  try  and   increase  that.  Pushing  them  aside  and  making  them  deal  with  land-­ lords  off  campus  is  awful  and  they  can  never  get  truly  immersed  in   the  community  of  New  Paltz.  I  lived  on  campus  and  made  friends  that   ZD\LWÂśVLPSRUWDQWÂąDQGPRVWVFKRROVFDQGRWKDWIRUWKHLUWUDQVIHUV´ Besides   executive   vice   president,   multiple   other   positions   are   being  voted  on  next  week.   Manuel   Tejada,   currently   the   SAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   executive   vice   president,   will  run  unopposed  for  the  position  of  SA  president.  Jordan  Taylor   is  also  running  unopposed  for  the  position  of  vice  president  of  aca-­ demic   affairs.   Issa   Beydoun,  Anthony  Adegunle,   Youssouf   Kuoyo   DQG'DQLHOD6XUGRDUHUXQQLQJIRUYLFHSUHVLGHQWRIÂżQDQFHDQGWKH vice  president  of  programming  position  will  be  contested  by  Yaritza   Diaz,  Henry  Lino  and  Molly  Thurston-­Chase.   Votes   can   be   cast   on   my.newpaltz.edu   beginning   at   8   a.m.   on   April  30  until  midnight  on  May  2.

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

HOW DO I VOTE? Log Onto: my.newpaltz.edu From April 30 at 8 a.m. To May 2 at 12 midnight.

WHO IS RUNNING? PRESIDENT:  

Manuel  Tejada  

EXECUTIVE  VP:  

Zachary  Rousseas   Jesse  Ginsburg   Mary  Bacorn  

VP  OF  ACADEMIC   Jordan  Taylor   AFFAIRS:   VP  OF  FINANCE:  

Issa  Beydoun   Anthony  Adegunle   Youssouf  Kouyo   Daniela  Surdo  

VP  OF     PROGRAMMING:

Yaritza  Diaz   Henry  Lino   Molly  Thurston-­Chase  


8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

AD

The  New  Paltz  Oracle


The GUNK Thursday, APRIL 18, 2013

Fine Prints From

ANTILOGY

Story on page 2b PHOTO  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


  2B

FEATURES

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Antilogy Starts The Presses T-SHIRT PRINTING SHOP SCREENS WEARABLE ART ON MAIN STREET By  April  Castillo Copy  Editor  |  Acastillo@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Traditional   technology   presses   on   in  Antilogy,   a   T-­shirt  printing  shop  tucked  away  on  Main  Street.  In   late  afternoon,  the  ceased  hum  of  the  conveyor  dryer   VLJQDOVWKDWZRUNLVÂżQLVKHG²IRUQRZ When  he  was  16,  Jim  Moore  began  printing.  The   KREE\ JUHZ VORZO\ ² KH ÂżUVW SULQWHG 7VKLUWV IRU friends   and   local   bands   in   his   Vermont   hometown.   When  he  worked  at  another  shop,  he  brought  in  jobs.   Eventually,  he  opened  up  Antilogy. Moore,  who  has  lived  in  New  Paltz  for  15  years,   opened  Antilogy  in  New  Paltz  in  June  2010.  Antilogyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   former  Rosendale  location  had  been  open  since  2006. Ryan   Williams,  Antilogyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   graphic   designer,   has   worked   with   Moore   for   seven   years.   He   originally  intended  to  visit  only  for  a  weekend,   but  ended  up  extending  his  stay.   Williams   also   frequently   designs   for   the  burrito  chain  Blockheads,  Active  Ride   Shop   and   Rock   and   Snow,   one   of  Antil-­ ogyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   rare   local   customers.   Moore  

draws  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;bare  bonesâ&#x20AC;?  of  a  design,  and  once  the  cus-­ WRPHU LV VDWLVÂżHG ZRUNV KRXU GD\V WR KDQGGUDZ the   piece   so   that   it   can   be   transferred   to   a   T-­shirt.   6KDUSHQLQJDQGÂżQLVKLQJLVXVXDOO\GRQHRQWKHFRP puter,  which  Williams  said  he  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  like  to  rely  on. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   big   lofty   art,â&#x20AC;?  Williams   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  grandiose  ideas.  T-­shirts  make  you  whittle   down  what  you  want  to  say.â&#x20AC;? The  staff  at  Antilogy  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  seem  to  worry  about   competition.   Unlike   other   printing   shops   in   the   New   Paltz   area,   the   majority   of   Antilogyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   customers   are   from  outside  the  Hudson  Valley. Word  of  mouth,  Moore  said,  is  key.    Antilogy  ships   about  a  thousand  shirts  per  week  and  gets  its  custom-­ ers   from   online   message   board   sites.   Clients   also   follow   Williamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   work.   And   although   Antil-­ ogy  primarily  prints  to  supply  skatewear  and   streetwear  companies,  customers  order  from   all  over  the  country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From  a  climbing  company  in  [Philadel-­ phia]...to  a  band  in  Portland.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  all  different   every   week,â&#x20AC;?   Moore   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   tradi-­ tional  way  to  do  business  in  a  mod-­ ern  world.â&#x20AC;? Matt   Luczak   recently   ÂżQLVKHG KLV ÂżUVW PRQWK working   at   Antilogy   and   said   the   staffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   shared   interests,  

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

like  skateboarding  and  local  bands,  help  to  produce  a   welcoming  work  environment.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   chill,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   about   competition,â&#x20AC;?   Luczak   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  about  doing  your  personal  best,  having  high   standards.  It  makes  it  interesting  if  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  be   printing  all  day.â&#x20AC;? Moore   uses   a   darkroom   and   exposed   screens   to   print  up  to  six  colors  at  a  time.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   about   tricking   your   eye.   For   instance   [on   a   Metallica  shirt],  there  are  only  four  colors:  cyan,  ma-­ genta,  yellow  and  black,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  way  they  over-­ lap,  the  colors  stack  up.  With  the  blue  directly  on  the   shirt,  it  looks  metallic.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  antiquated  process.â&#x20AC;?     Antilogy  has  two  presses,  one  used  for  single  color   prints  and  one  for  multiple  colors,  Moore  said.   The  screen  is  lowered  onto  a  shirt  and  wiped  over   with  a  squeegee.  Moore  uses  pressure  to  apply  the  col-­ or  and  prints  colors  in  rounds.   If   the   shirtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   colors   are   solids,   he   said   he   waits   until  the  color  has  dried  before  continuing,  but  for  gra-­ dient  prints,  he  adds  another  color  with  the  squeegee   while  the  paint  is  freshly  wet,  varying  the  pressure.  He   ÂżQLVKHVWKHSURFHVVZKHQWKHVKLUWVUXQWKURXJKWKH conveyor  dryer  to  set. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At   least   once   a   week   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   job   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   pretty   psyched   about,â&#x20AC;?   Moore   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   be  buying  the  shirt  if  I  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  making   it.â&#x20AC;?


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Features

oracle.newpaltz.edu

3B

Students Strive To De-Feet Poverty TOMS CLUB PROMOTES ONE DAY WITHOUT SHOES By  Zameena  Mejia Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

 No  shoes?  No  problem.  Not  for  the  new  TOMS  club,  but  they  are  working   to  raise  awareness  of  those  who  do  need  shoes. On   Tuesday,  April   16,   the   SUNY   New   Paltz   club   joined   other   people   around   the   world   participating   in   TOMSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;One  Day  Without  Shoes,â&#x20AC;?  an  event  where  peo-­ ple  go  through  the  day  without  their  shoes. The  club  tabled  outside  of  the  Lecture  Center  from   11  a.m.  to  3  p.m.  to  inform  those  who  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  about   the  event.  While  tabling,  Club  President  Alana  Costen-­ bader  had  a  station  set  up  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Experience  the  Walkâ&#x20AC;?   ZKLFK FRQVLVWHG RI WKUHH ODUJH GUDZHUV ÂżOOHG ZLWK GU\ grass,  rock  and  dirt. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  encouraged  people  to  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;experience  the  walkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  by   walking  on  each  type  of  terrain  to  feel  what  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  like  to   have  to  walk  on  something  other  than  grass  or  concrete   like  we  have  here,â&#x20AC;?  Costenbader  said. About   seven   of   the   club   members   participated   in   the  event  and  there  were  several  students  who  normally   walk  around  campus  barefoot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freshman  year  of  college,  I  went  shoeless  on  my   own.   I   got   escorted   out   of   the   Stop   and   Shop   in   New   Paltz  because  they  said  it  was  hazardous  and  that  you   had  to  have  shoes  on  to  shop  in  their  store.  Last  year,   I  went  solo  again  and  took  my  shoes  off  directly  after   ÂżHOGKRFNH\SUDFWLFHLQWKHPRUQLQJ´&RVWHQEDGHUVDLG According  to  the  TOMS  website,  campus  clubs  na-­ tionwide  seek  to  work  â&#x20AC;&#x153;together  to  raise  awareness  and   share  the  TOMS  story  and  movement  at  their  school  by   hosting  events  and  activities.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Initially,   TOMS   was   solely   a   shoe   company   in   which  you  bought  a  pair  of  their  shoes  and  they  would   match  that  pair  and  give  a  pair  to  a  child  in  need  in  an   undeveloped  country,â&#x20AC;?  Costenbader  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  became  in-­ terested  in  TOMS  my  senior  year  of  high  school,  2008,   when  I  saw  a  friend  of  mine  wearing  them.  I  checked   out  the  website,  bought  a  pair  of  shoes,  and  have  been   interested  ever  since.â&#x20AC;?   Currently   at   15   members,   the   club   started   up   this   semester  and  Costenbader  said  having  the  backing  and   support  of  the  TOMS  Company  is  really  comforting,  es-­ pecially  being  a  new  club. Club   member   Emily   Azer,   a   third  -­year   interper-­ sonal/intercultural  communications  major,  said  she  was   nervous  about  going  barefoot,  possibly  hurting  her  feet   or  feeling  embarrassed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being  in  New  Paltz  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  think  a  barefoot  person   would   get   no   attention,   but   I   was   incorrect.  After   the   second  head  turn  as  I  walked  through  campus  with  no   other  club  members  by  my  side,  it  hit  me,â&#x20AC;?  Azer  said.   Âł2IFRXUVH,ZDVIRUWKHPRVWSDUWÂżQHZLWKLWEHFDXVH,

SUNY New Paltz TOMS club sponsored the â&#x20AC;&#x153;One Day Without Shoesâ&#x20AC;? event on campus.

was  doing  it  for  a  cause,  but  I  could  not  imagine  going   to  school  every  day  without  a  pair  of  shoes.â&#x20AC;? Kellie  Gainey,  a  second-­year  sociology  major,  said   the   event   would   have   been   more   effective   if   it   took   place  in  a  city  where  everyone  always  wore  shoes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   stick   out   more,â&#x20AC;?   Gainey   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   since   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a  norm  here  to  not  wear  shoes  in  the  warm  weather,  it   would  be  hard  to  tell  the  difference  between  cause  and   culture.â&#x20AC;? Kirstie  Juenger,  a  fourth-­year  contemporary  music   studies   major,   believes   events   like   these   are   meant   to   start  a  reaction. Âł,WKDVPRUHWRGRZLWKUDLVLQJDZDUHQHVVWKDQÂżUVW

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

PHOTO BY SAMANTHA SCHWARTZ

handedly   doing   something   about   a   problem,â&#x20AC;?   Juenger   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not   wearing   shoes   for   a   day   causes   people   to   ask  questions,  both  to  you  and  to  themselves...  So  rais-­ ing  awareness  is  the  only  thing  they  can  do  in  hopes  of   gathering  many  people  together  to  make  a  difference.â&#x20AC;? Moving  forward,  Costenbader  said  she  wants  to  im-­ prove  advertising  and  get  more  people  involved  in  the   club. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  just  want  people  to  take  a  step  back  and  realize   all  the  stuff  they  do  have  and  what  they  take  for  grant-­ ed,â&#x20AC;?  Costenbader  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shoes  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  something  that  we   think  about,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  little  thing  and  starting  with  shoes  is   just  one  step.â&#x20AC;?


4B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

A Reason To Relay

STUDENTS SHARE STORIES AS THEY SEARCH FOR A CURE By  Katherine  Speller Features  Editor    |  Katherine.speller79@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

6DUDK6REHOFRFKDLURIWKH681<1HZ3DOW]5HOD\IRU/LIH&RPPLWWHHGHVFULEHVWKH$PHULFDQ&DQFHU6RFLHW\·VHYHQWDVDFROODERUDWLYH´YLVLRQµ 6REHOVDLGWKHHYHQWZKLFKZLOOEHKHOGRQ6XQGD\$SULORQ2OG0DLQ4XDGIURPDPWRSPLVDQRSSRUWXQLW\IRUPHPEHUVRIWKH1HZ3DOW] FRPPXQLW\ZKRKDYHEHHQWRXFKHGE\FDQFHUWRVSHQGWKHGD\UDLVLQJIXQGVWRÀJKWWKHGLVHDVHDQGFHOHEUDWLQJWKHOLYHVRIWKRVHDIIHFWHG $//3+2726%<6$0$17+$6&+:$57=

David Manis, fourth-year business major: ,QWKHPRQWKVOHDGLQJXSWRKLVVHQLRU\HDURIKLJKVFKRRO 5HOD\IRU/LIH&R&KDLU'DYLG0DQLVZDVPDNLQJSODQVWRUXQ $IWHU FRYHULQJ FRXQWOHVV PLOHV WUDLQLQJ IRU FURVVFRXQWU\ track throughout his teenage years, Manis said he was in the EHVWVKDSHRIKLVOLIH+RZHYHUZKHQDURXWLQHSUHVHDVRQYLVLW WRWKHGRFWRUUHYHDOHGVRPHDEQRUPDOLWLHVKHIRXQGRXWKHKDG WHVWLFXODUFDQFHU ´,UHDOO\ZDQWHGWRUXQEXW,UHDOL]HGWKDWLWMXVWZDVQ·WJR LQJWRKDSSHQµ0DQLVVDLG 0DQLV VSHQW WKH UHVW RI KLV VHQLRU \HDU UHFHLYLQJ WUHDW PHQWVEXWFRQWLQXHGDWWHQGLQJVFKRRO7UDYHOLQJEDFNDQGIRUWK IURP KLV FKHPRWKHUDS\ DSSRLQWPHQWV DQG FODVVHV 0DQLV VDLG he would spend his better weeks visiting potential colleges and DWWHQGLQJWUDFNPHHWVWRFKHHURQKLVWHDPPDWHVDOOZKLOHSODQ QLQJIRUWKHIXWXUH 0DQLVZDVLQUHPLVVLRQLQ0DUFK%\$XJXVWKHZDV HQUROOHGLQFODVVHVOLNHDQ\RWKHUÀUVW\HDUVWXGHQW +H VRRQ MRLQHG WKH 5HOD\ IRU /LIH FRPPLWWHH DQG EHJDQ sharing his story, working to raise awareness about the already ZHOONQRZQGLVHDVH ´1HDUO\HYHU\SHUVRQKDVDFRQQHFWLRQZLWKFDQFHU,W·VQRW DUDUHGLVHDVHµ0DQLVVDLG´$QGXQWLOZHÀQGDFXUHWKHUHDUH VWLOOSHRSOHZKRQHHGKHOSµ ,QKLVWLPHDVFRFKDLU0DQLVKDVXVHGKLVEXVLQHVVVNLOOVWR UHRUJDQL]HWKHZD\WKHFRPPLWWHHZDVUXQ/DVW\HDUWKHWHDP ZDVDEOHWRUDLVHQHDUO\0DQLVVDLGWKLVLQFUHDVHZDV SULPDULO\GXHWRWKHFRPPLWPHQWRIKLVFRPPLWWHHWRDGYHUWLV LQJDQGEULQJLQJDWWHQWLRQWRWKHLUFDXVH\HDUURXQG )RU WKLV \HDU·V UHOD\ 0DQLV VDLG WKH RUJDQL]DWLRQ KDV DO UHDG\ UDLVHG  DQG KH DQWLFLSDWHV WKDW WKH\ ZLOO UHDFK QHDUO\E\WKHHQGRIWKHHYHQW

Ben Abrams, second-year secondary education major:

Donna Coane, first-year art education major: While in the pediatrics unit of Stony Brook 8QLYHUVLW\ +RVSLWDO ÀUVW\HDU DUW HGXFDWLRQ PDMRU 'RQQD&RDQHZRXOGFURWFKHWVPDOOVWXIIHGDQLPDOV and draw pictures for the younger kids receiving WUHDWPHQW6KHVDLGVKHNQHZHYHQWKHQWKDWZRUN ing with the kids and with her art was what she ZDQWHGWRGR &RDQHZDVGLDJQRVHGZLWKUKDEGRP\RVDUFRPD ³DUDUHIRUPRIWLVVXHFDQFHUORFDWHGLQKHUIDFH ³ GXULQJ KHU MXQLRU \HDU RI KLJK VFKRRO EXW VDLG VWD\LQJSRVLWLYHGHVSLWHKHULOOQHVVZDVDOZD\VLP SRUWDQW “When I was sick, I knew I wanted to work WR VWD\ SRVLWLYHµ &RDQH VDLG ´%DG WKLQJV KDSSHQ ZKHQ\RXORVHWKDW>SRVLWLYLW\@µ &RDQHMRLQHGWKH5HOD\FRPPLWWHHWKLV\HDUDV WKHVXUYLYRUVKLSFKDLU7KRXJKVKHSDUWLFLSDWHGDQG JDYHDVSHHFKGXULQJKHUKLJKVFKRRO·VÀUVW5HOD\ for Life while she was sick in May of 2012, Coane VDLGVKHLVORRNLQJIRUZDUGWRKHUÀUVWFROOHJH5HOD\ HYHQW “It’s a really fun event to bond with people, to OHDUQPRUHDERXWFDQFHUDQGWKRVHZKRKDYHVRPH RQHDIIHFWHGE\LWµ&RDQHVDLG &RDQH VDLG 5HOD\ IRU /LIH LV DQ HYHQW WKDW LQ VSLUHVDZDUHQHVVHPSDWK\DQGXOWLPDWHO\KRSH ´<RXKHDUDERXWRWKHUSHRSOH·VWULDOVDQGWULEX ODWLRQVµ &RDQH VDLG ´,W·V LPSRUWDQW IRU SHRSOH WR NQRZWKDW\RXFDQJHWSDVWWKLVµ

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

%HQ$EUDPV·H[SHULHQFHZLWK5HOD\IRU/LIHEHJDQZLWK DYLFWRU\ODS +LVIULHQG6LPRQZKRKDGEHHQGLDJQRVHGZLWKEUDLQ FDQFHU LQ WKH VL[WK JUDGH ZDV ZDONLQJ DURXQG WKH WUDFN $EUDPVVDLG6LPRQFRQWLQXHGWRZDONWKURXJKRXWWKHHYHQW XOWLPDWHO\ FRPSOHWLQJ  ODSV (YHQ ZKHQ LW EHFDPH WRR KDUGWRFRQWLQXHZDONLQJRQWKHFRQFUHWHWUDFN6LPRQNHSW ZDONLQJ+HPRYHGWRWKHJUDVVZKHUHLWZDVVRIWHU 7KDW·VKRZKHOLYHGKLVOLIH$EUDPVVDLGVHWWLQJJRDOV DQGIROORZLQJWKURXJKUHJDUGOHVVRIKLVLOOQHVV ´,WZDVVXFKDFHOHEUDWRU\QLJKWµ$EUDPVVDLG´6LPRQ had good years and bad years and eleventh grade was a great \HDUµ 2QH\HDUODWHUMXVWEHIRUH5HOD\DQGRQHPRQWKVK\RI JUDGXDWLRQ6LPRQGLHG$EUDPVVDLGKHWRRNWLPHRXWRIWKH QLJKWWRUHÁHFWDQGWKLQNDERXWKLVIULHQG ´,WRRNDQKRXURUVRWRUHÁHFWIRU6LPRQDQG,SURPLVHG ,ZRXOGGRDVPXFKDV,SRVVLEO\FRXOGIRU5HOD\µ$EUDPV VDLG´+HLVDOZD\VRQP\PLQGµ 6LQFH FRPLQJ WR FROOHJH $EUDPV KDV EHHQ D SDUW RI WKH5HOD\IRU/LIH&RPPLWWHHDW1HZ3DOW],QWKHPLGVWRI WKHFKDRVRIWKHHYHQW$EUDPVVDLGKHVWLOOOLNHVWRUHÁHFW and take inventory of everything the group has done for the FDXVH $EUDPVVDLGKHOLNHVWRVHHWKHGLYHUVHJURXSRISHRSOH IURPGLIIHUHQWSDUWVRIWKH1HZ3DOW]FRPPXQLW\SDUWLFLSDWH LQ WKH DFWLYLWLHV DQG KRQRULQJ WKH PHPRULHV RI WKHLU ORYHG RQHV ´,OLNHWRFDSWXUHDSDQRUDPDYLHZRIWKHHYHQWDQGMXVW WR VHH D FRPPXQLW\ FRPH WRJHWKHU IRU D FRPPRQ FDXVHµ $EUDPVVDLG´7KDWPRPHQWWKDW·VLWµ


Features

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Global Education

PROFESSOR SPEAKS ON SUSTAINABILITY By  John  Tappen Copy  Editor  |  N02288261@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Pollution,  global  warming  and  carbon  footprints:  these   things  matter,  Assistant  Professor  of  Secondary  Education   Rosemary  Millham  said. “Humans   are   impacting   the   environment,”   Millham   said.  “It’s  important  to  be  environmentally  aware.” Millham  is  the  chair  of  the  committee  that  planned  the   Environmental  Awareness  and  Sustainability  Day. According  to  Millham,  the  event  will  be  a  learning  op-­ portunity   —   with   17   presentations   that   range   from   green   burial  and  sustainable  agriculture  to  recycling,  reusing  and   repurposing. Planning   for   the  April   20   event   began   in   June   of   last   year,   she   said,   and   the   committee   reserved   the   Old   Main   Quad  in  August. Second-­  year   adolescent   education   and   earth   science   major  Alicia  Heinemann  has  been  on  the  event’s  six  person   planning   committee   since   October   of   2012.   She   said   that   presentations  and  activities  were  chosen  not  only  because   they  illuminate  environmental  issues,  but  also  on  the  basis   of   their   potential   to   teach   participants   how   to   incorporate   sustainable  living  practices  into  everyday  life. “Many  people  want  to  live  sustainably,  but  don’t  know   how   to   go   about   it,”   Heinemann   said.   “With   these   work-­ shops  and  presentations,  we  can  help  the  public  start  becom-­ ing  sustainable  by  teaching  them  how  they  can  partake.” Through   the   day’s   arrangements,   Millham   said   she  

doesn’t   want   to   communicate   “gloom   and   doom,”   rather,   have  people  learn  the  science  behind  climate  change. Several   visual   games   and   exhibitions   about   weather   and  climate  —  the  carbon  footprint  game  that  helps  to  de-­ termine  a  person’s  carbon  footprint  —  will  be  available  to   help  engage  younger  children,  Millham  said. In   addition   to   workshops   and   displays,   the   event   will   host  guest  speakers  Andy  Revkin  and  Lynne  Cherry. &KHUU\SURGXFHV¿OPVIRUWKH<RXQJ9RLFHVRIWKH3ODQ et  series  and  is  the  author  of  children’s  books  “The  Great   Kapok  Tree”  and  “A  River  Ran  Wild.” Revkin   is   the   Dot   Earth   blogger   for   The   New   York   Times  and  author  of  the  books  “The  Burning  Season:  The   Murder  of  Chico  Mendes”  and  “The  Fight  for  the  Amazon   Rain  Forest.” Revkin  is  also  “someone  involved  in  the  movement,”   Millham  said. “Andy   and   Lynn   are   well   known   environmentalists   who  have  helped  a  lot  in  teaching  how  one  can  be  sustain-­ able,  so  we  thought  they  were  great  candidates  to  come  to   the  event,”  Heinemann  said. Both   national   and   local   vendors   will   be   present   and   selling  sustainable  items.   “Supporting   the   local   businesses   was   a   big   factor   in   deciding  which  vendors  to  have  as  well,”  Heinemann  said. Local  vendors  will  be  on  the  Old  Main  Quad  from  noon   to   4   p.m.   Local   bands   will   begin   performances   at   3   p.m.   Lectures   and   presentations   will   take   place   in   the   Lecture   Center.

Check Out The Oracle’s Live Coverage of Relay for Life! Follow @newpaltzoracle Sunday, April 28 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tweet at us using #NPOrelay Thursday,  April  18,  2013

oracle.newpaltz.edu

5B

ESK D Y P F: O F C O K COO “Matzoh Pizza” By  Suzy  Berkowitz Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz. Each week, one of the members of our Copy Desk will share their masterful culinary chops with you. Bon appetit! I  realize  it’s  not  Passover  anymore,  but  I’m  still   reliving  my  glory  days  of  being  culturally  torn  at  the   seder  table  and  rocking  out  to  “The  Prince  of  Egypt”   soundtrack.   No  celebration  of  Jews  (my  people)  escaping  the   wrath  of  the  Egyptians  (also  my  people  —  awkward)   is   complete   without   a   week   of   depriving   myself   of   bread-­like  products.  Because  carbs  are  my  lifeline,  I  don’t  even  think   about  going  seven  days  without  pasta  or  the  like,  but  I   do  try  to  maintain  the  no  bread  rule.  This  year,  I  made   it  from  Monday  to  Thursday  and  then  caved  and  ate   a  bagel.  Oh  well.   But  during  the  four  days  I  was  going  steady,  I   indulged  in  the  traditional  Passover  food  no  one  looks   forward  to  eating:  matzoh.  Matzoh  has  often  received   FULWLFLVP IRU EHLQJ ÀDYRUOHVV D FRPPRQ FRPSODLQW being  that  whether  you  eat  matzoh  or  the  cardboard   box   it   comes   in   doesn’t   matter,   because   they   both   taste  the  same.   However,   enduring   countless   Passovers   sans   bread  have  taught  me  how  to  make  the  ugly  duckling   food  of  the  holiday  something  tolerable  —  dare  I  say   exciting  —  to  eat.    Matzoh  Pizza What  you’ll  need: -­Shredded  mozzarella -­Tomato  sauce -­A  microwave Please  don’t  be  fooled  by  this  relatively  normal   recipe.  I  still  wear  the  “worst  cook  on  the  Copy  Desk”   crown  and  plan  to  never  use  actual  appliances  when   “cooking.”   Hence,   get   your   microwaves   out.   Break   off   a   piece  of  matzoh,  slab  on  a  dollop  of  tomato  sauce  and   pour   a   generous   helping   of   cheese   onto   your   mas-­ terpiece.  Behold,  matzoh  pizza.  Now,  place  it  in  the   microwave   for   the   infamous   nine   minutes   (thanks,   mama  Bev)  and  wait.  Take  it  out,  let  it  cool  (or  don’t   let  it  cool,  I  don’t  really  care)  and  eat.  Cardboard?  I   think  not.  


Ads

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Plan your future. DEGREE

GRADUATE ROSE SAINT A WITH

A WITH SE O R T SAIN ATE U D GRA EE DEGR

Plan your future and make a graduate degree from The College of Saint Rose your next step. Located in the heart of Albany, N.Y., Saint Rose offers graduate degrees and advanced certificates that provide the credentials you need to land your first job and launch your career.



Most graduate students are placed in internships or field experiences where they acquire valuable hands-on knowledge of the working world. Small classes provide personalized attention from faculty in state-of-the-art facilities.

oracle.newpaltz.edu

School of Arts & Humanities Art Education Communications Creative Writing (MFA) English History/Political Science Music Education Studio Art School of Business Accounting MBA Financial Planning (Advanced Certificate) Not-For-Profit Management (Advanced Certificate)

Organizational Leadership (Advanced Certificate)

School of Mathematics & Sciences Computer Information Systems (also Advanced Certificate)

Internet Programming (Online Advanced Certificate)

School of Education Adolescence Education (Grades 7 – 12) Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, English, Mathematics, Social Studies, Spanish

Applied Technology Education Business/Marketing Education (K – 12) Childhood Education (Grades 1 – 6) College Student Services Administration Communication Sciences & Disorders Curriculum and Instruction* Early Childhood Education

6B

Special Education/Dual Certification Programs Special Education/Adolescence Education Special Education/Childhood Education For more information: 1-800-637-8556 www.strose.edu/gradapply grad@strose.edu facebook.com/saintrosegrad

(Birth – Grade 2)

Educational Leadership and Administration Educational Psychology Educational Technology Specialist Instructional Technology (Advanced Certificate)

Literacy* Mental Health Counseling (Also Advanced Certificate)

Program Evaluation (Advanced Certificate)

School Counseling School Psychology Special Education*

www.strose.edu/gradapply

* Applicants must hold initial certification prior to applying.

AF R VO U SO FIL NN TED CI IAT ER N JO ETY ED UP ATI UR O W FO ON NA F P EBS R AL LI RO IT BE ST F E E ST S I SS BY N IO TH 20 N 10 AL E

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

oracle.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  April  18,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

7B

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

Malian Musicians, Traditional Tunes

DORSKY HOSTS WEST AFRICAN ARTISTS FOR CULTURAL CELEBRATION By  Suzy  Berkowitz Copy  Editor  |  Sabbasberkowitz90@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Dorsky  was  transformed  into   a   transcontinental   hub   on   Tuesday,   April  9  during  its  â&#x20AC;&#x153;West  African  Con-­ cert,â&#x20AC;?   which   celebrated   the   culture   through  various  creative  mediums.   The  event  included  a  performance   by   Malian   musicians   Yacouba   Sisso-­ ko   and   Famoro   Dioubate,   along   with   DÂżOPVHULHVDQGV\PSRVLXPFRPSOH-­ menting   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Photo-­Rapide,â&#x20AC;?   an   ongoing   exhibition   by   photography   Professor   François  Deschamps.   The   exhibition   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   opened   in   January   and   recently   closed   on   April  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  was  intended  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;provide   a   nuanced   glimpse   of   the   people   and   culture   of   the  West  African   nation   of   Mali,â&#x20AC;?  according  to  the  description  on   the  Dorsky  website.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  were  asked  to  come  up  with   programming   appropriate   for   West   African  culture,  so  I  looked  for  Mali-­ an  musicians  of  quality  that  would  be   great  to  bring  to  campus,â&#x20AC;?  Deschamps   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  went  to  a  big  Malian  cultural   event  in  Harlem  in  October  and  I  just   took  a  chance  on  these  musicians,  but   it  turned  out  to  be  the  best.â&#x20AC;? Sissoko,   a   Master   Kora   player,   originates  from  the  Djely  Griot  tradi-­ tion.  He  has  experience  playing  Kora,   a   harp-­like   instrument,   with   jazz,   Latin   and   R&B   bands   as   well   as   in   traditional  African   ceremonies.   He   is   the  leader  of  his  own  band,  Siya,  and   a  member  of  the  group  Super  Mande. Janis   Benincasa,   program   man-­ ager   for   the   Dorsky,   coordinated   the   Malian  concert  and  described  Sissoko   as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  delight  to  work  with.â&#x20AC;?   Dioubate   was   born   in   Conakry,   Guinea   to   a   Griot   family.   In   his   na-­ tive   country,   he   routinely   performed   for   the   president   and   visiting   foreign   dignitaries.  He  was  a  member  of  Mory   Kanteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   orchestra   and   a   member   of  

PHOTO  BY  TIM  SMITH Famoro  Dioubate  and  Yacouba  Sissoko  performed  at  the  Dorsky  on  April  9.  

Groupe  Standard.  Since  the  late  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s,   he   has   worked   as   a   freelance   musi-­ cian  for  a  variety  of  groups  and  dance   companies   for   performances   and   re-­ cordings.   Considering   their   skepticism   about   the   concert   attendance,   Benin-­ casa   and   Deschamps   were   pleasantly   surprised  with  the  turnout.   After   more   than   160   audience   PHPEHUVÂżOOHGWKH'RUVN\FUHDWLQJD standing-­room-­only   environment,   the  

show   was   an     â&#x20AC;&#x153;unexpectedâ&#x20AC;?   success,   according  to  Deschamps.   Benincasa  said  there  was  no  word   for  the  show  other  than  â&#x20AC;&#x153;spectacular.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  were  so  many  people  there,   half  of  whom  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  never  seen  before,â&#x20AC;?   she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  great  to  bring  in  new  au-­ diences,  and  it  was  obvious  that  a  lot   of  them  were  knowledgeable  of  West   African  music.  It  was  truly  wonderful.   I  hope  we  can  have  the  whole  ensem-­ ble  back.â&#x20AC;?

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

Benincasa  and  other  museum  co-­ ordinators   are   considering   asking   the   musicians   to   return,   as   they   like   to   hold  performances  on  Tuesday  nights   several  times  a  year,  when  current  mu-­ seum  exhibitions  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  take  up  much   Ă&#x20AC;RRURUZDOOVSDFH  Culturally-­relevant  performances   and   creative   outlets   will   most   likely   complement  an  upcoming  Dorsky  ex-­ hibition  on  Tibet,  which  will  run  from   July  to  December.  


8B

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Finding Art In The Grotesque

STUDENT AND PROFESSOR COLLABORATE ON PRESENTATION By  Zameena  Mejia Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

If  there  is  one  thing  humans  from  25,000  years  ago  have  in   common  with  the  humans  of  today,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  their  obsession  with  the   grotesque.   Communications   Professor   Jerry   Persaud   and   Sasha   Ri-­ bowsky,  a  third-­year  digital  media  production  and  French  double     major,   explored   this   concept   in   their   presentation   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Body   Grotesque:  From  Early  Art  to  Digital  Mediaâ&#x20AC;?  held  in  the  Honors   Center  on  Monday,  April  8  at  5  p.m.   Prior  to  the  event,  Persaud  and  Ribowsky  used  their  Face-­ book  event  page  to  pose  the  question:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;How  are  we  to  understand   representations  of  the  Grotesque  in  Western  culture?â&#x20AC;?  They  went   on  to  say,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;locating  the  trope  of  the  Grotesque  in  literature,  art,   photography,   mass   media   and   popular   culture   will   allow   us   to   move  between  genres  in  order  to  demonstrate  possible  answers   to  this  question.â&#x20AC;?   Ribowsky   began   the   presentation   by   giving   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oxford   (QJOLVK'LFWLRQDU\´GHÂżQLWLRQRIÂłJURWHVTXH´DQGWKHQSRVHGWKH question  her  presentation  revolved  around.   Âł*URWHVTXHPHDQVDZRUNRIDUWLQWKHVW\OHÂżJXUHRUGH-­ signs   characterized   by   a   comic   distortion   or   exaggeration,â&#x20AC;?   Ri-­ bowsky   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   the   proportions   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   accurate,   why   are   they   still  depicted  in  art  and  media?  In  order  to  understand  the  human   it  is  essential  to  look  at  the  portrayal  of  the  body  through  history.â&#x20AC;?   Ribowsky   showed   photos   of   the   25,000-­year-­old  Venus   of   :LOOHQGRUIVWDWXHÂżUVWGLVFRYHUHGLQQRUWKHDVWHUQ$XVWULD)RXQG in  22,000  BCE,  the  statue  depicted  a  distorted  woman  with  exag-­ gerated  breasts,  thighs  and  stomach  â&#x20AC;&#x153;laden  with  fat.â&#x20AC;?   Ribowsky  said  the  statues,  symbolic  of  the  human  obsession   with  fertility,  were  found  in  many  other  places  around  the  world   including  Russia,  France  and  Italy.   Moving   forward   through   historical   evidence,   Ribowsky   spoke  about  her  analysis  of  Greek  art.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  Greek  art,  originally  the  intent  was  to  create  the  most  re-­ alistic  image  possible,â&#x20AC;?    Ribowsky  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Egyptians  attempt-­ ed  and  came  close  to  reaching  the  most  realistic  depictions,  but   WKH*UHHNVZHUHWKHÂżUVWWREHVXFFHVVIXO2QFHWKH\DFKLHYHGWKH goal  and  created  sculptures  with  exact  human  dimensions  such  as   the  Kritios  Boy  circa  480  BCE,  it  became  banal.â&#x20AC;? Ribowskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  contemporary  examples  of  the  Grotesque  body   image  included  Valeria  Lukyanova,  known  as  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Real  Life  Bar-­ bie  Doll,â&#x20AC;?  and  French  performance  artist  Orlan,  who  â&#x20AC;&#x153;performs  

PHOTO  BY  ZAMEENA  MEJIA â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Body  Grotesque:  From  Early  Art  to  Digital  Mediaâ&#x20AC;?  presentation  was  held  in  the  Honors  Center  on  April  8.  

cosmetic  surgery  with  the  purpose  of  distortion  as  opposed  to  en-­ hancement  as  a  way  to  show  different  ideals.â&#x20AC;? Drawing   connections   from   Ribowskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   introduction,   Per-­ saud  related  the  Venus  of  Willendorf  to  the  19th-­century  Euro-­ pean   obsession   with   Sarah   Baartman,   also   known   as   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hot-­ tentot  Venus,â&#x20AC;?  an  African  woman  taken  to  Europe  to  be  ogled  and   publicly   ridiculed   for   her   large   bust,   buttocks   and   other   bodily   features.   Persaud   also   related   the   subject   to   his   research   of   musical   artists  today,  such  as  BeyoncĂŠ  and  Nicki  Minaj,  who  are  idolized   and  lauded  for  parts  of  their  bodies.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   that   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   wonderful   thing   for   students   to   learn     how   to   take   very   abstract   concepts   and   make   sense   of   things   around   them,   including   themselves,   and   that   includes   words,   conversations,  images  and  billboards  and  everything  in  culture,â&#x20AC;?     Persaud  said.   Persaud   had   already   planned   on   giving   a   presentation   on  

a  related  topic  at  the  Honors  Center,  but  when  Ribowsky  men-­ tioned  she  had  a  related  piece  published  in  the  universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  2011   â&#x20AC;&#x153;New  Voices,  New  Visionsâ&#x20AC;?  book,  he  said  he  would  love  to  have   her  present  alongside  him.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  rarely  do  that  with  students,  but  you  have  to  be  very,  very   dedicated  and  I  have  not  seen  dedication  like  this  in  a  very  long   time,â&#x20AC;?  Persaud  said.   With   about   30   attendees,   Ribowsky   said   she   was   pleased   with   the   presentation   because   she   got   the   chance   to   add   on   re-­ search  she  had  done  since  the  initial  publication  and  new  infor-­ mation  in  the  media.  Persaud  even  added  a  video  segment  from   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Katie   Couric   Showâ&#x20AC;?   that   had   aired   the   day   before   about   women  who  were  dangerously  obsessed  with  cosmetic  surgery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   it   [the   presentation]   was   really   successful,   espe-­ cially   with   the   faculty   participation   in   the   discussion   portion,â&#x20AC;?   Ribowsky  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  expect  to  keep  building  upon  our  research  and   hopefully  present  with  Persaud  again  in  the  future.â&#x20AC;?  

DO  YOU  LIKE  TO  WRITE? COME  JOIN  THE  ORACLE  AS  A  COPY  EDITOR! EMAIL  US  AT  ORACLE@HAWKMAIL.NEWPALTZ.EDU  FOR  MORE  INFORMATION Thursday,  April  18,  2013


Ads

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

9B

STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY

SUMMERSESSIONS 2013

Stony Brook University/SUNY is an affirmative action, equal opportunity educator and employer. 12120677

NEED CREDITS? THINK SUMMER! SESSION I: May 28 to July 3 '  

July 8 to August 15 The New Paltz Oracle EWS EXTENDED SESSION: May 28 to July 18

N

 8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

Stay on track for graduation. 2-1 (,)&&' (.!),0$-$.$(" Summer students 2), .#( )/,- -.) #))- !,)'$(&/$(".#)-  .#.' .), , +/$, ' (.-

2)(0 ($ (.)('*/- #)/-$("0$&& 2./1,))**),./($.$ 2#)$ )!.#,  convenient sessions

For more information visit stonybrook.edu/summer AF R VO U SO FIL NN TED CI IAT ER N JO ETY ED UP ATI UR O W FO ON NA F P EBS R AL LI RO IT BE ST F E E ST S I SS BY N IO TH 20 N 10 AL E

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

oracle.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  April  18,  2013


10B oracle.newpaltz.edu

Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

CUPSI Cultivates Creative Community

SUNY NEW PALTZ COMPETES IN THE NATIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LARGEST COLLIEGATE SLAM By  Ryan  Fasciano         Contributing  Writer  |  N02422227@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  SUNY  New  Paltz  Slam  Team  packed  their  bags   full   of   poetry   and   traveled   to   Barnard   College   in   New   York   City   for   the   largest   collegiate   slam   in   the   country   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  College  Unions  Poetry  Slam  Invitational  (CUPSI).   First   held   in   2001   with   seven   participating   slam   teams,  this  year,  CUPSI  hosted  58  teams  from  across  the   country   from   April   3   to   6.   Competing   teams   included   University  of  Californiaâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Berkeley,  Brown  University  and   Vassar  College.   )ROORZLQJWKHÂżQDOVRQ$SULO1HZ<RUN8QLYHUVLW\ was  named  the  2013  winner,  making  it  their  second  con-­ secutive  CUPSI  championship.   Although   all   six   members   of   the   SUNY   New   Paltz   7HDPDWWHQGHGWKH,QYLWDWLRQDORQO\ÂżYHSHUIRUPHGLQWKH FRPSHWLWLRQ7KHWHDPFRPSHWHGGXULQJWKHÂżUVWWZRGD\V of  the  invitational  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  or  the  preliminary  rounds  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  but  did   QRWPDNHLWWRWKHVHPLÂżQDOVGXULQJWKHODVWWZRGD\V During   the   invitational,   each   team   consisted   of   a   PLQLPXP RI IRXU DQG D PD[LPXP RI ÂżYH PHPEHUV ,Q a  bout,  four  poets  performed  individually,  and  then  once  

as  a  team.  A  team  piece  consisted  of  at  least  two  different   poets,  but  no  more  than  four.  New  Paltz  came  in  fourth  in   each  bout  they  performed  in.       Team   President   Breanna   Metcalf-­Oshinsky,   a   third-­ year   public   relations   and   creative   writing   double   major,   was  not  disappointed  with  how  the  team  performed,  but   was  slightly  upset  by  when  the  team  was  chosen  to  per-­ form. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each  team  is  randomly  chosen,â&#x20AC;?  Metcalf-­Oshinsky   VDLGÂł7KHUHDUHÂżYHUDQGRPMXGJHVDQGZHZHUHSLFNHG WRJRÂżUVWIRURXUWZRERXWV,WÂśVKDUGWRJRÂżUVW$VWKH night  went  on,  people  would  get  more  excited  about  the   poems.   I   wish   we   could   have   performed   at   a   different   time,   but   we   performed   well.  We   laid   our   hearts   on   the   stage.â&#x20AC;? Metcalf-­Oshinsky  said  New  Paltz  performed  â&#x20AC;&#x153;differ-­ entâ&#x20AC;?  kinds  of  poems  than  the  other  schools.   For   example,   team   member   and   third-­year   art   edu-­ cation   major   Brittany   Patane   performed   a   piece   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Application  for  Second  Bestâ&#x20AC;?  about  being  second  best  at   certain  jobs  and  applying  for  those  positions.   Each   starting   member   of   the   team   got   to   perform   a  

solo  piece  in  the  two  days  New  Paltz  competed.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   team   got   to   present   all   the   hard   work   we   had   done  over  the  past  four  months  in  front  of  a  large  group   of  new  faces  who  shared  the  same  interest,â&#x20AC;?  team  mem-­ ber   and   third-­year   English   major   Christine   Richin   said.     Âł$OWKRXJKZHGLGQRWPDNHLWWRWKHVHPLÂżQDOVVWDJHZH gained  a  lot  of  respect  from  people  in  our  community  and   were   recognized   as   a   school   with   great   craft   and   talent.   It  was  arguably  the  best  four  days  of  our  entire  season.â&#x20AC;?   The  slam  team  started  preparing  for  the  event  before   winter  break,  practicing  on  Sundays  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  sometimes  for  10   hours.  As  CUPSI  got  closer,  they  attended  weekend  po-­ HWU\UHWUHDWVDWFRDFK-DUHG6LQJHUÂśV%URRNO\QDSDUWPHQW Âł0DQ\ RI XV ZRXOG DOVR ÂżQG WLPHWR ZULWH WRJHWKHU during  our  free  time  if  possible,â&#x20AC;?  Richin  said.   The   New   Paltz   Slam  Team   might   not   have   made   it   WRWKHVHPLÂżQDOVEXWWKH\GLGYDOXHWKHLUH[SHULHQFHDW CUPSI.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  attended  CUPSI  as  a  team  and  left  as  a  family,â&#x20AC;?   Richin  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  truly  an  honor  to  have  the  opportunity   to   be   so   closely   connected   with   such   an   amazing   com-­ munity.â&#x20AC;?

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve earned your degree. Now turn it into a well-paying career. Congratulations to the Class of 2013 on achieving your bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree!

Richard J. DeStefano, MBA â&#x20AC;&#x2122;02, DPS â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13 Vice President, Information Technology Goldman Sachs

Learn more at www.pace.edu/succeed or call (800) 874-7223 Thursday,  April  18,  2013

Q

1-2 year MS programs in high job growth areas: Social Media and Mobile Marketing, Customer Intelligence and Analytics, and Financial Risk Management

Q

MBA and MS programs in Accounting, Finance, Marketing, Entrepreneurship, Strategic Global HR Management, Taxation, and more

Q

Lubinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strong network of alumni and corporate partners brings New Yorkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s business world to you

Q

Scholarships and assistantships available 11517 2013

Leverage what you have already learned and propel yourself into a well-paying career by enrolling in a masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program at Pace Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lubin School of Business in New York.


Arts & Entertainment

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu 11B

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: GUY PIAQUADIO

YEAR: Fifth MAJOR: Music HOMETOWN: Coldenham, N.Y.

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? Electric   Bass.   Because   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   standard   and  you  can  not  only  feel  the  groove,  but   you  can  literally  feel  the  tone  of  the  bass   through  your  body.  And  a  5  string  with  a   low  B?  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  just  straight  up  badass. PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  %/2*6327&20

ALK T L E â&#x20AC;? RE reakers â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sprin

gB

By  Spencer  Churchill Contributing  Writer  |  N01873994@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Okay,   so   this   comes   from   a   supporter   of   Harmony   Korine,   true   and   true,   so   if   the   reader   believes   this   will   inhibit  my  ability  to  answer  truthfully,  please  stop  reading   now. SPOILERS  AHEAD. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring  Breakers,â&#x20AC;?  to  me,  was  primarily  about  what   would   most   likely   happen   if   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;wishesâ&#x20AC;?   of   a   spoiled,   douchey,  teenage/early  adult  demographic  extended  their   stay  in  a  place  that  ultimately  thrives  on  impermanence.   To  live  in  a  realm  of  greed,  gluttony  and  buffoonery  can   only  be  legitimized  in  anticipation  of  a  return  to  reality. The   story   to   me   is   a   wake   up   call   to   a   generation   lost  in  a  spiral  of  drug-­fueled  irrationality,  disingenuous   emotional  spew  with  bouts  of  lying,  cheating  and  unfor-­ tunately   impressive   attempts   to   exonerate   any   shred   of   responsibility. Korine  does  what  he  does  best  by  exposing  the  surreal   realism  of  the  American  public.  These  brain-­dead  spring   EUHDNHUVDUHQRGLIIHUHQWWKDQWKHJOXHVQLIÂżQJFDWNLOOLQJ inhabitants  of  Zeno,  Ohio.  They  are  characters  to  the  most   extreme  potential  and  they  perform  the  dance,  rites  of  pas-­ VDJHDQGPDWLQJULWXDOVWKDWDQ\FXOWXUHSURXGO\UHĂ&#x20AC;HFWV Now  for  the  girls.  The  girls  present  an  interesting  cog  

in  this  well-­oiled  machine,  as  they  appear  to  be  reckless   and  dangerous,  long  before  they  meet  the  beach,  breasts   and  bass  lines  of  the  opening  credits.  They  also  seem  to   Âż[DWHRQWKHHVFDSLVPWKDWEHDFKOLIHZLOOSURYLGHDQGWKH happiness  that  money  will  ultimately  give  them.   These  girls  are  different,  with  the  equally  interesting   addition  of  the  pious  partier,  appropriately  named  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Faith.â&#x20AC;?   Faith  is  our  moral  arrow  within  the  story.  When  confront-­ ed  with  life  beyond  the  allotted  spring  break  of  her  peers,   she  breaks  down,  shows  immediate  concern  with  the  life-­ style  ahead  and  returns  home  in  a  panic. And   then   there   were   three   and   if   we   remember   cor-­ rectly,   these   were   the   original   â&#x20AC;&#x153;bad   bitchesâ&#x20AC;?   involved   in   ÂżQDQFLQJWKHWULSLWVHOIE\UREELQJDORFDOHDWHU\7KHWZR blondes  in  the  back  handle  the  dirty  work  inside,  and  the   driver  who  claims  importance  as  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;lookout.â&#x20AC;? 2XUORRNRXWLVODWHUZRXQGHGLQWKHÂżOPDQGLVVHQW home  after  feeling  scared  of  the  life  presented  even  thus   far.  The  two  girls  remaining  were  already  violent  and  eas-­ ily  excited  by  the  intrigue  of  life  beyond  the  laws  of  man.   They   even   transcend   the   dangerous   capacity   of   the   James   Franco   character,   Alien   (pronounced   A-­Leen).   We   see   this   when   the   girls   confront   Franco   within   his   own   home,   forcing   him   to   perform   fellatio   on   the   weaponry  he  openly  danced  around  just  moments  before. %RWWRPOLQH,ÂśPSV\FKHGWKDWD+DUPRQ\.RULQHÂżOP ZDV DEOH WR VOLS WKURXJK WKH +ROO\ZRRG ÂżOWHU MXVW ORQJ HQRXJKIRUDIHDWXUHÂżOPRIKLV²ZLWKDVWDUVWXGGHGFDVW ²WREHXQOHDVKHGLQVWULSPDOOVDFURVV$PHULFD7KLVÂżOP is  basically  a  cartoon,  a  critique  of  wild  youth  and  the  act   of   rebellion   performed   during   the   ceremonious   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring   Break.â&#x20AC;?   7KLVÂżOPLVDERXWWKHRGGMXVWLÂżFDWLRQRIKXPDQVUH gressing   to   primitive   needs   and   wants   at   the   expense   of   seemingly  no  one.  And  the  best  part  about  it  is,  most  audi-­ HQFH PHPEHUV ZRQÂśW HYHQ NQRZ WKH ÂżOP LV DERXW WKHP Those  who  come  for  the  Skrillex  and  the  promise  of  tits   will  be  disappointed,  and  they  should  be.

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

WHAT  ARE  YOU  INVOLVED  WITH  MUSICALLY? Generation  X,  a  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s  cover  band,  Hudson   9DOOH\*XLWDUDQG%RXQFH0HWKRGZKLFK is  funk  rock/alternative/reggae. WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? :KHQ , ZDV \RXQJHU GHÂżQLWHO\ )OHD RI RHCP  and  John  Paul  Jones  of  Led  Zeppelin.   As  I  got  older,  Pnut  of  311  and  Tony  Kanal   of  No  Doubt.  Now,  more  technically,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  in-­ Ă&#x20AC;XHQFHGE\9LFWRU:RRWHQDQG(YDQ%UHZHU WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? Deftones.   #RIPChi.   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;90s   alternative.   Be-­ lieve   it   or   not,   Fall   Out   Boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Take   This   To  Your  Grave  has  been  lodged  in  my  CD   player  for  the  past  six  months  or  so. WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? Backpack   Europe   and   see   what   happens,   move  to  Cali,  or  shack  up  in  the  city.  They   all  involve  creating,  just  depends  on  where   I  end  up. ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? Experiment,  listen  and  create. CHECK  OUT   GUY  PIAQUADIO PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE   WITH  ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  


THE  DEEP  END

12B oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END MEGAN PORPEGLIA Major:

Painting BFA

Year:

Fifth

Influences:

The space around her, the people around her, her home, food, the body, smells

Websites:

www.meganporpeglia.wordpress.com www.meganporpeglia.tumblr.com

“I like to do the things I like and be around the people that make me feel at home.”

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  MEGAN  PORPEGLIA      ARRANGED  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

STEPPING  UP  TO  THE  PLATE

CARTOON  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN  

After  several  years  of  discussion  and  a  strong  push  from   student  leaders,  SUNY  New  Paltz  will  have  gender-­neutral   housing  next  semester. Announced   at   last   week’s   cabinet   meeting,   three   gen-­ der-­neutral  suites  will  be  available  in  Bevier  Hall  next  fall.   These   suites   will   allow   students   of   any   gender   or   gender   identity  to  live  in  rooms  together. While  we  at  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  applaud  the  adminis-­ tration  for  taking  this  step  and  listening  to  student  voices,  we   hope  they  understand  the  urgent  need  for  these  options  and   that,  regardless  of  whether  or  not  the  trial  run  is  deemed  as  a   success  or  a  failure,  they  will  always  be  necessary. It  is  SUNY  New  Paltz’s  duty  to  ensure  all  students  on   this  campus  can  feel  this  is  a  safe  and  comfortable  environ-­ ment.   If   there   is   no   adequate   housing   for   all   transgender   VWXGHQWV DQG VWXGHQWV ZKR GR QRW LGHQWLI\ ZLWK D VSHFL¿F gender,  then  this  school  has  not  done  its  job. We  are  proud  that  the  school  has  gone  further  than  of-­ fering   gender-­mixed   suites   and   has   decided   to   offer   truly   gender-­neutral  residence  options.  It  is  essential  that  students   feel  their  home  is  a  safe,  secure  place  that  validates  and  ac-­ commodates  their  identity. Although  we  understand  starting  small,  the  overwhelm-­ ing  need  for  this  housing  should  not  be  overlooked  if  issues   arise  and  the  administration  deems  it  unsuccessful.  Even  if   gender-­neutral  housing  does  not  work  for  all  students,  there   will  always  be  a  population  of  students  who  desperately  re-­ quire  this  security.  

Transgender  students  constantly  struggle  with  threats  of   physical  and  emotional  violence,  and  it  is  this  institution’s   job  to  do  everything  possible  to  make  this  campus  a  place   where  students  can  be  themselves  without  fear  of  harm. To  take  away  gender-­neutral  housing  if  it  does  not  work   as   planned   would   be   actively   working   against   the   serious   needs  of  these  students.  Forcing  a  transgender  student  or  a   VWXGHQW ZKR GRHV QRW LGHQLWI\ DV D VSHFL¿F JHQGHU WR OLYH in  the  same  room  as  someone  of  the  same  legal  biological   sex  completely  disregards  and  invalidates  their  identity,  thus   taking  a  severe  psychological  toll  and  negatively  impacting   their  productivity  and  experience  at  SUNY  New  Paltz. Gender-­neutral  housing  is  not  like  a  class  that  you  try   out  to  see  if  it  should  be  offered  again.  It  must  always  be  of-­ fered  because  students  are  always  going  to  need  it,  whether   that  group  be  big  or  small.  The  number  of  students  who  re-­ quire   this   type   of   housing   does   not   determine  whether   the   housing   should   be   available   nor   does   it   minimize   the   dire   need. Every  student  at  this  college  deserves  an  enjoyable,  safe   and   validating   experience.   Every   student   deserves   to   feel   good  about  themselves  and  has  the  right  to  live  in  a  place   that  accepts  and  embraces  them.  This  is  not  idealistic,  nor  is   it  impossible.   These  initial  suites  are  a  valiant  effort  and  a  good  start,   but  they  must  continue  to  have  them  and  hopefully  expand   to   include   them   in   multiple   buildings   to   allow   students   a   greater  choice  in  their  housing.

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

Of   course   there   may   be   bumps   in   the   road,   as   there   are  with  the  introduction  of  anything  new,  but  by  no  means   should   gender-­neutral   housing   be   entirely   removed.   This   need   cannot   be   ignored   and   the   college   must   do   whatever   they  can  to  make  this  housing  viable  and  effective. We   also   believe   it   is   crucial   that   LGBTQ   students   re-­ ceive   priority   when   signing   up   for   these   suites,   as   they   should  be  reserved  for  those  who  need  them  most  in  order  to   feel  safe  and  accepted  in  this  community.   The  development  of  these  gender-­neutral  suites  is  with-­ out  a  doubt  an  achievement  on  the  part  of  the  administration   and  the  students  who  fought  to  make  it  a  reality,  but  it  is  just   WKH¿UVWVWULGH:HXUJHHYHU\RQHWRWDNHWKHWLPHWRHGXFDWH WKHPVHOYHVWREHWWHUXQGHUVWDQGWKHVLJQL¿FDQHRIWKLVLVVXH and  housing,  so  that  eventually  this  campus  can  be  a  positive   and  safe  place  for  students  of  all  gender  identities.

Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the  major-­ ity  of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,  op-­eds   and  letters,  excluding  editorials,  are  solely   those  of  the  writers  and  do  not  necessarily   represent  the  views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,   its  staff  members,  the  campus  and  university   or  the  Town  or  Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMN APRIL  CASTILLO Copy  Editor  

       Acastillo@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Persevering  Through  The  Pain

On  April  14,  I  ran  a  half-­marathon.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  trained  for   the  Fitness/MORE  Magazine  Half-­Marathon  for  three   months.  And  even  though  it  was  only  half  the  distance   of  the  full,  of  the  perceived  holy  grail  of  distance  run-­ ning,  even  though  my  legs  burned  and  my  thighs  felt   chafed  raw,  I  felt  like  I  had  joined  the  elite.   I  hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  slept  much  the  night  before  because  I  was   VRH[FLWHG$QGEHFDXVH,ZDVXWWHUO\WHUULÂżHG My  parents  cheered  me  on  at  mile  seven.  I  saw  my   ER\IULHQGDWPLOH,ÂśGÂżQLVKHGWKHKDUGHVWKLOORIWKH race  a  second  time,  and  just  seeing  him  gave  me  a  need-­ ed  boost.  Every  time  my  muscles  started  to  ache,  spec-­ tators  who  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  know  who  I  was  spurred  me  on.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  part  of  the  running  spirit  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  cheering  on  peo-­ ple  you  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  know.  The  â&#x20AC;&#x153;runnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hello,â&#x20AC;?  waving   to  another  person  out  for  a  run  is  the  kind  of  famous,   albeit  brief,  camraderie  that  makes  this  sport  special. I  only  started  running  because  I  had  to  train  for  my   lacrosse  team  in  high  school.  Running  just  one  11-­min-­ ute  mile  was  a  struggle.  I  realized  the  truth  of  the  track   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  slogan,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  sport  is  your  sportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  punishment.â&#x20AC;?   But   then   the   unthinkable   happened:   running   became   my  sport.  I  became  part  of  the  running  community.   At   the   half-­marathon,   strangersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   signs   promised   IRRG DQG 5\DQ *RVOLQJ DW WKH ÂżQLVK7KH\ VKRXWHG DW me  that  I  was  doing  well,  but  it  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  matter  which  en-­ couragements  they  shouted.  It  only  mattered  that  they   were  there.  Spectators  mean  everything  in  races. 6RPHWLPHV UXQQHUV FDQ EH VHOÂżVK :H GLWFK RXU families  and  friends  to  go  for  long  runs,  cancel  all  so-­

cial   events   before   race   day   and   plead   for   stretching   help   and   massages.   Runners   love   to   use   running   as   an  excuse  to  do  something.  An  important  race  had  me   justifying  $50  shoes,  four  hours  of  sleep  and  a  burrito   WKHVL]HRIP\KHDGFRQVXPHGDIWHU,FURVVHGWKHÂżQLVK line.   Sometimes,  runners  can  be  elitist.  Runners  love  to   brag  about  mile  splits,  running  swag,  the  distance  they   just  powered  through  or  their  latest  top  speed.  But  rac-­ es  are  different.  Runners  become  a  little  more  humble,   a   little   more   afraid   and   a   little   more   united,   because   suddenly,  here  you  are  with  thousands  of  people  who   have  sweated,  blistered,  pounded  the  pavement  and  the   trails,   fought   hard   for   where   they   are   today.   Just   like   you. :KDWPDNHVDUXQQHU",VLWWKHGLVWDQFH\RXUXQRU KRZVSHHG\\RXDUH" I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  rolling  out  of  bed  from  under  the  warm   covers  for  a  long  run  in  the  wee  hours  of  the  morning,   slipping  on  your  shoes  and  darting  out  of  your  home  to   get   it   done.   Maybe   you   belt   out   cheesy   pop   music   as   you  run.  Maybe  the  way  you  breathe  is  music  enough.   You   put   one   foot   in   front   of   the   other.  Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   to   keep   moving   forward.  You   have   to,   because   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   a   runner. This  week,  my  heart  aches  for  the  bystanders  of  the   Boston  marathon,  all  of  Boston  and  the  public  watch-­ ing.   Nothing   tests   the   solidarity   of   a   group   of   people   more  than  tragedy,  and  runners  called  each  other  to  ac-­ tion.  Many  runners  wore  their  race  shirts  on  Tuesday  to  

honor  the  victims  of  this  awful  tragedy. I  urge  you  to  remember,  not  just  this  week,  but  al-­ ZD\V:HDU\RXUSULGHRIEHLQJDUXQQHURQWKHLQVLGH Everyone  can  have  the  spirit  of  a  runner.  Of  having  joy   and  persistence  every  day,  from  the  little  kids  sprinting   across  the  grass  to  the  Olympians  bringing  home  gold.   Runners  know  the  importance  of  continuing  even   ZKHQ WKLQJV DUH GLIÂżFXOW EHFDXVH RQH GD\ WKHUH ZLOO EHDÂżQLVK(YHU\RQHFDQUHODWHWRWKDW6XIIHULQJLVQRW forever. Sometimes,   runners   can   be   jerks.   But   not   now.   Now   we   stand   together.   Now   our   fellow   runners,   our   cheerleaders  and  our  loved  ones  have  suffered  and  we   will  mourn.  Even  if  we  have  never  known  them,  run-­ ning  unites  us.   There  is  no  mistaking  that  this  tragedy  is  horrible.   7KHUHLVDQHHGWRPRXUQDQHHGWRUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWDQGDQHHG IRU MXVWLFH %XW RQH GD\ ZH ZLOO PRYH IRUZDUG :H KDYHWR:HÂśUHUXQQHUV ,KRSHZHFDQDOOÂżQGWKDWMR\DJDLQRQHGD\IURP UXQQLQJRUIURPOLIH:HMXVWKDYHWRJHWWKHUHRQHVWHS at  a  time.

April  Castillo  is  a  second-­year  journalism   major,  runner  and  chocolate  chip  cookie  en-­ thusiast.  She  lives  in  Staten  Island,  which  is   GH¿QLWHO\VWLOODSDUWRI1HZ<RUN&LW\5HDOO\

LETTER   Hello New Paltz Villagers! With Village Elections approaching, I am asking you to join me in voting for Tom Rocco on Tuesday, May 7. I have known Tom for four years and I have seen him work hard for this community during election seasons and on a variety of committees. He currently serves on the Village Planning Board, where he asks thoughtful questions and thoroughly reviews applications. As Chair of the Master Plan Review Task Force, he led a group of volunteers in a review and update of the 1994 Village Master Plan. They conducted a survey and collected feedback from the community, which is a good example of how Tom will operate as a Trustee on the Village Board. He will draw from his

training and experience as a philosophy professor to absorb as much public input as possible before forming his own, independent opinion. Tom will make wise choices when voting on shortterm and long-term goals, with an emphasis on current quality of life issues that affect our every day as well as protecting our future through sustainable initiatives. One long-term example includes how to mitigate Ă RRGLQJWKURXJKWKHLQVWDOODWLRQRIUDLQJDUGHQVWRRS timize storm water management. Tom is approachable and a great listener. These traits were evident when we were doing door-to-door canvassing collecting signatures for his nominating petitions, and when he has campaigned for other candidates he has supported in

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

the past. I am supporting Tom because I trust him and his progressive politics. I trust him to be open-minded, to make a positive contribution and to work collaboratively with the other Trustees as well as with the volunteer boards, committees and commissions that he will be the liaison to. I hope that all of you will recognize the importance of voting and how much more each vote counts in a local election such as this one. Thanks in advance for your participation in local government! Peace, Love and Positivity! Ariana Basco


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

SPORTS

SPORTS

THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

 11

oracle.newpaltz.edu

RALLYING AFTER LOSS

7KH0HQ¶V9ROOH\EDOOWHDPIHOOVKRUWRID89&&KDPSLRQVKLSDIWHUWKH\ZHUHGHIHDWHGE\6WHYHQV,QVWLWXWHRI7HFKQRORJ\3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

By  Angela  Matua 6SRUWV(GLWRU_N02039845@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volleyball  team  had  two  expecta-­ WLRQVRQ$SULO²WRDGYDQFHWRWKH¿QDOVRIWKH UVC  Championship  Tournament,  and  eventually   play  in  the  NCAA  Div.  III  Championship  Tourna-­ ment. $IWHUVZHHSLQJ0HGDLOOHLQWKHTXDUWHU ¿QDOV1R6WHYHQV,QVWLWXWHRI7HFKQRORJ\ZDV the  next  prey  on  the  Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  list.   1HZ3DOW]ZDVXSGXULQJWKHIRXUWK set  and  had  a  chance  to  cement  their  place  in  the   ¿QDOVZKLFK+HDG&RDFK5DGX3HWUXVVDLGZDV KLVIDYRULWHPRPHQWGXULQJWKHWRXUQDPHQW+LV PRVW IUXVWUDWLQJ PRPHQW FDPH DIWHU WKH 'XFNV IRUFHGD¿IWKVHWDQGZHUHXS3HWUXVDOUHDG\ used  his  two  timeouts  and  could  not  create  a  play   PRYLQJ IRUZDUG 7KH +DZNV HYHQWXDOO\ ORVW LQ WKH¿IWKVHW 3HWUXVFLWHGODFNRIH[SHULHQFHDVDGRZQ IDOO EXW LV WKRURXJKO\ VDWLV¿HG ZLWK WKH OHYHO RIVXFFHVVWKH+DZNVKDYHVHHQWKLVVHDVRQKH said.  The  Hawks  have  never  been  swept  in  three   VHWVWKLVVHDVRQDQGKDYHIRUFHGIRXURU¿YHVHWV DJDLQVW VWURQJ WHDPV VXFK DV 1D]DUHWK &ROOHJH DQG6SULQJ¿HOG&ROOHJH They   won   27   matches,   the   most   since   the  

WHDPZKRDFKLHYHGDRYHUDOOUHFRUG ³:HDUHD\RXQJHUWHDPDQGWKH\QHHGPRUH H[SHULHQFHLQJDPHVLWXDWLRQVZLWKDJRRGWHDP´ 3HWUXVVDLG³7KH\KDYHWREHPRUHFRPIRUWDEOH 6RQRZDIWHUWKLVWRXUQDPHQW,¶OOPDNHDSODQIRU ZKDWZLOOEHWKHWDUJHWIRUQH[W\HDUIRUWKHWHDP IRUHDFKSOD\HUIRUWKHRIIHQVHIRUWKHGHIHQVH´ The  Ducks  boasted  more  blocks  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  seven  to   WKH+DZNV¶VL[²ZKLFKLVDQDUHDRIWKHJDPH 3HWUXVVDLGWKHWHDPZLOOZRUNRQIRUQH[WVHDVRQ 7KH+DZNVHGJHGWKH'XFNVLQNLOOVEXW FRPPLWWHGHUURUVZKLOHWKH'XFNVUHFRUGHG 7KLUG\HDU&RFDSWDLQ%ULDQ6PLWKZDVEDW WOLQJVHYHUHDOOHUJLHVWKURXJKRXWWKHWRXUQDPHQW EXWVWLOOPDQDJHGWRUHFRUGNLOOVGLJVDQGD KLWWLQJSHUFHQWDJH+HGHVFULEHGWKHPRRG DIWHUWKHJDPHDV³VDG´EXWDOVRDFNQRZOHGJHG that  the  disappointment  did  not  overshadow  the   FRPPLWPHQW HDFK SOD\HU GLVSOD\HG GXULQJ WKH match.   ³,W¶VGH¿QLWHO\DWRXJKSLOOWRVZDOORZZKHQ \RXNQRZ\RXZHUHULJKWWKHUHDQGKDG\RXZRQ WKDW JDPH \RX ZRXOG EH SOD\LQJ LQ WKH 1&$$ 7RXUQDPHQW´6PLWKVDLG³-XVWORRNLQJDURXQG DOPRVWLQVKRFNLWZDVGHYDVWDWLQJEXWZHKDGD ORWRIJX\VZKRVDLGµOLVWHQNHHS\RXUKHDGVXS 1RPDWWHUZKDWLW¶VEHHQDJUHDWVHDVRQDQGZH FDQ¶WVD\DQ\WKLQJEDGDERXWWKHHIIRUWWKDWZDV

SXWLQE\HYHU\RQH¶´ 7KH +DZNV PLVVHG REWDLQLQJ D ELG WR WKH NCAA   Tournament   by   two   points,   Petrus   said.   The  NCAA  Div.  III  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volleyball  Tournament   ZDVHVWDEOLVKHGLQDQGRQO\QLQHWHDPVFDQ TXDOLI\ 6LQFH WKH SRRO RI WHDPV DOORZHG WR HQ WHUWKHWRXUQDPHQWLVVRVPDOORQO\WKUHHDWODUJH ELGVDUHJUDQWHG&RPSDUHGWRWKH:RPHQ¶V9RO OH\EDOO WRXUQDPHQW ZKLFK EHJDQ LQ  DQG JUDQWVELGVIRUTXDOLI\LQJWHDPVWKH+DZNV KDGDVOLPFKDQFHWRUHFHLYHDELGDIWHUORVLQJWR 6WHYHQV 6PLWKVDLGWKHWHDPKDVZDVWHGQRWLPHJHW WLQJEDFNWRSUDFWLFH7KH\UHVWHGRQ6XQGD\D GD\XVHGWR³FOHDURXUKHDGV´KHVDLG7KHSOD\ HUVFROOHFWLYHO\GHFLGHGWKDWWKHUHZLOOEHQRRII VHDVRQDQGKDYHKLWWKHJ\PHYHU\GD\VLQFHWKH tournamentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  end.   7KRXJK IRXUWK\HDU RXWVLGH KLWWHU %U\DQ Weber   was   disappointed   with   how   his   last   sea-­ son  ended,  he  said  what  he  valued  most  was  the   IULHQGVKLSVKHPDGHZKLFKRXWZHLJKWKH³KHDUW EUHDN´WKHWHDPH[SHULHQFHGDIWHUWKHORVV ³7KH JX\V RQ WKLV WHDP WUXO\ UHHQHUJL]HG my  desire  to  play,  even  when  my  body  was  tell-­ LQJPHWKDWLWPD\EHWLPHWRJLYHLWXS´:HEHU VDLG³,ZLOODOZD\VEHWKDQNIXOIRUWKDW´ /RRNLQJDKHDG3HWUXVVDLGWKHQHZUHFUXLWV

7KXUVGD\$SULO

KDYH WKH VDPH OHYHO RI WDOHQW DV WKH URRNLHV KH EURXJKWLQWKLVVHDVRQ$QHZFURSRI¿UVW\HDUV ZLOODOORZ3HWUXVWRXVHSOD\HUVLQGLIIHUHQWSRVL tions,  he  said.   :HEHUVDLGKHLVFRQ¿GHQWWKDWWKHWHDPZLOO EHVXFFHVVIXOLQWKHXSFRPLQJ\HDUV7KHWHDP¶V UHQHZHG FRPPLWPHQW WR WKH JDPH KDV DOORZHG WKHPWRJDLQFRQ¿GHQFHLQWKHLUDELOLWLHVKHVDLG ³7KLV\HDUWKHUHZDVDQRWLFHDEOHFKDQJHLQ WKHFXOWXUHRI1HZ3DOW]YROOH\EDOO´:HEHUVDLG ³*X\VZHUHDOZD\VLQWKHJ\PZRUNLQJRXWEH IRUHRUDIWHUSUDFWLFHPRUHDQGPRUHIDQVZHUH VKRZLQJXSWRVXSSRUWXVDQGWKHWHDPLWVHOIEH JDQWRUHDOL]HRXUSRWHQWLDO7KLVSURJUDPLVJR LQJWREHLQJRRGKDQGVIRUDORQJWLPH´ 6PLWKVDLGGHVSLWHWKHORVVWKH+DZNV¶¿IWK SODFHQDWLRQDOUDQNLQJLVDGH¿QLQJDVSHFWRIWKHLU EULJKW VHDVRQ +H VDLG WKH WRXUQDPHQW FRQ¿UPV KLVEHOLHIWKDWWKHWHDPLVDIDPLO\DOZD\VSLFNLQJ HDFKRWKHUXSGXULQJURXJKPRPHQWV$FFRUGLQJ WR6PLWKRQHPHQWDOLW\ZLOOGULYHWKLVWHDPQH[W VHDVRQ²KXQJHU ³:H¶UH JRLQJ WR FRPH EDFN QH[W \HDU DQG LW¶VJRLQJWREHVFDU\´6PLWKVDLG³%HFDXVHHQG LQJ WKH ZD\ ZH GLG WKLV \HDU LW KRQHVWO\ SXW D KXQJHULQXVDQGD¿JKWLQXVWKDW\RX¶UHQRWJR LQJWRVHHIURPDORWRISHRSOHVRLW¶VJRLQJWREH JRRGDQG,¶PORRNLQJIRUZDUGWRLW´


SPORTS

12 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Carozza  Pitches  A  No-­Hitter  

CAROZZA BY THE NUMBERS:

ERA: WINS: STRIKEOUTS:

2.03 8 41

3LWFKHU$PEHU&DUR]]DSLWFKHGKHU¿UVWFDUHHUQRKLWWHURQ)ULGD\$SULODJDLQVW681<3RWVGDP3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

By  Andrew  Lief Copy  Editor  |  N02452747@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Fourth-­year  pitcher  Amber  Carozza  made  history   and  she  didn’t  even  know  it.     &DUR]]DSLWFKHGKHU¿UVWFDUHHUQRKLWWHUDJDLQVW 681<3RWVGDPRQ)ULGD\$SULO7KH¿UVWJDPHRI DGRXEOHKHDGHU&DUR]]DDFKLHYHGWKLVUHFRUGGXULQJ WKH/DG\+DZNV¶¿UVWKRPHJDPH :KHQ&DUR]]D¶VWHDPPDWHFRQJUDWXODWHGKHUVKH ZDVXQDZDUHRIKHUDFFRPSOLVKPHQW ³2QHRIP\WHDPPDWHVFDPHRYHUWRPHDQGJDYH PHDELJKXJDQG,ZDVOLNHµ:K\DUH\RXKXJJLQJ PH"¶$QGVKHZDVOLNHµ%HFDXVH\RXMXVWWKUHZDQR hitter,’”  Carozza  said.   &DUR]]DKDVEHHQOHDGLQJWKH/DG\+DZNV¶SLWFK LQJ VWDII WKLV VHDVRQ UHFRUGLQJ DQ  UHFRUG ZLWK D  (5$  6KH KDV EHHQ QDPHG 681<$& 6RIWEDOO 3LWFKHU RI WKH :HHN WZLFH DQG ZDV (&$& 8SVWDWH 6RIWEDOO3LWFKHURIWKH:HHNIRUWKHZHHNHQGLQJRQ April  7. 6HFRQG\HDURXW¿HOGHU1RHOOH*UDQGHVDLGWKHHQ

WLUHWHDPZDVH[FLWHGIRU&DUR]]DDQGWKDWKHUWHDP ¿UVWPHQWDOLW\HQDEOHVKHUWRSHUIRUPWRWKHEHVWRI her  ability. ³,ZDVVRKDSS\IRU$PEHUDQGVRZDVWKHUHVWRI WKHWHDP´*UDQGHVDLG³,GRQ¶WWKLQNVKHHYHQNQHZ VKHKDGDQRKLWWHUVLQFHVKHLVQRWWKHNLQGRISOD\HU WKDWWKLQNVDERXWKHUVHOIGXULQJWKHJDPH6KHFRPHV RXWDQGGRHVKHUMREDVEHVWVKHFDQ´ Head  Coach  Tony  Ciccarello  said  it  was  a  typical   &DUR]]D SHUIRUPDQFH ZKHUH VKH ZDV FRPPDQGLQJ WKHJDPH ³$PEHU ZDV MXVW$PEHU´ &LFFDUHOOR VDLG ³+HU EDOO ZDV UHDOO\ PRYLQJ EXW VKH ZDV GRLQJ $PEHU VWXII$OO RI D VXGGHQ , VHH ]HUR RQ WKH ERDUG DQG , UHDOO\ ZDQWHG WR VD\ VRPHWKLQJ WR P\ DVVLVWDQW EXW WKDW¶VDQRQRVR,MXVWNHSWP\PRXWKVKXW´ *UDQGH VDLG &DUR]]D LV QRW RQO\ D WUHPHQGRXV KHOSWRWKHWHDPRQWKH¿HOGZLWKKHUVWURQJSOD\EXW DOVRRIIWKH¿HOGZLWKKHUSRVLWLYHDWWLWXGH&DUR]]D¶V role  on  the  team  does  not  stop  at  pitcher,  but  extends   WRIRVWHULQJFDPDUDGHULH

7KXUVGD\$SULO

³2QGD\VVKHSLWFKHVVKHJRHVRXWWKHUHDQGDO ZD\VJLYHVXVDFKDQFHWRZLQ´*UDQGHVDLG³6KH GRHVQ¶WHYHUVHHPWRJHWWLUHGEHFDXVHDVVRRQDVVKH¶V GRQHSLWFKLQJVKH¶VEDFNLQWKHGXJRXWFKHHULQJKHU WHDPPDWHVRQZKLOHWKH\EDW+HUORYHIRUWKHJDPH LVFRQWDJLRXV´ &LFFDUHOOR HQMR\V KLV UHODWLRQVKLS ZLWK &DUR]]D and  is  also  pleased  that  she  is  a  team  leader,  despite   QRWEHLQJDFDSWDLQ ³6KH¶V YHU\ KDSS\JROXFN\´ &LFFDUHOOR VDLG ³6KH WHOOV PH OLNH LW LV DQG , WHOO KHU OLNH LW LV WRR 6KH¶VQRWDFDSWDLQRUDQ\WKLQJEXWVKHLVGH¿QLWHO\DQ LQWHJUDOSDUWRIWKHZKROHG\QDPLFRIWKHWHDPNHHS LQJWKHPORRVHLW¶VNHHSLQJPHORRVH´ 0RYLQJ IRUZDUG &DUR]]D ZDQWV WR ZRUN RQ WKH FRQWURORIKHUSLWFKHVDQGWRPDNHVXUHWKDWKHUWHDP FRQWLQXHVWREHRQHXQLWRQDQGRIIWKH¿HOG ³>,DP@ZRUNLQJRQP\ORFDWLRQVDQGNHHSLQJWKH EDOORIIWKHSODWHVRWKHEDWWHUVFDQ¶WWRXFKLW´&DUR ]]DVDLG³:HKDYHWRVWD\VWURQJDQGZHKDYHWRVWD\ WRJHWKHUOLNHDELJIDPLO\´ 3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1


ADS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

13

ATTENTION  STUDENTS Fall  2013  Semester

 8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

SOUTHSIDE  TERRACE  APARTMENTS OFFERS  SEMESTER  LEASES NEWS

The New Paltz Oracle

Studio,  one  &  two  bedroom  apartments Heat  and  Hot  water  included All  apartments  are  furnished Walking  distance  to  the  campus  and  town Ask  about  our  great  rates  for  the  summer  too! Recreation  Facilities,Fitness  Center,  Heated  Pool,  Gas  Grills SOUTHSIDE  TERRACE  APARTMENTS 4  SOUTHSIDE  AVENUE NEW  PALTZ,  NY  12561  (845)  255-­7205

AF R VO U SO FIL NN TED CI IAT ER N JO ETY ED UP ATI UR O W FO ON NA F P EBS R AL LI RO IT BE ST F E E ST S I SS BY N IO TH 20 N 10 AL E

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

oracle.newpaltz.edu Thursday,  April  18,  2013


SPORTS

14    oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Pump  The  Breaks  With  Wheeler andrew.wyrich63@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Well,  it  seems  like  the  Mets’  hot-­ start   is   starting   to   show   its   true   col-­ ors. After  starting  off  the  season  with   a   power-­packed   performance   at   Citi   Field   against   the   Padres   —   and   a   handful   of   pretty   impressive   victo-­ ries  here  and  there  —  the  Mets  have   started  to  show  the  cracks  in  their  ar-­ mor;;   highlighted   by   two   wrenching   losses  to  the  Colorado  Rockies  at  the   snow-­covered  Coors  Field. Essentially,   the   formula   for   a   Mets   victory   is   simple:   if   Jon   Niese   or  Matt  Harvey  is  pitching,  they  have   a   decent   chance   at   getting   a   win.   If   any   other   of   the   Mets’   three   start-­ ers   are   on   the   hill,   the   likelihood   of   something   in   the   “W”   column   gets   much  lower. This  begs  the  question:  how  long   will   the   team   wait   for   top   pitching  

prospect  Zach  Wheeler  to  be  promot-­ ed  to  the  majors? The  answer  is  about  as  clear  as  it   was  in  Spring  Training.  Bringing  up   Wheeler   now   would   probably   give   the  Mets  a  better  chance  of  winning   JDPHVHYHU\¿IWKGD\²EXWDWZKDW cost?  Besides  starting  his  arbitration   clock  early,  and  therefore  forfeiting  a   year  of  potential  service  on  the  team,   the  Mets  also  have  to  consider  if  the   young   pitcher   is   truly   ready   for   the   big  leagues. Sure,   Wheeler   is   bound   to   pitch   better   than   Dillon   Gee,   Jeremy   Hef-­ ner   and  Aaron   Laffey   just   based   on   pure  skill  alone.    But  just  because  he   is  better  than  the  current  crop  of  has-­ beens   and   disappointments   current-­ ly   pitching   for   the   Mets,   it   doesn’t   mean  he  is  ready  to  compete  —  and   more  importantly  excel  —  at  a  major   league  level.

Wheeler  is  close  to  being  ready,   there   is   no   question   about   that.   But   the   timing   isn’t   right.   If   the   Mets   were   a   pitcher   or   two   away   from   competing  for  the  rest  of  the  season,   the  idea  of  placing  Wheeler  into  the   rotation  would  be  much  more  tempt-­ ing. But   the   fact   of   the   matter   is   the   Mets   aren’t   going   anywhere   this   season,   and   waiting   for   Wheeler   to   develop   and   mature   makes   sense   at   this  point.  Why  would  they  rush  the   brightest  pitching  prospect  they  have   possessed   in   recent   memory?   The   LGHDRIVDFUL¿FLQJDEULJKWIXWXUHIRU a  few  extra  wins  in  a  basically  irrel-­ evant  season  doesn’t  make  sense. Let   Wheeler   pitch   in   Las   Vegas   for   a   few   more   weeks,   and   then   in   mid-­May  we  can  watch  him  take  the   mound   for   what   will   hopefully   be   years  to  come.    

PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR  USER  SD  DIRK  

ADVERTISE WITH “THE ORACLE” Urgent  Medical  Care   Urgent  Medical  Care   No  Appointment  Needed                                                            X-­Ray  and  Laboratory  Testing          Suturing  And  Wound  Care                                          Testing  And  Treatment  For  All  STDs

LOCAL:  (NEW  PALTZ    AREA)

NATIONAL:  

Full  Page:  10.25”  x  10.5”  -­  $400   Half  Page:  10.25”  x  5.25”  -­  $200   Quarter  Page:  5.125”  x  5.25”  -­  $100   Eighth  Page:  5.125”  x  2.75”  -­  $50  

Full  Page:  10.25”  x  10.5”  -­  $500   Half  Page:  10.25”  x  5.25”  -­  $300   Quarter  Page:  5.125”  x  5.25”  -­  $200   Eighth  Page:  5.125”  x  2.75”  -­  $100

EXCLUSIVE SA CLUB & ORGANIZATION RATES: Full  Page:  10.25”  x  10.5”  $200   Half  Page:  10.25”  x  5.25”  $100 Weekdays:  8  a.m.  to  7:30  p.m.                    Weekends:  10  a.m.  to  4  p.m. Weekdays:  8  a.m.  to  7:30  p.m.  Weekends:  10  a.m.  to  4  p.m.

Quarter  Page:  5.125”  x  5.25”  $50   Eighth  Page:  5.125”  x  2.75”  $20

To Enquire, Email Us At:

oracle@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Thursday,  April  18,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

ANALYSIS: CAT  TACOPINA Managing  Editor

 Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After   tragedy   reared   its   ugly   face   to   terrorize  Boston  on  Monday,  New  York  un-­ derstood. In   those   moments   of   watching   the   events   of   the   Boston   Marathon   unfold   on   every  media  outlet,  I  was  immediately  tak-­ en  back  to  that  time  when  I  was  9  and  the   home  I  knew  my  whole  life  was  rocked  by   9/11.   I   knew   the   pain,   the   fear,   the   confu-­ sion,  the  inability  to  understand  such  an  evil   could  ever  happen  in  your  backyard  that  all   those   at   the   Boston   Marathon   experienced   ÂżUVWKDQGRQ0RQGD\ I   also   knew,   even   if   I   was   too   young   to  understand  at  the  time,  that  baseball  was   what   helped   so   many   people   I   knew   and   loved  get  through  the  devastation  and  rec-­ ognize  hope  and  happiness  again. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  writing  about  how  after   Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  game  against  the  Diamondbacks,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  never  be  able  to  hate  the  New  York  Yan-­ kees   again,   even   though   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   a   New   York   Mets  fan.

HYTHM & LUESHIRTS ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

With  only  six  games  left  in  the  regu-­ lar   season   and   a   current   eighth   seeding   in   a   very   competitive   Eastern   Confer-­ HQFHLWLVWLPHWRÂżQDOO\SRVHWKHTXHV tion:  will  the  New  York  Rangers  make  it   into  the  postseason? Yes. There  are  still  six  crucial  games  left   in   a   tight   playoff   race   and   any   serious   mistake   could   lead   to   an   early   trip   to   the   golf   courses.   However,   if   you   look   at   how   the   Rangers   are   playing   now,   ignore   Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   loss   against   the   Fly-­ ers  and  examine  the  schedule  they  have   IRUWKHUHVWRIWKHVHDVRQLWLVGLIÂżFXOWWR count  them  out.   In   those   last   six   games,   the   Rang-­ ers  are  going  to  be  playing  the  Carolina   Hurricanes,  the  Buffalo  Sabres  and  will   see   both   the   Florida   Panthers   and   New   Jersey   Devils   twice.   All   six   of   those  

SPORTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

15

More  Than  A  Game I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  begin  to  describe  the  sur-­ SULVH WKDW FDPH RYHU PH ZKHQ , ÂżUVW UHDG the   Yankees,   the   evil   empire   of   baseball,   would   be   paying   tribute   to   Boston   not   just  with  a  sign  that  said  the  former  would   stand  with  their  greatest  rivals,  but  that  they   would   play   Neil   Diamondâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet   Caro-­ line,â&#x20AC;?  the  anthem  of  the  Boston  Red  Sox,  at   the  end  of  the  third  inning.  One  of  the  great-­ est  rivalries  in  all  of  sports  would  forget  a   near   centuryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   worth   of   hatred   and   would   comfort.   And  the  more  and  more  I  think  about  it,   I  realize  how  foolish  it  was  to  be  surprised   by  such  an  act  of  generosity,  even  if  it  came   from  the  Yankees.  When  you  get  right  down   to  it,  I  think  what  New  York  showed  Boston   on  Tuesday  night  is  why  I  and  so  many  oth-­ ers   love   baseball   so   much.   Because   more   than  any  other  sport  on  the  planet,  baseball   is  the  one  that  remains  so  humble  and  non-­ petty,  yet  still  manages  to  transcend  and  be-­ come  more  than  it  actually  is. If   anyone   knows   pain,   suffering   and   the   darkest   corners   of   human   grief,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   New  York  fan.  I  was  disgusted  by  the  com-­ parisons  people  made  between  9/11  and  the  

Boston   Marathon   bombings,   saying   that   they   know   something   so   small   as   playing   what   happened   in   Boston   was   not   even   a  song  over  a  PA  system  could  send  such  a   close   to   what   happened   in   New   York   al-­ booming  message.  It  showed  us  why  base-­ most  12  years  ago.  I  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  that  a   ball  still  matters. group  of  people  who  knew  the  pain  caused   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  quote  from  the  now-­deceased,   by   unfathomable   evil   could   even   possess   great   American   columnist   Mary   McGrory   the   disrespect   to   invalidate   the   experience   that   goes   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baseball   is   what   we   were,   and   that  so  unfortunately  fell  on  Bostonians  just   football  is  what  we  have  become.â&#x20AC;?  For  the   days  ago. longest   time   I   agreed,   and   to   an   extent   I   How   can   we   compare   tragedies?   Are   probably  still  do.  But  after  what  happened   those  immediate  feelings  of  confusion  and   in   New   York   on   Tuesday,  April   16,   2013,   fear  any  different  whether  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  terrorist  at-­ Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  so  sure.  I  think  we  recognize  how   tack  in  New  York,  a  shooting  spree  in  Tuc-­ much   we   take   on   the   persona   of   football,   son,  Aurora  or  Newtown  or  a  bomb  going   but   I   think   deep   inside   every   American,   PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR  USER  SLGCKGC off  in  Boston?  Tragedy,  no  matter  where  it   there  is  still  baseball.  When  tested,  we  are   happens  or  the  body  count  it  commands,  al-­ still  baseball. ways  looks  the  same  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  it  is  hideous,  mali-­ Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  the  hope  and  humanity  that   cious  and  frightening. is   baseball.   Baseball   has   always   repre-­ And  the  New  York  Yankees  know  that.   sented   an   American   ideal   of   comfort   and   And  what  the  New  York  Yankees  also  know   humanity;Íž   the   romanticism   of   baseball   is   is  that  in  the  aftermath  of  such  horror,  the   something   no   one   is   willing   to   let   go   of.   RQO\UHDOFRPIRUWRQHFDQÂżQGLVWKHSURP What  we  saw  on  Tuesday  night,  as  two  ri-­ ise  that  in  anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  arms,  you  are  permitted   vals   looked   past   years   of   hatred   and   hos-­ WRJULHYHDQGÂżQGVRODFH tility,   was   a   countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   never-­ending   ability   The  Yankees  playing  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet  Carolineâ&#x20AC;?   to   show   compassion   and   empathy   during   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   just   some   nice   thing   they   felt   obli-­ a  time  when  two  such  things  are  necessary   gated  to  do.  They  played  that  song  because   for  our  survival.  I  believe  in  that.

Down  The  Home  Strech games  are  games  the  Rangers  could  eas-­ ily  win.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  doubtful  and  a  lot  to  expect   that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  pull  off  six  wins,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no-­ body  that  tough. Really,  the  only  concerns  the  Rang-­ ers   should   have   with   the   schedule   is   that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  have  to  see  hungry   teams  like  New  Jersey  and  Buffalo,  and   while   both   teams   may   be   lower   in   the   standings,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  no  teams  to  snivel  at. If  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  one  type  of  team  the  Rang-­ ers  cannot  succeed  against  as  witnessed   in   games   against   the   Montreal   Canadi-­ ans,   the   Toronto   Maple   Leafs   and   the   Sabres,   it   is   teams   dominated   by   their   speed   and   skill   players.   Their   track   re-­ cord   against   Buffalo   has   been   good   in   the  past  several  seasons,  but  those  games   are   always   hard-­fought   battles,   and   sometimes  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  only  for  one  point. The   biggest   concern   on   the   Blueshirtsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  schedule  right  now  are  those   two  games  against  New  Jersey.  Regard-­

less   of   standings,   games   between   the   Rangers   and   the   Devils   are   almost   al-­ ways  high-­energy,  blood  baths  for  glory.   And  points,  but  mainly  glory  and  brag-­ ging  rights.  The  winner  of  those  games   is  always  the  one  who  is  hungrier. And  after  this  past  Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  defeat,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  sure  if  the  Rangers  are  going  to   be  hungry  enough  for  the  games  that  are   going  to  be  more  challenging.   The  moment  I  read  that  Brad  Rich-­ ards   looked   devastated   in   the   locker   room   after   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   loss   against   the   Flyers   was   when   I   started   to   worry.   I   know   Richards   hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   been   the   most   consistent   of   players   since   he   has   been   here,  but  to  me  he  represents  the  player   who   never   gives   up   and   always   comes   up  big  when  needed.   The  last  player  I  want  to  see  or  know   feels  defeated  is  him. With   that   being   said,   I   am   a   New   York  fan  and  I  am  a  cynic.  Optimism  in  a  

Thursday,  April  18,  2013

New  Yorkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  eyes  is  usually  viewed  as   cynicism  by  everyone  else.  And  if  there   is   one   team   out   of   all   the   teams   I   root   for  that  is  able  to  prove  me  wrong  nine   times  out  of  10,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  Rangers.   And  if  the  Rangers  do  make  it  into   the  playoffs  this  year,  everyone,  regard-­ less  of  who  they  root  for,  has  to  remem-­ ber  that  the  playoffs  are  a  whole  new  ball   game.  Sure,  there  is  probably  no  team  in   the  league  who  will  be  able  to  outscore  a   healthy  Pittsburgh  Penguins  line  up,  but   maybe  destiny  will  rear  her  frightening,   beautiful   face   on   hockey   this   year   and   decide  to  be  as  cruel  as  ever.   Maybe   the   Rangers   will   be   some   sort   of   Cinderella   story   when   the   play-­ offs  roll  around  and  the  Stanley  Cup  vic-­ tory   many   predicted   before   the   season   started  will  become  a  reality.   And  then  I  wake  myself  up  from  my   dreams,  realize  that  is  probably  not  go-­ ing  to  be  the  case  and  pray  for  the  best.


SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

DETERMINED AFTER DEFEAT

Carozza Pitches No-­Hitter PAGE 12

Baseball Unites In The Face Of Tragedy PAGE 15

TOP  PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN   BOTTOM  PHOTO  COURTESY  OF  FLICKR  USER  INSAPPHOWETRUST

MEN’S VOLLEYBALL LOOKS FORWARD TO FUTURE AFTER LOSS: PAGE 11


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 84 Issue 22