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NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE THE

Volume  84,  Issue  XV

Thursday,  February  7,  2012

oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEW PALTZ VILLAGE BOARD AT ODDS STORIES ON PAGE 6

PHOTO BY ROBIN WEINSTEIN

EW N D N BRA No. 4

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MULLIGAN

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No.

‡  Student Association Productions To

Release Second Spring Concert Survey

‡Winning Acts On First Survey Unable To

T A ! C I PAN ISCO THE D 2 No.

3HUIRUP2IÀFLDOV6DLG

STORY ON PAGE 7 | EDITORIAL ON PAGE 9

O C S A I EF P U L .1

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No

INSIDE THIS WEEK’S ISSUE OF THE NEW PALTZ ORACLE

‡New  Paltz  Ranks  High  In  Kiplinger  List.........3J‡  Task  Force  To  Reach  Out  To  Graduates...........Pg  4    Task  Force  To  Reach  Out  To  Graduates   ‡STL  Extends  Hours  Of  Operation....................Pg  5              ‡Campus  Talks  Lift  Of  Female  Military  Ban...Pg  8 Campus  Talks  Lift  Of  Female  Military  Ban


Andrew  Wyrich   EDITOR-­IN-­CHIEF

Cat  Tacopina   MANAGING  EDITOR

_________________

THE

NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

Rachel  Freeman

NEWS  EDITOR ASSISTANT  MANAGING  EDITOR

Katherine  Speller   FEATURES  EDITOR

Carolyn  Quimby   Angela  Matua  

FEATURES          PG.  4B A&E                        PG.    5B SPORTS                  PG.  12

_________________

About  The  New  Paltz  Oracle

ARTS  &  ENTERTAINMENT  EDITOR SPORTS  EDITOR

Samantha  Schwartz   Robin  Weinstein   PHOTOGRAPHY  EDITORS

Julie  Gundersen CARTOONIST

_________________

Suzy  Berkowitz   April  Castillo   Caterina  De  Gaetano   Andrew  Lief Zameena  Mejia   Jennifer  Newman John  Tappen   Matt  Tursi   COPY  EDITORS _________________

Katie  Truisi WEB  CHIEF

Joe  Neggie

MULTIMEDIA  EDITOR  

Suzy  Berkowitz   SOCIAL  MEDIA  CHIEF   _________________

Megan  Ehrlich BUSINESS  MANAGER

Mark  Carroll  

DISTRIBUTION  MANAGER  

The  New  Paltz  OracleLVWKHRI¿FLDOVWXGHQWQHZVSDSHURI 681<1HZ3DOW]2XUFLUFXODWLRQLVThe  New  Paltz  Oracle   is  sponsored  by  the  Student  Association  and  partially  funded  by  the   student  activity  fee. The  New  Paltz  Oracle  is  located  in  the  Student  Union  (SU)   Room  417.  Deadline  for  all  submissions  is  5  p.m.  on  Sundays  in   The  New  Paltz  OracleRI¿FHDQGE\HPDLODWoracle@hawkmail. newpaltz.edu. $OODGYHUWLVHPHQWVPXVWEHWXUQHGLQE\SPRQ)ULGD\VXQOHVVRWKHUZLVHVSHFL¿HG E\WKHEXVLQHVVPDQDJHU&RPPXQLW\DQQRXQFHPHQWVDUHSXEOLVKHGJUDWXLWRXVO\EXWDUH subject  to  restriction  due  to  space  limitations.There  is  no  guarantee  of  publication.  Contents   RIWKLVSDSHUFDQQRWEHUHSURGXFHGZLWKRXWWKHZULWWHQSHUPLVVLRQRIWKH(GLWRULQ&KLHI The  New  Paltz  OracleLVSXEOLVKHGZHHNO\WKURXJKRXWWKHIDOODQGVSULQJVHPHVWHUV RQ7KXUVGD\V,WLVDYDLODEOHLQDOOUHVLGHQFHKDOOVDQGDFDGHPLFEXLOGLQJVLQWKH1HZ3DOW] community  and  online  at  oracle.newpaltz.edu)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO7KH ID[OLQHLV

Volume  84 Issue  XV

Disclaimer:  This  is  only  a  partial  listing.  For  all  incidents,  please  visit  the  University  Police  Department.

3-­7

THE  GUNK  

1B-­8B

THE  DEEP  END COLUMNS

-­  CAT  TACOPINA  &  CAROLYN  QUIMBY

SPORTS  

8B 9

EDITORIAL  

Incident:  Drugs   Date:  2/5/13 Location:  BOH POâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  responded  to  a  call  of  an  odor  of  mari-­ juana;Íž  call  unfounded.   Incident:  Drugs Date:  2/4/13 Location:  BVH POâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  responded  to  a  call  of  an  odor  of  mari-­ juana;Íž  call  unfounded.  

10 11-­15

FOLLOW  THE  ORACLE

-DOHHVD%DXONPDQ1LFROH%ULQNOH\*UHJ%UXQR-LPP\&RUUDR %HWK&XUUDQ.HOVH\'DPUDG1LFN)RGHUD(WKDQ*HQWHU5RJHU*LOVRQ )DLWK*LP]HN(OH[LV*ROGEHUJ5LFDUGR+HUQDQGH]0DWKHZ-RKQ %HQ.LQGORQ(LOHHQ/LHEOHU$GL0F+XJK.D\FLD6DLOVPDQ -DFN6RPPHU(PLO\6XVVHOO5\DQ:DO]+RZDUG<HZ

STAFF

oracle.newpaltz.edu

University  Police  Blotter

Index

NEWS

VISIT â&#x20AC;&#x153;THE ORACLEâ&#x20AC;? ONLINE:

SUNY  New  Paltz   University  Police  Department Emergencies:  845-­257-­2222    

WANT TO WRITE FOR THE ORACLE? STOP  BY  OUR  NEXT   STORY  MEETING  ON:   SUNDAY,  FEBRUARY  17  @  7  P.M.  IN  STUDENT  UNION  403

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

@NewPaltzOracle

Five-­Day  Forecast Thursday,  Feb.  7 Mostly  Cloudy   High:  29  Low:  23

Friday,  Feb.  8

Heavy  Snow    High:  32  Low:  22  

Saturday,  Feb.  9 Snow   High:  26  Low:  7

Sunday,  Feb.  10 Sunny   High:  34  Low:  22

Monday,  Feb.  11 Showers High:  40  Low:  32


   3

NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

oracle.newpaltz.edu

New  Paltz  Makes   New   Director   of   Alumni  Relations Kiplingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  List Appointed By  Angela  Matua Sports  Editor|  N02039845@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

By  Matt  Tursi Copy  Editor  |  N01980919@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SUNY   New   Paltz   has   been   chosen   as   one   of   the   top   public   four-­year   institutions   of  higher  education  in  the  country,  according   to  Kiplingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Personal  Finance  magazine. New   Paltz   was   ranked   No.   44   out   of   100   in   Kiplingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   list   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best   Values   in   Public  Colleges  2013â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  climbing  11  spots   from  last  year. While  the  44th  position  is  the  ranking   for   in-­state   schools,   New   Paltz   also   ranked   29th  for  out-­of-­state. According   to   its   website   Kiplingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   starts   with   data   on   the   nearly   600   public   four-­year   schools   provided   by   Petersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,   a   college   information   website   and   guide.     From  there,  Kiplingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  adds  in  their  report-­ ing.   The  metrics  breakdown  works  out  to  be   45  percent  cost  factors  and  55  percent  qual-­ ity  factors.  Those  two  categories  are  further   VXEGLYLGHGLQWRWKHVFKRROÂśVFRVWDQGÂżQDQ-­ cial  aid,  average  student  debt  at  graduation,   competitiveness,   graduation   rates   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   proof  of  the  puddingâ&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  academic  sup-­ port  which  is  comprised  of  the  freshmen  re-­ tention  rate  and  ratio  of  faculty  to  students,  

their  website  said.   SUNY   New   Paltz   President   Donald   Christian   said   he   is   very   pleased   with   the   recent  listing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ln   conversations   about   higher   educa-­ tion,   there   are   two   main   thrusts   there   right   now,â&#x20AC;?  Christian  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;One  is  quality  of  de-­ grees...are  students  learning  what  they  need   to   know   to   be   successful   in   the   world   that   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   all   inherit   and   live   in   and   contribute   to?  The  other  is  college  cost  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  to  be  included   in  a  ranking  like  this,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  measure  of  a   combination  of  quality  and  affordability.â&#x20AC;? While   the   rank   certainly   could   look   good  to  anyone  perusing  the  list  scouring  for   potential  schools,  L.  David  Eaton,  vice  pres-­ ident  for  enrollment  management,  said  there   are   other,   quite   possibly   more   important,   considerations  to  be  taken.    He  said  details   such  as  location  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  whether  the  school  is  in   a  city,  mountain,  farm,  or  suburban  area  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   ORFDO Ă&#x20AC;DYRU WROHUDQFH GLYHUVLW\ SURJUDPV offered  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  all  of  these  should  be  considered   paramount,  not  just  where  the  school  lands   on  a  list.     Eaton  said  he  places  an  emphasis  on  the   details  missing  from  the  pure  numbers  that   the  lists  are  composed  of.  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  use  a  list,  you  miss  a  lot  of  the   more   nuanced   things   like,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Is   this   a   good   ÂżW"œ¾:RXOGVRPHERG\ZKRÂśVYHU\FRPIRUW-­ able   in   a   tolerant   community   be   comfort-­ able  in  a  very  intolerant  kind  of  social  set-­ ting  where  people  all  have  to  conform  to  the   same  thing?,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Eaton  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  much  more   complicated   than   saying   I   think   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   go   to   number  12,  because  they  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  into  11.â&#x20AC;? Christian   said   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   shift   in   placement  has  to  do  with  Kiplingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  them-­ selves,  not  necessarily  the  school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   generally   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   change   that   dra-­ matically   in   a   one   year   time,   so   some   of   those   shifts   are   methodological,â&#x20AC;?   Christian   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  result  in  the  way  that  the  stan-­ dardized  data  gets  reported  and  tabulated  by   Kiplingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,   so   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   a   little   reluctant   to   put   too  much  stock  in  a  particular  ranking.â&#x20AC;? When  choosing  a  school,  Christian  said   it  is  important  to  consider  and  highlight  the   idea  of  value. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   to   think   about   value,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  somethingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  inexpensive  but  poor   quality,  it  has  no  value,  so  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  after   are  things  that  have  high  quality  at  reason-­ able   cost.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   value   measure   that   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  so  proud  of.â&#x20AC;?

Council  Holds  First  Spring  Meeting By  April  Castillo Copy  Editor  |  Acastillo@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

7KH VHPHVWHUœV ¿UVW &RXQFLO RI Organizations   meeting   was   held   on   Monday,   Feb.   4   at   7   p.m.   in   Student   Union  (SU)  62/63.   Student   Association   Dispersing   Agent  Linda  Lendvay  spoke  of  the  up-­ coming  Budget  and  Finance  weekend   on  March  14  and  the  need  for  clubs  to   ¿OHSDSHUZRUN The   new   restrictions   placed   on   the  credit  card  loaned  out  to  organiza-­ tions   were   also   discussed.   Originally   intended   for   extracurricular   purposes   such  as  travel,  hotel  and  play  reserva-­

tions,  the  credit  card  had  been  used  for   multiple   purchases   of   smaller   items.   Because  of  the  lengthy  paperwork  and   the  risks  of  credit  card  fraud,  the  card   can   no   longer   be   used   for   other   pur-­ poses.  Organizations  are  urged  to  shop   with  vendors  who  accept  purchase  or-­ ders,   for   which   the   department   will   â&#x20AC;&#x153;gladly  undergoâ&#x20AC;?  a  credit  check. A  representative  from  the  library   committee  spoke  about  the  extension   of   library   hours   and   the   addition   of   $10  to  the  student  print  quota. Council   urged   students   to   share   ideas   and   questions.   They   said   they   would   consider   online   or   email   op-­

tions   to   nominate   people   running   for   positions  in  the  future. The  remaining  seven  members  of   the  Student  Programming  Board  were   elected  unanimously. Brenda  Dow,  the  newly  appointed   director  of  development  services  (de-­ velopment   and   alumni   affairs)   stood   and   urged   students   to   become   active   in  the  alumni  situation  and  to  help  the   SUNY  New  Paltz  community  grow. Applications   for   tabling   at   Ac-­ cepted   Students   Day   were   given   out.   They  are  due  by  March  8  at  the  latest. The  next  meeting  will  take  place   on  Monday,  Feb.  25.

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

SUNY  New  Paltz  recently  appointed  Brenda  Dow  as   the  new  director  of  alumni  relations. Dow  previously  served  as  the  director  of  development   VHUYLFHV LQ WKH 2IÂżFH RI 'HYHORSPHQW IURP )HEUXDU\ WR December  2012.  This  position  helped  her  gain  knowledge   about  the  inner  workings  of  development  and  alumni  pro-­ cedures,  she  said. Âł0\ÂżUVW\HDUDW681<1HZ3DOW]KDVEHHQDZRQ-­ derful  experience,â&#x20AC;?  Dow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Serving  as  director  of  de-­ velopment  services  has  familiarized  me  with  current  devel-­ opment  and  alumni  operations.  I  also  began  meeting  some   of  the  people  who  help  make  SUNY  New  Paltz  a  special   place.â&#x20AC;? Dowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  previous  experience  in  alumni  affairs �� includes   a  nearly  seven-­year  position  as  the  head  of  alumni  affairs   at  the  SUNY  Institute  of  Technology  in  Utica/Rome.  She   was  also  the  director  of  public  relations  and  webmaster  at   Utica  College.   She  cited  the  alumni  relations  staff  and  the  promise  of   new  challenges  as  reasons  for  accepting  the  position.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   interviewing   for   the   director   of   development   services  job,  I  was  impressed  by  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  expertise,â&#x20AC;?  Dow   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  also  felt  the  development  and  alumni  operation  was   a  good  match  for  my  skills  while  also  offering  new  chal-­ lenges.â&#x20AC;?  Dow  will  also  serve  as  the  vice  chair  for  the  recently   established  Ad  Hoc  Alumni  Relations  Task  Force. With   more   than   60,000   alumni   around   the   world,   Christian   believes   changes   need   to   be   made   to   foster   an   alumni  community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  a  global  institution  with  graduates  living  in   countries  around  the  world,â&#x20AC;?  Christian  said  in  a  press  re-­ lease.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  an  obligation  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  indeed,  a  privilege  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  to   engage   them   in   the   exciting   future   that   awaits   their   alma   mater.â&#x20AC;? Dow   said   she   is   looking   forward   to   interacting   with   alumni  as  she  works  on  her  mission  to  create  and  sustain  a   more  engaging  alumni  program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   this   new   role,   I   look   forward   to   meeting   more   alumni,   hearing   about   their   New   Paltz   experiences   and   building  stronger  connections  that  are  meaningful  to  them   and  supportive  of  our  mission,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   Interim  Executive  Director  of  Development  and  Foun-­ dation   David   P.   Ferguson   said   the   combination   of   Dowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   credentials  and  experiences  will  help  the  task  force  reach   its  goals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ms.  Dow  is  a  personable,  energetic  and  knowledge-­ able   individual,â&#x20AC;?   Ferguson   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   loves   SUNY   New   Paltz  and  understands  the  tremendous  opportunities  that  are   DKHDGRIXV6SHQGLQJÂżYHPLQXWHVLQWKHURRPZLWK%UHQGD convinces  you  that  she  is  roaring  to  go.â&#x20AC;?


NEWS

4 oracle.newpaltz.edu

NEWS BRIEFS WORLD

Local  Catholic  Schools  Face  Tough  Times By  Caterina  De  Gaetano Copy  Editor  |  Cdegaetano64@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

RESORT  RAPES 7KH WRXULVP ZRUOG WXUQHG LWV H\HV RQ 0H[LFRDIWHUVL[6SDQLVKZRPHQZHUH UDSHG E\ PDVNHG JXQPHQ GXULQJ D YDFDWLRQ LQ WKH ORQJWURXEOHG 3DFLÂżF coast  resort  of  Acapulco. TUNISIAN  TROUBLE 6KDNHQE\WKHDVVDVVLQDWLRQRIDSURPLQHQW OHIWLVWRSSRVLWLRQOHDGHUWKDWXQOHDVKHGPD-­ MRU SURWHVWV 7XQLVLDÂśV SULPH PLQLVWHU DQ-­ QRXQFHG:HGQHVGD\WKDWKHZRXOGIRUPD QHZJRYHUQPHQWRIWHFKQRFUDWVWRJXLGHWKH country  to  elections  â&#x20AC;&#x153;as  soon  as  possible.â&#x20AC;? TSUNAMI  TRAGEDY Six   bodies,   including   a   childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,   have   been   found   in   the   sodden   wreckage   OHIWE\DWVXQDPLWKDWVPDVKHGLQWRYLO-­ ODJHVLQWKH6RORPRQ,VODQGVĂ&#x20AC;DWWHQLQJ GR]HQV RI KRPHV LQ WKH 6RXWK 3DFLÂżF island  chain. PROSECUTING  PRIESTS 7KH 9DWLFDQÂśV QHZ VH[ FULPHV SURVHFXWRU has   insisted   on   the   need   for   transparency   about   the   churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   failures   to   protect   chil-­ GUHQIURPVH[DEXVHE\SULHVWV

Twenty-­six   Catholic   schools   in   New   York  State,  including  two  in  Ulster  Coun-­ ty,   are   at   risk   of   closure   in   June   follow-­ ing   the   fall   analysis   of   the   local   regional   ERDUGVDQGUHFRQÂżJXUDWLRQFRPPLWWHHVLQ every  county  in  the  archdiocese,  according   to  the  Archdiocese  of  New  York  website.   St.   Mary   of   the   Snow   in   Saugerties   and   St.   Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   School   in   Kingston   are   the  two  in  Ulster  County  that  were  put  at   risk  of  closure.   +RZHYHU3DXO'H/LVLRFKDLUPDQRI WKHÂżQDQFHFRPPLWWHHDW6W-RVHSKÂśVVDLG WKHVFKRROZLOOUHPDLQRSHQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;St.  Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  is  not  going  to  close,â&#x20AC;?  he   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  surviving,  thriving  and  en-­ UROOPHQWLVXSÂŤRXUIDFLOLWLHVDUHLQZRQ-­ derful  shape.â&#x20AC;? ,QDQHIIRUWWRVDYHPRQH\WKHDUFKGL-­ RFHVHORFDOUHJLRQDOERDUGVDQGUHFRQÂżJX-­ UDWLRQ FRPPLWWHH DQDO\]HV EXGJHWV DQG YLVLWVVFKRROVWRGHWHUPLQHWKHLUFRQGLWLRQ DQGKRZPXFKWKHLQVWLWXWLRQZRXOGFRVW the  diocese  to  survive,  De  Lisio  said.   St.  Mary  of  the  Snow,  a  struggling  fa-­ cility,  costs  the  diocese  $600,000  a  year  to   NHHSRSHQDQGWKHFRPPLWWHHGHFLGHGWKDW

6\ULDQUHEHOVDQGUHJLPHIRUFHVIRXJKW WKHLUPRVWLQWHQVHFODVKHVLQZHHNVLQ-­ side  the  heavily  guarded  capital  of  Da-­ PDVFXV RQ :HGQHVGD\ DFWLYLVWV VDLG with  the  sounds  of  shell  blasts  echoing   through   the   downtown   area   and   keep-­ LQJ PDQ\ FKLOGUHQ KRPH IURP VFKRRO while  residents  hid  in  their  houses.

EGYPTIAN  CRITICISM (J\SWœV PRVW SURPLQHQW RSSRVLWLRQ OHDGHU FULWLFL]HG WKH ,VODPLVW JRYHUQ-­ PHQWRQ:HGQHVGD\IRULWVVLOHQFHRYHU D 0XVOLP FOHULFœV HGLFW FDOOLQJ IRU WKH death  of  opposition  supporters.

Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

the  school  will  close  in  June,  according  to   De  Lisio.   De  Lisio  said  that  when  the  archdio-­ cese  contacted  St.  Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  two-­and-­a-­half   years  ago  saying  it  was  an  â&#x20AC;&#x153;at  riskâ&#x20AC;?  school,   tuition   was   raised   drastically   to   bring   in   PRUH IXQGLQJ DQG VWXGHQW VFKRODUVKLSV LQFUHDVHG WR PRUH WKDQ  ,Q DGGL-­ WLRQ DOXPQL GRQDWLRQV UDLVHG PRUH WKDQ  IRU WKH VFKRRO 3DUHQWV DOXPQL and   parishioners   have   also   stepped   up   to   ÂżQDQFLDOO\ VSRQVRU FODVVURRPV WKH J\P-­ QDVLXPDQGWKHDWHUKHVDLG Âł:HKDYHQÂśWKDGWRXVHPXFKPRQH\ IURPWKHDUFKGLRFHVHIRUWZRSOXV\HDUV´ 'H/LVLRVDLGÂł:KDWÂśVWKHKDUPLQNHHS-­ ing   a   thriving   school   that   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   cost   the   DUFKGLRFHVHDGLPH"´ 6W-RVHSKÂśVVHUYHVFKLOGUHQIURPSUH K  to  eighth  grade.  The  school  has  an  art,   PXVLF DQG WKHDWHU SURJUDP WHFKQRORJ\ ODEVDQKRQRUVSURJUDPDQGLVKRPHWRDQ DZDUGZLQQLQJFKHVVWHDP&XUUHQWO\ VWXGHQWV DUH HQUROOHG IURP WKH .LQJVWRQ DUHD 1HZ 3DOW] DQG 1RUWKHUQ 'XWFKHVV County,   according   to   school   Principal   -HDQQH'RODPRUH â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   shadow   days   and   registra-­ tion  ongoing  for  new  students  every  day,â&#x20AC;?   'RODPRUHVDLG

With   the   closing   of   three   public   VFKRROV LQ .LQJVWRQ QH[W 6HSWHPEHU 'H Lisio  said  he  believes  there  will  a  greater   need   to   keep   St.   Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   open   because   VRPH RI WKRVH GLVSODFHG VWXGHQWV PLJKW enroll.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  love  a  faith-­based  education,â&#x20AC;?   KHVDLGÂł7KH\ORYHWKHHQYLURQPHQWLWÂśV what  the  general  public  is  looking  for.â&#x20AC;? As  of  now,  De  Lisio  said  he  is  uncer-­ WDLQDERXWWKHFKDQJHVWKDWZLOOEHPDGHWR the  title  and  status  of  St.  Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  School.   The   school   will   no   longer   be   part   of   the   UHJLRQDOL]DWLRQSURJUDPKHVDLGEXWPD\ FRQWLQXHWRUHPDLQDSDULVKVFKRROWKDWWKH FKXUFKVXEVLGL]HV ,IWKHVFKRROEHFRPHVDQLQGHSHQGHQW Catholic  school,  the  archdiocese  no  longer   KDVDQ\ÂżQDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUWKHID-­ FLOLW\DQGWKHFDUGLQDOPXVWJLYHSHUPLV-­ sion  to  continue  to  use  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catholicâ&#x20AC;?  within   WKHVFKRROÂśVQDPHDFFRUGLQJWR'H/LVLR Regardless   of   status,   De   Lisio   said   WKDW WKH VFKRRO ZLOO UHPDLQ D IDLWKEDVHG one. Âł:HDUHJRLQJWRNHHSPRYLQJNHHS enrolling   and   going   to   be   open.   We   just   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  what  our  title  will  be,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  working  on  the  next  100  years.â&#x20AC;?  

President  Creates  Alumni  Task  Force By  Cat  Tacopina Managing  Editor  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

SYRIAN  STRUGGLE

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

,Q DQ HIIRUW WR LPSURYH WKH UHODWLRQVKLS EH-­ WZHHQWKHXQLYHUVLW\DQGLWVDOXPQL681<1HZ 3DOW]3UHVLGHQW'RQDOG&KULVWLDQKDVVHWXSDQ$G +RF$OXPQL5HODWLRQV7DVN)RUFH ,Q DQ DGGUHVV WR WKH FDPSXV FRPPXQLW\ UHOHDVHG RQ -DQ  RQ WKH 1HZ 3DOW] ZHEVLWH Christian   said   he   believes   the   bond   between   the   DOXPQL DQG WKH FROOHJH LV DQ LPSRUWDQW RQH DQG WKDW LPSURYLQJ WKH UHODWLRQVKLS ZLWK DOXPQL ZLOO help  future  generations  of  students. Âł1HZ3DOW]ERDVWVPRUHWKDQDOXPQL UHVLGLQJ LQ PDQ\ FRXQWULHV DURXQG WKH ZRUOG´ Christian   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   an   opportunity   right   now  to  do  a  vastly  better  job  than  we  have  done   LQ EXLOGLQJ D ZRUOGZLGH FRPPXQLW\ RI 681< 1HZ3DOW]DOXPQL6WUHQJWKHQLQJRXUWLHVZLWKRXU graduates  is  not  only  the  right  thing  to  do  but  it  is   VRPHWKLQJZHPXVWGRLIWKHFROOHJHLVWRWKULYH and   continue   to   educate   new   generations   of   stu-­ dents.â&#x20AC;? In  the  address,  Christian  said  Vice  President   IRU(QUROOPHQW0DQDJHPHQW/'DYLG(DWRQZLOO FKDLUWKHFRPPLWWHHDQGWKDWUHFHQWO\KLUHG'LUHF-­

WRU RI$OXPQL 5HODWLRQV %UHQGD 'RZ ZLOO VHUYH as  vice  chair.   (DWRQVDLGEXLOGLQJDUHODWLRQVKLSZLWKDOXP-­ QLZLOODOVREHQHÂżWFXUUHQWDQGIXWXUHVWXGHQWV Âł:H KDYH DOXPQL VSUHDG RXW LQ SODFHV OLNH California   and   D.C.   and   we   want   to   work   with   WKHVHDOXPQLWRSURYLGHWKHPZLWKQHWZRUNLQJDQG ZRUNZLWKWKHPWRJURZLQWHUQVKLSRSSRUWXQLWLHV IRUVWXGHQWV´(DWRQVDLGÂł2XUDOXPQLWKDWDUHQÂśW UHWLUHG²DQGWKHUHÂśVDORWRIWKHP²DUHRXWLQ the   professional   world.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   very   powerful   net-­ ZRUNRISHRSOHWKDWJUDGXDWHGIURPKHUH´ Dow  said  the  current  goal  of  the  task  force   is  to  set  up  a  foundation  and  provide  groundwork   IRUEXLOGLQJUHODWLRQVKLSVZLWKDOXPQLDFURVVWKH globe. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   task   force   is   charged   with   creating   a   GUDIWPLVVLRQVWDWHPHQWDQGDGUDIWVWUDWHJLFSODQ IRUWKHRIÂżFHRIDOXPQLUHODWLRQVWKDWLVFRQJUXHQW with  and  supportive  of  the  Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  institutional   SULRULWLHVDQG681<6\VWHPJXLGHOLQHV´VKHVDLG (DWRQÂśVSODQLVWRORRNDWDQGDGDSWPHWKRGV used  by  other  schools  in  the  country  with  strong   DOXPQLEDVHV(DWRQSRLQWHGRXWVFKRROVOLNHWKH University   of   Michigan   and   SUNY   Oneonta,  

7KXUVGD\)HEUXDU\

DPRQJRWKHUSULYDWHLQVWLWXWLRQVDVSODFHVZKHUH WKHLUDOXPQLUHODWLRQVSURJUDPVH[FHO â&#x20AC;&#x153;Within   our   own   backyard,   the   best   SUNY   LQ WHUPV RI PDLQWDLQLQJ D FRQQHFWLRQ ZLWK WKHLU DOXPQLKDQGVGRZQLV681<2QHRQWD´KHVDLG Âł7KH\KDYHUHDOO\UHDOO\OR\DODOXPQL$VIDUDV DOXPQLJRWKH\ÂśUHDJUHDWSODFHWRORRN´ Eaton   and   Dow   are   both   in   the   process   of   VHOHFWLQJ PHPEHUV WR WKH WDVN IRUFH (DWRQ VDLG they  are  looking  to  appoint  eight  to  10  people  to   the  task  force  and  would  include  a  variety  of  re-­ VRXUFHVIURPWKHFRPPXQLW\WKDWDUHÂłJRRGWKLQN-­ ers  and  not  shy.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  best  way  to  develop  a  task  force  is  to   ORRN DW SHRSOH ZKR KDYH LQIRUPDWLRQ DQG VNLOOV FRQVLVWHQWZLWKWKHGHPDQGVRIZKDWWKHWDVNIRUFH is  going  to  be,â&#x20AC;?  Eaton  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  we  want  people   ZKRZULWHZHOOZDQWVRPHDOXPVVRPHERG\IURP WKHIDFXOW\VRPHERG\IURPWKHDGPLQLVWUDWLRQDQG VRPHERG\IURPRXWVLGHRIWKHFROOHJH<RXZDQW to  have  a  whole  host  of  perspectives.â&#x20AC;? (DWRQVDLGWKHÂżUVWVFKHGXOHGPHHWLQJRIWKH Ad  Hoc  Task  Force  will  be  held  at  the  end  of  the   PRQWK7KHIRUFHZLOOEHNHSWLQWDFWXQWLO-XQH of  this  year.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

NEWS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

Library  Hours  Extended  For    Spring By  Andrew  Wyrich

 5

NEWS BRIEFS NATIONAL

Editor-­in-­Chief  |  Andrew.wyrich63@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After  a  push  from  the  student  body,  Student   Association   (SA)   and   Sojourner   Truth   Memorial   /LEUDU\ 67/  RIÂżFLDOV DQQRXQFHG WKH OLEUDU\ÂśV hours  of  operation  have  been  extended  this  semes-­ ter.   For   the   spring   2013   semester,   the   library   hours   have   been   extended   until   12:30   a.m.   Sun-­ day  through  Thursday  while  the  Late  Night  Study   Room  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  which  was  temporarily  located  in  the  Col-­ lege  Terrace  as  STL  was  under  construction  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  will   now  be  open  from  11  p.m.  to  3  a.m.,  according  to   Library  Dean  W.  Mark  Colvson.   SA   Vice   President   of  Academic  Affairs   and   Governance  Jonathan  Espinosa  said  he Â��approached   Colvson  soon  after  his  appointment  as  dean  in  Sep-­ tember   to   relay   concerns   he   heard   from   students   UHJDUGLQJWKHOLEUDU\ÂśVKRXUVRIRSHUDWLRQ Espinosa   said   the   movement   members   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students  With  A  Common  Interest,â&#x20AC;?  who  were  a   former  iteration  of  the  now-­formed  New  York  Stu-­ dents  Rising,  showed  him  the  dissatisfaction  mem-­ EHUVRI681<1HZ3DOW]ÂśVFDPSXVFRPPXQLW\KDG ZLWKWKHOLEUDU\ÂśVKRXUVRIRSHUDWLRQZKHQWKH\RF cupied  the  library  in  December  2011. Âł7KDWJURXSGLGDVLWLQDQGZRXOGQÂśWOHDYH´ Espinosa  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  showed  me  that  students  had   a  legitimate  interest  in  [the  hours],  so  I  wanted  to   PDNHLWRQHRIP\JRDOV3HUVRQDOO\,GRQÂśWXVHWKH library  that  much,  but  I  know  that  people  do  and   would  want  the  hours  extended.â&#x20AC;?   ,QDGGLWLRQ(VSLQRVDVDLGODVWVHPHVWHUÂśVH[ tended  hours  in  the  Late  Night  Study  Room  were   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;catalystâ&#x20AC;?   for   the   new   extended   hours,   as   they   offered  Colvson  and  himself  the  ability  to  see  if  the   extended  hours  would  be  popular  enough  to  justify   a  change  in  schedule.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without   that   test,   extending   the   hours   now   would  have  been  a  lot  harder,â&#x20AC;?  Espinosa  said.   Espinosa  said  he  met  with  Colvson  frequently   over  the  last  few  months  and  expressed  his  goals   to  extend  the  hours  in  STL,  pointing  to  student  de-­ PDQGDQGRWKHU681<VFKRROVÂśKRXUVRIRSHUDWLRQ as  ways  to  show  the  hours  were  need.   In  2011,  the  members  of  the  occupying  group   LQ67/VDLG1HZ3DOW]ÂśVKRXUVRIRSHUDWLRQLQWKHLU library   put   them   lower   than   comparable   SUNY   schools  such  as  SUNY  Oneonta  or  SUNY  Platts-­ burgh.  In  2011,  SUNY  New  Paltz  was  only  one  of   three   schools   in   the   SUNY   system   that   operated   less  than  100  hours  per  week.   Espinosa   said   these   numbers   were   driving   factors  in  the  decision  to  experiment  with  extended   hours  this  semester.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;[Colvson]  was  open  to  my  ideas,  thought  the   extended  hours  were  needed  and  supported  it,â&#x20AC;?  Es-­ pinosa  said. After   meeting   with   Espinosa,   Colvson   said  

PROPOSED  PACKAGE House   Democrats   will   unveil   15   pro-­ posals   for   curbing   gun   violence   that   UHVHPEOH 3UHVLGHQW %DUDFN 2EDPDœV plan  and  will  include  a  call  for  banning   assault   weapons,   people   familiar   with   the  package  said  Wednesday. CLASSIFIED  ACCESS   President   Barack   Obama   has   directed   the   Justice   Department   to   give   Con-­ JUHVVœ LQWHOOLJHQFH FRPPLWWHHV DFFHVV WRFODVVL¿HGOHJDODGYLFHSURYLGLQJWKH JRYHUQPHQWœVUDWLRQDOHIRUGURQHVWULNHV against  American  citizens  working  with   al-­Qaida   abroad,   a   senior   administra-­ WLRQRI¿FLDODQG'HPRFUDWLFODZPDNHUV said  Wednesday. DRIVING  DISASTER PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN PHOTO  BY  TEO  ALMONTE The  Sojourner  Truth  Memorial  Library  announced  extended  hours  this  semester.

KHVSRNHZLWKOLEUDU\VWDIIDQGWKH3URYRVWÂśVRIÂżFH to   explore   the   feasibility   of   extended   hours.  This   lead   to   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;experimentalâ&#x20AC;?   extension   that   is   now   unfolding.   Colvson  said  that  while  students  approached   both  him  and  Espinosa  about  extending  the  hours,   he  is  still  waiting  to  see  if  the  extended  hours  are   truly  being  used  when  compared  to  the  demand.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  jury  is  still  out  on  that,â&#x20AC;?  Colvson  said.   Âł:HKDYHWUDIÂżFFRXQWVIRUWKHURRPWKDWVKRZD VWHDG\XVHWKURXJKRXWWKHQLJKWEXW,ZRXOGQÂśWFDOO LWKHDY\XVH:HÂśOOFRQWLQXHWRXVHDQGGHWHUPLQH LIWKHGHPDQGMXVWLÂżHVWKHDGGLWLRQDOFRVWWRNHHS the  room  open.â&#x20AC;?   Espinosa  said  students  will  need  to  use  the  ex-­

tended  hours  to  their  fullest  for  them  to  continue,   as  the  use  of  the  open  rooms  is  the  only  way  school   RIÂżFLDOVFDQJDXJHZKHWKHURUQRWWKHFRQWLQXDWLRQ of  them  is  feasible.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  biggest  voice  we  can  have  in  this  is  traf-­ ÂżF´(VSLQRVDVDLG Colvson  said  he  hopes  the  extended  hours  will   let  students  have  access  to  reserves,  books,  videos   and  journals  in  the  main  library  for  longer  periods   of  time,  and  the  Late  Night  Study  Room  will  offer   students  a  quiet  place  to  study  on  campus.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  hope  is  that  students  will  remember  the   library  as  a  supportive,  welcoming  space,  in  which   to   engage   in   serious   scholarly   activity,â&#x20AC;?   Colvson   said.  

More   than   two   dozen   cars,   pickup   trucks   and   tractor-­trailers   collided   :HGQHVGD\ PRUQLQJ LQ D ¿HU\ SLOHXS on  a  foggy  Georgia  interstate,  killing  at   least  four  people  and  sending  nine  oth-­ HUVWRDKRVSLWDORI¿FLDOVVDLG DELAYED  DECISION &DXJKW LQ DQ LGHRORJLFDO FURVV¿UH WKH Boy   Scouts   of   America   is   putting   off   until  May  a  decision  on  whether  to  ease   its  policy  of  excluding  gays.  Whatever   WKH RUJDQL]DWLRQ HYHQWXDOO\ GRHV LWœV likely   to   anger   major   constituencies   and  worsen  schisms  within  Scouting. NO  SATURDAY  SERVICE  Saturday  mail  may  soon  go  the  way  of   the  Pony  Express  and  penny  postcards.   The   Postal   Service   said   Wednesday   WKDW LW SODQV WR FXW EDFN WR ¿YHGD\D week   deliveries   for   everything   except   SDFNDJHVWRVWHPLWV¿QDQFLDOORVVHVLQ SECRETARY  SELECTED 3UHVLGHQW %DUDFN 2EDPDœV FKRLFH IRU interior  secretary  is  a  lifelong  outdoors   enthusiast   who   likes   to   bike,   ski   and   climb   mountains.   As   president   and   chief  executive  at  Recreational  Equip-­ ment  Inc.,  Sally  Jewell  has  applied  her   passion  to  her  job,  helping  push  REI  to   nearly  $2  billion  in  annual  revenues. Compiled  from  the  AP  Newswire

Thursday,  February  7,  2013


NEWS

 6 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Rhoads  Resigns  As  Deputy  Mayor By  Rachel  Freeman News  Editor  |  Rachel.freeman17@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

As  a  result  of  Mayor  Jason  Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  recent   actions,  Village  Trustee  Sally  Rhoads  resigned   as  deputy  mayor  at  a  village  board  meeting  on   Jan.  23,  stating  she  could  no  longer  stand  by   such  behavior. Rhoads   said   she   decided   to   resign   when   she   realized   some   community   members   be-­ lieved  she  supported  Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  views  and  actions. In   her   public   statement   delivered   to   the   board,  Rhoads  said  although  she  has  supported   West  for  the  past  year  and  a  half  and  even  pro-­ posed  a  salary  increase  for  him,  she  does  not   want  to  be  associated  with  the  behavior  he  has   been  exhibiting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  recent  weeks,  it  has  become  clear  that   I  can  no  longer  sit  by  and  tolerate  his  malign-­ ing  my  colleagues  and  his  recent  and  still  con-­ tinuing   defamation   of   respected   community   members  who  have  worked  long  and  hard  for   tax   relief   for   our   taxpayers,â&#x20AC;?   Rhoads   said   in   her  statement.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  believe  Mayor  Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  recent   actions   are   intolerable,   unbecoming   and   un-­ SURIHVVLRQDOIRUDQHOHFWHGRIÂżFLDO´ One   particular   issue   Rhoads   discussed   was   consolidation   of   the   village   and   town   governments,  which  she  and  West  have  never   agreed  on.  Rhoads  said  she  believes  now  is  the   time   for   New   Paltz   to   have   one   government,  

given  tough  economic  times.   However,  her  problem  was  not  their  dis-­ agreement,   but   rather   Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   refusal   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;par-­ ticipate   and   convey   his   ideasâ&#x20AC;?   in   discussions   regarding   consolidation,   instead   choosing   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;stone-­wall  and  obstruct.â&#x20AC;? Rhoads   also   criticized   West   voting   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;noâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   on   every   recommendation   made   to   the   joint   town  and  village  boards,  including  the  recom-­ mendation  for  consolidation,  only  if  it  meant   a   zero   tax   increase   for   all   residents,   as   well   as  the  idea  to  pursue  amending  the  New  York   6WDWHÂżQDQFHODZLQRUGHUWRPDNHWKHFRPPX-­ nity  eligible  for  $1  million,  should  it  choose  to   create  one  government. Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   resistance   to   the   recommenda-­ tions   was   particularly   problematic   to   Rhoads   because  she  said  he  did  not  participate  in  the   7RZQ9LOODJH (IÂżFLHQF\ &RPPLWWHHÂśV ÂżQDO-­ ization  of  the  goals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   one   cannot   be   in   opposition   without   offering   an   alternative   solution   and   espousing  keeping  the  status  quo  is  not  an  al-­ ternative  solution,â&#x20AC;?  Rhoads  said. Similarly,  after  West  doubted  the  work  of   WKH)LQDQFH6WXG\&RPPLWWHHVWXG\LQJWKHRS-­ tion  of  consolidation  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  Rhoads  said  he   refused  to  sit  on  despite  being  â&#x20AC;&#x153;something  of   DÂżQDQFLDOH[SHUW´¹²5KRDGVIHOWWKHPD\RU was  direspecting  her  colleagues.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having  relinquished  or  shirked  his  duty   when   his   expertise   would   have   been   useful,   KH QRZ IHHOV MXVWLÂżHG LQ FDOOLQJ ÂľOLDUVÂś WKRVH members   who   have   at   least   as   much   public   PXQLFLSDOÂżQDQFLDOH[SHULHQFHDVKH´5KRDGV said   in   her   statement.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   respect   the   wisdom   and   integrity   of   my   fellow   committee   mem-­ bers  and  I  stand  by  the  committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  report  and   its  recommendations.  I  can  no  longer  support   or  be  associated  with  a  Mayor  who  denounces   citizens  working  with  honesty  and  integrity  for   the  good  of  New  Paltz.â&#x20AC;? West  said  Rhoadsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  resignation  was  a  sym-­ bolic   action   which   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   any   effect   on   how  the  government  operates  or  what  they  are   able  to  get  done. Although  West  apologized  for  calling  the   )LQDQFH &RPPLWWHH PHPEHUV OLDUV DQG VDLG it   was   â&#x20AC;&#x153;rude   and   inappropriate,â&#x20AC;?   he   said   the   comment  was  not  without  a  basis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  watch  the  meetings  and  read  some   of  the  public  comments  and  questions  people   are  asking,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  unanswered.  What  the   public  is  being  told  and  what  this  report  says   are  completely  different  things,â&#x20AC;?  West  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   have  a  big  problem  with  that,  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  going   to  call  people  out  on  that  every  time  I  see  it.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  my  job.â&#x20AC;? West  said  in  the  end,  the  problem  is  not   calling  people  out,  but  the  numbers  that  were  

 PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN Sally  Rhoads  recently  resigned  as  deputy  mayor.

SUHVHQWHGVSHFLÂżFDOO\WKHVXJJHVWLRQWKDW million   could   be   saved   with   consolidation,   a   ÂżQGLQJ:HVWGRHVQRWEHOLHYHWREHDFFXUDWH As  a  whole,  West  said  his  dissatisfaction   stems   from   the   performance   of   the   Finance   &RPPLWWHHUDWKHUWKDQWKHDFWXDOPHPEHUV â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   frustration   is   not   about   Sally,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   about  this  process  and  about  the  work  of  this   committee  and  the  response  by  this  committee   to  public  criticism  and  questions,â&#x20AC;?  West  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  shame  because  it  destroys  relationships,   it  destroys  friendships,  these  are  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  live-­ lihoods  at  stake  and  you  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  play  games  with   that.â&#x20AC;?

Mayor  West  Criticizes  Village  Trusteesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Work  Ethic By  Carolyn  Quimby A&E  Editor �� |  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Recently   Mayor   Jason   West   publicly   criticized   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;work   ethicâ&#x20AC;?  of  two  Village  Board  Trustees  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Stewart  Glenn  and  Brian   Kimbiz. In  a  Facebook  post,  West  said  he  would  not  be  supporting   Glenn  or  Kimbiz  for  re-­election  in  May  and  solicited  people  who   might  be  interested  in  running  for  their  seats.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  put  something  on  Facebook,  because  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  impressed   with  them  and  what  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  doneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;not  the  quality  or  quantity  of   WKHLUZRUN´KHVDLGÂł,FDQFKRRVHZKRWREDFNXSLQSXEOLFRIÂżFH OLNHDQ\RQHHOVHEDVHGRQZKDW,ÂżQGLPSRUWDQW´ West  said  the  comments  are  strictly  based  on  his  professional   relationships  with  Glenn  and  Kimbiz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  personal  [and]  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  say  these  things  about   people  I  like,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  work  to  be  done  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not   getting  done.  The  frustration  is  that  I  know  what  we  could  be  do-­ ing,  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  capable  of.â&#x20AC;? Even   though   he   found   Westâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   approach   â&#x20AC;&#x153;unprofessional,â&#x20AC;?   Kimbiz  said  the  Mayor  has  the  right  to  say  whatever  he  wants. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  sure  why  he  made  this  statement,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  be-­ lieve  I  have  given  a  great  amount  of  time  and  effort  to  the  position   of  Trustee.  I  have  produced  some  great  work  and  fought  hard  for  

what  I  believe  is  right.â&#x20AC;? As   far   as   the   motive   behind   the   comments,   Glenn   said   he   thinks  West  is  anxious  to  have  a  board  that  will  â&#x20AC;&#x153;do  what  he  would   like  to  do,â&#x20AC;?  unlike  the  current  trustees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  a  fairly  diverse  group  of  independent  thinkers  who   do  the  best  for  the  voters,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  is  a  history  of  [West]   putting  things  up  for  a  vote  and  trustees  question  it  or  turn  it  down,   and  he  would  get  upset.  We  question  things  until  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  right.â&#x20AC;? Trustee  Sally  Rhoads,  who  resigned  as  deputy  mayor  during   a   Village   Board   Meeting   on   Jan.   23,   said   West   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;currently   at   odds  with  all  four  trusteesâ&#x20AC;?  because  he  wants  two  trustees  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;give   him  majority  on  the  board.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   still   a   trustee,â&#x20AC;?   Rhoads   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   only   resigned   as   the   Deputy   Mayor...because   I   do   not   want   residents   to   think   I   con-­ done  or  support  the  Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  negative  statements  regarding  fellow   Trustees,  Town  Board  members  and  community  members,  includ-­ ing  those  in  the  SUNY  college  community.â&#x20AC;? Glenn   said   while   the   comments   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   bother   him   and   he   knows  he  has  a  strong  work  ethic,  it  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;dishearteningâ&#x20AC;?  to  have  to   defend  himself  against  these  accusations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  follow  public  policy  would  read  the  com-­ ments  and  get  the  wrong  idea,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  trouble  is  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  out  of   context  and  people  who  know  the  context  will  take  it  for  what  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

worth.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  just,  but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  life.  I  was  elected  to  do  a  job  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   going  to  do  it  until  my  term  is  over.â&#x20AC;? As  far  as  time  commitments  go,  trustee  is  currently  a  part-­ time  position,  whereas  West  is  now  considered  full-­time,  accord-­ ing  to  Kimbiz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  year  the  Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  salary  was  increased  from  $22,500   SHU\HDUWRSHU\HDU²DYRWHWKDWZRXOGKDYHIDLOHGLIWKH Mayor  did  not  vote  his  own  raise  [as]  Trustee  Glenn  and  I  voted   QR´KHVDLGÂł,WUHPDLQVWREHVHHQLIKHLVFXUUHQWO\IXOÂżOOLQJWKHVH hours  to  the  expectations  of  his  colleagues.â&#x20AC;? Looking  forward  to  the  spring  elections,  West  said  he  wants   people   who   want   to   have   conversations   about   policy   instead   of   personalities,  which  â&#x20AC;&#x153;is  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  happening  now.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  political  culture  we  have  in  New  Paltz  is  the  most  toxic   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  seen  in  years,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  should  be  about  them  [the  commu-­ nity],  not  us.  Board  members  are  making  decision  for  us  instead   of  you  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  collective  you.â&#x20AC;? Glenn  said  he  thinks  his  fellow  trustees  are  â&#x20AC;&#x153;upsetâ&#x20AC;?  with  how   West  treats  and  speaks  to  them. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trustees  are  not  the  type  of  people  who  like  to  be  bullied   or   talked   down   to,â&#x20AC;?   Glenn   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   not   appropriate   [and]   it  makes  it  harder  to  recruit  volunteers  to  be  gung-­ho  about  this   beautiful  community.â&#x20AC;?


NEWS

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

   7

oracle.newpaltz.edu

SAP  To  Send  Out  Second  Survey  For  Spring  Concert Survey Results:

PHOTO  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN

No. 1 - Lupe Fiasco

No. 2 - Panic! At The Disco

By  Cat  Tacopina Managing  Editor  |  Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

After   compiling   results   and   contact-­ ing   artists   over   the   past   several   weeks,   Student   Association   Productions   (SAP)   plans  to  administer  a  new  survey  concern-­ ing   the   SAP   Spring   Concert   within   the   week. Due  to  complications  booking  the  top   four  artists  on  the  survey  as  chosen  by  the   student  body,  Vice  President  of  Program-­ ming  Esthephanie  Peralta  said  she  hopes   to  have  a  new  survey  out  by  the  end  of  this   week  with  a  new  set  of  artists. Peralta   said   pricing   and   changing   schedules   are   what   ultimately   led   to   the   need  for  a  new  survey. Âł7KHÂżUVWIRXUDUWLVWVRQWKHOLVWZHUH WKHRQHVZHREYLRXVO\ZHQWDIWHUÂżUVWEXW right   now   the   only   realistic   options   are   the  last  ones  on  the  list,â&#x20AC;?  Peralta  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   sucks   because   we   want   to   give   the   stu-­ dents  the  best  possible  concert  we  can.  SA   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  fair  to  make  students   VHWWOHVRZHZDQWWRFRQWLQXHWRÂżQGZKDW is  best.â&#x20AC;?   SAP  met  on  Monday,  Jan.  21  to  pool   WRJHWKHUWKHUHVXOWVIURPWKHÂżUVWVXUYH\ The   survey   showed   that   musician   Lupe   )LDVFRFDPHÂżUVWLQYRWLQJDQGZDVIRO lowed   by   Panic!   At   The   Disco,   Matt   &   Kim,   Brand   New,   Say   Anything,   Kend-­ rick  Lamar,  Fabolous  and  Talking  Heads,  

No. 3 - Matt & Kim

No. 4 - Brand New

No. 5 - Say Anything

No. 5 - Kendrick Lamar

respectively.  SAP  Vice  Chair  Molly  Thur-­ money  has  been  a  challenge.   VWRQ&KDVH VDLG DIWHU WKH ÂżUVW PHHWLQJ With   the   new   survey,   Peralta   said   SAPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  agent  contacted  the  higher-­ranked   the  current  plan  is  to  keep  Say  Anything,   DUWLVWVÂżUVWWRVHHZKRZRXOGEHDYDLODEOH Kendrick   Lamar,   Fabolous   and   Talking   and  affordable  for  New  Paltz. Heads  on  the  list  while  adding  a  few  other   Thurston-­Chase   said   pricing   and   names.  Another   idea   Peralta   said   SAP   is   VFKHGXOLQJ FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWV TXLFNO\ EHFDPH D interested  in  pursuing  is  hiring  a  comedi-­ problem   and   made   the   selection   process   an  and  instead  of  having  a  concert,  having   GLIÂżFXOW a  comedy  show. â&#x20AC;&#x153; I t â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s   H o w -­ been   a   ever,   this   c o m p l i -­ will   be   cated   pro-­ based   on   cess   so   far   7KHÂżUVWIRXUDUWLVWVRQWKHOLVWZHUHWKH what   the   b e c a u s e   RQHVZHREYLRXVO\ZHQWDIWHUÂżUVWEXW student   re-­ b e t w e e n   action   is   to   ULJKWQRZWKHRQO\UHDOLVWLFRSWLRQVDUH the   top   the  options. four   artists   WKHODVWRQHVRQWKHOLVW â&#x20AC;&#x153; I â&#x20AC;&#x2122; m   that   were   h o p i n g   s e l e c t e d ,   ESTHEPHANIE  PERALTA weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   have   there   have   a  full  list  by   been  issues   the   end   of   with   the   price   and   issues   with   schedul-­ the  week  and  we  can  give  out  the  survey   ing,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  prices  some  of  these   as  soon  as  possible,â&#x20AC;?  Peralta  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know   artists  have  been  asking  for  are  out  of  our   it   has   been   an   issue   in   the   past,   but   we   range  and  touring  for  some  have  made  it   want  to  be  as  transparent  as  possible  with   impossible  for  them  to  come  to  New  Paltz   the  students,  and  we  want  them  to  know   when  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  want  them  to.â&#x20AC;? that   what   we   want   most   is   for   them   to   In   the   past,   SAP   has   spent   between   have  a  concert  that  they  want  to  attend.â&#x20AC;? $40,000   and   $45,000   on   artists.   Peralta   Last  year,  the  SAP  Board  chose  rap-­ said  SAP  is  looking  to  spend  around  that   per   Wale   as   the   headliner   for   the   2012   PXFK DJDLQ WKLV \HDU DQG WKDW ÂżQGLQJ D spring   concert.   Despite   the   selection,   big-­name   artist   for   that   much   amount   of   :DOH FDPH LQ ÂżIWK RXW RI HLJKWK LQ WKH

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

No. 6 - Fabolous

No. 7 - Talking Heads

survey,   causing   disappointment   among   members  of  the  student  body  who  felt  the   board  disregarded  their  desires.   Peralta   said   the   board   this   year   is   looking   to   avoid   this   sort   of   disappoint-­ ment,  and  that  she  hopes  the  second  sur-­ YH\ZLOOKHOSWRÂżQGVRPHRQHWKHPDMRULW\ ZLOOHQMR\ Thurston-­Chase   said   once   the   new   survey  is  ready,  it  will  be  emailed  to  the   campus  community  and  will  be  available   for  a  week.  Survey  Monkey  will  again  be   the  venue  the  survey  is  available  through.   With  the  survey  results  changing  and   the  top  four  artists  being  taken  off  of  the   OLVWWKLUG\HDUVHFRQGDU\HGXFDWLRQPDMRU )DLTD$PUHHQVDLGWKHDEVHQFHRIRQHRI the  top  choices  is  disappointing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   really   excited   about   the   pos-­ sibility   of   some   of   the   artists   playing   in   New  Paltz,â&#x20AC;?  Amreen  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even  if  there   is   a   new   survey   coming   out,   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   un-­ derstand  why  certain  artists  would  be  on   WKHUHLIZHFRXOGQÂśWDIIRUGWKHPLQWKHÂżUVW place.â&#x20AC;? Peralta   said   she   hopes   with   a   new   VXUYH\6$3ZLOOEHDEOHWRÂżQGDEDODQFH with  getting  an  artist  whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  accessible  and   liked  by  the  student  body. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   concert   is   for   the   students,â&#x20AC;?   Peralta  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want  to  do  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best   for  them  and  we  want  to  give  them  some-­ WKLQJWKH\FDQHQMR\´


NEWS

 8 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

New  Paltz  Weighs  In  On  Female  Combat  Ban  Lift By  Hannah  Nesich Staff  Writer  |  N02183569@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

On  Jan.  24,  2013,  Defense  Secretary  Leon  E.  Panetta  lifted  a   EDQRQIHPDOHVROGLHUVÂżJKWLQJLQFRPEDWDQGDOWKRXJKWKHFRQ-­ YHUVDWLRQVWDUWHGLQ:DVKLQJWRQLWKDV1HZ3DOW]VWXGHQWVWDONLQJ ,Q$IJKDQLVWDQZKHQIRXUWK\HDUKLVWRU\PDMRUDQGZDUYHW-­ HUDQ 5HEHFD 1RODQ ZLWQHVVHG D PDOH VROGLHU ÂłIUHH]H XS´ GXULQJ DQDWWDFNXQDEOHWRVKRRWXQDEOHWRPRYHKHUODVWLQVWLQFWZDVWR EODPHLWRQWKHIDFWWKDWKHZDVDPDQ Âł*HQGHULVQRWDIDFWRULQWKLVPDWWHU´1RODQZKRVHUYHGD \HDULQ$IJKDQLVWDQIURP$SULOWRDQGPRQWKVLQ,UDT EHWZHHQ-XQHDQG0D\VDLGÂł0HQDQGZRPHQFRPHLQ DOOW\SHVRIWRXJKQHVV6RPHFDQFXWLWDQGVRPHFDQÂśWDQGWKDWLV WKHPRVWLPSRUWDQWSDUW´ )RU \HDUROG 1RODQ VHHLQJ D VROGLHU FKRNH GXULQJ KLJK VWDNHVFRPEDWZDVQRWDUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWLRQXSRQWKHLUVH[ZKLFKLVZK\VKH VXSSRUWVWKH3HQWDJRQÂśVUHFHQWGHFLVLRQWKDWKDVVRPHFRQVHUYDWLYHV XSLQDUPV Âł7KHFKDQJHUHDOO\GRHVQÂśWGRDQ\WKLQJEXWUHFRJQL]HZRPHQ ZKRKDYHDQGZLOOVHUYHXQGHUFRPEDWFRQGLWLRQV´1RODQVDLGÂł,W ZLOO RSHQ VRPH MREV IRU ZRPHQ WKDW ZHUH QRW DYDLODEOH WR WKHP EHFDXVHRIWKHLUJHQGHU´ 1RODQVDLGWKDWLIZRPHQDUHLQFRPEDW]RQHVQRRQHFDQWUXO\ FRQWUROZKDWJHQGHUPXVWHQJDJHLQFRPEDWÂżJKWLQJDQGWKDWÂłRYHU WKHSDVW\HDUVPDQ\ZRPHQKDYHVHUYHGXQGHUFRPEDWFRQGL-­ WLRQVDQGKDYHPDWFKHGDQGRUH[FHHGHGWKHLUPDOHFRXQWHUSDUWV´ $FFRUGLQJWRDUHFHQW3HZ5HVHDUFKVWXG\RXWRIDGXOWV

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Thursday,  February  7,  2013


The GUNK Thursday,February 7 2013

Evolutionists Celebrate

Darwin Day Story on page 2B ILLUSTRATION  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN


  2B

FEATURES

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The  New  Paltz  Oracle

An Evolutionary Celebration

EVOLUTIONARY STUDIES DEPARTMENT CELEBRATES DARWINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BIRTHDAY By  Ricardo  Hernandez  Jr. Staff  Writer  |  N02003802@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  annual  Charles  Darwin  Birthday  evolutionary   studies  seminar  series  kick  off  will  take  place  on  Mon-­ day,   Feb.   11,   in   Lecture   Center   100.   The   event   is   set   to   begin   at   5:30   p.m.,   featuring   a   lecture   by   Geoffrey   Miller,  associate  professor  of  psychology  at  the  Univer-­ sity  of  New  Mexico. The  Darwin  Day  event  started  in  2006  after  faculty   discovered  the  day  from  a  website,  darwinday.org.   The   organization   announced   the   day   as   one   day   for  secularists  to  celebrate  the  creation  of  evolutionary   studies  and  its  impact  on  understanding. The  event  was  initially  conceived  as  a  day  for  pro-­ fessors   to   get   together   on   campus   and   talk   about   how   evolution  applied  to  their  own  area  of  studies,  Dr.  Glenn   Geher,  professor  and  chair  of  psychology  and  director   of  evolutionary  studies,  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  were  standing  in  the  aisle,  people  were  sit-­ ting  on  the  stairs  and  that  was  right  before  we  started  the   evolutionary  studies  program,â&#x20AC;?  Geher  said. Since  then,  the  annual  event  was  created  as  a  kick-­ off   celebration   for   the   Evolutionary   Studies   Depart-­ mentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   seminar   series   hosted   in   the   spring,   which   in-­ cludes  lectures,  parties  and  food. This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   event   begins   with   Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lecture   fo-­ cusing  on  sexual  selections  in  humans  and  complex  be-­ havioral  patterns,  Geher  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Miller   is   great   at   getting   people   to   see   Darwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ideas  related  to  things  they  never  imagined  and  I  think   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  how  integrative  his  theory  is,â&#x20AC;?  Geher  said. Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lecture,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sexual   Evolution   and   Runaway   Consumerism,â&#x20AC;?  discusses  his  newest  evolutionary  stud-­ ies  theory  explaining  how  consumer  behavior  and  busi-­ ness  are  impacted  by  the  theory  of  sexual  selection. Following  the  lecture,  the  Evolutionary  Studies  De-­ partment  will  host  a  costume  party  for  Darwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  birth-­ GD\FHOHEUDWLRQWKHÂżUVWRILWVNLQGVLQFHWKH'HSDUWPHQW of  Evolutionary  Studies  began  their  annual  celebration. The  costume  party  held  at  the  College  Terrace  will   play  on  the  Victorian  costume  era,  but  any  other  Dar-­ winian  costume  will  also  do.  However,  Andrea  Varga,   associate  professor  of  theater  arts  design  and  evolution-­ ary   studies   board   member,   said   that   costume   require-­ ments   shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   discourage   any   faculty   or   students   from  attending.

There  were  numerous  secular-­themed  cakes  made  for  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Darwin  Day  event.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   more   of   the   notion   of   dressing   outside   the   norm,â&#x20AC;?  Varga  said.   Students  and  faculty  members  may  wear  any  cos-­ tume  to  the  event.  A  funky  hat  or  other  types  of  acces-­ sories  are  also  allowed,  Varga  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  board  wanted  to  do  something  that  was  a  little   more  festive  this  year,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody  who  par-­ ticipated  in  terms  of  faculty  loves  it,  believes  it  and  has   fun.â&#x20AC;?   Miller   will   also   host   a   book   signing   for   his   most  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  GLENN  GEHER

UHFHQWERRNFDOOHGÂł6SHQW´7KHERRNUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWVKLVHDU-­ lier  talk  on  spending  behaviors  and  consumer  behaviors   from  an  evolutionary  perspective. Melissa  Warren,  an  evolutionary  studies  minor,  will   be  attending  the  dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  festivities  and  believes  other  stu-­ dents  should  as  well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  actually  listen  to  and  po-­ WHQWLDOO\ LQWHUDFW ZLWK OHDGHUV LQ WKLV ÂżHOG´ VKH VDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   read   their   theories,   but   attending   their   seminars   adds  a  new  dimension  to  the  learning  experience.â&#x20AC;?


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3B

One Manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Trash

STUDENT GROUP GATHERS TO SHARE DISCARDED GARB

PHOTOS  BY  ZAMEENA  MEJIA

Members  of    Think  Thrift  swap  clothing,  shoes  and  accessories.  

By  Zameena  Mejia Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Rapper  Macklemoreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thrift  Shopâ&#x20AC;?   has   brought   attention   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;thrifting,â&#x20AC;?   an   increasingly   common   trend   among   col-­ lege   students   who   shop   at   thrift   stores   for  conveniently-­priced  clothing,  and  in   turn  has  become  many  college  studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   anthem  song.  SUNY  New  Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Think   Thrift   club   is   just   the   place   for   the   stu-­ dents  to  share  their  love  for  thrifting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From  the  moment  that  song  became   popular,   I   might   have   had   it   posted   on   my  Facebook  wall  about  15  to  20  times,â&#x20AC;?   Natalie  Skoblow,  founder  of  SUNY  New   Paltzâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Think  Thrift  club,  said.   On   Sunday,   Jan.   27,   Think   Thrift   KRVWHG Âł6WRS  6ZDS´ WKH FOXEÂśV ÂżUVW PHHWLQJRIWKHVHPHVWHUDQGLWVÂżIWKVXF-­ cessful  clothing  swap.  Twenty-­three  stu-­ dents  attended  and  swapped  shirts,  shoes   and   jewelry   among   other   clothing   and   accessories.   Skoblow,  a  second-­year  public  rela-­ tions  major,  has  been  thrifting  for  a  cou-­

ple   years   now,   but   got   the   idea   to   start   7KLQN7KULIW DIWHU D VXPPHU ÂżOOHG ZLWK thrift  shop  trips  to  New  York  City. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   started   going   to   [Buffalo   Ex-­ change   thrift   store]   every   month   or   so   with  a  giant  trash  bag  full  of  clothes  and   I   would   get   all   this   money   back.   It   be-­ came  this  thrill  to  me  that  I  can  recycle   my  clothes,â&#x20AC;?  Skoblow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  found  so   many   people   interested   in   where   I   got   P\ VWXII WKDW , ÂżJXUHG ZK\ QRW PDNH D club  out  of  it?â&#x20AC;?     In  its  second  semester,  the  club  has   attracted   a   small   following   of   students   interested   in   saving   money   and   do-­it-­ \RXUVHOISURMHFWVWRDGGDQHZĂ&#x20AC;DLUWRWKH pieces   of   clothing   already   in   their   clos-­ ets.   Located   within   a   20-­minute   walk   from   the   local   Salvation   Army,   Think   Thrift   often   does   Wednesday   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Salvoâ&#x20AC;?   trips  when  most  of  the  storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  items  are   sold  at  further  reduced  prices.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   started   thrifting   because   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have  much  money  and  I  refused  to  spend  

a   lot   of   money   on   clothing,â&#x20AC;?   Skoblow   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why   spend   $20   on   a   shirt   when   you  can  get  it  for  $5?â&#x20AC;?   Co-­Vice   Presidents   of   Think   Thrift   John   Owens   and   Casey   Richards   have   ZRUNHG WR ÂżQG QHZ ZD\V WR DSSHDO WR GLIIHUHQW FURZGV 2ZHQV D ��żUVW\HDU art  major,  has  given  extra  thought  about   how   to   get   more   guys   to   come   out   to   Think  Thriftâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  events. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  generation  is  in  the  process  of   UHGHÂżQLQJPDVFXOLQLW\DQGJX\VDUHSDU-­ ticular  about  their  clothes  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  usual-­ ly  the  only  guy  at  the  clothing  swaps,  but   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  putting  it  out  there:  I  do  have  stuff  I   want  to  trade,â&#x20AC;?  Owens  said.   Richards,   a   second-­year   vocal   jazz   major,   said   that   Think   Thrift   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   just   about   trading   clothing,   but   also   about   bringing  awareness  to  recycling  and  re-­ using  things  people  already  have. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  exchanging  things  within  a   community,  you  establish  a  sort  of  self-­ sustainability,  and  many  thrift  stores  give   back   to   the   community   as   well,â&#x20AC;?   Rich-­

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

ards  said. While   most   classmates   in   high   school  shopped  at  malls  and  department   stores,  Owens  said  she  felt  strained  and   stressed   over   buying   clothes   until   his   bandmates  took  him  to  a  Goodwill  thrift   store  and  showed  him  a  different  way  to   live. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  best  part  about  thrifting  is  that   you   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   told   what   to   buy,   you   just   shop  for  the  stuff  you  like,â&#x20AC;?  Owens  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   less   to   worry   about   and   more   to  be  proud  about.  All  my  hippie  friends   saved  my  life.â&#x20AC;?   Skoblow   pointed   out   that   most   col-­ OHJH VWXGHQWV DUH LQ WKH VDPH ³¿QDQFLDO boatâ&#x20AC;?   and   could   use   the   extra   cash   in   their  pockets.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   lucky   to   go   to   a   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;greenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   school   with   a   funky   artsy   hipster   vibe   where   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   okay   to   wear   whatever   you   want,â&#x20AC;?  Skoblow  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Think  Thrift  is  for   everyone  and  will  keep  breaking  through   thrifting  stereotypes  to  share  the  thrill  of   thrifting.â&#x20AC;?  


4B oracle.newpaltz.edu ESK D Y COP KOFF: COO

“Week Night Dinner”

Features

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Campus Advocacy, Unmasked STUDENT GROUP HOLDS DANCE TO RAISE FUNDS FOR SEX EDUCATION

By  John  Tappen N02288261@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Each week, one of the members of our Copy Desk will share their culinary chops with you. Bon appetit! 2YHU&KULVWPDVEUHDN,UHFHLYHGDUHFL SHERRN$VXEVWDQWLDOHQF\FORSHGLDRIHYHU\ dish   anyone   would   ever   want   to   eat.   Steak   GLQQHUVEUHDNIDVWRPHOHWVYHJHWDEOHVWLUIU\ (YHQDVQDFNVSDJH 7KHUH ZHUH VXEVHFWLRQV XSRQ VXEVHF WLRQV,QWRWDO,WKLQNPRUHWKDQLQFUHG LEO\ GHWDLOHG SDJHV WKDW FRXOG YLYLGO\ JXLGH PH WKURXJK DQ\ GHOLFLRXV UHFLSH , ZDQWHG ,¶P D OLWWOH KHVLWDQW DERXW WKDW SDJH QXPEHU EHFDXVH LW FXUUHQWO\ UHVLGHV LQ P\ PRWKHU¶V DSDUWPHQW  PLOHV DZD\ DFFRUGLQJ WR GooglePDSV 6LQFHWKDWERRNKDVQ¶WEHHQRSHQHGVLQFH 'HFP\&RS\'HVN&RRNRIIUHFLSHZLOO EHRQHRIDVHPLW\SLFDOZHHNQLJKWGLQQHU 7R VWDUW , RSHQ WKH UHIULJHUDWRU GRRU , stand  there  from  anywhere  between  four  and   VHYHQ PLQXWHV 6WDULQJ , OLNH WR WDNH LQ WKH VLJKWV RI OHIWRYHUV DQG ZHLJK P\ RSWLRQV 3OXVWKHFRROEUHH]HRIWKHLFHER[LVUHIUHVK LQJ I  take  a  shot  of  scotch. ,UHDFKIRUDMDURI1XWHOODDQGDFDQRI -,)) FUHDP\ QRW FUXQFK\  SHDQXW EXWWHU , DOWHUQDWH EHWZHHQ GLSSLQJ P\ ¿QJHUV LQWR HDFK EHIRUH , GHFLGH WR JHW UHVSHFWDEOH DQG XVHDVSRRQ,¿QGWKDWWKHWZRVSUHDGVEOHQG GHOLJKWIXOO\,SRXUP\VHOIDVKRWRIFOHDUUXP WRFOHDQVHWKHSDOHWWH 6HFRQGFRXUVH,SXOORXWVRPHFKHHVH$ block  of  cheddar,  to  delicately  slice  into  bite   VL]HSLHFHVDQGFRQVXPHVWLOOLQIURQWRIWKH IULGJH,I,¶PIHHOLQJDGYHQWXURXV,¶OOWKURZ a  few  of  those  cheddar  chunks  on  a  slice  of   bread  and  let  it  heat  in  the  microwave  for  30   VHFRQGV 7ZR JODVVHV RI OXNHZDUP 1DWKDQ VRQ&UHHN0HUORWJREHVWZLWKWKLVGLVK , HQG LW ZLWK D SLQW RI +DDJHQ 'D]V , VWLFN LW LQ WKH PLFURZDYH IRU  VHFRQGV WR soften  it  just  a  bit.   $QRWKHUVKRWRIUXPZKLOH,ZDLW ,¿QLVKWKHSLQWZKLOH,VLWRQWKHFRXFK PD\EH LQ IURQW RI D ³3DUNV DQG 5HFUHDWLRQ´ rerun.   Two  more  shots  of  rum.   $QGWKHUH\RXKDYHLW

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By  April  Castillo &RS\(GLWRU_Acastillo@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Entertainment   will   be   unmasked   at   the   second   annual  Yule   Ball  on  Friday.  This  year,  attendees  will  enjoy  winter  festivities   ZLWKDP\VWHULRXVÀDLUWKDQNVWR1HZ3DOW]¶VFKDSWHURIWKH+DUU\ 3RWWHU$OOLDQFH'XPEOHGRUH¶V$UP\RI1HZ3DOW] 7KLV\HDU¶VEDOOIHDWXUHVDPDVTXHUDGHWKHPH$OWKRXJKWKHUH LVQRGUHVVFRGHGUHVVLQJXSLVHQFRXUDJHG/DVW\HDU¶VEDOOIDVK LRQVLQFOXGHGIRUPDOJRZQVDQGGUHVVHVIRUWKHODGLHVDQGGUHVV SDQWVIRUWKHJHQWV 0DVNVZLOOEHJLYHQRXWWRWKH¿UVWSHRSOHZKRGRQDWH 6WXGHQWVDUHSHUPLWWHGWREULQJWKHLURZQPDVNVDVORQJDVWKH\ DUHQRWIXOOIDFHPDVNV7KHERWWRPKDOIRIWKHLUIDFHPXVWEHXQ covered.   ³:H GHFLGHG WR PDNH WKH HYHQW D PDVTXHUDGH WKLV \HDU EH FDXVHZHZDQWHGWRFKDQJHWKLQJVXSDOLWWOHELW´&OXE3UHVLGHQW -XOLD)HOOVDLG³/DVW\HDUZDVPRUHRIDWUDGLWLRQDOGDQFHDQGZH KDGDJUHDWUHVSRQVHVRWKLV\HDUZHDGGHGRQHPRUHHOHPHQWRI IXQ´ 7KLV\HDU¶VIRRGZLOOEHFDWHUHGE\ORFDOUHVWDXUDQW/D%HOOD ZLWK0R[LH&XSFDNHVUHWXUQLQJDVWKHGHVVHUWSURYLGHUDQGWKH'- %5RFNZLOOUHWXUQIRUPXVLF7KHIHVWLYLWLHVZLOOUXQIURPSP WRPLGQLJKW 1DWDQLD%XFKELQGHUDWKLUG\HDU(QJOLVKPDMRUZLWKDFRQ FHQWUDWLRQLQFUHDWLYHZULWLQJPHWKHUER\IULHQGDWODVW\HDU¶VEDOO 6KHZHQWZLWKIULHQGVWKHGHOLFLRXVFXSFDNHVIURP0R[LH&XS FDNHVOXULQJKHULQ ³,DQDQG,VWDUWHGWDONLQJDOLWWOHEHIRUHWKHGDQFHEHJDQEH FDXVH,UHFRJQL]HGKLPIURPDFOXEPHHWLQJ´%XFKELQGHUVDLG 7KHFRXSOHVWDUWHGGDWLQJDIHZZHHNVODWHUDQGZLOOEHDW WHQGLQJWKLV\HDU¶VEDOO )LYHGROODUVLVWKHVXJJHVWHGGRQDWLRQZKLFKJRHVWRZDUGWKH HGXFDWLRQGHSDUWPHQWRI3ODQQHG3DUHQWKRRG 7KHHGXFDWLRQGHSDUWPHQWUXQVSURJUDPVRQVDIHUVH[DZDUH QHVVVH[XDOLW\HGXFDWLRQDQGWHHQSUHJQDQF\SUHYHQWLRQSURJUDPV

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

3+2726&2857(6<2)  FACEBOOK

ZKLFKHQFRXUDJH³\RXQJSHRSOHWRHLWKHUSRVWSRQHVH[XDOLQWHU FRXUVHRUXVHFRQWUDFHSWLRQZKHQWKH\GRHQJDJHLQLQWHUFRXUVH´ DFFRUGLQJWR3ODQQHG3DUHQWKRRG¶VZHEVLWH $IWHUVWXGHQWVH[SUHVVHGFRQFHUQZLVKLQJWRFKDQJHWKHFKDU LW\WRVRPHWKLQJOHVVFRQWURYHUVLDOWKHFRPPLWWHHPDLQWDLQHGLWV GHFLVLRQWRGRQDWHVWULFWO\WRWKHHGXFDWLRQGHSDUWPHQWRI3ODQQHG 3DUHQWKRRGZKLFKGRHVQRWLQFOXGHWKHGHSDUWPHQWVWKDWSURYLGH DERUWLRQVFDQFHUVFUHHQLQJVRUYDFFLQDWLRQV ³7KHUH LV D ORW RI FRQWURYHUV\ VXUURXQGLQJ ZRPHQ¶V ULJKWV DQGUHSURGXFWLYHULJKWVULJKWQRZDQGZHKDYHKDGVRPHFRQFHUQ DERXWZKHUHWKHPRQH\UDLVHGZDVJRLQJGXHWRZRUU\DERXWSUR OLIHSURFKRLFH LVVXHV´ )HOO VDLG ³+RZHYHU ZH PDGH WKH GHFL VLRQWRGRQDWHVWULFWO\WRWKHHGXFDWLRQGHSDUWPHQWRI3ODQQHG3DU HQWKRRGZKLFKLVFRPSOHWHO\VHSDUDWHIURPWKHGHSDUWPHQWWKDW KDQGOHVDQ\NLQGRIPHGLFDOSURFHGXUHV´ +RZHYHUVRPHVWXGHQWVUHPDLQXSVHWDERXWWKHGHFLVLRQ ³3ODQQHG3DUHQWKRRGLVQRWDQRUJDQL]DWLRQWKDW,FDQVXSSRUW GXH WR P\ HWKLFDO EHOLHIV UHJDUGLQJ DERUWLRQ´ -RVKXD %URRNV D WKLUG\HDUDFFRXQWLQJDQG¿QDQFHPDMRUVDLG +HVDLGKHKRSHGWKH<XOH%DOOFRXOGEHQH¿WDOHVVFRQWURYHU VLDOLVVXHVXFKDVUHOLHIDLGIRU6XSHUVWRUP6DQG\YLFWLPV 7DELWKD*DUQLFDDVHFRQG\HDU(QJOLVKPDMRUVDLGVKHVWLOO IHOW DOLHQDWHG EHFDXVH RI 3ODQQHG 3DUHQWKRRG¶V LQFOXVLRQ LQ WKH event.   ³,UHVSHFWHYHU\RQH¶VYLHZVEXW,IHOWWKDWLWZDVQ¶WQHFHVVDU\ WRWXUQDFROOHJHGDQFHLQWRDPRUDOGLOHPPD´*DUQLFDVDLG $PDMRUWKHPHRIWKH+DUU\3RWWHUERRNVLVWRXVHWHDPZRUN WRGHIHDWWKHSUREOHPVRIWKHZRUOGDQGLPSURYHLW)HOOVDLG7KH FOXEEHOLHYHVWKHGHFLVLRQWRGRQDWHWR3ODQQHG3DUHQWKRRGFRU relates  with  that  theme. “We   are   concerned   only   with   the   education   of   teens   and   \RXQJDGXOWVDERXWKRZWRVWD\VDIH´)HOOVDLG³%\ZRUNLQJDV D FOXE DQG D FDPSXV FRPPXQLW\ WR UDLVH PRQH\ WR GRQDWH WR D FKDULW\DQGLQWXUQZRUNLQJZLWKWKDWFKDULW\,WKLQNWKDWZH¶UH SXUVXLQJWKDWJRDORIPDNLQJWKHZRUOGDEHWWHUSODFHWRJHWKHU´


oracle.newpaltz.edu

5B

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT West Africa Unframed

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

TWO DORSKY EXHIBITIONS CAPTURE MALI THROUGH PORTRAITS By  Zameena  Mejia Copy  Editor  |  Zmejia09@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Sometimes   all   it   takes   is   a   certain   frame   to   capture   the   humanity   behind   the  newscasts. SUNY  New  Paltz  Photography  Pro-­ fessor  François  Deschamps  has  provided   the   campus   with   a   chance   to   view   the   West   African   nation   of   Mali   through   a   wider  lens.   On  Saturday,  Feb.  2,  257  people  at-­ tended  the  opening  reception  of  “Photo-­ Rapide”  and  “Malian  Portrait  Photogra-­ phy,”  Deschamps’  exhibits  at  the  Dorsky.   Three   years   ago,   Deschamps   re-­ ceived  a  Fulbright  Senior  Research  Fel-­ lowship   to   live   in   Mali   for   a   year,   for   which   he   was   required   to   teach   Malian   students  at  the  Conservatoire  des  Arts  et   Metiers. 'HVFKDPSV VDLG KLV ÀXHQF\ LQ French  made  the  trip  all  the  more  enjoy-­ able,  even  when  he  ran  into  people  who   didn’t  speak  French.  In  these  cases,  the   power   of   photography   became   the   un-­ spoken,   but   mutually   understood   lan-­ guage,  he  said. After  completing  the  teaching  posi-­ tion  at  the  Conservatoire,  Deschamps  set   out   on   a   photo   expedition   with   his   Lu-­ mix  digital  camera  and  a  portable  Pola-­ roid  printer. “It   was   exciting   and   heartening   to   see  that  people  loved  the  photos  and  the   process   of   taking   them,”   Deschamps   said.  “These  photos  allowed  them  to  be   themselves.”   “Photo-­Rapide,”   French   for   “quick   photo,”   includes   photographs   of   Ma-­ lian  strangers  Deschamps  met  during  his   travels.   When  describing  his  process,  he  said   he  photographed  the  stranger,  printed  out   their  favorite  photo  and  allowed  them  to   choose  a  patterned  border.  Then  he  took   another   photo   of   the   person   holding   up  

their  own  photo.  In  the  end,  each  person   got  to  keep  their  own  photos.   “It  wasn’t  the  idea  of  this  white  guy   coming   into   another   culture   and   photo-­ graphing  like  an  ethnographer  or  an  an-­ thropologist,  but  I  saw  it  much  more  as   an   exchange   where   I   gave   them   some-­ thing,”  Deschamps  said.   “Malian   Portrait   Photography”   ex-­ hibits   portrait   photographs   from   the   1940s   through   the   late   1970s   taken   by   Malik  Sidibé  and  Seydou  Keita,  two  of   Mali’s   best   known   portrait   photogra-­ phers,   as   well   as   other   Malian   photog-­ raphers  whose  work  is  being  newly  pre-­ miered  on  the  East  Coast. “Malian  Portrait  Photography”  tells   stories   of   a   time   when   portrait   studios   were   without   electricity,   so   they   had   to   take   photographs   outside   with   people   wearing   vibrant   patterns   and   colors   for   clearer  photos.   Freelance   curator   Daniel   Leers,   whose  most  recent  work  includes  “New   Photography   2011”   at   the   Modern   Mu-­ seum  of  Art  in  New  York,  worked  with   Deschamps   to   curate   “Photo-­Rapide”   and  “Malian  Portrait  Photography.”   Leers   visited   Deschamps’   studio   to   view  the  photos  he  took  during  his  Ful-­ bright  and  connected  trends  and  themes   of   Malian   culture   to   collaboratively   se-­ lect  the  photos  to  showcase. “There   are   intersections   and   con-­ nections   between   ‘Malian   Portrait   Pho-­ tography’   and   François’   photography,   like  the  colorful  frames  resembling  Ma-­ lik   Sidibé’s   hand-­painted   glass   frames,   which   reach   back   to   Sidibé’s   tradi-­ tion   and   extends   forwards   to   François’   work,”  Leers  said. In  many  of  the  “Photo-­Rapide”  pho-­ tos,  Deschamps  picked  up  on  this  unique   Malian  portrait  style  and  placed  vibrant   textured   patterns   around   the   photos   of   sitters  who  went  to  his  studio  to  be  pho-­

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF    FRANÇOIS  DESCHAMPS Malian  photography  will  be  exhibited  at  the  Dorsky.

tographed,  according  to  Leers.   “Even   while   being   a   white   man   in   West  Africa,   François   was   able   to   gain   access  to  very  intimate  parts  of  people’s   lives  which  isn’t  easy,”  Leers  said.   Deschamps   said   he   hopes   that   through   “Photo-­Rapide”   and   “Malian   Portrait   Photography,”   “people   will   fall  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

in  love  with  the  Malian  culture  and  stim-­ ulate  a  curiosity  of  a  culture  so  different   from  their  own.” Catalogues  designed  by  Deschamps   accompany  both  exhibitions,  which  will   be  held  in  the  North  Gallery  of  the  Dor-­ sky’s   Alice   and   Horace   Chandler   Gal-­ lery  from  Jan.  23  to  April  12.  


6B

Arts & Entertainment

oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Rediscovering The Underground Railroad

SUNY NEW PALTZ PROFESSOR COMPOSES HARRIET TUBMAN OPERA By  Carolyn  Quimby A&E  Editor  |  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Nkeiru   Okoye   gave   one   of   the   most   famous   women   of   the   abolitionist  movement  a  voice  rooted  in  truth  and  full  of  melody.   Okoyeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   two-­act   opera,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;HARRIET   TUBMAN:   When   I   Crossed   That   Line   to   Freedom,â&#x20AC;?   is   commissioned   by  American   Opera   Projects   and   supported   by   a   grant   from   the   National   En-­ dowment  for  the  Arts.   Act   One,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   Slavery,â&#x20AC;?   begins   with   a   young   Tubman   born   LQWRVODYHU\DQGIRFXVHVRQKHUUHODWLRQVKLSVVSHFLÂżFDOO\KHUFORVH bond  with  her  sister,  Rachel.  In  Act  Two,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  Freedom,â&#x20AC;?  Tubman   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  already  an  integral  part  of  Philadelphiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  abolitionist  network   and  the  Underground  Railroad  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  works  alongside  other  African   Americans,  including  Reverend  Samuel  Green  and  famed  station-­ master  William  Still. 2NR\HVDLGVKHZDQWHGWRGRDÂżFWLRQDOL]HGDFFRXQWRI7XE-­ PDQRQWKH8QGHUJURXQG5DLOURDGDWÂżUVWEXWGLVPLVVHGWKHLGHD ZKHQVKHUHDOL]HGKRZFRPPRQWKH\ZHUH Âł$ORWRISHRSOHDUHGRLQJÂżFWLRQDOL]HGYHUVLRQVEXW,ZDQWHG to  look  into  her  humanity,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  thought  why  she  did  what   VKHGLG²ÂżQGLQJKHUPRWLYDWLRQ²ZDVIDUPRUHLQWHUHVWLQJWKDQ the  fact  that  she  did  it.â&#x20AC;? Most  tales  about  Tubman  center  around  her  time  on  the  Un-­ derground   Railroad,   but   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   mention   her   family,   Okoye   said.   However,  she  said  her  opera  reveals  a  lot  about  her  family  mem-­ bers  and  her  husband  John  Tubman,  a  free  man. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  lot  of  times  when  you  hear  about  her,  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  in  isolation,â&#x20AC;?  

she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  hear  much  other  than  the  fact  that  she  worked   on  the  Underground  Railroad.â&#x20AC;? As  a  Black  woman,  Okoye  said  Tubman  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;part  of  [her]  his-­ toryâ&#x20AC;?  and  she  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  follow  the  typical  â&#x20AC;&#x153;master  narrative,â&#x20AC;?   or  a  few  good  men  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  typically  white  men  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  who  come  and  rescue   people  of  color. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most  people  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  there  were  other  Black  abolition-­ ists,  and  that  there  was  a  lot  of  self-­liberation  at  this  time,â&#x20AC;?  Okoye   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   want   that   [master   narrative],   because   the   truth   of   Tubmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  life  is...a  wonderful  story,  a  wonderful  actuality.â&#x20AC;? Okoye  said  she  wanted  to  compose  a  folk  opera  that  would   engage  people  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  typically  enjoy  opera.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  wanted  it  to  be  full  of  folk  music  that  has  very  singable   songs  and  melodies  you  can  get  into,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Folk  operas  are   very  accessible,  but  still  challenging.â&#x20AC;? Okoye  explored  African  American  folk  music  from  the  19th   century,  as  well  as  work  songs,  protest  songs  and  dances.  She  said   she   stumbled   on   parlor   music   from   the   time   and   found   minstrel   songs,  some  written  by  African  American  composers. Âł7KHVHVRQJVZKLFKYLRODWH%ODFNSHRSOHVSHFLÂżFDOO\%ODFN women,   were   written   by   my   ancestors,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some   of   the   things  were  so  incredibly  offensive.â&#x20AC;? The  minstrel  songs  she  heard  that  day  inspired  Okoye  to  write   an  anti-­minstral  song,  which  she  said  is  one  of  her  favorite  songs   in  the  opera.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  these  things  they  talk  about  negatively  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  color  of   RXU VNLQ WKH VL]H RI RXU OLSV WKH ZD\ RXU ERGLHV DUH VKDSHG ²

John  Tubman  sings  to  [Harriet]  and  makes  them  all  the  great  things   about  Black  women,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  a  songwriter,  but  now  I   am.  I  love  all  the  lyrics,  and  of  all  the  songs,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  one  that   made  me  smile.â&#x20AC;? Part  of  Okoyeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  struggle  was  learning  to  write  an  opera,  as   she  had  only  written  orchestral  music,  and  building  a  network  of   contacts.  She  said  she  soon  discovered  and  started  attending  con-­ ferences  about  Tubman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   people   who   are   enchanted   with   her   story,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  have  symposiums  that  are  not  your  regular  academic   FRQIHUHQFHV<RXÂżQGWKHVHQHWZRUNVDQGÂżQGRXWPRUHSLHFHVRI her  story.â&#x20AC;?   Okoye   said   the   best   part   of   composing   is   that   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   doing   what  she  loves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   hear   music   in   my   head,   write   it   down   and   hear   it   per-­ formed,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;For  this  opera  I  had  both  sides  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  easy  and   the   struggle   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   but   to   be   there   and   hear   someone   perform   your   SLHFHLVDPD]LQJHYHU\VLQJOHWLPH´ American  Opera  Project  will  present  an  abridged  version  of   Okoyeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  opera  at  SUNY  Albany  on  March  8. On  Sunday,  Feb.  10  at  3  p.m.,  music  from  Okoyeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  opera  will   be  played  during  the  concert,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  Ride  on  the  Underground  Rail-­ road,â&#x20AC;?  in  Studley  Theatre.  In  celebration  of  Black  History  Month   and  the  150th  anniversary  of  the  Emancipation  Proclamation,  the   QLJKW ZLOO IHDWXUH WDOHQW IURP 681< 1HZ 3DOW] WKH 1HZEXUJK Free  Academy,  the  PonĂŠ  Ensemble  for  New  Music  and  three  opera   singers  from  New  York  City.  

Piano Program Transverses Eras

MUSIC PROFESSOR PERFORMS WITH â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ADVENTUROUSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; KEYS By  Manny  Yupa Contributing  Writer  |  Myupa98@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Through   balance   and   contrast,   Pro-­ fessor   Ruthanne   Schempf   performed   a   program  of  impelling  piano  pieces  from   WKUHHGLIIHUHQWHUDVWR681<1HZ3DOW] faculty,  students  and  musicians  in  Shepa-­ rd  Recital  Hall  on  Tuesday,  Jan.  29. 7KH ÂżUVW SLHFH SHUIRUPHG ZDV -R-­ hann   Sebastian   Bachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;English   Suite   No.  2  in  A-­minor,â&#x20AC;?  a  piece  that  she  had   begun  to  work  on  with  her  late  mother.   Despite   its   minor   key,   the   tempo   and   harmony  are  notably  cheerful.   Next,   she   performed   Robert   Schumannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kreisleriana,  Op.  16â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a   set   of   eight   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fantasie-­like   movementsâ&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   was   composed   over   six   days  

LQ WKH VSULQJ RI  DQG UHĂ&#x20AC;HFWV WKH composerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mad  personality  and  inspira-­ tions.   Second-­year   contemporary   music   studies  major  Keith  Downs  said  this  was   his   favorite   piece,   particularly   the   sec-­ RQGPRYHPHQWÂł6HKULQQLJXQGQLFKW]X raschand,â&#x20AC;?  and  the  way  Schempf  transi-­ WLRQVLQWRLWIURPWKHÂżUVWPRYHPHQW Âł>6KHLV@IDVWSDFHGDQGĂ&#x20AC;\LQJKLJK and   backing   away   into   a   contemplative   state,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. 7KHÂżQDOSLHFH6FKHPSISHUIRUPHG was   Maurice   Ravelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Valses   nobles   et   sentimentales,â&#x20AC;?   which   she   described   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;crunchy   harmony...very   colorful   and   attractive   and   yet   somewhat   appalling-­ ly   dissonant.â&#x20AC;?   She   said   she   thought   the   piece   shows   how   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ravel   thought   about  

the  piano  more  orchestrally.â&#x20AC;? 7KLUG\HDUMD]]VWXGLHVPDMRU0LVKD 6DYDJH VDLG KLV WHFKQLFDO SURÂżFLHQF\ LV only   matched   by   her   â&#x20AC;&#x153;very,   very   con-­ scious  awareness  of  dynamics.â&#x20AC;? Âł6KH GHÂżQLWHO\ NQRZV KRZ WR FUDIW waves   that   really   get   the   nuances   of   emotion,â&#x20AC;?  Savage  said.   6FKHPSI VXJJHVWHG WKDW MD]] PXVL-­ cians   would   be   particularly   attracted   to   the   Ravel   piece,   and   Savage   said   he   agreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   lying   [with]   the   beau-­ tiful   voicing   and   very   jarring   effects,â&#x20AC;?   Savage  said. Downs   said   he   personally   appreci-­ ated  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;wide  variety  of  intensities,  jux-­ taposing  a  dire  urgent  message  in  calm-­ ness  with  playful,  rambunctious  energy,â&#x20AC;?  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

achieving  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  lot  of  fast-­paced  polyphon-­ ic  textures  with  acute  precision.â&#x20AC;? Schempf   said   she   practiced   numer-­ RXV SLHFHV DQG FKRVH WKH RQHV WKDW ÂżW best  for  this  particular  concert.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  like  going  on  a  date,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  go  on  a  lot  of  blind  dates,  then,  oh!   This  is  the  one,  these  are  the  ones.  In  this   combination.â&#x20AC;?   7KHVHSLHFHVDUHVLJQLÂżFDQWEHFDXVH they   â&#x20AC;&#x153;inspire   the   imagination,â&#x20AC;?   accord-­ ing  to  Schempf. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   attracted   to   music   that   is   de-­ scriptive,   that   has   associations...things   other  than  just  sound,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. Blending   the   technical   and   the   dy-­ namic,   Schempf   said   the   concert   was   meant   to   be   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;musical   adventureâ&#x20AC;?   for   those  who  attended.  


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Arts & Entertainment

The Promise of Punk Rock

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MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK: DANIEL PINTO

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;GOOD THINGSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TO COME FOR ALTERNATIVE MUSIC IN 2013 YEAR: Fourth MAJOR: Digital Media Production HOMETOWN: Queens, N.Y.

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  BLOGSPOT

By  Samantha  Spoto Contributing  Writer  |  N02474818@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

At  the  end  of  each  year,  music  critics  cre-­ ate  a  narrow  list  of  albums  deemed  worthy  of   high   recognition.   In   2012,   The   Black   Keys,   Frank  Ocean,  fun.,  Mumford  and  Sons  and  Tay-­ lor  Swift    all  received  Grammy  nominations.   Although   punk   rock   glided   underneath   the  mainstream  radar,  several  bands  gained  the   reputation   of   producing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Album   of   the  Yearâ&#x20AC;?   among  their  listeners.       Punk   fans   praised  The   Menzingersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   third   studio  album,  On  The  Impossible  Past7KHÂżUVW of  their  albums  to  be  released  on  Epitaph  Re-­ cords,  the  collection  features  nostalgic  tales  of   loss,  longing  and  regret. The  album  begins  with  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good  Things,â&#x20AC;?  in   which   Greg   Barnett   sings,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   closing   P\H\HVWRÂżQGZK\DOOJRRGWKLQJVVKRXOGIDOO apart.â&#x20AC;?    The  lyric  serves  as  a  theme  for  several   of  the  songs  on  the  album,  including  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Burn  Af-­ ter  Writingâ&#x20AC;?  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Obituaries.â&#x20AC;? Listeners  arrive  at  the  title  track  near  the   end  of  the  album.    It  may  appear  as  a  segue  into   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nice  Things,â&#x20AC;?  but  the  content  is  as  direct  and   hard-­hitting  as  the  others.     The   Menzingers   contrast   their   agoniz-­ ing   lyrics   with   fast-­paced   guitar   and   drums,   especially   on   tracks   like   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ava   Houseâ&#x20AC;?   and    

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mexican  Guitars.â&#x20AC;?     While  On  The  Impossible  Past  propelled   The  Menzingers  to  the  top  of  the  punk  scene,   New   Jersey   band   The   Gaslight   Anthem   re-­ leased   another   noteworthy   punk   rock   album.     Previously  signed  to  SideOneDummy  Records,   WKHEDQGUHOHDVHGWKHLUÂżUVWPDMRUODEHODOEXP Handwritten,  via  Mercury  Records. Handwritten EHJLQV ZLWK Âł´ WKH ÂżUVW single  released  from  the  album.  The  fast-­paced,   anthemic  rock  opener  provides  listeners  with  a   sense  of  the  sounds  to  expect  in  the  remaining   41  minutes. Tracks   such   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mulholland   Driveâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keepsake,â&#x20AC;?   feature   Alex   Rosamiliaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   glori-­ ous  guitar-­work.    Other  rocking  tunes  include   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Howlâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Biloxi   Parish.â&#x20AC;?   Whereas   songs   like  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too  Much  Blood,â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maeâ&#x20AC;?  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;National   Anthemâ&#x20AC;?  sound  reminiscent  of  the  slow-­tempo   VRQJVIURPOHDGVLQJHU%ULDQ)DOORQÂśVVLGHSURM ect,  The  Horrible  Crowes. All   in   all,   the   Gaslight   Anthemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Hand-­ written  remains  true  to  the  bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  honest  rock   and  roll  sound. Punk  bands  Cloud  Nothings  and  Titus  An-­ dronicus  also  released  albums  in  2012.    Steve   Albini,  who  has  worked  with  highly  acclaimed   artists   such   as   Nirvana   and   The   Pixies,   engi-­ neered   Cloud   Nothingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   second   studio   album,  

Attack  on  Memory.    Noteworthy  tracks  include   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fall   Inâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stay   Useless.â&#x20AC;?   Titus   Androni-­ cus  released  their  third  album,  Local  Business,   which  found  a  spot  on  Rolling  Stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  top  al-­ bums  of  the  year.     Like  2012,  2013  holds  the  promise  of  an-­ other  great  year  for  punk  rock  music.     ,QGLHSXQN RXWÂżW /HPXULD IURP %XIIDOR N.Y.,   recently   recorded   their   third   full-­length   studio   album.   They   have   yet   to   announce   a   release  date,  but  the  trio  will  be  performing  in   New  Paltz  tonight. English  folk/punk  singer  Frank  Turner  re-­ ceived  great  recognition  for  England  Keep  My   Bones,  his  most  recent  album  to  date.    On  April   (SLWDSKZLOOUHOHDVH7XUQHUÂśVÂżIWKVWXGLRDO bum,  Tape  Deck  Heart. The   following   day,   Long   Island-­based   singer-­songwriter  Laura  Stevenson  will  release   her   third   full-­length   album,   Wheel,   on   Don   Giovanni   Records.     The   single,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Runner,â&#x20AC;?   is   available  to  stream  at  Pitchfork. Within  the  year,  Against  Me!  will  release   highly  anticipated  album  Transgender  Dyspho-­ ria  BluesWKHEDQGÂśVÂżUVWDOEXPVLQFHWKHOHDG singer  Laura  Jane  Graceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  coming  out. Alkaline   Trio,   Cloud   Nothings   and   The   Front   Bottoms   also   intend   to   release   albums   this  upcoming  year.

DO YOU HAVE SOMETHING TO SAY?

WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  INSTRUMENT  OF  CHOICE  AND  WHY? I  usually  play  guitar,  because  I  know  how   to  play  it.  Sometimes  the  kazoo. WHO  ARE  YOUR  BIGGEST  INFLUENCES? Joe  Strummer.  Joey  Santiago.  Men  at  Work. Minus  The  Bear.  Mr  T. WHO  HAVE  YOU  BEEN  LISTENING  TO  LATELY? Lately  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  found  myself  listening  to   Avalanches,   Dead   Kennedys   and   Eddie   Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  solo  album. WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  YOUR  PLAN  FOR  THE  FUTURE? To  become  an  astronaut/pizza  critic  and  best   friends  with  John  Cleese. ANY  ADVICE  FOR  ASPIRING  MUSICIANS? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  an  aspiring  musician,  so  if  you  have     any  advice,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  always  learning.  I  guess   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   real   advice.   Keep   learning.   Never  stop  playing.    And  get  advice  from   a   professional   musician,   not   some   guy   that   plays   guitar.   (Quite   the   paradox,   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  it?)

CHECK  OUT   DANIEL  PINTO PERFORMING  BY  SCANNING  THIS  CODE   WITH  ANY  SMARTPHONE!  

Write   a   review   for   the  A&E   sec-­ tion  of  a  recently  released  album,   movie,   TV   show,   comic   book   or   something   else!   Make   them   less   than  500  words  and  rate  them  out   of  four  stars.

MAKE SURE TO HAVE A STRONG OPINION!

DO                          W YOU ANT  TO  BE...

Email  them  to: A&E  Editor  Carolyn  Quimby  at Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

MUSICIAN OF THE WEEK? Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu   Contact  Carolyn  Quimby  at  Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013


8B

oracle.newpaltz.edu

THE  DEEP  END

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

This Week in

tHe Deep END

JENNIFER NICHOLAS Major: Visual Arts Education Minor: Italian Studies Year: Fourth

Influences: Jenny Sayville, Michelangelo, Eva Zeisal, my mother

“The past four years of my art making has been about exploration; both of myself, and the world around me through art. I’ve discovered new mediums that I never anticipated working with and developed a greater understanding of the importance of conceptual art. I feel so lucky to be studying something I love so passionately and I know I will continue to explore and grow as an artist for the rest of my life, while teaching children to do the same.”

PHOTOS  COURTESY  OF  JENNIFER  NICHOLAS          CAPTION  BY  SAMANTHA  SCHWARTZ


The New Paltz Oracle

EDITORIAL  

   9  

oracle.newpaltz.edu

SERVING  UP THE  SURVEY

CARTOON  BY  JULIE  GUNDERSEN  

Student  Association  Productions  (SAP)  will  be  con-­ ducting  a  second  survey  concerning  the  spring  concert.                    Vice  President  of  Programming  Esthephanie  Peralta   said  she  and  her  SAP  Board  will  be  administering  the  new   survey  due  to  the  unavailability  of  the  top  artists  that  the   FDPSXVYRWHGIRURQWKHÂżUVWRQH We  at  The  New  Paltz  Oracle  want  to  commend  Stu-­ dent  Association  (SA)  and  SAP  for  their  transparency  on   the   issue,   and   hope   that   both   parties   will   continue   to   do   their  job  to  the  highest  of  standards. In  the  past,  we  have  seen  SAP  boards  who  have  been   unable  to  book  artists  for  similar  reasons  but  were  dishon-­ HVW DERXW LW /DVW \HDU 6$3 FKRVH WKH ÂżIWKUDQNHG DUWLVW out  of  eight  for  the  concert,  and  the  lack  of  transparency   caused  discontent  within  the  student  body  at  the  end  of  the   year.   However,   this   SAP   board   has   been   honest   with   the   results   of   the   survey   and   why   they   are   unable   to   book   top-­ranked   artists   such   as   Lupe   Fiasco   and   Brand   New.   The  price  SAP  is  willing  to  spend  on  an  artist  is  between   $40,000  and  $45,000,  and  higher-­ranked  artists  are  asking   for   higher   prices   and   their   schedules   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   working   out   with  ours.

Unfortunately,   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   that   much   money   to   spend   on   artists.   Schedules   for   artists   change.   As   far   as   monetary  concerns  go,  SAP  also  has  to  look  at  how  much   security,  staging  and  other  amenities  such  as  special  effects   artists  want  will  cost.  With  a  small  budget  to  begin  with,  it   LVGLIÂżFXOWWRÂżQGDZHOONQRZQDUWLVWWRSHUIRUPKHUH SAP  has  not  been  shy  of  sharing  that  information  and   being  honest  with  how  the  current  situation  stands.  This  is   the  job  and  the  expectation  of  our  student  government,  and   we  need  to  see  that  this  will  be  continued  not  just  with  the   spring  concert,  but  with  all  current  and  future  issues.   Student   governments   are   not   just   campus-­governing   bodies.   They   are   our   peers   and   people   we   choose   to   be   friends  with  during  four  of  the  most  important  years  of  our   lives.  As  such,  there  is  a  duty  for  them  to  not  just  be  honest   and  transparent  because  that  is  what  a  government  should   be,  but  because  we  are  students  together  and  the  campus   they  serve  deserves  nothing  but  the  utmost  respect. Transparency  has  been  a  strength  not  just  for  this  par-­ ticular  SAP  board,  but  of  the  current  SA  E-­board  as  well.   While  this  was  an  expectation  of  a  group  that  in  the  past   have  been  vocal  about  transparency  and  how  necessary  it   is   for   success,   it   is   nice   to   see   a   governing   group   that   is  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

willing  to  share  information  with  the  student  body  without   any  sort  of  problems.   As  a  campus,  we  need  to  realize  that  this  has  not  al-­ ways  been  the  case.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  seen  E-­boards  that  were  unwill-­ ing  to  share  information  and  the  result  of  this  has  led  to  dis-­ content  for  the  senate  and  a  reluctance  to  become  involved   with  campus  issues. While   transparency   hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   always   been   a   strength   of   ghosts  of  SA  E-­boards  past,  we  are  glad  to  see  the  progress   made  by  current  SA  members.  We  only  ask  and  hope  that   this  sort  of  transparency  will  continue  in  the  future.

Editorials  represent  the  views  of  the  major-­ ity  of  the  editorial  board.  Columns,  op-­eds   and  letters,  excluding  editorials,  are  solely   those  of  the  writers  and  do  not  necessarily   represent  the  views  of  The  New  Paltz  Oracle,   its  staff  members,  the  campus  and  university   or  the  Town  or  Village  of  New  Paltz.


OPINION

10 oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

COLUMNS CAT  TACOPINA

Managing  Editor  

         Ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Hug  Me,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  Scared

I  really  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  like  hugs.  I  am  not  a  misanthrope.   Okay,  this  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  all  true.  I  do  like  hugs.  A  lot.  In  fact,   scratch  the  gripping  opening,  I  love  hugs.  What  I  mean  to   say  is  that  I  hold  a  hug  with  someone  else  in  high  regard,   and  I  have  very  little  tolerance  for  anything  that  falls  short   of  said  regard.   Do  you  remember  in  that  cold,  vacuous  pit  of  hell  (re:   middle  school)  when  someone  you  were,  at  best,  acquain-­ tances  with  would  scream  your  name  in  the  hallway  on  the   way  to  class  and  they  would  bring  you  into  a  hug  so  light   and  insincere  that  it  would  remind  you  of  every  awkward   insecurity  you  and  all  of  your  peers  had?  Because  I  do,  and   the  memory  alone  makes  me  cringe.  I  feel  like  hugs  are  a   status  symbol  among  adolescents.  The  more  hugs  in  a  day   they  get,  the  more  beloved  they  believe  themselves  to  be.  If   they  could  collect  hugs  in  a  jar,  a  hug  between  two  people   would  be  nothing  but  a  rushed  clutch  onto  a  soul  you  will   never  know. And  I  think  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  I  truly  hate.  Not  the  hug  itself,   but  how  easily  a  hug  can  be  taken  for  granted.  How  easily   WKH\FDQEHVLPSOLÂżHG Maybe   I   am   just   a   weepy   40-­year-­old   spinster   taking   XSUHVLGHQFHLQD\HDUROGÂśVERG\EXWQRZDGD\V,ÂżQG

CAROLYN  QUIMBY

A&E  Editor

Carolyn.quimby@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

myself   viewing   a   hug   as   more   intimate   than   most   things.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  two  bodies  held  so  close  together  that  they  become  in-­ tertwined  and  in  those  moments  a  hug  lasts,  the  parties  in-­ volved  can  learn  so  much  about  one  another. In  a  real,  true  hug,  we  shut  out  the  world  around  us.  Ev-­ erything  melts  slowly  away  and  standing  there  are  two  peo-­ ple  who  want  to  know  as  much  as  their  mind  and  soul  will   allow  them  to  learn  of  another  in  what  a  minute  has  to  offer.   I  want  to  know  the  relaxed  shoulders  and  the  even  breath-­ ing  that  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mine  feel  against  me.  I  want  to  know  that  the   arms  around  me  will  remember  my  curves  and  insecurities   and  hopes  when  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  nothing  but  a  memory  on  a  shelf. When  I  was  younger,  I  knew  a  boy  who  smelled  of  Old   Spice   and   fresh   linen   so   strong   that   I   could   never   for   the   life  of  me  forget  what  that  smell  and  embrace  was  like.  He   broke  me  in  the  end  and  it  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  until  recently  that  I  saw   him  again.  I  had  pushed  him  out  of  my  mind. As  we  hugged,  every  knot  his  words  had  once  made  in   P\VWRPDFKDQGHYHU\FKLOOKHJDYHPHZKHQKHĂ&#x20AC;DVKHGPH a  smile  came  back.  I  remembered  the  Old  Spice  and  fresh   linen  like  it  was  just  yesterday  when  we  said  goodbye.   And   you   know,   that   shit   is   painful.  The   memories   of   a  hug  also  bring  back  the  pain  and  loneliness  that  a  lack  of  

embrace  provides.  And  in  the  end,  I  get  freaked  out  that  a   hug  I  give  someone  else  could  ever  mean  that  much  to  them.   ,ÂśPWHUULÂżHGWRNQRZWKDWPD\EH,ÂśOOOHDYHVXFKDPDUNRQ someone   that   whatever   I   smell   like   or   the   way   my   hands   rest  on  someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  back  will  bring  up  their  greatest  pain  or   whatever  else  I  give  someone. And   then   there   are   the   people   whose   embrace   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   always  get  lost  in  and  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  always  run  back  to  for  comfort   and  solace.  There  are  people  out  there,  whether  you  know   them   now   or   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   walk   into   your   life   somewhere   down   the  line,  who  will  never  leave  you,  and  the  way  they  hold   you  when  yourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  in  tears    will  be  some  of  the  greatest  hap-­ piness  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  ever  come  to  know.   I  guess  what  bothers  me  about  hugs  is  that  something   so   powerful   can   be   given   as   something   so   meaningless.   I   just  never  want  to  be  so  taken  for  granted.  

Cat  Tacopina  is  a  third-­year  journalism  major  with   PLQRUVLQ*HUPDQ6WXGLHVDQG¿OPDQGYLGHRVWXGLHV (YHQWKRXJKWKLVLVWKH¿UVWWLPHThe  Oracle  has  had   bios  in  a  long  time,  she  is  still  the  Swan  Queen,  hunty.

Empathy  Over  Apathy

Murphyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  law  seems  to  be  in  full  effect  this  week   for  me.  Everything  that  could  have  gone  wrong  did  go   wrong  and  I  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  handled  it  in  the  best  way.   But   sometimes   the   only   way   to   get   through   the   pain  (that  demands  to  be  felt,  right  John  Green?)  is  to   write  it  away.  So  hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  note  to  myself  (and,  maybe,   you)  for  when  life  becomes  a  perfect  storm  of  awful: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   okay   to   realize   that   home   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   necessarily   a   place.   Sometimes   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   about   where   you   are,   but   who  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  with.  A  house  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make  your  bones  ache   the  way  a  sunrise  conversation  with  a  friend  will. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   never   understand   why,   but   the   people   you   grew  up  with  (regardless  of  the  last  time  you  saw  them)   will  always  hold  a  piece  of  you  that  feels  timeless.  Let   yourself  be  unstuck  in  time  when  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  with  them.   Force  yourself  to  be  open  and  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  hold  the  world  

at  arms  length.  Try  to  be  surprised  by  what  you  see  and   never  get  jaded  (or  more  jaded  than  you  already  are),   because   the   ocean   is   always   more   beautiful   than   you   remember. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  keep  people  in  your  life  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make  it   better.    Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  feel  obligated  to  anyone  that  makes  you   feel  anything  other  than  your  best  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  not  people  from   your  high  school,  your  misogynistic  uncle  or  that  per-­ son   you   met   that   one   time   at   that   place   you   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   re-­ member.   Sometimes   people   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   deserve   to   be   your   friend  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  not  even  virtually. Being   passionate   is   not   a   weakness.   Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   ashamed  to  love  things  unironically  and  unabashedly.   Let  your  love  leave  an  imprint  on  everything  you  do,   everyone  you  touch  and  everywhere  you  go.   When  you  meet  the  person  who  makes  your  heart   speak   a   different   language,   learn   the   lines   of   their  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

palms   like   a   map   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   one   that   leads   you   back   to   yourself.   Forget   gravity   and   fall,   because,   if   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   right  for  you,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  catch  you.   And  when  one  of  your  oldest  friends  suddenly  los-­ es  her  father,  say  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  sorry  (because  you  are),  that   you  love  her  (because  you  do)  and  hold  her  close.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   all  you  can  do  even  if  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to  do  so  much  more.   Try  to  lift  some  of  the  heaviness  from  her  heart.  Try  to   understand  that  it  will  always  be  there. $QGÂżQDOO\FKRRVHHPSDWK\RYHUDSDWK\$OZD\V

Carolyn  Quimby  is  a  fourth-­year  creative  writing  major,   journalism  minor,  and  proud  member  of  the  Bane  Girls   Club.  She  recently  saw  a  photo  of  a  French  Bulldog  in  a   bow-­tie  and  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  care  about  anything  else.


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Different Strokes

<XND6X]XNDVZDPWKHEDFNVWURNHLQVHFRQGVEUHDNLQJDQ(OWLQJ3RROUHFRUG3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

By  Matt  Tursi Copy  Editor  |  N01980919@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Yuka  Suzuka,  a  fourth-­year  back  and   individual  medley  swimmer,  shattered  an   Elting  Pool  record  during  a  meet  against   SUNY  Oneonta  on  Saturday,  Jan.  26. Suzuka  achieved  a  time  of  57.66  sec-­ onds  in  the  100  backstroke.    She  not  only   broke  a  record,  but  also  nabbed  an  NCAA   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bâ&#x20AC;?  qualifying  standing,  which  she  pre-­ viously  earned  for  her  performance  earli-­ er  this  season  at  the  Eastern  College  Ath-­ letic  Conference  Winter  Championships.   The  previous  record  was  set  by  Michelle   Coombs  in  2008  with  a  time  of  59.45. 6X]XNDZDVRYHUMR\HGZKHQVKHÂżUVW UHDOL]HG KHU WLPH TXDOLÂżHG IRU WKH QHZ pool  record. Âł,ZDVWLUHGÂżUVW,ZDVKRSLQJ,ÂśGJHW 58  or  59  or  close  to  the  record,  but  when   I  got  57â&#x20AC;Ś  I  got  so  happy  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  splashing  up   and  down,  like  a  child,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  got   P\UHFRUGRQWKHERDUG,WÂśVOLNHWKHPRVW

exciting   thing.   I   never   had   that   in   my   swim   club   or   even   my   high   school,   but   when  I  got  my  name  on  [the  Elting  pool   board],  I  got  really  happy.â&#x20AC;? Suzuka   began   swimming   when   she   was  four  years  old.    She  was  frequently   sick   as   a   child,   similar   to   her   mother,   who  made  her  swim  in  order  to  build  her   strength.  Suzuka  swam  every  day  to  re-­ gain  her  health  and  power,  which  enabled   her  to  go  to  school. :RPHQÂśV 6ZLPPLQJ +HDG &RDFK Scott  Whitbeck  said  he  is  very  proud  of   6X]XNDÂśV RYHUDOO SHUIRUPDQFH QRW RQO\ this  year,  but  prior  seasons  as  well.   Âł<XNDÂśVEHHQRXUEHVWVZLPPHUIRUD FRXSOH\HDUVRQWKLVWHDP,PHDQVKHÂśV had  a  great  season,â&#x20AC;?  Whitbeck  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   was  an  all-­American  last  year,  conference   swimmer  of  the  year,  set  school  confer-­ ence  records  in  a  number  of  events.â&#x20AC;? In   terms   of   this   season,   Whitbeck   said   Suzuka   has   taken   even   more   steps  

to  become  a  top  SUNYAC  swimmer.  She   ZDVDWRSÂżQLVKHUIRUWKHEDFNLQ the  national  championships  and  has    been   able   to   improve   her   race   times   during   practice. 7KHVZLPWHDPZRQWKHLUÂżQDOPHHW this  Saturday  in  the  Skidmore  Sprint  In-­ vitational   at   Skidmore   College.   Suzuka   and   the   team   are   setting   their   sights   on   the   SUNYAC   Championships,   which   runs  from  Feb.  21  to  23  in  Buffalo. Âł)RU 681<$&V ,ÂśP OLNH UHDOO\ IR cused  on  100  back,  200  back,  200  IM,â&#x20AC;?   she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  won  all  those  events  last  year,   EXW,FDQQRWEHOLNHÂľRK,ÂśPJRLQJWRZLQ DJDLQÂś EHFDXVH , NQRZ WKHUHÂśV VR PDQ\ swimmers  that  work  so  hard.â&#x20AC;? Whitbeck   is   also   optimistic   of   the   WHDPÂśV DELOLW\ WR FRQWLQXH WKHLU VXFFHVV into  the  SUNYAC  Championships. Âł:HÂśYH KDG WKH IRUWXQH RI KDYLQJ not  only  great  top-­end  swimmers;Íž  in  ad-­ dition  our  depth  in  our  freshmen  class  is  

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

phenomenal   this   year,â&#x20AC;?   Whitbeck   said.     Âł,WKLQNZHÂśUHDWHDPWKDWÂśVLQDSRVLWLRQ to  compete  with  some  of  the  best  teams,   hopefully  in  contention  for  a  conference   title.â&#x20AC;? Suzuka   also   believes   the   team   is   a   strong   contender   for   the   SUNYAC   Swimming   and   Diving   Championships   and  wants  to  end  her  senior  year  with  a   victory.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   we   have   a   chance   to   win   a   SUNYAC   champion   and   that   would   be   really,   really,   really   awesome,â&#x20AC;?   Suzuka   said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  we  win  that,  that  would  be  like,   the  best  senior  memory  ever.â&#x20AC;?     6FDQ7KLV45&RGH:LWK Any  Smartphone  Or   Check  Out  Our  Award   Winning  Website  To   Watch  Our  Exclusive   Interview  With  Suzuka   $ERXW+HU3HUIRUPDQFH


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Lady  Hawks  Bounce  Back  After  Slump By  Chelsea  Hirsch

motivation   for   us,   since   now   every   team  will  give  us  their  best  shot,â&#x20AC;?  Fish-­ After  a  mid-­season  slump,  the  Lady   er   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   to   play   that   much   Hawks   are   back   in   form   and   taking   harder  and  prove  what  a  good  basket-­ down  their  prey.   ball  team  we  really  are.â&#x20AC;?   Though   the   team   has   lost   two   Co-­captain   Kahsyrah   Bryant   ex-­ games,   they   have   recently   come   back   pressed   the   same   sentiment   and   said   to   win   their  last   three,  improving  their   the   team   can   now   focus   on   growth   overall   record   to   19-­2   and   are   ranked   rather  than  their  perfect  record.   No.1   in   SUNYAC   standings,   ahead   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Next   time   we   play   them,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   SUNY  Geneseo. gonna  be  a  tough  game,â&#x20AC;?  Bryant  said.   The  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Basketball  team  lost   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now  the  pressure  of  being  undefeated   WKHLUÂżUVWJDPHRIWKHVHDVRQWR*HQHVHR is  off  our  chest,  so  we  can  just  focus  on   resulting  in  the  end  of  their  undefeated   improving  and  playing  the  game.â&#x20AC;?   streak  on  Jan.  25,  and  were  also  defeat-­ Seward   appreciates   his   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ed  by  Western  Connecticut  State  on  Jan.   positive  attitude  and  willingness  to  im-­ 29.  Whereas  some  teams  would  sulk  in   prove.  He  said  the  team  is  more  recep-­ their  sorrows,  the  Hawks  are  using  this   tive  to  constructive  criticism  when  he  is   o p p o r -­ able   to   keep   tunity   to   things   fresh   grow   and   in  practice. d e v e l o p   He   also   as  a  team,   It  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  our  goal  to  be  undefeated.  It   said  the  team   H e a d   was  good  while  it  lasted,  but  our  goal  is   has  a  tenden-­ C o a c h   cy   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;beat   J a m i e   WREHDYHU\GLIÂżFXOWWHDPWRFRPSHWH themselves   S e w a r d   with. up,â&#x20AC;?   but   are   said. motivated   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153; I t   JAMIE  SEWARD succeed.   w a s n â&#x20AC;&#x2122; t   S e w a r d   our   goal   said   players   to  be  undefeated,â&#x20AC;?  Seward  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was   have   been   showing   up   early   for   prac-­ good  while  it  lasted, �� but  our  goal  is  to  be   WLFHV DQG D ÂżUVW\HDU SOD\HU UHTXHVWHG DYHU\GLIÂżFXOWWHDPWRFRPSHWHZLWK´ longer  practice  sessions  to  reap  the  re-­ He  said  the  team  was  going  through   wards  of  hard  work. a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;mid-­season  slumpâ&#x20AC;?  prior  to  the  game,   Fisher  said  the  team  wants  to  move   and  even  when  they  were  on  a  winning   forward   from   their   loss   and   that   they   streak,  they  were  not  playing  to  the  best   would  rather  lose  in  the  regular  season   of  their  abilities. than  lose  in  the  playoffs,  which  would   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Geneseo   played   very   well   and   end  their  season. theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   a   great   team,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Com-­ Bryant   said   the   losses   have   posi-­ bine  that  with  us  not  playing  to  the  best   tively  affected  the  team  and  will  result   of  our  abilityâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;dog  daysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  of  Janu-­ in  a  stronger  threat  for  their  opponents.   ary  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  not  a  great  week  of  prep,  and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  through  a  rough  time   we  got  what  we  deserved.â&#x20AC;? because   we   just   lost   to   Western   Con-­ The   loss   against   Geneseo   â&#x20AC;&#x153;woke   necticut,â&#x20AC;?   Bryant   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   gonna   the   team   up   a   little   bit,â&#x20AC;?   according   to   stick   together   and   continue   being   a   Seward   making   every   practice   and   family.  This  has  actually  been  making   game  more  important  for  all  12  players.   us   really   closer,   so   people   are   gonna   â&#x20AC;&#x153;During  the  Geneseo  game,  we  had   have  a  tough  time  beating  us  now.â&#x20AC;? a   lack   of   focus,â&#x20AC;?   Co-­captain   Maliqua   Despite  this  slump,  Seward  said  he   Fisher  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  did  not  play  up  to  our   thinks  that  the  team  is  in  a  good  posi-­ GHÂżQLWLRQRIÂľ1HZ3DOW]%DVNHWEDOOϫ tion   for   the   rest   of   the   season   and   is   Fisher  said  the  loss  acted  as  motiva-­ looking  forward  to  the  continued  sup-­ tion  for  the  team  and  will  result  in  stron-­ port  from  fans. ger  play  by  opposing  teams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Losing   that   game   was   just   more   Contributing  Writer  |    Chirsch29@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1

7KH:RPHQÂśV%DVNHWEDOOWHDPORVWWKHLUÂżUVWJDPHRIWKHVHDVRQWR681<*HQHVHR

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13

0HQ¶V9ROOH\EDO6SLNHV'RZQ7KH&RPSHWLWLRQ  By  Angela  Matua  Sports  Editor  |  N02039845@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

The  Men’s  Volleyball  team  defeated  Bard  College  in   the  2013  United  Volleyball  Conference  (UVC)  opener  on   Feb.  4. They  defeated  the  Raptors  in  three  matches,  recording   a  .650  hitting  percentage  to  the  Raptors’  .069.   Head  Coach  Radu  Petrus  said  having  a  talented  class   of  rookies  allows  him  to  implement  a  higher  level  of  vol-­ leyball  strategy. “We  have  a  lot  of  freshmen  and  they  have  the  ability   to   put   more   volleyball   strategy   on   the   volleyball   court,”   Petrus   said.   “So   with   each   group   of   students,   we   can   do   different  practice  from  their  level  so  we  have  a  very  good   group   of   students   and   we   can   play   high   [quality]   volley-­ ball.” First-­year  Tim  Ferriter  recorded  10  kills  in  14  attempts   with  no  errors.  He  credits  his  coaches  and  teammates  as  a   motivating  factor  to  his  strong  season.  “I  feel  that  my  role  on  the  team  thus  far  has  been  trying   to  bring  my  skills  to  the  court,  and  do  whatever  the  team   needs  from  me  to  get  the  victory,”  Ferriter  said.  “Being  a   freshman,   I   feel   as   if   my   coach   and   team   [have]   gained   trust  in  me  quickly  which  can  be  a  lot  of  pressure  at  times   EXWDOVRJLYHVPHFRQ¿GHQFHRQWKHFRXUW´ Co-­captain  Brian  Smith    said  the  team’s  dedication  to   SK\VLFDO¿WQHVVKDVKHOSHGJLYHWKHWHDPLWVVWURQJVWDUW

“As  a  team  we’re  all  in  the  weight  room  a  lot  more,   running   and   lifting   before   or   after   practice   so   that   when   it   comes   time   for   the   games,   we   know   we   are   in   better   physical  condition  than  the  other  team,”  Smith  said.  “Our   coaches   really   trained   us   hard   this   intercession   and   this   WHDPGH¿QLWHO\FDPHLQWRWKLVVHPHVWHUVWURQJHUWKDQHYHU´ Smith  said  his  focus  as  co-­captain  is  to  make  sure  the   SOD\HUVNQRZWKDW³WKHWHDPFRPHV¿UVW´6WDWVDQGLQGL vidual  awards  should  not  take  precedence  over  team  goals   and  embracing  that  mentality  is  what  makes  the  team  “spe-­ cial,”  he  said. He  also  acknowledged  the  impact  the  nine  underclass-­ men  have  had  on  returning  players. “The  nine  underclassmen  on  our  team  have  been  phe-­ nomenal  for  us  and  will  be  an  integral  part  in  our  winning   as  a  team,”  Smith  said.  “Their  talent  and  work  ethic  has   pushed  all  the  upperclassmen  to  work  even  harder  and  the   WHDPKDVEHQH¿WWHGDVWURQRPLFDOO\´ First-­year  Christian  Smith  dished  out  seven  assists  and   WLHG ZLWK ¿UVW\HDUV 7LP )HUULWHU DQG .HYLQ 1DUGRQH IRU match-­high  digs  with  four.  Petrus  said  as  brothers,  Chris-­ tian  and  Brian  Smith  inspire  a  positive  attitude  on  the  court.   Christian  said  volleyball  requires  a  next  play  mentality  and   players  cannot  afford  to  dwell  on  a  mistake.  He  said  posi-­ tivity  on  the  court  helps  foster  that  mentality.   “My  brother  and  I  just  try  to  be  positive  at  all  times   because   when   you   stay   positive   good   things   happen   and   basically  you’re  better  as  a  team,”  Christian  said.  “When  

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somebody  makes  a  mistake  on  the  court  we  try  to  be  there   to  pick  them  up  and  let  them  know  that  they  will  succeed   on  the  next  play.” Brian  said  staying  humble  and  focused  are  the  keys  to   having  a  successful  season.   “Our   main   goal   for   this   season   is   to   work   hard   and   focus  everyday  so  that  we  have  the  best  chance  to  win  ev-­ ery  time  we  step  on  the  court,”  Brian  said.  “If  we  can  do   that,   there   is   no   reason   we   shouldn’t   win   our   conference   DQGEHSOD\LQJLQWKH1&$$7RXUQDPHQWZKHQ$SULOUROOV around.”

Upcoming  Games  

ora c le. n e w p a l t z .

MEN

WOMEN

2/8 vs Buffalo State 8 p.m.

2/9 vs SUNY Fredonia 4 p.m.

2/8 vs Buffalo State 6 p.m.

2/9 vs SUNY Fredonia 2 p.m.

2/21

2/22

SUNYAC Championships

SUNYAC Championships

2/7 vs Baruch College

Recognized  by  THE  SOCIETY  OF  PROFESSIONAL  JOURNALISTS  as  

NATIONAL RUNNER UP IRUWKH%HVW$I¿OLDWHG:HEVLWHIRUD\HDUFROOHJHRUXQLYHUVLW\LQ

3+272%<52%,1:(,167(,1  The  Men’s  Volleyball  team  defeated  Bard  College    on  Feb.  4                                                            

MEN

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

7 p.m.

Andrew   Joseph


SPORTS

14    oracle.newpaltz.edu

The  New  Paltz  Oracle

Canine  Athletes  Pupstage  The  Super  Bowl Biscuit

Fitz

Marta

FUN FACT: Her mom is a dog named Julia Roberts

FUN FACT: Loves to pull his brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tail

FUN FACT: Loves to wrestle with bigger dogs

ing  their  chew  toys  past  designated  end  zones.  As   far  as  I'm  concerned,  the  rules  were  far  less  counter-­ intuitive  than  American  football.   Despite  the  game  being  designed  to   showcase  the  different  puppies  frolick-­ ing  up  and  down  the  tiny   stadium,  there  aren't  too   many  rules.  It's  es-­

sentially  a  12-­hour  loop  of  precious  footage  of  the   OLWWOHGRJVWDFNOLQJRQHDQRWKHUÂżJKWLQJRYHUWR\VDQG celebrating  the  spirit  of  athleticism  through  play.  It   brings  out  my  deeply  suppressed  sports  fan.   The  Puppy  Bowl,  of  course,  brings  to  the  surface   many  of  the  potential  great  sports  stories  of  2013.   What  of  invisible  puppy-­love  on  the  pitch?  I   could've  sworn  I  saw  some  air  humping  in  the  periph-­ ery  of  the  game.  Could  we  have  the  canine  Manti  T'eo   on  our  hands? Do  the  puppies  have  a  players  union  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  or  pup-­ pies  union?  Is  there  a  Collective  Bargaining  Agree-­ ment  in  sight? What  about  unknown  doggie  doping  in  the   games?  What  are  they  feeding  these  little  guys  to  keep   them  so  rambunctious? The  people  need  to  know.  If  I  pursue  these  leads,   perhaps  I  could  win  a  poo-­litzer.

By  Katherine  Speller   Features  Editor    |    N02285279@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

Sunday  evening,  Americans  huddled  around  their   televisions  to  take  part  in  the  longtime-­lauded  display   of  pageantry  that  celebrates  athletic  prowess,  good   breeding  and  undeniable  nationalism.   That's  right  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  Puppy  Bowl's  back.   The  Animal  Planet's  answer  to  traditional  Super   %RZO6XQGD\JDWKHULQJVKDVVLJQLÂżFDQWO\PRUHSXS pies  than  its  CBS  counterpart,  less  electrical  problems   DQGVLJQLÂżFDQWO\OHVVFRPPHUFLDOV7KLVZRUNHGLQLWV favor  as  the  ninth  installment  of  the  program  garnered   higher  ratings  than  ever  before. With  excellent  contenders  like  Fitz,  a  catahoula   mix,  Marta,  a  schnauzer/beagle  mix  who  was   ultimately  named  MVP  (Most  Valuable  Puppy)   and  Biscuit,  a  Puerto  Rican  sato  among  others,  the   puppies  demonstrated  the  different  ways  they  could   tumble  about,  falling  asleep  and  occasionally  bring-­

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Thursday,  February  7,  2013


The  New  Paltz  Oracle

HYTHM & LUESHIRTS ctacopina97@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

             So  long,  Rupper.            On  Monday,  the  New  York  Rangers   announced  that  they  had  traded  forward   Mike   Rupp   to   the   Minnesota   Wild   for   forwards   Darroll   Powe   and   Nick   Palm-­ ieri.   Powe   played   in   Tuesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   game   against   New   Jersey   while   Palmieri   re-­ SRUWHG WR $+/ DIÂżOLDWH &RQQHFWLFXW Whale.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  really  happy  with  this  trade.  So   pleased  with  it  in  fact  that  I  think  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   crazy  if  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  a  fan  of  it  too. On  the  one  hand,  I  will  miss  Rupp.   +HPD\EHDJLQJDQGQRWWKHVDPHÂżJKW er  he  used  to  be,  but  he  was  the  catalyst   RI WKH :LQWHU &ODVVLF YLFWRU\ RYHU WKH )O\HUVDQGDQ\RQHZKRSURYLGHVSDLQWR the  Flyers  gets  a  gold  star  in  my  book.   With   that   being   said,   the   Rangers   clearly   got   the   long   end   of   the   stick   in   this  one.  Unfortunately  for  Rupp,  bring-­ ing  Arron  Asham  into  the  lineup  during   the   offseason   made   Ruppâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   role   on   the   WHDP D OLWWOH ELW REVROHWH +LV REMHFWLYH RQ WKH WHDP ZDV WR EH D ÂżJKWHU VRPH thing   that   I   think   has   not   been   as   up   to  

SPORTS

oracle.newpaltz.edu

15

Adding  Some  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poweâ&#x20AC;?  To  N.Y.   par   as   it   should   be   for   someone   of   his   caliber.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   not   a   fan   of  Asham   at   all,   EXWDVIDUDVÂżJKWHUVJRWKHUHFDQRQO\ be  one. And  to  his  credit  as  well,  Rupp  has   been   around   the   block   with   the   league   and   he   is   a   locker   room   leader   in   the   postseason.  Remember  when  he  got  the   JDPHZLQQLQJJRDOLQWKH6WDQOH\&XS ÂżQDOZLWKWKH'HYLOV"5HPHPEHUZKHQ he  was  playing  on  a  Penguins  team  that   ZDV DOZD\V D 6WDQOH\ &XS FRQWHQGHU" 3+272&2857(6<2)FLICKR86(505B Rupp  knows  how  to  win,  but  there  are   a   couple   of   guys   on   the   Rangers   now   The  Rangers  could  miss  the  presence  of  Mike  Rupp.   who  know  what  it  takes  to  get  to  the  top.   one  assist  and  97  penalty  minutes.  Powe   best.   The  leadership  Rupp  brings  is  something   KDGVL[JRDOVVHYHQDVVLVWVDQGSHQ What   the   Rangers   really   need   are   that   Brad   Richards,   John  Tortorella   and   alty  minutes.  Oh,  and  he  was  second  in   guys   who   are   going   to   do   nothing   but   HYHQJX\VZKRKDYHZRQ2O\PSLFPHG league  forwards  with  blocked  shots.  That   produce   some   more   up   and   down   scor-­ DOVOLNH+HQULN/XQGTYLVWDQG5LFN1DVK VWDWLVWLFDORQHVD\VHYHU\WKLQJ ing  and  further  strengthen  their  identity.   can  carry  on. 3RZHLVJRLQJWRÂżWLQEHFDXVHKHÂśV 6R IDU LW VHHPV OLNH WKH 5DQJHUV KDYH :LOO , PLVV 5XSS" 2I FRXUVH EXW gritty  and  he  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  afraid  to  take  a  hit  or   taken  more  time  than  desired  to  get  back   KDYLQJ3RZHRQWKHWHDPLVJRLQJWREH a  puck  to  the  body,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  secret  that   to  the  way  we  were,  especially  after  last   DTXLFNORFNDQGÂżWIRUWKH5DQJHUVDQG is   what   Tortorella   wants.   Torts   has   his   nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   game.   Maybe   Powe   will   be   the   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  work  in  the  Tortorella  sys-­ all-­star   goalie,   he   has   his   goal-­machine   match  that  lights  the  spark  for  the  Rang-­ WHPIDVWDQGHIÂżFLHQWO\ forwards  and  he  has  a  defense  strong  and   ers   and   bring   them   back   to   being   a   top   Last   season,   Rupp   had   four   goals,   scary  enough  to  shut  down  the  best  of  the   league  threat.

Sandy  Has  A  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pen  Plan  This  Season andrew.wyrich63@hawkmail.newpaltz.edu

With   Spring   Training   mere   days   away,   the   Mets   are   putting   more   focus   on  who  currently  resides  on  their  roster   rather  than  the  remaining  names  left  on   the  free  agent  market.   +RZHYHU LQ WKH ODVW ZHHN 0HWV General   Manager   Sandy   Alderson   has   PDGHDĂ&#x20AC;XUU\RIWUDQVDFWLRQVDOODLPHG DW LPSURYLQJ RQH RI WKH WHDPÂśV PRVW glaring  needs  heading  into  the  2013  sea-­ son  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  their  bullpen.   In   recent   memory,   Alderson   has   VLJQHG IUHH DJHQW UHOLHYHUV 3HGUR )HOL ciano,  Scott  Atchison,  LaTroy  Hawkins   and   is   reportedly   close   to   a   deal   with   hard-­throwing   set-­up   man   Brandon   Lyon.  All  of  the  signings    â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  sans  Lyon   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   were   minor   league   deals,   meaning   WKH 0HWV KDYH PDGH D VHULHV RI FDOFX ODWHG ORZ ULVNKLJK UHZDUG PRYHV WKDW

KDYH WKH SRWHQWLDO WR UHYDPS ZKDW ZDV one   of   the   worst   bullpens   in   the   major   league  last  year.   The  Metsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  need  was  apparent.  Last   season,   the   Mets   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;pen   posted   a   collec-­ WLYH  (5$ RQH RI WKH ZRUVW LQ WKH majors.   And   while   a   slew   of   minor-­ league  deals  might  not  seem  like  a  sexy   ZD\WRUHEXLOGDEXOOSHQWKHSURFHVVÂżWV in  perfectly  with  the  Mets  position  and   SODFHLQWKH1/(DVWPRYLQJIRUZDUG The  Mets  are  not  going  to  be  in  the   upper   echelon   of   the   National   League   next  year.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  to  say  that  the  team   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   respectable   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   but,   when   look-­ LQJDWWKH%UDYHVÂśDQG1DWLRQDOVÂśURVWHUV it   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   seem   likely   the   team   will   be   FRPSHWLQJIRUWKH1/(DVWFURZQFRPH 6HSWHPEHU+RZHYHUWKH0HWVÂśSHQGH cisions  perfectly  mirror  this.   All   of   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   newly   acquired  

arms   are   on   cheap   deals   that   the   Mets   KDYH Ă&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\ ZLWK DOORZLQJ WKHP WR PL[ DQG PDWFK WKH ROGHU YHWHUDQV WKH\ signed  with  the  slew  of  young  arms  that   DUH FXUUHQWO\ GHYHORSLQJ LQ $$$ DQG AA.   Now,  if  the  bullpen  falters    â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  like  it   did  last  season  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  suddenly  the  Mets  will   not  be  faced  with  a  lack  of  depth,  but  ac-­ tually   the   complete   opposite.  Through-­ out   the   2013   season,   the   Mets   bullpen   VKRXOG EH D UHYROYLQJ GRRU RI WKRVH within  the  organization  who  are  throw-­ LQJWKHEHVWUDWKHUWKDQDUHYROYLQJGRRU RI SRRU UHOLHYHUV WKDW IDQV KDYH JURZQ accustomed  to  in  the  past.   +RZHYHU ORRNLQJ IRUZDUG WR WKH  VHDVRQ WKLV VWUDWHJ\ RI VLJQLQJ ORZULVN DUPV PDNHV HYHQ PRUH VHQVH *LYLQJ WKH GHDUWK RI \RXQJ DUPV WKH 0HWV KDYH LQ WKH PLQRU OHDJXHV DQ H[

Thursday,  February  7,  2013

WUDVHDVRQWRGHYHORSVKRXOGSD\RIILQ VSDGHVLQÂľDQGEH\RQG 1DPHV OLNH -DFN /HDWKHUVLFK &RU\ 0D]]RQL-HXU\V)DPLOLD(OYLQ5DPLUH] DQG5REHUW&DUVRQDOODUHVHHQDVSRWHQ tial  weapons  in  the  bullpen  and  all  could   EHQHÂżW IURP QRW EHLQJ FRXQWHG RQ WR produce  immediately  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  seemed   like  the  case  only  a  few  weeks  ago  for   the  Mets.   3HUKDSVRYHUWKHFRXUVHRIWKHVHD VRQ DOO RI WKH QDPHV DERYH ZLOO KDYH brief   cups   of   coffee   in   the   big   leagues   instead  of  being  forced  to  be  something   they  might  not.   Strong  bullpens  are  the  key  to  win-­ ning   championships   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   just   ask   the   Gi-­ ants   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   so   any   way   the   Mets   can   begin   WRFXOWLYDWHWKDWVHHPVOLNHDVWHSLQWKH right  direction.


SPORTS THE  NEW  PALTZ  ORACLE

WHAT’S INSIDE

RECORD BREAKING

Women’s Basketball Looks To Improve PAGE 12

Men’s Volleyball Stays Undefeated PAGE 13

PHOTOS  BY  ROBIN  WEINSTEIN  

S U Z U K A S E T S N E W E LT I N G P O O L R E C O R D : P A G E 1 1


"The New Paltz Oracle" Volume 84 Issue 15