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Enhancing Communities Through Capacity Building and Technical Assistance

Building Successful Community/Government/Business Collaborations

March 8–10, 2017 • Washington, DC SUMMARY REPORT


NOTICE The National Environmental Justice Conference, Inc., prohibits discrimination in all its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, age, disability, sex, sexual identity, or gender identity. Persons who need special accommodations to fully participate in the conference, workshops, or training programs, and persons with disabilities who require alternative means for communication of program information (Braille, large print, audiotape, etc.) should contact the conference coordinator at (202) 827-2224. Because of chemical sensitivities in many people, we are requesting that attendees wear unscented toiletry items. Images from this conference may be captured, published, and distributed.


The 2017 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training was held March 8 through 10, 2017, in Washington, DC, with approximately 650 registrants. The conference theme was “Building Successful Community/Government/Business Collaborations.� During the conference, attendees had the opportunity to interact with a diverse group of representatives from federal and state agencies, local governments, tribes, community groups, and business and industry leaders. Kim Lambert of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Honorable Congressman James E. Clyburn, Assistant Democratic Leader (D-SC), and Milton Bluehouse Jr. of Navarro Research and Engineering Inc. served as Keynote speakers. The conference agenda provided an Emerging Leaders Summit, which featured our young and future environmental justice (EJ) leaders, panel discussions, and question and answer segments, as well as networking lunches and receptions. Twenty workshops and technical training sessions were held, and two EJ-related documentary films were viewed and discussed. All-in-all, the conference provided an array of networking opportunities among students, faculty, community, business, and government leaders.

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DAY ONE–WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017 YOUTH/EMERGING LEADERS SUMMIT Mistress of Ceremonies Carolyn Sawyer, National Environmental Justice and Training Program (NEJC); Board Chairman Benjamin F. Wilson, Esquire; and U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Justice Program Manager Melinda Downing welcomed the 2017 NEJC attendees to the Opening Plenary Session (the Youth/Emerging Leaders Summit) at the Washington Marriott Metro Center. Following the opening remarks, the Youth/Emerging Leaders Summit opened with a presentation from Cydney Tiye Noelle Christian, an undergraduate student at Hampton University in Virginia. Christian shared her experience with a community involvement project that she undertook as her high school senior year “Culminating Project,” in which she renovated a forgotten and environmentally abused courtyard that sits in the middle of her high school. Her idea was that students could use the renovated area to study, enjoy the outdoors, or relax. Courses that ranged from food and nutrition, special education, and science classes could also utilize the space. Through her efforts, the area went from dead to lively and vibrant with beautiful plants and flowers. The courtyard is still being maintained by her high school’s Environmental Education Club, environmental classes, and local volunteers. A panel discussion entitled: Mentorship for Environmental Scholars (MES): Six Paths One Destination followed, moderated by Clarence T. Brown, MES program manager, Pre-College University. The MES program is a summer internship that welcomes many academic disciplines if the participant’s focus/ research area centers on environmental science or EJ. These students come together at DOE Office of Legacy Management sites and offices around the country to participate in summer research. The conference heard from six MES summer interns, representing six different academic disciplines, who shared their summer experiences and how they became academically prepared for their summer internships. The students discussed how they were able to use their summer experience to enhance or further their career and educational goals. Aayana Ingram is an environment and political science MES intern from Alabama A&M University. During her internship, she analyzed the environmental disparities involving minerals in water. Dominique Jenkins, is a mathematics and environment science MES intern from Morris College. He introduces and enlightens people about global issues by utilizing basic mathematics to show an association with current environmental issues, such as pollution, using statistics. Jabril McKevie is a chemical engineering and environment science MES intern from South Carolina State University. He is responsible for improving the reliability of software and database of field material tracking. Belinda Owusu is an MES Intern from Spelman College and deals with biology and its influence on environment science. She studies biodiversity and water sampling in lakes. Kiara Thorpe, is an English major MES intern, also from Spelman College. Kiara began her internship in technical writing, but gained interest in EJ while sampling for overexposure to beryllium and lead in a laboratory setting. Alton Turner is an MES intern from Elizabeth City State University. He developed an Excel file that codes Visual Basic for Application. Program Director Travers McNeice, California Youth Energy Services at the Rising Sun Energy Center in Berkeley, California, gave an overview of their mission to build healthy communities through climate solutions and green career pathways and their summer job program to help empower people in achieving environment and land economic suitability for themselves and communities. In collaboration with Conetoe Family Life Center (CFLC) and the City of Rocky Mount, North Carolina, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships led

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a panel discussion that investigates the role faith-based organizations play in exposing young people to nature and a connection to the land, agricultural practices, food security, healthy-lifestyles and career pathways, using CFLC as an example. The panel also discussed the historical and racial significance of CFLC’s programing. After a networking lunch, the conference again heard from the Green Ambassadors. During the 2015 NEJC, Green Ambassador youth and educators team members from Houston, Texas, presented about the establishment of a greenbelt of fruit trees, native plant understory, and urban gardens in an impoverished Latino/African American community in Houston, and focused upon pollinator conservation, providing healthy foods to area community members, and creating avenues for education and careers in natural resources, which was well received and created a sense of excitement and hope among conference participants. The Green Ambassadors shared their inspiring story of the program’s evolution and the numerous awards, high-level recognition, and capacitybuilding opportunities that have occurred since then. Each Green Ambassador shared their wonderful learning experience and their appreciation for and commitment to EJ. Dr. Sarah Otterstrom, Paso Pacifico, and Jerry Bauer, USDA Forest Service, provided insight into a wonderful youth program involving the conservation and protection of animals, such as Nicaragua’s endangered sea turtles, and the Junior Ranger Program there that has many young community leaders who will be the next generation of biodiversity stewards in coastal Nicaragua. The final panel of day one featured the Lone Star Family Health Center in Conroe, Texas, which serves underserved children and families and has created a Certified Nature Explore Classroom. Physicians prescribe time in this nature-rich space, which then serves as a springboard for patients to connect with nearby forests, parks, and other natural areas for mental, physical, and emotional well-being. Positive results showed community partners had changes in knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to design and benefits of the Nature Explore Classroom and the health benefits of connecting with nature. Results also showed doctors increased writing of prescriptions for nature, patients significantly indicating plans to return to the Nature Explore Classroom at the Medical Center, and patients significantly indicating plans to visit nearby parks and forests. Also featured were several workshops and training programs, including Effects of Improper Disposal of Agricultural Waste on the Environment; Nature Smart; and The Universal Language of Nature. Day one concluded with a screening of the film City of Trees, a film about one community’s fight for equal access to good jobs and safe parks in Washington, DC.

DAY TWO–THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 Day two started with a presentation from Kim Lambert, EJ coordinator at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which was a case study on the Mountain View South Valley Neighborhood and the Creation of Valle de Oro Refuge Partnership: Win-Win Situation. This was followed by remarks from the keynote speaker, The Honorable James E. Clyburn, who was introduced by Melinda Downing. Several presentations on tribal communities followed. Suzanne Baker from the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service presented on partnerships with the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe and their development of tribal adaptive conservation strategies due to environmental challenges.

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Chris Wamsley from the National Weather Service discussed building relationships with the Hopi Tribe and Navajo Nation to better assess and mitigate drought impacts. Patricia Cochran, executive director of the Alaska Native Science Commission, focused on Alaskan tribal communities, preparing for changing environment national climate assessment, and key messages from indigenous peoples’ land and resources. The presentation showed how climate change poses particular threats to indigenous peoples’ health, well-being, and ways of life. Ann Marie Chischilly from Northern Arizona University introduced NEJC attendees to the Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals and how the program recognizes all tribes in preparing for changes in the environment. She spoke about air and water quality, solid waste, climate change, internships, and the development of program policy and strong food programs. Elder Advisor Sarah James, Arctic Village, Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council, discussed increasing food sovereignty in Alaska through tribal conservation districts. James spoke about climate change causing erosion and drying the land, which has decreased hunting. Maryann Fidel, an environmental scientist also with the Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council discussed the diversity of knowledge and cultures to combat climate changes. Fidel spoke about research in drinking water and community gardens, tribal conservations to increase resources (financial and technical), and agricultural efforts. Tania Ellersick, USDA Forest Service, introduced the 2016 USDA Forest Research and Development Tribal Engagement Highlights Report, which describes 27 examples of USDA Forest Service tribal engagement. Chris Koeppel from the USDA Forest Service Office of Tribal Relations enlightened attendees on partnerships to protect sacred sites and the USDA Forest Service Sacred Sites Policy. The policy protects access to sacred tribal sites, worship in privacy, and ensures confidentiality. Gina Allery’s, Office of Tribal Justice, U.S. Department of Justice, presentation provided tips and tools for tribes when working with the federal government to ensure their EJ concerns are heard and adequately addressed by the federal agencies. Fred Clark, the director of the Office of Tribal Relations, USDA Forest Service, introduced a GIS tool developed by the Forest Service that displays three layers, including national forest system lands, tribal trust lands, and lands ceded by tribes through treaties. There is room for additional federal lands coverages. The tool illustrates the proximity of federal public lands to tribal interests, so work of mutual benefit may be more effectively pursued. Danny Gogal from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Office of Environmental Justice, discussed how EPA’s Policy on Environmental Justice for Working with Federally Recognized Tribes and Indigenous Peoples, is being implemented at EPA, as described in EPA’s recent five-year EJ strategy, EJ 2020 Action Agenda, and efforts to coordinate with other federal agencies on addressing the EJ concerns of tribes and indigenous peoples will be discussed. Milton Bluehouse Jr., a frequent conference presenter, delivered remarks, as the luncheon speaker, entitled Listening to the Community. The afternoon session of day two provided several panels that discussed “Success Stories.” Sarah Hurt Evans and John Hazlett discussed the Williams Creek (Indianapolis, Indiana) pilot Green Infrastructure (GI) Maintenance Training program. GI refers to a variety of stormwater management practices, which utilize engineered vegetated systems and materials to treat stormwater where it lands, mimicking natural processes. These technologies are utilized throughout the United States to address combined sewer overflows, reduce flooding, and improve water quality. This on-the-job training program involved 70 individuals from a reentry facility, eight neighborhoods, and three at-risk youth volunteers who were trained on various GI and greenspace maintenance practices at multiple sites in a nearby downtown neighborhood experiencing revitalization and reinvestment.

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Robert Garcia, founding director and counsel of The City Project in Los Angeles, California, shared with attendees over 85 years of studies on park and health disparities in Los Angeles that need to be alleviated through federal agencies, the city of Los Angeles, and diverse stakeholders working together on green justice efforts. Garcia explored the struggle for green justice in California, shared three success stories, identified green justice struggles on the horizon, suggested best paths forward to ensure future success stories, and provided attendees with resources to learn more about green justice and the tools to implement green justice efforts in their own locales. Leah Andrascik and Thaddeus Popovich of Allegheny County Clean Air Now (ACCAN), along with Jessica Pachuta of Carnegie Mellon University and Gwen Ottinger of Drexel University, shared their Ingredients for Success: How Technology Can Serve Community-Based Organizing and Storytelling. This involved DTE Energy Services Shenango Coke outside of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, which shut down in 2015 after operating for 52 years producing coke—a fuel used in steelmaking. Located in a densely-populated area of 70,000 people, the coke plant repeatedly violated air quality regulations meant to protect the population from hazardous byproducts like fine particulates and carcinogenic air toxins. Although financial reasons were cited for the decision, the move came after intense criticism from the citizens’ group ACCAN. ACCAN organized meetings within the community and met with government officials and regulatory agencies. ACCAN supported a lawsuit on their behalf, worked with local media, and established a social media network. The group also worked with Carnegie Mellon University’s Community Robotics, Education, and Technology Empowerment—or CREATE—laboratory to develop a stories project and to film numerous fugitive emissions from the coke works and present them to the public. The images that were generated convinced EPA, in the months before the closure was announced, to more closely scrutinize the facility. This case is an important success story, representing a powerful, effective collaboration between a community group and university engineers reaching the decision-makers and regulators. Evaine K. Sing and Kate Hancock of GTECH Strategies discussed “ReClaim McKeesport.” The residents of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, have long been burdened by the environmental costs of heavy industry. With the collapse of the steel industry in the 1950s, near catastrophic population losses in McKeesport—from a peak of 55,000 in 1940 to less than 19,000 currently—a deteriorated economic base combined with a legacy of environmental distress, and an abundance of unmaintained vacant land, resulted in a vulnerable population. To address environmental issues at their roots, GTECH launched ReClaim McKeesport in 2014 to give residents the power to design, implement and steward their own small-scale greening projects in their community. Completed in 2015, it was a major success that through a first-of-its-kind Sustainable Return on Investment report, forecasted a sustainable return on investment ratio of $1.00 to $21.90. Reverend Dr. Horace Strand, John Waffenschmidt, and Alice Wright of the Chester Environmental Partnership in Chester, Pennsylvania, reviewed with the attendees the history of the city of Chester and its involvement with the EJ movement, as well as an overview of the workings of the Chester Environmental Partnership, including case histories and current project considerations.

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Emily Bockian Landsburg of Ultra Capital and President Margaret O’Gorman of the Wildlife Habitat Council provided presentations on communities working with the private sector. Deborah January-Bevers, Houston Wilderness president, concluded the session with a discussion on how Houston Wilderness is working with partners to further incorporate ecosystem services into proposals and projects where they can enhance, restore, and enrich areas where critical EJ solutions are needed. Again, several workshops and training programs were featured, highlighted by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1970 and EJ: Leveraging Federal Resources to Advance Community Environmental, Economic, and Health Vitality. A Focus on Promising Practices for EJ Methodologies in NEPA Reviews; Using EJ SCREEN and C-FERST for Science; Collaborative Conservation Through Engagement of Communities and Partnerships; Justice for Children: Improving Environmental Health at School; Teaching the Social Determinants of Occupational Health Equity: NIEHS Educational Resources to Promote Work Environmental Justice and Sustainable Jobs; Building Environmental Justice and Cumulative Impacts into Local Decision-Making; Ensuring Equity in Planning and Capital Improvement: A Case Study from Minneapolis Park; and Communities for Clean Streams: Growing a Partnership to Address Environmental Issues. Day two concluded with a screening of the film Le jardin d’Ewald, a film about the attempt of Senegalese people to live a daily life and to outwit one of the greatest threats for that region, which is drought due to climate change. A networking reception followed.

DAY THREE–FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 Day three of the conference opened with presentations on “Building and Sustaining Healthy Communities.” Associate Professor Dr. David Rivers, Medical University of South Carolina and director, Public Information and Community Outreach, provided opening remarks and served as the moderator. Raven Hayes, University of Delaware, and Maria Rockett and Michael Williams of Northern Michigan University discussed the Flint, Michigan, water crisis. Christopher Ahlers of the Clean Air Council introduced the attendees to air modeling and citizen science for EJ, and Melissa Deas of Georgetown University’s Climate Center discussed integrating climate adaptation policy with social and EJ goals. Federal Emergency Management Agency (also known as FEMA) analysts Savin Ven Johnson and Marcy Van presented a case study highlighting communities and organizations affected by disasters and different approaches taken with at-risk populations during disaster response and recovery. The case study reviewed promising practices in conducting inclusive engagement and outreach with at-risk populations in pre-disaster planning and post-disaster recovery. The presentation also highlighted a checklist of ethical considerations and practices for local officials and their communities to consider helping address the needs of at-risk populations during and after natural disasters. Dr. Gary A. Bojes of the USDA Rural Development Rural Utilities Service provided a presentation on the USDA’s Rural Development programs, how they have evolved and how they can serve as an answer to EJ. Sheryl Good, EPA Region 4, moderated a panel Advancing Communities Through the Environmental Justice Academy. The EJ Academy is primarily based on EPA’s Collaborative Problem-Solving Model, which is a seven-step process for bringing about positive change and community revitalization by having community leaders, community members, and their stakeholders work together. The teachings of the EJ Academy are also rooted in appreciative leadership philosophy, which is identifying what is working well, analyzing why it is working well, and then doing more of it. Through the participation and cooperation of residents, EJ organizations, and grassroots community organizations, the EJ Academy will encourage collaborative problem solving with local government, small businesses, 8

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academic institutions, and industry to create a shared vision among different stakeholders so that all who are a part of the community can have a voice. William S. Robinson, vice president of Institutional Advancement at Allen University; Ernest Omar Muhammad, Low Country Alliance for Model Communities; Ernest Mooring Jr., Navassa, North Carolina; and Siobhan Whitlock, EPA Region 4, also were panelists. A networking lunch followed. During the lunch, Melinda Downing recognized the achievements of and presented awards to EJ stalwarts Kim Lambert, Deeohn Ferris, and Mustafa Ali. The afternoon of day three saw several presentations on solar energy and energy sovereignty. The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Environmental and Climate Justice Program, Field Organizing Team members Marnese Jackson, Ryan Kelley, and Lorah Steichen stressed that in order to prevent communities of color and low-income communities from paying high utility bills, we must shift the energy business model. The panel suggested that alternative practices such as community solar and net metering give the power back to the people and build the capacity to become autonomous from utility companies. They also suggested that as we transition away from fossil fuels and toward clean, renewable energy, we must also transition to a more justice, equitable, democratic, and locally controlled energy system at large. Elizabeth Doherty and Sherri White-Williamson, students at the Vermont Law School Institute for Energy and the Environment (IEE) introduced their innovative community solar ownership model that reduces the environmental and economic costs of generating electricity for mobile home communities. The model attacks a key element in environmental and energy justice efforts, providing low-cost technical assistance and capacity building because the model is replicable and involves the communities in the process. The panel discussed mobile home communities in the United States, energy poverty, economic and environmental justice, solar energy and community solar, the IEE energy clinic resident-owned community solar model, and expansion opportunities for the model. Kely Markley with the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor discussed reaching out to and engaging low-income customers in energy efficiency retrofits; highlighted the challenges faced by program administrators, and the best practices that have been used to address these challenges; and the suitability of these strategies. Steps toward developing a targeted, community-based approach to low-income households were also recommended. The panel Expanding Solar’s Reach: Strategies for Enhancing the Direct Benefits of Solar Energy for Lowand Moderate-Income Households and Communities discussed examples where barriers to access to solar energy have been effectively overcome and the range of models, policy interventions, and business approaches have, which successfully expanded solar access for households and communities. Panelist included Derrick Jackson, Union of Concerned Scientists; Maria Laverdiere, legislative assistant to U.S. House of Representatives member Keith Ellison (MN); Nicole Steele, GRID Alternatives MidAtlantic; Karla Loeb, PosiGen; and Telana Felder, Southern Homes and Gardens. The final presentation of the conference was from Sarah Koenig and James Snow of GTECH Strategies. GTECH Strategies has crafted a suite of innovative approaches to maximize resident input in order to identify neighborhood assets and create neighborhood trails to highlight these assets.

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These low-cost engagement approaches can be used as tools to help support community outreach and data collection efforts across any region, ultimately helping to ensure that all residents can have a voice in community planning and initiatives in their neighborhood. Conference attendees again had the opportunity to participate in several workshops and training programs on day three. These included Limited English Proficiency Considerations in Sustainability Planning: Implications at the Local and Federal Levels; Developing a New Federal Strategy to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures; National Library of Medicine Resources: Case Studies in Environmental Health; the Interagency Working Group’s Educate, Motivate, Innovate Workshop: Building the Next Generation of Climate Justice Leaders, which featured presentations from Rebeka Isaac, University of Texas at El Paso; Carol E. Ramos Gerena, University of Puerto Rico; and Latia Jackson, Virginia State University; as well as EJSCREEN Training: EJSCREEN for Climate Justice Application; Toxic Trespass Training Program: Addressing Health Concerns from Oil-Chemical Exposures; Web-Based Instructional System for Environmental Review; Climate Justice/Environmental Justice at the Intersection of STEM: Constructing Career Pathways from Secondary to Higher Education; and the NEJC’s annual Grant Writing and Technical Assistance workshop. Closing remarks for the 2017 NEJC were given by Timothy Fields Jr., vice-chairman of the Board of Directors for NEJC and Melinda Downing, Environmental Justice program manager with the U.S. Department of Energy.

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Enhancing Communities Through Capacity Building and Technical Assistance Building Successful Community/Government/Business Collaborations

AGENDA

DAY 1 – WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017 FIRST FULL DAY OF THE 2017 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE CONFERENCE AND TRAINING PROGRAM

YOUTH/EMERGING LEADERS SUMMIT Washington Marriott at Metro Center Grand Ballroom Salons A-D 775 12th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005 7:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Registration Exhibit Hall Open

8:00 a.m. – 8:30 a.m.

Welcome/Opening Remarks Mistress of Ceremonies Ms. Carolyn Sawyer Communications Strategist Tom Sawyer Company

Benjamin F. Wilson, Esq. Chairman Beveridge & Diamond, P.C. Chairman, Board of Directors National Environmental Justice Conference, Inc.

Melinda Downing Environmental Justice Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy

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8:30 a.m. – 8:50 a.m.

Presentation Paying It Forward: From Classroom to Community Service Cydney Tiye Noelle Christian Undergraduate, Hampton University

8:50 a.m. – 9:50 a.m.

Panel Mentorship for Environmental Scholars (MES): Six Paths One Destination Clarence T. Brown

MES Program Manager Pre-College University

Aayana Ingram MES Intern Alabama A&M University

Dominique Jenkins MES Intern Morris College

Jabril McKevie MES Intern South Carolina State University

Belinda Owusu MES Intern Spelman College

Kiara Thorpe MES Intern Spelman College

Alton Turner MES Intern Elizabeth City State University

9:50 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

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Break

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10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Panel Resiliency: People, Planet, and Community Travers McNeice Program Director, California Youth Energy Services Rising Sun Energy Center Berkeley, California

11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Panel Connecting Faith, Health and the Outdoors: Conetoe Family Life Center’s journey to improve their community’s health, social, and economic well-being through nature Reverend Richard Joyner Founder, Conetoe Family Life Center

Dr. Garrie Moore Executive Director, Conetoe Family Life Center

Victoria Revelle Program Director, Conetoe Family Life Center

Torey Powell Partnership and Outreach Specialist, USDA Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships

Student Participants: Laniyah Williams Su’Qasia White Takhiya Whitehead Tationa Hyman 12:15 p.m. – 12:30 p.m. Break 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Lunch “Where Do We Go from Here?: A New Movement for Justice” Bakari Sellers Strom Law Firm, LLC

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1:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Break

1:45 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Presentation Green Ambassador – Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Journey and Evolution to XQ Super School and Award Winning Effort

Nalleli Hidalgo

Angela Gomez

Fredalina Pieri

Outreach and Health and Wellness Initiative Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Sophomore High School Student The Green Institute at Furr High School

Urban Connection, Texas A&M Forest Service Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Founder

Career and Technical Education Department Chair Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, and Math (STEAM) Magnet Coordinator

Juan Elizondo Partnerships Lead and Green Ambassador Coordinator The Green Institute at Furr High School

David Salazar Educator and Personalized Learning The Green Institute at Furr High School

Luis Cruz Zumba Instructor Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Founder Americas for Conservation + Arts

Jesse Torres Outreach and Wildlife Education Senior High School Student The Green Institute at Furr High School

Cinthia Cantu Zumba Instructor Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Founder Senior High School Student The Green Institute at Furr High School

Jainny Leos Zumba Instructor Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Founder Senior High School Student The Green Institute at Furr High School

Kala Price Outreach and Wildlife Education Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Sophomore High School Student The Green Institute at Furr High School

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Marco Gonzalez Outreach and Health and Wellness Initiative Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Junior High School Student The Green Institute at Furr High School

Jazmin Cruz Outreach and Health and Wellness Initiative Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Sophomore High School Student The Green Institute at Furr High School

Susie Wirth Outreach Director Arbor Day Foundation – Nature Explore – Dimensions Educational Research Foundation

John R. Warner CF, CA Urban District Forester, Texas A&M Forest Service Society of American Foresters – Certified Forester International Society of Arboriculture – Certified Arborist

Michael Hill Landscape Architect DC Youth Program Coordinator National Partnership Office USDA Forest Service

Tamberly Conway, Ph.D. Partnerships, Diversity and Inclusion Specialist Conservation Education Program USDA Forest Service

Michiko J. Martin Director, Conservation Education USDA Forest Service

Building Successful Community/Government/Business Collaborations


Presentation

3:15 p.m. – 4:05 p.m.

Building Capacity of Youth: The Junior Ranger Program, Paso del Istmo Biological Corridor, San Juan del Sur, Nicaragua Sarah Otterstrom, Ph.D. Founder and Executive Director Paso Pacifico; Ashoka Fellow

Jerry Bauer Team Leader International Cooperation USDA Forest Service

4:05 p.m. – 4:15 p.m.

Break

4:15 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Presentation Medical Center’s Unique Outdoor Classroom Links Nearby – Nature with Better Health

Susie Wirth

John R. Warner, CF, CA

Outreach Director, Arbor Day Foundation/ Dimensions Educational Research Foundation Nature Explore Program

Urban District Forester Texas A&M Forest Service

Daniel Porter, M.D. Medical Director Lone Star Family Medical Center Conroe Family Medicine Residency Program

Marilyn Kasmiersky Director of Professional and Government Relations Lone Star Family Health Center

Nalleli Hidalgo Urban Connections Texas A&M Forest Service Woodsy Owl Conservation Corps Founder

Tamberly Conway, Ph.D. Partnerships, Diversity and Inclusion Specialist Conservation Education Program USDA Forest Service

Sara Espinoza Managing Director, Research and Best Practices National Environmental Education Foundation

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5:30 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

Break

5:45 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Documentary Introduction and Screening “City of Trees” (A film about one community’s fight for equal access to good jobs and safe parks in our nation’s capital.) Lance Kramer Producer of “City of Trees” Meridian Hill Pictures

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DAY 2 – THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 SECOND FULL DAY OF THE 2017 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE CONFERENCE AND TRAINING PROGRAM Washington Marriott at Metro Center Grand Ballroom Salons A-D 775 12th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005

Exhibit Hall Open

8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Mistress of Ceremonies Ms. Carolyn Sawyer Communications Strategist Tom Sawyer Company

Presentation

8:00 a.m. – 8:45 a.m.

Mountain View South Valley Neighborhood and the Creation of Valle de Oro Refuge Partnership: Win–Win Situation Kim Lambert Environmental Justice Coordinator U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

8:45 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.

Introduction of Keynote Speaker Melinda Downing Environmental Justice Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy

Keynote Speaker The Honorable James E. Clyburn Assistant Democratic Leader (Democrat, 6th District, South Carolina)

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Break

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9:45 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Presentations on Tribal Communities Tribal Communities: Preparing for Changing Environments Carolyn Olson, Ph.D. USDA Office of the Chief Economist Climate Change Program

Chris Wamsley Impact Decision Support Program Manager and Tribal Liaison National Weather Service

Tony Merriman Warning Coordination Meteorologist National Weather Service

Patricia Cochran Executive Director Alaska Native Science Commission

Ann Marie Chischilly, J.D. Executive Director Institute for Tribal Environmental Professionals Northern Arizona University

Suzanne Baker USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service Project Liaison to USDA Northeast Climate Hub

10:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Increasing Food Sovereignty in Alaska Through Tribal Conservation Districts Maryann Fidel Environmental Scientist Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council

Sarah James Elder Advisor Arctic Village, Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council

10:45 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

2016 USDA Forest Service Research and Development Tribal Engagement Roadmap Highlights Report Tania Ellersick Senior Policy Analyst, Forest Management, National Forest System USDA Forest Service

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11:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m.

Presentations on Tribal Communities (continued) Facilitating Shifts in Attitudes About Protecting Native American Sacred Places Chris Koeppel

Assistant Director USDA Forest Service Office of Tribal Relations

11:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Presentation Environmental Justice, the Federal Family, and Indigenous Communities, Federal Perspectives Gina Allery Deputy Director Office of Tribal Justice, U.S. Department of Justice

Fred Clark Director of the Office of Tribal Relations, USDA Forest Service

Danny Gogal Tribal and Indigenous Peoples Program Manager U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Environmental Justice

12:15 p.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Break

12:30 p.m. –1:15 p.m.

Lunch Luncheon Speaker: “Listening to the Community” Milton Bluehouse, Jr.

Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.

1:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Break

1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Panel Discussions: Success Stories The New Green Economy: Green Infrastructure Maintenance Training and Workforce Development Sarah Hurt Evans, PLA, ASLA

Landscape Architect and Marketer Williams Creek

John Hazlett

Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) AP O+M Team Leader – Integrated Planning Williams Creek

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2:00 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

Panel Discussions: Success Stories (continued) Social Equity and Green Justice in California: Replicable Stories of Success and Forging a Path Forward Robert García Founding Director and Counsel, The City Project

2:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Ingredients for Success: How Technology Can Serve CommunityBased Organizing and Storytelling Leah Andrascik Allegheny County Clean Air Now (ACCAN)

Thaddeus Popovich ACCAN

Jessica Pachuta Community Robotics, Education and Technology Empowerment (CREATE) Lab Carnegie Mellon University

Gwen Ottinger Drexel University

3:00 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

ReClaim McKeesport: Environmental Justice Through Capacity Building: A Sustainable Return on Investment Success Story Evaine K. Sing, RLA, LEED AP Executive Director, GTECH Strategies

Kate Hancock Project Associate/Intern, GTECH Strategies University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work

3:30 p.m. – 3:50 p.m.

Chester Environmental Partnership Enhancing Community Involvement Reverend Dr. Horace Strand Chester Environmental Partnership

John Waffenschmidt Chester Environmental Partnership V.P., Environmental Science and Community Affairs, Covanta

Alice Wright Director, Chester Environmental Partnership

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3:50 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Break

4:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Working with the Private Sector Obtaining Project Financing: Learn the Basics of Project Finance and what Equity Investors Look For Emily Bockian Landsburg Director, Ultra Capital

Leveraging Corporate Conservation for Community Benefit Margaret O’Gorman President, Wildlife Habitat Council

5:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Presentation Looking Beyond Ecological Functions to the Value of Ecosystem Services in EJ Communities in the Greater Houston Region Deborah January-Bevers President, Houston Wilderness

5:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Break

6:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.

Documentary Introduction and Screening “Le jardin d’Ewald” (A film about the attempt of Senegalese people to live a daily life and to outwit one of the greatest threats for that region, which is drought due to climate change.) Alexandra Pille Director, Writer, Producer Berlin, Germany

Anton Hufnagl Environmental and Urban Affairs Officer, German Embassy Washington, DC

7:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.

Networking Reception

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 THIRD FULL DAY OF THE 2017 NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE CONFERENCE AND TRAINING PROGRAM Washington Marriott at Metro Center Grand Ballroom Salons A-D 775 12th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Open Mistress of Ceremonies Ms. Carolyn Sawyer Communications Strategist Tom Sawyer Company

8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Presentations: Building and Sustaining Healthy Communities Opening Remarks/Moderator Dr. David Rivers Associate Professor, Medical University of South Carolina and Director, Public Information and Community Outreach (PICO)

The Economic, Political, and Social Ramifications of the Flint Water Crisis Raven Hayes University of Delaware

Environmental Justice in Flint, Michigan: Comparing Lead Concentrations in Domestic Water Supplies Among Household Income Levels and Race Demographics in Connection with Aid Formation and Allocation Maria Rockett Northern Michigan University

Michael Williams Northern Michigan University

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8:30 a.m. – 10:00 a.m.

Presentations: Building and Sustaining Healthy Communities (continued) Air Modeling and Citizen Science for Environmental Justice Communities Christopher D. Ahlers Staff Attorney, Clean Air Council

Integrating Climate Adaptation Policy with Social and Environmental Justice Goals Melissa Deas

Institute Associate, Georgetown Climate Center

10:00 a.m. – 10:30 a.m.

Presentation Addressing the Barriers to Disaster Recovery for At-Risk Populations Savin Ven Johnson Analyst Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)

Marcy Van Analyst FEMA

10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Presentation An Introduction to USDA Rural Development Programs Gary A. Bojes, Ph.D.

USDA Rural Development Rural Utilities Service

11:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Panel Advancing Communities Through the Environmental Justice Academy Sheryl Good

Ernest Mooring, Jr.

EPA, Region 4

Town of Navassa, North Carolina

William S. Robinson, MA

Siobhan Whitlock

Vice President of Institutional Advancement Allen University

EPA, Region 4

Ernest Omar Muhammad Low Country Alliance for Model Communities

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12:00 noon – 12:15 p.m. Break 12:15 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Networking Lunch Presentation of Awards Melinda Downing Environmental Justice Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy

1:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.

Break

1:30 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.

Presentation Building Capacity Within Marginalized Communities Towards Energy Sovereignty Marnese Jackson National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) Environmental and Climate Justice Program Field Organizing Team, NAACP Region I, III, IV, V, and VI

Ryan Kelley NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program Field Organizing Team, NAACP Region I, III, IV, V, and VI

Lorah Steichen NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program Field Organizing Team, NAACP Region I, III, IV, V, and VI

2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Presentations Creating a Model for Solar for Low- and Moderate-Income Communities Elizabeth Doherty

Vermont Law School, Institute for Energy and the Environment, J.D./ Master of Energy Regulation and Law Candidate 2018

Sherri White-Williamson

Vermont Law School, Institute for Energy and the Environment, J.D./ Master of Energy Regulation and Law Candidate 2018

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Presentations (continued)

2:15 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Towards a Targeted, Community-Based Approach to Energy Efficiency Project Uptake in Low-Income Communities Kely Markley Urban Energy Justice Research Assistant University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Panel

3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Expanding Solar’s Reach: Strategies for Enhancing the Direct Benefits of Solar Energy for Low- and Moderate-Income Households and Communities Derrick Jackson Journalist, Author, and Fellow Union of Concerned Scientists Maria Laverdiere Legislative Assistant, Representative Keith Ellison (MN) U.S. House of Representatives Nicole Steele Executive Director, GRID Alternatives Mid-Atlantic Karla Loeb Director of Policy and Government Affairs, PosiGen Telana Felder Resident Manager, Southern Homes and Gardens Washington, DC 4:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Presentation Connecting Communities and Discovering Hidden Gems: Maximizing Resident Engagement in the Creation of an Urban Trail System Sarah Koenig Project Manager: Land Use and Environment GTECH Strategies James Snow Project Manager GTECH Strategies

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4:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Closing Remarks Timothy Fields, Jr. Senior Vice President, MDB, Inc. Vice-Chairman, Board of Directors National Environmental Justice Conference, Inc. Melinda Downing Environmental Justice Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy

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TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE WORKSHOPS AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Washington Marriott at Metro Center 775 12th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005

DAY 1 – WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

Effects of Improper Disposal of Agricultural Waste on the Environment Nneora Ezeanya Megan Barnes Chukwuemelie Onwubuya Ja’Pa Lockhart Allen University

Oluwole Ariyo, Ph.D. Allen University

Agricultural wastes are substances that emanate from horticultural practices and are intended to be discarded. They produce harmful effects that are hazardous to human health, contaminate water bodies surrounding the area, and contaminate the atmosphere. Improper disposal of agricultural wastes can cause acute and chronic effects on the ecosystem by dispersing foreign bodies (toxins) into the water and soil. This workshop will engage and train farmers, community leaders, and agriculturists how to mitigate the effects of runoff and pesticide poisoning.

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DAY 1 – WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 2017 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

Nature Smart

GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

Urban students can make academic progress if they have access to meaningful outdoor learning experiences. This presentation explains how local school districts are using “Green Teams” to promote environmental stewardship and engage students in problem-based learning challenges, which positively impact academic achievement through genuine collaboration with others.

The Universal Language of Nature This session will explore how language diversity challenges at local urban schools are overcome with innovative use of the common language we ALL speak … nature. Local schools are creating “Green Teams” to immerse limited English proficiency (LEP) students in problem-based learning challenges that help promote faster language acquisition and a deeper understanding of curriculum that results from genuinely collaborating with others. Brian Hollingsworth

Elaine Tholen

Science Technology Engineering Arts and Math Specialist Green Team Leader Science Lead Teacher Centre Ridge Elementary School Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS)

Program Manager Environmental Stewardship Get2Green FCPS

Elaine Camarillo Chalmers EEO, Diversity and Outreach Program Manager Civil Rights, Office of Chief USDA Forest Service

Beatrix Preusse-Burr Educational Specialist World Languages Instructional Services FCPS

Kelly Baugh English to Speakers of Other Languages Teacher Centreville Elementary School FCPS

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DAY 2 – THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. LONDON ROOM I

Building Environmental Justice and Cumulative Impacts into Local Decision Making Ana Isabel Baptista, Ph.D. The New School University Milano School of International Affairs, Management and Urban Policy

Nicky Sheats, Esq. Ph.D. Thomas Edison State College/New Jersey Environmental Justice Alliance

Molly Greenberg, MSW Ironbound Community Corporation

Cynthia Mellon, MA Co-Chair, City of Newark Environmental Commission

This workshop will review how the city of Newark, New Jersey, came to consider, adopt, and implement an “Environmental Justice and Cumulative Impacts Ordinance.” The workshop will draw on participants from various sectors involved in the ordinance’s development and implementation, and will review the details of the ordinance and lessons for cities and community organizations interested in adopting similar measures in their efforts to address environmental justice in their own municipalities. 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m. LONDON ROOM I

Ensuring Equity in Planning and Capital Improvement: A Case Study from Minneapolis Parks Adam Regn Arvidson, PLA, FASLA Director of Strategic Planning, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board

Linden Weiswerda Park Management Analyst, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board

In December of 2016, the Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board (MPRB) adopted its annual budget, which for the first time utilizes an empirical equity metric to select capital improvement projects in neighborhood parks. The metric goes beyond facility condition to consider area demographics and recreation need. This session will describe in detail the planning, community engagement, and data analysis process MPRB used to develop the equity metric and also allow time for discussion and questions.

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DAY 2 – THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. LONDON ROOM I

Communities for Clean Streams: Growing a Partnership to Address Environmental Issues Monica Billger Virginia Conservation Advocate Audubon Naturalist Society

Leah Tenorio Director of Hispanic Ministry, Good Shepherd Catholic Church

Lily Whitesell Watershed Specialist, Northern Virginia Soil and Water Conservation District

Carla Claure Carmina Díaz Case studies often explore the entire process of a successful partnership. This case study presentation is unique, in that it explores the initiation and expansion of a set of community partnerships in real time, as community members seek to take on new environmental issues. Lessons learned can help attendees examine the beginning of a process seeking to engage communities disproportionately affected by negative environmental factors.

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DAY 2 – THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. LONDON ROOM II

National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and Environmental Justice (EJ): Leveraging Federal Resources to Advance Community Environmental, Economic, and Health Vitality. A Focus on Promising Practices for EJ Methodologies in NEPA Reviews.

Presenters:

Case Study Facilitators:

Denise Freeman

Juliet Bochicchio

Co-Chair, NEPA Committee of the Interagency Working Group (IWG) on EJ Environmental Protection Specialist Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy

Cynthia Huber

Co-Chair, NEPA Committee of the IWG on EJ Senior Counsel Natural Resources Section Environment and Natural Resources Division U.S. Department of Justice

Iris Maska

Economist Fish and Wildlife Service U.S. Department of the Interior

Environmental Protection Specialist Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance Office of General Counsel U.S. Department of Energy

Arthur Totten

Office of Federal Activities Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance EPA

Hilary Zarin, Ph.D.

Socioeconomics Program Decision Support, Planning and NEPA Bureau of Land Management U.S. Department of Interior

Suzi Ruhl, J.D., MPH

Past Co-Chair, NEPA Committee of the IWG on EJ Senior Attorney Advisor Office of Environmental Justice U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Antoinette Quagliata Environmental Protection Specialist Federal Transit Administration

This training/workshop is designed to share the principles and best practices of the Promising Practices for EJ Methodologies in NEPA Reviews Report, 2016 (Promising Practices Report) with a special emphasis on 1) the application of NEPA to aid in providing funds to the community, 2) distribution of beneficial impacts in addition to adverse impacts, and 3) the importance of meaningful engagement of EJ populations throughout the NEPA process. The session will be two parts: 1) presentation and interactive dialogue, and 2) case study/group exercise. Specifically, Part 1 will be in the form of a presentation/ interactive dialogue format from various sections of the Promising Practices Report. Part 2 will be a case study/group exercise that will allow participants to work through an EJ analysis utilizing the concepts from the Promising Practices Report.

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DAY 2 – THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

LONDON ROOM II

Collaborative Conservation Through Engagement of Communities and Partnerships Kasey L. Taylor State Conservationist Delaware Natural Resources U.S. Department of Agriculture/Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS)

Kellee Melton Assistant State Conservationist for Programs NRCS South Carolina

Norman and Gwen Pierce Owners, Union Ridge Farms Delaware

Jerome Brown State Resource Conservationist NRCS South Carolina

Kevin Farmer Watershed Programs Team Leader Conservation Engineering Division NRCS Washington, DC

Robert Chambers Forester NRCS South Carolina

This workshop is designed to showcase collaborative initiatives and activities through partnerships using conservation practices, which contribute to successful environmental incentives and effects for landowners and communities. Program experts and local landowners will explain, in detail, the benefits of using reliable conservation practices while expanding environmental justice goals and efforts that have transformed individuals, communities, and the environment.

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DAY 2 – THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 3:30 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. LONDON ROOM II

Justice for Children: Improving Environmental Health at School Claire L. Barnett, MBA Executive Director, Healthy Schools Network, Inc. Albany, New York

Monique Harden, Esq. Assistant Director of Law and Policy Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, Inc. New Orleans, Louisiana

This workshop will offer attendees an opportunity to learn about: the environmental conditions of schools nationwide and in key states; the characteristics of children enrolled in schools; the environmental health hazards common to PK–12 schools; and how some of the many hazards can be avoided or reduced. 10:00 p.m. – 12:00 Noon GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

Teaching the Social Determinants of Occupational Health Equity: NIEHS Educational Resources to Promote Work Environment Justice and Sustainable Jobs Mrs. Sharon D. Beard, MS NIEHS Worker Training Program

Dr. Linda Delp University of California, Los Angles, (UCLA) Dir. Labor Occupational Safety and Health Program Adjunct Assoc. Professor, Community Health Sciences

Sherry Baron, MD, MPH Queens College, Flushing, New York

Deborah Weinstock, MS National Clearinghouse for Worker Safety and Health Training

This workshop will provide an overview of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Worker Training Program (WTP) under the Environmental Career Worker Training Program (ECWTP) which addresses one of the most important and significant problems with unemploymentworkers lacking crucial technical and marketable job skills and experience on the job. It will also summarize the accomplishments and salient results from this report and share information on new Occupational Health Work Equity Curricula that has been developed to address workers issues around health disparities.

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DAY 2 – THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 2017 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

Breaking Barriers and Building Bridges: Using EJ SCREEN and C-FERST for Science Laura Stewart ORISE Research Participant, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Chelsea Berg EPA

This workshop will introduce innovative approaches for combining the capacity of EPA science tools – EJ SCREEN and the recently released Community Focused Exposure and Risk Screening Tool (C-FERST). Following a nationally applicable case study, participants will learn how these tools can be used sequentially to; (1) identify community environmental health ‘hotspots’; (2) take a closer look at local scale sources of exposure and; (3) use new features of the tool to for target potential partners and resources across the country. By exploring the power of GIS mapping and crowd source data, participants will leave with simple, user-defined approaches for using state of the science tools to advance their community and environmental health projects. 3:00 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Understanding Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

Federal Coordination and Compliance Section U.S. Department of Justice, Civil Rights Division Office of Civil Rights U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development

Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 is one of several tools used to address environmental justice issues. This two-part workshop includes an overview of Title VI followed by a panel discussion of the efforts by federal agencies to ensure compliance with the law.

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. CAPITAL HILL ROOM (3rd Floor)

Limited English Proficiency Considerations in Sustainability Planning: Implications at the Local and Federal Levels Ricardo Martinez Outreach Specialist U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service

Lemir Teron Assistant Professor Department of Environmental Studies SUNY College of Environmental Science & Forestry

With the emergence of municipal sustainability offices and departments in cities across the United States, local frameworks have been created to make urban areas more environmentally resilient. Although compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 mandates, that on the federal level, limited English proficiency (LEP) populations must be accounted for in governance, the same considerations aren’t codified on local scales across the nation. The consequence in regards to sustainability issues results in the loss of engagement with tens of millions of Americans and the disabling of residents’ capacity to fully partake in local sustainability agendas and to shape consequent policies. This workshop evaluates the considerations that LEP communities have been afforded by sustainability planners in its review of municipal sustainability documents from the nation’s most populous cities. This workshop will provide insights on the implications of LEP policy, or lack thereof, at the local level, specifically as it relates to sustainability planning in the urban and municipal level. It will then segue into what policy is already in place at the federal level, and considerations for not just compliance but success in efforts regarding environmental planning under the National Environmental Policy Act and the National Forest Management Act, among others. The intent with this workshop will be to highlight areas where the federal effort(s) around LEP are demonstrating success, areas that can be improved, and how the lack of a correspondent body of policy at the local level represents a missed opportunity for engagement with interested parties in local decision-making and undermines the underlying effort toward effective local government.

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

CAPITAL HILL ROOM (3rd Floor)

Developing a New Federal Strategy to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures Ruth Etzel Director, Office of Children’s Health Protection U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Sandra Howard Senior Environmental Health Advisor Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS)

Shannon Steinbauer Director, Lead and Healthy Homes Programs Division Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development

Carol Kemker Deputy Division Director Air, Pesticides and Toxics Management Division EPA, Region 4

Alan Shannon Director, Public Affairs Food and Nutrition Service, Midwest Region U.S. Department of Agriculture

The President’s Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children (Task Force) is developing a new federal strategy to reduce childhood lead exposures and associated health effects. The Task Force is seeking input from stakeholders, including the environmental justice community, to inform the development of the strategy. The Task Force includes 17 member agencies and is co-chaired by the EPA and HSS. The Senior Staff Steering Committee—the action arm of the Task Force—recently identified lead as a re-emerging priority. In November 2016, the Task Force published “Key Federal Programs to Reduce Childhood Lead Exposures and Eliminate Associated Health Impacts.” The document highlights current and planned federal efforts to understand, prevent, and reduce sources of lead exposure among children. As a next step, a new federal strategy is being developed. This session is an opportunity for members of the Senior Staff Steering Committee to 1) highlight a number of existing capacity building and technical assistance resources that are available to communities to address childhood lead exposures, and 2) engage with stakeholders to inform the development of the new federal strategy.

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. CAPITAL HILL ROOM (3rd Floor)

National Library of Medicine Resources: Case Studies in Environmental Health Shannon M. Jordan, MPH

Chemist National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine (NLM)

Recent public health incidents and emerging issues provide an informative cadre of case studies on how NLM resources have been and may be utilized to support the work of professionals and the general public working on environmental justice issues. Recent case studies include: the Dakota Access Pipeline crude oil; public drinking water contamination in Charleston, West Virginia and Flint, Michigan; soil contamination in Indiana and Michigan; smoking in public housing in Pennsylvania; and Zika virus mosquito control in the United States. Knowledge of NLM online resources provides quick, free access to authoritative information and tools that professionals and the general public may use. An examination of recent environmental case studies will demonstrate the usefulness of the NLM resources in helping to achieve environmental justice and build capacity within communities.

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 9:30 a.m. – 12:00 Noon LONDON ROOMS I and II

Educate, Motivate, Innovate Workshop: Building the Next Generation of Climate Justice Leaders Photovoice Project: Climate Change Effects on Future Water Supply and Colonias Without Water Rebeka Isaac University of Texas at El Paso

Community Food Security in Underserved Spaces in Urban Public Housing in Puerto Rico Carol E. Ramos Gerena University of Puerto Rico

Climate Change: An Effect on the Location of Food Markets and Community Gardens and how it Relates to the Food Deserts in Virginia Latia Jackson Virginia State University

The Federal Interagency Working Group on Environmental Justice’s “Educate, Motivate, and Innovate Climate Justice Initiative” is proud to present “Educate, Motivate, Innovate: Building the Next Generation of Climate Justice Leaders.” This two-part workshop features presentations of climate justice projects from students attending Minority Serving Institutions, including: Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander Serving Institutions. The workshop will focus on the impacts of climate change on underserved, minority, low-income, American Indian, and Alaska Natives who are faced with environmental justice concerns. Also featured is training on EJSCREEN, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EJ screening tool to help identify and better understand potential community vulnerabilities.

EJSCREEN Training: EJSCREEN for Climate Justice Application Kevin Olp Director of Communications, Office of Environmental Justice EPA

Learn how to navigate EPA’s EJSCREEN. This screening information may be of interest to community residents or other stakeholders as they search for environmental or demographic information that can support a wide range of research and policy goals related to environmental justice.

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 1:30 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.

LONDON ROOMS I and II

Grant Writing and Technical Assistance Part 1. Ready, Set: Give Me Your Money, What’s In A Name? and Do We Really Want To Do This? Terms and Techniques of Grant Writing Part 2. Go: How Do We Do It? and How Much Do We Need? Developing a Proposal and Budget Part 3. Where Is The Money? Finding Available Grant Funding Agencies Ms. Deborah N. Blacknall Grants Administrator and Assistant Officer Office of Sponsored Programs, South Carolina State University Orangeburg, South Carolina

Ms. Gwendolyn F. Mitchell Ulmer

Grants Administrator and Assistant Officer Office of Sponsored Programs, South Carolina State University Orangeburg, South Carolina

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 Noon

GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

Toxic Trespass Training Program: Addressing Health Concerns from Oil-Chemical Exposures Emily L. Harris, MPH

Toxic Training Program Co-Director University of Central Arkansas, Interdisciplinary Leadership Studies Ph.D. Student and Graduate Assistant Field Researcher

Martial Broussard, Captain USAF, Ret. (2006) Louisiana Toxic Trespass Team Trainer

Glynn Barber

Inventor, Environmental Controlled Sustainable Integrated Agricultural (ECSIA®)

Dr. Dameon V. Alexander

Director of Strategic Initiatives, Department of Academic Technology Professorial Lecturer, Department of Sociology The George Washington University

The Toxic Trespass Training program takes science to where people need it the most—into at-risk communities. By creating a science-based program that is accessible to the people most at risk, we are developing tools that everyone will be able to use to identify, document and reduce toxic oil-chemical exposures in their own communities while working together for a better future. The Toxic Trespass Team is made up of a diverse group of partners. All members have direct experience on the impacts of living in heavily polluted areas. Our interactive trainings include identifying types of environmental health hazards, where oil-chemical pollutants might be in our environment, how these pollutants enter and exit our bodies, how to explain symptoms of oil-chemical exposures and health effects, why being exposed to oil-chemical pollutants is dangerous, and why it is important to choose a health care provider familiar with environmental medicine. This program creates trainings for and with at-risk populations, ensuring scientific and medical information is accessible. Collaboration builds on local first-hand knowledge and peer learning, providing a sustainable foundation for regional activities and cross-boundary solutions. This session will provide a discussion concerning citizen science training in community assessment and improvement planning with an introduction to freely accessible tools and resources.

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DAY 3 – FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 2017 1:30 p.m. – 2:30 p.m.

GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

Web-Based Instructional System for Environmental Review (WISER) James Potter, AICP, PP

U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

Everything that the HUD does involves environmental justice (EJ). HUD’s affordable housing mission touches low-income residents in every city in the country. Therefore, what we do and how we do it matters. This workshop will unveil the updated HUD EJ Strategy for 2016–2020. This document will be the basis for a discussion of the department’s intent, programs, and priorities with regard to EJ. Secondly, HUD’s new training tool, the Web-based Instructional System for Environmental Review (WISER), will be introduced using its EJ module. Participants will see first-hand how HUD grantees and staff are trained to understand and address EJ concerns. 3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

GRAND BALLROOM SALON E

“Climate Justice/Environmental Justice at the Intersection of STEM: Constructing Career Pathways from Secondary to Higher Education” Dr. Cliff Cockerham

Marnese Jackson

National Campaign Director Climate Emergency Coalition Adjunct Science Faculty Merritt College

Fellow, NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program

Dr. Jim Newell Climate Emergency Coalition

Dr. Robbie Kunkel Dean of Academic Pathways and Student Success Merritt College

Ryan Kelley Fellow, NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program

Sudheer Shukla Adjunct Faculty Northern Virginia Community College Outreach Specialist Biodiversity for a Livable Climate

Marcus Franklin Program Specialist NAACP Environmental and Climate Justice Program

In part I of this workshop, authors will present on two topics: “Toxicity Close to Home Can Blaze a Trail to Climate Justice Careers: Inner-city Youth in the EJ Education Pipeline to Merritt College” and “Student Driven EJ Field Studies Tap Intrinsic Motivation for STEM Exploration: Technical Assistance from U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s My Environment Delivers a Quantum Leap.” In part II of the workshop, authors will be joined by discussants who will set up an interactive fishbowl discussion for participants wishing to explore and problem-solve in applying the same techniques and tapping similar STEM funding streams in other secondary and community college systems of other states.

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Enhancing Communities Through Capacity Building and Technical Assistance

CONFERENCE DATES APRIL 25 THROUGH 27, 2018 2018 CONFERENCE REGISTRATION FEES: (only 300 spaces available)

Students, Faculty, Community Members, and Organizations, Government Employees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FREE Corporate and General Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $300.00

TO REGISTER FOR CONFERENCE AND HOTEL: www.thenejc.org

Location: Washington Marriott at Metro Center 775 12th Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005

Room Rates: (a limited number of rooms are available)

$295.00* Single/Double *If reserved before April 2, 2018

For More Information Contact: Lloyd Moore Conference Coordinator email@thenejc.org (202) 827-2224

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National Environmental Justice Conference & Training Program Sponsors

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF

ENERGY

NAVARRO

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Building Successful Community/ Government/Business Collaborations

Enhancing Communities Through Capacity Building and Technical Assistance

thenejc.org

2017 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program Summary Report  

2017 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program Summary Report  

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