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Issue 17

APRIL - MAY

2011

Connecting CD10 Communities Since 2008


Publisher/Executive Editor/Reporter Dianne V. Lawrence Associate Editor/Reporter Renee Montgomery Staff Reporter Carla Pineda Contributing Writers John Arnold Cindy Olnick Laura Meyers, Gavin Glynn Layout & Design/Executive Ad Sales Dianne V. Lawrence TO ADVERTISE OR SUBMIT IDEAS Contact us at: 323.871.8580 theneighborhoodnews@yahoo.com

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t’s been an exciting few months! Out with the new (our competition, Mid City Press closed their doors) and in with the old (Councilman Herb J. Wesson is handily re-elected). In Mid-City publisher Allison Cohen’s farewell editorial, she cited an inability to “generate the advertising revenue to support a community newspaper”. Because of the healthy competition Mid-City Press provided, TNN became ever more focused and committed to our vision of celebrating and connecting our community and more determined to make it work. For this we are grateful and wish Ms. Cohen the best of luck in her future endeavors. On page 5 you will find a report on Councilman Wesson’s return to the 10th District after easily outdistancing the competitors. In a discussion with some local residents, we saw a great opportunity for TNN to become a resource of accountability and information exchange between the Council Office and the community over the next four years, with the community directing the nature of the exchanges. We have come up with several ways to make this happen. Per local activist Gavin Glynn’s suggestion, we invited the Councilman to provide a State of the District address for the June issue. TNN invited the Councilman to share his perception of the issues in the 10th District, address some community concerns that TNN will submit to him and provide his solutions and action plan for the next four years. Councilman Wesson was enthusiastic about the opportunity and invited TNN for a sit down where we discussed other ideas we had for facilitating this exchange of information. I emphasized that residents would be directing the nature of those exchanges not the Council Office and we would also continue to keep an Eye on Wesson. He didn’t shy away from the opportunity. We look forward to keeping our readers up to speed on what our Council Office is doing (or not doing) to make our community better. In our last issue we reported on the Council Office’s inability to resolve a community dispute between the effort by McCarty Church to create a Charter School and community concerns with codes not met. We mentioned possible interference by the Council Office. It generated a lively back and forth on our website and created a re-activation of the issue with city agencies. As of press time we are waiting for a resolution of the issues discussed and should be able to provide a report in the June issue. Code enforcement does seem to be haphazard and arbitrary. We have a great article from UNNC’s Land Use expert Laura Meyers about an effort by the City Attorney to create a smoother system for enforcement and where that effort stands today. We are introducing a new feature..Crime reports. Each district has it’s Most Wanted and we thought we would help our local law enforcement by spreading the word. All this and much more so sit back, take the phone off the hook, get a cuppa joe (we suggest at the new Jacks N Joes) and enjoy this walk around your neighborhood.

Carla Pineda

Renee Montgomery

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COUNCILMAN HERB J. WESSON RE-ELECTED.

- D.V. Lawrence

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GRANDMASTER GOODE; TEACHING KIDS HOW TO MASTER THEMSELVES - Renee Montgomery

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EUREKA CAFE GETS INTO THE SPIRITS.

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- D.V. Lawrence

BUKOWSKI’S ROOTS IN MID-CITY.

- Renee Montgomery

10 ANIMAL RESCUE CENTER RESCUES RESCUERS - D.V. Lawrence

11 PICO BUSINESSES BEGIN TO UNITE. - D.V. Lawrence

12 IN MEMORY OF: ROBERT LEARY. - Cindy Olnick

13 JEFFERSON PARK HPOZ UPDATE - John Arnold BRIAN IDE ReDISTRIBUTES PROFITS - D. V. L. 14 CRIME WATCH; CD10’S MOST WANTED. FREE TUITION TO HARVARD. 15 ST. ELMOS & UofC - GROW YOUR OWN GARDEN - D.V. Lawrence

16 WAHA 2nd ANNUAL ART TOUR - D.V. Lawrence 17 CODE ENFORCEMENT REFORM - Laura Meyers 18 COMMUNITY REPORTS; UNNC, OPNC, MINC - Carla Pineda 19 SCHOOL REPORTS & MID TOWN PLAZA UPDATE - Gavin Glynn

COVER PHOTO D.V.Lawrence


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Councilman Herb J. Wesson Re-elected! Dianne V. Lawrence

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n 2007 Herb J. Wesson ran unopposed in CD10. In 2011 six candidates, unhappy with what they were seeing or not seeing in District 10, came forward to challenge the incumbent. Yet try as they might, they were unable to combine their votes to force Councilman Wesson into a run off. Their criticisms of what they perceived were Wesson’s shortcomings; an inability to articulate a vision for CD10, unresponsivenss and inability to make a substantive connection with the whole of his district, did not seem to outweigh a Councilman who has not made any glaring public missteps and enjoys the goodwill of many. So without making any campaign promises, Councilman Wesson was voted back in with the highest percentage of the returning City Hall incumbents, nearly 74%. The lack of experience, an inability to come close to Wesson’s financing, an inability to develop any of the endorsements needed to pose a serious challenge, weak campaign agenda’s, hamstrung the passionate and serious efforts of the opponents. Councilman Wesson had a total of $236,367 in campaign contributions making the amounts raised by the challengers look like small change at best. Chris Brown had an impressive $20,000, Andrew Kim came in third with $17,085, Austin Dragon, $7,769, Althea Rae Shaw, $7,185, Luis Montoya, $1,796 and write in candidate Gavin Glynn had heart but no cash. Wesson also garnered endorsements from LA Weekly and the LA Times who pointed to his popularity at City Hall, ability to run effective committee meetings and the unchallenging opponents, as the reason to re-elect. Interestingly, nothing was said about his work representing CD10. As we previously reported, it is very difficult to unseat an incumbent and true to form nobody at City Hall was replaced this election cycle although Bernard Parks in neighboring Council District 8 had to sweat it out as the vote counting went into overtime. He had a close call and a tough challenge by Forescee Hogan-Rowles but ultimately prevailed with just 51.21% of the vote. Because of local forums and local media attention it was possibly the most watched election our community has experienced since Councilman Wesson came to the district and he was feeling the pressure as his campaign tactics took an aggressive turn. The Neighborhood News received let-

ters and phone calls from residents complaining about the frantic and repetitive campaign phone calls. Vicki Jackson from Harvard Heights wrote “I called his actual office and told them to stop the harassing phone calls- as many as 4-5 per day-every day! I continued to receive them until I called a second time and told them to stop or I was filing a harassment charge with the police dept.”. We also received a report of Wesson’s crew stapling posters over other candidates posters. Here is a photo of a Wesson poster stapled over Candidate Chris Brown’s poster. But in the end, he had little to worry about as he slid into an easy victory. CD10 has 98,000 registered voters. 11,122 of them showed up to vote. Thanks to the challengers, it was a 25% jump up from the last election. Herb J. Wesson Jr. 8,212 votes (about as many as he received in the last election) counting for 73.84% of the votes taken. Andrew Kim came in second with 1,190 votes indicating that all may not be so rosy for Wesson in Koreatown. Althea Rae Shaw, despite name recognition and a passionate albeit one-focused cause, racked up only 574 votes. Luis Montoya promised to address the ballooning budget and make the city’s business policy more friendly but his youth and lack of experience worked against him and he gained only 449 votes Chris Brown’s promises to cut his salary in half, raise funds for schools through an innovative e-waste program, strong media push and promise to make CD10 more accessible weren’t enough to convince voters to put their mark next to his name. 417 votes. Austin Dragon’s numbers were surprising. He received some support in the media but ran a lackluster campaign garnering him only 280 votes.

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Grandmaster Walter Goode Teaching Kids How To Master Themselves

Renee Montgomery

Renee Montgomery

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ehind the humble façade on Jefferson Blvd. you will find a humble man with a big name, Grandmaster Goode, founder and owner of World Championship Karate Sports Academy. But the self-effacing Walter Goode has every reason to crow. He holds black belts in four karate techniques, is an inductee of the National Black Belt League Hall of Fame and elite Ninja Ryu Club, and 2007 Grandmaster of the Year, among other distinctions. Considered one of the #1 karate schools nationally, the walls of Goode’s studio are lined with his and his students’ numerous trophies from hundreds of tournaments. Grandmaster Goode could have set up shop anywhere in Los Angeles and command large fees but he was on a spiritual mission. He wanted to give kids in underserved communities an alternative to gangs and wrong choices. It is his Continued on Pg. 20

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Eureka Cafe Gets Into the Spirits D. V. Lawrence

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fter a long arduous process, Johnnie and Theresa Green have finally been able to secure a full bar liquor license and necessary permits for their Eureka Cafe. Eureka has become a popular weekend spot for locals who want to socialize

while eating their omelets, along with outsiders, who come for the famous pancakes and stay for the community atmosphere. Yet in order to turn the profit needed to keep them going they had to be able to open in the evenings. The license will support that effort.They’ll shortly be opening two or three evenings a week with Champaign Sunday brunches just around the corner! If the quality of their day menu is any indication, the neighborhood eagerly awaits another quality dinner option on the community menu.

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Charles Bukowski Legendary L.A. Writer With Roots in Mid-City D.V. Lawrence

Renee Montgomery

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efore embarking on thousands of poems and stories chronicling the lives of L.A.’s prostitutes, lonely and destitute, the famous writer Charles Bukowski (known as the Poet Laureate of Skid Row) grew up in the Mid-City area.

Bukowski’s family moved to L.A. from Germany in 1923. In 1926 they lived at 4511 W. 28th St. , and Charles attended Virginia Road elementary school located below Adams Blvd. near Crenshaw. A couple of years later the family moved to 2122 Longwood Ave., just south of Washington Blvd., near La Brea Ave. The teenage Bukowski attended Mt. Vernon Jr. High (now renamed Johnnie Cochran Middle School), then Dorsey High followed by Los Angeles High . In his 1982 autobiographical novel “Ham and Rye” Bukowski mentions these and several other sites in our neighborhood, for instance, this scene after his stern father kept his job loss a secret from this family: “Each Saturday when my parents went for their free food they didn’t go to the nearest market because they were afraid some of the neighbors might see them and then know that they were on the dole. So they walked two miles down Washington Boulevard to a store a couple of blocks past Crenshaw…They walked the two miles back, sweating, carrying their shopping bags full of canned hash and potatoes and bologna and carrots. My father didn’t drive because he wanted to save gas. He needed the gas to drive to and from his invisible job.”

4511 W. 28th St.

us may recall the old Sears building that later became a discount hardware store before being cleared for the new Loew’s at MidTown Crossing. “ My first delivery was to lingerie. I located the items, placed them in my little green cart … and pushed it toward the elevator. … It was very slow . . . the doors opened and an albino with one eye stood at the controls.” Shortly thereafter Charles left home to attend LACC, moved to different boarding houses downtown and then finally to Hollywood. He passed away from cancer in 1994 in San Pedro after re-marrying. It should be noted in the war on library cutbacks, that Bukowski credits his interest in writing from the many times he walked from his Longwood home to the local branch library where he discovered the literary greats. Lawrence, Huxley, Lewis, Anderson, etc: “Each day I walked down to the library at Adams and Continued on Pg. 20

If he hadn’t already developed his edge by being beaten as a child, Bukowski’s dark attitude was probably forged as one of the poor kids attending the otherwise-affluent L.A. High. He writes of graduation day in 1939. “I walked up to and across the stage, took the diploma, shook the principal’s hand. It felt slimy like the inside of a dirty fish bowl.” (Two years later he would be exposed as an embezzler of school funds). After high school Bukowski secured a job at the Sears-Roebuck store on Pico Blvd. where he was a stock boy. Some of

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Local Animal Rescuer’s Find Affordable Help At The Animal Rescue Center D.V. Lawrence

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Photo by D.V. Lawrence

hen retired veterinarian Salam Saleh asked dedicated animal rescuer Alex Tiraki, what dream project she envisioned in her ongoing efforts to help animals, she didn’t hesitate. An animal hospital that catered to the rescue community. She understood the kind of

Salam Saleh and Alex Tiraki

unsung sacrifices animal rescuers made, not only in time and effort but financial as well. Paying to spay and neuter, cure a parvo puppy, fix a broken leg, address the skin conditions of malnourished dogs. The list was endless.

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Veterinary services are costly, so the difficult-to-care for animals are left behind or rescuers put off taking care of their own bills in order to pay vet costs. When Salam heard Alex’s dream, he also didn’t hesitate. “Let’s do it!” and The Animal Rescue Center was born, offering low cost full vet services for the rescue community. They found the perfect location on Exposition just down the street from the South LA Animal Shelter, in a building already zoned for animal activity. Although the Grand Opening is set for April and they are still busy building the new additions, they have already opened their doors with people coming and going as we interviewed. Behind the counter were four or five small dogs recently rescued from a hoarder, (people who rescue too many animals and are unable to properly care for them all). They were cuddled up in blankets looking warily at strangers as they slowly got used to receiving love, attention and real care. Although Animal Rescue Services caters primarily to the rescue community, (individual rescuers as well as organizations) they will also help low income families in emergency situations. Alex does not want to see a family forced to give up a beloved pet because the vet bill was too high. Rescue Spay and Neuter Prices $25 or $35 for cats $40 or $45 small dogs under 25 lbs. $55 dogs 20 - 75 lbs Over 75 lbs $1 per pound To the public it’s $10 more each price. Vaccines $5 Rabies and $8 other vaccines. To the public $8 rabies and $10 other vaccines No office visit charge for Rescuers unless it’s just for an exam then it’s $10. $25 office visit to the public unless just for vaccines. 2901 Exposition Blvd. 90018 323.402.0039 The Neighborhood News welcomes this incredible service to our community!

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Pico Businesses Attempt to Unite D. V. Lawrence

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mall boutiques, restaurants, hair salons, barbershops, coffee houses and more, are popping up like mushrooms in pockets along Pico, from La Brea to Fairfax, making it the best kept secret shopping destination in Los Angeles.

P.I.C.O. Neighborhood Council business representative and owner of Maison de Pain, a local favorite bakery, Carmen Salindog and business rep and outreach chair Nikki Largesse and head of the Ethiopian Cultural Center on Fairfax are hoping to change that. They are currently attempting to create a Pico Business Association in the hopes that a coalition of businesses working together will find ways to get the secret out and raise community awareness about the variety and value of the services available along the Boulevard. Nikki looks forward to business mixers, joint promotions and bringing businesses together to discuss their concerns which would allow P.I.C.O. NC to represent those concerns to the CD10 Council office.

quality can be found on Pico for a lot less? Need to catch some quality take out or sit down to a fine dinner? Pico offers many food choices from soul to Jamaican to delicious Mexican to California cuisine and some of the best chicken in town. There is a place to rent quiet space if you are a writer, an exercise spot for the kids, a place for low cost therapy. Creating a directory, holding a street fair, sponsoring a Discover Pico Raffle Weekend are some of the ideas that had been floated at a recent meeting where seven business owners gathered to discuss how to begin to pull the businesses in and generate interest. To find out more or how to participate, call or email; Nikki - nlegesse@yahoo.com, 310-633-4830; or Carmen - 323- 934-5858 To see for yourself what the area has to offer Google - Pico/Fairfax/yelp

Shopping for fashionable clothes, shoes and accessories? Why pay Larchmont or Culver City prices when the same

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Robert Leary (1959 - 2011) Passionate Preservationist, Beloved Community Member Cindy Olnick

A native of New Jersey, Leary received a bachelor’s degree from Niagara University in New York. He worked as an actor on the East Coast before moving to Los Angeles in 1991. Leary joined the Conservancy in 1992, was active in the leadership of the Friends of Hollyhock House, and was active in West Adams preservation advocacy. Leary’s experience as an actor contributed to the great tours he gave of his West Adams home, as well as architect Frank Lloyd Wright’s Hollyhock House and Ennis House.

Teddi Shattuck of Hollyhock House remembers, “I can’t forget all that Robert did for Hollyhock House, but above all, I remember his energy and enthusiasm for all projects, from gardening to cleaning to meeting and proobert Leary, a passionate preservationist and Los Angeles moting the house and his particular Conservancy member, passed away delight in giving a private tour to Brad Pitt. Robert inspired many people to on January 23 after a long illness. take on the challenge of revitalizing

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Jefferson Park Historic Preservation Overlay Zone (HPOZ) Update

Gramercy Park Resident Brian Ide ReDistributes Film Profits to Education

John Arnold

D. V. Lawrence

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fter a busy fall wrapping up the historic resources survey of the neighborhood and having a hugely successful public workshop in December, another major milestone was reached on March 8th when the Planning Department held a public hearing solely to hear testimony from Jefferson Park residents and their opinions about the HPOZ. Approximately 70 people attended the meeting, and about 25 people spoke about their experiences living in Jefferson Park and whether or not they supported the HPOZ. Of the 25 or so speakers, only one person spoke out against the HPOZ, showing the City that the neighborhood overwhelmingly supports an HPOZ in the district. The next step is a final public hearing by the City’s Cultural Heritage Commission as soon as April, date to be determined, and then on to the City Council for a vote sometime in the late spring.

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ramercy Park resident Brian Ide is the founder of ReDistribute, an innovative philanthropic model that connects the profits of film to the needs of a wide variety of charities focused on social issues. ReDistribute is guided by a governing principle: After costs and salaries are paid, every penny of their profit goes to charity.

Each film under the ReDistribute umbrella partners with a different social issue and their first focus is Education. “We believe, that if we as a society want to fully address major social issues like homelessness, hunger, substance abuse, sustainability and inadequate medical care, we must first address Education”. They partner with 60-70 education-focused Charities throughout the US who are doing exciting and innovative work. Besides sharing the film’s profits with each of them, ReDistribute is also able to generate significant awareness to the work of these creative programs. The charities, in turn, support ReDistribute films by bringing them an audience.

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MOST WANTED Fatal Hit & Run in Koreatown Leaves One Dead & Four Injured

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Oscar Bolanos alias Oscar Lopez

Mario H. Contreras alias Miguel Ruiz

FOR MURDER

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n April 20, 1993 at approximately 10:10 p.m., Suspect Oscar Bolanos and Suspect Mario Contreras along with a third unknown male Hispanic arrived at the Victim’s residence in a vehicle driven by Suspect Contreras. Suspects Bolanos and Contreras argued with the Victim regarding Contreras’s sister (Estela). Suspect Bolanos pointed a blue-steel revolver at the Victim’s chest and fired one round, striking the Victim in the chest area. Suspect Contreras then grabbed his sister by the arm and pushed her out of the residence and forced her into the vehicle. The Suspects then fled the location. If you have any information about these people contact Wilshire Homicide Detective Fajardo at 213-473-0444.

Wellington Square Farmers Market ist Year Anniversary

D.V. Lawrence

n Saturday, March 26, 2011, at around 2:28 a.m., a fatal traffic collision occurred on James M.Wood Boulevard and Ardmore Avenue in LAPD’s Olympic Area. Ricardo Leos, a 19-yearold resident of Los Angeles, was driving a 1998 Mitsubishi Eclipse eastbound on James M. Boulevard. As Leos approached Ardmore Avenue, he was directly behind a 2004 Toyota Camry, also eastbound on James M. Wood. At the intersection, The Camry was turning left onto Ardmore Avenue. Leos drove the Eclipse into the oncoming lane and tried to pass the Camry’s left side, causing both cars to collide. After the collision, the Camry continued southbound and came to a stop at the northeast corner. The Eclipse rolled upside down and slid into a power pole, then collided with a parked car. The Eclipse finally came to rest in the westbound lane of Ardmore Avenue. After the collision, Leos left the scene without rendering aid or identifying himself as required by law. Los Angeles Fire Department Paramedics responded and pulled out Jacento Ojeda, a 41-year-old Los Angeles resident from the front passenger seat of the Eclipse. Ojeda was pronounced dead at the scene. Another passenger was also pulled out from the rear passenger seat of the Eclipse and rushed to a local hospital where he was treated for injuries. The driver of the Camry and two other passengers were transported to a local hospital and treated for minor injuries. Leos was later arrested at his residence and he was booked on suspicion of Gross Vehicular Manslaughter. He is being held at Men’s Central Jail in lieu of $100,000.00 bail. The initial investigation conducted at scene indicates that alcohol was a factor in this traffic collision. Anyone with information about this incident, please contact LAPD, West Traffic Detective Section at 213-473-0222. During non-business hours or on weekends, calls should be directed to 1-877LAPD-24-7. Anyone wishing to remain anonymous should call Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (800-222-8477)

The winners of the raffle took home huge baskets of produce donated by the vendors as well as a bicycle from Rolling Cowboys, donated by Mid City Neighborhood Council

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St. Elmo’s Village Partners with U of C’s Cooperative Extension to show you how to

Grow Your Own Vegetable Garden! D. V. Lawrence

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ave you been dreaming about growing your own vegetables but just didn’t know how to get started? Many of us hesitate because we think of the backbreaking work involved or feel we need a large area to get started. In fact you can start a garden easily in a container or a section of your own backyard. For those of us who want to lower our grocery bills and create our own fresh vegetable garden, the University of California Cooperative Extension is launching a “Grow LA Victory Garden Initiative” in different locations all over the city. During the month of April, St. Elmos Village will be hosting a unique opportunity for novice garden growers in our community. There is nothing quite like going into the garden first thing in the morning to see how your garden grows or picking fresh herbs or vegetables for dinner. The St Elmo Village course will cost $7 per workshop, or $20 for the four-class series. It will be held from 1 – 4 pm on Saturdays, April 9, 16, 23, and 30th at 4830 St. Elmo Dr. LA 90019. Between Washington and Venice, east of La Brea. Space is limited and advanced registration is requested. Spanish translation will be provided. For more info contact Daniela Yanez at 323.549.9640.

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West Adams Heritage Association Second Annual Art in Historic Places Tour D. V. Lawrence

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n March 26, the West Adams Heritage Association (WAHA) hosted its Second Annual Art in Historic Places tour, providing an opportunity for visitors to immerse themselves in the art and historic architecture of our community. As one traveled from one architectural delight to another, greeting friends and neighbors, talking to the artists, viewing the variety of artistic styles, one could easily see why our community is fast becoming the destination of choice for Los Angeles artists.

www.lindafrost.com Donald Ferguson can be found on Facebook

www.paulpapanek.com

www.joantucker.com

Georgia Toliver Photo’s D.V. Lawrence except for Paul’s

www.sueannart.com

EXPO LINE TRAIN TESTING TO BEGIN www.jennyhager.com

www.tadbeck.com

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rain testing activities on the Expo Line are scheduled to start the week of April 4, 2011 and continue for several months. PLEASE REMEMBER: Obey all warning signs and traffic signals when crossing the tracks. Always look both ways before crossing any street. Never walk on railroad tracks. Watch for trains from both directions. Use the crosswalks-Do not jaywalk across the tracks. For more information visit http://www.BuildExpo.org.

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Code Enforcement: Does the City Attorney Have an ACE Up His Sleeve? Laura Meyers

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ne of the biggest issues in West Adams and throughout the city is code enforcement. Or, better said, NON-code enforcement. HPOZ board members everywhere complain that neither Building & Safety nor the Housing Department takes seriously the responsibility of enforcing historic preservation requirements. New developments are approved with no oversight or enforcement of conditions that were imposed. Worse, in any neighborhood, try getting enforcement on unpermitted construction, paving over and parking in front yards, unpermitted window change-outs in historic districts, , noise violations and “party houses,” drinking in public, destruction of mature trees without license, and for that matter, unlicensed, barking and reproducing dogs. There are too many violators all over town for city officials to keep up with their prosecutions. In 2009, according to Jane Usher, deputy City Attorney, some 17,000 unresolved Los Angeles Municipal Code (LAMC) violations were referred by various city departments to the City Attorney for misdemeanor criminal filings. Half of those were indeed filed in court. But, says Usher, “The Criminal Courts abhor prosecutions for code violations. Their patience and tolerance for code violations is low.” That’s why many neighborhood activists were happy to hear, early last year, that code enforcement reform was in the offing. In January 2010, CD5 Councilman Paul Koretz, working with City Attorney Carmen Trutanich, initiated an ordinance to create a new, administrative rather than criminal, procedure to avoid the courthouse and yet still go after violators and their violations. “ACE” (Administrative Code Enforcement) if enacted by the City Council, would be used for LAMC code violations and to enforce orders issued by Boards and Commissions. “We can also use ACE to enforce the conditions of a project,” Usher noted. As the City Attorney’s report to Council puts it, “The existing code enforcement system in the City of Los Angeles involves a complex and extended multi-step process that can drag out for weeks or months, with little hope for a prompt resolution of the underlying violation or abatement of the potentially harmful conditions. City enforcement officers struggle to keep up with the backlog of cases. Moreover, the few cases that warrant criminal prosecution by this Office are often times criticized by the courts as mere nuisances that unnecessarily clog the dockets”. Under ACE, any department that deals with LAMC violations (from Animal Services to Planning, Housing, Building & Safety, the Fire Department, LAPD, and Transportation) will be able to issue a ticket, sending the violator into an administrative hearing process. The City Attorney staff would evaluate each situation to determine if the ticket is valid, or not. For those that are, the accused would be offered two choices: pay the fine and comply (and it’s then over). Or, appeal the ticket, pay the fine amount as bail into a trust fund, and ask for an administrative hearing.

The City Attorney is urging City Council to adopt the ACE proposal. In a statement, Carmen Trutanich said, “The proposed ACE program is a comprehensive and self-funding administrative citation, hearing and enforcement program that will capture a wide range of low-grade municipal code violations and free up scarce courtrooms and law enforcement officers for more serious crimes and civil actions. Many municipalities, including San Diego and Santa Ana (and more recently, Santa Monica), maintain and operate such citation enforcement programs.” Unfortunately, in a report issued on March 7, City Administrative Officer Miguel A. Santana (who is charged with overseeing the City’s budget) wrote, “Although this Office recognizes the potential of this new program, it is not possible to determine at this time if this program will achieve full cost recovery given that additional unidentified costs have yet to be identified.” “We recommend that a six month pilot program be implemented

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United Neighbors Neighborhood Council UNNC Olympic Park Neighborhood Council OPNC Carla Pineda

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he leadership of the Olympic Park Neighborhood Council is operating under the urgency of a vanishing budget. Much of the council’s March 7 meeting was centered on the possibility that the city could cut neighborhood council funding significantly in the coming fiscal year. “We may not have rollover funds,” said Peter Schulberg, OPNC president. In addition, the annual funding allocation to each neighborhood council could shrink from $40,000 down to $22,000, according to Schulberg’s discussions with city leaders. At the beginning of the meeting, the council had $38,000 in its account. Most items on the agenda were proposals for expenditures to commit as much of the $38,000 to community projects before OPNC loses the right to sign checks in April. The uncertainty bothered some board members who requested time to propose worthwhile projects and vote at the next board of directors meeting. This desire to diversify the receivers of OPNC funds drove some board members to vote down some of the large allocation proposals. “If we end up getting rollover funds, we’ll feel like idiots for trying to spend it all,” Schulberg said. Some of the expenditure proposals included: - The board discussed the February approval of $30,000 as a Neighborhood Purposes Grant to the Los Angeles Neighborhood Initiative for the San Vicente Median project. This project is receiving $150,000 from the Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles. - The Wilshire division of Los Angeles Police Department asked for $2,000 for a youth sports program and furniture for the room where OPNC meetings are held. The proposal was approved except for a projector purchase. Additional quotes were requested for the items to be purchased. - Koreatown Youth and Community Center applied for a $15,000 grant for tree planting and maintenance. Despite heavy support from Schulberg, nine of 11 board members at the meeting voted the proposal down but asked KYCC to re-introduce the proposal at the next meeting with visual aids, location maps and a breakdown of the wages and expenditures where the funds would go. Ralph Johnson’s biggest concern was that if it was approved, a total of $45,000 would be spent on trees rather than children and the elderly. - A total of $7,100 was authorized for a wide variety of promotional items that Johnson referred to as tchotchke. This amount could fund OPNC outreach purchases for the next year or two, some argued. - Also in the outreach budget was a $2,100 allocation to advertising in The Neighborhood News. In addition, Chris O’Malley was appointed to fill the vacant west area seat, Amado Peraza resigned from the board and Helene Maidan resigned as secretary of the board.

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Carla Pineda

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ycling in United Neighborhoods Neighborhood Council territory will be easier in coming years. Jeff Jacobberger of the Los Angeles Bicycle Advisory Committee gave a presentation at the March 3 meeting of UNNC’s governing board. He was there to start a dialogue between the city and the community about the 2010 Los Angeles City Bicycle Plan. The plan establishes goals, objectives, policies and programs to make the city more bicycle-friendly. Jacobberger said some of the proposed bike lanes and routes are on Adams, Exposition, Venice, Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and Vermont. More about the bicycle plan can be found at: http:// media.scpr.org/documents/2011/03/01/BICYCLE_PLAN_ FINAL_01.11_1.pdf Another bicycle item on the agenda was a proposed city ordinance that would require bike parking be provided at any new development, major remodel or at a property where the use is changed. The proposed measure includes rules on signage, lighting, location and size requirements for bike parking. Action on the matter was tabled until the ordinance advances to a secondary draft phase. The board voted in favor of recommendations made by the Historic Preservation Committee for the Planning Department’s draft preservation plan for the proposed Jefferson Park Historic Preservation Zone. Some expenditures approved at the prior month’s meeting included: - A $1,000 allocation to the Economic Development committee to promote the Spring Fling Cleanup event on Washington Boulevard , which will be held on May and June weekends. - A $500 grant was given to the newly formed 30/31 block club for its inaugural block party March 20. Funding was subject to acceptance of several friendly amendments. In addition, Ed Turner was appointed to fill a vacant seat as resident representative of Region 6.

Mid-City Neighborhood Council MINC Carla Pineda

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he Mid-City Neighborhood Council’s March 14 stakeholder meeting ran smoothly without many major updates since its February meeting. - CIM Group Inc. forwarded enhanced drawings of Midtown Crossing to board member Bruce Durbin. - The council is looking into a parcel where RVs park and into a marijuana clinic on Redondo that is believed to be illegal. - The design committee is beginning to extrapolate graphic images from the MINC logo to be used on banners and other MINC signage. Two funding requests in phase two (of four proposal stages)

Keep our Local Businesses in Business. Use local Services!


(School reports continued)

- Carson-Gore El. had to offer its pre-K school to a charter school since they ran out of federal money for their LAUSD program. - Open Charter (LAUSD sanctioned) is scouting West Adams for a new location to mirror its success of their Westchester & Bel-Air campuses. - Chris Carlson of Western Heights has been our Integrated Services (Magnet) host for the past several years to educate West Adams residences on how to select the best school for your child. - Mid-City Charter has opened enrollment for their campus on Washington Blvd. - 24th Street School now houses Crown Charter School on their schoolyard specializing in boot-camp discipline. - Superintendent Cortines (80) is retiring this May and John Deasy (Daisy) of Santa Monica School District will replace him.

MIDTOWN SHOPPING PLAZA MARCH 2011 Gavin Glynn

D.V. Lawrence

are a MINC music pavilion and a vinyl banner for Washington Boulevard. - There was no status update on the new MINC website. Edgar Arroyo of the outreach committee is in charge of the project but was absent. President Allan DiCastro reported the website name has been purchased and there is an internal website that has not been published because it is not ready. - Durbin has nearly completed his survey of sidewalk repairs to be submitted to Council District 10. - The board of directors approved a $500 grant to cover brushes, gloves and buckets for 100 local 7th graders who will repaint fire hydrants on Washington Boulevard between Fairfax and Redondo. - Two letters of support were authorized by the MINC board in February. One was for the median island on Washington Boulevard at Alsace. The council also supported CD 10’s extension of the Ballona Creek Bicycle Path addressing the same concerns as The Cochran Ave./Cloverdale Block Club. This block club is closest to the area impacted by the extension of the bike path, which stretches from Mid City to Playa Del Rey. - The council also is investigating whether it can adopt an unclaimed area on La Cienega. Though MINC submitted paperwork for adoption, adjacent neighborhood councils are interested in adopting it as well. Celia Bell is resigning from the board because she is relocating to Vegas soon. ( Editor: Neighborhood News Salutes the years of service and dedication Cecilia gave to her community!) - MINC’s new by-laws were approved.

SCHOOL REPORTS Gavin Glynn

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chool bells are ringing louder in West Adams!

Marguerite LaMotte was re-elected to the LAUSD School Board last March 8th, 2011. She was backed by the powerful UTLA union with $325,000 dollars toward her campaign. Ms. LaMotte has faithfully approved all raises for teachers. - Arlington Heights middle school added 17 newly constructed classrooms and their API scores jumped to 718. - Cochran MS enrollment has dropped from 2,600 students to 1,500 and is expected to be even lower , to 1,100 next year. The principal has expressed interest in converting Cochran into a Magnet School for music and public debate. - LA High School has returned to a regular single track school after two decades and has announced it is looking for offers from Charter School operators. - Pacific Charter schools received 500K dollars from the Reardon Foundation to keep its schools open, namely our Frederick Douglas campus on West Adams. - Mid-City Magnet will be converting to a 100% magnet elementary (very rare opportunity) which will house 2 classrooms for every grade level from 1st to 5th grade. All 60 5th grades will matriculate to LACES (Los Angeles Center for Enriched Studies) the highest rate API school within LAUSD.

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id-Town Plaza is on track to open March 21st. 2012. Job applications for the entire complex will begin at the Job Fair currently scheduled for January 2, 2012. Kathleen Kim, CIM Asst. Director, reported difficulty in attracting quality stores. Merchants know the area has been stagnant for years (since the fall of Sears & Builders Emporium there ) and expect low rents to open their franchises there. However, Lowe’s, the anchor store, is a high end home improvement store and the only one in the mid Los Angeles area. It is expected to attract home owners from Beverly Hills, Hollywood, Culver City as well as the West LA weekend warriors. They will also be looking for ways to round out their shopping with eating and clothing stores. Currently the Panda Express and Starbucks are supported by the MidTown Crossing bus depot. ANSWER TO RIDDLE:

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Originally from New Jersey, Goode moved to L.A. in the 1980s to find greater opportunities and ended up on Venice Beach performing amazing brick-breaking techniques. He went on to open his own karate program in 1990 infusing his practice with Christian principles. More than a martial arts instructor, Goode is also advisor and friend to his students, expecting to see the kids’ report cards, encouraging college attendance, and even visiting schools if his students are in trouble. One of Goode’s adult students Connie White, an L.A. Police Officer, explains that Goode lets in many kids who can’t afford the academy tuition. “He has lots of respect from the community. Lots. He will even drive his students home if needed.” Another pupil Latonya Edwards studies kickboxing at the studio while her two children, Jaedeh and Khaliah, take other martial arts classes: “It feels more like a family here than a studio. Grandmaster took time to bring my daughter Khaliah out of her shell. Now her self-esteem is constantly rising.” “He’s just a big-hearted guy -- huge heart. He cares, he truly cares,” commends Officer White. Goode’s mission is simple “To teach kids and adults greater wisdom and knowledge” This dedication has been honored by too many city, county and state awards to cite here but here are some examples...for “commitment and dedication to youth”, for “outstanding achievement,” for “community service”, for “pioneering accomplishments,” for “honors youth program,” and simply as “hero.” When Goode is not teaching at the Academy, he instructs at the neighborhood Holy Name Catholic Church school, and also serves as a celebrity bodyguard. Another bright Star in our community! The World Championship Karate Sports Academy is located at 2027 W. Jefferson Blvd just east of Arlington 323.445-6516 CODE INFORCEMENT Cont. from Pg. 17 with the Department of Animal Services. A pilot program will allow the City Attorney’s Office the ability to evaluate the initial framework, make adjustments as necessary and provides additional time to explore alternative technology options as needed. It is recommended that the City Attorney’s Office report back in six months on the status of implementation, program effectiveness and cost recovery. Thereafter, additional analysis by this Office will be conducted as to the feasibility of program expansion citywide.” One is left to wonder if this approach will give a realistic picture of the effectiveness of this important program. (reprinted with permission from the WAHA newsletter)

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BUKOWSKI Cont. from Pg. 9

D.V. Lawrence

GRANDMASTER GOODE cont. from Pg. 7

2122 Longwood Ave. La Brea . . . I kept pulling the books off the shelves. The first real book I found was by a fellow named Upton Sinclair . . . I went back for more. I read each book in a single evening.” Bukowski’s archive can now be found at the Huntington Library. Local boy makes good. ROBERT LEARY Cont. from Pg. 12

Hollyhock House, which, at the time, was in such disrepair. Our accomplishments are due, in part, to Robert. His spirit, along with Aline’s lives on in the House.” Leary was instrumental in preventing demolition of the 1902 South Seas House on Arlington below the 10 freeway, a unique landmark that suffered decades of severe neglect before its award-winning transformation into a community center. Leary and the many others in the community who helped save the South Seas House won both California Preservation Foundation and preservation awards for their efforts. In 2008, the Frank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy honored Leary’s work on the Ennis House with a Wright Spirit Award acknowledging his untiring and unlimited efforts in leading the restoration of this historic home. Gail Fox, curator of the Wright-designed Schwartz House in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, had this to say about Leary’s award. “People were so obviously pleased by the announcement of the award recipient. What struck me and stuck with me were not the specific remarks that Robert made upon accepting the award for the group, but the humility and grace he demonstrated while accepting it so modestly on behalf of the Ennis House Foundation. Fortunately, the Conservancy left no doubt about the level of planning and effort the accomplishment entailed. Robert’s demeanor and words were eloquent and moving.” Along with his significant contributions to historic preservation in Los Angeles, Leary was widely beloved for his warmth, charm, humor, and dedication. He had a way of making instant friends, and he always had a smile, words of encouragement, or a witty remark for everyone. Reprinted and edited wiht permisssion from the Los Angeles Conservancy membership newsletter.

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TNN ISSUE #17 April2011