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Issue 36

JUNE/JULY

2014

TNN Salutes Neighborhood Council Voters


Publisher/Editor/Reporter

Dianne V. Lawrence Associate Editor/Reporter

Renee Montgomery Staff Reporters

Carla Pineda, Chelsee Lowe, Dawn Kirkpatrick

TNN Staff L - R Back Row

Contributing Writers Daphne Brogdon, Calvin Park, Rashad Rucker, John Patterson Social Media/Website Assistant, Photographer

Chelsee Lowe, Dawn Kirkpatrick, Carla Pineda

Dawn Kirkpatrick

L - R Front Row

Layout & Design/Executive Ad Sales

Renee Montgomery, Dianne V. Lawrence

Dianne V. Lawrence

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always write these notes just before I send it off to the printer and honestly today I am whooped. This issue is jam packed with drama. A local resident recounts her experience at Wilshire Division when a shooter appeared during their community meeting. A local Neighborhood Council is upended during the elections by determined stakeholders. Tom Bradley Family Center dodges a bullet. And an Oil company is forced to toe the line by a couple of determined residents. More exciting than TV and we bring it all to your doorstep in this issue. But right now I need a power nap so enjoy this lovely image of the beginning of summer, put your feet up while enjoying a tasty coffee at Cafe Picfair or some fluffy pancakes at Honey Bee's or perhaps some Hen Soup at Kang Nam, and take a little stroll around your community.

Cover Photos by Dawn Kirkpatrick Corrections: Spelling Corrections: In the last issue the names of Stevie Stern, the outgoing UNNC president and photographer Amber Clarke were misspelled. Apologies! In last issues' editors notes, TNN gave the wrong time for the UNNC voting time. In order to amend, Editor Dianne went to the site to apologize to anyone showing up at the wrong time. Fortunately the voters did show up at the right time.

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Contact us at: 323.871.8580 info@theneighborhoodnews.net

CONTENT 4

Neighborhood Council Election Results

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Eyewitness of Shooting at Wilshire Division

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Tom Bradley Center Saved

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Freeport McMoRan Toes the Line

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L.A. High Receives State Grant

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Look Who Lived In Mid-City

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Restaurant Review: Kang Nam

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Yippee! Yuppets are Back!

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Restaurant Review: Honey Bee's Breakfast

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Gay Pride Month

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Seen On the Scene

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TNN Reporter Carla Pineda

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TNN INFO BACK PAGE: RETAILERS LOCATION MAP


Local Neighborhood Council Election Results Compiled by Dawn Kirkpatrick

MINC - Total voters - 82

MRCHNT/COMRCIAL, PROP-OWNER, REPS 5 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Yolanda M Orsot (withdrew) 18 NO Deborah Ann Montgomery 29 YES Michael Maloney 35 YES Armando Lopez 31 YES Moses Kagan 27 YES Laura Davis 50 YES AT-LARGE REPRESENTATIVES:GENERAL 4 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Lorraine Genovese 43 YES Eric Morales 42 YES Shauna Skarin 41 YES Shai Levy 40 YES AT LARGE REPRESENTATIVES:ORGAN 3 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Lawrence Klutse 44 YES Juana Rosa Cavero 50 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 2 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Thom Ray Washington 2 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 3 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE ELECTED VOTES Michael J. Sontag 11 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 4 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Ernest Dominguez 7 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 5 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Christina Marasigan Stern 2 NO Angie King 12 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 6 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Nykia Williams 3 YES Craig Knight 1 NO REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 7 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Lisa Ford-Cook 3 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 8 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Valaida P. Gory 6 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 10 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Bridgette Croil-Snell 19 YES REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 11 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Marguerite Davis 2 YES

OPNC - Total voters - 62

WEST AREA REPRESENTATIVE 6 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Anya K. Adams 27 YES

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Daphne Dianna Brogden 28 YES Sharon Craig 24 YES John Jake 32 YES Gerry Bryan Pass 19 NO Laura Diana Rudision 25 YES Jocelyn Duarte 36 YES EAST AREA REPRESENTATIVE 6 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Judith Wyle Goldman 23 YES Reid K. Isaki 9 NO Jason Bron Maddox 9 NO Alexander Alfonso Mena 26 YES Faalaniga Taofi Smith 13 NO Theodore James Smith III 14 YES David Cochrane Crowley 9 NO Sung Jik Park 16 YES Batstone Raja 15 YES Ky Trang Ho 16 YES YOUTH REPRESENTATIVE 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Charles Harville Cohen 42 YES SENIOR CITIZEN REPRESENTATIVE 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Pamela W. Whittenbury 47 YES COMMUNITY BASED ORGAN REP 2 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Mark Peel William 40 YES Skye Kelly 27 YES AT-LARGE REPRESENTATIVE 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Joann Fleming 43 YES

PICO - Total voters - 75

RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Michael Stokes 1 NO Brad Steven Kane 2 NO Sharon K Christie 3 YES RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Marsha R Levine 2 YES RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATIONV REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Joe Jordan 32 YES RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Amy Williams 6 YES Emilio Juan Lacques-Zapien 3 NO RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Agnes Copeland 6 YES RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Sylvester Eugene Robertson 6 YES RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Yvonne E Smith 12 YES

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RESIDENTIAL ASSOCIATION REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Sylvia Schweri 2 YES

UNNC – Total Votes 180 AT-LARGE REP CANDIDATE VOTES Rene O Ortega 19 Laura Meyers 143 Dolores Spears 141 Rosie Brown 132 Vanessa Van Wagner 32 Helen Indrani Chaudhuri 86 Ron M Page 11 Sandra Paul 105 Betty L Phillips 56 AREA 1 RESIDENT REP CANDIDATE VOTES Denise Jackson 14 AREA 2 RESIDENT REP CANDIDATE VOTES David Nico 2 Heidi Cabero 17 AREA 3 RESIDENT REP Jeff Camp 26

5 ELECTED ELECTED NO YES YES YES NO YES NO YES NO 1 ELECTED ELECTED YES 1 ELECTED ELECTED NO YES 1 ELECTED YES

UNNC, WEST ADAMS, KOREATOWN CONT. Pg. 20

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shaking. I looked up and saw across from me a bullet had come into our room about four feet above my head cross the room

First-Hand Account of Shooting at Wilshire Division Daphne Brogdon

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n April 7 Daniel Christoph Yealu walked up to the desk officers in the east lobby of L.A. Police Department's Wilshire Division. He was talking to the officers when he suddenly pulled out a gun and began firing shots. He shot one officer seven times, three in the vest and four in the extremities. Despite his wounds the officer, along with his partner, returned the gunfire, seriously wounding the assailant. Both the officer and the gunman were transported to the hospital. The officer, a seven-year veteran of the LAPD was saved by his bullet proof vest.

We were taken into the roll call room at Wilshire. The police were wonderful to us. Very comforting. Very understanding. I felt very close to my colleagues and other people who were in the room that night. I understand the band of brothers feelings. It helped to talk about it with them that night and later. It was traumatizing and I have had issues sleeping and am very sensitive to loud noises. I'm doing better, but I can't go back in there. I'm the new President of Longwood Area Neighborhood Association (LANA). We now meet at the library. I went back once. Didn't like it. Some who weren't there didn't want to meet there again either. Remember someone was shot at the Wilshire station last year ( from the outside). OPNC no longer meets there either."

During the shooting, the Olympic Park Neighborhood Council (OPNC) was in the middle of their monthly meeting in LAPD's community room adjacent to the lobby. We contacted them for some comments and board member Daphne Brogdan generously offered TNN this community report: "We were having our meeting per usual when out of nowhere I heard four shots. I knew without thought that it was a gun and it was right outside our door. There is no exit, but that hallway where the shooter was. I thought, "someone is mad at the cops and is trying to kill them." I jumped behind and to my right and hid inside a lectern. Someone yelled, "Get down!" The firing continued. No one in our room screamed. Everyone got down. Later we learned the firing was also return fire from the police. I was terrified. I didn't know who was "winning." I thought of my children and how mad I was that some deranged person might take me away from my little children. I thought "this is not a movie and it's not stopping." I thought how mad my dad would be that I was in harm's way. I thought, the LAPD would probably get this guy before he can kill me because I was in the back of the room. But I worried for the people who were right by the door. I thought, "Oh, here we go, this is our mass shooting." Sadly, we've all heard about them. When the shooting stopped, we were all quiet. The door opened. We didn't know if it was the police or the gunman. The door opened again. "Is anyone in here?" We were still quiet. Slowly I saw from behind the lectern my colleagues start to rise. I looked up. It was an officer. Thank God. "Is anyone hurt?" he asked. Another officer came in. I asked if the gunman was under control. They said yes, and they had to move us to look for bombs. I think like the Boston Marathon they expected a second "issue" I couldn't move from my place for a while. I was petrified. I was

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Councilman Wesson Rescues Tom Bradley Family Center D. V. Lawrence

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n a nail-biting last minute save, Council President Herb Wesson rescued the jobs and programs of the current regime at the Tom Bradley Family Resource Center.

As reported in the last edition of TNN, due to cuts in federally funded programs and in an effort to save money, the Los Angeles Housing Department was about to make a recommendation to the Housing Commission to move the staff at Tom Bradley’s (Tony Nicholson, Andrea

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Solomon and Eddie Nuno) to a family center in Watts and turn control of the cityowned Tom Bradley Center over to a nonprofit who would fund and provide new programs to the community. Tony, who grew up in Mid-City, has dedicated his life to helping its lowincome residents and was distraught over leaving them behind. As hopeless as things seemed, he refused to give up the effort to save programs that served the poor in our community; programs that would move with him to Watts. He continued to press for meetings with all the officials involved. Recently the recommendations from the Housing Department to defund this and two other family centers came before the commission. Tony reported to TNN that Council President Herb Wesson, also happens to be a member of the Housing, Community and Economic Development (HCED) Committee and during the meeting of it's commission, questioned the logic of defunding the Tom Bradley Center. Tony reported to TNN, Wesson made the point Continued on Page 19

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Residents Prevail in Forcing Freeport McMoRan Oil and Gas To Toe the Line D.V. Lawrence In our last issue we reported on an effort by two residents to hold the city and the oil drilling company,Adams Freeport McMoRan Oil and Gas, accountable to the residents. We file this update:

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n Wednesday, June 4th, the South Los Angeles Planning Commission was scheduled to hear two appeals and public comment about the L.A. City Planning Dept., approval that allows the oil company, Freeport McMoRan Oil & Gas (FMOG), to expand its operations of the Murphy oil site (Adams and Gramercy) by placing a Clean Emission Burner (CEB) into the enclosed "park" at 27th and St. Andrews south of the controlled drill site. The appeals noted that the approval was provided without appropriate and adequate review, lacked transparency and accountability, and ensured that there would be no public input. L.A. City Council President Herb Wesson announced at the hearing that he had brokered an agreement between the appellants (Michael Salman and Steven Peckman), the applicant (FMOG), and the Planning Department (Linn Wyatt, Chief Zoning Administrator): Continued on Page 19

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West Adams Neighborhood Council Election Drama L.A. High School Receives California State Improvement Grant Calvin Park, L.A. High Staff Writer

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he state of California has picked several schools in the Los Angeles area to receive the benefits of the School Improvement Grant (SIG); Los Angeles High School is one of them. Through SIG, which dedicates millions of dollars towards improving lower performing schools, the Federal government has taken a step to improve public schools across the nation. The grant requires the beneficiary school to enter one of four SIG models to turn the school around. These options include the Turnaround, Transformation, Restart, and Closure models. Each of these models requires the school to make significant changes and sometimes require a change in staff. The Local Education Agencies (LEA), in this case, LAUSD, decides which schools can apply for the benefits and, ultimately, which intervention model each of those schools will adopt. The State of California and LAUSD have officially decided that, as part of SIG, L.A. High will receive close to $2 million a year, for three years. It will undergo the Restart model, working with California State University Dominguez Hills (CSUDH) as an Educational Management Organization (EMO). SIG will mainly be used to raise student academic achievement, with programs such as summer credit recovery programs, summer bridge programs for incoming 9th graders, technical hardware and software, instructional coaches, additional academic courses, and more, to help the students of L.A. High. Whether this grant will help improve the school is unclear; it is too early to tell if the SIG grant will be a massive failure or an astounding success. Mr. Gebhart, Assistant Principal, is hopeful for some of the opportunities that SIG will provide, “Not having been at a SIG school, I cannot comment on the efficacy of the SIG grant," said Gebhart, "[However,] I can say that the funds provided under the SIG grant do allow L.A. High to purchase personnel, resources, and time that otherwise would not have been available. From there, it is up to the L.A. High leadership and staff to utilize all of the resources and opportunities to [further] build a positive educational environment for students and staff alike.”

D.V. Lawrence & Rashad Rucker

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he West Adams Neighborhood Council (WANC) race was full of surprises and gave life to the saying that all politics are local. Starting from the call for candidates right down to the very last hour of voting at the polls, it was a bitter and strongly contested race between the old guard determined, to hang on to power and disgruntled stakeholders determined to share a piece of the pie. When the dust settled and the last vote was counted, three out of the six incumbents lost their seats by a few votes, including the previous President and Vice President. The reaction of the community is mixed. Some are glad to see change and excited to see what will happen. Others are somewhat disappointed and concerned about the priorities of the new board. The drama began in April, 2011 when Bright Star Schools, which operates five charter schools throughout Los Angeles, came to Kimani Black, a deputy of CD10, to request a meeting with the council office and WANC. One of Bright Star’s schools, Stella Academy, had received a $24,000,000 bond apportionment from the State of California, which was part of a voter approved effort to fund new facilities for charter schools. Bright Star wanted to place the school on the property where the old military recruiting building (on Rodeo east of La Brea) now stands. They were interested in meeting with the community to begin a dialogue and address concerns. In early May, Mr. Black organized a meeting between Bright Star and four members of the WANC executive board at Councilman Wesson's office. The executive board expressed several concerns: Was there enough room for a physical education program? Bright Star: Yes. The current building is larger than the building that will be built thus opening up space for athletics. They would also be getting permits from their neighbor, the Rancho Cienega Sports Complex, to use some of their facilities. They would also be creating a large multi-purpose room and gymnasium on the property. What about parking congestion? Bright Star: The downsizing of the current building would allow for a substantial parking area in the front of the lot. This area will be constructed in order to have efficient flow of traffic. Stella's program already has various day lengths for its students which allows "staggering" to occur both during morning dropoff and afternoon pick-up. This spreading out of traffic flow will largely mitigate the impact. As part of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) process (lead by LAUSD), Bright Star had contracted a traffic consultant to perform a traffic impact analysis that assumes 650 students, which would have been shared with the community when completed. They would also be required to work with the Dept. of Transportation to come up with a traffic mitigation plan. Continued on Page 16

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GOOD GOLLY! Look Who Lived in Mid-City LITTLE RICHARD VIRGINIA RD. LAFAYETTE SQUARE. afayette Square was alread home to many notable residents when James Nelson Pattilo, a building contractor erected an Italian/Spanish Renaissance Revival residence on Virginia Road in the early 1920's. Corinthian columns flank its front door, which also features an elaborately-carved surround. This home attracted musicians in 1933; organist C.E. McAfee lived

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here. And, in 1959, during a period of time when he had turned to Christianity and gospel music, famed singer Little Richard purchased the Portillo residence. Richard Wayne "Little Richard" Penniman (b.1932) was a flamboyant musician whose hit songs of the mid-1950's were defining moments in the development of rock and roll. This singersongwiter-recording artist is considered key in the transition from rhythm and blues to rock and roll in the 1950's. He was also the first artist to put the funk in the rock and roll beat and contributed significantly to the development of soul music.

there she began playing clubs in Greenwhich Village and then performed at Carnegie Hall. Horne left New York to perform at the Trocadero Club in California. Within a short time, she signed a Hollywood movie contract with MGM. Her contract stipulated that she would not be cast in stereotypical black roles, and with her elegance and glamour, she became know for transforming the image of the black woman in film.

HATTIE McDANIEL 2177 WEST 31st ST. Oscar-winning Hattie McDaniel was born in 1895 in Whichita, Kansas, the daughter of a Baptist minister and a spiritual singer. She worked as a singer with Professor George Morrison's Orchestra in 1915, touring the country. She became the first African American to sing on network radio in the United States. In 1931, she went to Hollywood to seek a film career and began as an extra before capturing larger roles. In 1932, "Hi-hat Hattie" (her nickname) made her movie debut in The Golden West. She then appeared in a number of movies, including Saratoga, where she sang with Clark Gable. Then she read Margaret Mitchell's novel and was fascinated by the role of Mammy. "I naturally felt I could create in it something distinctive and unique" McDaniel later recalled. Excerpted from "West Adams' Landmarks of African American History" a publication of West Adams Heritage Association. Reprinted with Permission.

LENA HORNE 1200 S. ARLINGTON North of Pico ena Horne's signature song from a 1943 film of the same name is "Stormy Weather". Some would say she weathered many storms in her life. At age 16 Horne began working at Harlem's Cotton Club, first as a dancer, then in the chorus and later as a solo singer. She began singing with orchestras, and, while singing with Charlie Barnett's (white) ochestra, she was discovered. From

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KANG NAM

A Neighborhood Staple Since 1982 Carla Pineda

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must admit: I’ve always played it safe with Korean food. When I arrived at Kang Nam all I knew from Yelp reviews was that this was a traditional spot where Korean adults could enjoy a good old school Korean meal. So, I jumped into this culinary adventure by asking our lovely waitress Jang for a little guidance, “What’s popular here?” We started with appetizers before we got into entrees and grillworthy meats. Jang recommended Gogi Japchae (No. 11), which consisted of stir-fried noodles seasoned with sesame oil, onion, and garnished with vegetables and beef strips. My companion chose Ojingeu Bokkeum (No. 13), a saucy stir-fried squid with vegetables. Soon after ordering, the little saucers began to arrive. Just the sides alone began filling the table. Apparently every Korean meal can include anywhere from 5 to 12 side dishes, or banchan. Part of the adventure required tasting all the colorful items that I generally overlooked during my previous Korean barbeques. Kimchi? Not the spicy, tangy flavor I expected. It reminded me a bit of curtido, a pickled cabbage served with Salvadoran pupusas. Some of my favorite surprises included the subtly salty seaweed, the sweet and crunchy apple salad, the green “pancakes,” and sautéed broccoli. Others will be filed under the experimental once-is-enough archive, such as the anchovy and peanut combo, the pickled radish, and the bean sprouts. The Gogi Japchae had savory written all over it. The ribbons of veggies added crunch and color to the darkened glass noodles, the sesame seeds gave it a tasty and visual touch and the beef strips were tender. All combined, these ingredients were the beginning of the end. I devoured a couple of healthy servings of the saucy noodles, so good that I almost forgot about the Ojingeu Bokkeum, which was a feast for the eyes. Beautifully presented, the squid was fried in a vibrant red sauce and accompanied by contrasting green scallions and sesame seeds as well. Not a fan of the consistency of squid, I only tasted a couple of pieces and enjoyed the sauce’s rich flavor. However my companion expected more kick in the sauce which tasted mild even to a heat-averse person like me. Halfway into the hefty-sized meal, I asked our waitress Jang for honest advice, “What do you think? Should we continue and order meat to grill or an entrée to share?” Jang made a cute face as if that was a silly question, said that was too much food, and took our menu away. She was right, we were stuffed before we finished our appetizers. Our Editor enjoys going for lunch and having the large salad bowl filled with mixed lettuce, a variety of crunchy vegetables and sashimi for $12. She always finishes with a bowl of green tea ice cream. She claims the sushi dinners are generous and filled with sweet and tender sushi. Prices range from $10 - $30 averaging around $16. TNN readers get 10% off with the ad in the next column.

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The more places I be The less you can see What am I?

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Yippee!! The Yuppets Are BACK! Renee Montgomery

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n TNN’S August 2010 issue we featured Gary Jones and his amazing Blackstreet USA Puppet Theatre. His theatre was a mainstay on Washington Boulevard until one day the name “Yuppets” disappeared off the green awning. Puppeteer founder Gary Jones had worked and lived in the Washington corridor for 27 years, until the building sold and he was forced to move his theatre, workshop and studio apartment out of the area. Now, three years later, The Yuppets (Jones’ name for his puppet troupe) have returned to the Nate Holden Performing Arts Center and the glorious marionette puppets can be seen hanging out in the front window of the theatre, their little shoes dangling in a row under dust covers.

puppets, putting each through a routine to determine if it has the desired movement for the new production -- some puppets being more fluid to handle than others. L.A. is home to two old-school puppet theaters, but unlike the Bob Baker Marionettes on third street near downtown where professional puppeteers work the puppet in the background, Jones’ dances with his puppets. The graceful movement is mesmerizing, appealing to our youthful spirit for play and expressive movement. What will be the theme of the upcoming performances? Jones answers, "Why of course “the Yuppets over the first 27 years -- a celebration about being back.” The Nate Holden Performing Arts Center is located at 4718 W. Washington Blvd., Los Angeles, phone (323) 964-9768. June 21 2pm children's show July 12 2pm children's show June 28 8pm adult show July 19 8pm adult show

($5 children under 12 / $10 adults) ($5 children under 12 / $10 adults) ($10 Adults Only) ($10 Adults Only)

On five successive Saturdays in June and July, the puppets will appear in three-four matinees for children and one-two evening performances for adults. Jones begin his career as a scenic designer of the world famous Kungshold Miniature Grand Opera in Chicago in 1967, then decided to move to L.A .and found his own puppet company in 1975. Since then Jones has presented literally thousands of performances locally and internationally. His many awards include the Crystal Castle Award from the Disney Corp. for his outstanding work with children, as well as fellowships, grants and residencies from the Smithsonian Institution, L.A. Department of Cultural Affairs and California Arts Council to cite a few. In 1998 People magazine reported on Jones’ integration of social issues within puppetry, such as drugs, AIDS, self-esteem and conflict resolution. As TNN reported in 2010, like a modern-day Geppetto, Jones has handcrafted hundreds of puppets, lovingly molding the head, carving limbs, painting features and sewing in hair. He also designs each puppet’s costume and accessories, and even “auditions” his

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KEEP DOGS OFF OF HOT CEMENT AND ASPHALT THIS SUMMER

Honey Bee's for Breakfast and Lunch

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Carla Pineda

Paul J

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ating at Honey Bee’s House of Breakfast illustrated a personal breakfast dilemma that comes up in my kitchen often – American or Central American breakfast? Walking into the cozy restaurant on Adams Blvd, west of Crenshaw, on a busy Saturday morning, my jaw dropped when I saw the El Clasico plate and I pointed it out to my Salvadoran dad. This deluxe Central American breakfast took me back to all the good things that came out of my mom’s kitchen on weekends of my childhood: veggie scrambled eggs, casamiento (rice and black beans), avocado, cheese, handmade tortillas, and fried plantains.

Knowing El Clasico would be a home run, I decided to take a more neutral route with the Breakfast Special to guage its American flavor. This special includes eggs, hash browns, bacon, and pancakes. My over medium eggs were great over crispy hash browns and the bacon was perfectly crisped as well. The pancakes were nice and fluffy. My coffee cup was full during the whole meal. Honey Bee’s passed the American breakfast test. I couldn't have asked for more. “You should mention the service is great,” my dad said. The homey vibe made you feel as if you’re sitting at your tia Ana’s kitchen. Talking up the waiter and owners, my dad and I learned this business is owned and run by a Salvadoran family, hence the contrast between American and Latino breakfast dishes. The family wanted to bring to the community a restaurant that attracted people from all backgrounds, not just people who are already familiar with Salvadoran food. This is why they mix cuisines and serve breakfast and lunch throughout the day. We saw tables where customers were eating pupusas and pancakes. There were families eating French toast and yuca frita. For those already familiar with Honey Bee’s, here’s a scoop: They will be adding dinner to their menu and extending their hours within the next couple of months. And for those Honey Bee’s fans that are in it for the long run, there are hopes to expand the restaurant and potentially add a wine bar down the line. But for now, take your time sampling everything on the menu and keep an eye out for the dinner additions, which are bound to have dual citizenship just like their breakfast and lunch counterparts. Check out ad on next column for details

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Gay Civil Rights Early Roots in West Adams John Patterson

Public Forum and LGBT Pride Month Commemoration LGBT Workers and Families of Color: On the Bottom Rung of the Low Wage Economy Monday, June 16, 7pm (6:30pm dinner for an $8 donation) Solidarity Hall, 2122 W. Jefferson Blvd., Los Angeles 90018 Due to discrimination, queer and transgender people of color are hit hardest by the recession. Lesbian, Salvadoran immigrant and Freedom Socialist columnist, Karla Alegria, will kick-off a roundtable discussion about strategies to win full rights for all. Co-sponsored by the Freedom Socialist Party and Radical Women. For information contact: 323-732-6416, radicalwomenla@ earthlink.net, fspla@earthlink.net, www.radicalwomen.org or visit www.socialism.com.

The Michael J. Connell Carriage House

"Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month (LGBT Pride Month) is currently celebrated each year in the month of June to honor the 1969 Stonewall riots in Manhattan. The Stonewall riots were a tipping point for the Gay Liberation Movement in the United States." From the Library of Congress. In honor of LGBT Month we are reprinting this article from our Oct 2011 issue. est Adams was home to some of the earliest gay rights activists in the country. The Michael J. Connell Carriage House on 23rd near Hoover has been a part of the fabric of West Adams from the very beginning days of the gay right’s movement dating back to the late 1940’s. Today this University Park community is also home to ONE Archive, the largest collection of memorabilia on the subject of the gay rights movement from that early era up to today. Fredric Frisbee, a long-time resident of West Adams, lived for many years at the Carriage house and was one of the early pioneers of what became known as the “Mattachine Foundation” The term “Mattachine” has its roots in the Societe Mattachine, a French medieval masque group that traveled from village to village, using ballads and dramas to point out social injustice. Jim Childs (whose 2004 nomination of the Carriage House resulted in the designation of Historic Cultural Monument # 779) had numerous conversations with his neighbor Mr. Frisbee, about the many early meetings that were held there. It was at his home that the leaders made a unanimous decision to meld all of the various gay rights groups into “ONE, Incorporated.” A line from a poem by Thomas Carlyle inspired the name: “A mystic bond of brother hood makes all men one.” In April, 1951 the group produced a single-page document that summarized not only their goals, but their understanding of themselves as an oppressed minority. Often victims of police entrapment, the nascent group was soon presented with their first legal challenge; a founding member, Dale Jennings was arrested. The media ignored the case so the group took it upon themselves to produce leaflets under the auspices of the “Citizens Committee to Outlaw Entrapment,” and distributed them in neighborhoods

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West Adams and Bright Star cont. from Pg. 10 There were concerns and rumors that Dorsey High would be developing their own K-12 program. Bright Star: This was unlikely and just a rumor. It has since been confirmed that it isn't happening. The Board also expressed concerns that African-American children should be well represented at the school. Bright Star responded by pointing out they were a public school and could not pursue a quota and that enrollment was open to all children. If demands exceeded available seats, children were chosen by lottery. (There were later concerns about fighting between Stella and Dorsey students at the park. Bright Star pointed out that rivalry between middle school children and high school children was unlikely and there were not going to be any high school children at Stella.) A few weeks after this meeting, in late May of 2011, Bright Star did a presentation before the West Adams Neighborhood Council Board. Although they were hoping for a discussion and vote, the Board decided to hold off. Bright Star subsequently sent several emails and voice messages to the President hoping to be put on the June agenda, but never heard back. They continued pressing to be put on the agenda in July without receiving a response. Tyler Baier, Bright Star’s project manager, went to the July meeting and during public comments asked to be put on the agenda for the August meeting. After a follow up call to the President, they finally got the go ahead for the August meeting, where there was a brief discussion and a vote. They lost the vote by a clear majority. When they also lost support by one vote from LAUSD, Bright Star let go of the attempt to build a school at the Rodeo location and actively pursued other opportunities in the area. "We could easily go to South Central or up to the Valley but this area is the community we want to serve" said Mr. Baier. After Continued on next page

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three years, Bright Star was unable to identify any appropriate sites, while the Rodeo location continued to be available and the owner continued to express interest in selling the property to them. So at the beginning of 2014, Bright Star went back to the West Adams Neighborhood Council and presented to a hopefully more sympathetic Board. They also brought about 100 supporters of Stella Academy school, including parents and staff. They had at least 220 of their students living within WANC borders. Once again, no interest or much discussion by the board, no action was taken and the issue again became stale. Today, Bright Star continues to look for other locations and the space on Rodeo is in the process of being sold to someone else. If Bright Star cannot find a location by May of 2015, the money goes back to the State. But there was a consequence to the Board. Realizing the influence of Neighborhood Councils in their community, and frustrated by the behavior of the Board's leadership, several people decided to run for the board in the recent elections. On Election Day parents, teachers and participants of Bright Star came out in their Bright Star T-shirts to vote. There were accusations that some of these people came from outside the community but DONE explained that anyone who had a stake in the community was eligible to vote and parents of the students were considered to have a stake in the community. When the votes were in, the assistant principal for Stella, Daryl Garris, and two teachers, Stephanie Gomez and Erin Kleiner were on the new Board. A student's parent, Maria Salinas, volunteered to take over the position of youth representative when that member stepped down. Elbert Preston who had held the position of President lost by four votes and Clint Simmons the Vice President lost by three, business representative Abdullah Sharif another controversial board member and owner of the liquor store on the corner of Adams and West Haven also lost by three votes. Although he did not lose his seat to a Bright Star candidate he lost to another business owner, Jessica Fischbein, who felt she could better represent the business community. Members of the outgoing Executive Committee tried an end run before the elections of the new executive committee took place at the first meeting of their new board. They called for an emergency meeting to challenge the behavior of an old board member. Would getting rid of her allow a seat to open and one of the old guard to apply for her seat? But the Department of Neighborhood Empowerment (DONE) who oversees Neighborhood Councils, squashed that attempt. The ousted members no longer had any authority. After five years of representing their communities, both exPresident Elbert Preston and ex-Vice President Clint Simmons bid farewell as board members at their final meeting. Both have stated that they will remain active in the community and will look forward to working with the new board in making our community better. The board elected Steven Meeks for President and Maria Norris as Vice President.

Edward (Eddie) Ingram Ingram's Antiques D.V. Lawrence

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or the last 20 or so years if you took Washington Boulevard between La Brea and Crenshaw, chances are you would have noticed Eddie in front of his Ingram’s Antique shop on the south side of the street by West Boulevard. He sat among the chairs, trunks, drawers, tables and other sundry items, while holding court with a steady stream of visitors, neighbors and clients. I finally decided to stop in and see what treasures I could find and I was not disappointed. As my eye traveled from item to item, impressed, uninterested, excited, it stopped cold in front of an 18 inch tall, plaster statue of Louis Armstrong dressed in a vintage, mustard yellow, late 30’s early 40’s suit; clutching his horn, holding the ever present handkerchief, his head thrown back with that million dollar smile. I had to have it! Instead of playing it cool, I blurted out “This is AMAZING!! How much!!??” Eddie gave me an exceedingly generous and affordable quote and I walked out of the store with my arms around Louis. Looking online for information about his recent passing, I came across a customer review that pays Eddy and Ingram’s Antiques proper homage: "A few weeks ago I drove by Ingram's Antiques on my way out to the west side and made a point of going back to look around. I'm so happy that I did. Street parking is plentiful, and as I rounded the corner I was greeted by the owner, who was sitting out front listening to jazz. He later shared with me that he's been selling antiques for five decades. Inside it's a literal treasure hunt. The store is packed, and I spent half an hour slowly making my way through it, tiptoeing around dressers and chairs and paintings. I opened a beautiful teal chest to discover vintage Mahjong tiles. There's a great deal of art work, old tins, jewelry, handbags, and hats. It's clear that the store has been curated by a man who has a love and knowledge of old collectibles, and there isn't a whiff of pretension about the place. I asked him if he sold online, he replied "not really". I bought a lovely Tortolani necklace, which I later learned (upon Googling) is a Los Angeles jeweler who has been making custom pieces for 70 years. I got it at a fabulous price too." Yelp review Eileen K. TNN says "Goodbye Eddie and thanks for being a valuable member of our community."

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June/July 2014

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Photos by Dawn Kirkpatrick

St. Elmo Village 45-Year Anniversary

UNNC Easter Celebration

William Grant Still Art Center Birthday Celebration

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June/July 2014

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Residents Prevail Cont. from Pg. 9 1. FMOG will submit a Plan Approval application to Planning by around mid-June for placement of a CEB in the "park" land noted above. 2. FMOG agrees that the application will receive a full Zoning Administration review inclusive of a pubic hearing. The agreement brokered by Council President Wesson and accepted by the South L.A. Planning Commission accomplishes the principal goals of the appeals and the appeals were withdrawn. We should expect the assignment of the new FMOG application to a Zoning Administrator with experience and expertise in oil related quasi-judicial conditional use cases who will perform a complete review of the file and the application, ensure a site inspection, and conduct a public hearing in which public comment will be presented. Information about the appeals as well as a timeline of events that led to the hearing today can be found at the Jefferson Park United website: http://jeffersonparkunited.org/category/site-topics/ murphy-oil-site Please stay tuned for more information about the Plan Approval application and the Zoning Administration public hearing. Tom Bradley Center Cont. from Pg. 8 that 90% of the funds used for the Bradley Center pay for the salaries of the three staff members and this money would follow them to Watts, so no savings there. By bringing in a nonprofit to run the Center the only money saved would be money for the janitor, utilities and landscaping, a mere 10% of the overall budget. To save this 10%, the city would be sacrificing the programs, food give aways, legal services, classes and more. It didn’t add up. The commission agreed with the Council President and made a recommendation to the City Council to continue to fund the Center for at least another year, or two. The Council voted to accept the recommendation. For now, a reprieve.

ELEANOR GREEN ROBERTS AQUATIC CENTER 4526 PICO & West Blvd. (323) 936-8483 FREE TO SENIORS 65 AND OLDER!! MonClosed Tue 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm Wed 3:30 pm- 5:00 pm 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm Thu 3:30 pm- 5:00 pm 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm Fri 3:30 pm - 5:00 pm 7:00 pm - 8:00 pm Sat 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm Sun 1:00 pm - 4:00 p

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TNN Reporter Carla Pineda Lands a Plum Job D.V. Lawrence

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NN wants to give one of our dedicated and talented reporters, Carla Pineda, a big shout out for her fantastic new job as associate web editor for LinkTV World News http://news.linktv. org/, the news website for a channel operated under independent public television station KCETLink. In her new role, she is writing, editing, uploading and managing website content, analyzing site performance, promoting the site via social media outlets, growing the audience, and fostering engagement with them. Carla thanks TNN for "keeping my pen inked, for keeping my writer's spirit alive, my clips fresh, and my powerful women's circle strong." Happily for TNN, Carla will continue to contribute to the Neighborhood News‌. "TNN has helped 'raise' me ever since I moved back home from college. My dad gets TNN in his mailbox and knows it's the only outlet to report on issues right in his backyard. That's why this magazine is a synonym for home. I would be honored to continue informing this beautiful community and working with the sharp ladies who work miracles to make it possible every issue."

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AREA 4 RESIDENT REP CANDIDATE VOTES Talicia Raggs 18 AREA 5 RESIDENT REP CANDIDATE VOTES Richard Brenton 19 Ophelia Daniel 26 AREA 6 RESIDENT REP CANDIDATE VOTES Marius Stelly 29

1 ELECTED YES YES 1 ELECTED ELECTED NO YES 1 ELECTED ELECTED YES

WEST ADAMS – Total voters 160 AT-LARGE REPRESENTATIVES 4 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Darryl Garris 81 YES Eva M Aubry 90 YES Ernest L Moore 56 NO Ana McBride 65 YES Geraldine S Gonzales 16 NO Clinton Simmons 60 NO Erin E Kleiner 63 YES Elbert Preston Jr 59 NO BUSINESS REPRESENTATIVE 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Jessica Fischbein 73 YES Abdul Sheriff 70 NO EDUCATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Stephanie Gomez 85 YES Irvin L Davis 44 NO HOMEOWNER REPRESENTATIVE 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Adam Tootla 54 NO Beatrice Jett McGowens 87 YES

WILSHIRE KOREATOWN – 362

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION REPS 7 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Manuel Flores 80 NO Sung Hoon Yoon 164 YES Caroline J Sim 92 YES Scott Suh 165 YES Janine Hee Lee 161 YES Shawn Kuk 83 NO Niall Kelly 79 NO Frank J Park 134 YES David E Ryu 140 YES Christine Najung Lee 97 YES BUSINESS REPRESENTATIVES 7 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Susan Lee 162 YES Sue Hee Ko 156 YES Sang Kyun Kwak 155 YES Homyung Kang 143 YES Don Cho 154 YES Jayson K Choi 145 YES Alex Cha 122 YES Yeong Jun Cha 118 NO Y Nicole Chang 86 NO

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Peter Paik 86 NO Celine Park 93 NO LATINO REPRESENTATIVE 2 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Aura Vasquez 96 YES Edward Anthony Colacion 109 YES AT-LARGE RESIDENTIAL REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Chin Yong Kim 11 NO James Young Jung 68 YES Alberto Gabriel Hernandez 13 NO SUB-DISTRICT 1 RESIDENT REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Vahe G 3 YES SUB-DISTRICT 2 RESIDENT REP 1 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Chima Anyadike-Danes 3 YES SUB-DISTRICT 4 RESIDENT REP 2 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Niroshan Kahwatte 18 YES Bill Robinson 10 YES Yonah Hong (Withdrew) 15 NO SUB-DISTRICT 5 RESIDENT REP 2 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Sang G Lee 13 YES SUB-DISTRICT 4 RESIDENT REP 2 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Niroshan Kahawaite 18 YES Bill Robinson 10 YES Yonah Hong (withdrew) 15 NO SUB-DISTRICT 5 RESIDENT REP 2 ELECTED CANDIDATE VOTES ELECTED Sang Gi Lee 13 YES Gay Rights Roots in West Adams Cont. from Pg. 16 with a high density of gay residents. At trial, Jennings acknowledged being homosexual, but denied the charges against him. The jury ultimately deadlocked, and the attorney general chose to drop the case. Warren Johansson summarizes “The contrast with the usual timidity and hypocrisy in such cases was such that the Citizens Committee justifiably call the outcome a “great victory.” With this victory and a growing sense of empowerment, ONE Magazine was launched, with Mr. Jennings serving as its first editor. It is from this first “gay magazine” that the ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives takes its name. Located in our community at 908 W. Adams Blvd the archives preserve the history and promotes understanding of our Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered citizens. A visit to the archives reveals the confrontation between ONE Magazine and the US Postal Service, a battle that went all the way to the supreme court, which ultimately ruled unanimously that the “mere discussion of homosexuality could not be branded obscene.” You will also learn about the fire that burned down the gay MCC Church at 22nd and Union in 1972 and you can also browse through the archived magazines. For a tour or more info about One Archives, call213.741.0094 or visit their website www.onearchives.org

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WASHINGTON BLVD. BLU ELEFANT COFFEE Washington and Harvard PAMORE PIZZA 2910 W. Washington (s.e. corner Western) WASHINGTON IRVING LIBRARY 4117 W. Washington (e. of Crenshaw) MARISCO RESTAURANT. N.W. corner of Washington/Crenshaw EBONY REPERTORY THEATRE 4718 W.Washington (e. of Rimpau) KABOOM RESTAURANT 4641 W. Washington VENICE WILSHIRE POLICE STATION 4861 W. Venice (e. of La Brea) PICO TOM BRADLEY FAMILY CENTER 5213 W. Pico (e. of Cochran) CJ’s RESTAURANT 5501 W. Pico (w. of Hauser) PINKY ROSE BOUTIQUE 5730 W. Pico (e. of Hauser) CULTURAL INTERIORS 5406 W. Pico. (next to Sky Taco E. of Hauser) MY 2 CENTS 5583 Pico (w. of Hauser) CORDIALLY INVITED 5571 W. Pico (w. of Hauser) RALPH’S (Pico and Farifax) PAPER OR PLASTIC 5772 W. Pico (e. of Fairfax) ADAMS VEES CAFÉ

5418 W Adams Blvd (w. of La Brea)

LA BREA HIATUS BBQ 1292 S. La Brea (corner of San Vicente) LIBRARIES WASHINGTON IRVING LIBRARY 4117 W. Washington (e. of Crenshaw) BALDWIN HILLS BRANCH LIBRARY (2906 S. La Brea s. of Adams) MEMORIAL BRANCH LIBRARY (4625 W. Olympic. E. of Rimpau) Plus 10-11,000 on resident doorsteps. If you would like to get your own copy on your computer when it first comes out, just email us and put INCLUDE ME in the subject line if you want to get all of our eblasts (community events, business offers, story updates, community alerts) or JUST MAGAZINE if you just want to receive a desktop copy when it comes out. Or call us and leave your email address. 323.871.8580

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TNN Issue #36 June/July 2014