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BUILDING A

DREAM D E S I G N E R S // I N F L U E N C E R S // A R T I S A N S // R E N O VAT O R S


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READ THIS

p.20 CM Studio's Bellevue Hill project utilised ROCKCOTE Marrakesh throughout the home


W E LC O M E ISSUE NO.17 / CONTENTS 03 04 08 16 20 28

WELCOME THE PROJECT // THE TWEED HOUSE BY RAUNIK DESIGN THE DESIGN // HOUSE ACUTE BY MCK ARCHITECTS THE INFLUENCER // DANA TOMIĆ HUGHES OF YELLOWTRACE THE HOME // BELLEVUE HILL HOUSE BY CM STUDIO THE ARTISAN // MR AND MRS WHITE

COVER PHOTOGRAPH JOSHUA WHITE CREATIVE + EDITORIAL DIRECTOR NINA DORN CREATIVEDIRECTOR@ROCKCOTE.COM.AU THE NATURAL ARTISAN MAGAZINE 18 MACHINERY ROAD, PO BOX 230, YANDINA, QLD 4561 PHONE: 1300 736 668 THENATURALARTISAN.COM INSTAGRAM @THENATURALARTISAN VIEWS EXPRESSED BY THE AUTHOR ARE NOT NECCESSARILY THOSE OF ROCKCOTE WHILST ALL CARE IS TAKEN IN THE PREPARATION OF THIS PUBLICATION, THE PUBLISHER ACCEPTS NO RESPONSIBILITY FOR ANY ERRORS AND/ OR OMISSIONS @COPYRIGHT THE NATURAL ARTISAN / ROCKCOTE. NO PART OF THIS PUBLICATION MAY BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT THE EXPRESS PERMISSION OF ROCKCOTE. THE NATURAL ARTISAN IS PRINTED ON ECOSTAR WHICH IS 100% RECYCLED UNCOATED PAPER. BY USING ECOSTAR OFFSET RATHER THAN A NON RECYCLED PAPER THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT WAS REDUCED BY: // 164KG OF LANDFILL // 24KG CO 2 AND GREENHOUSE GASES // 4,800 LITRES OF WATER // 243KM TRAVEL IN THE AVERAGE EUROPEAN CAR

NOTE

Craftsmanship and artisanship are learned skills or trades not only governed by time limitations or budget constraints, but by exceptional quality of workmanship, attention to detail, and dedication to the pursuit of perfection. Welcome to the all new ROCKCOTE Natural Artisan magazine. Our focus is to showcase the work of the most talented people in our industry, and to highlight and celebrate their unique projects. Each issue we will bring you beautiful and carefully curated architecture, design and interiors that share an innate understanding and appreciation of the environment, along with materials and techniques to inspire. We hope you enjoy it. N I N A D O R N A N D T H E R O C KC O T E T E A M

issue no 17

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The Project / The Natural Artisan

FLUID

LINES THE TWEED HOUSE, DURANBAH, QLD Challenging conventional concrete construction, this series of ROCKCOTE rendered pods create a unique home that celebrates the site's magnificent location overlooking Flagstaff beach. The organic curved forms beget a striking sculptural structure that echoes the shell-like flotsam that has washed ashore. We speak to architect Frank Ruinik. WORDS: NINA DORN

//

04 The Natural Artisan

P H OTO G R A P H Y: M AT T B A R R E T T

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issue no 17


LOVE THIS

This internal finish was achieved by using ROCKCOTE Smooth Sanding Patch

W H AT WA S T H E D E S I G N B R I E F ?

reverted to hand-drawn concept and

that celebrates a contrast with colours

The client has always loved organic,

construction details, as this proved a

and textures.

curved shapes. When he came across

better method of communicating the

some completed works by Mexican

curved forms.

YOU USE ROCKCOTE SMOOTH

W H AT C H A L L E N G E S D I D YO U

S E T I N T H E H O M E . W H AT W E R E

Architect Javier Senosiain, the client saw these curves and the potential for a future

SA N D I N G PATC H A N D S M O OT H

home. Javier was commissioned for an

ENCOUNTER WITH THIS BUILD?

T H E A DVA N TAG E S?

initial concept design, and subsequently

One of the first challenges was obtaining

The ROCKCOTE Smooth Sanding Patch

Raunik Design Group was engaged to

council approval for the design. The high

used internally and ROCKCOTE Smooth Set

develop this concept into reality. Raunik

profile site already had an existing

used externally gives a fantastic finish that

Design progressed the concept on from

approval for a much taller building, and

leaves people wondering how the structure

the initial concepts through to

council originally felt that it may have

was built. The ROCKCOTE Smooth

development approval, design

been an underdevelopment of the site.

Sanding Patch and ROCKCOTE Smooth Set

development, building approval and

Through design development, council

render technique avoided control joints

construction documentation.

eventually agreed that the proposed

and allowed for a clean homogenous finish

design would result in an iconic building

throughout the residence. Although the

W H AT W E R E S O M E E S S E N T I A L

that was worthy of such a prominent site.

main material – concrete – is used every

This was a unique project that presented

DESCRIBE YOUR DESIGN ETHOS.

form required the material’s performance

challenges and opportunities at every

Raunik Design Group have traditionally

to be pushed beyond its normal use. The

turn. The most essential design

designed contemporary-modern projects

structural engineers, Odyssey Consulting,

considerations were regarding how to turn

using strong linear and geometric

were able to bring the unique form into a

the organic curved forms into a built

elements, so this new organic form was

reality and achieve the large curved

reality. The actual documentation and 3D

entering new design territory in terms of

structure with minimal internal columns.

modelling presented many challenges.

aesthetic style. Although the building style

Experimenting with new software to

is unique, the design ethos behind it is

actually built by film set designers, who

achieve the desired outcome and working

consistent with our other coastal projects.

had the technology to import our 3D

with such organic shapes proved

Celebrating the site’s magnificent views,

model and cut the curved foam pieces,

a challenge to provide exact

large open-plan living and entertaining

which were then assembled on site piece

measurements. In many cases we actually

spaces, and a clean material palette

by piece. Curved steel reinforcing was laid

D E S I G N C O N S I D E R AT I O N S ?

day in construction, our project’s unique

The formwork for the concrete was

and then sprayed with concrete.

06 The Natural Artisan

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The Project / The Natural Artisan

" T H E R O C K C O T E R E N D E R G A V E A F A N TA S T I C F I N I S H T H AT L E F T P E O P L E W O N D E R I N G H O W T H E S T R U C T U R E W A S B U I LT "


THE POINTY

END

THE HOUSE ACUTE, NSW Bold and beautiful, this brutalist-inspired home is located just outside of Sydney, where it sits like an abstract sculpture overlooking the Pacific Ocean. A tight parcel of land dictated the shape of this home, which features a much-loved communal space a roof terrace that surveys both bush and ocean views. WO R DS: A M Y CO L L I N S-WA L K E R // P H OTO G R A P H Y: B R E T T B OA R D M A N


The Design / The Natural Artisan

" A W E D G E- S H A P E D, A L M O S T FO R G OT T E N P A R C E L O F L A N D T H AT U LT I M AT E LY INFLUENCED THE SHAPE OF THE DESIGN"


The Design / The Natural Artisan

WHO LIVES IN THE HOME

master bedroom, however, flanks the rear

The home is a weekender that was

of the kitchen on the first floor meaning

designed for a family of six to escape their

when the home is occupied by one couple,

busy Sydney lives and the distraction that

they can live on a single level.

routine can bring. W H AT I S T H E P O S I T I O N I N G A B O U T T H E A R C H I T E C T:

OF THE HOUSE AND WHERE

W H AT WA S YO U R FAVO U R I T E PART OF TH E PROJ EC T ?

Definitely the ‘pointy end'. The site is

I S I T LO C AT E D?

a wedged-shaped, almost forgotten tight

Located at the edge of a coastal bluff,

parcel of land that ultimately influenced

What is the MCK design ethos?

close to the Pacific Ocean, the home is

the shape of the design. Being the first

Our ethos centres around design as

compact yet robust. The home orientates

property in the street and at the end of

itself towards the bush and ocean views

a steep incline, we knew the ‘pointy end’

face of constraint or adversity.

to the east and south and turns its back

would turn heads as people in their cars

on the street. The layout comprises two

swept past the site, and enjoyed that

connected pavilions that pivot over each

moment when the wedge shape of the

other at the tight end of the wedged

building suddenly appears impossibly thin.

STEVE KOOLLOOS

a process to create opportunity in the

Where do you find inspiration? Inspiration can come from a

completely random source; there

is often no formula to how it arrives.

shaped site, appearing to float above the native landscape.

ARE THERE ANY SPECIAL

W H AT WA S T H E D E S I G N B R I E F ?

The two concrete pavilions are made to

expect it and can often come from

The brief called for a weekender that was

contrast by adding a timber grained

as comfortable for a couple as it was for

formed texture to the top floor in contrast

before, or the lyrics of a song.

the entire family. The site was tight but

to the flat off-form finish of the ground

was also the first house in the street and

floor. Plate steel was introduced again to

closest to the ocean, so views and privacy

provide some fine edged hoods competing

were important design targets to aim for.

against the bulk and visual heaviness of

Being a weekender, the owners were also

the concrete. The exterior concrete is

looking for something that was easy care.

matched on the interior, but balanced by

People, context and existing conditions inform our design process, but true inspiration hits you when you least

something you saw travelling years

What are your influences? As much as my influences come from my architectural heroes, the big

thinkers like Niemeyer or Le Corbusier, I find great influence from the day to

day people in my life – my family, work colleagues and even my deceased

father. He was a builder who taught me

to draw and use my hands. I find myself

P O R T R A I T: L A U R A R E I D

on the ground floor entry level. The

AND HOW IS IT USED?

FINISHES INSIDE THE HOME?

some clean white walls. We worked with TELL US ABOUT THE USE OF CONCRETE AS AN EXTERIOR AESTHETIC.

continually challenged by my children

The use of off-form unfinished concrete

without the constraints of the need to

aesthetic. Concrete was adopted early in

freedom is as innocent as it is inspiring.

Briony Fitzgerald on the interiors who added a coating of warmth throughout the interior with plywood, and punches of colour throughout the wet areas.

who effortlessly think and sketch

has given the home a genuine brutalist

understand structure and gravity. That

the process to offset the bushfire zone to

UNIQUE ROOF TERRACE.

the site’s south and to create a form that

Council gave us approval for the roof

could withstand the coastal elements.

terrace with no structure higher than a

What is your favourite project?

DESCRIBE THE HOME'S

handrail. The current design includes an

Every project where we get to witness

W H AT A R E SO M E O F T H E M O R E

metaphorically takes someone’s

The plan has been flipped such that the

directly from the main living level below.

primary living space is on the first floor

The roof terrace has become a really

where the views are more easily obtained

important break out space as the family

and bedroom accommodation is located

has grown.

that moment the architecture

breath away. Architecture's a powerful medium and is extremely rewarding in this respect.

U N I Q U E I N T E R I O R F E AT U R E S?

‘L’ shaped motorised roof-light that slides below handrail height to permit access

issue no 17

/ The Natural Artisan

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" C O N C R E T E W A S A D O P T E D E A R LY I N T H E P R O C E S S TO O F F S E T T H E B U S H F I R E ZO N E "

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issue no 17


The Design / The Natural Artisan

1.

✖ ROCKCOTE Marrakesh (Polished Finish) in Concrete. Drawing inspiration from traditional Tadelakt and Moroccan plaster finishes, Marrakesh delivers a smooth, lustrous and luxurious finish. Here Marrakesh has been used to recreate the look of polished concrete, showing its power to create beautiful, contemporary spaces.

3. 2.

6. 5.

7.

4. TH IS PAGE 1.

Ferm Living Kelim Rug in Squares, $599,

5.

2.

Ambit Pendant 40cm in Black, $535,

6.

Hank Vertical Chandelier, $148, top3.com.au

4.

Guest Chair by Swedese, $3,150,

Knot cushion by UMEMI, $229, fentonandfenton.com.au

simpleform.com.au 3.

MENU Salt and Pepper Bottle Grinders in Ash and Carbon, $129, designstuff.com.au

urbancouture.com.au

7.

ROCKCOTE Marrakesh Polished Decorative Effect in Concrete, rockcote.com.au

fredinternational.com.au

issue no 17

/ The Natural Artisan

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The Influencer / The Natural Artisan

SOCIAL

SCENE DANA TOMIĆ HUGHES, YELLOW TR ACE Dana is the founder of Yellowtrace and Studio Yellowtrace, a design blog and interior design service. Her irreverent style and witty approach to design communication has seen her win awards, and gather tens of thousands of fans on social media. WORDS: NINA DORN

// P H OTO G R A P H Y: J O D U C K

YOU BEGAN YELLOW TR ACE IN

2010. DID YOU EXPEC T SOCIAL M E D I A T O B E C O M E S O H U G E LY

PORTRAIT PHOTO COURTESY OF JONES MAGAZINE

INFLUENTIAL?

thing feels like a huge deal when you’re first taking the leap. For me, starting Yellowtrace felt like a massive risk back then, and I was terrified of so many things.

I don’t necessarily feel social media

Other people’s judgement was at the very

exploded overnight. It was more like

top, but I’ve since then learned that every-

a slow creep until people eventually

one else is too caught up in their own crap

panicked and felt they suddenly had to be

to worry about what you’re doing. Try it,

on everything. With regards to Instagram

it’s absolutely liberating!

specifically, everything was so different when it first started, and it’s totally changed in nature since the beginning.

I N W H AT WAYS H A S SO C I A L MEDIA BENEFITED THE

It is now a publishing platform in its own

DESIGN PROFESSION?

right, and I have a bit of a love/ hate

Social media has levelled the playing field

relationship with it, if I’m 100% honest.

and democratised the design profession. It

Hang on, what was your question?

has never been easier to access good

D I D TH E FAC T SOCIAL M ED IA

WASN'T AS POPULAR MAKE IT EASIER TO LAUNCH?

content, or connect with clients, suppliers and collaborators. On the flip side, it has created a huge amount of hype and noise, which makes it more difficult to focus.

Not at all. If you think about it – every-

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The Influencer / The Natural Artisan

" I ’ V E L E A R N E D TO T R U S T M Y I N T U I T I O N I M P L I C I T LY " HOW DO YOU EDIT ALL THE

W H AT ' S T H E B E S T C O U N T RY

IN HER SHOES

V I E W O N A D A I LY B A S I S ?

I N S P I R AT I O N ?

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF DANA

AMAZING VISUALS YOU MUST

TO VISIT FOR DESIGN

It’s taken me years of practice, discipline

Probably Denmark, where design is

and perfecting my decision-making skills.

fundamental woven into the very day.

Although it may sound frivolous when I say that I chose content for Yellowtrace

DO YOU HAVE A

TOMIĆ HUGHES 6:40am: I hit snooze, scan emails & social media, then rush like mad to my Pilates class because I spent too long on

quickly and spontaneously, I’ve learned to

FAVOU RITE H OTEL?

trust my intuition implicitly which has

The favourite two hotels I’ve stayed in

also developed from practicing as an

so far are The Upper House in Hong Kong

interior designer for more than a decade.

and Katamama in Bali. Like, OMG!

and my vitamins.

I N YO U R O P I N I O N , W H AT A R E

HOW WAS THE TRANSITION

together almost every day. Then we grab a

I N S TAG R A M AC C O U N T S?

ARCHITECTURE FIRM TO

T H E T O P 3 M U S T- FO L L O W

FROM A COMMERCIAL

My most favourite accounts have nothing

WORKING SOLO?

to do with design and architecture, but

Thrilling, liberating and terrifying. There

I do love following @ad_magazine,

were so many unknowns, I literally had no

@cntraveler and @nasa.

idea how anything would work - and whether it would work at all - but you

W H AT ’ S T H E B I G G E S T

OPPORTUNIT Y TO YOU AS A DESIGN INFLUENCER?

never know what you’re made of until you put yourself into a situation where you just have to work things out.

It’s taken a lot of hard work to build a platform I’m very proud of today, and it

W H AT A R E YO U R D E S I G N

the phone.

8:10am: Shower, get dressed, look for

keys, drink some crazy healthy green juice 8:40am: Nick and I walk our son to school coffee on our way to the studio and call that our ‘directors meeting’.

9:15am: I plan my agenda and catch up

with the team. I’m always super strict with my time otherwise I’d get nothing done.

10:45 am: Eat a handful of nuts cause I’m starving (I’m really into tamari almonds at the moment!). Then more emails, phone calls and stuff.

1:30pm: Lunch, which I try not to eat at my

desk as much as possible. I often fail at this. 2:00pm Afternoons are usually pure

creation. I could be researching, writing,

takes even more hard work to maintain it.

PREDICTIONS FOR 2019?

But I hope to be able to continue

Design that embraces technology - and

propagating good design, presenting the

New Look Yellowtrace. Watch this space!

talk, writing one of my regular magazine

W H AT I S YO U R FAVO U R I T E

7:30pm Dinner at home then wrestling

best of the best, and also remind other designers why they got into this profession in the first place. Because I know for

ARTISAN-PRODUCED DESIGN

editing, conceptualising, working on

presentation for new business, preparing a columns, going off on a shoot etc.

with our son’s homework and bedtime

a fact it’s easy to forget this with the

OR PRODUCT?

routine. Usually have a glass of red on the

pressures of the daily grind.

I love the work of Melbourne-based

9:00pm Try not to fall asleep during said

stone mason and artist Steven John Clark, FAVOU RITE BU I LD I N G?

aka Den holm.

Pantheon (Roman temple in Rome). It's the only building that makes me cry.

16 The Natural Artisan

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issue no 17

go. Because I’m worth it.

bedtime routine, but I often do cause I’m exhausted.

11:00pm Is my ideal bedtime, but I’m not that lucky most nights…


LOVE THIS Achieve a similar

finish with ROCKCOTE Clay or Ecostyle Paint

Williams Burton Leopardi Studio in Adelaide

Below:

Malababa Flagship in Madrid by Ciszak Dalmas

and Matteo Ferrari

Right:

Hotel National des Arts et Metiers_Paris by Raphael Navot

2.

CHRISTOPHER MORRISON, ASIER RUA , JÉRÔME GALL AND

Above:

issue no 17

/ The Natural Artisan

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18 The Natural Artisan

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issue no 17


The Home / The Natural Artisan

SUMMER

DREAMS T H E B E L L E V U E H I L L H O U S E , S Y D N E Y, N S W With tropical plant life and expansive white-washed spaces, this airy home captures the feeling of a languid summer day on the Mediterranean. We speak to Megan Burns, Director of CM Studio, who transformed this French-style home into an exotic oasis. WO R DS: R OS A M U N D B R E N N A N // P H OTO G R A P H Y: A N S O N S M A RT

W H AT WA S T H E C L I E N T ' S

VISION FOR THE PROJECT?

M E E T T H E A R C H I T E C T: MEGAN BURNS

retained much of the front façade, and just painting the house white with

Our client had a really clear vision for the

How did CM Studio come about?

a beautiful tactile lime wash transformed

project. She wanted to create a home that

the home. We extended the property to

CM Studio started straight after I

had a relaxed holiday vibe with Mediterra-

the rear to allow a more open-planned

nean influences. She chose CM Studio

kitchen space, spilling out to the external

because we work with a layered natural

casual dining areas. We adjusted the

palette and detail our projects simply.

existing stairs and introduced a walk-in

While there were aesthetic elements -

pantry that our client sourced some

such as influences from European holiday

beautiful shutters for. All the surfaces

houses – in essence the owner

were refinished, and all the bathrooms

was looking for a sophisticated, natural

completely gutted. The landscaping was

palette using textured, organic materials

updated introducing palm trees, michelia

and open planned spaces for relaxation

albas and a lot of textural succulents.

finished studying architecture. I had worked in firms overseas and in

Sydney while completing my degree,

and this really cemented my desire to focus on single dwelling residential

projects and own my own business. How would you describe your design philosophy? There are a number of factors that shape a project, including site

constraints, council conditions and

and entertaining. HOW DID YOU BRING THIS CONCEPT TO LIFE?

the clients’ wish list. We do not

ROCKCOTE MARRAKESH

subscribe to a particular style or look.

PLASTER EFFECT WAS USED

What we do focus on is a layered

T H R O U G H O U T. T E L L U S M O R E . . .

The house was not particularly old, it had

Our client loved the Moroccan tadelakt

been built in the last 15 years or so. We

look and had mentioned it in an early

natural palette and simple detailing. No matter what the 'style' is of our projects this is a common thread.

issue no 17

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The Home / The Natural Artisan

✖

LOVE THIS

CM Studio specified ROCKCOTE Marrakesh in its Natural Colour to achieve this look throughout the home

issue no 17

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The Home / The Natural Artisan

design meeting. We had no idea what it

The pine boards were painted white and in

flow through the house. There are lots of

was, so we met with Sydney-based plaster

some of the bathrooms and balconies we

really special features in the kitchen,

artist Peter Holmes and quickly got up to

introduced small terracotta bricks that

including shelves for styling and

speed. We used ROCKCOTE Marrakesh to

were laid in a herringbone pattern. All the

displaying as well as the large island that

achieve the look throughout, with a

joinery doors were made from recycled

is not only a functional work space, but

combination of smooth and rough

oregon and painted white. This introduced

big enough for food display. There is also

textures to create depth. The contrast

a really lovely quality of hand-made,

a bar area off the kitchen window, so you

between rough and smooth is particularly

natural materials which complemented

relax outdoors and be served from the

evident in the powder room, for example,

the ROCKCOTE Marrakesh effect. Those

inside for special events or dinner parties.

where the imported Italian marble sink

two materials really speak to each other,

rests on a smooth floating bench against a

particularly in the kitchen. Our client

rough wall. Most of the kitchen is smooth,

styled the home with a muted palette that

which we built using Hebel. We were using

works effortlessly with the subtle tones of

PLEASED WITH?

ROCKCOTE Marrakesh in ways that had

finishes and spaces.

Honestly, the fact that when you go

never been seen before, such as the floors of the bathrooms. It worked well; it’s a

WHICH ASPECT OF THE

PROPERT Y ARE YOU MOST

through the gates you just feel transportT H E H O M E C L E A R LY H A S

ed. It does feel like a holiday home and

really beautiful finish.

A FO C U S O N E N T E R TA I N I N G ,

W H AT W E R E SO M E O F T H E

Our client loves entertaining and that was

It’s just a lovely sanctuary for my client

OTHER UNIQUE FINISHES USED?

a big driver for renovating the kitchen. We

and her girls to enjoy.

We used a really subtle palette internally.

expanded it out to the rear to improve the

22 The Natural Artisan

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issue no 17

HOW DID YOU ACHIEVE THIS?

has such a calm and relaxing vibe about it, but it's within 15 minutes of the city.


THE PRODUCT ROCKCOTE MARRAKESH

Translating to ‘massage with stone’ in Arabic, Tadelakt is a traditional lime plaster method originating from

Morocco in the eleventh century.

Smooth and elegant, it’s often used as a finish on feature walls, sculpted bedheads, handcrafted dado rails,

fireplace surrounds and entry areas. Sydney-based plaster artisan Peter Holmes used the ROCKCOTE

Marrakesh significantly throughout

this home. From the open kitchen to each of the four bathrooms, the

ROCKCOTE Marrakesh finish on the walls creates a natural, organic and

smooth surface to complement the rustic feel of the space.


" W E W E R E U S I N G R O C KC OT E M A R R A K E S H I N W A Y S T H AT H A D N E V E R B E E N S E E N B E F O R E "


The Home / The Natural Artisan

✖ ROCKCOTE Marrakesh in its Natural

1.

Colour. For the ultimate in versatility Marrakesh can be used in its raw state or tinted to a wide range of colours using oxides. The seamless and sensuous form of Marrakesh evokes a timeless sense of style and grace, reminiscent of traditional Tadelakt and Moroccan plaster finishes. 2.

3.

4.

4.

6.

5.

7.

TH IS PAGE 1.

Carly Wall Hanging in Large, $329,

4.

2.

ROCKCOTE Marrakesh in its Natural Colour,

5.

Leaf Supply: A Guide to Keeping Happy House Plants, $49.99, thedesignedit.com.au

rockcote.com.au 3.

Faux Cactus in White Ceramic Pot, $94, templeandwebster.com.au

zanui.com.au

Santa Maria Novella Nostalgia Cologne,

6.

The Spencer Boater, $79, lackofcolour.com.au

$180, mensbiz.com.au

7.

HK Living Rattan Egg Chair in Natural Bohemian, $899, norsu.com.au

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The Artisan / The Natural Artisan

S M O OT H

SAILING MR AND MRS WHITE FURNITURE DESIGNERS Cutting his artisanal teeth in the precision-focussed shipwright trade, Nathan White of Mr and Mrs White talks furniture design and shopfitting - the kind that’s delivered with a special blend of elegance and humility. W O R D S : S A L LY PAT E R S O N //

PHOTOGR APHY: JOSHUA WHITE

TA K E U S B AC K TO YO U R

HOW DID MR AND MRS WHITE

SKILLS WERE HONED.

INTO BEING?

TR AINING AND WHERE YOUR

FURNITURE DESIGN COME

I started with a shipwright apprenticeship

My wife Sasha and I were newlyweds

for four years. There is very minimal room

living in a small apartment. She was a

for error as a shipwright - if you’re

student and I was an apprentice, so we

a couple of millimetres out you could

decided to make what we could for our

throw the whole boat out!

home - Sasha on the sewing machine

So you have to really focus on the smaller

her grandmother gave her, and me

things, the detail. I use a lot of what

making furniture.

I learnt in the boats in making our

It involved being clever in what we

furniture, in terms of structure. Our

created because it was such a small space,

designs are honest and simple, but we

but we really took pride in what we were

want them to be made to an exceptional

pulling together. Family and friends

level of quality. After the shipwright

started noticing and before long we were

apprenticeship I went into cabinet making

selling a few things. We rented a small

and learnt even more skills that had an

factory inside a factory and I’d go there

application in furniture craftsmanship.

after hours and do little jobs on the side.

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✖

LOVE THIS

Get a similar finish using ROCKCOTE Otsumigaki in its Natural Colour


WAS IT DAUNTING LAUNCHING

W H AT I S YO U R FAVO U R I T E

M AT E R I A L TO W O R K W I T H ?

THE WHITE HOUSE M A N LY, N S W

Yes! When we finally moved to the larger

Oak will always be a good, staple, go-to

Sasha, tell us about your new Manly

premises we did it without having a lot

timber so we’ll always keep that. We have

store. How did you shape it to suit

of work lined up, but we thought if we

been doing a lot with walnut lately, in

your needs?

secured the factory we’d be able to take on

some settings it works really well and it’s

more work. Looking back it was probably

a reliable material to work with. Maple

the scariest thing we’ve ever done, but

features in our range also, and we started

we’ve learnt that if we want to keep

using ash when we were doing the shop fit

growing we have to make those big

out for Assembly Label and it’s continued

decisions and leaps.

into our collections.

W H AT I N S P I R E S YO U R

W H AT OT H E R S H O P F I T O U T S

One of the things we love about Japanese

We’ve done 10 stores for Assembly Label

Why the location?

design is their quality of craftsmanship

now, and each one has involved something

The area has become a design

and their detail-focus to joins. We’re also

fresh and unique in the design. This year,

drawn to the Scandinavian aesthetic for

Sasha designed the new Paddington store

its clean simplicity and practicality. We’ve

for Bondi Wash. It’s a really exciting store

always tended to design as if it’s for our

with a lot of cool, quirky pieces in there

home - thinking of a space and designing

and a decadent mix of oak, green onyx

to suit it. In a way we’re going back to

and brass. That was a really tricky but fun

where it all began when we were fitting

project - lots of curves, counters made

out our own apartment - creating pieces

from solid timber and detailing. The whole

Any plans to expand?

to live with that are functional but at the

project really drew on the relationship

same time very beautiful and timeless.

with the boat building.

Definitely! We’re really enjoying Manly,

A SIDE BUSINESS?

HAVE YOU BEEN WORKING ON?

FURNITURE DESIGNS?

30 The Natural Artisan

/

issue no 17

It’s in a beautiful old building full of

hidden gems, like the timber flooring we unearthed. We stripped the space back to basics, created a central archway,

sanded the floors down and applied a beautiful textured paint. The counter and wall unit are the only fixed pieces,

the rest is our free-standing furniture and soft furnishings.

destination with a strong creative

community including our neighbours Assembly Label and now The Horse. Also, Nathan and our first daughter

Selah were born in Manly, so it seemed perfect for our vision of creating

a shopfront that feels like a home.

but would love to expand to Melbourne.


The Artisan / The Natural Artisan

issue no 17

/ The Natural Artisan

31


ROCKCOTE is the natural choice for those with a deep appreciation for outstanding design, quality, performance and beauty.

For almost 40 years ROCKCOTE has created award-winning people safe paints, renders and finishes for residential and commercial building projects. Proudly designed and manufactured in Australia, ROCKCOTE’s range of over 100 products has been borne from a profound respect for Mother Nature, along with ancient knowledge and traditional skills. When combined with ROCKCOTE’s reputation for innovation, the result is naturally beautiful spaces that honour our planet and its people.

To speak with ROCKCOTE’s fully qualified Interior Designer or find your nearest Australian or New Zealand Distributor contact: phone:

1300 736 668

email:

enquiries@rockcote.com.au

www.rockcote.com.au

Profile for The Natural Artisan

The Natural Artisan: Issue 17  

For people passionate about naturally beautiful spaces, places and objects

The Natural Artisan: Issue 17  

For people passionate about naturally beautiful spaces, places and objects