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Niez Marie Aguirre “My heritage consists of the present, past, and future. The simultaneous awareness of all three provides a level of responsibility and integrity to the work I put into all my projects. Our Mother Earth is filled with an abundance of gifts bestowed by creator. Her resilient ability to blossom under the most unexpected places is a guiding example. I commit to following in mother earth’s lead and recognizing our duty to protect her for the generations who have came, the ones that are here now, and the ones who shall follow.” About the look: “Using the tones and colors of nature as an inspiration has always been present in my work. The Roses Vibrant eye glam was used to display precisely that. Roses are strikingly vibrant and beautiful. The tones of pinks and reds connect me to the gracefulness and radiance of the blossoming flower. The deeper tones are mesmerizing and accentuate the velvet-like petals.”

@niezmarie.beauty

Stevie Tobacco (Oglala & Mnicoujou Lakota) “My maiden name is Stevie Tobacco, and I am Oglala and Mnicoujou Lakota. I’m married to my high school sweetheart, who is a descendant of Chief Bigfoot. We have three beautiful babies together. I am also a registered nurse but currently, a stay-at-home mom where I love to express and explore my love for makeup.”

@_smtlf88_

About the look: “I chose to do the milky way because it’s the path we take when we walk on.”

Quilapiza Sorimpt (Colville) “I am from the Colville Confederated tribes of the Colville Reservation. I grew up in Seattle, Washington. I started doing makeup about five years ago but didn’t get serious until about three years ago after getting clean of substance abuse and a miscarriage. After my miscarriage, I wanted to do makeup to make myself feel good, look great-feel-great kind of thing. But I was crying inside. I came home from the hospital and sat down to do my everyday makeup. Then came across a picture of a beautiful warrior with a face full of paint. I decided to paint my face to uplift myself, something I never have done before. I didn’t have paint and used lipstick and eyeshadow to make it happen. When I finished, I got a call and was asked to go to the grocery store. I was covered in full warpaint. I didn’t care. My heart was too broken. I went to the store and was stared at by so many, like a rockstar. I got in line to pay, and another customer asked me, “are you real? I thought your people were gone?” I smiled at the ridiculous question and replied, “we are still here.” When I got home, I realized, “we are still here.” Nobody recognizes us because we look like everyone else. We were forbidden to wear our traditional makeup. And now we are free to do so as we wish. The world shows us true beauty is to look like Kim Kardashian or Kylie Jenner, or those models in magazines, so we all look the same. No beauty is more exotic than our own. And we forgot our ways. We can wear our traditions proudly now. Yes, everyone that looks the same is quickly forgotten. But nobody forgets an Indigenous beauty who wears her culture proudly like a warrior. I am a warrior. I am a descendant of warriors who have given their lives and their ways so I can be free. To honor them, I paint my face like a warrior. I paint my face because no beauty is more exotic than my own. And I’ll wear it to honor those who weren’t free to do so.” @quilapiza1982

NATIVE MAX MAGAZINE | 37

Profile for Native Max Magazine

Native Max Magazine - November/December 2020  

Welcome to the Native American Heritage Issue, featuring Muscogee Creek, Colville, Salish-Kootenai, and Cherokee tattoo artist and actress N...

Native Max Magazine - November/December 2020  

Welcome to the Native American Heritage Issue, featuring Muscogee Creek, Colville, Salish-Kootenai, and Cherokee tattoo artist and actress N...

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