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VOL. 7, NO. 1889 TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

TR UTH IN DEFENCE OF FREEDOM TRUTH

N150.00

I can’t be intimidated, says Tinubu

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•Asiwaju Tinubu ... yesterday

PHOTO: ISAAC AYODELE

ORMER Lagos State Governor Asiwaju Bola Ahmed Tinubu said yesterday he is not perturbed by his scheduled appearance tomorrow before the Code of Conduct Tribunal. Tinubu has been summoned by the Tribunal to appear for allegedly keeping foreign accounts while in office. Speaking at the Murtala Muhammed Airport in Lagos on his arrival from a foreign trip, he described his sum-

•Tribunal: trial not politically motivated

We have seen the level that the ruling party will go to destabilise the opposition through the Code of Conduct Bureau ... How come the ruling party could not find anything to hold on to after many years since I left office? For the ruling party, it is a good time to lynch the opposition. By Kelvin Osa-Okunbor

mon by the Tribunal as “politically-motivated” and “illtimed.”

According to the Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN) national leader, it is an attempt to silence him as the leader of the largest opposi-

tion party. But, according to him, he is no stranger to political Continued on page 2

Obasanjo, Boko Haram peace talks under threat Activist says he may quit mission

SET FOR THE LEGAL YEAR

From Tony Akowe, Kaduna

From Kamarudeen Ogundele, Ifeoluwa Ojo and Anne Udeze, Abuja

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IVIL rights campaigner Shehu Sani yesterday said he facilitated the meeting between former President Olusegun Obasanjo and Boko Haram leader Yusuf Mohammed’s brother-in-law, Babakura Fugu, in the interest of peace. But the activist threatened to quit the talks should the government fail to grant the sect’s requests. Obasanjo apparently met with Fugu in Maiduguri in an attempt to establish dialogue between the government and the Islamic fundamentalist group, which has claimed responsibility for most of the bombings that rocked some parts of the North, including the UN House, Abuja explosion that killed 23 people. Barely 72 hours after the meeting, Fugu was murdered by those believed to be hardline members of the Boko Haram sect. SEE Sani, president of the Civil Rights Congress (CRC), urged the government to ALSO guarantee the safety of Boko Haram memPAGE bers, if Obasanjo’s peace initiative is to suc53 ceed. Sani, speaking on the telephone yesterday, said he had informed the former President and the Boko Haram leadership that he will pull out of the process, if the government fails to meet the sect’s demands, which were passed to the government through Obasanjo. To him, Fugu’s killing is a sacrifice for the peace process. Said Sani: “I facilitated the first meeting between the Boko Haram members and Obasanjo and I will not put my life on the line again for another meeting with them, unless the government meets their demands and guarantees the security of their members and myself. “I facilitated the meeting in the interest of peace and the need to end the orgy of violence and bloodletting Continued on page 2

Musdapher to reform NJC

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LL is not well with the judiciary, Acting Chief Justice of Nigeria Dahiru Musdapher and Nigerian Bar Association (NBA) President Joseph Daudu (SAN) said yesterday. Justice Musdapher is worried about the public perception of judicial officers as corrupt. To Daudu, it is regretful that “the credibility and image of the justice delivery system have been severely dented”. The NBA boss observed that “there are question marks on the ability of the judicial system to deliver justice rooted in the universal principles of the Rule of Law and constitutionalism”. The duo spoke at the Special Session of the Supreme Court to mark the beginning of the 2011/2012 Legal Year in Abuja, which was presided over by Justice Musdapher. But the Acting CJN said Nigerians should not lose sleep over the worrisome trends as efforts were on to reverse the situation. He promised to raise a Judicial Reform Committee, which will overhaul the administration of justice that will restore public confidence in the judiciary. In the interim, the Judiciary, the Executive and the Legislature are making several amendments to the Constitution and other laws to enhance judicial efficiency and probity, he said. Justice Musdapher went on: “Though we have always done our best, I feel it is honourable to admit that things are not as they ought to be. Since the judiciary exists •Justice Musdapher at the session ... yesterday

PHOTO: ABAYOMI FAYESE

Continued on page 2

•AVIATION P13 •SPORTS P23 •PROPERTY P25 •ENERGY P37 •POLITICS P48


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

NEWS Libyan rebels arrest more Nigerians

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•Delegates to the 5th Nigerian Dredging Summit on tour of the ECM terminal at Calabar Port ... yesterday PHOTO: NAN

FTER a two-week reprieve, the crackdown on Nigerians in Libya continued yesterday. Besides, most of the detained 200 Nigerians have not been released, The Nation learnt. Although 30 women among the detainees were set free yesterday by the rebels, a spokesman for the trapped Nigerians in Libya, Mr. Daramola Siji, said more male Nigerians were quickly arrested to “fill the vacuum” left by the women. The troubled Nigerians are pleading with the Federal Government to prevail on Britain and France to lift the air sanction on Libya to enable them return home. Siji, who spoke exclusively with The Nation, claimed that

I can’t be intimidated, says Tinubu Continued from page 1

persecution, having been slammed with a treason charge during the regime of the late Gen. Sani Abacha. Tinubu urged the ruling Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), which he accused of being behind his invitation by the Tribunal, to learn from the revolutions in the Middle East, including Libya, where the 41-year regime of Col. Muammar Gaddafi has fallen. The former Lagos State Governor said: “I can just tell you that nothing will intimidate me as a leader of the opposition in Nigeria. I believe wholeheartedly in the tenets of constitutional democracy and the rule of law. And as a politician, I’m used to being persecuted or tried. There was this experience of the treasonable felony hanged on me during the Abacha era; when they hanged a life sentence on me. After all, it is democracy in a very dangerous environment. “But they cannot induce any charge to silence the opposition in this country. The question of

Tribunal: case not political

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HE Code of Conduct Tribunal said yesterday that its case against Asiwaju Bola Tinubu is not political. In a statement by its spokesperson Iyabo Akinwale, the Tribunal said: “The case of ex-Governor Asiwaju Tinubu started in May 2007 before the Code of Conduct Tribunal. Therefore, it has no political undertone. The case was only put on hold because investigation was on going. “In addition, the attention of the Code of Conduct Bureau has been drawn to the fact that some political office holders and public servants are in the habit of not submitting their assets declaration forms after collection. “The Bureau wishes to remind all public office holders and public servants to endeavour to complete and submit their assets declaration forms within thirty (30) days of collection to avoid appearing before the Tribunal for prosecution.” the rule of law, the question of dividing the judiciary, the question of the ruling party orchestrating allegations to silence the opposition party, and the urge to continue to rule without obeying the rule does not bother me. We have seen the end of the Gaddafi authoritarian rule. “We have seen the level that the ruling party will go to destabilise the opposition through the Code of Conduct

Bureau. This is clear to everybody. How come the ruling party could not find anything to hold on to after many years since I left office? For the ruling party, it is a good time to lynch the opposition. “It is the same ruling party that is orchestrating various charges against the judiciary to destabilise it. I am not worried about all that. “ Tinubu said though the Eco-

nomic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) is probing the activities of the Lagos State House of Assembly, he is convinced that Speaker Adeyemi Ikuforiji is an honest man. He said: “The matter is under investigation and it is in court. We have confidence that the speaker is not a fraudulent person. People have a right to petition. Now, the speaker and I are facing all sorts of allegations. We know what is coming for the opposition and we are ready for them. Coming at this time, we are prepared. “I think they are all politically motivated. The noise about it is political. It is politics.com. It is tyranny of dead ideas. They have done it before; it was inherited from their founding fathers. “The same political foot steps; the same political action. I’m going to face them. I’m happy to be back home.” On who the founding fathers are, Tinubu said: “You know them, if you do not know, that is a riddle for you.”

•Blacks ‘not intimidated’ -p53 From Yusuf Alli, Abuja

Col. Muammar Gaddafi’s firespitting broadcast has led to the fresh crackdown on Nigerians. He said: “The rebels have started attacking and arresting Nigerians again, following fugitive Gaddafi’s adamant posture. “The fate of the over 200 Nigerians in underground cells is still unknown. Although 30 Nigerian women were released on Monday, more male Nigerians were arrested at Libya’s borders with Tunis and Mahruga (near Tripoli) to replace those lucky women.” “The thinking of the Transitional National Council (TNC), the new rulers of Libya, is that Gaddafi has succeeded in holding on till now because Blacks are fighting his cause. Nigerians in Libya are erroneously thought to be fighting for that beleaguered Colonel. “But the rebels do not know that the pro-Gaddafi forces are not Nigerians. They are other Black migrant workers

from Niger, Chad, Burkina Faso and others.” Siji said: “We have appealed to the Federal Government to evacuate Nigerians in Libya, but no action has been taken. “Our latest plea is that the government should prevail on Britain and France to ensure the lifting of air sanction on Libya by NATO to enable us find our way back home. “We have reached a point that some of us are ready to pay our way through to return to Nigeria. If not for the air sanction, some of us would have returned home.” A Ministry of Foreign Affairs source, who spoke in confidence, said: “The plight of stranded Nigerians and other Black migrant workers will certainly come up in the discussion with TNC leaders at the ongoing General Assembly of the United Nations (UN). “We will find a common ground on the issue. Let us be hopeful.” Continued on page 6

Peace talks under threat Continued from page 1

by the group. The intention is to help stop the spate of killings that the government has not been able to stop. “I was compelled by the fact that prominent Northerners took the option of remaining silent or neutral, and so, I mooted the idea and facilitated the meeting between the Boko Haram group and Obasanjo. I will not be party to another meeting, until the request of the late Fugu, which he passed to the government through Obasanjo, is granted. “I believe the violence can be brought to an end through this type of initiative, if it is

well explored. “I sympathise with the family of the late Fugu for his death and I want to say that he was a man of peace who was ready to start the process of peace by bringing violence to an end. His death should be seen as a sacrifice for peace and an end to violence in the country. “I have told the Boko Haram people and the former President that in the event that there is no guarantee from the government, I will pull out of the deal because I cannot convince people to come for negotiation only for them to be hunted down. If their conditions are not met, Nigerians should consider the process as dead.”

Acting CJN Musdapher promises to reform judiciary Falana: Bar, Bench must join forces

Continued from page 1

for the benefit of society, then the essential verdict regarding our performance must be from that which we sit to serve. “As it stands today, it appears that the society we serve is not entirely satisfied with our performance. Hard as it may be to accept, we feel it is less important to focus on whether this assessment is fair or not. The important thing is for us to transparently come to terms with the prevailing realities, accept the gap in expectations, and do our utmost to bridge it. “So, let me assure you that we are fully aware of the weighty responsibilities hanging on our shoulders, and we shall do our utmost to discharge them with vigour, truth and dignity. “Therefore, we must have an efficient judiciary manned by judges that conduct themselves with fairness and integrity in all of their dealings; both socially and professionally. “The public’s perception of our propriety and the system we represent must be that of respect and admiration. We must consistently perform our judicial functions in a

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CTIVIST-lawyer Femi Falana yesterday praised Acting Chief Justice of Nigeria (CJN) Dahiru Musdapher’s plan to reform the judiciary and ensure zero tolerance for corruption and misconduct. Falana, who spoke in a telephone interview, said: “His declaration could not have come at a better time especially when the judiciary is facing intensive criticism from the media and the public.” Justice Musdapher yesterday during a special court session at the Supreme Court in Abuja to mark the beginning of the 2011/ 2012 legal year, promised to ensure that those who abuse the privilege of judicial authority will be punished. manner that would not erode the public’s belief that those saddled with the responsibility of redressing wrongs done unto them are beacons of fairness, equity, competence, propriety and justice.” Daudu regretted that “there is a growing perception backed up by empirical evidence that Justice is purchasable in and it has been purchased on several occasions in Nigeria”. “We are reaching the point in time where accusations of corruption in the system will be at its loudest.

By Toluwani Eniola

Falana , who urged the Bar to take the lead in exposing corrupt judges, said the suspension of President of Court of Appeal (PCA) Justice Ayo Salami underscored the disturbing trend of judicial corruption. He said the Salami matter should spur the need to reform the judiciary. Falana said the judiciary witnessed such lapses in the 80’s when an Attorney General was the accuser and the judge over legal issues. The lawyer said it took the intervention of the late Chief Gani Fawehinmi (SAN), who challenged the case in the High Court. The victory, he said, led to the introduction of the Legal

The various Election Tribunals are in the process of delivering judgments. The Court of Appeal is beginning to deal with interlocutory appeals and some final decisions in some governorship disputes. “No wonder assassinations, unresolved killings and terrorism are on the rise in Nigeria. The root cause is the failure to provide authentic, credible and indeed realistic justice to Nigerians.” The Acting CJN, who warned Judges to sit up or

Practitioners’s Act to control the excesses. He said: “It is very important for the Bar to work hand-in-hand with the Bench to restructure the judiciary. They must come together to save the situation .Besides, efforts must be put in place to ensure that the leadership of the NJC is not subject to any serving judicial officer. This will enable it to maintain its autonomy and pave the way for its independence. “I also want to advise the NBA to set up a Judicial Monitoring Committee in each of its branches to stop this disturbing trend. This is because it is the lawyers that know the corrupt judges better. Lawyers exchange information with them daily.”

face removal from office, challenged the public to go beyond mere allegation against a judicial officer by backing their claims with empirical evidence. “Accordingly, it is very important to ensure that those who abuse the privilege of judicial authority are exposed, expunged, banished and punished. “I feel it is necessary at this point to strongly advise that those who cannot sustain the true allegiance to their judicial oath and abide by all the

demands of the Code of Conduct for Judicial Officers to bow out immediately. I urge you to realise that there is no middle ground and no space on the bench for those adjudged to be unworthy arbiters of truth. The choice is simple and our resolve is absolute - ‘plata o plomo’ (Gold or Lead). Henceforth, there shall be zero tolerance to judicial corruption or misconduct.” On the strained relationship between the Bench and the NBA, which became evi-

dent during the tenure of the immediate past CJN, Justice Aloysius Katsina-Alu, on the circumstances leading to the suspension of the Appeal Court President, Justice Isa Ayo Salami, Justice Musdapher appealed for understanding in tackling the many challenges facing the judiciary. He specifically urged the media to partner in efforts to correct the observed ills in the sector, saying actions that could lead the country into anarchy must be avoided. Besides, Justice Musdapher extended a hand of fellowship to the Bar, saying: “Traditionally, members of the Bar have always cooperated with the Judiciary in educating the public regarding judicial action. The Bar has often stepped up in defence of the judiciary at moments where our actions were perceived wrongly. The degeneration of the healthy working relationship between the Bar and the Bench has severed a necessary link in the symbiotic efforts to bridge the gap between law and society. This link must be restored immediately. Continued on page 6

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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NEWS

•Jonathan and Chairman of the FRSC Board, Col Lawan Gwadabe (rtd) at the launch of the new number plate and driver’s licence.

Since the launch of the new driver’s licence and number plate, there has been a lot of confusion about how to get them and what the Federal Government hopes to achieve with the new policy. Enquiries by AUGUSTINE EHIKIOYA fill in the missing links and show that many Nigerians may find the process cumbersome

‘You can’t sit in your office and get the new driver’s licence’

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EFT to Lagos lawyer and human rights activist Jiti Ogunye, the new plate number and driver’s licence launched with glee by President Goodluck Jonathan early this month will not see the light of the day. Ogunye believes the Federal Road Safety Commission (FRSC) lacks the power to introduce such a policy. He filed a suit to stop it. A national opinion poll conducted by the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) shows that many Nigerians feel unhappy about it, especially the cost of acquiring the number plate and the driver’s licence. Not many consider that N15,000 for new number plate and driver’s licence at N6,000 expensive. While some see it “a change too many”, others described it as a “rip-off of the common man,” by the FRSC. But as things appear, the FRSC has had its way and Ogunye his say. By next September 2, vehicles in the country will bear new number plates. Drivers too are carrying new licences, which has been designed to capture and store the biometric of the holder. The FRSC is downplaying the monetary gains of the new policy while painting the picture of a smooth acquisition process. But, in the long run, it may not be as easy as the commission’s Public Education Officer, Mr. Nseobong Akpabio, explained. He told The Nation: “If you are a holder of an expired licence, you don’t need to go to a driving school to renew it. You can do that in your office if you have access to an Internet. You just click to FRSC, that is www. gob.ng. If that is done, you will see the FRSC website come up. On the page, you will see Driver’s Licence request. Click it and you will see another page with Driver’s Licence Appli-

FRSC to generate N200b from driver’s licences, number plates

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HE inauguration of the new drivers’ license and personalized number plates by President Goodluck Jonathan last Friday, the stage is set for the Federal Government to rake in N200 billion annually from the issuance of vehicle particulars. Available data showed that no fewer than 12 million drivers’ licensers and eight million vehicles are in circulation in the country. According to the Corps Marshal and Chief Executive of the Federal Road Safety Commission (FRSC), Osita Chidoka drivers and vehicle owners across the country have up till August 31, 2012 to comply with the new rule. Investigation showed that the allocation of number plates would yield a whopping N120 billion to the government coffer while N72 billion would accrue from the issuance of licenses. Chidoka put the amount payable for a private driver’s licence and number plate at be N6, 000 and N15, 000 respectively. He did not disclose what commercial driver’s licences and number plates would cost. An official; who spoke on the matter in confidence said the Joint Tax Board (JTB) of the Federal Government would determine the rate for cation. When you click it, what will come up are options for New Driver’s Licence or Renewal of Driver’s Licence. For those, who have driver’s licence, they will click Renewal of Driver’s licence.” “The moment you click it, it will open another page for you to key in the driver’s licence number on the licence you want to renew. The page

the commercial vehicle operators. He, however, sad it would not be far different from what private owners would pay. The FRSC chief had in a paper he presented at the Dance/Award Night at the University of Nigeria Alumni Association, Abuja Branch on December 18, 2007, stated that 12 million driver’s licenses were in circulation. In his paper entitled: “The Role of the Driver’s License in State Building”, Chidoka had stated: “Despite the acceptance of driver’s license as one of the most acceptable form of identity in Nigeria

currently, it is appalling that of the 12 million driver’s licenses in circulation, only two million of them have the correct records of the holders in our database.” Although the figure would have risen tremendously about three years after, if 12 million drivers’ licenses to be replaced their licenses at N6000 each, the government would earn nothing less than N72 billion. It was also learnt that there are no readily available records for the number of vehicles in circulation in Nigeria. But while receiving the President of the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA), Joseph

Daudu in his office in April this year, Chidoka stated that about eight million vehicles currently ply the Nigerian roads. Besides, the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport had, in a statement in October 2009, revealed that more than seven million vehicles operate on Nigerian roads everyday, while answer.com, an online publication, put the figure at five million. Therefore, going by the estimate given by the FRSC chief, the Federal Government would realize about N120 billion if eight (8) million vehicles owners purchase the new number plate at N15, 000 each. Chidoka said officials of the FRSC, FIRS and the Directorate of Road Traffic Services, popularly called Vehicle Inspection Officers (VIOs) would render these services in a one-stop -shop being put in place for the purpose. An official of the FRSC who spoke in confidence said the haphazard manner the issuance of driver’s licenses and vehicle number plates were handled in the past has made it difficult for the Commission to have accurate data on the number of driver’s licenses and vehicles in circulation in Nigeria as at now.

will also ask you for your date of birth and then click search. It will now bring out the detail of that person if he obtained the old licence legally because every licence obtained legally has a data base. The whole detail of that person will be there. On the web page, you will fill in information required and then go to where you will get Accredi-

tation ID on the web page. That is the ID number you will use to go and pay at the bank. You will print out the form you filled on-line. After paying at the bank, you now go to the VIO office where the form you printed from the Internet will be signed for you. “We have recognisable and approved signatures of VIO

all over the country. When you go to the VIO, they will cross check the details on the form in order to be sure that you are the person. You will also be given a test to be sure that you can drive. If you pass the VIO test, you now come for physical capture in our office (FRSC). “But if you fail the VIO test, you will be given another

APPROVED RATES FOR DRIVER’S LICENCE AND NUMBER PLATES A.

Driver’s licence

N

i. ii

Motor Vehicle Driver’s License Motor cycle License

6,000.00 3,000.00

B. i. ii iii iv v. vi vii. viii.

Vehicle Number Plates Motor cycle Standard Motor Vehicle Articulated Out of Series Fancy Dealer Government Government fancy

N 3,000.00 15,000.00 20,000.00 40,000.00 80,000.00 30,000.00 15,000.00 40,000.00

From Sanni Onogu, Abuja

appointment after two or three weeks for another test. There is no way an applicant can go on physical capture without the signature of the VIO.” On the estimated time it will take to acquire the new driver’s licence, he said: “ Once you have been physically captured, our officers will then print a temporary licence for the applicant which will cover him for the period between 15 to 30 days. We issue the temporary licence for up to 30 days to allow us configure other security details into the real licence. When the licence comes back, it will go directly to the VIO for distribution. As time goes on, the whole process will not take more than a day.” But in a country, such as Nigeria, the process may turn out cumbersome at the end of the day. For instance, the process begins on-line. In Nigeria, Internet access is not so widespread. Many drivers in the country are not literate and using the Internet to renew their licences may not be a tea party. This may create a situation where middlemen will make money helping them with the on-line part of the process. Also, for a country with millions of drivers and prospective drivers, the few number of approved driving schools and testing centres may lead to chaos and slow down the process. There are only 324 approved driving schools. But what is important, said the commission, should not be the teething problems that may emerge but the benefits. The new licence is planned to checkmate the rising wave of terrorism in the country, improve exchange of security information among intelligence operatives , curb forgery of driver’s licence and crime by tying number plates to vehicle owners.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NEWS David-West challenges govt on fuel subsidy From Bisi Oladele, Ibadan

•The ceremonial shoes and caps of the fallen heroes at the funeral at the National Cemetery in Abuja.

Five years after the crash of a military plane in Ngokugh hills, Benue State, the people of the area relive the incident which led to the death of thirteen military top shots and beg the state government to remember its promises of a better life, reports UJA EMMANUEL.

Community relives plane crash of officers who trained, played and died together

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T was a good example of government neglect. It still is, five years after it came to limelight: no good access roads, it lacks potable water, school, electricity and healthcare system. That is the story of the scenic Ngokugh hills located in Kwande Local Government Area of Benue State, where a military plane crashed on September 17, 2006. It was conveying top military officers, who were headed for the Obudu Ranch Resort. The then Army chief Andrew Azazi, who was waiting for them for a meeting, waited in vain. At the weekend, Sati village where the military plane crashed and killed 13 military topshots held a memorial in their honour and used the occasion to ask the Benue State government to fulfil promises made to it after the crash. Five persons survived. Most of the passengers were generals in the Army. Among the dead were: Major Generals J O Adesunloye, A N Bamali, S O Otubu, S M Lemu, P M Haruna, J T U Ahmedu, B Duniya and J O Agoola. Others were Brigadier-Generals Y J Braimah, M B Bawa, Wing Commanders E O Adekunle and S S Balogun as well as Lieutenant Colonel N A Mohammed. Those who survived were Colonel Nuhu Agboso and Abraham

‘ Shortly after the aircraft had passed through our

compound, we heard a very fearful noise on top of the mountain which lasted for about thirty minutes or more. I saw books flying everywhere and then a large expanse of land that looked as if it had just been cleared. When I trailed that route, I saw a plane that had crashed with human beings trapped inside

Dosu, Lieutenant Colonel Obinna Ajuwan as well as Emmanuel Ejileke and Esther Ejuwa. Five of the deceased were course mates who joined the Army 33 years before their death. They had been inseparable and coincidentally died together. After the crash, Benue State Ministry of Commerce, Industries and Tourism unveiled its plan to establish a resort centre at Ngokugh hills. The proposals included the establishment of a hotel, museum, water falls, concrete stairs, carriageway, cable cars, hospitals, as well as game resorts at the crash site. But five years after, the village has gone back to its obscurity. Spokesman of the community Dr. Daniel Tyochivir listed the other promises to include: rehabilitation and upgrading of the Adikpo-Obudu road, reward for four youths whose heroic efforts led to the successful rescue operation as well as provision of water, hospital and electricity to

the community. The interdenominational service was held at the NKST Church Akaa, Sati-Mbakunu in Shangev-ya. The community expressed appreciation to the Benue State Government for sponsoring one of the five youths who found the crashed aircraft and alerted the community and urged that a similar gesture be extended to the other four. The arrowhead of this initiative was then 14-year-old Detimbir Chia, who was a Junior Secondary School Two pupil of Government Secondary School, Koti, Shangev-ya. The youngster whose compound is at the foot of the Ngokugh hills with four other youths, Daniel Kenti, Tyozua Iorhemen, Richard Iorhemen and Ternenge Anakula, heard the strange sound from the crash and set out for the top of the hills to investigate. Chia said at the time: “Shortly after the aircraft had passed through

our compound, we heard a very fearful noise on top of the mountain which lasted for about 30 minutes or more. I saw books flying everywhere and then a large expanse of land that looked as if it had just been cleared. When I trailed that route, I saw a plane that had crashed with human beings trapped inside. When I moved closer, I saw human beings in army uniforms, some dead and a few still alive and rolling in pains. I began to shiver and started crying. Thirteen among them were dead while five persons were still alive but most of them were badly injured and unconscious.” Their efforts led to a successful rescue operation, which impressed both the Benue and federal governments. The crash made the hitherto unknown village appear on the national scene. Shortly after that incident, both international and local media thronged the area to witness the gory site of disembodied bodies of military generals. Five years and a change of government, the promises made to the community seem to have been forgotten. The then governor, George Akume could not fulfil the promises before leaving power for Governor Gabriel Suswam, who is serving his second term of office. Will Suswam hear the people’s call? Time will tell.

EFCC makes u-turn over bias allegation against judge

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HE Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) yesterday withdrew its application which urged Justice Adeniyi Onigbanjo of the Lagos State High Court, Ikeja, not to hear the cases involving former Managing Director of Bank PHB, Mr Francis Atuche. The agency, through its counsel, Mr Kemi Pinhero (SAN) and Dele Adesina (SAN) urged the court to strike out two motions in which they

By Joseph Jibueze

asked the judge to stop handling Atuche’s trial. Atuche was charged separately with two former directors of Bank PHB, Mr Lekan Kasali and Mr Fumi Ademosun before Justice Onigbanjo on three counts each of conspiracy and stealing of the bank’s over N11.4 billion. EFCC had, in a Motion on Notice

dated June 22, sought “an order that this honourable court presided over by Justice Adeniyi Onigbanjo to recuse, remove and disqualify itself from presiding over, sitting upon or hearing to determine or continue to preside over the charges ID/149C/ 2011 (FRN vs Francis Atuche and Lekan Kasali) and ID/150C/2011 (FRN vs Francis Atuche and Funmi Ademosun) or any application pending before this honourable court.”

Counsel to Atuche, Mr Deji Sasegbon (SAN), did not oppose the applications, but asked for N100,000 cost. He said: “We are asking for cost because we did a lot of brain work in preparing the counter-affidavits. There are three SANs involved in this matter and many juniors to look after.” Justice Onigbanjo struck out the application at no cost to EFCC and adjourned till September 30.

FORMER Minister of Petroleum Resources Prof. Tam David-West has challenged the Federal Government to publish its proof that it is subsidising prices of petroleum products. David-West, who spoke to The Nation in Ibadan yesterday, said there was no subsidy on the products. He accused the Federal Government of deceiving Nigerians and preparing the platform for another arbitrary increase of prices of petroleum products. His challenge came on the heels of plans by the government to include the removal of the subsidy in the 2012 budget. He said: “There is no subsidy in pump price of fuel. It is a lie. Gen. Muhammadu Buhari was a Petroleum Minister before becoming the Head of State. He also said there was no fuel subsidy. We have been saying it for over 10 years and nobody has challenged us. I even went further to challenge them to allow the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) bring its books to the open and prove the subsidy. Let government set up a panel comprising the NNPC, transporters, market women and other stakeholders. Then, let NNPC bring its books to justify that there was subsidy. They never took up the challenge because they know they are lying. “I also further said that instead of this arbitrary increase of fuel price, let this body as suggested put their heads together and come up with a figure. It will last and be more sincere. But they refused. Chief Olusegun Obasanjo unilaterally increased fuel price. The increase of pump price cannot be subjected to the whims and caprices of people in government because it is a dangerous thing and portends instability for the system. The people affected are the poor masses who are relatively deprived by the system. They are suffering and there is a limit to which we can subject the poor masses to hardship. The elastic limit to their patience will snap and there will be massive social unrest and instability.”

Administrators to get safety certificate By Miriam Ndikanwu

LAGOS State Government has directed all school administrators to obtain a safety certificate. The new directive, according to the Director-General Lagos State Safety Commission, Mrs. Dominga Odebunmi, is to ensure compliance with safety measures. Odebunmi regretted the avoidable accidents that took place in the last academic session, and reiterated the government’s commitment to proper safety standard in public and private schools. She called on all private schools owners to ensure that school buses are in perfect condition. She explained that the commission, in collaboration with relevant Ministries, Departments and agencies such as the Ministry of Health, Education Lagos State Drivers Institute and the State Emergency Management Agency (LASEMA), would ensure a free and save city. She assured that government would punish schools that fail to comply with safety standards.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NEWS PHCN workers wage bill to hit N11b From Vincent Ikuomola, Abuja

THE monthly wage bill of workers of the Power Holdings Company of Nigeria (PHCN) will soon hit N11 billion from the current N7 billion, Vice President Namadi Sambo said yesterday. The increase is expected to come from the proposed raise of 50 per cent in the salary structure of PHCN workers. ‘’Suffice it to state that we inherited a huge wage bill of over N7billion monthly for the PHCN staff. However, with the new increase, the monthly salary will escalate to over N11billion. This figure is interestingly about the same amount the PHCN generates monthly”, Sambo said. He said N57billion was expended by the Federal Government on the payment of monetised benefits to all PHCN employees. About 99per cent of them have received monetised benefits. The almost one per cent who are yet to be paid are those with incomplete records or whose next of kin have not been ascertained. “Once each case is sorted out, the payment shall be made as enough funds still exist with the Central Bank of Nigeria for the settlement of this outstanding liability,” he said.

Presidential election: INEC’s reply forces Tribunal to adjourn T HE Presidential Election Petition Tribunal yesterday adjourned proceedings in the motion filed by the Congress for Progressive Change (CPC) against the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) Chairman, Prof. Attahiru Jega. CPC is praying for an order to serve a court order by substituted means on the INEC boss. The CPC said it had difficulties serving the subpoena issued by the Tribunal Chairman, Justice Kumai Akaahs on Jega. The subpoena was issued on CPC’s request to compel Jega to come and give evidence in the petition. In paragraphs 15 and 16 of the INEC’s counter-affidavit, its counsel, Chief Adegboyega Awomolo (SANs) claimed he had talks with the CPC lawyer, Oladipo Okpeseyi (SAN)

From Kamarudeen Ogundele and Anne Udeze, Abuja

to seek ways of facilitating service of the subpoena on INEC chiefs. Paragraph 15 reads: “On 16th September, Chief Adegboyega S. Awomolo, SAN duly explained the situation to Oladipo Okpeseyi, SAN, FCIArb, with suggestions on how to facilitate the service of the subpoena without further rancour. The position was disclosed by the counsel in the open court on September 17. Paragraph 16 reads: “Rather than accept in good faith, the effort of Chief Adegboyega S. Awomolo, SAN, the applicant initiated this application with the intention of creating a wrong impression that the chairman or the1st re-

spondent (INEC) was evading service of a subpoena’. At the hearing yesterday, Okpeseyi said he had no talks with Awomolo on the issue, asking the Tribunal to expunge the paragraphs. In a swift response, Onyechi Ikpaezu (SAN), who represented INEC yesterday informed the five-man panel that Awomolo was ready to stand by his deposition. Justice Akaahs told Okpeseyi that he has two options: either to overlook paragraphs 15 and 16 or depose to an affidavit to deny them. Okpeseyi decided to swear to an affidavit and sought adjournment till today, with no objection from the respondents. The tribunal, had earlier admitted 12 documents as exhibits from the petitioner (CPC),

who is challenging the election of President Goodluck Jonathan in the April 16 presidential election. They were admitted after no objection was raised by respondents. The documents, according to Okpeseyi, were part of the first set of documents released by INEC to his client. Admitted as exhibits were: the percentage voter turnout on state basis, summaries of the presidential election results at the national, states and FCT, as well as local government area collation centres. Others include: declaration of result into the office of the President, contained in form EC with serialnumber 0120 000001, award of contracts to Aero Vote Nigeran ltd, G. I. Solutions Press and Tulip Press Ltd.

Libyan rebels arrest more Nigerians Continued from page 2

Demolition of illegal structures in Abuja begins From Bukola Amusan, Abuja

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FRESH round of demolition of illegal structures is underway in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) following a directive by President Goodluck Jonathan to the FCT Administration to rid the city of such structures and restore its master plan. The Co-ordinator, Abuja Metropolitan Management Council (AMMC), Reuben Okoy, an architect, told reporters yesterday in Abuja during the demolition at the Federal Housing Authority estate, Lugbe that the President has charged the FCT Minister, Senator Bala Mohammed to invigorate the master plan restoration process. The Coordinator who warned owners of illegal structures across the city to remove them immediately, otherwise they would be surcharged for removal in line with the provision of Section 63 of Urban and Regional Act. He said the demolition and removal of illegal structures across all the districts of FCT would be a continuous exercise. He said: “It is going to be sustained. Last week we were in Gwagwalada and we are now in Lugbe. From here we are going to move to other places where we are to continue the exercise.” He said estates that were built illegally would not be spared in the exercise, noting that the restoration of the Abuja master plan is backed by law. “If we come to your estate and it was erected illegally, it shall come down because we are backed by law”, he added The coordinator reiterated that the existing court injunctions restricting the Council from demolishing some structures would not be violated.

Akaah’- led panel also accepted the presidential election finishing and packing control sheets of four pages each numbered‘Flight 1-4’, as well as INEC’s logistics and transports department’s distribution of EC 8 series to states. Besides, it accepted five newspaper publications and rejected two. Five witnesses testified yesterday. In the motion to be argued today, the CPC stated that “On 15th September 2011, when Mr. Abubakar Moh’d, a bailiff of this court attempted to effect personal service of the subpoena on the 2nd respondent at his office located at INEC Headquarters, Maitama, Abuja. The bailiff, despite the fact that he introduced himself as the bailiff of this Honourable Court was refused entry into the premises of INEC by agents of the 2nd respondent”

•Pupils of Mind Builders Nursery and Primary School, Alausa, Ikeja praying on resumption after a long vacation... yesterday PHOTO: NIYI ADENIRAN

Musdapher to reform NJC, others Continued from page 2 “In view of the importance of the Bar in this crusade, I hereby make an urgent call to the Nigerian Bar Association and members of the Bar to rejoin us in restoring public belief in our judicial system. We expect balanced debate, constructive criticisms, and active consultation in our joint efforts to enthrone justice in Nigeria.” He spoke on the need for judges to remain neutral. His words: “As I have admitted on previous occasions, the extent to which prevalent societal currents have also engulfed the judiciary, demands great concern. Judges and the judicial system must remain politically neutral and rise up to safeguard our fledgling democracy. We must deflect the tides of impropriety and immunise the entire judicial system against all identified iniquities. “Similarly, we are deeply concerned that irrespective of concerted efforts to stem the tide, most cases are still decided on the raw basis of technicalities, rather than the substantive issues placed for our determination. Procedural laws are meant to regulate the conduct of proceedings and ensure that the process for the

attainment of justice is fair and equitable. “Therefore, the strict application or invocation of these rules cannot be allowed to stand on the path of substantial justice. I hereby urge all Judges to realise that stringent application of procedural rules and technicalities that do not lead to the attainment of substantial justice is clearly against modern trends of adjudication. This reality is akin to observing table manners and still rising from dinner with an empty stomach. This trend must be reversed. “It follows, therefore, that the problems affecting the judiciary cannot be solved without an active collaboration between the Bar and the Bench.” “Significantly, we are of the view that Section 233 (2) of the Constitution of the Federal republic of Nigeria (as amended) must be revised to compulsorily require leave of the Supreme Court before appeal may lie from decisions of the Court of Appeal. The Supreme Court Rules and the Supreme Court Act are also being scrutinised for possible amendments towards ensuring improvements in judicial efficiency.” This, Justice Musdapher said, will check frivolous ap-

peals which often cause undue delays and backlogs. Such a ground breaking amendment is expected to allow the apex court to function efficiently and dispense justice without delay. The Acting CJN went on: “The current mode of judicial appointments must also be reviewed. We believe that there is considerable merit in the call to diversify the pool from which judicial appointments to superior courts are made. A wider diversity of experience will undoubtedly add quality to judicial deliberations in our courts. Therefore, we intend to commence a process where members of the Bar aspiring to judicial office may apply to join the Bench based on objective and transparent criteria. “To further support these reform initiatives, the appropriate authority shall be directed to introduce ‘Intelligent Performance Measurement System’ for judicial and non-judicial staff immediately. Those found performing below the required standards shall be removed via an objective and transparent process. This and other initiatives shall be deployed to weed out unfit persons from our lot. “The National Judicial Council, the Federal Judicial

Service Commission and the National Judicial Institute shall be restructured and repositioned to improve their capacity to meet their constitution and statutory roles. “We have also identified the lack of a comprehensive National Judicial Policy & Development Plan to serve as a guide for steady judicial administration and planning. Work is already in progress to ensure that a document to serve the needs of the judiciary over the next decade is prepared. “To my brothers on the Bench, I implore you to remember that we do not have a political platform nor represent a sectional constituency. Right or Left, religious or secular, rich or poor, man or woman, disabled and nondisabled, any and all, must remain equal before us. “As judges, we do not aspire to power and do not seek to rule. We must not stretch the chains that bind us as Judges. It must always be the rule of law and not the rule of the judge. We hope that adherence to these simple ideals would ensure that we make a positive difference in our declining society. We further hope that history vindicates our resolve at so doing.”

The Minister of Foreign Affairs, Amb. Olugbenga Ashiru, a few weeks ago protested to the TNC the plight of migrant Black workers, especially Nigerians. Ashiru said: “The Government of the Federal Republic of Nigeria wishes to note with concern reports of incessant abuse of helpless civilians in Libya by some unscrupulous elements who continue to take undue advantage of the ongoing crisis in that country, particularly to carry out attacks on Black migrant workers and other Black Africans stranded in Libya arising from the crisis in that country. “Regrettably, these reports revealed outright killings, rape and extortion of money from these helpless Africans who have taken refuge in camps as well as those in detention and incarceration. “This development is a deviation from the overall expressed desire of the TNC, the African Union and indeed the United Nations for the restoration of democracy and good governance in Libya. “These extra-judicial killings certainly run contrary to Nigeria’s call for the leadership of the TNC to be magnanimous in victory and can only stand in the way of peace building, early reconciliation and reconstruction in Libya. “While confirming that the concern of the Nigerian government on this reported development has accordingly been brought to the urgent attention of the representative of the TNC, the government seizes this opportunity to call on the leadership of the TNC to immediately take steps to check the excesses of these unscrupulous elements in Libya in order to pave the way for the restoration of genuine democracy and true reconciliation for all Libyans. “Nigeria reiterates its support not only for the yearnings for political freedom by the Libyan people, but also in the ability of the leadership of the TNC to restore order in the Libyan society at the shortest possible time.”


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NEWS Why researchers aren’t accessing ETF fund, by UI VC From Oseheye Okwuofu, Ibadan

HE University of Ibadan (UI) ViceChancellor, Prof Isaac Adewole, yesterday said many universities in Nigeria have not accessed the N3billion set aside by the Education Trust Fund (ETF) for academic research because they lacked genuine information on the fund. Adewole spoke in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital, at the opening of the two-day retreat/symposium of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative in Nigeria (MEPIN) held at the Trenchard Hall of the university. He expressed delight at the large attendance by foreign participants, despite reports of Boko Haram’s alleged threat to bomb some universities, including UI. The Vice-Chancellor said the Federal Government could not be blamed for not funding academic research if those the ETF fund is meant for do not access it. The retreat has as its theme: Research for Improved Teaching and Healthcare Delivery. Adewole expressed delight at the impact the programme has had on education development in the past one year, adding that many scholars have not used the opportunity to fund their researches. He said: “ETF set aside N3billion for research. So, I am telling our people to access the fund because the Federal Government specifically set it aside for academic research. The money is there and we are not accessing it. We cannot blame the Federal Government for that.” On why researchers were not accessing the fund, Adewole said: “I think that is due to two reasons: lack of information and capacity. But in the UI here, we have been sending out notices about the availability of the fund. We are also training our younger ones to write proposals to us, to enable them access the fund.” The Vice-Chancellor expressed appreciation to foreign participants, including Prof Phyllis Kanki of the Harvard School of Public Health, for defying the alleged threat by the Boko Haram sect.

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Salami: Kwara NBA calls for sack of AGF Adoke

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AWYERS in Kwara State, under the aegis of the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA), yesterday demanded the review of the appointment of the AttorneyGeneral of the Federation and Minister of Justice, Mohammed Adoke (SAN). They alleged that the AGF misadvised President Goodluck Jonathan on the suspension of Justice Isa Ayo Salami as Appeal Court President. The lawyers also demanded the lifting of the suspension and called for the reinstatement of Salami. Chairmen of Ilorin and Offa branches of the NBA, Salman Jawondo and Malik Oluwole addressed reporters in Ilorin, the state capital, before the peaceful procession to protest Salami’s sus-

‘We dare say that an unlawfully and unconstitutionally created vacuum is not and can never be a vacuum recognised by law. Therefore, there was no vacuum as what the NJC purported to have is a nullity on which nothing can stand or be predicated’ From Adekunle Jimoh, Ilorin

pension. The Ilorin and Offa branches make up the Kwara NBA. The lawyers condemned Salami’s suspension by the National Judicial Council (NJC) and the appointment of an Acting President of the Court of Appeal by President Jonathan. Reading a letter entitled: When Salt Rottens, Jawondo,

on behalf of the lawyers, said: “If it is true, as widely reported in the newspapers, that the President acted on the advice supposedly by the Attorney-General and Minister for Justice to approve the unlawful suspension of Justice Salami, then we make bold to say that the President was misadvised and, to that extent, it is our humble view that the presence of such an adviser in the President’s cab-

inet needs to be reviewed or reconsidered. “The Senate represents the people of the country. The legislative arm can be described as the bastion of democracy. Whatever an unlawful act the executive takes should be challenged by the legislature. “The Senate should ensure that the (President’s) request is refused. The Senate should obey the rule of law. They should know that the destruction of the judiciary will spell doom for the country.” Jawondo noted that the suspension of Salami and his recommendation for retirement came after he had gone to court to challenge the decision of NJC that he should apologise for allegedly lying on oath against former Chief Justice of Nigeria, Alloysius

Katsina-Alu. He argued that there was no vacancy for which an Acting President of the Court of Appeal was appointed to fill. He said: “We dare say that an unlawfully and unconstitutionally created vacuum is not and can never be a vacuum recognised by law. Therefore, there was no vacuum as what the NJC purported to have is a nullity on which nothing can stand or be predicated.” He regretted that the judiciary and the administration of justice are being undermined by “those who swore to uphold the Constitution of the land and whose duties include the protection and preservation of the judiciary and the Rule of Law and the entire judicial system.

‘Bauchi has highest internally displaced persons’ From Austine Tsenzughul, Bauchi

T • From left: Minister of Labour, Chukwuemeka Wogu; Secretary-General, Organisation of African Trade Union Unity (OATUU), Alhaji Hassan Sunmonu; Vice-President Namadi Sambo and Senator Chris Ngige at the power reform workshop in Abuja…yesterday. PHOTO: NAN

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Govt, Labour differ on proposed hike on electricity tariff

HE Federal Government and Labour yesterday differed on the proposed 50 per cent increment in electricity tariff from next year. While government insisted there was no going back on the plan, Labour warned that it would cause anarchy should the new tariff regime be imposed on Nigerians. The government premised its position on the excuse that Nigeria has one of the lowest electricity tariff. It promised that the increment would take effect when there is an improvement in power supply. President Goodluck Jonathan restated government’s plan yesterday during a workshop on power sector reform with the theme: Towards Power Stability in Nigeria, held at the State House, Abuja. He said the reform in the power sector would be trans-

From Vincent Ikuomola and John Ofikhenua, Abuja

parent, promising that it would not lead to job loss. Rather, he said the reform would lead to the creation of more jobs. The President, who was represented by the Vice-President Namadi Sambo, said: “Nigeria has the lowest tariff and, no wonder, we have the lowest power. We have our own saying that better soup, na money make am. We have to tell our people the truth. However, we have to ensure adequate power.” He assured that the reform would not jeopardise the agreements it reached with the unions in the sector. Dr Jonathan said the Federal Government had paid about 99 per cent of the monetisation

benefits to Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN) workers, adding that it has enough fund at the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) to pay the remaining one per cent. He said: “The power sector reform will not only provide Nigerians with uninterrupted and quality electricity but will also attract Foreign Direct Investments (FDIs), create employment and business opportunities, enhance the living standards of electricity workers, like those of their counterparts in the telecoms sector, enable power sector employees to work with state-of-theart technology and to regularly undergo domestic and international courses. “It is obvious that the reform will create thousands of job opportunities for the elec-

tricity workers through the development of new power infrastructure that will include but not limited to the NIPP 10 new power plants, 4,000kilometres of transmission lines and several substations and hundreds of injection substations and distribution networks, development of the new Zungeru and Mambila hydro-power plants, several other small and medium scale hydro power plants and other renewable energy plants…” Minister of Power Prof Barth Nnaji, who was represented by the Permanent Secretary, Mrs Ibukun Odusote, said the workshop was to ensure a common front in the march towards power stability, which he said would be possible. Labour Minister Emeka Wogu said the government has demonstrated enough commitment to its agreements with Labour to show that it means well.

HE Director-General of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) Mohammed Sani-Sidi has said Bauchi State has the highest number of Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Nigeria. He put the figure at over a million persons and attributed the development to ethno-religious, post-election crises in Borno, Kaduna and Plateau states. The NEMA chief spoke in Bauchi during his verification tour of displaced persons’ camps in Bauchi and Plateau states. Sani-Sidi said the verification was due to last week’s directive by President Goodluck Jonathan to provide more reliefs to the displaced persons. He said: “We have also taken time to appeal to the displaced persons to remain calm, law-abiding and to cooperate with their host communities that have assured them of peaceful coexistence.” The NEMA chief said the agency would support them until they are resettled. He praised the state government for accommodating the IDPs, resettling them and taking care of some of their basic needs. Sain-Sidi said the IDPs need holistic rehabilitation and resettlement, adding: “Bauchi State has done so much in this direction. NEMA is coming in to support the efforts of the state government.”

Ekiti urges workers to end strike

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HE Ekiti State Government yesterday urged its striking workers to return to work to enable the government resolve the dispute over the implementation of the new minimum wage. In a statement by the Commissioner for Information and Civic Orientation, Mr Funminiyi Afuye, the government said there was no justification for the strike since negotiations were ongoing between Labour and the government. It said the Kayode Fayemi administration has proved that it is worker-friendly, hav-

From Sulaiman Salawudeen, Ado-Ekiti

ing consistently affirmed it would pay the minimum wage. The statement reads: “The government has said, and this was in the nespapers that by end of September, it would implement the payment of the minimum wage. Why should anyone doubt this, coming from a government that is implementing unprecedented social security for the elderly, who are 65 years and above; giving free medical treatment to children of 0-5 years; expect-

ant mothers; and the elderly of 65 years and above? “How can the same government be nonchalant to the plight of its workers, when it is on record that even when the Federal Government had not made any categorical decision on the minimum wage, Ekiti State had paid a workerfriendly and forward-looking relativity package to its workers, including the Consolidated Medical Salary Scale (CONMESS) and the Consolidated Health Salary Scale (CONHESS). “We wonder where they found the justification for their

action against a government that is seen as too soft with and friendly towards its workers. We are at a loss about their grievances. “We want to add that the Freedom of Information (FOI) Bill, which Ekiti State was the first to domesticate, precludes any public official from hiding official documents relating to any matter whatsoever. The government had invited Labour to the Fund Allocation Committee meeting time and time again and they are aware of the financial position of the state. “Besides, information re-

garding the financial position of the state and facts on any subject about the state is on the Internet for anyone to access. How then can they validly claim that they have been denied access to details on earnings of the state?” The strike continued yesterday as the civil servants stayed away from their offices. Labour leaders were seen moving round offices to ensure compliance with the work boycott and apparently to punish defaulters. Some workers reported for work, saying they were not aware of the strike. Labour

leaders monitoring the strike sent such workers back home. The government had promised to begin the payment of the N18,000 salary to its workers from September. Aluko said while government offered to pay those on grade levels 1 to 6 the N18,021 wage, those on Level 7 and above are to get N15,000. He said: “During negotiation, we tabled before the government 20, 25 and 15 per cent increment options. We met government on Monday on the matter where the government praised Labour for its maturity over the agitation.”


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

NEWS Solarin’s widow protests moves to seize school

‘Shun rumour against LASU leadership’ THE Movement against Bad Administration in Lagos Tertiary Institutions (MGALTI) has urged the public to shun alleged moves by some people to tarnish the image of the leadership of the Lagos State University (LASU). In a statement by its Secretary, Dr. Diji Rhodes, MGALTI said: “Our attention has been drawn to malicious moves by some disgruntled elements to cause discontent within the management hierarchy of LASU. “These unscrupulous elements have been going round media houses trying to cause to be published, paid advertorials to discredit the current leadership of the institution, particularly the person of the acting Vice Chancellor, Professor Ibiyemi Olatunji-Bello, who has within this short while elevated the rating of the institution in the nation. “At a time when all hands should be on deck to return this pride of Lagos called LASU to reckoning by cooperating with its current management, these faceless elements, obviously motivated by their do-or-die desire to lead the institution, have taken recourse to character assasination and maligning of the acting VC. “We call for peace, academic stability and development in LASU, which is what Prof. Olatunji-Bello has so far given the institution. It is our resolve that having proved herself worthy of the position she occupies, the acting VC should be allowed to do more. “We urge the state government and the discerning public to be wary of the antics of these anti-academic progress elements in LASU, who are out to cause mischief to the person of the acting VC, the entire LASU management and the state in general, through faceless and malicious advertorials. “We say no to people that once made mockery of the academic reputation of LASU.”

From Ernest Nwokolo, Abeokuta

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Senator Olu Adetunmbi representing Ekiti North (left); Ekiti State Governor Kayode Fayemi (middle) and the Chinese Ambassador to Nigeria, Mr. Deng Boging; during Fayemi’s visit to the Chinese Embassy in Abuja...yesterday

How Oyinlola blew billions on unfinished roads, by Aregbesola

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SUN State Governor Rauf Aregbesola yesterday said the repair of six major roads, awarded at billions of naira by the ousted administration of Prince Olagunsoye Oyinlola, remains uncompleted. Aregbesola said of all road contracts awarded in 2006, only the Ikoyi/Oranran Farm Settlement road was completed. He said others were abandoned with less than 50 per cent work done. The contracts include the 16.59 kilometre Ijebu-Jesa/ Ere Ijesa/Ibokun road with 5.5 carriage way; repair of the 24km Ile-Ife/ Famia/Akinlalu extension to Ibadan/Ife expressway; rehabilitation of the 30 km Ejigbo/Ife-Odan/ Oyo State boundary road; and rehabilitation of the 19.70 km Osu/Iloba/Kajola road. In a statement by his media aide, Mr. Semiu Okanlawon, the governor said: “Contracts for the construction of

•Governor advises varsities on honorary degrees From Adesoji Adeniyi, Osogbo

the roads were awarded by the Oyinlola administration in 2006 to a firm that left the jobs unattended to. “By October, 2010, when the Oyinlola administration was kicked out, work done was 49 per cent. “The repair of the Osogbo/Gbongan/Ago/Owu/ Ijebu-Igbo/Lagos road is part of the benefit of rural integration, which all states controlled by the Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN) have adopted for the economic transformation of the Southwest.” Also, Aregbesola has advised academic institutions to give honourary degrees to only people, who have contributed to the country’s development. In his congratulatory mes-

sage to recipients of honourary degrees at the convocation of Fountain University in Osogbo, the state capital, last weekend, the governor regretted that awards had been abused in the past. The recipients included exLagos State Governor Asiwaju Bola Tinubu; former Grand Khadi of Niger State, Sheik Ahmed Lemu; founder of Muri International Television (MITV), Alhaji Muri Busari; and former President of the Nigeria Academy of Science, Prof. Lateef Salako. Aregbesola said: “While congratulating the recipients, one should remind our academic institutions that such honours should always be accorded to those who deserve them, in terms of the contributions they have made to the country’s growth. “Contributions to good governance; advancement in

democratic culture, education, agriculture and mass food production; notable community services; and other noble endeavours should be the criteria for the award of honours to Nigerians. “This is why I congratulate Fountain University on its choice of recipients. Asiwaju Tinubu remains a leading force in the campaign for good governance in Nigeria and has fought relentlessly for the enthronement of true federalism. “Lemu is an astute administrator of justice, who should be emulated. Busari has made his mark in journalism by setting up MITV and Salako has contributed to the development of science.” Aregbesola urged the recipients to do more for the society.

Mimiko urges judges to be fearless

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NDO State Governor Olusegun Mimiko has urged judges to be true to their oath of office. Mimiko spoke yesterday at the swearing in of two judges in Akure, the state capital. They are Justices Folarin Adeyeye and Adeyemi Fasanmi. The governor urged them to be neutral and honest in the dispensation of justice. He said: “It is with insightful candour that I charge you to insulate yourselves from those unholy distractions that may keep you from display-

From Damisi Ojo, Akure

ing the rich traditions of justness, frankness and fearlessness associated with this noble estate of the realm.” Mimiko advised them to develop a thick skin against unprofessional and immoral actions that are capable of eroding their integrity. He said: “The abiding centrality of an efficient, well motivated and independent judiciary to good governance is not lost on this government. Our policy thrust in this sector has been an aggressive widening of access to justice.

“We can optimise our achievements in the on-going systematic repositioning of the judiciary through better understanding and genuine administrative collaboration, particularly in the area of industrial peace.” The new judges promised to be fair to all. With the inauguration of the two judges, who were formerly in private practice, the state now has 17 judges. Mimiko also used the installation of the Olufira of Ifira-Akoko, Oba Anthony Oluremi Olugboya, to restate

his commitment to the rule of law. He said his administration, being a product of the rule of law, has remained transparent in the selection of traditional rulers for vacant stools. Represented by the Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Local Government and Chieftaincy Affairs, Mr. Tunde Adeola, Mimiko said all laws guiding chieftaincy were observed to checkmate the enthronement of unpopular candidates. He thanked the people for supporting his administration.

Ajimobi encourages alternative dispute resolution

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•Ajimobi

YO State Governor Abiola Ajimobi yesterday said he would create an enabling environment for effective dispensation of justice. Ajimobi spoke during a prayer to mark the beginning of the 2011/2012 Legal Year at the Oja Oba Central Mosque in Ibadan, the state capital. He said his administration would renovate courts and

improve the welfare of judiciary workers. Ajimobi said: “I assure you that this wind of change shall pervade all spheres of the judiciary. We will change the culture of impunity erroneously attributed to us in Oyo State.” He said there was need to encourage alternative dispute resolution methods, so as to reduce litigation and the delay associated with it.

The governor urged members of the bench and bar to always conduct themselves in a manner that will promote public confidence and the integrity of the judiciary. In his sermon, the Head of the Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies, University of Ibadan, Dr. Afis Oladosu, urged members of the judiciary to see justice as a moral virtue that must be upheld at all times.

Oladosu called for quick dispensation of justice, noting that justice delayed is justice denied. The Aare Musulumi of Yorubaland, Alhaji Abdulazeez Arisekola Alao, and the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA), Ibadan branch, urged the government to provide legal aid for indigent persons and review laws relating to criminal justice and magistrate courts.

RS. Sheila Solarin, widow of the late social critic and founder of Mayflower School in Ikenne, Dr. Tai Solarin, yesterday urged the Ogun State Government to return the school to the family. The 87-year-old widow and co–founder of Mayflower said it was unfortunate that the school and others founded by the missionaries, which were committed to improving education, are today treated harshly by the government. The Sixth House of Assembly had nullified the return of 26 schools to their original owners by the immediatepast administration of ex-Governor Gbenga Daniel on the ground that the return did not follow due process. Mrs. Solarin spoke at the school’s gate in Ikenne yesterday. Protesting moves by the state government to retrieve the schools, the she said: “In 2009, the government asked if we were willing to take back Mayflower and run it as a private institution again. A few years earlier, an ex-Commissioner of Education asked me the same question and I declined. “But the continuing deterioration of the school was markedly accelerating by 2009, so the family agreed to resuscitate the school. “My daughter left her career and family in the United States and returned to Ikenne to join my son and I in the effort.” Her daughter, Corin, and members of the school’s Parents/Teachers Association joined in the protest. Corin said the family has invested a lot of resources into rehabilitating the school and urged the government to reconsider its position.

Put Nigerians first, lawmaker urges colleagues By Dada Aladelokun, Assistant Editor

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MEMBER of the House of Representatives from Ife Federal Constituency, Chief Rotimi Makinde, yesterday urged his colleagues to place the interest of Nigerians above their personal interests. Commenting on the rumpus in the House over the composition of its standing committees, Makinde said: “I seriously think we must not bother ourselves about who chairs one committee or the other. Rather, we must concentrate on our legitimate roles and prepare to uphold the confidence reposed in us by Nigerians. “Although some members might feel slighted about the composition of the committees, we must be conscious of our primary determination to achieve our collective agenda. “I therefore seek one love, bearing in mind that the Speaker cannot satisfy all at the same time.” Assuring the House leadership of his loyalty, Makinde condemned the recent call by ex-President Olusegun Obasanjo on the Speaker of the House and his deputy to resign.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NEWS Edo contractors ordered back to site From Osagie Otabor, Benin

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HE Edo State Government has ordered contractors handling various CGS-MDGs projects in the state to return to site and complete the projects. It said it would institute legal actions against any contractor who fails to complete and deliver projects according to contract specifications. Executive Director of Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) Theresa Erediauwa gave the order, when she discovered that some CGS-MDGS projects have been abandoned by contractors. Ms. Erediauwa, who inspected projects in Edo Central, said she was worried at the abandoned projects. She said the projects were aimed at improving lives of benefitting communities and contributing to the achievement of MDGs in the state. Ms. Erediauwa said the government would not accept substandard jobs. Projects inspected included ante-natal clinic and primary health care centres with staff quarters, renovated maternity and labour wards in central and general hospitals.

Amaechi nominates commissioners

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IVERS State Governor Rotimi Amaechi has sent the names of 10 commissioner-nominees to the state Assembly. On the list are some excommissioners: Sampson Parker, Joe Poroma and Marshall Uwom. Others are: Nwogu Boms, Levi Gogo-Charles, Chuma Chieneye, Owene Nwonodi, Ipalibo Harry, Mrs. Joe-

From Clarice Azuatalam, Port Harcourt

ba West and Lloyd Ukwu. The House Clerk, Sir Emmanuel Amaewhule-Ogele, said the House had received the governor’s letter. He told the nominees to forward 40 copies of their original credentials to his office today.

Policeman, five others arrested for traffic offence in Lagos A POLICE corporal and five others have been arrested by the special security outfit codenamed “Operation Mesa‘ for violation of traffic rules in Lagos. The Intelligence Officer, 9 Brigade, Capt. Andrew Malgwi, who paraded the suspects in Ikeja, said the arrest was ordered by Governor Babatunde Fashola (SAN), whose convoy was driving past when the offence was committed on Sunday. Malgwi gave the names of the suspects as Nicholas Odeh, a police corporal, Michael Ameh, Henry Ameh, Nicholas Danladi, Augustine Ameh and Austin Osunsakin He said: “At 9pm on Sunday, these six men were arrested for driving against traffic. “They were arrested around the Cappa traffic light area on Agege Motor Road on suspicion that they were criminals, because of

123 convicted in Delta From Okungbowa Aiwerie, Asaba

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HE Federal Road Safety Commission (FRSC) mobile court in Asaba, Delta State, has convicted 123 motorists arrested for various traffic offences. Nine others were discharged by the court presided over by Chief Magistrate Nnamdi Onyekwe. The offences range from non use of seat belt to number plate violation; light/caution sign violation; drivers’ license violation; riding motorcycle without crash helmet; obstructing corps marshal on duty and overloading. FRSC Sector Commander Luka Umar Ikpi said the prosecution of the offenders was part of the operation ‘zerotry’ organised nationwide by the headquarters every quarter. The exercise ended yesterday. He said the operation was not punitive but meant “to instill discipline in motorists and bring about awareness about the proper way to drive. “It is also a way of inculcating discipline on the highway,” adding that all this was “geared towards bringing about safer roads and fuller lives.” BY Miriam Ndikanwu

the way they were driving. “By their action, they have

breached the state‘s traffic rules. “And OP Mesa, with a mandate to fight criminal-

ity, will ensure the men are prosecuted. Capt. Malgwi added that the suspects will be handed over to the police for further interrogation. One of the suspects, Michael Ameh, said he acted in ignorance because he did not know the state‘s traffic rules. “I actually committed the offence out of ignorance because I am not familiar with the road being new in Lagos. “My cousin, Nicholas, the owner of the vehicle, called me and told me he was injured in an accident and that he would need me to take him to the hospital. “I got the other people informed and we traced him to the scene. “It was while I was driving him that we were rounded up by security operatives,” he said.

Two kidnap suspects arrested From Okungbowa Aiwerie, Asaba

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HE police in Delta State have arrested Beke Muina and Ejaita Awarhitefe for their alleged complicity in the abduction of an employee of the Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). It said the victim, identified as Godwin Ngbekeme, was rescued unhurt Police spokesman Charles Muka said N1.627 million was recovered from the suspects. Muka said Ngbekeme spent four days with his captors. He said the Anti-Terrorism squad, acting on a tip-off, stormed the gang’s hideout behind Panalpina Company in Warri, Warri South Local Government. The spokesman said the suspects demanded N5million as ransom. Items recovered include one locally made pistol, nine cartridges, 11 sim cards and N1.627 million.

Fed Govt gives N93.7m for UBE projects

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HE Federal Government has flagged off the Universal Basic Education (UBE) community initiated self-help projects with N93.7million to 125 communities in Bayelsa State. Minister of State for Education Nyesom Wike announced this yesterday in Yenagoa, the state capital. The minister said the Federal Government, in line with the current transformation agenda, has taken steps to ensure the full participation of stake holders not only in sector funding but also in the administration of specific programme components.

From Isaac Ombe, Yenagoa

This, he added, informed government’s decision to approve the UBEC’s initiative in utilising 14 per cent educational funds for addressing imbalance among and within states. Wike commended Governor Timipre Sylva for government’s renewed interest in basic education delivery and “the outstanding efforts made in the direction of providing free and quality education to the people.” Sylva praised UBEC for the initiative and for starting it in the state. “Bayelsa supports the initiative in total,” he said.

Shippers appeal to Jonathan

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RESIDENT Goodluck Jonathan has been urged by shippers to release the funds he promised for the clearing of abandoned vessels and wreckages on the Lagos waterways. The call was made in Lagos by Christopher Eboseremen, Managing Director of Chosen Oil and Gas Limited, an indigenous shipper who lost his vessel to a tidal wave that swept through the Takwa Bay beach early this year. According to Eboseremen, the fund will ameliorate the condition of local shippers who lost their investments to natural causes. Jonathan had, during a recent visit to Lagos, promised government funds for the removal of vessel carcasses on the waterways. Eboseremen said: “I appeal to President Jonathan to expedite action on the issue as the Lagos State Government has threatened to drag me to court over my beached vessel, MT Techno-Horizon. “I hope that if the money is released to the state, the pressure on me to remove the vessel will reduce.”

•Capt. Malgwi briefing reporters...yesterday

The suspects at the 9 Brigade Headquarters...yseterday

Security guards lock out pupils, teachers

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UPILS and teachers of Oramiyan Model Primary School in Egor Local Government of Edo State were yesterday locked out for two hours by security guards. The guards were protesting alleged unpaid salaries. The action stalled academic activities in the school as the guards insisted on the payment of their five months

•Protest non-payment of salaries From Osagie Otabor, Benin

salary arrears before the gates would be opened. It took the intervention of the council chairman, George Aimenokho, for the gates to be opened. The school’s head teacher, Mrs. Carol Okuomose, said

it was surprising to see the school’s four entrances locked. Mrs. Okuomose said she reported to the council boss who prevailed on the guards to open the gates. She said the protesters were not employed by the school, adding that they

ASUU begins strike Sept 25

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HE Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU), Benin Zone, says it will comply with the directive of its National Executive Council (NEC) to begin a one-week warning strike on September 25. Zonal Coordinator Sunday Ighalo, at a briefing yesterday, said the strike was because of government’s insincerity and refusal to fully implement an agreement it had with the body in 2009. Dr. Ighalo said they had tried to convince government to fully implement the 2009 Federal Government/ ASUU Agreement but to no avail.

From Osagie Otabor, Benin

He said parents and students should hold the Federal Government responsible for the disruption in academic activities. His words: “Government for the umpteenth time has deployed the instrument of deceit, insincerity and refused to honour the union’s consultation and peaceful bid for it to implement the vital and critical aspects of the 2009 agreement. “The vital aspects of the agreement are non-passage of the law on 70 years retirement for academics in professorial cadre, earned allowances and funding.

“Having consulted and made several peaceful moves and attempts to get the government to do the right thing but without success, our union has taken the option of strike as a way out because that is the only language it understands and consequently to compel a recalcitrant, insincere and unrepentant government to do the right thing. “Consequent upon this, we have resolved to embark upon a one week warning strike to compel the anti-education government to honour an agreement it entered into,” he said.

claimed they were being owed N300,000. The council Secretary, Ezekiel Enabulele, said the council has approved N210, 000 for the payment of the salary arrears. Enabulele said the four guards were not members of staff of the council but four permanent workers from the council have been posted to the school.

Air Nigeria introduces My Easipay By Kelvin Osa- Okunbor

AIR NIGERIA has launched a new product known as “My Easipay”. It is designed to enable customers pay for their ticket reservations at any Interswitch partnerbank branch or with a Verve card at Quickteller ATMs nationwide. Customers can make reservations on the airline’s website www.myairnigeria.com or through their phones.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NEWS Yobe ex-governor Ibrahim’s wife dead From Onyedi Ojiabor, (Assistant Editor), Abuja

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ISHA, the wife of former Yobe State Governor, Senator Bukar Abba Ibrahim, is dead. She was said to have died at the University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital (UMTH) on Sunday. An aide to Ibrahim said Hajiya Ibrahim was rushed to the hospital when she complained of ill health. She was said to have died a few hours after her admission. The late Hajiya Ibrahim was buried on Monday according to Islamic rites. Ibrahim (Yobe East) is Chairman, Senate Committee on Housing. He has reportedly been receiving sympathisers in his home in Damaturu, the state capital. Among them is Yobe State Governor Ibrahim Gaidam, members of the House of Assembly, among others.

Council poll: Seven parties present candidates in Niger

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HE Niger State Independent Electoral C o m m i s s i o n (NSIEC) has said seven political parties, out of the 12 registered parties in the state, are fielding candidates for the October 8 local government election. The Chairman of the commission, Alhaji Mohammed Danlami Abubakar, told reporters in Minna that the six parties are fielding 60 chairmanship candidates and 569 councillorship candidates. The parties, according to him, are: the Action Alliance (AA), Action Congress of Nigeria (ACCN), All Nigeria Peoples Party (ANPP), Congress for Progressive Change (CPC), Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) and the Social Democratic Mega Party (SDMP). The Peoples Redemption Party (PRP) only has a candidate for councillorship position. Abubakar said 10,410 adhoc workers would work with the commission during the election. He added that the commission has decided that National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) members

From Jide Orintunsin, Minna

would not be included in the polls because the commission wants to avoid what happened during the April polls. According to him, the commission will organise a training workshop for the ad-hoc workers during the polls. He said an examination would be conducted for the ad-hoc workers after the workshop and that only those who pass would be selected. This, he said, is to test their ability about the job and to reduce mistakes. Abubakar said: “There will be a training workshop for presiding officers, supervisors and returning officers and at the end of the workshop. There will be an examination for them. The examination will involve the use of the result sheets because that is where the mistakes always come from. We want to ensure that mistakes are reduced to the minimal level and whoever does not pass the examination, at the end of the workshop, will not be chosen.”

LOSS OF DOCUMENT This is to inform the General Public that Alhaji Saliu Moshobalaje Olubuade is the owner of the property situate at No.11, Attan Street, Yaba/Surulere, Lagos by virtue of Certificate of Occupancy registered at the Lagos State Land Registry as No. 37 page 37 volume 1983. It is to inform the General public further that the Certificate of Occupancy with respect to the property got lost and all effort to locate it proved abortive hence dealing or transaction with respect to the property is invalid, and null and void. Signed: Alhaji Saliu Moshobalaje Olubuade.

PUBLIC NOTICE JESUS ARMOUR BIBLE MINISTRY This is to infor the grneral public that the above named organization has applied to the Corporate Affairs Commission for registration under part C of the companies and allied Matters Act 1990. THE TRUSTEES are; Pastor Chinonye Benjamin Evang. (Mrs.) Hope Benjamin Pastor Happiness Amadi Pastor Prince Elijah Pastor Imomotimi Daniel Omoger Dillon Henry Pereokosifa Marcus Apeli AIMS AND OBJECTIVES INCLUDES' To preach the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ to every nation. To provide quality worship centres for believers to worship God freely. To minister to the afflicted, poor, hungry and oppressed in accordance with provisions in the Bible. Any objective to this registration should be forwarded to the Registrar-General, Corporate Affairs Commission, Plot 565 Ndola Square Wuse Zone 5, PMB 198 Abuja within 28days of this publication. SIGNED C. C. ONYEMA (MRS.) ESQ

•From left: Secretary to Osun State Government (SSG), Alhaji Moshood Adeoti; Deputy Governor Titi Laoye-Tomori; Governor Rauf Aregbesola; Chairman, Nigerian Institute of Public Relations (NIPR), Osun State chapter, Gbenga Ojo; Assistant Secretary, Musbau Bello; and others, during the NIPR team’s visit to the governor in his office at Abere, Osogbo.

Tribunal dismisses Aliyu’s petition T in Niger senatorial poll HE State/National Assembly Election Petition Tribunal sitting in Minna, Niger State, has thrown out the petition by the former Chairman of the Senate Committee on National Security, Nuhu Aliyu, of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), challenging the election of Musa Ibrahim of the Congress for Progressive Change (CPC). Aliyu was the senator representing Niger North Senatorial District until the April election, when he lost to Ibrahim. The tribunal also dismissed the petition by Mohammed Duba of the PDP challenging the election of Idris Graba of CPC for the Kontagora/ Mashegu/Wushishi Federal Constituency.

•Upholds CPC victories From Jide Orintunsin, Minna

Dismissing Aliyu’s petition, Justice Kingsley Udeh said the tribunal lacks jurisdiction under the Electoral Act to entertain a petition on fake certificate, as presented by the petitioner, explaining that such allegation was a criminal case. Citing Section 65(1) of the 1999 Constitution, the tribunal averred that the Electoral Act forbids it to look into criminal matters. The tribunal also faulted the allegation of irregularities

during the election. Justice Udeh ruled that the evidence of the petitioner’s witness lacked substance and so could not be relied upon by the tribunal. According to him, the petitioner was not physically present at the voting centres in the senatorial district but depended on his agents at the polling units. Justice Udeh held that the petitioner failed to prove the allegations of irregularities beyond reasonable doubt, as required by the Electoral Act.

Upholding Garba’s victory, the tribunal ruled that Duba’s petition was flawed on the ground of inconsistence. Describing the judgment as a victory for democracy, Ibrahim said the judiciary has shown that it is on the side of the truth. CPC Chairman Shuaibu Umar said the victories at the tribunal have shown that the state supports CPC. He said when the tribunal delivers judgment on the petition filed by the party’s governorship candidate, the state would be fully liberated from the PDP.

PLWHAs accuse officials of N15m fraud

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HERE is the over N15 million balance meant for the upkeep and treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS in the Federal Capital Territory (FCT)? This is the question on the lips of members of the support groups of People Living with HIV/AIDS (NEPWHAN) in the city. A member of the FCT Interim Management Board, Mr John Okene speaking on behalf of the board along with eight others, accused the suspended management board of the FCT, under the sacked FCT coordinator, Mr Peter Ekiti of misappropriating over N15 Million meant for the upkeep and activities of persons living with

•It’s not true, says coordinator From Augustine Ehikioya, Abuja

HIV/AIDS. After misappropriating the money, Ekiti was alleged to have barred individuals from participating in support group activities. Okene also raised the alarm over the HIV/AIDS status of some members said to have infilterated the organisations. According to him, there is also doubt over the HIV/AIDS status of the suspended coordinator, adding that he had never produced any evidence of his status nor has he ever accessed drugs from any health facility over the past 12 years.

Okene said: “Furthermore, every person who claims to be living with HIV in FCT must be screened or tested for HIV before he or she can participate and benefit from the support meant for people living with HIV/AIDS in the FCT.” But Ekiti yesterday denied all the allegations and claimed that he was being framed up because he asked the NACA DG and the NEPWHAN National President, Mr Edward Ogeniyi to render accounts. Insisting that no one has asked him to render account of his stewardship, he said that he is ready to account for the N15 million once the NACA

DG and the NEPWHAN National President render their own accounts. According to him, his status as HIV/AIDS patient is not in doubt as he has been living with the virus for 14 years but was not on any ARV. “I am not taking any ARV and by God grace, I will not take any ARV. If anyone is contesting my status, they should come with the NEPWHAN national coordinator and a scientist to test me,” she said. The national NEPWHAN had suspended the FCT coordinator over his alleged politicising of affairs of NEPWHAN and causing discord between the network and their partners.

I’ll maintain open door policy, says Kwankwaso

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ANO State Governor Rabi’u Musa Kwankwaso has said the doors of his administration are open to contributions that would facilitate the socio-economic development of the state. The governor spoke in Kano when he received a report on development strategies by a group of concerned

From Kolade Adeyemi, Kano

citizens, led by Abubakar Balarabe Mahmood (SAN), at the Government House. He said the government is willing to tap from the wealth of experience of wellmeaning indigenes. According to him, governance is a collective responsi-

bility and there is need for the cross-fertilisation of ideas to drive policy formulation and implementation. Kwankwaso hailed the indigenes for their patriotism and commitment to the development of the state. He promised to implement the recommendations of their report.

Presenting the report, Mahmood said the committee was ready to partner the government in the development of Kano. He said the report was compiled after a thorough study of the problems and prospects of the state, adding that if implemented, it would enhance the progress of the state.

Northern governors meet tomorrow over Jos crises

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INETEEN northern governors, under the aegis of Northern Governors’ Forum (NGF), will meet tomorrow in Abuja over the protracted crises in Jos, the Plateau State capital. The meeting was summoned by NGF chairman and Niger State Governor Babangida Aliyu. It will come up with recommendations that would halt

From Jide Orintunsin, Minna

the violence on the Plateau and prevent a recurrence. In a statement by the Chief Press Secretary to the NGF Chairman, Malam Danladi Ndayebo, the forum said it is determined to stop the violence that has caused the death of scores of innocent residents and the displacement of hundreds.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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BUSINESS THE NATION

E-mail:- bussiness@thenationonlineng.net

Naira hits four-month low on strong dollar demand

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HE naira fell to its weakest in four months against the dollar on the interbank market on yesterday after the Central Bank (CBN) failed to clear all demand for the greenback at its bi-weekly forex auction. The local currency closed at N156.80 to the dollar, its weakest since May 12 and lower from N156.20 at Friday’s close. Traders said strong demand for dollars and the inability of the CBN to meet all demand at its auction had forced users of foreign exchange to redirect their bids to the interbank market, putting pressure on the naira. At the official window, the CBN sold only $350 million at a rate of N153.91 to the dollar, short of the $467.56 million demanded but equal to the $350 million sold at N153.54 per dollar at its last auction on Wednesday. “We have expected the CBN to clear all the demand at the auction in view of its position to defend the naira and the fact that there has been persistent strong demand for dollars in the market,” one dealer said. Traders said despite cumulative sales to lenders of $750 million in two tranches by state-owned energy firm, the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation ( NNPC) last week, dollar liquidity in the interbank market remained tight, leading to pressure on the naira. “The naira will continue to be under pressure in the coming days unless the CBN intervenes at its next auction on Wednesday and clears all the arrears of unmet demand,” another dealer said.

From the 122 enterprises that have been privatised so far, N146 billion has been realised from the sales. 33.6 per cent of them are doing poorly while 66.3 per cent are doing well. -Bolanle Onagoruwa, Director-General, Bureau of Public Enterprises (BPE)

CBN increases interest rate T to 9.25 % T HE Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) yesterday increased the interest rate mechanism - the Monetary Policy Rate (MPR) - to 9.25 per cent. It was previously 8.75 per cent. The adjustment is the fifth this year. CBN Governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi announced the new rate in Abuja after the Monetary Policy Committee meeting. He said the decision was taken to tighten monetary policy by increasing MPR by 50 basis point to 9.25 per cent. The committee also unanimously agreed to maintain the current symmetric corridor of +/- 200 basis points around the MPR and retain the Credit Rate Ratio (CRR) of four per cent. Sanusi said the key concern that informed the CBN’s decision was the continuing “expansionary fiscal stance and high component of recurrent expenditure; liquidity surge expected from AMCON intervention, fol-

• Backs removal of Petroleum Subsidy From Nduka Chiejina, Assistant Editor (Abuja)

lowing conclusion of bank recapitalisation,” Other consideration are the “sharp rise in month-onmonth headline inflation rate despite failing headline inflation rate on year-onyear basis; need to have positive real interest rates; and the persistent demand pressure in the foreign exchange market, driven by significant liquidity injections and reflecting structural deficiencies that have perpetuated the import dependence of the economy.” According to Sanusi, “the announcement of a target of one per cent annual reduction in government recurrent spending when viewed in

the context of the anticipated injections associated with the implementation of the new minimum national wage, suggests that the fiscal retrenchment is likely to be drawn-out.” The apex bank is also worried that “the weight of structural factors, such as the announced hikes in electricity tariffs and the expected removal of petroleum subsidy,” will add to liquidity in the system. In addition, AMCON’s injection of N3 trillion will have “adverse impact on prices.” Sanusi said the apex bank is in support of the deregulation of the petroleum sector, particularly the removal of subsidies on petroleum products. This development, he said, will be uncomfortable in the

days immediately after the removal, but the decision will in the long-term, be in the best interest of the country. Nigeria’s external reserve increased to $34.85 billion as at last week, representing an increase of US$1.12 billion or 3.32 per cent above the level of $33.73 billion attained as at July 21. The increase on the nation’s gross external reserve, Sanusi said, was accounted for by increased inflows of royalties into the Federation Account, reflecting the upward trend in international oil prices and stable oil production in the Niger Delta. He added that foreign direct and portfolio investments increased over the last eight months with foreign capital inflows for the eight months of last year standing at US$5.66 billion, which is US$1.06 billion or 23.04 per cent higher than the US$4.6 billion recorded in the corresponding period last year.

NSE JSE NYSE LSE

-N6.747 trillion -Z5.112trillion -$10.84 trillion -£61.67 trillion RATES

Inflation -9.3% Treasury Bills -7.08% Maximum lending-22.42% Prime lending -15.84% Savings rate -1.42% 91-day NTB -6.99% Time Deposit -6% MPR -8.75% Foreign Reserve $34.87b CFA EUR £ $ ¥ SDR RIYAL

FOREX -

0.281 215.1 245.00 153.16 1.5652 243.2 40.57

HE partnership with two South African firms will boost service delivery and infrastructure development, the Managing Director of Nigeria Urban Development Bank (UDBN), Adekunle Oyinloye has said. The UDBN earlier in the month in Pretoria signed Memoranda of Understanding (MoU) with Price Water House Cooper, a financial management company and aurecon Engineering on infrastructure development in Nigeria. Oyinloye said the partnership with a global leading engineering company would provide the immediate service delivery. “There is a lot of potential in Nigeria waiting to be tapped. Nigeria has realised that the government alone cannot provide the infrastructure development needs. The only way out of the decay infrastructure everywhere in Nigeria is to go into Public-Private Partnership. “UDBN is set up to provide platform for financing of infrastructural development, we have identified major area Nigeria need immediate infrastructural development, and our partner are ready to come in to make the dream of provision of service delivery possible in the country,’’ Oyinloye said.

Capital Oil sells kerosene in Kano, Kaduna

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DATA STREAM COMMODITY PRICES Oil -$118.7/barrel Cocoa -$2,856/metric ton Coffee - ¢132.70/pound Cotton - ¢95.17pound Gold -$1,161/troy ounce Rubber -¢146.37pound MARKET CAPITALISATIONS

‘Deal with South African firms’ll boost infrastructure’

• Managing Director/CEO Airtel Nigeria, Mr Rajan Swaroop (left), with the Managing Director/CEO, Keystone Bank, Mr Oti Ikomi, during his visit to Airtel Corporate Office, Banana Island, Lagos...last week.

AMCON to invest N800b in rescued banks

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SSET Management Corporation of Nige ria (AMCON) is to invest additional N800 billion in the five rescued banks. Shareholders are expected to okay the deal at the scheduled Extra-ordinary General Meetings (EGMs). The amount would bring total capital injection by AMCON to N1.5trillion. Earlier, it had put in N700 billion to recapitalise the three bridged banks. Speaking at an interactive session with journalists in Lagos, yesterday, the Managing Director, Asset Management Corporation of Nigeria (AMCON), Mustafa ChikeObi, said the bank has plan for additional N500 billion to recapitalise and take control of the five rescued banks in case shareholders vote against

• Puts N500b on standby for any bridge By Taofik Salako

merging. He said AMCON has an investment scenario of a minimum of N1.5 trillion if the business combinations of the rescued banks sail through and a worst case scenario of N2 trillion should the shareholders reject the mergers and acquisition deals, adding that to deal with any unforeseen eventuality at any of the EGMs, AMCON has increased the shelf value of its bond to N4.5 trillion to provide headroom for additional capital that might be needed. AMCON is expected to recapitalise the rescued banks from their negative shareholders’funds to zero level in exchange for equities.

AMCON had bought three banks - Afribank Nigeria, Bank PHB and Springbank, that were earlier nationalised and in which it injected N700 billion. The three banks, renamed - Enterprise Bank, Keystone Bank and Mainstreet Bank are now owned by AMCON. Chike-Obi said AMCON has invested a total of N1.7 trillion in the purchase of NonPerforming Loans and the three nationalised banks, adding that with the bad debts taken over by the corporation, it has shares in all banks and many quoted companies. He, however, dismissed insinuations from some quarters that the nationalisation of the three banks was premeditated pointing out that the

government acted in good faith in the interest of the majority of vulnerable people by protecting depositors and guaranteeing continuing operations of the banks, employees’jobs and customer relationships. He said AMCON plans to sell the three nationalised banks as soon as possible within a timeline of two years, noting that it has received over 20 expressions of interest (EOIs) for the banks including 15 EOIs from foreign investors. “AMCON is not interested in holding on to banks, I have no desire to own bank. There was no agenda, no plan to hurt anybody. But you can’t sit there and worry about few people when lack of actions will hurt majority of people,” Chike-Obi said.

APITAL Oil and Gas said yesterday that it had stopped direct sale of kerosene to consumers in Lagos. It said it was serving consumers in Kano and Kaduna. Head of Trading and Business Development of the firm, Mr Nisikan Usoro, disclosed this to the News Agency of Nigeria (NAN) in Lagos. “Currently, we are selling to consumers in Kaduna and Kano and we hope to be back to Lagos soon. “The project, which marked a milestone in the history of kerosene distribution to the masses in Nigeria, is continuous one. It is not abandoned. “There is no going back on the issue. Lagos residents should not panic,” Usoro said. According to him, the project will be in segments to check fraud in the system. He urged consumers to always buy sales vouchers at NNPC mega stations and retail outlets to avoid carrying cash to points of sales. Usoro expressed optimism that the decentralisation of the distribution chain would relieve consumers of pains associated with buying kerosene at exorbitant prices in their neighbourhood.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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BUSINESS NEWS TCN raises grid stability committee

Flight Schedule MONDAY - FRIDAY LAGOS – ABUJA Departure Arrival 1. Aero 06.50 08.10 2. Associated 07.00 09.30 3. Air Nigeria 07.00 08.20 4. IRS 07.00 08.20 5. Dana 07.02 08.22 6. Arik 07.15 08.15 7. Chanchangi 07.15 8. Air Nigeria 08.15 09.35 9. Dana 08.10 09.20 10. Aero 08.45 10.05 11. Arik 09.15 10.15 12. Chanchangi 10.00 11.00 13. IRS 11.15 12.35 14. Dana 12.06 12.26 15. Aero 12.20 13.30 16. Air Nigeria 13.25 14.45 17. Chanchangi 13.30 14.30 18. Arik 13.45 14.45 19. IRS 14.00 15.20 20. Aero 14.10 15.30 21. Air Nigeria 14.50 16.10 22. Dana 15.30 16.50 23. Chanchangi 15.30 16.30 24. Arik 15.50 16.50 25. Aero 16.00 17.20 26. IRS 16.30 17.50 27. Arik 16.50 17.50 28. Dana 17.10 18.30 29. Chanchangi 17.30 18.30 30. Air Nigeria 17.35 18.55 31. Air Nigeria (T/TH) 18.30 19.50 32. Arik 18.45 19.45 33. Aero 19.20 20.40 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

LAGOS – BENIN Arik 07.30 Associated 08.30 Aero 10.50 Arik 11.45 Associated 13.00 Aero 14.25 Arik 15.30 Associated 16.00

1. 2. 3. 4.

Arik Aero Arik Aero

1. Arik 2. Aero 1. 2. 3. 4.

LAGOS – CALABAR 07.30 11.20 12.50 16.00 LAGOS – JOS 10.55 11.15

LAGOS – KADUNA Aero 08.00 Chanchangi 10.00 Arik 10.00 Arik 15.10

08.30 09.10 11.50 12.45 13.40 15.20 16.30 16.40 08.50 12.40 14.10 17.20 12.15 12.45 09.10 11.00 11.10 16.20

LAGOS – PORT HARCOURT (CIVIL) 1. Aero 07.15 08.35 2. Arik 07.15 08.35 3. Arik 09.00 10.20 4. Dana 09.27 10.40 5. Aero 10.50 12.30 6. Arik 11.40 13.00 7. Air Nigeria 12.00 13.10 8. IRS 13.30 15.00 9. Arik 14.00 15.20 10. Dana 15.03 16.20 11. Air Nigeria 16.00 17.10 12. Arik 16.10 17.30 13. Aero 16.15 17.30 14. Arik 17.10 18.30 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

LAGOS – OWERRI Aero 07.30 Arik 07.30 Air Nigeria 13.40 Arik 14.00 Arik 16.30

08.40 08.40 14.55 15.10 17.40

1. 2. 3. 4.

Arik Aero Arik Aero

LAGOS – WARRI 08.15 11.50 11.55 14.55

09.1 12.50 12.55 15.55

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

LAGOS – KANO Air Nigeria 07.10 IRS 08.00 Dana 08.10 Arik 12.20 IRS 14.00 IRS 18.15

08.50 09.45 09.40 14.00 15.45 19.55

LAGOS – OWERRI 07.20 14.00 16.30

08.30 15.10 17.40

LAGOS – UYO 10.35

11.35

1. Arik 2. Arik 3. Arik 1. Dana

LAGOS – MAIDUGURI 1. IRS 11.15 13.15 2. Arik 15.50 18.00 LAGOS – ILORIN 1. Overland 07.15 2. Arik (M/T/TH/F) 17.30

08.00 18.00

LAGOS – ABUJA SAT/SUN Arik 7.15; 10.20; 2.20; 5.20pm – 7.30; 9.15; 10.20; 2.20; 4.50; 6.45 Aero 07.30; 09.35; 13.10; 14.50; 20.20 – 07.30; 09.35; 13.10; 14.50; 20.20 Air Nigeria 08.15; 14.30; 17.15; 18.30 – 08.15; 13.30; 14.30; 17.15; 18.30

From John Ofikhenua, Abuja

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• From right: Bola Akingbade, Chief Marketing Officer, MTN, presenting a N10 million cheque to a winner, Miss Gift Azubike, at the MTN SIM Registration Reward, in Lagos. With them is Okechukwu Nweke, General Manager, National Communications Commission (NCC). PHOTO: JOHN EBHOTA

Fed Govt, EU consortium seal N240b deal T

HE Federal Govern ment has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with a consortium of Swiss and European investors for N240 billion ($1.6bilion) investment in the power, petroleum and housing sectors of the economy. The Minister of Trade and Investment, Olusegun Aganga, confirmed the development during the signing of the first phase of the MoU with the representatives of the consortium in Abuja. The group, comprising Seagas Services Limited and Oceanmar Services Limited, was led by the First Deputy Prime Minister and Head of International Affairs and Investments, Republic of Kosovo, Behgjet Pacolli. Aganga said the Ministry of Trade and Investment would work closely with the Ministries of Power and Petroleum to facilitate the investments, adding that the

Federal Government is committed to supporting genuine investors to invest in critical sectors of the Nigerian economy. He said: “We have held discussions with the representatives of Seagas Services Limited and Oceanmar Services Limited, about the investment opportunities in Nigeria. We have agreed on investments in a few areas, such as housing, building a factory for gas infrastructure for the manufacturing of gas pipelines. We also discussed the possibility of investing in the area of power, building of refineries and housing construction. “After a number of discussions, we are signing a Memorandum of Understanding for the estimated $1.6 billion to be invested in some of these areas. Specifically, the money will be invested in refinery, power and housing. It is the

desire of the Federal Government, through the Ministry of Trade and Investment, to attract Foreign Direct Investments into Nigeria, create jobs, generate wealth and enhance the economic growth of the country. Aganga thanked Pacolli for the trust and confidence reposed in the nation’s economy and promised to collaborate with him to ensure the successful execution of these projects. “We are committed towards ensuring that these investments generate wealth and create jobs for Nigerians,” he added. Pacolli, who spoke on behalf of the consortium during the signing, noted that the decision to invest in Nigeria is based on the huge and largely untapped investment potential in the economy, adding that the consortium would work assiduously towards the completion of its proposed investment projects in Nigeria.

Dangote, Cameroon sign $115m cement contract

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AMEROON and Dangote Group yesterday signed a $115 million Investment Agreement for the construction of a composite cement production plant, which will result in the production of 1.5 million metric tonnes of cement in Douala, Cameroon yearly. The $115 million agreement, which the company described as the first tranche of a $700 million long term investment projection in Cameroon’s various real sector arms, was signed by President of Dangote Group Alhaji Aliko Dangote and the Prime Minister/ Head of Government of Cameroun Philémon Yang at a ceremony in the east African country. Other Cameroon government officials who signed parts of the agreement include the Minister of

Commerce Mr Mbarga Atangana, Minister of State for Transport Bello Bouba Maigari, Governor of Douala Mr Francis Fai Yengo and the Director-General, Cameroon Ports Authority, Mr Dayas Monoume Jean Marcel. Speaking after the endorsement, Yang praised the Nigerian investment drive in its sister nation and said it would go a long way to improve economic and political cooperation between the two countries. “I extend my congratulations to Dangote Group and its President Alhaji Aliko Dangote for this massive investment initiative in cameroun. It will certainly change the industrial landscape of Cameroon,” he said. The prime minister commended Dangote for its belief in the Cameroonian economy, his track

record and described him as an inspiration to other African investors. According to him, “we salute the determination of Dangote who believed so much in this project, who has done so much for the African community and has stopped at nothing to make it happen.” While stating the country’s commitment to its responsibilities and obligations in the agreement, he said the achievement represented an endorsement of the industrial policy thrust of president Paul Biya of Cameroon. “This is, indeed, a welcome development and in line with the renewed government policy of encouraging Private sector growth and employment generation”| he said.

Power reform is productive, says BPE chief

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HE Bureau of Public Enter prises (BPE) has said global experience in the implementation of reforms in the power sector has shown that reforms can be productive and profitable. The Director-General of BPE Ms. Bolanle Onagoruwa, in her paper entitled: Power sector: Global experience, presented at the two-day Nigerian power sector reform workshop, organised by the BPE, said reforms can yield huge productivity gains, particularly through dynamic efficiency gains under competitive pressures. This assertion was also corroborated by

By Emeka Ugwuanyi

Dr. Cezley Sampson, a lead consultant at CPCS BPE’s Head, Public Communication, Chukwuma Nwokoh, in a statement, said they contended that experiences with reforms elsewhere have yielded several general lessons for developing countries, such as Nigeria. “It shows that radical unbundling is feasible—that generation, transmission, and distribution can be separated from one another even in power sectors that did not adopt this structure from an early stage

of development. Several countries have recently unbundled their power sectors. Examples are England and Wales, Argentina, Bolivia, Hungary, Peru, Poland, Ukraine, Kenya and India/Delhi,” Onagoruwa and Sampson explained. They pointed out that private financing of power investments in a competitive market is feasible in a sound business environment. To them, the key is to ensure that private developers carry the risks that they can manage, and that government guarantees are limited as much as possible.

HE Chief Executive Officer, Transmission Company of Nigeria (TCN), Akinwumi Bada, has set up a Grid Stability Committee (GSC), to monitor grid operations and swiftly handle major issues relating to serious grid incidents. In a statement yesterday, the Assistant General Manager, Public Affairs, Dave Ifabiyi, explained that the committee is part of the firm’s effort to stabilise and ensure the reliability of the transmission grid network. Members of the Committee are drawn from the eight transmission regions of the company, three of which would be sent to countries that have had similar conditions with Nigeria, to understudy how their grid was stabilised to replicate it in the country. The major thrust of the new management, is to make use of available resources to ensure stability and efficient service delivery. To this end, the company is working hard at expanding the transmission network, to successfully wheel the expected increase in electricity generation from the National Integrated Power Plants (NIPPs) and other power generating plants in the country. To achieve this, Bada, challenged the Regional Transmission Managers to reduce the list of all unavailable equipment in their region by at least 50 per cent by the end of September 2011.

TECNICOOL Nigeria, LG Electronics to host managers, surveyors

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ECNICOOL Nigeria Limited, a air-conditioning solutions provider and partner to LG Electronics for commercial air-conditioners sales and installations in Nigeria, is to host project managers and quantity surveyors. This interactive forum comes up on Wednesday, September 21 at Eko Hotel & Suites Victoria Island, Lagos. According to Mr Niyi Kolawole, the Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer of Tecnicool Nigeria Ltd, the objective of the forum is to familiarise the quantity surveyors, as cost professionals, with various range of LG brand of commercial airconditioners and their various attributes. ‘’The more knowledge a quantity surveyor has on the various attributes of our air-conditioning equipment and the cost/benefits associated with them, the more understanding and coherent of purpose he would achieve with M&E engineers when specifying LG commercial air conditioners equipment on projects. LG Air-conditioners has achieved an outstanding record in the shortest span of time, from manufacturing Korea’s first air conditioner in 1968 to achieving the No.1 world position for nine consecutive years now.

World oil demand to hit 112.2m

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ORLD oil demand will climb to 112.2 million bar rels per day over the next two decades, up 1.4 percent from a previous estimate, the United States Energy Information Administration said Monday. Total world petroleum use was projected to climb by 26.9 million bpd between 2008 and 2035, the EIA said in its yearly international energy outlook


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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AVIATION

Kwara Aviation College to train commercial pilots H ISTORY was made in the aviation industry at the weekend when the Ilorin International Aviation College in Kwara State got a licence from the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) to start the training of commercial pilots. The state Governor Alhaji Abdulfatah Ahmed received the licence at Government House, Ilorin. Governor Ahmed spoke of government’s effort to partner with

Stories by Kelvin Osa-Okunbor Aviation Correspondent

the private sector under a PublicPrivate-Partnership (PPP) arrangement for the development of the aviation industry in the country His words: “Today marks another milestone in our determination to partner with the private sector to promote the growth and development of the aviation industry in Nigeria. The need for this arose

from obvious deficit in the aviation personnel ready to drive this sector. “It is, therefore, a thing of joy for me to be here this morning to receive a certificate that will enable us to commence training in our newly established Aviation College”. Nigerian, he noted, has a serious shortage of manpower in the aviation industry, which he blamed in

the existence of only one training institute in the country – the Nigerian College of Aviation Technology, Zaria, and the huge financial cost of training pilots abroad. Governor Ahmed reiterated the commitment of his administration to the execution of projects that will enhance the socio-economic development of the state, such as the International Aviation College. With the take-off of the aviation college, he said, more airlines are expected to operate at the Ilorin International Airport, while other aviation-related activities are also expected to transform the state. He congratulated the development partners involved in the establishment and take-off of the aviation college as well as the entire people of the state for the achievement, expressing hope that it will raise the economic status of

the state and its people as well. Presenting the pilot training certificate to the governor, the representative of the Director-General of NCAA, Mr Emmanuel Ogunbanbi, congratulated Alhaji Ahmed on his first 100 days in office, describing the certificate as memorable. In his opening remarks, Commissioner for Works and Transport, Dr Abubakar Kannike, explained that the acute shortage of aviation personnel, especially the training of pilots necessitated the establishment of the college by the state government to address the shortage of pilots. He said all registration procedures have been completed while the presentation of the certificate by NCAA is an indication that full academic exercise would start in the college any moment from now.

Airport police chief okays security

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HE Police Commis sioner Airport Police Com mand, Tambari Mohammed, says security arrangements have been put in place to ward off any external aggression at the various airports across the nation. Speaking with airport correspondents in his office at the Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja, Commissioner Mohammed said the security situation at the airports was not as bad as it was being painted.

Describing security as a collective effort, he urged Nigerians to be positive about the nation and to do things that can unite Nigeria rather than causing disaffection. He said the police will not succeed if the business of security was left solely for them to carry out. He warned that touts will no longer be allowed at the airports, adding that anyone caught touting or loitering will be apprehended and prosecuted.

Arik Air introduces credit cards • Alhaji Ibrahim Auyo, MD/CEO, Nigeria Airspace Management Agency (NAMA) left and officials of the agency. PHOTO: ISAAC JIMOH AYODELE.

Emirates to hire 500 pilots

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T a time when many of India’s airlines are passing through financial difficulties, Dubai-based Emirates Airline is coming to India to hire 500 pilots. The airline intends to hire a whopping 500 pilots from across the world as it is adding 49 new aircraft to its fleet by next year. While the carrier plans to pick up as many qualified pilots as possible from India, it has not revealed any number or the break-up of the categories. Air India (AI), which is reeling under a huge debt burden of over Rs 42,000, has been facing difficulties in paying the salaries of its staff, including pilots, on time. In fact, AI has been irregular in paying the pilots’ productivity-linked incentives (PLI), which forms over 60 per cent of their welfare package. This has resulted in deep resentment among the pilots. Some have even resigned. Many of the first officers (copilots) are required for new slots. While commercial pilot licence (CPL) holders with no flying experience are not eligible, pilots flying cargo planes and private jets can apply. The selected pilots would fly Boeing 777, A330s and be upgraded to fly A380s. The Emirates officials are coming to India for three days to meet Indian pilots and familiarise themselves with the recruitment procedure. “The Indian pilots have always

been a talented bunch and with the new age of simulation training they are arguably as good as those from any other country. With the new recruitment drive, we are looking at hiring approximately over 500 pilots as per our requirements,” said Alison Ward, vice president of recruitment, Emirates Group. The pilots will be based in Dubai to operate flights across the globe as Emirates, with its 150 wide-bodied aircraft, flies to 110 destinations globally. It has placed orders worth $68 billion with Boeing and Airbus to en-

hance its fleet size to 199 by 2012 and 300 by 2016. Due to the fresh induction of 49 new aircraft by next year, 500 new pilots are required and Emirates is going the extra mile to fill these slots. The airline declined to reveal the pay package on offer. Emirates now employ 40 pilots from India. To attract Indian pilots Emirates is dangling the carrot of flexible schedules, fixed flying hours, exposure of flying on global routes, exposure of flying a diverse fleet and a handsome remuneration, among others.

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RIK Air has introduced the option to pay with inter national credit cards (VISA, MasterCard) for tickets purchased on its website: www.arikair.com The credit card transactions will be processed in the US dollars (USD), British Pounds (GBP) or South African Rand (ZAR). When accepting credit card payments, Arik Air will take advantage of the additional security measures such as Verified by Visa and MasterCard SecureCode systems as well as an advanced fraud prevention system made available by the Payment Service Provider. This will ensure the transactions are safe for Arik Air and Arik’s online customers. Kevin Steele, Senior VP Commercial Arik Air, commented on the introduction of the new payment system: “The introduction of the credit

card option will now make payment easier for our customers as well as expedite bookings without having to go to a sales office, travel agent or airport ticketing office as has been the practice up until now. The whole process is simpler and more convenient to the passenger and we have taken every step to ensure that it is a secure system.” “Whilst this is a major step for Arik as well as our regular customers, we are still working on a solution to implement a local Nigerian Naira credit card payment solution.We will hopefully be able to offer this service to all passengers very soon.” Arik Air (www.arikair.com) is West and Central Africa’s largest domestic airline, and operates mainly from two hubs at Murtala Muhammed Airport Lagos and NnamdiAzikiwe International Airport, Abuja.

‘Demand on air transport affects infrastructure’

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LOBAL aviation bodies including the International Air Transport Association (IATA) have joined the crusade for the urgent need for countries to improve on aviation infrastructure development. A January 2011 report by the New York-based Regional Plan Association (RPA) makes plain aviation’s importance to the global economy, and the world’s social and cultural structures. “Without the ability to efficiently transport business and leisure travellers and time-sensitive cargo, both domestic and international business would grind to a halt. “The leading economic sectors – financial and business services, tourism, pharmaceuticals, media and communications, higher edu-

cation, and research and development – all rely on frequent air travel to many destinations. Having too few flights to handle demand will prevent millions from flying and cost the region thousands of jobs and billions of dollars,” he said. China would doubtless agree with the assessment that airport capacity is essential to economic success. The country has built 45 new airports in the past five years and is planning another 52 by 2020. In Asia-Pacific in general – now the world’s largest aviation market – new airports have been a response to, and driver of, economic growth. It is no coincidence that three of the world’s five largest airlines by market value are in the region. By 2030, the region will handle 80 per cent

more traffic than Europe according to Airports Council International. Indeed, the world will look very different in 2030 as Asia’s booming middle class demands new connections and frequencies. Meeting that demand cannot be isolated to one region, however. Capacity has to be built in all parts of the network to avoid bottlenecks that could limit potential growth. Chief Executive of Dubai Airports, Paul Griffiths, says building airports early is necessary to avoid artificial constraints on growth. “We are not putting the cart before the horse by expanding Dubai International now and building Dubai World Central,” he notes. “Dubai had consistent growth

until 2005 but, from 2005–2010, traffic doubled. The Dubai model not only shows the positive effects of aviation on the economy but has also provided the traveler with more choice, better service, and a cheaper price.” It is a different situation in Latin America. Brazil is the powerhouse economy. Aviation-backed travel and tourism support 9.1 per cent of Brazilian GDP and more than eight million jobs. But problems with São Paulo have led IATA to warn that the country will never fulfill its potential with the current infrastructure. São Paulo handles 25 per cent of Brazil’s total traffic and is creaking at the seams with old and inefficient terminals.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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AVIATION SAA Group makes N19.5b profit THE South African Airways (SAA) Group announced a net profit of R782M (about N19.5 billion) for the 2010-2011 financial year, a 77 per cent increase on the restated figure of R442M (about N11.5 billion) achieved last year. This came even as the market is still recovering from the effects of the global financial crisis and the fluctuating Brent crude price. Group operating profit rose by 66 per cent to R807 million (about N20.17 billion) from restated R487 million (about N12.17 billion) in the previous year. Turnover, made up largely of passenger revenue, increased by six months to R18 billion (about N450 billion) from R16.9 billion, (about N422.5 billion) while operating costs rose by only five per cent despite significantly higher fuel costs. Capital and reserves went up to R1 641 million (about N41.025 billion) from last year’s restated R992 million (about N24.8 billion) while R618 million (about N15.4 billion) in cash was generated. Net retained earnings of R681 million (about N17.025 billion) exceeded the target of R201 million (about N50.25 billion).

Aero buys B737

• Medview Cabin Crew after being received by General Manager, Medview Airline, Mr David O. Babatunde, on their arrival at the Murtala Muhammed Airport, Ikeja, Lagos after a two-month training in Saudi Arabia. PHOTO: ISAAC JIMOH AYODELE.

Club to promote safety, security

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ORRIED by the seeming lack of feedback from aviation service providers, a group of experts has established a platform where members of the public can express their feelings on service delivery to ensure that they are not exploited. The Aviation Associates Club said its motive is to ensure that the objectives of aviation safety and security are not compromised by the Federal Airports Authority of Nigeria (FAAN), Nigeria Airspace Management Agency (NAMA), Nigeria Meteorological Agency (NIMET), and ground handling companies. The Chairman of Aviation Associates Club, Mr Leo Eguabor, explained that the group, would engage stakeholders to create awareness

Stories by Kelvin OsaOkunbor Aviation Correspondent

on aviation safety and security. Eguabor said with the membership of the group drawn from agencies in the industry, the major rule of engagement is to advise government on how to improve services and encourage the younger generation to develop career interest in the aviation sector. He said: “We are also encouraging professional excellence in the industry. What we have primarily involved in is enlightenment of the public to understand that in this industry, there has to be a synergy between the providers and the public. So we want them to understand that they also have a part to play in anything

that has to do with aviation. “As we have said, our vision obviously is to share in the commitment to safety and security within the aviation industry so we are also sharing in the commitment as well as be a tool of enlightenment. So from time to time, we will be carrying our various programmes and the people will get to know because primarily we are going to do a lot of enlightenment programames. “In as much as we have our primary agencies that are the sole providers of certain services or functions, the public too have a role to play in the safety and security within the airport environment and within the aviation industry as a whole. “Well, our aims and objectives are four, we are here to engender a favourable working relationship in the aviation industry through en-

couraging and sustaining safety consciousness within the aviation environment because at times members of the public don’t even know that they have a part to play in this issue. “One of our key enlightenment programmes that we will be carrying out in the future, if you could observe most of us who travel you will observe that there is a tendency for even passengers, members of the public to take things for granted. “When they are on board a plane, you will tell them say please switch off your phones; that the plane is about to take off, you will see some people up to the last minute even in the threshold about to take off, they will still be making calls when a staff member of the agency or the airline tries to caution them.”

Kenya Airways to double fleet in five years

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Advert “2 X 5”

ENYA Airways to double its fleet in the next five years as part of a 10-year plan aimed at extending its network to every African nation. The airline, partly owned by Air France-KLM, aims to connect African travellers to the rest of the world through Nairobi. “Our strategy has been to grow in Africa, try and get in all capital cities in Africa and also increase frequencies. We are looking at doubling our fleet in the next five years,” Titus Naikuni, the Chief Executive of the airline said at a news conference. Kenya Airways, which is one of the largest carriers in Africa, along with Ethiopian Airlines and South African Airways, operates a fleet of around 27 planes, made up of Boeing aircraft and seven Embraer jets. Naikuni spoke after signing a confirmation deal with Brazil’s Embraer for 10 E-

190 jets, due for delivery between July next year and 2013. The deal was first announced during the Paris Airshow this year, when Kenya Airways offered a letter of intent. The Brazilian plane maker has seen steady growth in orders from African carriers, which demand a smaller optimum capacity of 70-120 passengers per plane. The value of the deal between Kenya Airways and Embraer, which has sold 149 planes to 47 operators in 19 African countries thus far, was not disclosed. Kenya Airways signed a deal for the purchase of nine 787-8 Dreamliner planes with Boeing in April this year to replace its ageing fleet and expand routes and flight frequencies. It is in the process of seeking regulatory approval to raise capital to fund the acquisition of the new planes.

AERO Airlines has added a Boeing 737 to its fleet. This is part of the carrier’s expansion programme to double the fleet and add new destinations. The new B737 aircraft is equipped with the latest navigation equipment with lower fuel burn and increased reliability. The Managing Director of Aero, Capt Akin George, said; “This is only the beginning of our major capacity expansion programme. With this new aircraft, we will be able to add additional flights on all routes and also extend our operations to other cities. This will further consolidate Aero’s leading position both in the domestic and regional markets, making Aero the fastest growing airline in West Africa by aircraft usage.” Capt George also guaranteed passengers of the airline’s commitment to the highest safety standards. “Aero adhere strictly to the maintenance schedule for aircraft as prescribed by the manufacturers and the Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority {NCAA}. We will not relent in our efforts to offer the most satisfying flying experience for passengers every time they fly with us,” he said.

Firm spends $680,000 on lobbying THE corporate parent of United and Continental airlines spent $680,000 on lobbying government in the second quarter on issues including funding for the US Federal Aviation Administration and regulation of baggage fees. A house proposal would have required airlines to refund baggage fees if a piece of luggage is lost, delayed, or damaged. It would also have required airlines to include the cost of checked baggage when quoting airfare. Airlines have generally opposed bills that would regulate baggage fees. United Continental Holdings Inc. also monitored legislative and regulatory activity related to merger integration, air cargo security, and air traffic control. The lobbying spending in the second quarter was down from $1.02 million in the first quarter and $810.000 in the fourth quarter of 2010. United and Continental combined on October 1, and the parent company is merging them into one airline that will fly under the United name. Besides Congress, the company lobbied the Federal Aviation Administration, the Transportation Department, and the State Department in the second quarter.

British Airways gets new Facebook site BRITISH Airways has launched a new APP on its Facebook page to allow users create and comment on their perfect days in locations around the world. The new Perfect Days Facebook APP has been designed to allow everyone to share his itinerary for a perfect day in his favourite British Airways destination. The APP also allows the airline’s well-travelled staff and cabin crew to give their own handy tips and insider knowledge to give users inspiration for their perfect day. Richard Bowden, British Airways’ Digital Marketing Innovation Manager, said: “Perfect Days allows travellers to find new experiences and be inspired by others who are passionate about a destination and want to share their insider knowledge and travel tips.

Air Nigeria set for Freetown, Kinshasa routes AIR Nigeria is set to extend its route coverage to Freetown, Sierra Leone and Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo as well as improve transportation within its existing 10 regional destinations by introducing new sectors and increasing frequencies. The scheduled commencement of the Freetown and Kinshasa routes and the increased frequencies on the regional routes –Accra & Douala will be effective from early November. Air Nigeria has an established route network that provides convenient connections for domestic, regional and international passengers and its drive to make Accra a minihub for flights around the West African region, and Cotonou for flights to the Central African region. Whilst it offers seamless connectivity in the regional and domestic routes, it is also able to connect onwards via interline agreements with various airlines and its codeshare partnership with Delta Airlines, Kenya Airways and Ethiopian Airlines.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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MARITIME Minister tasks on service delivery

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• Apapa port

Ripples over Calabar port dredging W

AS there any underhand deal in the contract award for the dredging of Calabar Port? This is the puzzle to be resolved by the Federal Ministry of Transport following the allegations of a contractor Jan De Nul Limited, of contractual breach of trust. Jan De Nul, is alleging that due process was not followed in awarding the contract to Lagos Channel Management (LCM). LCM, it alleged, is a subsidiary of the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA), which has an interest in the contract. It further claimed that LCM is a channel company and not a dredging firm. But, LCM, it was gathered, dredged the Lagos port, where two large vessels with 4,500 containers berthed a few months ago. Jan De Nul alleged that “LCM has no vessel to its name and that it was the tool of NPA to execute its contracts. Of the six companies that were pre-qualified, Jan De Nul sent in the lowest bid price of 79, 083,454 euro. It was followed by China Harbour Engineering Company (CHEC) 90, 910,731.09 euro. Dredging International, 101, 829, 300 and LCM, 120, 331,199.47 euro. Westminster Dredging and Van Oord, which were disqualified after the opening of the bid for failure to submit bond security, sent the highest bid prices. Westminster offered 132, 395,176.03 euro for the job; Van Oord quoted 139, 574,782.56 euro. LCM is yet to secure a certificate of no objection from the Bureau of Public Procurement about 15 months after the transaction because of the other bidders’ objection. Jan De Nul and others are alleging that LCM, by virtue of its relationship with the arbiters, should not have been part of the bid process. Its involvement, to them, is not only unethical but also tantamount to NPA acting as a judge in a competition it is taking active part in. The situation, they claim, is further compounded by the refusal of LCM to disclose its ties with NPA as required in the bid procedure and extant BPP regulations on one hand as well as the refusal of NPA and the ministry to declare their interest in LCM. LCM, it was gathered offered the highest bid price among the four companies that scaled the hurdle for commercial evaluation. But it came a fourth overall. Investigation, however, revealed

Stories by Oluwakemi Dauda, Maritime Correspondent

that the Director-General of BPP, Mr Emeka Ezeh, referred the matter to the Minister of Transport, Idris Umar, for action. A senior official of BPP, who craved anonymity, told The Nation that Ezeh took the action after discovering that the petitioner,Jan De Nul, failed to comply with the provisions of the Procurement Act 2007. At a meeting between the petitioner, officials of the Ministry of Transport and BPP in Abuja last week, it was noted that the law on procurement stipulates that the bidder that submits the least priced evaluated responsive bid should win the project as claimed by the petitioner. It was, however, gathered that the petitioner was asked to forget the contract because its bid was not responsive and that it came with major deviations from the Procurement Act. Jan De Nul’s bid, it added, was not the lowest because the petitioner under quoted the price of some major component materials for the job. The government, The Nation was told, was also not willing to give the contract to the petitioner based on some deliberate errors, misinformation and stringent conditions, which the petitioner attached to its document. Some of the allegations against the petitioner at the meeting included, its refusal to comply with the Cabotage Act in its bid document. The source alleged that Jan De Nul, in its bid document, said that “The employer (The Federal Government), shall be responsible to pay any fees requiring in due respect of Cabotage law, green light fees, harbour dues, wharfage or pilotage charges, landing rights, dredging and dumping fees and all other local dues, fees royalty or levies of any kind whatsoever.” Also, under the Procurement Act, only 15 per cent of the amount of contract can be paid to any contractor as mobilisation fees, but Jan De Nul, The Nation was told, demanded 25 per cent mobilisation fees in its bid document. “Jan De Nul requested that the proposed advance payment should be increased to 25 per cent of the contract price and payment of advances shall be made to it from the beginning of six months after the commencement date of the project.” Investigation also revealed that the petitioner, while presenting its bid last December, underquoted the price of diesel to be N105, while the actual price of the product in the

market then, was N160. This deliberate price reduction, The Nation gathered, was seen by BPP and ministry officials as a bad business practice by the petitioner. The petitioner was also upbraided its alleged refusal to accept responsibility for death or injury that may occur while carrying out the project. The bid document stated that the dredged materials would be deposited at an approved location, while the petitioner intends to drop dredged materials at its own choice place, of maximum two kilometre. Investigation showed that 24 companies reached the pre-qualification stage while only 11 of them were shortlisted and invited to participate in the commercial bid. But one did not submit its bid. According to investigation, the bid document gives all the contracting firms a guide to submit acceptable bids that are based on the Procurement Act. The Act provides that in the event a bidder does not understand the bid document clearly, the bidder should seek clarification from NPA. In such a situation, the clarification would be given to all the bidders irrespective of who sought the clarification in order to sustain a level plying ground for all the bidders as required by law. Investigation revealed that no clarification was sought by any of the six companies, Jan De Nul, Dredging International, Westminster Dredging, China Harbour Engineering, Van Oord and Lagos Channel Management in this case. Speaking with The Nation on the issue, an official of the Ministry of Transport, Mr Biodun Oladujoye, confirmed that the ministry has written back to BPP on the observation raised by the bureau on the award of the contract. This is the third controversial contract for the dredging of the seaport. The previous attempts ended in fiasco and cost the nation N13 billion. According to Maritime experts, the 2006 contract on which the Federal Government invested $56 million failed due to the underestimation of the task by the consultant engaged by the ministry and NPA. The 1996 dredging done by China Civil Engineering and Construction Company suffered the same fate. Some officials of the ministry and NPA inspected the job on completion and declared it the best ever done in the country. It took a maritime expert to alert the nation that the contractor had done a shoddy job which was frustrating maritime activities along the channel.

HE Transport Media Chapel (TMC) has cautioned the Minister of Transport, Idris Umar, against following the foot steps of his predecessors who between 1999-2011, failed y to grow the transport sector. Speaking with The Nation in Lagos, the Chairman of the group, Mr Kingsley Anaroke, urged the minister to separate service and shallow party agenda, pursue the cause of critical policy discourse and its implementation, such as the Cabotage Act, effective and efficient railway rebuilding, port infrastructure. Anaroke also urged him to undertake a holistic review of variety of industry development apparatus that were politically structured, such as the port inland container deport (ICD), wrecks removal, seafarers training, mari-

time training institutions and see to the quick passage of the Ports and Harbour Bill. The chairman listed other priority areas to include freeing port districts from human, social, commercial and economic encumbrances to achieve a free flow of traffic and the eventual attainment of quick turn around for the port industry. He further urged the minister to review locations of tank farms that has for a very long time distorted the port district. Secretary of the group, Mr Eguono Odjegba, want the minister to be wary of some ceremonial excesses associated with the ministry and its parastatals to reduce the job of nation building to conferences, seminars, workshops and high turnover of foreign trips with no commensurate gains or impact on the sector and industry.

Onitsha port ready for opening

T

HERE are indications that the Onitsha port in Anambra State may become operational soon going by the assurances given by the Minister of Transport, Senator Idris Umar. Umar disclosed at a briefing in Abuja last week that the strategic river port has been completed and ready for opening. It was also discovered that the an Australian-based crane manufacturer has delivered two mobile harbour cranes to the port ahead of starting business. The cranes, which were delivered to the Niger River port form part of Onitsha’s ongoing redevelopment. According to the Federal Government, this is an example of the state keeping to its promise of upgrading port infrastructure in the country.

By Uyoatta Eshiet

Sources confirmed last week that the ordering and delivery of the two LHM 180 mobile cranes follows government’s programme of dredging and port refurbishment that has resulted in the upgrading of the Onitsha port during the last year, resulting in new warehousing, port accommodation and the provision of storage space. The LHM 180 mobile cranes have a maximum lifting capacity of 64 tonnes and a maximum outreach of 35 metres. They are expected to be used to handle a wide variety of breakbulk cargoes, including iron billets for the steel mills, building and construction materials, spare parts, wine and spirits, tyres, cements, cars and the container.

Stakeholders against police database

M

OVES by the Ports Author ity Police Command (PAPC) to develop a database for legitimate port users and their organisations have been criticised. The Vice-Chairman of the Ports Security Facility Officers Forum, Lagos Maritime Zone, Dr. Zebulon Ikokide, said it is not the responsibility of the Nigeria Police to determine who comes into the ports or not. He said it is only the Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) that is statutorily responsible for determine those who gain access into the ports across the country. Ikokide said: “Well, I don’t know when the Police became the Ports Authority that will be looking at people that are coming into the port. In fact, I don’t know how they are

going to do it. I don’t know where they have got the training to regulate people that are coming into the port. Unless they want to tell us that they are doing that in conjunction with the Nigerian Ports Authority, and, if so, the Nigerian Ports Authority needs to call the attention of stakeholders and, let them know, but that has not been done and we are just watching to see what is going to happen.” Similarly, the National Public Relations Officer of the National Council of Managing Directors, Licensed Customs Agents (NCMDLCA), Mr. Emeka Abara, said it is not the responsibility of the Police to determine who enters the seaports or not. He said the Police cannot engage in such a venture since they are not the landlords of the port.

Cabotage Act, waiver clause for review

F

OLLOWING the criticism which trailed the Cabotage Act, the Minister of Transport Senator Idris Umar, says he will constitute a ministerial committee to review of the Act soon. He confirmed that the waiver clause in the all-important Act has been abused, while the granting of waiver has become encumbered by delays and that to immediately address the shortcomings, an investigation into the delay in granting waiver will be carried out and that the waiver clause will be for stakeholders. In an apparent affirmation of the lingering challenges of the Cabotage Act, the Minister disclosed that he is already aware of the cries of stakeholders vis a vis the implementation of the Act, which was enacted by the National Assembly and signed into law by the then President Olusegun Obasanjo in 2007.

By Uyoatta Eshiet

Though the minister did not give details about the impending ministerial committee, it would be recalled that a former Minister of Transport, Mr Okechukwu Emeka, had constituted a similar committee in 2007. The committee, which was headed by a former Chairman, Senate Committee on Marine Transport, Senator Uguchukwu Uba and, which drew its membership from stakeholders sat several times and travelled abroad to study the implementation of the Act. After many months, its report was submitted to the then, minister, who could not implement its recommendations before he was moved to another ministry. The report, which the committee entitled ‘Staying Afloat’, has varying degrees of remedies that can enhance implementation of the Cabotage Act.


16

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

MARITIME

Involve Nigerians in oil lifting, NNPC told

M

ARITIME lawyers said they were not happy that local ship owners are not being involved in the lifting of crude oil and gas by the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). Speaking at a seminar organised by the lawyers in Lagos, the Executive Secretary, Shipping Technology and Gas, Mr Frances Aluko, condemned the foreign domination of the oil and gas industry. He urged the Federal Government to prevail on NNPC by insisting that local ship owners should be involved in the business. Aliko said there was an allegation that some forces within the NNPC were teaming up with their foreign partners to sideline the local shipping operators.

Stories by Oluwakemi Dauda, Maritime Correspondent

But the Cabotage Act, he said, stipulates that ships engaged in such businesses should be owned by Nigerians. The national carrier, he said, has the exclusive right to carry goods of Federal and state governments. The maritime expert, therefore, condemned the engagement foreign shipping companies by the NNPC to lift crude oil and gas without involving local companies. He said local ship owners with their vessels must start lifting oil, gas, rice and other goods in the interest of the industry and the country. He, however, advised local ship owners to be transparent in their dealings with the agency.

A maritime lawyer, Mr Kunle Adigun, urged them to make sure their vessels are classified, well-maintained and that the vessels have insurance, Protection and Indemnity (P and I). Also, he said the training of maritime personnel and collaboration among stakeholders are vital tools for the growth of the maritime industry. Training, Adigun said, is an essential factor for the present and future of port operations and that is why he commended NIMASA for training Nigerians as seafarers with utmost dedication and attention. Apart from being part of the agency’s contractual obligations, the lawyer believes that training has a great role to play and will, to a large extent, determine the future of trade at the ports.

He urged state governments to use the opportunity provided by NIMASA in training Nigerians to develop the industry and the country. Explaining the state governments’ contributions to training Nigerians in sea seafaring, ship management, engineering and other aspects of port operations, the lawyer urged NIMASA to send more Nigerians for training abroad. Another lawyer, Mr Williams Abraham, commended the efforts of Ondo, Ekiti, Ebonyi, Niger, Kaduna, Adamawa states in the training initiative of the agency. On training of Nigerian seafarers, Williams charged individuals and corporate organisations to fund the training of personnel, if the country is not to lag behind, among the comity of maritime nations.

ANLCA kicks against pact with firms

T

HE Association of the Nigerian Licensed Customs Agents (ANLCA), has urged the Federal Government to cancel its agreement with Single Window System and Technology Limited and reduce the number of its agencies at the port. The cancellation of the agreement, the group said, became necessary because of what it called the secrecy and the back door arrangement at which the Single Window Concession Agreement was concluded between the Federal Ministry of Finance and Single Window System and Technology Limited; without consultating with key stakeholders, especially the Customs Agents/Brokers under the umbrella of the Association of Nigeria Licensed Customs Agents. Speaking during a five-day public hearing organised by the House of Representatives Ad-Hock Committee on the Concession Agreement between the Federal Ministry of Finance and Single Windows and Technology Limited in Abuja last week, the National President of the Association, Alhaji Olayiwola Shittu, said the group said it would only support the Single Window System on the existing platform of the Nigeria Integrated Customs Information System (NICIS). Shittu told the Committee that they support the idea of paperless cargo clearing operations at the port and canvassed that the Nigeria Cus-

T

Maritime summit for October Stories by Oluwakemi Dauda, Maritime Correspondent

THE Port Industry Anti-Corruption Standing Committee (PIACSC) will hold its Fourth Maritime Stakeholders’ Summit in Lagos between October 18 and 19. The theme of the summit, according to the Coordinator, Mrs Enoche Ogenyi, is Evolving a new Ethical order in the Nigerian Maritime Industry. Ogenyi listed the objectives of the summit to include efforts to eradicate corruption and sharp practices in the maritime industry, entrenching transparency in the industry, evolving standard ethical and enlightenment/ education of stakeholders. The summit, will be chaired by former Head of State, General Yakubu Gowon, while the Minister of Transport, Senator Idris Umar, will deliver the keynote address.

CRFFN suspends officers THREE top officials of the Governing Council of the Council for Regulation of Freight Forwarding in Nigeria (CRFFN) have been suspended. Though no reason was given for the action, sources say it is not unconnected with the recent registration of the National Association of Government Approved Freight Forwarders (NAGAFF) by CRFFN, which the suspended officials did not support. It was gathered that the motion to suspend them was moved by CRFFN Chairman, Alhaji Hakeem Olanrewaju. He was said to have backed his motion with evidence which prompted the council to slam the suspension order on them. Consequently, the matter was put into vote and the results showed that 12 voted in support of the motion while 8 voted against. With the suspension, the fate of the officials has been sealed thus ending the wrangling within the council.

Edo asks for maritime police

• From left: Shittu and Comptroller-General, Customs Alhaji Dikko Abdullahi at the event.

toms Service (NCS) should be made the lead agency for the single window system instead of appointing a company that has no major business at the port. For effective port operations, ANLCA recommended that the following should be addressed by the Committee: • stopping personnel with questionable intentions to hijack the steady progress already recorded by the Nigeria Customs Service; • the re-appraisal of the roles of government and limitations of their involvement in port operations and cargo clearance; • full integration of rail

transport system link in the ECOWAS Members Countries. This can be achieved if the players joint fund contributions of 0.5 per cent ECOWAS Trade Liberation Scheme, which is meant for properly and judiciously expended; • full utilisation of tools to assist in implementing the NICIS as a platform for inter-governmental agencies and notable international organisations; • full adoption of the United Nations Centre for Trade Facilitation and Electronics Business (UN/ CEFACT) Recommendation and Guidelines on establishing a Single Window

Recommendation No. 33. (New York and Geneva, 2005); • removing delays associated with billing services by shipping companies and terminal operators; • continuous capacity building/re-training of customs officers and the customs licensed agent/broker; and • establishment of Nigeria Trade Network Stakeholders Consultative Forum (NTNSCF), where all parties including private bodies, Associations, and public/government agencies involved in international trade, can appraise the progress made, and recommend appropriate remedial measures.

Brokers condemn quackery HE President Association of Shipbrokers and Consultants, Mr Lucky Idehenre, has condemned the domination of the maritime industry by quacks, saying that this has led to the under development of the industry in the last few years. It said they are ready to curb the trend by embracing the best practices. He called on practitioners to join the association in its efforts to promote and foster

Maritime Watch

ideals, standards, professionalism and best practices in the marine industry. Speaking at a seminar organised by the association in Lagos, Idehenre said the association intends to bridge the gap between ship owners, operators, government agencies, charterers and brokers. Other objectives of the group, he said, include promoting local content in the marine industry by sup-

porting legislations and advocacies, fostering the welfare of shipbrokers and operators collaborating with various institutions and agencies on training, development and capacity through seminars and workshops. The invasion by non-professionals into the trade, he said, has become worrisome to the practitioners. Ship brokers are agents involved into purchase, sales

of vessels and charter services of all types of ships for both dry and wet cargo purposes. He said it was disturbing that those who had no training have hijacked the profession. He disclosed that part of the efforts to address the issue was the reason for having an association, adding that the body would go all out to tackle the activities of quacks.

EDO State Governor, Comrade Adams Oshiomhole, has appealed to President Goodluck Jonathan to approve the deployment of a Marine Unit of the Police to the state and address the absence of marine military presence in the southern part of the State. Speaking at a one-day security awareness and consciousness workshop for top functionaries of local governments in the state, the governor said the absence of security agents in the vast maritime stretch in the Southern-most part of the state makes Edo State vulnerable to cross-border criminal. He challenged security agencies to expedite their investigation into the recent cases of kidnapping in the state and ensure that the perpetrators are apprehended as was done in earlier cases. He also called on the Judiciary to expedite action in the trial of criminals, especially kidnappers, many of whom had been apprehended by the State Security Services (SSS).

Shipping lines returns to Libya THE rebellion in Libya and support for the new regime is likely to be met by the restoration of regular container shipping services to/from the country, reports London’s Containerisation International. Since the uprising started in February this year, the nation’s international freight transport links have been disrupted, if not severed, with shipping lines either withdrawing direct calls or suspending bookings to the country. France’s CMA CGM has offered limited services to/ from Libya via its Marsaxlokk hub in Malta and a connecting carrier agreement. Denmark’s Maersk Line, on the other hand, stopped accepting bookings soon after the troubles began.

Maritime Watch celebrates ALL is set for the 10th Anniversary of Maritime Watch Publishing Company. Its Publisher, Mr Shola Mekusi, said the anniversary will hold at Ikeja, on Friday. The company will honour 15 Nigerians, who have distinguished themselves in their chosen careers. Expected at the event are officers and men of Nigeria Customs Service, members of the Association of Nigeria Licensed Customs Agents (ANLCA) and other stakeholders in the industry. Otunba Akeem Adigun is the chief the host, while Mr Apagun Kayode Ajibola is the Chairman of the occasion. Former Comptroller Ademola Onaadepo, fleet Commordre Adekunle Yusuf and Mr Patrick Akpobolokemi, Director-General, NIMASA are the Special Guests of Honour.


17

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

MARITIME

Involve Nigerians in oil lifting, NNPC told

M

ARITIME lawyers said they were not happy that local ship owners are not being involved in the lifting of crude oil and gas by the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). Speaking at a seminar organised by the lawyers in Lagos, the Executive Secretary, Shipping Technology and Gas, Mr Frances Aluko, condemned the foreign domination of the oil and gas industry. He urged the Federal Government to prevail on NNPC by insisting that local ship owners should be involved in the business. Aliko said there was an allegation that some forces within the NNPC were teaming up with their foreign partners to sideline the local shipping operators.

Stories by Oluwakemi Dauda, Maritime Correspondent

But the Cabotage Act, he said, stipulates that ships engaged in such businesses should be owned by Nigerians. The national carrier, he said, has the exclusive right to carry goods of Federal and state governments. The maritime expert, therefore, condemned the engagement foreign shipping companies by the NNPC to lift crude oil and gas without involving local companies. He said local ship owners with their vessels must start lifting oil, gas, rice and other goods in the interest of the industry and the country. He, however, advised local ship owners to be transparent in their dealings with the agency.

A maritime lawyer, Mr Kunle Adigun, urged them to make sure their vessels are classified, well-maintained and that the vessels have insurance, Protection and Indemnity (P and I). Also, he said the training of maritime personnel and collaboration among stakeholders are vital tools for the growth of the maritime industry. Training, Adigun said, is an essential factor for the present and future of port operations and that is why he commended NIMASA for training Nigerians as seafarers with utmost dedication and attention. Apart from being part of the agency’s contractual obligations, the lawyer believes that training has a great role to play and will, to a large extent, determine the future of trade at the ports.

He urged state governments to use the opportunity provided by NIMASA in training Nigerians to develop the industry and the country. Explaining the state governments’ contributions to training Nigerians in sea seafaring, ship management, engineering and other aspects of port operations, the lawyer urged NIMASA to send more Nigerians for training abroad. Another lawyer, Mr Williams Abraham, commended the efforts of Ondo, Ekiti, Ebonyi, Niger, Kaduna, Adamawa states in the training initiative of the agency. On training of Nigerian seafarers, Williams charged individuals and corporate organisations to fund the training of personnel, if the country is not to lag behind, among the comity of maritime nations.

ANLCA kicks against pact with firms

T

HE Association of the Nigerian Licensed Customs Agents (ANLCA), has urged the Federal Government to cancel its agreement with Single Window System and Technology Limited and reduce the number of its agencies at the port. The cancellation of the agreement, the group said, became necessary because of what it called the secrecy and the back door arrangement at which the Single Window Concession Agreement was concluded between the Federal Ministry of Finance and Single Window System and Technology Limited; without consultating with key stakeholders, especially the Customs Agents/Brokers under the umbrella of the Association of Nigeria Licensed Customs Agents. Speaking during a five-day public hearing organised by the House of Representatives Ad-Hock Committee on the Concession Agreement between the Federal Ministry of Finance and Single Windows and Technology Limited in Abuja last week, the National President of the Association, Alhaji Olayiwola Shittu, said the group said it would only support the Single Window System on the existing platform of the Nigeria Integrated Customs Information System (NICIS). Shittu told the Committee that they support the idea of paperless cargo clearing operations at the port and canvassed that the Nigeria Cus-

T

Maritime summit for October Stories by Oluwakemi Dauda, Maritime Correspondent

THE Port Industry Anti-Corruption Standing Committee (PIACSC) will hold its Fourth Maritime Stakeholders’ Summit in Lagos between October 18 and 19. The theme of the summit, according to the Coordinator, Mrs Enoche Ogenyi, is Evolving a new Ethical order in the Nigerian Maritime Industry. Ogenyi listed the objectives of the summit to include efforts to eradicate corruption and sharp practices in the maritime industry, entrenching transparency in the industry, evolving standard ethical and enlightenment/ education of stakeholders. The summit, will be chaired by former Head of State, General Yakubu Gowon, while the Minister of Transport, Senator Idris Umar, will deliver the keynote address.

CRFFN suspends officers THREE top officials of the Governing Council of the Council for Regulation of Freight Forwarding in Nigeria (CRFFN) have been suspended. Though no reason was given for the action, sources say it is not unconnected with the recent registration of the National Association of Government Approved Freight Forwarders (NAGAFF) by CRFFN, which the suspended officials did not support. It was gathered that the motion to suspend them was moved by CRFFN Chairman, Alhaji Hakeem Olanrewaju. He was said to have backed his motion with evidence which prompted the council to slam the suspension order on them. Consequently, the matter was put into vote and the results showed that 12 voted in support of the motion while 8 voted against. With the suspension, the fate of the officials has been sealed thus ending the wrangling within the council.

Edo asks for maritime police

• From left: Shittu and Comptroller-General, Customs Alhaji Dikko Abdullahi at the event.

toms Service (NCS) should be made the lead agency for the single window system instead of appointing a company that has no major business at the port. For effective port operations, ANLCA recommended that the following should be addressed by the Committee: • stopping personnel with questionable intentions to hijack the steady progress already recorded by the Nigeria Customs Service; • the re-appraisal of the roles of government and limitations of their involvement in port operations and cargo clearance; • full integration of rail

transport system link in the ECOWAS Members Countries. This can be achieved if the players joint fund contributions of 0.5 per cent ECOWAS Trade Liberation Scheme, which is meant for properly and judiciously expended; • full utilisation of tools to assist in implementing the NICIS as a platform for inter-governmental agencies and notable international organisations; • full adoption of the United Nations Centre for Trade Facilitation and Electronics Business (UN/ CEFACT) Recommendation and Guidelines on establishing a Single Window

Recommendation No. 33. (New York and Geneva, 2005); • removing delays associated with billing services by shipping companies and terminal operators; • continuous capacity building/re-training of customs officers and the customs licensed agent/broker; and • establishment of Nigeria Trade Network Stakeholders Consultative Forum (NTNSCF), where all parties including private bodies, Associations, and public/government agencies involved in international trade, can appraise the progress made, and recommend appropriate remedial measures.

Brokers condemn quackery HE President Association of Shipbrokers and Consultants, Mr Lucky Idehenre, has condemned the domination of the maritime industry by quacks, saying that this has led to the under development of the industry in the last few years. It said they are ready to curb the trend by embracing the best practices. He called on practitioners to join the association in its efforts to promote and foster

Maritime Watch

ideals, standards, professionalism and best practices in the marine industry. Speaking at a seminar organised by the association in Lagos, Idehenre said the association intends to bridge the gap between ship owners, operators, government agencies, charterers and brokers. Other objectives of the group, he said, include promoting local content in the marine industry by sup-

porting legislations and advocacies, fostering the welfare of shipbrokers and operators collaborating with various institutions and agencies on training, development and capacity through seminars and workshops. The invasion by non-professionals into the trade, he said, has become worrisome to the practitioners. Ship brokers are agents involved into purchase, sales

of vessels and charter services of all types of ships for both dry and wet cargo purposes. He said it was disturbing that those who had no training have hijacked the profession. He disclosed that part of the efforts to address the issue was the reason for having an association, adding that the body would go all out to tackle the activities of quacks.

EDO State Governor, Comrade Adams Oshiomhole, has appealed to President Goodluck Jonathan to approve the deployment of a Marine Unit of the Police to the state and address the absence of marine military presence in the southern part of the State. Speaking at a one-day security awareness and consciousness workshop for top functionaries of local governments in the state, the governor said the absence of security agents in the vast maritime stretch in the Southern-most part of the state makes Edo State vulnerable to cross-border criminal. He challenged security agencies to expedite their investigation into the recent cases of kidnapping in the state and ensure that the perpetrators are apprehended as was done in earlier cases. He also called on the Judiciary to expedite action in the trial of criminals, especially kidnappers, many of whom had been apprehended by the State Security Services (SSS).

Shipping lines returns to Libya THE rebellion in Libya and support for the new regime is likely to be met by the restoration of regular container shipping services to/from the country, reports London’s Containerisation International. Since the uprising started in February this year, the nation’s international freight transport links have been disrupted, if not severed, with shipping lines either withdrawing direct calls or suspending bookings to the country. France’s CMA CGM has offered limited services to/ from Libya via its Marsaxlokk hub in Malta and a connecting carrier agreement. Denmark’s Maersk Line, on the other hand, stopped accepting bookings soon after the troubles began.

Maritime Watch celebrates ALL is set for the 10th Anniversary of Maritime Watch Publishing Company. Its Publisher, Mr Shola Mekusi, said the anniversary will hold at Ikeja, on Friday. The company will honour 15 Nigerians, who have distinguished themselves in their chosen careers. Expected at the event are officers and men of Nigeria Customs Service, members of the Association of Nigeria Licensed Customs Agents (ANLCA) and other stakeholders in the industry. Otunba Akeem Adigun is the chief the host, while Mr Apagun Kayode Ajibola is the Chairman of the occasion. Former Comptroller Ademola Onaadepo, fleet Commordre Adekunle Yusuf and Mr Patrick Akpobolokemi, Director-General, NIMASA are the Special Guests of Honour.


18

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

IN THE HIGH COURT OF LAGOS STATE OF NIGERIA PROBATE REGISTRY, IKEJA DIVISION WHEREAS the person whose names are set-out in the first Column under died intestate on the date and place stated in the said Column. AND WHEREAS the person or persons whose names and addresses and relationship (if any) to the deceased are set out in the second Column here have applied to the High Court of Lagos State for a Grant of Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal Properties of the deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY given that Letters of Administration will be granted to such persons unless a NOTICE TO PROHIBIT THE GRANT is filed in the registry within (14) days from the date hereof. S/N 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78.

NAMES OF THE DECEASED PERSON:

S/N

Mr Kadiri A.Moshood (Otherwise known as Kadiri Habeeb Moshood and Kadiri Abibu Moshood) late of AB26, Fed. Low Cost Housing Shagari Estate Ipaja Road, Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of November, 2007 at Lagos. Mr Limson Owolabi Dosunmu, late of Block 14, Flat 2, Ije Housing Estate, Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of June, 2002 at General Hospital Ikeja. Onyewuenyi Ambrose (Otherwise known as Onyewuenyi Ambrose Chidi) late of 35, Oyewole Street, Iyana Ipaja Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of January, 2011 at Lagos. Sanni Abayomi, late of 26, Olasonde Street, Papa Ajao Mushin, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of June, 1995 at Lagos. Idam Edward Okoh, late of 39, Uzoamaka Onuegbu Street, Igando, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 17th day of March, 2010 at Lagos. James Emenyionu Ekeocha (Otherwise known as Mr James E.Ekeocha ) late of Zone 2, Ijegun Ogba Waterside, Satellite Town, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of March, 2011 at Owerri, Imo State. Jones Aremu (Otherwise known as Aremu Jones ) late of 29, Abaranje Road, Ikotun, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of October, 2009 at Lagos. Okoh Abigail (Otherwise known as Abigail Ugbe) late of No. 9, Association Avenue Ija Oko Ojodu Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of May, 2010 at Lasuth Ikeja. Stephen Okechukwu Ebiem (Otherwise known as Stephen Ebiem) late of 2, Baba Benjamin Street, Oreyo, Igbe Road, Ikorodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of August, 2010 at Enugu. Mr Chukwu William Ani (Otherwise known as William Ani Chukwu) late of No. 22, Adebayo Oloye Street, Meiran, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 21st day of January, 2008 at Lagos. Comfort Essien (Otherwise known as Essien Comfort) late of No. 2B, Market Lane, Shogunle deceased who died intestate on the 10th day of June, 2010 Revd Alaba Olu Eko (Otherwise known as Rev. Alaba O. Eko) late of Priest Lodge, Archbishop Vining Memorial Church Cathedral (AVMCC) Oba Akinjobi Way, G.R.A. Ikeja deceased who died intestate on the 11th day of March, 2011 at Ikole Ekiti. Mrs Patience Ndidi Okolie (Otherwise known as Mrs Ndidi Patience Okolie and Patience Ndidi Okolie) late of No. 14, Adegoke Street, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of December, 2007 at Royal London Hospital, White Chapel. Olutosin O. Jemilugba (Otherwise known as Miss Olutosin Jemilugba) late of 26, Akanni Street, Somolu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 22nd day of November, 2009 at Lagos. Prince David Oludayo Kehinde (Otherwise known as Prince Oludayo Kehinde and Kehinde Oludayo) late of No. 1, Adebanjo Street, Dopemu, Agege, Lagos State, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of February, 2002 at Ikeja General Hospital. Sule Sumoni (Otherwise known as Sule Sumaina and Mr Sule Sumoni ) late of 8, Sadiku Street, Oshodi, Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of October, 2010 at Lagos. Mrs Fadeyi Elizabeth Ojuolape (Otherwise known as Fadeyi Ojuolape) late of 6, Engr. Segun Fadeyi Close, Ijegun deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of January, 2011 at Luth. Mr Fred Adaghe (Otherwise known as Mr Adaghe Fred) late of 23, Admin Street, Unilag Estate , Magodo, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 15th day of November, 2008 at Lagos. Akingbade Muibat Adebike (Otherwise known as Akingbade Muibat )late of 25, Lagos Street, Ebute Metta., Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 15th day of February, 2010 at Lasuth, Ikeja. Racheal Kehinde Wilson (Otherwise known as Mrs Racheal Kehinde Wilson) late of 4, Akinwunmi Street, Ayobo, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of November, 2005 at Orile Agege General Hospital, Lagos. Chief Gilbert Adisa Jaiyeola (Otherwise known as Pa G.A. Jaiyeola) late of 24, Ishola Anigbajumo Street, Orile Oshodi, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 7th day of January ,1994 at Oshodi. Mr Chukwudi Nwankpa (Otherwise known as Nwankpa Chukwudi) late of 22, Abayomi Adewale Street, Off Oyewole Street, Okota, deceased who died intestate on the 25th day of September, 2010 at Lagos. Onwuadike Cyprian Afunanya (Otherwise known as Onvadike Afunanya Cyprian) late of 3, Cole Street, Lawanson Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of June, 2010 at Lagos. Nnaji Gregory late of 25, Alhaji Kareem Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 22nd day of September, 2010 at Lagos. Kehinde Agoro (Otherwise known as Agoro Kehinde) late of 6, Akinyosoye Street, Odogunyan Ikorodu , Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 28th day of October, 2006 at General Hospital Ikorodu. Kanayo Biosah (Otherwise known as Biosah Kanayo) late of 9, Ebenezer Street, Off Government Road, Ikotun, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of Feburary, 2009 at Lagos. Alhaja Taibat Amoke Obagun (Otherwise known as Obagun Taibat) late of 45, Adenaike Alagbe Street, Ikorodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of March, 2008 at Ikorodu. Mr Patrick Ojiata Nku (Otherwise known as Inspector Patrick Ojata) late of No. 44, Oki Road, Iyana Ipaja, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of December, 2008 at Afrike Cross River Ogun Fadebo Adetola late of 32, Oni Street, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 17th day of July, 2009 at Lagos. Chioma Queen Maduagwu (Otherwise known as Maduagwu Chioma Queen) late of 45, Ajisegiri Street, Agodo Egbe, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of May, 2010 at Lagos. Afolabi Abimbolu Adelani (Otherwise known as Afolabi Abimbola) late of A5, Rev. Fowokan Close, Saw-Mill B/Stop, Ibereko Badagry, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 21st day of July, 2009 at Badagry. Eziefula Williams late of Old Blk 6, Flat 24 Queens Barracks Apapa, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of October, 2010 at Lagos. David Ibikunle Akinlawon John late of Blk 365, Flat 2, Jakande Estate, Isolo, Lagos , deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of November, 1990 at Lagos. Bintu Alake (Otherwise known as Alake Bintu) late of 11, Laide Lane, Offin Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of June, 1975 at Lagos. Gabriel Attah Idoko (Otherwise known as Idoko Gabriel) late of No. 4, Abudu Ottun Close, Okokomaiko, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of April, 2011 at Luth. Lateef Adeleke late of 47, Jebba Street, Ebute Metta East deceased who died intestate on he 27th day of October, 2006 at Ebute Metta, Lagos. Lamina Oladehinde Akinbami late of 11, Akinpelu Street, Oko Oba Orile Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of January, 2011 at Lagos. Mr Sunday Nupo Samuel (Otherwise known as Sunday Samuel) late of 7, Fatai Animashaun Street, Magodo , G.R.A. Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of September, 2002 at General Hospital Ikeja. Eniola Ajoke Alaba (Mrs) late of 2, Olawoyin Street, Pen Cinema Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of February, 2010 at Orile Agege. Mr Benson Osamedike (Otherwise known as Benson Osemedike) late of 17, Adelakun Street, Ilupeju Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 28th day of December, 2009 at Lagos. Mrs Akile Caroline late of 33 Silver Street, Olodi Apapa, deceased who died intestate on the 28th day of December, 2010 at Luth. Mrs Abolaji Comfort Olufunmilayo late of 2, Hassan Street, Mafoluku Oshodi, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of March, 2010 . Chief Akin Lawrence and Mrs Subuola Abraham both of 22, Aba Johnston Crescent, Ikeja, the widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Onyebuchi Anyansi late of 20, Kajola Road, Bariga, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 4th day of June, 2009 at Ojuelegba Road. Mrs Victoria Omitola Afolaya (Otherwise known as Victoria Omitola Afolayan) late of 25, Layi Oyekanmi Street, Mushin, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of July, 2009 at Lagos. Aniekwena Joseph Nwoye of 9 Cole Street, Lawanson, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of June, 2002 at Onitsha. Agbede Samuel Clement (Otherwise known as Agbede Samuel) late of 67, Oshola Street, Ifako Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 11th day of April, 2009 at His Residence. Mr James Ojugbile Opiah (Otherwise known as Ojugbile Opiah James) late of 53, Isaac John Street , Fadeyi , Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 6th day of August, 2010 at Lagos State University Teaching Hospital. Mr Godwin Ejiofor Nwezi (Otherwise known as Nwezi Godwin Ejiofor) late of Buba Marwa Road, Ijegun, Egba Satellite Town, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of December, 2010 at Lagos. Babajide Obe Michael Durojaiye, late of 16, Mathew Street, Off Surulere, Baptist Church Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 21st day of December, 1994 at Lagos. Mrs Cecilia Omolara Mendes (Otherwise known as Mendes Cecilia Omolara) late of 41, Glover Street, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 7th day of September, 1974 at Lagos. Mr John Adebayo Ajayi (Otherwise known as Adebayo John Ajayi) late of 7, Kolawole Aina Street, Magodo, Isheri, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of February, 1988 at Lagos. Mr Ifemezie Christian Chika, late of 8A, Alhaji Salami Street, Aguda, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of March, 2011 at Lagos. Mrs Adebisi Cecilia Ladipo (Nee Sessi) (Otherwise known as Mrs Cecilia Adebisi Ladipo) late of 119, Ikorodu Road, Igbobi Fadeyi Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of December, 1997 at Lagos. Akubueze Samuel Ikechukwu (Otherwise known as Akubueze Samuel) late of 23, Layi Otegbade Street, Off Pedro Road, Shomolu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of June, 2010 at Lagos. Oduware James Emmanuel late of12, Ona-Ara Street, Idimu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of July, 2009 at Lagos. Mr Komolafe Samuel Oluremi late of R Ezra Close, Agbado Crossing Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of May, 2010 at Ijoko, Ogun State. Fabiyi Adebanji Timothy late of 3, Ogunbona Street, Mowe deceased who died intestate on the 10th day of December, 2008 at Sagamu. Olubunmi Oyeyemi Julius-Adeoye (Otherwise known as Mrs Julius Adeoye) late of Blk F, Flat 5, Run Snr Staff Quarter RCC G Camp deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of May, 2010 at Redeemers University Adesoji Babatunde Ajayi (Otherwise known as Babatunde Micheal Olusoji) late of 17A, Aderupoko Street, Iwaya Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of June, 2008 at Lagos. Paul Amenechi (Otherwise known as Azubuike Amenechi) late of 13, Adeyinka Osijo Street, Akoka, Yaba, deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of June, 2010 at Lasuth Ikeja. Alhaji Ibrahim Shehu Tijani (Otherwise known as Alh. Ibrahim Sehu Tijani) late of 37, Arowolo Street, Iwaya Yaba, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of August, 2010 at Lagos. Anakebe Okoli Arinze Innocent (Otherwise known as Anakebe Innocent Arinze Okoli, Anakebe Innocent Okoli Arinze, Okoli Anakebe Innocent , Innocent Arinze Okoli Anakebe and Arinze Anakebe Innocent Okoli) late of 36, Iwaya Road, Onike Yaba deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of October, 2001 at General Hospital Marina Lagos. Pa Durojaiye Akinsola Joseph late of 152, Railway Line Mushin, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of January, 2011 at Lagos. Dr Peter Ighofose (Otherwise known as Chief Dr Peter Orovbemuake Ighofose) late of Plot 1398A, 6th Avenue Festac Town, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of June, 2008 at Warri. Paul Atanda Ogbeifun late of 14, Adegbite Street, Iju Ajuwon Deceased who died intestate on the 28th day of May, 2010 at Lagos. Emmanuel Olakanmi Akingbade (Otherwise known as Mr Akingbade Emmanuel) late of 3, Mosadoluwa Street, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 4th day of July, 2007 at Eko Hospital , Lagos. James Alphonsus Azuike (Otherwise known as James Alphonsus Eke) late of Umuaga Nguru Ngor Okpala Imo State deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of April, 1977 at Imo State. Alhaja (Mrs) Sherifat Adebisi Bakare (Otherwise known as Bakare Sherifa) late of 7, Williams Street, Aguda Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 9th day of June, 2009 at Lagos. Anawanti Gift Chinyere, (Otherwise known as Chinyere Gift Anawanti and Anawanti Chinyere Gift) late of 13, Independent Street, Anifowoshe Ikeja Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of June, 2011 at Lagos. Obioha Ezeji Emmanuel (Otherwise known as Chief Obioha Emmanuel Eziji) late of 16, Richard Ibikunle Street, Ikotun, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 15th day of December, 2010 at Imo State. Fabiyi John Olanipekun late of 62, Aiyetoro Street, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of February, 2005 at Iloye Ota. Mr Agada Olusola Felix late of No. 6, Jide Agada Street, Olaogun , Agbado Crossing Lagos State , deceased who died intestate on the 12th day of March, 2010 at Lagoon Hospital, Apapa. Alhaji Baba Isah late of 49, Oyewole Road, Iyana Ipaja, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 10th day of January, 1996 at Agaie, Niger State. Maj. (Rtd) S.A. Lawal late of 15, Morenikeji Street, Oke Ira Ogba, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of March, 2011 at Farma Hospital Yaya Abatan. Olajide Thaddeus Timothy (Otherwise known as Mr Thaddeus Olajide and Mr Olajide Thaddeus Timothy) late of 27, Alfa-Nla Street, Agege, Lagos State, deceased who died intestate on the 22nd day of November, 2007 at Lagos. C.P.L Bassey Ibiang Okey (Otherwise known as CPL Bassey Ibiang Oke) late of No. 88, Bola Street, Oyingbo Ebute Metta, Lagos, deceased who died in testate on the 9th day of October, 2008 at Port Harcourt, Rivers. Godwin Toluwalase Sawyerr (Otherwise known as Sawyer Godwin Tolulase) late of No. 14, Peter Ayanson Close, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 3rd day of September, 1980 at Lagos State.

NAMES OF APPLICANT APPLYING FOR THE GRANT

1. Mrs Awawu Kadiri and Mr Hakeem Kadiri both of AB 26, Federal Low Cost Housing , Shagari Estate, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 2. Mrs Kudirat Adekoya of 11, Jebba Street, Ebute Metta, Lagos, Mrs Sikirat Adeyemo of 2A, Church Street, Ebute Metta, Lagos, and Mr Mojeed Dosunmu of 78, Odo Street, Obalende Lagos, the three children of the said deceased. 3. Gloria Onyewuenyi of 35, Oyewole Street, Iyana Ipaja and Ben Nkwazena of 3, Akintoye Street, Iyana Ipaja widow and cousin respectively of the said deceased. 4. Mopelola Abayomi ,Ayoola Abayomi, Adewale Abayomi and Oyinkansola Iwuchukwu all of 26, Olasonde Street, Papa Ashafa Mushin, Lagos, widow and three of the children respectively of the said deceased. 5. Helen Chinyere Idam of 39, Onuegbu Uzoamaka Street, Igando Lagos, and Michael Ologwu of 63, Collins Enelele Street, Igando Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. 6. Patience Ndibe and Queen Ekeocha both of Zone II Ijegun Egba Waterside Satellite Town, two of the children of the said deceased. 7. Jones Fausat, Jones Olanrewaju Waheed and Jones Morayo all of 29, Abaranje Road, Ikotun widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 8. Mr Ugbe Emeke and Mr Ugbe A. Sylvester both of Block 9, Room 14, Queen’s Barracks, Apapa, Lagos, two brothers of the said deceased. 9. Mrs Celine Chidimma of 2, Baba Benjamin Street, Oreyo Off Igbe Road, Ikorodu, Lagos and Mr Nathaniel Ebiem of 38, Aliu Street, Ketu, Lagos, widow and uncle respectively of the said deceased. 10. Mr Chukwu E.Ani Williams and Miss Nnennaya Ani Williams both of 22, Adebayo Oloye Street, Meiran Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 11. Eno Bassey of No. 38, Oluwagbebe Street, Shasha Egbeda, and Saviour Bassey of No. 2, Market Lane Shogunle Lagos, two children of the said deceased. 12. Mrs Ayoola Adetutu Eko of Priest Lodge, Archbishop Vining Memorial Church Cathedral, Oba Akinjobi Way, G.R.A. Ikeja, Lagos and Mr Ebenezer Eko of Plot 3691, Akeem Agboola Crescent, Amuwo Odofin G.R.A. Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. 13. Mr Francis Osadebe Okolie, Ms Winifred N. Okolie and Mrs Uno James (Nee Okolie) all of No. 14, Adegoke Street, Surulere, Lagos, three children of the said deceased. 14. Mr Taiwo Olusola Jemilugba and Mrs Oluwatosin Olayemi Jemilugba both of No. 26, Akanni Street, Somolu, Lagos, father and mother respectively of the said deceased. 15. Oriyomi Kehinde ,Kolawole Kehinde ,Adeola Kehinde and Adedayo Kehinde all of 1, Adebanjo Street, Agege, Lagos, four of the children of the said deceased. 16. Rafa Sule of 8, Sadiku Street, Oshodi, Lagos, and Abdul Jalil Momoh of 4, Assoland Street, Mafoluku Oshodi, Lagos, widow and cousin respectively of the said deceased. 17. Fadeyi Olusegun and Fadeyi Oluwagbemiga both of 6, Engr. Segun Fadeyi Close, Ijegun, Lagos, widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 18. Mrs Chrstiana Adaghe, Mr Fidelis Adaghe and Miss Beatrice Adaghe all of 23, Admin Street, Unilag Est. Magodo Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 19. Akingbade F.Oluwadare and Akingbade S.Ayobami both of 25, Lagos Street, Ebute Metta Lagos, widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 20. Mr Akinsola Wilson of No. 4, Akinwunmi Street, Ayobo Lagos, the only surviving child of the said deceased. 21. Mr Jeffrey Ifihan Jaiyeola of 5/7 Somide Street, Idi Mangoro, Agege, Lagos and Miss Adepeju Remilekun Jaiyeola of 14, Babatunde Street, Off Ogunlana Drive, Surulere, Lagos, the two grand children of the said deceased. 22. Chinedu Peter Nwankpa, Felix Nwankpa and Onyebuchi Munachi all of 22, Abayomi Adewale Street, Off Oyewole Street, Okota Isolo ,two brothers and cousin respectively of the said deceased. 23. Okechukwu Cyprian Onwuadike and Nwakaego C. Onwuadike both of 3, Cole Street, Lawanson ,two of the children of the said deceased. 24. Ngozi Nnaji and Ikennah Nnaji both of 25, Alhaji Kareem Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 25. Mrs Iyabo Agoro and Mrs Olufunmilayo Ajanaku both of 8, Akinyosoye Street, Odogunyan Ikorodu, Lagos, widow and sister respectively of the said deceased. 26. Tina Biosah (Mrs) and Fred Biosah both of 9, Ebenezer Street, Off Government Road, Ikotun, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. 27. Mr Kazeem Obagun and Mrs Latifat Adewunmi both of 9, Itaoloja Odogunyan Ikorodu, Lagos, two children of the said deceased. 28. Mr Micheal Ojiata and Mr Mathias Ojiata both of No. 44 Oki Road, Iyana Ipaja, Lagos two of the children of the said deceased. 29. Ogunfadebo Adebukola, Ogunfadebo Omodayo A, Ogunfadebo Alice A. and Ogunfadebo Omonike M. all of 32, Oni Street, Surulere, Lagos, four children of the said deceased. 30. Augustine Dike Chukwukere and Mrs Ikechi Chukwukere both of 45, Ajisegiri Street, Agodo Egbe Lagos, father and mother respectively of the said deceased. 31. Afolabi Elizabeth Oluwatosin and Abimbolu Emmanuel Damilare both of A5, Rev. Fowokan Close, Saw Mill B/Stop, Ibereku Badagry, two of the children of the said deceased. 32. Williams Rebecca of Old Blk 6, Flat 24, Queen Barrack Apapa, and Ugwuegbu Eugene of New Block 2, Flat 24, Queen’s Barrack Apapa, Lagos, the widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. 33. Richard A.O.John and Abimbola Palmer both of 14, Bodunrin Caulcrick Close, Ogba, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 34. Iyabo Awesu of 28, John Street, Idumota Lagos, the only surviving child of the said deceased. 35. Mrs Cicilia Idoko, Blessing Idoko and Emmanuel Idoko all of 4, Abudu Ottun Close, Okokomaiko, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased 36. Mrs O.T. Bodede, Miss Iyabo Adeleke, Miss Olutayo Adeleke and Mr Durojaiye Adeleke all of 26, Abosede Aro Avenue Ogo Oluwa Street, Igbogbo Ikorodu, Lagos four children of the said deceased. 37. Alhaja Aminat O. Akinbami of 11, Akinpelu Street, Orile Agege,Lagos and Akinbami Abayomi Jubril of 8, Sotire Street, Agege, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 38. Oladele Samuel and Sewunu Ayodeji Samuel both of 7, Fatai Animashaun Street, Magodo ,the two of the children of the said deceased. 39. Mrs Abimbola Ogunkeye and Ismaila Adewunmi both of 104, Alaja Megeda Road, Ayobo Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 40. Mrs Hope Osamedike and Osamedike Stephen both of 17, Adelakun Street, Ilupeju , Lagos, the widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 41. Akile Anthony Chuks , Akile Emmanuel Obiajulu and Akile Olisa Emeka Anthony Jnr. all of 33, Silver Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, widower and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 42. Oladipo Emmanuel Sunday Gbemisola and Mrs Omowumi Deborah Asalu both of 2, Hassan Street, Mafoluku Oshodi, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 43. Chief Akin Lawrence and Mrs Subuola Abraham both of 22, Aba Johnston Crescent , Ikeja, the widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 44. Mrs Anyansi Juliana, Chinasa Anyansi and Ikechukwu Anyansi all of 20, Kajola Road, Bariga, Lagos, the mother and sister respectively of the said deceased. 45. Bola Afolayan, Kemi Afolayan and Kunle Afolayan all of 25, Layi Oyekanmi Street, Lagos, widower and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 46. Chief (Mrs) Theresa Aniekwena, Mr Arinze Aniekwena and Mr Olisa Aniekwena all of 9, Cole Street, Lawanson Surulere, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 47. Mrs Juliana Yemisi Agbede and Mr Ayorinde Agbede both of 67, Oshola Street, Agege, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 48. Mrs Edna Opiah, Mr Henry Opiah and Miss Patience Opiah all of 53, Isaac John Street, Fadeyi, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 49. Mrs Grace Emeni Nwezi, Mr Godwin Obiajulu Nwezi and Miss Happiness Nkiruka Nwezi all of 30, Buba Marwa Road, Ijegun Egba, Satellite Town, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 50. Bosun Babajide Obe of 1A, Modele Compound of Tejuosho Street, Surulere, Lagos, and Shade Babajide Obe of 58, Oshola Street, Off College Road, Ifako Ijaiye Lagos, two children of the said deceased. 51. Mrs Mary O. Ashenuga, Mrs Cecilia T. Agunbiade, Mr Francis O. Da-Souza and Otunba Olusegun Oladitan all of 10, Olatunde Close, Surulere, Lagos. 52. Mr Timothy Ajayi and Mr Peter Ajayi both of 7, Kolawole Aina Street, Magodo Isheri, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 53. Mr kelechi Ifemezie and Mr Maduabuchi Ifemezie both of 2, Alhaji Salami Street, Aguda, Surulere, Lagos, two brothers of the said deceased. 54. Ms Olufunke Ladipo, Mr Olumide Ladipo and Mr Olusola Ladipo all of 119, Ikorodu Road, Igbobi Fadeyi Lagos, three children of the said deceased. 55. Mrs Chioma N. Akubueze and Candy Ikechukwu Akubueze both of 23, Layi Otegbade Street, Off Pedro Road, Shomolu, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 56. Patricia James of 12, Ona –Ara Street,Idimu Lagos, Eshebor Oghogho Joy of 30, Idowu Alani Street, Idimu, Lagos, and Oduware Ruth of 12, Ona-Ara Street, Idimu, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 57. Mrs Komolafe Aina Eunice and Mr Komolafe Seyi both of 2, Popoola Street, Isaka Ifo, Ogun State, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 58. Mrs Esther Anike Adebanji and Opeyemi Adeola Adebanji both of 3, Ogunbona Street, Mowe , widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 59. Rantimi Jays Julius –Adeoye of 28, Ogundimu Street, Iwaya, Yaba, and Obasa Odunayo E. of Blk F, Flat 5, Run Snr Staff Quarters RCCG Camp, widower and brother respectively of the said deceased. 60. Adewale Ajayi and Bayo Ajayi both of 17A, Aderupoko Street, Iwaya, Lagos, two brothers of the said deceased. 61. Joseph Amenechi and James Amenechi both of 13, Adeyinka Osijo Street, Akoka Yaba, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 62. Mr Ibrahim Ganiyu Akande and Miss Ibrahim Awawu Olajumoke both of 37, Arowolo Street, Iwaya, Yaba, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 63. Tony O. Anakebe of 36, Iwaya Road, Onike Yaba, and Mr Valentine C. Anakebe both of 1B Abionu Close Off Allen Avenue Ikeja, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 64. Anthonia Olaide Durojaiye of 17, Tom Hendrid Avenue Area. 1 Estate Casso, Lagos, and Anthony Kayode Durojaiye of 23, Raji Street, Odofin Dopemu, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 65. Mr Peter Ighofose and Miss Ochuko Ighofose both for Plot 1398A, 6th Avenue Festac Town, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 66. Mrs Rebeccah Ogbeifun and Monday Ogbeifun both of No. 14, Adegbite Street, Ajuwon , widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 67. Mrs J.O.Akingbade, Olatunji Akingbade Olanrewaju Akingbade and Oladotun Akingbade all of 3, Mosadoluwa Street, Lagos, widow and three of the children respectively of the said deceased. 68. Nnamdi Azuike and Sylveter Orgunkandu both of 13, Ipodo Road, Ikeja, Lagos, two brothers of the said deceased. 69. Abdul Kareem Ajibola Bakare and Rahmat Ajibike Bakare both of 1, Gbajumo Street, Off Adeniran Ogunsanya Street, Surulere, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. 70. Anawanti Roseline (Mrs) and Anawanti Ugochi Ngozi both of 13, Independent Street, Anifowoshe Ikeja, Lagos, mother and sister respectively of the said deceased. 71. Obioha Chukwudi Collins of No. 2, Elewe Street, Ikotun, Lagos, and Obioha Justin Uzoma of Umulolo, Abba Nwangele L.G.A. Imo State, two of the children of the said deceased. 72. Madam Olajumoke Fabiyi, Madam Layonu Fabiyi and Mrs Iyabo Smith (Nee Fabiyi) all of 62, Aiyetoro Street, Surulere, Lagos, three children of the said deceased. 73. Mrs Abosede Agada and Miss Simisola Agada both of No. 6, Jide Agada Street, Olaogun Lagos State, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 74. Ibrahim Isah Mohammed of 49, Oyewole Road , Iyana Ipaja, Lagos, one of the children of the said deceased. 75. Mrs Ganiyat Ibiyinka Lawal and Mr Ganiyu Adebiyi Lawal both of 15, Morenikeji Street, Oke Ira Ogba, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. 76. Olajide Funmilayo, Olajide Funke and Olajide Ayotunde all of 27, Alfa-Nla Street, Agege, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. 77. Mr Samson Bassey Okey and Emmanuel Okey Bassey both of No. 88, Bola Street, Oyingbo Ebute Metta, two brothers of the said deceased. 78. Fayemi Sawyerr and Akinola Sawyerr both of 14, Peter Ayanson Close, Surulere, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased.

G.A SAFARI (MR.) PROBATE REGISTRAR


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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EDITORIAL/OPINION EDITORIAL FROM OTHER LAND

COMMENT

A chastening verdict

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Who did it? •Labour leaders’ detention in Enugu should be investigated

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HE callous detention of executive members of the Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC) and the Trade Union Congress (TUC) by armed policemen, soldiers and thugs in Enugu State recently is a sobering reminder of the reckless personalisation of coercive force by public office holders in Nigeria. The NLC and TUC delegations were in the state to lead peaceful demonstrations against the Enugu State Government, in pursuance of their aim of ensuring the implementation of the N18,000 minimum wage agreement. On the morning of the demonstration, they woke up to find their hotel surrounded by heavily-armed policemen and soldiers who allegedly prevented them from leaving the hotel by threatening to shoot them.

‘The NLC and the TUC were clearly not a security threat; even if they were, the proper response should have been for them to be arrested and arraigned before a competent court. Their detention was a crude assault on their inalienable freedoms of movement and assembly, and no effort should be spared in finding out who was responsible for it and sanctioning them accordingly’

Calls to senior members of the security forces in Abuja led to the eventual withdrawal of the security personnel, but they were quickly replaced by weaponwielding thugs who continued to hold the labour leaders hostage. Their ordeal came to an end only when some of the thugs were arrested by officers from the Enugu State Police Command. The Enugu State Government has denied sending anybody to detain the labour leaders. Incidents like this simply serve to emphasise the way in which self-serving government officials refuse to play by the laid-down regulations of participatory democracy. The NLC and the TUC were clearly not a security threat; even if they were, the proper response should have been for them to be arrested and arraigned before a competent court. Their detention was a crude assault on their inalienable freedoms of movement and assembly, and no effort should be spared in finding out who was responsible for it and sanctioning them accordingly. It is clearly a contrived mystery that nobody seems to know whose orders the policemen and soldiers were following. Obviously they did not go there on their own. Only the Federal Government can order the deployment of soldiers and policemen, given the fact that both are federally-administered organisations. As the Chief Security Officer of the state, Governor Sullivan Chime is

definitely in a position to influence the actions of the state police command, even though the resident Commissioner of Police reports to the Inspector-General in Abuja. If Chime did not order their deployment to the hotel, he should be worried that such actions took place in the state he was supposed to be governing. As for the thugs who took over guard duty from their uniformed accomplices, it is very difficult for anyone to believe that those ruffians could run riot across the state without the support of powerful backers. The uproar over the implementation of the minimum wage law is simply one of the normal processes of a functioning democracy. Groups have a right to disagree with governments, and also have a right to demonstrate in support of their stand. Those who oppose them are wrong to attempt to cow them into submission, regardless of the public office they hold. The Federal Government must get to the bottom of this affair. Those who gave the illegal order for the deployment of policemen and troops must be identified and punished. The thugs who were taken into custody must be thoroughly investigated and prosecuted. The governors of states like Akwa Ibom, Ekiti and Lagos have shown that it is possible to arrive at a peaceful resolution of the minimum wage imbroglio. Governor Chime would do well to imitate them.

LCCI’s concern •The chamber is right; govt must check indiscriminate recruitment of expatriates HICHEVER way one may look at it, it is not well with the country’s industrial policy, both in content and the delivery imperatives. Apparently out of frustration with the ways we do things in the country, the Lagos Chamber of Commerce and Industry (LCCI), has called on the Federal Government to help put an effective checkto the influx of expatriates; skilled and unskilled, into Nigeria, in flagrant disregard of extant laws on expatriate recruitment quota. The concerns of the chambers are not limited to the negative effects of crowding local concerns out of businesses through stiff competition, but perhaps more importantly, because the unchecked influx of immigrants masquerading as skilled expatriates constitutes a major drain on the economy. The influx of expatriates may not be a bad thing in itself; for instance, if it is in total compliance with the laws, that is if the skills required are in short supply, and if their recruitment is targeted towards a ‘development project’ of significant national importance. The point of departure, however, is when expatriates now handle jobs for which Nigerians (employed and unemployed) are eminently qualified to do. That the LCCI is the whistle blower shows its members are not involved in the racketeering that trails the recruitment of the so-called expatriates. The corruption and collusion in the commanding heights of the economy and political sphere makes the matter worse

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as it robs the national economy of the requisite capacity for renewal and or meaningful development. The foregoing however raises other fundamental questions about the workability of the systemic imperatives as designed by the State. The State runs an indefinable system of government that is devoid of modern State character, except in structures and nomenclature. Foreign governments and other nationals see this and may be tempted to cash in on the lapses, hence the influx of immigrants taking up few available jobs in Nigeria, even in the face of the worrisome situation of mass unemployment in the country. The immigration unit has become a shadow of itself; for instance, it took the dreadful threats of the Boko Haram sect to spur the unit into action, not against expatriates hired illegally, but somewhat against hapless, though parasitic Chadians, Togolese and their Niger citizen counterparts who in all honesty also constitute a nuisance to the country. The various companies and corporations that hired these illegal immigrants did it on purpose, and they have little or no regard for our laws. Indeed, chances are that no one would check on these expatriates (partly due to intimidation and mutual corruption) or verify the validity or otherwise of their papers. Obviously, the immigration department lacks any credible record on illegal immigrants, and this is sad. The Nigeria

Police Force is not better either, with the officers and men having enough challenges of their own - inadequacy of intelligence, arms, motivational incentives, etc. Even the federal ministries of trade, labour and productivity are equally, if not twice as culpable. How were vacancies for expatriates filled without passing through these ministries? The pertinent question to ask is where is the policy synergy and purposeful cooperation between government agencies and parastatals which are supposed to work together? Apparently therefore, the only common denominator in the government bureaucracy is corruption. That is why it is more urgent than ever before for Nigeria to deal with this corruption plague and the national question, so that the country could make progress.

‘The influx of expatriates may not be a bad thing in itself; for instance, if it is in total compliance with the laws, that is if the skills required are in short supply, and if their recruitment is targeted towards a ‘development project’ of significant national importance. The point of departure, however, is when expatriates now handle jobs for which Nigerians (employed and unemployed) are eminently qualified to do’

AR is horrific, chaotic and frightening. But nothing justifies the treatment of the Iraqi civilian Baha Mousa, who was

subjected to the most horrifying degradation and torture by British soldiers while detained in prison. His death in custody in 2003 is a lasting stain on the reputation of the British Armed Forces. To those who seek to excuse his treatment it must be said, unequivocally, that Mr Mousa was not a casualty of war. He was the victim of wholly gratuitors violence in the prison where he was detained. This hotel receptionist and father of two should never have been subjected to such treatment by members of The Queen’s Lancashire Regiment who seem to have been out of control, in the absence of any leadership from senior officers. Mr Mousa died after 36 hours in custody – much longer than the 14-hour limit for initial interrogation – during which time he sustained 93 injuries, including fractured ribs. His children were left orphaned, because his wife had succumbed to cancer shortly before he died. The public inquiry into these events, led by Sir William Gage, has been a model of integrity and painstaking thoroughness. Its verdict has left no doubt that there was a serious loss of discipline in the battalion that was overlooked by those in charge, including one senior officer and the padre of the battalion, Father Peter Madden. The inquiry raises wider questions. Why were orders banning the use of hoods and stress positions not communicated to all levels of the Services? And how could officers have failed to take prompt action to stop what was happening, and to discipline those involved? Mr Mousa’s case is, unfortunately, not an isolated example. Sir William says that he did not find evidence to suggest that there was an entrenched culture of violence within this particular unit. But the Ministry of Defence agreed in 2008 to pay #2.8 million in compensation to the families of Mr Mousa and nine other Iraqi men abused by British soldiers. Moreover, there are 150 other cases of alleged mistreatment of detainees by British soldiers. A second inquiry is due to open shortly, into allegations that up to 20 men were tortured and murdered in British custody after a gun battle in southern Iraq in 2004. And the Court of Appeal is considering whether to order a third inquiry, into the military’s detention and interrogation policy as awhole. Few civilians can ever fully appreciate the immense stress and pressure that soldiers experience in way zones. Eruptions of violence are never going to be far from the surface when young men are shipped into dangerous situations and asked to use their muscle and guile. But there is an important distinction between things that happen in the heat of battle and thigns that happen in the cold of a prison or detention centre over a prolonged period. And it is inexcusable that officers shoud fail to keep a close eye on these activities, knowing the risks as they must do. There have been too many allegations of unwarranted brutality by soldiers over the past decade. The lesson needs to be learnt that when the blood is running hot, no matter how much discipline has been instilled on the parade grounds at home, conduct can easily fall to the lowest common denominator. The services need to take much more seriously their responsibility to prepare soldiers for guarding and interrogating detainees, and for overseeing that process. In many young people, the Armed Forces foster decency, bravery, magnanimity and team spirit. The servicemen and women who chose to fight in Iraq had made a deeply courageous decision. But the killing of Baha Mousa was the act of cowards. It has put the reputation of the Armed Forces in jeopardy, and it must not happen again. – The London Times

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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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EDITORIAL/OPINION

Give us this day... our MINIMUM WAGE!

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IR: The survival of the industrial economy of the United States of America and her Western allies depends largely on the abundance of both oil and raw materials scooped from the Middle East, Africa and Asia. These all important two lifelines must be protected at all cost without which their economies are doomed. They subjugate nations and crush with utmost ruthlessness any obstacle which dares to stand on their path to retaining these lifelines. The west has employed the services of the mass media to champion their causes, cook up vicious lies and twist facts in favour of their imperialistic tendencies. The subjective reportage of their activities by international western media has gone a long way in wrongly shaping the opinion of many. Concerted efforts by minority opinions to put this issue at their right perspectives were intentionally drowned. At the moment enormous human and material resources are being wasted in a relentless war raging between the United States and groups in Afghanistan and Pakistan and the end is still not in sight. History is replete with stories of America’s sponsorship of terror organisations in the past only to turn against her creation when the alliance crumbles. The persona of Osama Bin Laden and Mullah Muhammad Omar the Al-Qaeda and Taliban leaders respectively are monstrous creations of the Americans. Today, the whole world is led by the nose in pursuit of this American nightmare without any

EDITOR’S MAIL BAG SEND TYPEWRITTEN, DOUBLE SPACED AND SIGNED CONTRIBUTIONS, LETTERS AND REJOINDERS OF NOT MORE THAN 800 WORDS TO THE EDITOR, THE NATION, 27B, FATAI ATERE ROAD, MATORI, LAGOS. E-mail: views@thenationonlineng.net

It’s all about oil, raw materials deep thought. Before the fall of the USSR, many were led to believing that communism was evil. Today it has been acknowledged that the pranks and lies of the America and her allies have not only fallen flat on their faces but no longer hold water. The 2008 global economic meltdown was an unforgettable revelation that communism was not evil as was painted by the West. Most governments in the West and

Europe paid to rescue their failed enterprises instead of auctioning them as they always recommend for third world developing countries. You can fool some people sometimes but you cannot fool everybody all the time. The Americans, according to John Perkins’ The Confession of An Economic Hit Man ‘were said to have been liberated by the words of Paul Revere, Tom Paine and Thomas

Jefferson which fired the imaginations of their countrymen, and opened their hearts and mind to the question, and when they did, they discovered a new reality that cut away at the deceits. They discerned the truth behind the patina, understood the way the British Empire had manipulated, deceived, and enslaved them. They saw that their English masters had formulated a system and then had managed to convince

Rethinking nuclear option for Nigeria

IR: Nuclear energy has been in existence and use for quite a long time, serving several purposes. It has over the years given respect or fear to nations who wish to have them or have them in abundance. The United States and several western powers like Britain and France, are viewed with respect because they can flaunt their nuclear capabilities to so called belligerent nations. Despite the respect or fear nuclear capabilities confer on those that possess them, it is of serious concern to the international community. No wonder Germany decided that before the year 2020, many of its nuclear plants will be shut for reasons of safety. The

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Germans were taking a cue from Japan, whose Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant continues to deteriorate amid concerns with radiation leak. Nuclear production, despite its history of crisis, is helping to bridge the energy gap. Malaysia, Vietnam and China are all looking at nuclear energy for the future. There are however, growing concerns, as these countries are usually prone to natural disasters like tsunamis which Indonesia witnessed in 2004. It is for this reason that Nigeria’s quest for ‘delivery of atomic energy for peaceful purposes calls for concern. It is true that a lot of benefits can accrue from having nuclear

capabilities. The most fundamental issue is how to maintain them. Proponents of nuclear energy argue that it is a sustainable energy source which reduces carbon emissions and can increase energy security if its use supplants a dependence on imported fuels. They argue further that it produces virtually no air pollution unlike alternative fossil fuel. However, the threats it possess is more than whatever proponents argues in support of it. Nuclear power leads to health risks, environmental degradation due to mining of uranium, high cost of transport and processing, sabotage from vested groups or individuals and most importantly the

Sanctions won’t end Syria’s repression

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IR: On Sept. 2, the European Union, supported by the United States, imposed an embargo on exports of Syrian oil. The EU buys some 95% of Syria’s oil output, accounting for almost a third of Syria’s national income. By hitting the regime of Bashar Assad in its wallet, the EU aims to destabilize the regime and force it to end its repression of its citizens. But that hope is farfetched and ignores a number of important features of Syria’s economy and the Assad regime. First, sanctions will not be efficient in the short term because Syria is not well integrated in the global economy. It is not a member of the World Trade Organization and is self-sufficient in many sectors, including agriculture. It has enough oil and gas for domestic consump-

most people of a lie—that it was the best system mankind could offer, that the prospects for a better world depended on channelling resources through the King of England, that an imperial approach to commerce and politics was the most efficient and humane means of helping the majority of the people—when in fact the truth was that the system enriched only a very few at the expense of the many. This lie, and the resulting exploitation, endured and expanded for decades, until a handful of philosophers, businessmen, farmers, fishermen, frontiersmen, writers, and orators began to speak the truth. This truth must be told in our own time too! • Sunday Onyemaechi Eze Nigerian Defence Academy (NDA) Kaduna.

tion, and, besides, its Iranian friends will always stand ready to help. The expectation that the embargo will somehow deprive the regime of support from the Syrian business community is similarly misguided. The country’s business community is divided into two groups: the new bourgeoisie, made up of a small number of Assad-supported businessmen, and the traditional bourgeoisie, consisting of the Sunni and Christian merchant families of Damascus and Aleppo. So far both groups support the regime—the former because of the privileges and rents that doing so provides, and the latter because they fear uncertainty, instability and religious conflict. It will be hard, to say the least, for European sanctions to cause the business community to turn against Assad.

What about the EU’s hope that by weakening Syria’s economy, the regime will re-evaluate the costs and benefits of maintaining its repression? This would be relevant if the regime’s objective were to create wealth for its citizenry. But Syria is not a democracy. It is hardly concerned with maximizing wealth for the benefit of its people. Rather, it seeks to obtain the largest possible slice of the cake for itself. The embargo will reduce the size of the cake, but the regime’s incentives and power remain the same. If sanctions are maintained for the long term, it is ultimately Syria’s poor who will suffer, not the regime. Well-connected players will almost certainly be able to bypass the embargo, generating profits that accrue to notables rather than

to the average Syrian. The weakening of Syria’s economy will increase unemployment and poverty, and diminished oil revenues will compromise the ability of the state to pay the salaries of civil servants and provide public services. It is worth remembering, that Syria has been subject to U.S. economic sanctions since 2003, but those measures have clearly not weakened the Assad regime. Sanctions must be part of a larger strategy that includes measures like diplomatic incentives and political and economic support—measures that will help the Syrian opposition overthrow the regime from within. • Hicham el Moussaoui Sultan Moulay Slimane University, Béni-Mellal, Morocco

unresolved problem of radioactive nuclear waste. Let us imagine a scenario where a nuclear plant exists in Odi and Ogoni or somewhere in Jos and Borno. The resounding damage to lives and properties would be unimaginable. For the single fact that Nigeria does not have simple maintenance culture, how does she intend to maintain the plants to work effectively? How would plants be secured or what would be in place for people living around a nuclear plant, the environment itself and the country as a whole? What if one of the covers of a nuclear plant goes up in flame? How do we prepare to contain contamination and radiation? These are several questions policy makers in Abuja must be ready to answer. The Chernobyl nuclear disaster reminds us of the secretive method the Soviet Union used to hide such crisis from the world. It was not until radiation began to spread over European skies that the enormity of the crisis was exposed. Despite the technological wizardry of Japan, its containment policies and efforts have not yielded much progress as water, land and air continues to be contaminated. The consequences of the Japanese nuclear disaster might not be feasible now and in years to come, but if the aftermath of Chernobyl and all other nuclear disasters are anything to go by, nuclear power which the Jonathan administration seeks to pursue in a geographically unstable country like ours is not something we should toy with. • Raheem Oluwafunminiyi Lagos


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

EDITORIAL/OPINION

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ICINIUS Velutus and Junius Brutus were the two tribunes of Rome, in Shakespeare’s tragic play, Coriolanus, that bated the plebs against Gaius Macius Coriolanus. Gaius Macius was an imperious youth, almost a boysoldier. Nevertheless, he had a lion heart, and held the key to Rome’s Olakunle security, against the rampaging Abimbola Volscians. lordbeek@yahoo.com, 08054504169 (Sms only, please) Though Rome fashioned the office of the tribunes to be voice of the plebs against patrician oppression, this duo had their agenda of insatiable spite well and truly planted in this institutionalised role as public defenders. So, they found it quite easy to push their vendetta as public good; and bated the plebs to mutiny, over shortage of grains, which they blamed the impolitic Gaius Macius for. More tragically, they goaded the plebs to help in the duo’s But that it must do, without hate or malice, though that evil plot to banish Coriolanus, who had just made a disastrous borders on the ideal, for every newspaper fights causes it bid for consul – not because he wanted to but because believes in, so long as it keeps within the bounds of decorum Volumnia, his mother, and Menenius Agrippa, his mentor and civility; and it is ready to face the consequences of its and Roman senator, wanted him to. actions. But when the proverbial chicken came home to roost, and Many say Tribune has departed from the hollowed path the banished Coriolanus led a Volscian military expedition Awo envisioned for it, by unrepentantly donning the garb of against his native Rome, the plotting and colluding tribunes reaction, thus making a bastard of the pristine Awo cause. literally melted. It took the motherly sentiments of That might well be. Volumnia, the sagacity of Menenius Agrippa and, of course, But Tribune cannot be linked to its ruinous Roman cousins the heart-melting sight of Virgilia, Coriolanus’s wife, simply because it embraced reactionary causes – that is within dangling her new baby in plea, to save Rome from sure its right of choice. Still, it remains legitimately and fairly perdition; but consigned Coriolanus to early death in the charged by the way it has gone about it all – slanting stories Volscian camp. as if it has some baleful agenda like its old Roman cousins. Shakespeare wrote Coriolanus between 1605 and 1608, though Again, that should not make undue news. But it does because the raw materials for the play dated way back to classical Tribune had itself been a victim of power lynching, simply history. Chief Obafemi Awolowo, the great sage whose ideas because it was owned by Awo, during the travails of Awo in live forever, founded Nigerian Tribune on 16 November 1949. the hands of central reactionary power in Nigeria. Yet, the parallel between the two ruinous tribunes of old Recall those terrible days in the First Republic: when the Rome and Nigerian Tribune is all too clear. federal government, its quislings in Samuel Ladoke Akintola, Awo fashioned Tribune to be an unrepentant voice of the SLA’s Western Region and their client media, fell over oppressed, both in colonial Nigeria and in the inequitable themselves to demonise Awo for no just cause? Also recall Nigerian federation to come. Besides, the newspaper as part the banning and unbanning drama of the Tribune, even within of the Fourth Estate of the Realm, has a “watch dog” role the Western Region, by a baleful SLA, just for political over the other three estates, the executive, the legislature vendetta; and because the people were reacting to rigged and the judiciary. votes and had made the region ungovernable for that votethieving government? Now, could a newspaper with such a chequered history of “Each time Nigeria power-gamers victimisation turn itself into a shrill and reckless want to push their luck, they pick political trumpet for the political victimisation of others? on a Yoruba victim: Awolowo, Since the 2007 electoral debacle when vote robbers took government houses in the Yoruba South West and much Abiola and now Tinubu. Each over of the rest of Nigeria, Tribune picked no bones as to where its attempt had ended in debacle.” sympathy lay – the vote robbers, which economically could be all right, since those governments were known to be

supportive of the paper. But when the judicial axe kept swishing down, starting with Edo, and going to Ondo, Ekiti and Osun, Tribune stuck with its allies, even though it was clear that the mandates being reclaimed were blatantly stolen; and were judicially proven to be so. Even in Oyo and Ogun states that escaped the judicial retrieval, it was clear those two governments faced huge legitimacy burdens; and the spiritually inclined could well put that to the spectacular self-destruction of Otunba Gbenga Daniel (OGD), the man that did not call a truce until he completed annihilated himself. As for the Oyato one, that turned Awo’s capital of glory into an antediluvian court of governmental jesters, Tribune was part and parcel of his buffoonery, without any tinge of irony! But the final descent would come, with Tribune’s unabashed anti-Salami campaign of calumny. During all the rigged processes to demonise Salami and get rid of him at all cost, Tribune was there, proudly filling the role of a bearer-inchief of false tales and slanted stories to demonise a man whose only crime was doing his duty by law. When therefore the National Judicial Council (NJC) did the unthinkable by rigging its own processes, Tribune was the first to announce to the world how President Goodluck Jonathan would accept the NJC’s recommendation and appoint an acting president of the Court of Appeal (PCA). Now, was the paper fully briefed; or had it become the virtual soul of the plotters against the Nigerian Constitution for short political gains? Now, the drama is approaching its end game and it is no surprise that the newspaper Awo founded is in virtual lather, insinuating and suggesting what charges to file, which ones to amend and what charges to renew, in the Code of Conduct trial of Bola Tinubu, a trial even the densest of political observers know is desperate witch-hunting that bodes ill for the polity. Even then, the latest plot is to divert attention from the Salami saga and nail Tinubu, if the plotters can. Still, there is this feeling of déjà vu about it all, though it is strange Tribune is too far gone to savour its sweet irony. Once upon a time, Awo, Tribune with him, was in the dock and many mighty men of power with their client media were arrayed against him. But today, where are those newspapers and their power sponsors? But more grimly for the polity: each time Nigeria powergamers want to push their luck, they pick on a Yoruba victim: Awolowo, Abiola and now Tinubu. Each attempt had ended in debacle. Shouldn’t the president then pause and think hard? As for Tribune, where would it be when the chicken comes to roost: take to its heels like its vengeful but cowardly Roman cousins? Or fall on its sword of vendetta masking as public good? That is the making of the curse of Corioli!

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Is it that the Boko Haram has so cowed the leaders once revered and said to be imbued with moral authority to the point that their voices cannot be heard in an emergency such as the one the country is presently going through? So much for the finger-pointing –the federal government is said to have failed. But that has never been in dispute. The government’s lack of imagination in fighting the menace seems palpable enough. What does one make of President Goodluck Jonathan directive to the Chief of Defence Staff, Oluseyi Petirin which translates to upscaling the combat even when the unwinnable situation of the armed forces being forced to declare a sustained war on Nigerian citizens in the name of internal security operations ought to be self-evident? This is even when there are no guarantees of “security” as the fear of the dreaded group has since become the beginning of wisdom. But that hardly excuses the option of silence by those who ought to speak out. Where are the elders – I mean elders in the north and elsewhere to provide the moral compass for the nation’s troubled soul? It seems to me that silence at this time is tantamount to the sin of abdication. We are obviously back on a familiar path. It is unfortunate – but true – that the so-called giant of Africa doesn’t even pretend to have the will let alone equipped to fight one battle on which its very survival depends. It would soon be time to dust up that old Niger Delta template of appeasement. Unlike erstwhile warlords in the creeks, the Boko Haram cannot threaten to bring the economy down. At best, the group has enough clout to keep the rather elusive foreign capital at bay, driven, as it were by poverty of an intolerable kind. What the members do have a surfeit of is the rabid ideology that guarantees the rest of us hell while promising them better life after this life! Even to tribe of those who insist that we do not have any business negotiating with mass murderers, it seems increasingly clear that the group will continue to rupture our peace for as long as it pleases them. Simply because we possess neither the intelligence sophistication nor a credible strategy to take them out, our best chance at securing the peace seems pretty obvious: let’s beg them to talk. Isn’t it said that talk is cheap? In any case, what difference would it make if the nation went ahead to roll the red carpet for another set of criminal dissenters when there is already precedence to point to? It’s a shame that Babakura Fugu had to die the way he did. I imagine the billions that the man would have made as possible consultant to the federal government on Boko Haram affairs in this criminal enterprise called Nigeria. I also imagine the zillions that would have rolled in to fund some misconceived amnesty programme. Isn’t that our idea of governance in these parts?

epublican ipples

HEN the crisis of state intersects with the breakdown of communal values as is increasingly the case with our country Nigeria, the net result is predictably the reign of anomie. While Nigeria’s crisis of statehood is well documented enough, the other benign crisis, which is the huge moral puddle which the nation is mired, has barely received the kind of attention it deserves. As it is, the force propelling the nation towards the moral abyss would seem infinitely greater than the force behind the de-legitimisation of the authority of the Nigerian state. An apt illustration of the nation’s moral pathology was provided in the visit by the former President Olusegun Obasanjo to the family of the slain Boko Haram leader Mohammed Yusuf last week. The visit adds not a small jab to the gangrenous sore inflicted by the dreaded group on the national psyche. A former number one citizen playing the peace emissary particularly in these turbulent times would ordinarily be proof-positive that the nation is not deficit in leaders who could rise up when occasions demand. There is, however, a lot to say about the timing and the message of the “unofficial” emissary that spells not only a grave misjudgement but a fundamental moral lapse on the part of the undertaker. Let us look at the issue of its timing. When a former President chooses the day of the memorial service for the 21 victims the August 26 blast at the United Nation’s House in Abuja to visit the family of an outlaw sect – alleged to have caused their mass murder, it goes beyond symbols to underlie the grave moral crisis facing the leadership class and the nation as a whole. Here is this newspaper account of the highly publicised visit, which later turned a fiasco: “Obasanjo met Mohammed Yusuf’s family at Railway Quarters, the demolished headquarters of the Boko Haram. The ex-

‘But that hardly excuses the option of silence by those who ought to speak out. Where are the elders – I mean elders in the north and elsewhere to provide the moral compass for the nation’s troubled soul? It seems to me that silence at this time is tantamount to the sin of abdication’

Tribune and the curse of Corioli

Policy Sanya Oni sanyaoni@yahoo.co.uk 08051101841

Obasanjo, Boko Haram and Nigeria President stayed with them for about one and half hours before departing for the airport”. His message of peace was apparently well-couched: “I urge you to forgive and forget the past. I plead with you to give me the chance to mediate between the family and the government”. Forgiveness was obviously meant to be the first stage of restitution for the killing of their benefactor, Mohammed Yusuf, the Boko Haram sect leader, by the police after he was captured and handed over to them by the Army. The emissary’s chief host, Babakura Fugu – whose father was reportedly killed also in 2009 – obviously thought nothing of using the high profile visit to open the taps on valuable intelligence about the group. Rather gleefully, he reportedly informed his visitor: “about 3040 percent of our members are scattered in neighbouring countries of Chad, Niger and Cameroun”! For the sins of squealing, he was found dead some 48 hours later – killed to mark the definite abortion of the OBJ initiative before it had the chance of taking off the ground. While it comes as no surprise that OBJ does not appear to suffer any moral revulsion at the activities of the terrorist group, hugging the media prematurely with the initiative is obviously vintage OBJ. Having said that, what the former President cannot be accused of is indifference to the Boko Haram issue. Whatever anyone may say of his indiscretion and moral ambiguity, both of which I consider outrageous, it would seem tolerable compared with the eerie silence of other former leaders, particularly those claiming to be champions of northern interests. The reign of silence from their quarters has certainly left much room for the moral vacuum in which mass murder is being venerated and impunity extolled.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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EDITORIAL/OPINION HE victory secured by the Musical Copyright Society Nigeria, MCSN, at the court against the Nigerian Copyright Commission, NCC, on July 25 after a three-year legal battle is significant not just for the amount awarded it – N40 million- which is worth celebrating but for the import of the ruling. At last, the sore issue of the status of an owner, assignee and exclusive licensee vis-a –vis a collecting society has been laid to rest in the literal and metaphorical sense of the word. We hope that the criminalization of MCSN by NCC because it is not licensed by it will now come to an end. We pray also that corporate bodies which are in the habit of exploiting the more than 30 million works of MCSN but unwilling to pay because MCSN is not a collecting society with the tacit support of NCC will now pay up. Isn’t it curious that NCC would join corporate pirates to deny real owners of works garnered over the years through reciprocal agreements with international copyright societies the enjoyment of their rights? When the issue came up for adjudication at the Court of Appeal between MCSN and judgment was given in favour of the former, NCC looked the other way and continued to hound MCSN as if it were an illegal body. The Appeal Court’s decision as far as they were concerned was the internal affair of MCSN. And so from time to time it invades the premises of MCSN in search of “infringing materials”. We would not be wrong to say therefore that NCC gave the corporate bodies the impetus to operate with impunity while diverting attention by chasing the small fries at Alaba International market. But then a little background to the case that spawned the latest judgment. Sometime in 2007, NCC officials had stormed, in commando style, the corporate headquarters of MCSN off Allen Avenue, Ikeja with a lorry load of policemen and arrested the Director-General with one other management staff. They also carted away several documents from the office. The raid, it was later learnt, was based on a petition by the International Federation of Phonographic Industries, IFPI , that MCSN was

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Copyright Commission: Now that the Court has spoken By Sammy Johnson illegally infringing on the right of its members by authorizing the reproduction of musical and film works of its members without permission. In other words MCSN is being accused of piracy! By the way, most of the works being claimed by IFPI are owned by MCSN. But that is a story for another day. Well, MCSN went to court to protest its innocence and enforce its fundamental human rights as well as seek compensation. Now note the remark of the judge: “The first Respondent (NCC) has failed to acknowledge, appreciate, or welcome the notion and reality that owners and assignees of copyright can enforce property rights without necessarily being registered as a collecting society by the copyright commission. Registration as a collecting society is not a prerequisite for the enjoyment and exercise of rights of an owner or exclusive licensee of copyright”. The judge explained that the provisions of Section 15 of the Copyright Act show clearly that it confers rights on owners, assignees and exclusive licensees – be they literary, musical or artistic adding: “I cannot find any part of Section 15 of the whole Act where it is stated that the rights are exclusive preserve of a collecting society”. He therefore ruled: “Nothing in the Copyright Act denies the owner, the assignee or the exclusive licensee of a copyright the right to collect royalties for the performance of their works in public or to transact commercially with anybody in respect of such works or appoint agents to claim and enforce directly their rights under Section 6 of the Copyright Act and I so hold. The offence of purporting to perform the duties of a society without the approval of the Copyright Commission created by Section 39 of the Copyright Act cannot and

does not relate to the activities of owners, assignees and exclusive licensees of copyright and I so hold”... We have gone to some details of the observations of the judge and the ruling because they have been at the core of the problems MCSN has been facing since NCC was created by the government to supervise copyright administration in Nigeria. Now, a little bit of history will guide us. MCSN was incorporated in 1984 in the wake of the divestment of Performing Rights Society, PRS and Mechanical Copyright Protection Society, MCPS both of the United Kingdom which hitherto were overseeing the works of members in Nigeria. With the works passed to MCSN, it became the first indigenous copyright society in the country. Five years later when NCC was created, the expectation was that the relationship between it and MCSN would be cosy and the issue of approval or registration a fait accompli. But what happened? Rather than consider the application of MCSN, NCC in the biggest insider abuse ever, nurtured and promoted a fresh society- the Performing and Mechanical Rights Society, PMRS, with four members of staff of NCC as directors! As if that was not enough, when it came to granting license or approval, PMRS was approved as “the sole government-collecting society” with MCSN shut out. Tons of petitions have been written on this without any remedy. For MCSN to continue to operate, it headed to the courts which gave it reprieve. But to the officials of NCC if you are not approved by them, you are not a legal body. NCC took this to a ludicrous level in 2007 when it came up with another contrivance- Collective Management Organisations, CMOs. Three years after going back and forth, specifically in 2010, it

again gave approval to Copyright Society of Nigeria, COSON, then only three months old but indeed PMRS with a new name which licence it had earlier withdrawn. Again, MCSN with its intimidating credentials was denied approval for reasons best known to then Director- General, Adebambo Adewopo. Today, we hear of COSON as the “only government approved CMO”. The question that agitates the mind is: how can a government agency be so hell bent on rooting out a private enterprise with vast international affiliations like MCSN rather than collaborate with it for the benefit of hapless musicians? Well for now it has no choice but live with the hard cold fact that MCSN will continue to thrive as owner, assignee and exclusive licensee of copyright. It is only for administrative purposes that registration or license is required. The judge has spoken. And for all those companies exploiting MCSN’s works without paying for them and hiding under the cloak of non approval by NCC, the day of reckoning has come. They should be sure that MCSN would use all legal means to get their money so that the music can really pay. • Johnson, a music critic lives in Abuja

‘The Appeal Court’s decision as far as they were concerned was the internal affair of MCSN. And so from time to time it invades the premises of MCSN in search of “infringing materials”. We would not be wrong to say therefore that NCC gave the corporate bodies the impetus to operate with impunity while diverting attention by chasing the small fries at Alaba International market’

Reflections on Anambra @ 20

ECENTLY Anambra state marked its twentieth anniversary on August 27. It was a swell occasion attended by a galaxy of prominent Anambra indigenes. Government officials, diplomats, captains of industries, the business community and journalists were also present. It was an occasion for introspective search which afforded the people an opportunity to reflect on the progress the state has made so far; its noticeable challenges, and the prospect of attaining self dependency. The three day event was kick-started by inspection of projects executed by the Peter Obi administration and interlaced with symposium/award giving ceremony and ended with interaction with stakeholders/breakfast. As many of the speakers noted, the state has potential for greatness, but only lacked political will to drive it. There was also the issue of the teething troubles made evident by the military administrators’ inability to bequeath the state with good foundation. As a result, the abundant human and material resources indwelling in the new state were

‘This is where the Obi administration has done very well and needs encouragement. His administration has on its advent espoused far reaching ideas on how to make the state work. First, he deftly destabilized a phalanx of barely literate moneybags operating in the state as godfathers. With this, impunity was brought to a manageable degree as political strife faded behind the recesses’

By Okechukwu Asekuma adversely hemmed in and stifled to listlessness. This was enervated further by impunity of the emergent political class. Bickering and rancor, unleashed on the system as a result, simply enfeebled the structures that would engender transformation. What was more, development became delayed for as long as the situation prevailed. Though all the speakers in turn agreed there is still hope for the state once leaders as well as the led agree to alter their turn of mind and affirm positive attitude. Hard work and application of right values, they all agreed, would unlock the cache of potentials and set the state on the path of greatness. Evident in this assertion is the conviction that the state has produced till date some of the best humankind the nation can boost of. One of the speakers, Oby Ezekwesili, was particularly emphatic about the need for hard work and lamented the seeming loss of enterprising spirit by the people. She urged a rekindle and blamed the loss of values in Igboland of today on respect accorded questionable wealth and their questionable accomplishments. The audience was informed that ideas, rather than oil, drive economy of developed nations, and urged to propound a surfeit of them so as to push development bars beyond the reaches of time. She harped on the need for the people to prioritize their values before oil is tapped in the zone lest it accomplishes nothing. It was a moment for true reflection indeed as members of the audience had the opportunity to re-evaluate the very essence for which the state was created. Re-echoing Ezekwesili on the need for right values, the governor Mr. Peter Obi said the state will no longer indulge people of seedy antecedence, but will appreciate those who brought it honour. According to him politicians will now have to earn the ‘Excellency’ titles through their excellent conducts. That way, public offices would be sanitized, especially when occupiers know that honour/

courtesy would be conferred accordingly. Those present were enjoined to emulate the people honoured for their outstanding contributions in the transformation of the state, nay Nigeria. Men and women who blazed forth like stars that lit pre/post independent Nigeria. People like Nnamdi Azikiwe, Nwafor Orizu, Chuba Okadigbo, Louis Odumegwu Ojukwu, Ikemba, Emeka Anyaoku, Kenneth Onwuka Dike, Chinualumogu Achebe, Chike Obi, Pius Okigbo, Ben Nwabueze, Phillip Emeagwali, Chukwuemeka Ike, Chukwuma Soludo, Christopher Okigbo, Chimamanda Adichie, Cardinal Arinze, Papal Nuncio Okolo, Blessed Tansi, Emmanuel Ifeajunna, Power Mike, Innocent Egbunike, Mary Onyali etc. They were exhorted to replicate the feat. This then brought the issue of empowerment. Whether the state has empowered the citizens enough to be able to replicate the feat of their forebears? If no, what is expected of it in order to arrest the deplorable state and nudge the youths back to some worthy engagements. Have those in authority shown concern in bequeathing their generation and indeed future generation a workable society? Or has it been “a great fizzling act”, to use the words of one of the critics of the state. This is where the Obi administration has done very well and needs encouragement. His administration has on its advent espoused far reaching ideas on how to make the state work. First, he deftly destabilized a phalanx of barely literate moneybags operating in the state as godfathers. With this, impunity was brought to a manageable degree as political strife faded behind the recesses. The state no longer competes for space on the banner of negative news. As peace returns in the state so have development. Using his work plan, the Anambra Integrated Development Strategy (ANIDS), the governor has been able to work development in all sectors of the economy simultaneously. Though there are those who are apt to disagree with this. But in doing so, they should not forget that the facts are verifiable. Apart from the fact of raising the bars

of development in sectors hitherto neglected, fleeing international bodies and donor agencies are back in the state. This was made possible with the flight of impunity from a state that once reveled in a hideous kidnap attempt of her governor and mindless destruction of its common heritage. Today infrastructural development of the entire state has gained some mileage from its previous middling state. Without prejudice to the ages of the five south eastern states, the development reach of Anambra state is comparable to no other within the zone. Consolidating on the foundation of an earlier administration, Obi built over 500 kilometres of road in the hinterlands with bridges and box culverts. Until his assumption of office, the state had no befitting workers’ secretariat besides the one provided the state on creation by the federal government. The two edifices that serve as the workers’ secretariat were conceived and built by the administration within the first four years. The efforts of the administration in education, health, judiciary, transport, environment, industrialization, security, agriculture can only be appreciated against their dismal emptiness prior to Obi becoming the governor. What seems a blight on the good work of the administration – the neglected federal roads that extends from Onitsha to Enugu – has seen the Governor pressuring the federal governor for permission to do them. Again this is without prejudice to a master plan already secured for the beautification of the three cities of Awka, Onitsha and Nnewi. If the plan is put to good use by a conscientious successor, then will cynics appreciate the man’s far-reaching innovations. Actually what the Obi administration does in the state is more of foundation since that vital aspect of statecraft was missing out all those years. In much the same way Bola Tinubu laid the foundation of transformational government in Lagos today, many will appreciate Obi’s work when a hard working governor takes over in 2014. • Asekuma writes from Awka, Anambra State


LONDON 2012

ALL AFRICA GAMES FALLOUT

Martins, Aiyegbeni Ajose hails Nigerian for Eagles recall boxing team Pg. 24

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Nation Tuesday, September 20, 2011

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•Osaze

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NIGERIA VERSUS GUINEA

Eagles' list out today T

HE Technical Committee of the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) led by Chris Green will meet today to listen to Super Eagles Chief coach, Samson Siasia's explanation on his choice of the players he hopes to use for the game between Nigeria and Guinea in one of the last rounds of qualifying matches of the 2012 African Cup of Nations. The meeting is fixed for 2pm this afternoon in Abuja. The Technical Committee will also be using the forum to

persuade Siasia to include 'rebel' goalkeeper, Vincent Enyeama in his list having apologised to the coach, his mates and the NFF chiefs for a protest about the small aircraft used to fly the Super Eagles to Antananarivo for the last qualifier against Madagascar which Nigeria won 2-0. The football body will also look at the report of the committee constituted to ensure that a Beach Soccer League is begun in Nigeria later in the year.


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NATION SPORT Mmadu may drop out of Century Club

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IGERIA’s sole entry into the prestigious FIFA Century Club, Maureen Mmadu, may have her entry reviewed. The club is for players who have made up to 100 appearances for their national team. Mmadu, a former Super Falcons player, was listed in the women’s category last year and was believed to have made 101 appearances for the Nigerian women’s team in Grade A matches. However, a check has discovered that this may not be the case. It is currently believed that Mmadu made up to 50 appearances for Nigeria, a far cry from the 101 caps attributed to her. Available records confirm she played 44 matches for Nigeria since her debut in the Women’s World Cup match against Canada on June 8, 1995, in Helsingborg, Sweden. The full team lists of six other Super Falcons’ matches are not available but if Mmadu played the six matches in question her total will be 51. That is a whole 50 matches less than what is attributed to her. The FIFA Women’s Century Club list was compiled with the help of German women’s football specialist, Hennies Rainer. When contacted, he explained that he based his calculation on the figures given him by the then Nigeria Football Association (NFA). According to him, he gathers information through the various football associations every four years, for both the Olympics and the Women’s World Cup. The Nigerian “FA is just inventing statistics and still seems to be happy with it”, Rainer wrote in an email response to enquiries. According to him, it has been very difficult getting data from the Nigerian Football Federation this year.

NATION SPORT

Eguavoen wants Euro training camp O

LYMPIC team coach Austin Eguavoen has proposed a European training camp for his squad ahead of the final phase of their Olympic qualifiers. Turkey and Portugal are the two countries proposed by the former international defender when he meets with the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) Technical Committee today in Abuja. “This qualifying series is more of a championship and we are leaving nothing to chance in ensuring that we pick a ticket to London 2012,” Eguavoen said. The proposed Euro trip will be the

final leg of five-week preparation for the eight-nation qualifying tournament, with the first phase being camping with domestic league players. “Plans are on to have the team camp in either Portugal or Turkey; this is one of the decisions the Federations technical committee would be considering,” Olympic team media officer Arafat Aliu said. Eguavoen also plans to arrange friendly games between his Under23 side, and as yet unnamed European countries during the FIFA match-free days this year. Eight teams will participate in the elimination tournament to be held in Egypt from 26 November to 10 December. The qualified teams are hosts Egypt, Algeria, Cote d’Ivoire, Gabon, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal and South Africa.

Martins, Aiyegbeni I for Eagles recall S

AMSON SIASIA is contemplating inviting Obafemi Martins and Yakubu Aiyegbeni to rejoin the Super Eagles after months of absence. SuperSport.com can report that the move comes against the backdrop of the performance of the two players for their clubs in the past days. Last Thursday, Obafemi scored in Rubin Kazan's 3-0 win over Shamrock Rovers in the UEFA Europa League. Aiyegbeni, 28, emerged the hero in Blackburn Rovers' 4-3 win over Arsenal in the Barclays English Premier League on Saturday with a double strike.

Sammy Ameobi thrilled with Newcastle breakthrough

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AMMY AMEOBI is delighted by his sudden first team elevation at Newcastle United. The young striker has already impressed the Toon Army in action this season. He told the Sunday Sun: “To be playing for Newcastle United – I can’t believe I’ve got this chance. But this is just the beginning, it’s really no more than that. “I can’t believe it but I’m taking nothing for granted, I’ve got such a long way to go. It’s just a start. “How do I manage to do that? Well my

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because of an unnecessary tackle, the second goal was unexpected from a corner and the third one from the goalkeeper's kick. Three is too many so you can't say it was just our mistakes because they deserved their victory. "They really played well and are a nice team who move the ball very quickly. The first half was very frustrating because we were running after the ball and were always late. "I don't think you can say whose fault it was or pick out one line that showed less aggression, I think the overall team performance was poor and that's why the result was like that." He added: "The gaffer said after the

first half that we could have a bad day, but it's never a bad day if you run as much as you can and give your best. "It can be a bad day with the ball or scoring goals, but you have to make sure you give your best and not concede too many goals to make sure you don't lose by too many. His reaction after the game was that he was more or less pleased with the second half. "There was an unfortunate goal but they didn't outplay us in the second half. After the first half that is the only positive thing we've got. These are games that you always want to forget - and there are always bad days during the season. Now we have to forget this and get our points at home on Saturday. It is a home game and we

Super Eagles assistant manager, Simon Kalika, revealed that Obafemi and Yakubu will now be considered for recalls to the Nigerian men's national team. "Obafemi was with us (the team) recently. He got injured and we had to allow him recover, and thank goodness he is back now. Yakubu had a bad time in the national team but we are happy that he has taken the right step to revive his career. "Coach Siasia is considering the two of them for call-ups to the team. They are very good players that will add quality and experience to the side," the Dutchman said. But it is unclear whether Obafemi and Yakubu would be named for next month's games against Ghana and Guinea.

Kalika refused to comment on the possibility of the two featuring in the games. Aiyegbeni has been left out of the Nigerian set-up following a dismal display at the FIFA 2010 World Cup in South Africa. Obafemi, on the other hand, has had to face a difficult period of injuries, club switch and bereavement. Nigeria's Super Eagles are scheduled to play Guinea in a Group B game of 2012 Africa Cup of Nations qualification in Abuja on October 8. On October 11, Siasia's men will confront their West African rivals, the Black Stars of Ghana in an international friendly. Super Eagles' head coach, Siasia is expected to announce his squad for both games in Abuja today.

family are a very big help and they’re my inspiration really. They keep my feet on the ground and they keep me working hard. “I’m very thankful to them for the way they’ve brought me up. It’s a very humble way and I’m reaping the benefits, I think, of the way they’ve helped to bring me up. “I’m still the boy I was before all of this happened and they tell me I shouldn’t let myself change. The thing they tell me is not to let that happen – they wouldn’t.”

have lost the first two, so we want to win and have the feeling of a home victory. We want to build up our confidence for the coming home games." The Nigeria international has also given his view on the unfortunate clash of heads between him and Neil Taylor in Saturday's South Wales encounter that saw the Swans leftback stretchered off in the 85th minute after lengthy treatment. "I got booked but no footballer ever wants a situation like that, either to hurt themselves or someone else," Odemwingie insisted. "I thought he wouldn't go for the ball and would be scared to go for it so I went in 100 per cent and unfortunately we collided head to head.”

Aba loss: Cotonsport coach alleges foul play •Says Enyimba Stadium was ‘a pool’

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FTER losing 2-0 to Enyimba International Football Club of Aba in a CAF Champions league encounter at the weekend, the technical adviser of Cameroonian campaigners, Cotonsport FC, Denis Ravagne has blamed the loss on Monkey business. The coach, who was serving a touch line ban during the clash, could not hold back his emotions and pain after their Sudanese rivals, Al Hilal picked the second semi-final ticket against Wydad of Morocco and poured it all out against the People's Elephant and their bad pitch. Ravagne blamed the loss on the state of the pitch and also fingered the centre referee as he opined that the match should have been called off after the heavy downpour which led to the flooding of the Aba pitch. "It’s a shame to play football on a pitch like this", he shouted. "All over

ALL AFRICA GAMES FALLOUT

Manu to unfold plans for Golden Eaglets Ajose hails •Promises fair play, equity in team selection

Osaze to teammates: Don't dwell on defeat

SAZE Odemwingie has urged his team-mates not to dwell on their 3-0 defeat at Swansea. The Baggies striker is already looking ahead to Wednesday's Carling Cup third-round trip to Everton (ko 8pm) and Saturday's Barclays Premier League home clash with Fulham (ko 3pm). And he is confident Roy Hodgson's men can show the Liberty Stadium reverse was out of character for a Baggies side that finished 11th last term. "It was obviously not the result we were looking for," said Odemwingie. "The first goal came from a penalty

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From Florence Nkem Israel, Aba the world, when it rains heavily, you stop the football but the referee did not. It’s a shame. It’s not a football pitch, its a pool. "If we lose, we should lose under good conditions. In all countries, you stop when there is rain. It’s a shame. That place is not good to play football. It’s only in Africa that this is allowed. It’s a shame. It’s very shameful. Fine, we lost the game, it’s for us to go back home", he said. Speaking about the first goal for Enyimba which resulted from a penalty kick, the coach said: "On that issue, I don't know, I can't say but my keeper said he did not touch the player, so I don't know." Cotton Sport’s 2-0 loss to Enyimba stopped their qualifification for this year's CAF Champions' league semis.

N what can be described as a policy thrust, Garba Manu, Golden Eaglets’ Head Coach has stated categorically that he would be guided by equity and fairplay in team selection with the cardinal objective of qualifying Nigeria for the next FIFA Under-17 World Cup to be staged in the United Arab Emirates in 2013. The Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) recently appointed Manu as the head of the Golden Eaglets’ coaching crew that includes former African Footballer of the Year, Emmanuel Amuneke (assistant coach 1), Nduka Ugbade; who captained the Golden Eaglets to win the maiden FIFA U-16 World Cup in 1985 ( assistant coach 2), as well as former youth international, Emeka Amadi (goalkeeper coach.) The crew has been working behind the scenes and would unfold its plans immediately after meeting with the NFF, but Manu has given an insight on what to expect in the coming months. “People should not worry about what to expect from us,” said Manu, who assisted the late Coach Yemi Tella when Nigeria won the Under-17 World Cup in Korea in 2007. “Every talented

Nigerian within the Under-17 age bracket stands a chance of making the team.” He explained that he would embark on screening of players on the home front while not ruling out the possibility of giving a look-in to Nigerian players in Diaspora. He promised to speak extensively on his programme after rubbing minds with the NFF, which is expected to come up soon. Meanwhile, Manchester-based Nigerian coach, Chukwuma Akuneto has sent his best wishes to the Golden

Eaglets’ coaching crew, promising to support the team in any way possible. Akuneto is currently working as Head Coach of FC United Club of Manchester United (an Under-18 youth side) but has promised to support the country’s quest for glory despite missing out on the shortlist of coaches for the Golden Eaglets. “I wish the coaches and the team the very best,” said the former Rangers International FC of Enugu player. “Nigeria is my country and I would pray and show my support always.”

EPL GOAL OF THE WEEK

Yak's strike against Arsenal nominated B

LACKBURN striker Yakubu Aiyegbeni's spectacular goal on his debut for English Premier League club, Blackburn Rovers on Sunday has been nominated for the next English Premiership Goal of the Week. Aiyegbeni scored two goals in Blackburn’s 4-3 win against the Gunners at the Ewood Park. The goal in question occured when Aiyegbeni collected a through-ball from Junior Hoilett and produced an unorthodox finish to beat Arsenal goalkeeper Wojciech Szczesny. Other players whose goals were also nominated for the award include Sergio Aguero for Manchester City against Fulham, Nani for Manchester United against Chelsea, Fernando Torres for Chelsea against Manchester United and Luka Modric for Spurs against Liverpool. Meanwhile, Aiyegbeni is expected to lead Rovers’ attack tonight as they face Leyton in the 3rd Round of the Carling Cup. The Nigerian forward however said he has nothing to prove after hitting a brace on his debut to help his side to their first win of the season.

•Says, ‘I can score against any team’ By Bimbo Adesina

"There's been pressure all week but today the fans were unbelievable, they stuck with the team, we stuck together as players and in the end we are so happy." He added: "I always believe I can score whatever team I play for, so to have the opportunity to play for Blackburn is a great feeling. "To be scoring again back in the Premier League is great and for me to score two against Arsenal and to get a win is a great feeling. "I have nothing to prove to anyone — I know I can score. It is just unfortunate that I did not get the chance to do that at Everton where I did not play for almost a year because of a serious injury.Thankfully, Steve Kean has given me the chance to play week in and week out back in the Premier League," the Yak said.

Enyimba target African treble

E

•Aiyegbeni

NYIMBA are upbeat they will stop Morocco’s Wydad in the Champions League semi-final next month on their way to winning a third continental title. The Nigerian champions finished the group phase of Africa’s premier club competition Sunday with a flourish after a 2-0 home win over Cotonsport of Cameroon. Champions League winners in 2003 and 2004, ‘The People’s Elephant’ were runaway winners of Group A with 14 points and extended their unbeaten run in the annual competition to 11 matches thus far. “Our target now is to overcome Wydad of Morocco in the semi-final. We expect a good match from them but they can’t stop us from winning the competition and playing at the Club World Cup,” Enyimba coach Evans Ogenyi told MTNFootball.com “We are delighted with our victory against Cotonsport. It showed that we are a complete team who fear no foe.” The first leg semi-final will be played on October 2 in Casablanca with the return leg two weeks later in Aba. Wydad, who finished second in Group B with seven points, have already accounted for Nigerian opposition in this year’s competition after they sent packing Kano Pillars in the Round of 32. The Moroccans won the first leg 2-0, before they held Pillars to a goalless draw in Kano. Enyimba will welcome back defender Markson Ojobo for the semifinals after he served out a one-match ban for picking two yellow cards in the group series. Ojobo picked up his second booking in the 2-1 win at Al Hilal of Sudan and so missed Sunday’s match against Cotonsport. The 21-year-old Ojobo has formed a superb central defence partnership with Chinedu Udoji, however, in his absence coach Okey Emordi opted for

Udoji and Nnaemeka Anyanwu in the heart of the back four. Also expected to return will be first choice goalkeeper Chijoke Ejiogu, who has been sidelined by an ankle injury and has missed the team’s last three Champions League matches. However, the highly experienced Ejiogu faces a tough battle to bench Paul Godwin, who has impressed in his absence.

Nigerian boxing team By Innocent Amomoh

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OMMONWEALTH LightWelterweight boxing Champion, Segun Ajose has commended the Nigeria boxing team to the All African Games for what he described as a splendid performance. Ajose, who is warming up for his elimination bout for the world title against Ali Shebah, said considering the level of preparation the boxers had before the competition, they deserve praise. “ Based on their preparation it was wonderful. At least we got four medals, that was good. You have to remember that they didn’t attend any international competition for like a year and they came with four medals. Probably if they had had better preparation, they would have returned with six medals, three of it being gold. “It is difficult, other countries prepared better than we did, but they still went out with little preparation and still did this much. We have to give them kudos for that,”he said. Ajose explained that talents abound both in amateur and professional boxing in the country and on the African continent. He however gave a reason for their non-exposure. “The problem is lack of promotion because the TV stations are not ready to do business. They want the promoter to pay them money to show fights on television. No, the way it is done everywhere in the world is that the television stations pay the promoters to put the fight on air. “That is the way it is done in the United States, Germany, United Kingdom, and everywhere, name it. You pay for content, not the other way round. It is like going to the market to buy yam and asking the seller to give me N20 to take the yam, that is what it looks like. I am surposed to pay for her yam. If I expect her to pay me for her product, it will not work,” he declared. Ajose is in Nigeria tranning ahaead of his elimination bout coming up on September 30th.

CONTRACT IMPASSE

Salami faults Sundowns

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IGERIAN Under-23 international, Gbolahan Salami, has faulted his exit from South African side, Mamelodi Sundowns. Salami told SuperSport.com that Sundowns have refused to tell the truth about all that happened during his time in South Africa. The Nigerian forward was signed during the transfer window, but his contract was later terminated on September 1. “I have a valid three-year contract with Sundowns, but they refused to honour the terms of the contract. If I didn’t have a contract, why did they pay me for two months? The club assigned jersey No. 39 to me and I featured prominently during the preseason training in Swaziland. “My former Nigerian team (3SC) didn’t get any transfer fee from Sundowns, but they told me that the money was sent to the club. Sundowns General Manager, Kenneth Makhanya, 3SC General Manager, Mutiu Adepoju, Sundowns Lawyer, J. Gadan, my agent and I signed the contract papers on July 13, 2011. This was after I signed the contract papers with Sundowns on July 8. “They also failed to get me a work permit and even told me to go and get it myself. I learnt someone who didn’t want me at the club actually withdrew

my application to make way for another player. There is no league in the world where a player gets work permit himself. A club is supposed to get work permit for a player and not the other way round,” Salami told SuperSport.com. The forward said he was shocked that Sundowns even attempted to send him on trials at another South African side, Maritzburg United. Salami stated that he had a wonderful time during the club’s pre-season training in Swaziland.

•Salami


25

PROPERTY

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 Website:- http://www.thenationonlineng.com

* The Environment * Mortgage * Apartments * Security * Homes *Real Estate

email:- property@thenationonlineng.net

Housing made easy •Intending Lagos home buyers get 20-year moratorium

•The opening of Sir Michael Otedola Housing Estate at Odonagunshin, Epe.

PHOTO: OMOSEHIN MOSES

The Lagos State Government has designed a scheme for residents desirious of their houses without stress through a mortgage product known as Home Ownership Mortgage Scheme (HOMS). Under the scheme, applicants will become proud owners of their homes upon the payment of an equity contribution not exceeding 30 per cent of the price of the house, with the balance payable over 10 to 20 years, reports OKWY IROEGBU time buyers. At its launch at the Lagos He said: "The Scheme will provide eqgage calculator, which will enable prospec•Experts advocate rent-to-ownership stable polity House, Ikeja, Governor Babatunde Fashola uityfor funding on the platform of mortgage tive applicants to calculate concept the quantum of said the scheme is designed as a vehicle to financing for the purchase of homes,

OR tenants in Lagos State, here comes good news. They can become home owners without breaking a sweat. All they have to do is to be part of the Home Ownership Mortgage Scheme (HOMS) and they are on the way to having their houses. The scheme is designed to provide equity funding in mortgage financing for first

F

make the dream of home ownership of homes come true for all Lagos residents. He explained that the HOMS website would serve as data base for applicants to download needed information, including rules of prequalification as well as the mort-

•Four cities in Nasarawa review planning proposals

- PAGE 26

their income that will go towards settling their mortgage payment. According to Fashola, under the scheme's policy, all disputes arising under the plan will be resolved by arbitration governed by the Lagos HOMS Housing Arbitration Rules.

•Lagos demands N59b from Fed Govt

- PAGE 27

whereby applicants will become proud owners of their own homes upon the payment of an equity contribution not exceeding 30 per cent of the price of the housing •CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

•Senate probes Trade Fair Complex concessioning

- PAGE 28


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

26

PROPERTY/ENVIRONMENT

Four Nasarawa cities review planning proposals

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TAKEHOLDERS in four cities in Nasarawa State have adopted sustainable longterm development strategies to guide their growth over the next 20 years under renewed efforts to revive the fortunes of urban centres. The stakeholders, comprising no fewer than 408 representatives of community and civil society organisations, traditional institutions, civil servants, trade associations, private sector operatives as well as women and youth groups and the media gathered with planning consultants and state and local government officials during City consultations held in each of the four cities a week ago. The meeting was to review highlights of the new planning proposals and commit to its successful implementation. The initiative is coming under a technical co-operation agreement between the state government and the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat), under which Structure Plans are being developed for Lafia the state capital, Doma, Keffi and Karu - the emerging commercial hub on the outskirts of the Federal capital Abuja. Though the agreement for the N60 million projects was signed on July 30, 2008, implementation did not begin till June 2009. Specifically, the Structure Plans are aimed at guiding the growth of the identified towns for the next 20 years and to specifically make significant contributions towards achieving the goals of the Nasarawa State Economic Empowerment and Development Strategy (NASEEDS), its Local Economic Empowerment and Development Strategy (LEEDS), the Habitat Agenda and the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).

By Okwy Iroegbu Asst. Editor

The plans are being developed using a methodology developed by UN-Habitat known as the Rapid Urban Sector Profiling for Sustainability (RUSPS), which was favoured for its attributes that include the rapid, cross-cutting, holistic and action-oriented assessment

of needs. The City Consultation for four cities had a total of 208 stakeholders in attendance. Nine consultants were recruited to work on the project, comprising town planning, transportation, economy, gender and Geographical Information Systems specialists. Profiling surveys earlier conducted on the cities, which served as the

•Afribank Estate, Ilupeju, Lagos

basis for the draft reports, had identified nine key thematic areas for intervention, namely shelter and slums, local economic development, governance, gender, the environment, urban basic services, transportation, heritage and urban safety. During each City Consultation, the key issues from the draft report

PHOTO: OKWY IROEGBU

Lagos launches scheme

‘Government has designed a structure whereby it will collaborate with partner banks for the provision of funds to support applicants in the acquisition of homes as well as the management of the prequalification procedures’

•Continued from Page 25

unit with the balance payable over a period of 10 to 20 years". On how the scheme will work, Fashola said: "First Time Buyers" (FTBs), who are entering into the home ownership market would be required to provide a sworn buyer's affidavit attesting that they do not own property anywhere within the territory of Lagos State, proof of employment, residency in Lagos State and evidence of tax payment.” He warned that any false deposition in the buyer's affidavit will be a ground for re-possession and this will be without prejudice to other criminal sanctions that may be imposed by law. Other requirements, according to him, include the execution of a Contract of Sale and a Deed of Mortgage by the applicant, two documents, which would govern the transaction and set out the rights and obligations of the parties. He said the pool of housing stock presently available to the government wouldbe deployed in the scheme while more will be added as they are completed in the various housing estates under construction. On funding, he said: “Government has designed a structure whereby it would collaborate with partner banks for the provision of funds to support applicants in the acquisition of homes as well as the management of the pre-qualification procedures.” On the Housing Arbitration Rules, he said the rules have been

were presented to stakeholders, after which they engaged in detailed discussions on the identified thematic areas in syndicate sessions. Thereafter, the group resolutions were debated and adopted at plenary sessions, which also saw the signing of the Lafia Declaration, the Doma Declaration, the Keffi Declaration and the Karu Declaration in each of the participating cities. UN-HABITAT Programme Manager for Nigeria, Prof Johnson Bade Falade, stressed that the consultations presented a unique opportunity for stakeholders to shape the development of their cities by participating actively in the exercise. High points of the resolutions adopted by the stakeholders included improvement of access to land and mortgage finance, adoption of faster and more efficient property titling processes. Others include resolution of conflicts among agencies responsible for various aspects of city governance, presentation of proposals for upgrading and expanding urban infrastructure facilities, recommendations for establishment of mass transportation facilities, relocation of markets and motor parks. Also included are adoption of participatory, inclusive and more gender-friendly urban governance practices, as well as the improvement of waste management services. Following the conclusion of the City Consultations, the final reports on the Structure Plans, including land use and other proposals are expected to be submitted shortly, after which strategies for implementation would be articulated by the state government.

•From left: MD/CEO, Lagos State Development and Corporation, Mr Taofeek Biodun Oki with Michael Otedola College of Primary Education Provost, Prof Olu Akeusola, during the launch of Sir Michael Otedola Housing Estate at Odoragunshin Epe, Lagos State.

passed by the Board of the Lagos Court of Arbitration in preparation for its use in the resolution of the disagreements that are a permanent feature of human endeavour and commercial transactions. He said, among other things, the HOMS project will provide an alternative platform for the recovery of premises from recalcitrant tenants as against the former policy, which made some landlords resort to mitigating their recovery risks by demanding multiple years' rent in advance. This, he said, added to the congestion in the courts. Allaying fears on the cost of ar-

bitration, Fashola said: “The cost of arbitration would be limited to two per cent of the purchase price of the property and will be shared equally between the parties. “To save cost, arbitration will be conducted by a single arbitrator and in cases where it is appropriate, by the submission of documents only." He said the preference of his administration for arbitration as the sole means of resolving disputes under the Scheme was not a "vote of no confidence" in the courts but acknowledgement of the fact that an not all disputes must end up in court, particularly those that can

easily be lawfully resolved in other ways”. He reiterated his conviction that the operation of these rules will engender comfort and confidence among Lagosians to sign up for the scheme. According to him, the Arbitration Rules will ease the problems of recovery of possession of houses acquired under mortgage and this also represents a critical incentive to bankers and financial institutions for attract them to finance mortgages. This, he said, would be the critical driver of home ownership. He urged legal advisers of banks

and financial institutions to familiarise themselves with the Arbitration Rules and advice their management on its benefits. Earlier, HOMS committee, Chairman and immediate past Attorney-General and Commissioner for Justice, Mr Olasupo Shasore (SAN), said the committee would ensure the success of the scheme as it is the first of its kind in the history of housing in the country. In attendance were: Deputy Governor Mrs. Adejoke OrelopeAdefulire, Commissioner for Housing, Mr Bosun Jeje and his Environment, Physical Planning, Transportation, Budget and Economic Planning counterparts, Mr Tunji Bello, M. Toyin Ayinde, Mr Kayode Opeifa and Mr Ben Akabueze, among others. Others are President of Lagos Court of Arbitration, Mr Babajide Ogundipe;w Chairman, First City Monument Bank, Mr Jonathan Long, other members of HOMS Committee and top government functionaries.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

27

PROPERTY/ENVIRONMENT

•A Container house

Donor-nations scored low on climate finance D

EVELOPED countries are not transparent on the cli mate-change finance they promised to developing nations at the Copenhagen Summit in 2009, according to a scorecard published by the International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED). Its authors urged international negotiators, who are gathering for talks under the UN Framework on Climate Change at the end of next week in Panama to set up an independent registry of climate finance that includes project-level information. Norway ranked top on the scorecard with a score of only 52 per cent while New Zealand came last with just 26 per cent. The generally low scores mask progress in some areas and show that countries are not consistent in being transparent about all aspects of their funding. The scorecard’s authors say the overall lack of transparency hinders efforts to monitor where the money

goes and ensure it is spent responsibly. It also means recipient countries may struggle to plan their responses to climate change. The scorecard assesses how transparent countries have been in the delivery of $30 billion of ‘new and additional’ funds, which they agreed to provide to developing countries between 2010 and 2012. To evaluate the transparency of these reports, David Ciplet and J. Timmons Roberts at Brown University in the United States, Martin Stadelmann at the Center for Comparative and International Studies, ETH and University of Zurich and Saleemul Huq and Achala Chandani at IIED created a scorecard based on 25 criteria in three group: Is the summary information adequate and clear? Are the methods for measuring and allocating climate finance clearly defined? Are data presented for individual projects. Countries varied greatly across these three groups of criteria: Aus-

tralia scored 73 per cent for summary information, but 17 per cent for its baseline information and 0 per cent for its project data. “A transparent system for reporting on climate finance is essential to make sure that funds are adequate, predictable and used responsibly,” says David Ciplet. “Greater transparency will be critical to building trust in the international negotiations towards a global agreement on how to tackle climate change.”

‘A transparent system for reporting on climate finance is essential to make sure that funds are adequate, predictable and used responsibly’

Drainage construction excites residents

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ESIDENTS of MosanOkunola Local Council De velopment Area in Alimosho, a Lagos suburb, have hailed the council boss, Hon Abiodun Mafe, for the council’s environmental renewal programmes through the construction of arcs, drainages, trees planting and road rehabilitation. The residents said the construction of arcs and beautifications of medians at various entrances of the estates have gone long ways to give the areas new look. Among those who spoke with The Nation, Chairman, Community Development Committee, Mr Adewale Ogunronbi, lauded the aesthetic vision of the contractors who worked at the entrance and strategic parts of the estates. Ogunronbi said the three estates Abesan, Gowon and Jakande under Mosan-Okunola Local Council Development Area - have witnessed a developmental reformation. “The council boss having lived in the community for longer years knows where the shoe pinches and

By Tajudeen Adebanjo

he has really done well to complement the effort of the state government in the areas of road rehabilitation, beautification exercise and construction of new culverts,” he said. Chairman, National Union of Local Government Employees (NULGE), Mosan-Okunola chapter, Femi Oladapo, said without the ingenuity of the council chief, the last July 10 flood would have had devastating effects on the inhabitants. “The construction of drainages at various communities assisted in reducing the negative impact of the flood on the residents. You can imagine what the number of casualties would be if the drainages and culverts are not on ground,” he said. Oladapo urged council chiefs in other local government to emulate Hon Mafe. This, he said, would complement efforts of Governor Babatunde Fashola and the Commissioner for the Environment, Mr Tunji Bello, to make Lagos a comfortable city.

•A new roundabout at Mosan

Lagos demands N59b from Fed Govt •Promises six new pedestrian bridges THE Lagos State Government has called on the Federal Government to refund the over N59billion it spent on the construction and rehabilitation of federal roads . Commissioner for Works and Infrastructure, Dr. Kadri Obafemi Hamzat, told The Nation that the debts started mounting in 2001. He said the liquidation of the account by the Federal Government would free funds for the state to deplore into more infrastructures, for the state. In a related development, he assure assurance that bridges across the State are safe and technically fit for public use and revealed the government’s intention to construct six new pedestrian bridges on the Lagos Abeokuta Expressway to are lives. He said the audit of the bridges indicates that they are safe for use. Specifically, he mentioned the Oke Afa bridge which he confirmed as technically fit and not in danger of failing against public apprehension. While assuring that the steel pedes-

By Okwy Iroegbu Asst. Editor

trian bridges are maintained, Hamzat said in event of distress, the state government would not hesitate to seal them off to avoid untoward result. On the Lagos Badagry expressway , the Commissioner said it was necessary to construct the road to reap the benefit of the economic value of the axis. He stated that the road will complement the highway that extends to as far as Guinea on the West African coast. He assured that all onging projects will be completed within the timeframe, adding that the adoption of the medium term expenditure framework is to ensure that the resources are better managed. On road construction prioritisation, he said resource limitation led to the prioritisation of roads projects, adding that aside from palliatives measures being undertaken on most roads across the state, the government is poised to continue with its major effort at rebuilding the roads.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

28

PROPERTY/ENVIRONMENT Building Issues

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•Trade Fair Complex

Senate probes Trade Fair Complex concessioning

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HE leadership of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Privatisation of Nigeria’s Public Enterprises investigating contracts concessioning sealed by the Bureau of Public Enterprises (BPE) and National Council on Privatisation (NCP) has pledged to right the wrongs allegedly perpetrated in the sale of Lagos International Trade Fair Complex (LITC). The Trade Fair Complex on the Lagos/Badagry Expressway is home to building materials manufacturers, dealers and allied products. Addressing journalists shortly after a closed door meeting with representatives of Trade Fair Stakeholders’ Forum (TFSF), Aulic Nigeria Limited, the purported concessionaire, Trade Fair Management Board, Chairman of the Senate Committee, Alhaji Ahmed Lawan, said: “The principal target of the committee is to find a lasting solution to the crisis that has engulfed the complex since the BPE conducted the process of concessioning the complex to private investors during the President Olusegun Obasanjo administration.” Trade Fair Stakeholders Forum is a central body made up of of the executives of Balogun Business Association (BBA); Auto Spare Parts and Machinery Dealers’ Association (ASPAMDA); Association of Progressive Traders of Nigeria (APTON); C. Tempo International Company and others enjoying several long-term leases running to 50 years, which were genuinely secured from the Federal Government through the Ministry of Commerce and Industry. Senator Lawan and his team, that took a tour round the bushy areas yet to be redeveloped by the concessionaire, noted: “We are not here to take sides with any party, but to identify the true position of things ourselves and present our report in a way it will guide the Senate in resolving the matter for the interest of the economy and Nigerians.” He said: “My committee, from the presentations by all the parties concerned in the crisis, has resolved to invite every party to Abuja within two weeks to come and represent their positions with supporting documents and addresses so as to enable us to do a good job in solving the crisis once and for all. “Inasmuch as we will not allow

By Okwy Iroegbu & Chinaka Okoro

abuse of private investments, we will equally look at all the documents and take a definite position with the aim of maintaining a lasting peace. During his presentation, Chairman, on Aulic Nigeria Limited, (the concessionaire), Dr. Nick Ezeh, claimed that he has spent over N2.9 billion in changing the face of the complex. However, the area under his control could not reflect such injection of fund his further confused the senators, who insisted that “apart from the fact that BPE was not transparent in handling the deal, parties must come to Abuja to represent their arguments to enable the committee to take a clear-cut position on the matter.” According to Dr. Ezeh, the reason he has not achieved much is due to the problems his firm encountering in getting rents from owners of developed areas. However, owners of developed areas under the TFSF represented by former president of Balogun Business Association (BBA), Chief Okey Ezeibe maintained: “Going by the lease agreement, owners of all the developed areas had with the Federal Government represented then by the Trade Fair Management Board under the Federal Ministry of Commerce and Industry as lessor, they will continue to keep the agreement which is paying the lessor until a letter from same agency says otherwise or advises them to pay to another entity.” President of ASPMDA, Chief Anthony Ughagwu clarified that members of TFSF are not against the Federal Government concessioning the complex, but if it wishes to do so, “it has to respect existing leases signed by it under the Ministry of Commerce and Industry to avoid confusion.” Ughagwu said: “Before the socalled hand-over of the

concessioned portions to the purported concessionaire, the concessionaire, Aulic Nigeria Limited, had made it clear in writing that all developed areas were not part of areas to be controlled by his deal with the government.” On this premise therefore, he questioned why “the same Aulic will turn back after the letter and seek control of estates and private investments valued at well over N300 billion?” In his final submission, ASPMDA helmsman maintained that TFSF will not watch and see their investments cornered by anybody in the name of concession. Corroborating Ezeibe and Ughagwu’s views, former President of ASPMDA and also former chairman of TFSF, Chief Sunday Ernest Ohanazoeze, linked the confusion to greed by unsuccessful businessmen and the poor due process flowed by the BPE in concessioning the complex, saying “we have been fighting this injustice since 2008 to date and will continue until government realises that the BPE erred in the sale of the complex.” Chief Ohanazoeze said: “The BPE failed to listen to presentations by TFSF and also failed to conduct diligent investigation to find out who has developed what and under what condition before rushing to declare Aulic the concessionire of people’s investment which is wrong in all ramifications.” He maintained: “The BPE cannot concession what the same government it’s serving has leased out in the first instance for 50 years and another 49 years after,” stressing that “TFSF will answer the senators at Abuja and will continue to present their positions until justice is seen to has been done.” It will be recalled that both parties had been in court since the BPE handed over the complex to Aulic Nigeria Limited without recourse to court proceedings on the matter in 2010.

‘The BPE failed to listen to presentations by TFSF and also failed to conduct diligent investigation to find out who has developed what and under what condition before rushing to declare Aulic the concessionire of people’s investment which is wrong in all ramifications’

End-of-year home sale tips

HE end of the year can cause By Okwy Iroegbu some developers and sellers Asst. Editor to worry if their home still home's appeal when it's on the host the ‘to- let ‘without enquires market. that may lead to its selling, espe- Stage for Photos: Apply the socially if the sale is attached to a cial media on the net to display project. Sales from statistics around you’re the picture of your home. this period may not be very encourPictures don’t tell lies and they also aging due to the insecurity cash amplify problems. Remove any squeeze in the country. clutter or excess furniture. RearThere are some key factors that range furniture with looks taking may help sell your home, but first rank over functionality. If your furremember that you may watch the niture has seen better days, contrend and offer some discounts to sider budgeting for furniture ready buyers, especially now that rental. Add detailed touches, such it looks like the buyer’s market. as flowers, throw pillows, paintOn the other hand, there will be ings etc. some serious and willing buyers - Clean: While smells and grime looking for a very nice gift for don't always translate in pictures, themselves, wives, children and they will definitely be a buyer degirlfriends! If they're out shopping terrent during showings. If your in these rainy season and the palhome needs a lot of scrubbing, eipable fear of insecurity with Boko ther hire a maid service or work Haram. If they venture out or deon one room at a time until they tail their agents to act on their beall shine. Buyers are especially half it could be because they're exturned off by dirty tremely serious bathrooms, kitchabout making a Remove any ens, and odors. purchase before the clutter or excess Scrubs these rooms end of the year. With this in mind, furniture. Rear- and spray room be sure to make the range furniture fresheners. - Enhance curb most of every showing. Don't let with looks taking appeal: Curb appeal the first impresthings slide with rank over func- ission of the real esthe upkeep of your tionality. If your tate market. Yes, home because you buyers do judge a are juggling selling furniture has house by its a home, working, seen better days, "cover." The outside or doing other create a desire things that may not consider budget- must to see the inside. directly affect the ing for furniture To accomplish selling the house at its peak. rental. Add de- this you may need to spend money to Selling your tailed touches, make money. Coshome in this season must be a priority such as flowers, metic enhancements go a long and the closer to the throw pillows, ways. Start small beginning of the and work your way paintings quarter the better. up. You will not im-. Price Competitively: Buyers are press your buyers by showing off a clustered home that is un-kept. If more Naira conscious than ever. there is a reduced number of buy- Fears of a renewed recession and a ers seeing your home, make the high unemployment rate have them most of each showing by having a wanting the best deal for their spectacularly staged and clutter- money. Buying in today's market means free house to show off, this will provide a competitive advantage, high levels of affordability. Buyers knowing that there are many aren't willing to pay more for an image or an idea. Be sure to be realhouses on the waiting-list. I have heard people say there will istic about what your home is worth be no point fixing a home you want in today's market. Prices have changed, dramatically to sell for appeal; they see it as a waste of time and resources but this in some areas. If you price too high is simply because they have refused you run the risk of scaring away to acknowledge that there is a con- would be buyers. Price correctly nection between the eye and a from the beginning so that you don’t look unserious. sense of taste and longing. -. Hire an Estate agent: Perhaps this What sells a home? Is it the price, location, or condition? The truth is should have been number one. that it takes a combination of all of Many sellers may be considering these factors to make a sale in to- doing –a- for –sale- by- owner in an day's market. Unlike boom era attempt to save money on closing transactions, the seller is now in the costs in these tough times. That passenger seat. Buyers today have could be a big mistake . Buyers have the upper-hand in a great advantage. A glut of homes in many mar- negotiations these days and withkets means that supply far out- out an experienced professional by weighs demand. Buyers are able to their side, they could get taken adbe choosy and to negotiate sweet vantage of. Agents also have access to a larger pool of potential buyers. deals. When your home is on the mar- Buyers seek them out when they ket, you want to be noticed and for want a home. Selling today is possible. In fact, the right reasons. It's a competitive advantage that many areas are seeing increases in could mean the difference between existing-home sales. Buyers know making the sale or not. Let's look now is a great time to buy, you just at few top ways to increase your have to convince them that they should be buying your home.

‘Buyers have the upper hand in negotiations these days and without an experienced professional by their side, they could get taken advantage of. Agents also have access to a larger pool of potential buyers. Buyers seek them out when they want a home’ •Contributions, questions? e-mail: quichi3cities@yahoo.com


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

E-mail:- law@thenationonlineng.net

How to make the Constitution work • Lawyers set agenda for National Assembly

•National Assembly complex

The National Assembly has set up two panels of 91 members to review the 1999 Constitution. Senate President David Mark described the assignment as ‘top priority.’ Lawyers have hailed the move and identified areas that need the most attention. JOSEPH JIBUEZE writes.

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ITH constitution of two panels, the National Assembly last week kickstarted the process of amending the 1999 Constution (as amended). Deputy Senate President Ike Ekweremadu chairs Senate committee that consists of 47 members; Deputy Speaker, House of Representatives Emeka Ihedioha heads the lower chamber’s committee of 44 members. The committees will identify areas of the constitution that require “urgent” amendment and work as a team towards actualising the review. The amendment, Senate President David Mark, said would address contentious questions like whether state police should be allowed; whether the current revenue formula is equitable; whether power distribution should be on the Exclusive Legislative List, and whether states that invest in power generation should be allowed to distribute. They will also consider if it is necessary to create new states to bring government nearer to the people and address cries of marginalisation, as well as how effective local governments are, and whether they should be made to function independently of the states.

Speaker Aminu Tambuwal said issues to be tackled related to the budgetary process and impact on the application and implementation of the budget. This includes the provisions of section 81(1) of the Constitution which allows the president to lay the budget at any time during the year. The amendment, Tambuwal said, has become necessary if Nigeria must achieve the internationally recognised best practice of laying the budget before the parliament at least three months before the end of a fiscal year. Experts said the importance of a constitution in the governance of any nation cannot be overemphasised. The link between democracy and constitutional government is well established. It has been pointed out that although democracy is not dependent on the existence of a written set of rules in a constitution, without a constitution, there may not be practices conducive to efficiency, well being and social justice. Constitution making and/ or review is of paramount importance in any country. Lawyers have welcomed the planned re-

view of the Constitution, and one area they want the government to concentrate on is resource control in the context of federalism and fiscal federalism. In Nigeria, there have been at least 10 attempts to make or review the constitution during the colonial era (1861-1960) and postcolonial era (1960-2012). During the 99 years of British rule, there were at least six major constitution-making experiences. These include the amalgamation constitution of 1914, the Clifford Constitution of 1922, Richards Constitution of 1946, Macpherson constitution of 1951, Lyttleton Constitution of 1954 and independence constitution of 1960. The independence constitution of 1960 retained most of the provisions of the Lyttleton constitution. The Queen of England remained Nigeria’s constitutional monarch only represented by the GovernorGeneral. The final court of Appeal for Nigeria was the Judicial Committee of the British Privy Council. These provisions, which were still applicable in “independent” Nigeria, led to agitations for a change. This culminated in a constitutional conference held in Lagos from

July 25 –26, 1963 where political leaders resolved that Nigeria should become a Federal Republic. The republican constitution of 1963 was passed into law by the Federal parliament on September 19, 1963. The constitution came into force on October 1, 1963. On January 15, 1966, the military took over government. In September 1975, the government of Gen. Murtala Mohammed set up a constitution drafting committee made up of 50 members with Chief F.R.A Williams (SAN) as chairman. All the members were men. The Gen. Ibrahim Babangida regime set up a political bureau, which produced a draft document that was tabled before a constituent Assembly. The draft of the 1989 Constitution was debated by the Constituent Assembly. The Gen. Sani Abacha regime inaugurated a constitutional conference in 1994. On November 11, 1998, Gen. Abdulsalami Abubakar inaugurated the Constitution Debate Coordinating Committee made up of 25 members headed by Justice Niki Tobi. The committee was asked to submit its report by December 31, 1998. The committee

•Judicial integrity at stake over investigation

•Continued on page 31

•Fashola warns officers against liabilities- P.33•Institute partners Supreme Court on justice delivery- P.34


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

LAW REPORT

Taking preliminary objection with main suit amounts to overruling preliminary objection before argument IN THE SUPREME COURT OF NIGERIA On Friday, June 24, 2011 Suit No: SC.3/2011 BEFORE THEIR LORDSHIPS DAHIRU MUSDAPHER ....... Justice of the Supreme Court CHRISTOPHER MITCHELL CHUKWUMA-ENEH ....... Justice of the Supreme Court OLUFUNLOLA OYELOLA ADEKEYE ....... Justice of the Supreme Court SULEIMAN GALADIMA ....... Justice of the Supreme Court BODE RHODES-VIVOUR ....... Justice of the Supreme Court BETWEEN 1. HON. ZAKAWANU I. GARUBA 2. HON. LEVIS A. AIGBOGUN 3. HON. FRANCIS O. OKIYE 4. HON. BLESSING AGBEBAKU 5. HON. CHRISTOPHER I. ADESOTU 6. HON. SUNDAY EBOSELE EREGHAN 7. HON. EMMA OKODUWA 8. HON. (DR.) ISRAEL MANDI AGUELE 9. HON. SAMUEL SHEGUN SAIKI, JP. Appellants AND 1. HON. EHI BRIGHT OMOKHODION 2. HON. PETER ALIU 3. HON. PAUL OHONBAMU 4. HON. PHILIP SHAIBU 5. HON. IKPONMWONSA E. OGBEIWI 6. HON. UWAMOSE AMADASUN 7. HON. KABIRU ADJOTO 8. UYIGUE IGBE 9. HON. FOLY JOSEPH OGEDENGBE 10. HON. JUDE ISE-IDEHEN 11. HON. BRIGHT N. OSAYANDE 12. HON. BRIGHT OSAYIMWEN 13. HON. JOHNSON E. OGHUMAH 14. THE CLERK, EDO STATE HOUSE OF ASSEMBLY Respondents HON. ZAKAWANU I. GARUBA & ORS V. HON. EHI BRIGHT OMOKHODION & ORS CITATION: (2011) LPELR-SC.3/2011 •Continued from last week

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HETHER or not the Court of Appeal should have considered the merits of the substantive appeal in the alternative despite declining jurisdiction to hear the appeal (Ground 10).” The foregoing issues for determination in the appeal have also been challenged by the respondents. Excepting 5th - 7th respondents (otherwise know as the 2nd sets of respondents) the rest of the respondents (otherwise comprising 1st, 3rd and 4th sets of respondents) have severally filed in this court their notices of preliminary objections to the appeal. The 1st - 4th respondents in their brief of argument have challenged issues 1, 2 and 4 of the appellants issues for determination as contained and argued in the Appellants’ Brief of Argument on the grounds of appeal firstly, that the ratio decidendi or basis of the decision of the lower court appealed against herein is clear enough being strictly that the appeal filed by the appellants has required leave of court to be competent because the same has disclosed or involved questions of mixed law and facts. To buttress this point they have cited and relied on Chami v. UBA (2010) 3 SCM.59 at 71 paragraph C and Federal Ministry of Health v. Gomet (2009) 6 SCM 63 at paragraph B; and, secondly that issues 1, 2 and 4 of the appellants’ brief of argument are clearly extraneous to the decision of the lower court as they do not relate to or bear any relevance to the ratio decidendi or basis of the lower court’s decision and even then that a point not directly decided upon by court cannot constitute the basis of an issue for determination in an appeal. See: Olufeagba & Ors. v. Abdul-Raheem & Anor. (2009) 11-12 (pt.1) SCM 125 at 153. However in the event of overruling their preliminary objection, they have in the alternative raised the following issues for determination, viz: “(1) Whether the lower court has in the circumstance subtracted or read out of the record of Appeal what is there (Grounds 6, 8 and 9). (2) Whether the three grounds of appeal filed by the appellants before the lower court did not disclose or involve questions of mixed law and facts and therefore do not require leave to be competent (Grounds 1,

2, 5 and 7). (3) Whether the court below ought to have considered the merits of the substantive appeal in the alternative having declined jurisdiction to hear the appeal (Ground 10).” In the 5th - 7th the 2nd set of respondents’ brief of argument they have raised no objections to the appeal, they have otherwise raised two issues for determination in the appeal as follows: “1. Whether the Court of Appeal was right in holding that the grounds of appeal were grounds of mixed law and facts. 2. Whether the Court of Appeal having found that the appeal was incompetent should have considered the merits of the appeal its contentious and disputed nature notwithstanding.” The 5th - 7th respondents have not taken any objection. The 8th - 11th (i.e. 3rd set) respondents have filed a brief of argument and in it have argued their notice of preliminary objection by contending that grounds 3, 4 and 6 of the Notice of Appeal have severally not arisen from the lower court’s judgment. In particular that

ground 3 represents a comment and so an obiter dictum and not an appealable point. In sum it is submitted that ground 4 has questioned the failure of the lower court to take judicial notice of the said two cases cited to it and which it is submitted has no nexus with the failure to seek leave of court to file the instant appeal and that ground 6 has complained of omitting the said cited cases in the record of appeal/proceeding of 26/4/2010 and the failure to take judicial notice of the said cases; and furthermore that the ground has no nexus with the decision appealed against. The lower court has been urged to strike out the appellants’ appeal because the appeal is an interlocutory appeal and is questioning the exercise of the trial Court’s exercise of its discretion requiring leave of court to be competent and which has neither been sought nor obtained for the instant appeal to be properly constituted as per Section 242(1) of the 1999 Constitution as amended. They have submitted relying on Saude v. Abdullahi (1989) 4 NWLR (Pt.116) 387 at 431, Aina v. U.B.A. (1997) 4 NWLR (Pt.498) 181 at 187 - 188 and Coker v. UBA (1997) 2 NWLR (pt.490) 641 at 604 to contend that an appeal in essence has to attack the ratio decidendi i.e. the reason for the decision appealed against to be sustainable. And that the failure of the lower court to take judicial notice of this court’s decisions in Diapalong v. Dariye (2007) 8 NWLR (A.1036) 32 and Inakoju v. Adeleke (2007) 4 NWLR (Pt.1025) 423 has no bearing to the decision appealed against. They have urged the court to uphold the objection. In the alternative i.e. of being overruled they have raised two issues for determination in the appeal viz: “1. Whether the court below was right when it held that the appeal of the appellants is incompetent and struck same out Grounds 1, 2, 5 and 7. 2. Whether this matter in which the court below could have properly considered of the merits of the suit and whether this Honourable court can invoke its powers under section 22 of the Supreme Court Act and treat the matter as if it were a trial Court Ground 10.” The 12th - 14th respondents have also filed their brief of argument and notice of preliminary objection and it has been argued in their brief of argument to the effect that ground 4 of the appellants’ grounds of appeal and issues 1 and 2 formulated in the appellants’ brief do not arise nor flow from the decision of the lower court in this matter and therefore, should be struck out. In the event of being overruled they have adopted the four issues as raised by the appellants. They have also cross-appealed in this matter and have also filed their respondents/crossappellants brief of argument. On the 12th - 14th respondents’ preliminary objection I may further add firstly, they have argued that an appeal cannot properly be based on what the court never decided. They rely on Osuji v. Ekeocha (2009) 16 NWLR (Pt.116) 81 at 122 paragraphs C-D, Owie v. Ighiwi (2005) 5 NWLR (Pt.917) 184 at 217 paragraphs A-B, Dalek Nig. Ltd. V. Ompadec (2007) 7 NWLR (Pt.1033) 402 at 430 and Oloruntoba-Oju v. Abdul-Raheem (2009) 13 NWLR (Pt.1157) 83 at 121 paragraph B-C.

Secondly, they have submitted also that issues 1 and 2 as formulated by the appellants have not emanated from the grounds of appeal which in turn do not flow from the said judgment of the lower court and have cited and relied on Akinduro v. Alaya (2007) 15 NWLR (Pt.1057) 312 at 326 paragraphs C-D. Finally, they have urged the court to uphold the preliminary objection and strike out the appeal for want of competence. The appellants have responded to the various submissions made by the above 3 sets of respondents severally by filing a reply brief to each of the 3 sets of respondents’ brief of argument they have, if I may repeat, in this regard filed 3 appellants’ reply briefs firstly to 1 - 4 appellants’ brief, secondly 8th - 11th respondents’ brief and thirdly to 12th -14th respondents’ brief. The appellants in their reply briefs filed in this matter have developed a common point in response to the effect that the preliminary objections are totally misconceived in that it is wrong to hold that there is only one Ratio in the instant appeal as against examining of the whole judgment in that regard and that issues 1, 2 and 4 of the appellants’ brief of argument have relationship with the decision of the lower court that is as to whether or not the said decisions of the Supreme Court have been cited to the trial Court as the appellants have contended even as the said cases have been set out in the particulars to ground one of their notice of appeal in this matter and so should have been judicially noticed. On the question of grounds 3, 4 and 6, they have submitted they are competent grounds. And they have relied on Adetomi Oladeji (Nig.) Ltd v. N.B. Plc. (2007) 5 NWLR (pt. 1027) 415 at 436 and 437. Egbe v. Alhaji (1990) 1 NWLR (pt.128) 590 and G. Cappa Plc. Abmine & Sons (Nig) Ltd. (2002) 1 NWLR (Pt.777) 32 at 49 and Olaruntaba & Ors. v. Abdul-Raheem & Ors. (2009) 13 NWLR (Pt.1157) 87, in expatiation of their submissions in this matter. They have urged the court to overrule the preliminary objections. They have also filed their appellants/cross-respondents brief of argument to the cross-appeal filed by the 12th - 14th respondents/crossappellants in this matter. I have carefully perused the notices of preliminary objections of the three sets of respondents severally filed in this matter. For convenience sake of giving a joint short ruling on the preliminary objections I hereby consolidate them not only because these applications have a common substratum as borne out from the foregoing review of the parties’ cases, the preliminary objections filed by 8th - 11th and 12th - 14th respondents are coterminous and have raised similar questions challenging severally the appellants’ issues 1, 2, 3 and 4 for determination as set out herein and grounds 3, 4 and 6 of the appellants’ ground of appeal. I have also gone through the respondents’ submissions in their respective briefs of argument on these causes and the reply briefs filed by the appellants thereto and also their submissions at the oral hearing of this appeal. I have given them due consideration and I find merit in these preliminary objections. I now go on to expatiate on the same. •To be Continued

•From left: National Treasurer, NBA, Funmilayo Oluyede, President, Joseph Bodunirn Daudu (SAN) and National Publicity Secretary, Emeka Obegolu, during a briefing by Daudu in Lagos.


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LAW COVER CONT’D

How to make the Constitution work •Continued from page 29

submitted its report and the Armed Forces Ruling Council promulgated the 1999 Constitution a few days to the handing over of power to a civilian regime on May 29, 1999. Critics have faulted the 1999 Constitution on several fronts. They said its content does not take into account the political history of the country. In addition they said there are inconsistencies and provisions that do not meet the wishes and aspirations of the people. The history of Nigeria shows that it is a federal system. But the Constitution is unitary. There is over concentration of powers at the centre. The Constitution establishes a judicial council to control the appointment, promotion and discipline of both state and federal judicial officers. Again, its language is problematic in two respects. It is written in masculine gender as if there are no women in Nigeria. Women groups have faulted this provision. Some said it is written in legal jargons that are very difficult to understand. The trend today is to write constitution in a simple language that the average person can understand. Furthermore, the constitution does not guarantee economic, social and cultural rights. Provisions for adequate shelter, suitable and adequate food, reasonable national minimum living wage, old age care and pensions, unemployment and sick benefits and welfare of the disabled are provided for under chapter two titled Fundamental Objectives and Directive Principles of State Policy. These provisions are not justiceable under the 1999 constitution and cannot be enforced. Lawyers have set an agenda for the committees on the areas they should look at. They said there is a lot of inelegant drafting. For instance, Section 222 dealing with the registration of political parties gives the impression that political parties only need to register with the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) but Section 40 gives the proviso that INEC will have to accord recognition to the parties. Another example of inelegant drafting, they said, is Section 156, which prescribes the same qualifications for members of Federal executive bodies of which INEC is one and members of the House of Representatives. Section 65 gives membership of political parties as one of the qualifications for becoming a member of the House. This means that members of INEC charged with the responsibility of organising and supervising elections must be members of political parties. Many think this is not the intention of the Constitution. Moreover, the 1999 Constitution not only continues the marginilisation of women but also discriminates against them. A lawyer, Mrs Judith Obasi, said there is no specific equality clause. There is no affirmative action clause. Whereas Section 26 makes it possible for any man to confer citizenship on his foreign spouse by registration, the same right is not extended to women. Critics added that the Constitution does not provide a liberal regime for political parties to operate. It vests all the resources in the country on the federal government, a negation of the principles of fiscal federalism. Lawyers have recommended that the federating units should have control and ownership of the resources in their area. They should, however, pay taxes to the Federal Government. The rate of such taxes would need to be determined in consultation with the states. The rate may, however, not be more than 50 per cent, considering that states would take on more spending responsibilities under true federalism. They also want changes in sections dealing with Land Use Act to guarantee access of people to land and adequate compensation; states’ responsibility for collection and retention of value added tax; placing of certain items in the Exclusive Legislative List on the

•Mark

•Tambuwal

•Wali

•Rabana

concurrent list. At all levels of government, mechanisms must be put in place to ensure public control and accountability, while Section 44 should be amended so that ownership and control of all resources will be vested in the federating units. According to them, Section 162 should be amended so that the federating units will pay taxes to the Federal Government from the resources available in those areas. The derivation principle will no longer apply since the units will have total control and ownership of the resources. Other issues that need to be addressed include devolution of power; control of Local; Council and autonomy; restructuring of the polity; prison reforms; management of Federation Account; human rights and rights of women and less privileged; status of traditional rulers, and the electoral system. Former Nigerian Bar Association President, Mr Oluwarotimi Akinredolu (SAN), said the problem is not necessarily with the law book, but with the operators. “I always believe that there are more things wrong with the operators than the document itself. We can amend the document but the problem is much more with the people.” He added: “There is need for a total reorientation from the head to the bottom. The people operating it are the politicians; they are the ones messing everything up. The political class is a disaster to this country, which is the problem that we have now. They are the ones operating the constitution; they are the ones messing it up.” Chairman, NBA Legislative Advocacy

Group, Okey Wali (SAN), said a piecemeal approach would be better. “There is an urgent and imperative need to amend the Constitution as it were. But I don’t support a holistic amendment because you cannot have a perfect document anywhere in the world. There is always room for improvement. “Let us take them and amend the laws in piecemeal as the situation demands. As the challenges arise, we amend the laws to address them. Several countries have amended and reviewed their constitutions systematically and in piecemeal, and they came out good out of it. Even if you do a holistic review today, by tomorrow, you will see the need for further amendments. “We have to review and amend the law small, small, with ease. Holistic approach to the amendment will cause unnecessary delays and hardship for the Nigerian masses and cause unnecessary setback for the implementation of good and viable policies that will improve the living standard of the people.” Mr Chuks Muoma (SAN) said: “Let there be resource control like we had it in the past. In a true federalism you have resource control; states control their own resources and pay royalties and tax to the Federal Government. But a situation where the Federal Government captures everything and pays out charitable handouts to the oil-producing states is unacceptable. “I believe in resource control. In the 1963 Constitution, Eastern Nigeria controlled palm oil and palm kernel; Western Nigeria controlled her cocoa and Northern Nigeria controlled its groundnuts and with this we were able to develop the country and not

•Akeredolu

much was stolen, but now some people are stealing the oil money.” Former NBA General Secretary, Mr Rafiu Rabana (SAN), said: “Luckily, all the shortcomings in our constitution have been tested in a lot of litigations which has put a lot of the controversial aspects to rest. For instance, the provisions that have to do with the impeachment of governors by Houses of Assembly which was very rampant between the year 2000 and 2007. The courts came heavily down to interpret the sections dealing with impeachment proceedings and that laid to rest, that reckless exercise by various Houses of Assembly. “We have also seen the courts coming out to say that INEC does not have power to disqualify candidates in election. So, most of the contentious areas are being tested by court pronouncements, effectiveness and proper interpretation of the laws.” Executive Director, the Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP), Mr Adetokunbo Mumuni, a lawyer, said: “It is clear that the socio-economic condition of the vast majority of Nigerians have witnessed overwhelming degeneration within the last decade in spite of democracy. “An amendment of the Constitution that will be of fundamental moment and meaning to the vast majority of Nigerians in my humble and considered view is that which will impact positively on the socio-economic life Nigerians. “The starting point therefore is to make the provisions of the present Chapter Two relating to fundamental objectives and directive principles of state policy compulsory, entrenched, enforceable, and justiceable as the provisions of Chapter Four dealing with civil and political rights.” Constitutional lawyer, Mr Theophilus Akanwa, said: “I am of the opinion that Section 308 has caused more hardship and bad governance that any other section. It encourages corruption. Immunity clause should be abolished. Powers devoted to the Federal Government should be reduced to enable states and local governments execute programmes.” Lagos lawyer Mr Jonathan Iyieke said: “The issue is not the setting up of review panels. It has to do with sincerity in implementation of laws and applying correct legal sanctions. Whatever the reviews without the correct application of the law is useless and baseless.” Activist-lawyer, Mr Joe Nwokedi, is of the view that INEC should be separated from the executive in terms of appointment, remuneration and funding, otherwise the quest for credible election will continue to elude Nigeria. Nwokedi added: “The Southeast should be given one more state to assuage its quest and balance the structuring of the geo-political zones to reflect equity and fairness. Presidency should also be on rotation basis to prevent fear of domination and imbalance. Let us have zonal Vice President too. “Let the judiciary be completely independent of the executive in terms of appointment, remuneration and ratification so that judicial officers can do their job without fear of losing their jobs or being victimised.”


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LAW & SOCIETY

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‘Society must learn to tolerate ex-convicts’

EARS ago, the Civil Liberties Organisation (CLO) wrote a book: Behind the Walls detailing life in prison. It painted a black picture of how inmates are kept and treated. Some 20 years down the line, the situation is still the same. Prison life is harsh and brutish. Only the strong can survive in Nigeria prisons. Outside the prison, ex-convicts are not treated better. Many see them as outcasts who people should not have anything to do with. Can the people’s attitude ever change towards prisoners and ex-convicts? This was the question to which the Prison Fellowship International (PFI) sought an answer at a workshop in Lagos tagged: Informal social support system, security and nation building – Prison Ministry Model. Lagos State Governor Babatunde Fashola society can positively develop by reforming the attitudes of the citizens towards inmates and offenders. This, he said, should be done through a collective effort. Fashola, represented by Permanent Secretary, Lagos Television (LTV), Mr Lekan Ogunbanwo, said most Nigerians do not have a forgiving spirit and are unwilling to be associated with offenders in the society. “We all turn our backs on them and cringe at the thought of employing them. “Our society is a very angry one, which brings about the destruction and locking up of innocent victims all because we are not ready to forgive. Except people are willing to stand up and look those who offend them in the eye and forgive them despite what the judicial system has ruled, then we all need to be re-oriented,” he said. Fashola added that Nigeria lacked credible counselling institutions that can advice inmates and help them psychologically. “Apart from non-governmental organisations, we lack counselling institutions that should be run by retirees who are versatile, skilled and have experiences. These retirees should use their free time to counsel these inmates,” he said. “If we are ready to remove the stigma associated with released inmates, then we are willing to change the society positively. It is easy to forgive, but hard to practise it in Nigeria. Repairing the damage done to innocent victims and inmates has to start with the victim and not the prisons and judicial system alone. “We need to pay attention to ourselves so that we can stand as role models to the next generation. Our society needs help from within and not from the outside. This we can do by joining our efforts to reform our offenders and forgive them,” he said. Comptroller-General of Nigeria Prisons Service, Mr. Olusola Ogundipe, said the lack of employment leads to youths ending up in

•From left: Iwuagwu; member PFI Canada, David Peck; member, PFI Washington D.C, Dan Van Ness; Anglican Arch Bishop of Enugu, Rt Rev Emmanuel Chukwuma and Chuks Iriegu at the event By Abike Hassan

jail. “Lack of jobs has led our youths to terrorism, manufacturing of bombs, suicide bombers and kidnapping. When we do eventually catch them, we treat them as lepers and don’t want to associate ourselves with them,” he said. According to Ogundipe, as of May 2011, there are 48, 473 inmates in Nigeria with a lot of awaiting trial cases. He said Ikoyi Prisons held up to 2, 000 inmates that were meant for 800 inmates. “If one wants to know how a society functions, then he/she should look at the state of its prisons. We are easily molested and intimidated in Nigeria and as such our inmates are molested

and are not often given a right to justice. “If the rights of the citizens are expressed freely, then the prisoners will also have a right to access the judicial system. Each prisoner should have a right to free and fair hearing and not be denied of his/her right. “As long as an offender has not been pronounced guilty, then it is our right to protect him/her from injustice. It is our mandate to those with pending cases to be well-attended to and treated psychologically. This is because most of the inmates are suffering from psychotic problems,” he said. He urged the government and Nigerians to develop a human contact with offenders in the society.

‘When an affluent celebrity abuses the trust reposed in him and manages to be tried and convicted, he is welcomed out of prison with drums and dancing. But when the poor comes out of prison, he is despised, stigmatised, ostracised and rejected’

Executive Director, Prison Fellowship Nigeria, Benson Iwuagwu said the high rate of prison over-crowding makes impossible the attainment of minimum standards in the treatment of prisoners. Programmes and projects should be explored to make the prisons a correctional and transformational institution, he said. “The issue of crime and imprisonment are global. We must make our prisons a humane custodial place, suitable for correctional and reformatory interventions. The crime pre-disposing factors in our environment are unemployment, the widening gap between the rich and the poor, socio-economic deprivations and selective justice. “When an affluent celebrity abuses the trust reposed in him and manages to be tried and convicted, he is welcomed out of prison with drums and dancing. But when the poor comes out of prison, he is despised, stigmatised, ostracised and rejected. “If our leaders are not accountable, how can we progress as a nation? We should be challenged to strengthen our common platform for cross-fertilisation of ideas and promotion of best practices in prison ministry and criminal justice,” he said.

AT THE 2011 FINALS OF MFON USORO LAWYERS TABLE TENINS CHAMPIONSHIP AT THE NATIONAL STADIUM, LAGOS

From left: Enitan Oshodie, Men over all winners, Oduwale Olawale, Mfon Usoro and women overall winner, Titilayo Osagie with her trophy

•Efe Etami and Chairman, NBA Lagos branch Taiwo Taiwo

•Lagos State Sports Commissioner, Enitan Oshodi and Secretary NBA Lagos, Alex Muoka

•Onwuka igwe and Roosevelt Ogbonna


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

LAW & SOCIETY

‘She was a walking librarian’

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T was a moment of joy as family, former colleagues and friends gathered at the foyer of the Lagos State High Court, Igbosere Road, Lagos Island, to honour the court’s retiring Director of Library Services, Mrs Flora Koleoso. She is bowing after serving in the state judiciary for 35 years. Chief Judge of Lagos, Justice Inumidun Akande, said Mrs Koleoso would be missed. She described her as a caring mother who was dedicated to her job. Justice Akande, represented by the Chief Registar, Mr Ganiyu Safari, added that Mrs Koleoso is leaving indelible marks in the state judiciary. “You have run a good race,” she said. Former Chief Judge of Lagos, Justice Samuel Ilori, under whom Mrs Koleoso also served, said she knew her job. “I am pleased to say that she was herself a walking library. Just give her a hint of what the book is about, and she brings it to you. At some point, she and her boss were my speech writers. “She is retiring without facing the EFCC or the ICPC and without being probed. I know as

Stories by Joseph Jibueze

you go out you will excel,” Justice Ilori said. He urged judiciary workers to emulate Koleoso by giving their best so that they would be remembered after they leave. Chairman, Judiciary Staff Union of Nigeria (JUSUN), Lagos Branch, Mr Olusegun Adekanye, said Mrs Koleoso always stood by her colleagues and never blocked their progress. “She is very intelligent, punctual and available when needed. She has never been a stumbling block to the growth of any staff. She even assisted junior colleagues in scaling through their promotional interviews. And she always supported our association.” Director of Finance and Administration, Mrs Yetunde Odejayi, in her welcome address, said Mrs Koleoso was an exemplary staff who gave her best. She wished her success in retirement. Mrs Koleoso thanked all those who helped her to succeed in her career and who stood by her all the way. She prayed for God’s rich blessings upon them. Goodwill messages also came from representatives of the magistrates and the bar.

•Justice Funmilayo Atilade and Justice Ilori (rtd)

•Mrs Odejayi and Mr Safari

•Justice Lateefat Oluyemi and Mrs Koleoso

PHOTOS: NNEKA NWANERI

•Deputy Chief Registrar (DCR) Special Duties, Rasaq Oluyimi and DCR Administration, Magistrate Tajudeen Elias

Fashola warns public servants against incurring judgment-debt liabilities

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NY senior public officer who through negligence incurs judgment-debt liability against Lagos State will be held responsible, Governor Babatunde Fashola has said. He said due process must be followed in disciplining errant officers to avoid unnecessary litigations. Fashola spoke at a one-day workshop organised by the Directorate of Advisory Services, Ministry of Justice, for Permanent Secretaries, State Counsel, Directors of Finance and Administration and other management staff. The governor, represented by the Attorney-General and Commissioner for Justice, Mr Ade Ipaye, noted that increasing litigations against the government over allegations of wrongful and unlawful dismissals have become worrisome. It had the theme: Attaining Excellent Disciplinary Standard and Avoiding Government Liability in Employer/Employee Dispute. “The government cannot continue to pay and be responsible for such acts,” Fashola said.It was the second in the series of such workshops. Ipaye said the government was worried about public officers who delay or fail to give essential information to litigation officers. This, he said, has led to the government paying avoidable compensations. Fashola, Ipaye said, has directed that officers who fail to work with law officers in defending the state should be reported to him. “His Excellency has given an express directive that if there is default in response

either to a petition by a private citizen or advice of Ministry of Justice by anyone, I, as the Commissioner for Justice, should take it up at our Executive Council level. “It means I don’t have the liberty to keep such default to myself any longer,” Ipaye said. Solicitor-General and Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Justice, Mr Lawal Pedro (SAN) urged Ministries, Departments and Agencies (MDAs) to collaborate more with his ministry to prevent the burden of judgment-debts. He said there had been instances where the government had to reinstate workers, with full benefits and arrears, five to 10 years after they were dismissed. “We have situations where the court has ordered the re-instatement of officers who had been dismissed from service for over 10 years and for the payment of their arrears of salaries, including the restoration of their promotions,” Pedro said. Avoiding such liabilities, he noted, is one way to save money and time and protect the state’s integrity. Pedro attributed such court-ordered reinstatements to the failure of some principal officers to take appropriate steps to discipline errant workers. He said even some workers who were due for dismissal, had to be recalled because appropriate disciplinary steps were not taken against them. Chairman, Lagos State Civil Service Commission, Dr Olujobi Ososanya, represented by Mr Israel Alagbe, said arbitration could also be explored in settling such disputes.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

36

FROM THE COURT LAW AND PUBLIC POWER

with gabriel AMALU email:gabrielamalu1@yahoo.com

•From left: Ukpi Itiza, Augustine Odokuma, James Bathnna, Musdapher; Prof Azinge, Charity Addingi, Prof Paul Idornigie, Eze David Okorie and Prof Chinedu Obiora Okafor, during the visit to the CJN

Institute partners Supreme Court on justice delivery HE Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, (NIALS) has promised to assist the Supreme Court to review its rules for speedy and efficient delivery of justice. The Director-General, Prof Epiphany Azinge (SAN), made the pledge when he led a team of NIALS staff on a courtesy call on the Acting Chief Justice of Nigeria (CJN), Justice Dahiru Musdapher . Azinge said: “My Lord, may I on behalf of management and staff of the Nigerian Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, warmly congratulate you on your well deserved appointment as the Acting Chief Justice of Nigeria. “Let me place on record the fact that the Institute is privileged and indeed, proud that successive Chief Justices of Nigeria have always emerged from sitting Chairman of Council of the Institute. You can therefore appreciate our eagerness to pay this courtesy call and felicitate with you as you ascend to the pinnacle of your judicial career by virtue of this appointment. “From our close interaction with you as our Chairman of Council, we can attest to your leadership skills, your strictness, your desire and determination to succeed in any task you embark upon and your commitment to excellence, your unwavering devotion to an independent judiciary and your quest for the enthronement of the judiciary as the bastion of constitutional democracy in Nigeria. “These are qualities and attributes that you undoubtedly need to confront the challenges

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ahead of you as you assume the mantle of leadership of the judiciary of the most populous country in Africa. Our prayer is that God will imbue you with wisdom, courage and discerning mind to take the right decisions at all times. “Your appointment has coincided with the time the Institute has just published its maiden edition of NIALS Journal of Supreme Court Review – a journal solely dedicated to analyse judgements of the Supreme Court and highlight obvious inconsistencies and contradictions therein. “This is predicated on the belief that the Supreme Court should be bold enough to overrule itself at the shortest notice rather than perpetrating its errors. We agree with your brother, Hon, Justice Chukwudifu Oputa (rtd) that the Supreme Court is final not because it is infallible but is infallible because it is final.” “My Lord, your appointment providentially, has come about at a time when we are researching comprehensively on the Supreme Court. The thrust of our research includes the evolution of the Supreme Court and its constitutional powers, profile of Justices, case flow management, judgements and judicial reasoning of Justices of the Court, recruitment and tenure of Justices, judicial integrity and performance evaluation, analysis of valedictory statements of retired Justices of the Supreme Court, Independence of the judiciary, capacity building of Justices, research fa-

cilities and infrastructural developments, Supreme Court and election petitions and public perception of judgements of the Supreme Court. “Our target is to conclude the research during your tenure as Chief Justice of Nigeria and publish our findings as our contributions to the reform of the Supreme Court. The Institute will be readily available to review the rules of the Supreme Court to help in speedy dispensation of Justice at the apex court. “We are looking forward with relish the prospect of your delivering NIALS Fellows Lecture on the November 10, 2011. It is instructive that this will be the first time in the 32 years history of the Institute that a serving or sitting Chief Justice of Nigeria will be delivering the Fellows Lecture of the Institute. We are happy that the lecture will enable my Lord to speak to the nation on the reform of the Judiciary, the road map for shifting the frontiers of Law, rebuilding public confidence in the Judiciary and redefining the role of the Judiciary as the bastion of Constitutional Democracy. “The nation eagerly awaits what, ultimately, will be the defining moment of your judicial career as you chart a path of glory for yourself and the Nigerian Judiciary through the Fellows lecture. “What you can be sure of, my lord, is that the Institute will stand shoulder to shoulder with you as you perform the functions of your office as Acting Chief Justice of Nigeria.”

•From left: A Magistrate, Mrs Ariyike Ipaye-Nwachukwu; Director of Accounts, Lagos State Judiciary, Mrs Adesola Olufowobi and Mr Napoleon Ogbeide, at a send-off for Mrs Koleoso (See page 33)

Placing premium on National security

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RESIDENT Goodluck Jonathan’s charge at the passing out parade of the Nigerian Defence Academy, Kaduna, last Saturday that the Federal Government will place premium on national security ordinarily should be reassuring to Nigerians. This is because security of lives and properties has become the greatest challenge of governance in Nigeria today, and section 14(2)(b) of the 1999 constitution as amended says that security and welfare of the people shall be the primary purpose of government. Before his Kaduna declaration, the President had shown this new resolve when he directed the Chief of Defence Staff (CDS) to take over security in the troubled city of Jos. Obviously, the President would have come to the painful conclusion that the crisis in Jos, which long ago went beyond Police action, may also have gone beyond the challenge of the army, hence the new mandate to a combination of the armed forces, through their chief. Mr President would have been distressed that the soldiers deployed to return sanity to the wanton killing in Jos, like the police have, so far, proved unsuccessful. So the President may have played his last card, his ultimate joker if you like, by handing over the city’s security to the Chief of Defence Staff. Our common prayers should be that the president’s best hand should solve this internal strife. But while we are praying, the President must begin to worry at the palpable inefficiency of the Nigerian Police, and how the country has degenerated to resolving internal disputes using those whose primary responsibility is to protect external aggression against the country - the armed forces. It may be easy for him to say that his predecessors, particularly President Obasanjo, used this measure with lethal consequences during his Presidency. It would also be right to say that the authorities have reacted in the past by creating new agencies to deal with security challenges arising from economic and political corruption. While the creation of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), Independent Corrupt Practices Commission (ICPC), and now about to be armed Civil Defence Organisation, are attempts at solving this problem, experience so far has shown, that they are not any substitute for an efficient policing required in any modern society. While they concentrate on economic crimes against the state, what about crimes committed against individuals and private organisation. As experience has shown people try to steer private disputes to meet the mandates of these specialised agencies as they are cock sure that the regular police would likely compromise their complaints. No doubt, Mr President such as his predecessors, would have had the best information on the challenges of theNigerian Police. As chief, security officer he would have tried out some of the recommendations with minimal efficiency. Like many have argued, including this writer, the basic fundamentals like intelligence gathering, a motivated workforce, and modern technology may all be part of the problem. But as many have also wondered, are these enough to strangulate the growth of the policing capacities of our country, despite the huge resources that are yearly budgeted for that? So the question would be, is the fault with us, or in our stars. The call for state police as a viable alternative has also received mixed reactions. While many have expressed fear that partisan interest would truncate the benefits, others fear possible abuse by governors and other local interests. Yes, these fears may be genuine, but it appears to be the inevitable road. But as our numerous security emergences await a new thinking and strategy, our political leaders would also need to change their ways to help alleviate the near loss of faith in this basic requirement of a modern society. The fire-fight against insecurity in our country is also compounded by the celebration of corruption in high places. One distressing single from the state capitals across the country is the total lack of interest by the governors and legislators to lead the economic challenges facing their states by example. Apart from Rochas Okorocha, the Governor of Imo State, l am not aware of any other governor, who has openly denounced the unconstitutional appropriation of billions of naira belonging to the state, as security vote. If not that the entire national leadership has been compromised security vote, any governor or President who spends money not listed in an appropriation act would be due for impeachment. As I have argued on this page, there is no justification for governors and legislators and other public officials in the states to be paid the same salary across the states; since all the states are not equally endowed in terms of resources. Unfortunately, states only remember that they are not equally endowed when it comes to determining what to pay to workers. What I had expected was that those governors whose state are listed as incapable of paying the minimum wage, would lead by example, first by declaring what they currently earn, and then going ahead to slash it. States can also make budgetary provision for security, as against the governors drawing huge unbudgeted sums as security vote. The avowal by the Senate President that they would engage in another round of constitutional amendment should provide the nation the opportunity to deal with some of these challenges. A state police is inevitable. Also the devolution of economic rights to the states should be treated as an emergency. The salaries of public officials in the state should also not be determined centrally. While we await redemption and efficiency in our policing capabilities, the leadership of Nigerian Police should stop the extortions on the highways in the name of providing security to our beleaguered country.


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

ENERGY THE NATION

E-mail:- energy@thenationonlineng.net

NDPHC to raise power generation by Oct By Emeka Ugwuanyi

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• Osogbo facility

Nigeria attains 4242 MW power generation T

HE ongoing reform in the power sector seems to be yielding dividends as the country broke the jinx of surpassing 4,000 megawatts (MW). Power generation last Friday hit 4,242.7MW. The Minister of Power Prof. Barth Nnaji encouraged some big manufacturing concerns in the country, such as the Nigerian Brewery Plc that voluntarily withdrew from the grid to reenter into the public power service system to make their business more profitable. Nnaji, who spoke in Abuja yesterday at the stakeholders’workshop with the

INSIDE • Diversify energy

sources, experts tell Lagos

•••Page 38

• ‘How promoters

frustrated Amakpe Refinery project’ •••Page 39

• Sambo woos

workers, labour on power reform •••Page 40

By Emeka Ugwuanyi

theme: Toward Stability in Power Sector, said it was cheery news. He added that President Goodluck Jonathan did not waver as far as the power sector was concerned. “Even at the risk of provoking powerful and entrenched interests benefitting from the status quo that could easily mobilise forces against him, he demonstrated convincingly that the ongoing power sector reform could not be compromised,” he said. Nnaji in his paper entitled The will to do the right thing, said: “On Friday, September 17, 2011, Nigeria attained the highest quantum of power ever. We achieved 3,982.7MW. This figure does not include the 260MW maintained as spinning reserve, which is used for system stability. I am glad to report that all the 3,982.7MW now produced in Nigeria goes into the national grid without difficulty. “In other words, the attained generation is now 4,242.7MW. Nigeria used to experience an average of four system collapses every month, that is, almost 50 system failures annually. Much as we have reduced the failures in the last one year, our goal is to reduce them to zero. I must add, however, that some of the failures are caused by factors beyond our control, like a sudden shortage of gas supply to a power generation facility.” He noted that there are credible reports of a noticeable improve-

ment in power supply in many parts of the country. “We are expecting an additional 10MW from the Delta Power Station in Ughelli, Delta State, this month, plus 120MW later in the year, thus bringing the quantum of power from this plant to 470MW. This improvement will still leave us with a shortfall of 430MW because the station’s installed capacity is 900MW. From its sister power station in Sapele, we are expecting an additional 100MW this year, raising supply from this station to 252MW. Still, there will be a shortfall of 768MW because the installed capacity of the station is 1,020MW. “We have a programme to recover as soon as possible lost capacities at Egbin, Kainji and other places. The 760MW Kainji hydro station, built in 1968, has never been overhauled. But some of its units which are out of use are now undergoing rehabilitation. “Coupled with the scheduled launching of some plants being built under the National Integrated Power Project (NIPP), we are optimistic of achieving the target of 5,000MW this year and hit 6,000MW in 2012. We are not preoccupied with just power generation, but also committed to the development of the entire value chain in the power sector,” he said. He said President Jonathan has approved the implementation of the Super Grid transmission infrastructure. This, he said will have the capacity to wheel the entire

OIL PRICES SEPT 9 -SEPT 16

Light Crude

Source: Rigzone.com

Brent Crude

• Nnaji

nation’s power when the 765kv super grid is installed. “This will make Nigeria have a cutting edge technology which even many advanced countries have not yet acquired. As a government, we are determined to be proactive. Yet, we have resisted the temptation to roll out the drums because Nigeria is still far from where the Jonathan administration would like it to be, in terms of electricity. “With the gradual but steady improvement in power, we expect a dramatic increase in the demand for electricity because our nation currently experiences significant suppressed demand. We expect big manufacturing firms like Nigerian Breweries plc to rejoin the national grid; the NB Plc voluntarily withdrew several years ago from the national grid because of the enormous damage regularly done to its expensive machines and parts by constant outages. Even for wealthy multinationals, such as the Nigerian Breweries it is very costly to self-generate electricity 24 hours everyday. “Power supply in Nigeria can only get better. And this development will have a tremendous multiplier effect on all facets of our national existence. It will soon be a new day in our nation. In the words of the British Prime Minister, Donald Cameron, Nigeria is a dream waiting to be realised. We cannot agree more. • Continued on page 38

HE management of the Niger Delta Power Holding Com pany (NDPHC), which oversees activities of the National Integrated Power Project (NIPP), is making efforts to wheel more power into the grid from some of the projects before end of October. Our correspondent gathered from a source at the company, that the focus of the management is to bring on stream Alaoji, Sapele and Olorunsogo power plants by next month. “Although it is not possible to bring the whole installed capacities into operation but what we are striving for, is to ensure that some units from the plants are generating into the grid. “Our concern now is not about how many megawatts to be generated from the plants but what efforts we are making to improve electricity supply. Our target is to ensure that Mr President launches generation from the three plants before end of October,” the source said. He said the company has already secured licences from the regulator – Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC) to enable it generate electricity from the power stations. Already megawatts are being generated from Olorunsogo and are being injected into the grid. Alaoji Power Station, the biggest plant among the NIPP project, has installed capacity of 1074MW. It has four gas turbines and two steam turbines. The NIPP was originally conceptualised as seven medium sized power stations in the Niger Delta area because that is where the gas is. The first project was to capture the requirements for those power stations but eventually one couldn’t go through, which was planned for the steel company, the Aladja Steel Company. The privatisation process was on then and those who bought that company didn’t want a power station built there, so instead of seven it became six. The source said: “The entire Niger Delta area cannot consume that power. It was necessary therefore, to ensure that Nigerians who have been contributing together to do the project benefit and the only way to achieve that is to secure transmission projects across the nooks and crannies of this country and also to do distribution projects in all relevant areas to ensure that power gets to you and me in the quality and the quantity that will make Nigeria a better place. That was what brought about the kind of scope that we have, but even then the government now saw more value in the programme, six power stations will only give us 2000 megawatts and Nigeria needed much more than that.” The country’s requirements are in the region of 10,000 megawatts. So the existing power stations the Federal government had done were added to the initial six. These new ones include Geregu, Omotoso, Olorunsogo and Alaoji. Alaoji was completely transferred from PHCN to NIPP, it was originally a Federal government project but given to NIPP to complete.


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

ENERGY

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• Mrs. Diezani Alison-Madueke, Minister of Petroleum Resources (left), and Godswill Akpabio, Governor of Akwa Ibom State, after they were conferred with honorary degrees by the Nigerian Defence Academy (NDA) in Kaduna on Saturday.

Diversify energy sources, experts tell Lagos T

HE National Centre for En ergy Efficiency and Conser vation (NCEEC) and the Energy Commission of Nigeria (ECN) have advised the Lagos State Government on the need to diversify its sources of energy supply to adequately meet the state’s energy needs. The two energy bodies gave the advice to the Lagos State Commissioner for Energy and Mineral Resources, Taofik Tijani, an engineer, at a workshop they organised in Lagos. Speaking at the event, the Director, National Centre for Energy Efficiency and Conservation (NCEEC), Prof Wole Adegbenro, advised the commissioner to look into development of the renewable sources of energy. He said: “Now that Lagos has a Ministry of Energy, the state stands a great chance of developing the energy sector to boost its economy. But I think the ministry under the watch of the commissioner, Taofik Tijani, should look beyond the non-renewable sources including crude oil, gas and coal which is advancing. “The state should focus on the renewable sources such as solar, waste and wind. This is because of the immense potentials in this area. For instance, Lagos, according to available statistics, produces 9, 000 tonnes of waste per day and 65 per cent of the waste is organic while the rest is inorganic. “Of this total, about 80 per cent is recyclable, buts only 18 per cent is being recycled. This shows enormous potential for waste-to-

By Bidemi Bakare

energy project in the state. So, the ministry would have to collaborate with the ministry of environment so that this opportunity can be exploited. “It is the same with the wind and tidal source. Findings have shown that with its extensive coastline, Lagos State has the capacity to generate energy from wind and tidal waves.Already, wind information data for the state is now available. And so by using the software developed by Lahmeyer International and Federal Ministry of Science and Technology, it is possible to estimate the wind energy potential for the state.” He also urged the commissioner to step up effort at encouraging the culture of energy efficiency and conservation among the citizens. “Energy efficiency, conservation and renewable Energy are the twin pillars of sustainable energy policy. The idea is to prevent the energy from being converted to an unwanted form or being wasted because direct energy generation by whichever means, whether from renewable or non-renewable sources, costs a lot and could take several years in planning and implementation. “Such efficiency measures include the use of CFLs and refrigerators and air-conditioners with energy star labels. The conservation measures include switching off lights

when they are not in use, using natural day-lighting, unplugging unused appliances instead of leaving them on stand-by. The ministry and the ministry of information should be at the forefront of propagating this message,” he added. The Centre also drew the attention of the commissioner to areas that have to be focused upon. For instance, the revival of the Lagos State Electricity Board to enhance achievements made by the state in power projects such as the Akute Power Project at Iju Waterworks and the Island Power Project at Marina and also the Elsewedy Transformer factory located at Badagry, which is the first transformer manufacturing factory in Nigeria. The centre also noted that having worked for 30 years in the energy industry, including the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC), the commissioner should bring his wealth of experience to putting in place strategies for realising the key priorities and objectives of the energy sector master plan recently developed by the Lagos State. The master plan, among other things, seeks provision of reliable alternative to the current erratic power supply by the Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN) and also to fully exploit all the necessary hydrocarbon resources including natural gas, condensates, bitumen and crude oil. Others are the reversal of urban decay, reduction of maintenance costs and reduction of environmental pollution caused by self generation through generating sets.

Oil price gains on European debt plan

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IL headed for a fifth weekly gain in London, the longest winning streak since March, on bets that a plan to contain Europe’s debt crisis would help shore up fuel demand. Brent advanced after the European Central Bank said it worked with the USnited States, UK, Japan and Switzerland to extend three-month loans to euro-area banks. The 17 euro nations accounted for about 12 percent of global oil demand in 2010, according to Bloomberg calculations based on BP Plc’s Statistical Review of World Energy. U.S. crude stockpiles dropped after Tropical Storm Lee closed platforms in the Gulf of Mexico, according to a September 14 Energy Department. “European politicians seem to be doing whatever they can to calm the

market, and to avoid further speculation about debt- burdened countries,” said Thina Saltvedt, an analyst at Nordea Bank AB in Oslo. “Hurricane activity in the Gulf of Mexico has picked up lately and caused a short-term draw-down in stocks.” Brent oil for November settlement gained as much as $1.50, or 1.3 percent, to $113.80 a barrel on the London-based ICE Futures Europe Exchange and was at $112.75. The October contract rose $2.94 to $115.34 on Friday, when it expired. Crude for October delivery on the New York Mercantile Exchange was down 34 cents at $89.06 a barrel. The contract on Thursday rose 49 cents to $89.40. Prices were up 2.1 per cent last week, its fourth straight gain, and 19 percent higher in the past year. The European benchmark was at a

premium of $23.51 to West Texas Intermediate November futures, compared with a record $26.87 on September 6 based on front-month settlement prices. Brent, which has risen 45 per cent in the past year and 1.6 per cent this week, may be headed for $150 a barrel, according to chart analysis by Citigroup Inc. Oil stockpiles in developed nations fell below their five- year average in July, the first time since the 2008 recession, and were expected to have fallen further in August, the International Energy Agency said on September 13. The lack of supply from Libya and production outages in areas such as the North Sea caused inventories to fall in Europe and North America, while Asian companies held less crude than normal, the IEA said in its monthly report.

‘Energy planning key to Vision 2020’

NTIL Federal and State Gov ernments factor energy planning into their development plans, the dream of Nigeria becoming one of the 20 strong economies in the world by 2020 may be hard to realise. The Energy Commission of Nigeria (ECN) disclosed this at a workshop for energy professionals in Lagos. The Director-General of the commission, Prof Abubakar Sambo, said the use of modern energy modelling tools to adequately plan for energy demand and supply has become the trend among developed and fast growing economies, noting that the country cannot afford to act differently if it is to go far with her Vision 20:2020 goals. In his presentation entitled ‘The challenges of energy planning for ensuring enhanced national energy supply,’ Sambo who was represented by director,energy planning and analysis department, Oluyemi Ojosu, said since the country is endowed with abundant non-renewable energy sources such as coal and renewable energy sources that include solar, biomass, wind, small and large hydropower with potential for hydrogen fuel, geothermal, nuclear and ocean energies, there is a need to find the optimal mix of these fuels for the diversification of electricity supply in the country. He revealed that integrated energy planning is essential in achieving energy supply security adding that energy demand and, supply projections are key components of energy planning at all levels. Currently, he said energy demand outstrips the supply with attendant constraints on socio-economic growth. He noted that the two modeling tools being utilised for this planning are the Model for the Analysis of Energy Demand (MAED) and the Model for Energy Supply Strategy Alternatives and their General Environmental Impacts (MESSAGE). He said from the energy supply

By Bidemi Bakare

modeling mix for instance, it was gathered that large hydro source accounts for about 31.30 per cent of grid electricity generation while natural gas accounts for the balance. From projections, he disclosed that the share of hydropower (large and small) in the total installed capacity is expected to decrease from 31.30 per cent in 2005 to 11 per cent in 2030, while that of natural gas would increase from 68.30 per cent in 2005 to 82.15 per cent in 2010 and, thereafter, decrease to 62.95 in 2030. He added that coal and nuclear energy, which are not used for power generation, will account for 15.6 per cent and 6.7 per cent by 2030 while solar and wind energy are also projected to account for 8.3 per cent and 1.8 per cent by 2030. He stated that it is only with the projections from these models that an efficient planning can be done for the country to achieve her aspiration of adequate electricity supply required for industrial development. On what has been responsible for the low utilisation of other renewable energy sources for electricity generation unlike the large hydropower source, Sambo disclosed that major constraints, such as the absence of market and the lack of appropriate policy, regulatory and institutional framework to stimulate demand and attract investors and the high initial cost made the development and diffusion of renewable energy technologies difficult. He stated that these barriers needed to be eliminated for the potentials of these sources to be unleashed to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDG) and Vision 2020. The way to achieve this according to him, is through significant investment in research and development (R&D), indigenous capacity building and the intensification of on-going economic reforms to create investor-friendly environment by the signing of the renewable energy master plan into law.

Nigeria attains 4242MW power generation • Continued from page 37 “The will to do the right thing accounts for the resolve for the rigorous implementation of Service Level Agreements (SLAs) signed with all chief executive officers in the PHCN. The performance of the SLAs will determine the future of each CEO, and not lobbying or bribery. Each CEO is fully in charge of his PHCN successor company. Each

CEO will be rewarded when things are done properly, and will be made to carry the can when the expectations of the Nigerian people are not met. The era of undue interference by either the Federal Ministry of Power or the PHCN Corporate Headquarters in the affairs of the successor companies is over. This administration is not shy to do the right things so that Nigerians will enjoy uninterrupted power supply, even if it means stepping on toes.”

IEA stops oil releases from reserves

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HE International Energy Agency(IEA) is ending an emergency programme of releasing oil from rich-country reserves, which was meant as stop gap for supply disruptions occasioned by Libya’s war. The United States and 27 other countries agreed in June to release 60 million barrels of crude oil to the market to offset Libya-related disruptions, and stave off a spike in energy prices. The Paris-based agency, according to Associated Press, said Thursday that the collective action has been terminated. The IEA’s governing board “concluded that the interrupted Libyan supplies have been successfully addressed” by the collective release and increased production from producer countries. It also noted weakening growth in oil demand. Meanwhile, Libya would start oil

exports next week and its oil production may hit one million barrels per day within six months, says the country’s National Oil Corporation (NOC). The international oil markets have been deprived of the Libyan oil for the past seven months due war. The clash between rebels and Gaddafi loyalists still continues, but has subsided since he was dethroned. Oil producer Agoco had earlier said that they have restarted production ahead of the planned September 15 deadline. “Our problem is with equipment and not production. We have a management crisis team for safety and maintenance. It will cost hundreds of millions to do all the repairs, not billions,” the chairman of NOC told Reuters. “We should have enough oil for a one million barrel shipment from Tobruk in eight to ten days,” he added.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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ENERGY

Why Amakpe Refinery project failed to take-off, by govt

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HE Deputy Governor of Akwa Ibom State, Mr Nsima Ekere, has said the reason Amakpe Refinery failed is because of the insincerity of its promoters. Ekere, during an interaction with reporters, said it was unfortunate that the promoters have been unable to make progress in a project, which was meant to boost the economy by providing employment and encouraging local investors to establish downstream industries. He noted that the government has given the promoters a 21-day ultimatum to refund all money invested in the project or report their fraudulent dealings to appropriate anti-fraud authorities in Nigeria and America. He said attempts by the promoters to create the erroneous impression that Governor Godswill Akpabio should be blamed for the failure are disingenuous. Ekere explained that the refinery project was conceived in 1999 by its promoters, who sold the idea to the former Governor, Obong Victor Attah. He said: “One year later, Amakpe International Inc, came up with a cost estimate of $60 million in shares allocation and co-operation agreement and urged the state government to pick up three percent allocation of shares amounting to $3million of the project cost. “The government of Attah, though persuaded that the refinery was a good idea, doubted that the duo could come up with $57million counterpart funding, if it were to table its $3million and, therefore, declined to commit itself. It rather sought to merely facilitate the building of the refinery and paid $50,000 to the Department of Petroleum Resources for the licence to construct the refinery.” He said after four years with the promoters, and the discovery that the promoters lacked good faith and sincerity to honour agreements and convents entered into with the government, the former governor was compelled to order that they be sued and also to refund the money invested in the company to government. Narrating how the project got to this messy stage, Ekere noted that

• Govt issues 21-day ultimatum for refund By Jude Isiguzo

after obtaining a site along Mobil Qua Iboe Terminal Road in 2001, the investors urged the Akwa Ibom State Government to fence it around as part of its equity and N14, 666,250 was disbursed to them for this purpose. But when the natives complained of the environmental hazards, the site was relocated to Ikot Uso Ekong, on Eket-Oron Road. In the same year, they notified the state government that Ventech Engineers Inc had been engaged to build the refinery in two phases of 6,000 barrels each. Phase one, they said, would cost $17,139,961, it added. He said in 2002, the fears of the Attah administration over the incapacity of the investors to raise the money for the project were justified when they started a desperate search for project finance and approached First International Bank (FIB) of Hartford, Connecticut. The bank requested that the loan be guaranteed by US-Exim Bank and the US-Exim Bank on being approached requested that the Amakpe duo should secure a Nigerian Bank Guarantee in support of the refinery project first. In desperation they came to the Akwa Ibom State Investment and Industrial Promotion Council (AKIIPOC) and requested for their intervention to obtain a guarantee from a Nigerian bank. He said it was clear that between 1999 and 2003, the investors had not been able to meet any part of the cost of its execution. However, in spite of this, the government, in 2004, magnanimously spent N1, 541,031 extra to survey the Ikot Uso Ekong site. Ekere said: “Based on the development of a private placement memo on Amakpe by NAL Bank Plc, the bank made a representation to Amakpe to let AKIIPOC drive project implementation through representation on the expanded Board of Directors of the Company. Team Amakpe considered the proposition and sought

audience with Governor Attah, accompanied by Ventech Engineers. The meeting proved fruitful and Governor Attah directed that $10 million be deposited in an escrow account to give US-Exim Bank the comfort it needed. NAL Bank Plc was saddled with the responsibility of raising the balance of US$7 million. The sum total of this amount was for the part funding of the onshore cost of funding the project. This action triggered the release of US-Exim Bank guarantee to fund the construction of the refinery plant by Ventech Engineering. “The relationship with Governor Attah began to sour when Chief Amanam submitted a bill to the state government for the refund of $14,586, which he claimed were outof-pocket expenses incurred by him, Dr. Ikpe and Mr Jerry Stanley, for flight tickets to Nigeria. Governor Attah did not approve of the payment. The request for a refund of such a miserly amount by persons who were involved in multimillion dollar deal sent a warning signal to the government of the pecuniary situation of the investors and their incapacity to raise the funds for the project.” He noted that with release of US$10 million to NAL Merchant Bank Plc and credited to the account of Amakpe, the state government expected that project implementation would commence and run without hitches and also expected

that FIB would release the loan and Ventech would proceed to manufacture the refinery components. Ekere said, surprisingly, it was later discovered that the US$10 million which Amakpe unilaterally confiscated under the guise of turning it to equity had been used to settle debts by Amakpe. “This prompted the Attah Administration to notify Sterling Bank Plc that Akwa Ibom State Government was withdrawing from the refinery project. It stated reasons for the withdrawal to include, inability of the promoters to make progress, and government’s frustration of its investment in the company, which was meant to boost the economy by providing employment and encouraging local investors to establish downstream industries. Entreaties by Team Amakpe for the Government not to withdraw government’s investment fell on deaf ears as Governor Attah was worried by their non-performance. Ekere noted that Governor Attah had his Attorney-General and Commissioner for Justice institute a legal action in the Federal High Court against Amakpe Team to protect the tax payers’ money invested in the refinery and misappropriated by them. “The administration of Chief Godswill Obot Akpabio inherited this court case. Team Amakpe reached out to him, promised to turn a new leaf and pleaded with him to withdraw the case from

court. In a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed between them and the government after Governor Akpabio magnanimously decided to give them a second chance, they stated: “That Amakpe regrets the embarrassment caused the government and people of Akwa Ibom State, owing largely to the unintended communication breakdown.” The terms of the MoU reduced Government’s interest from US$10 million to US$6,250,000 and urged Amakpe to refund of $3,750,000 to the state government in two tranches. The first was paid as at when due on January 31, 2008, while the second one, which was to be paid on or before April 30, 2009, had not been paid till now. He said: “A quantitative analysis of the Amakpe situation lends itself to logic that they are not in a position to realise the Amakpe Refinery project. Already, they are indebted to UPS Capital/US EXIM Bank, Sterling Bank and the Nigerian Export-Import Bank amounting to US$24,600,000. While Government is trying to untie these Gordian knot and clean the Aegean stable known as Amakpe, its promoters are busy shopping around for buyers of the refinery. The Akwa Ibom State Government has had inquiries from other states in the Federation requesting for the status of Amakpe and intimating us that they have been approached by Chief Amanam and Mrs. Ikpe to come and buy the refinery.”

UN drops sanctions on Libyan oil firms

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HE United Nations Security Council has dropped sanctions on two Libyan oil companies and eased restrictions on four banks in a move to boost the nation’s recovery from the war that toppled dictator Muammar Qaddafi. The Security Council voted 15-0 to adopt a resolution that unfreezes the assets of the Libyan National Oil Corporation and Zueitina Oil Company. The measure permits the Central Bank of Libya, the Libyan Foreign Bank, the Libyan Investment Authority and the Libyan Africa Investment Portfolio to purchase humanitarian aid, fuel, electricity and to back efforts to strengthen the nation’s government and economy. The Hellenicshippingnews.com report quoted the U.S. Ambassador Susan Rice as saying: “We all stand witness to the birth of a new Libya,” referring also to the General Assembly’s decision to recognize the National Transitional Council as Libya’s representative at the UN. The UN members voted 114-17 to permit envoys of the opposition group to take Libya’s seat at meetings of the world body, including the General Assembly next week. Venezuela and Cuba led opposition to the move, and 15 nations abstained from the vote. The Qaddafi regime had retained

authority to represent Libya at the UN, though no diplomats have occupied the seat since February. President Barack Obama is scheduled to meet with the NTC’s chairman, Mustafa Abdel Jalil, this week. Obama plans to congratulate Abdel Jalil on the defeat of Qaddafi’s forces and to discuss transition plans, Ben Rhodes, Obama’s deputy national security adviser, said. Ibrahim Dabbashi, Libya’s deputy UN ambassador before he defected from the Qaddafi regime in February, represented Libya at the Security Council table. “Today is undoubtedly a decisive, historic day in the life of the Libyan people,” Dabbashi said. “It is an indication that dictatorship has fallen. A period of terror, of denial of freedom and of violations of human rights has now come to an end for the Libyan people. The fact that the NTC today takes Libya’s seat at the UN indicates that a new page has been opened in the history of the Libyan people.” The resolution eases the arms embargo on Libya, allowing the UN and the NTC to bring in light weapons. It ends the ban on all flights by Libyan aircraft. The Security Council also established a UN mission to promote economic recovery, restore public security and services, protect human rights and coordinate delivery of international aid.

• From left: Akwa Ibom State Commissioner for Education, Dr. Nseabasi Akpan; Deputy Governor, Mr Nsima Ekere and Head of Civil Service, Mrs. Cecilia Udoessien, during the opening ceremony of the Read and Write Now Initiative training programme for public primary school teachers in the state, at the Governor’s Office Annex, Uyo.

Rig demand improves in West Africa

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ITH much of Libya’s pro duction still offline and the North Sea’s maturity pointing to a secular production decline trend, developing resources that offer lighter grades of crude has become an imperative across the energy industry. We spotlight the waters off West Africa, where much of the product meets the qualitative demands of European refineries, as one of the primary regions where consensus points to ever-increasing exploration to satisfy the world’s appetite for oil. Demand for deepwater rigs should continue to trend favourably over the next two years. During 2010, the number of floaters active in the region averaged 23 rigs. In the most recent month completed, August 2011, 25 deepwater rigs were drilling off the coastline of West Africa or nearly a 10 percent increase over

last year. At its current pace, West Africa will likely only trail Brazil for the highest deepwater rig growth of any region tracked by RigLogix this year. One drillship and one semisub was mobilized to the West Africa region during August, bringing the total number of floaters actively marketed in the region up to 34 rigs. This fact explains why utilisation during August for floaters (at 74 percent) was 100 basis points below July’s level even though one additional floater was under contract during the month. Based on our RigLogix/RigOutlook proprietary forecasts, we are projecting steadily growing floater demand in the upcoming three years. Broken down into the two types of floating rigs (semisubs and drillships), West African utilisation for semisubs (19 marketed rigs) is

74 per cent, slightly off pace due to near-term vacancy. The drillship fleet, a tad smaller at 15 marketed rigs, has shown improvement with its utilization surging from the mid60s to the mid-70 per cent range. The jackup fleet is the largest of the three types in the region with 34 rigs marketed. With Addax recently expressing interest for a jackup in the region, there is a near-term opportunity for jackup utilization to expand beyond its current reading of 65 per cent. Over the next two years we are forecasting jackup demand in the region to grow by nearly 20 per cent. We would note that the political unrest, that at times tends to flare up in the region, does create some volatility for rig demand. Jackup rigs, which are typically positioned closer to shore than floaters, are the easiest targets for disruption.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

40

ENERGY

Sambo woos workers, labour on power reform

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ICE-PRESIDENT Mohammed Namadi Sambo has stressed the need for electricity workers, labour unions and entire populace to support the Federal Government on the ongoing reform in the power sector to advance its aspiration to making the country an industrialised nation. Sambo also stressed how the government values its workforce, especially those in the power sector. He noted the government’s efforts in accomplishing payment of monetisation benefits and agreement to increase salaries by 50 per cent as demanded by the workers, among other things. He told the workers that the power sector reform is a win- win deal for all and it is central to President Goodluck Jonathan’s transformation agenda. Trade unions in the power sector and, indeed, all Nigerians are enjoined to embrace it wholeheartedly, he added. Sambo, who spoke at the stakeholders’ workshop titled Toward stability in the power sector, in Abuja, explained to the labour unions in the power sector the need to support the reform. The unions have been kicking against the reform, which has altered achievements of milestones scheduled in the reform

• 99% PHCN staff paid monetised benefits By Emeka Ugwuanyi

programme. The Vice-President said: “This workshop is a major step in the effort to bridge the communication gap between the government and the labour unions in the power sector. I thank the Federal Ministry of Power, the Federal Ministry of Labour, the Bureau of Public Enterprises and the National Union of Electricity Employees, the Senior Staff Association of Electricity and Allied Companies, as well as the Nigeria Labour Congress. The organised labour and the government may sometimes take different approaches to issues in national development, but the goal has always been the same - the common good. All of us are committed to the future of our nation and the prosperity of its people. “The commitment of this administration to the welfare of power sector workers is well-established. Within one month, President Goodluck Jonathan became the substantive President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria in May, 2010, he went to the National Assembly to obtain approval for a

supplementary budget which contained a N57billion vote for the payment of monetised benefits to all Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN) employees. Although public sector workers were paid monetised benefits in 2003 when the Federal Government introduced the policy of monetised benefits, PHCN employees were somehow excluded from this payment. “This administration took the issue of the power sector and its workers so seriously that a meeting was held every Tuesday from June 2010, to May, 2011, to review progress reports on power, including the payment exercise. The President himself presided at each meeting, with my humble self as the Alternate Chairman. “We are pleased to announce that about 99 per cent of the PHCN staff, both serving and retired, have received their monetised benefits. The few, who have yet to get theirs are those with incomplete records or whose next of kin has not been ascertained. Once each case is sorted out, the payment will be made. There are still enough funds with the Central

Bank of Nigeria for this purpose. Worried about the plight of thousands of Nigerian citizens, who have for years worked as socalled casual employees in the power sector, this administration has decided that their appointments with the PHCN be regularized. These workers will receive their full benefits once their biometric data are completed. As a further demonstration of the current administration’s interest in the welfare of electricity workers, the government has also accepted the recommendation for a 50 per cent increase in the salary structure of the PHCN staff, despite the enormous economic challenges of the moment. The current administration inherited a huge wage bill of over N7 billion monthly for the PHCN staff; with the new increase, the monthly salary will escalate to over eleven billion naira. This is interestingly about the same amount the PHCN generates monthly. The leadership of the PHCN headquarters and of the successor companies will have to find creative ways to sustain this salary structure and still meet basic obligations to ser-

• Sambo

vice providers such as gas and electricity suppliers. He urged PHCN staff to invest in the 17 successor companies where the government is divesting, especially as President Jonathan has directed that a percentage of shares in the PHCN successor companies which are being privatised be reserved for the staff.

BP oil spill report may cost $30b

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• An oil platform

‘Tanker fixtures declined in August’

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N its report for Au gust, the Organisation of Petro leum Exporting Countries (OPEC) said after the gains experienced in the last few months, OPEC spot fixtures declined in August by six per cent. The decline was mainly driven by eastbound fixtures as some refineries were still in maintenance.

Compared to a year ago, spot fixtures declined by nine per cent. OPEC sailings were slightly down in August by one per cent or 0.22 million barrels per day (mbpd) compared to the previous month. On an annual basis, OPEC sailings showed a decline of four per cent in August. Middle East sailings decreased in August by 1.4 per cent from the previous month,

Domestic prices of petroleum products Companies

PMS

AGO

according to preliminary data. Initial estimates indicated that United States and West Asia arrivals decreased by 0.5 per cent and four per cent in August from the previous month, while Europe arrivals gained 0.6 per cent. The small gain in Europe was supported by higher Black and North Seas activity.

Energy prices Energy & Oil Prices OIL ($/bbl)

DPK

Conoil

65.00

160.00

140.00

AP

65.00

160.00

140.00

Total

65.00

160.00

140.00

Oando

65.00

160.00

140.00

Mobil

65.00

160.00

140.00

Texaco

65.00

160.00

140.00

Energy

65.00

160.00

140.00

Fagbems

65.00

160.00

140.00

Nipco

65.00

160.00

140.00

INDIGENOUS

INDINGS of the second major investigation by the government into last year’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill may press BP into putting over $30 billion on the table to quickly settle its outstanding legal headaches. According to Reuters, the joint Coast Guard and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement probe into the Macondo well blow-out which led to the death of 11 men and the biggest offshore oil spill in United States history, put most of the blame on BP. The report, released last week, was even more damning of BP’s behavior than the Presidential panel’s findings, which were issued in January and February. Both reports also highlighted mistakes made by BP’s contractors, driller Transocean and cement specialist Halliburton. The investigations have not left London-based BP eager to face the Department of Justice (DoJ) or civil claimants in court. “We would like everything settled as soon as we can, otherwise you have lingering reputation issues and investor uncertainty,” one insider said after the latest report. Companies often drag out litigation, as payments in the future have less value than payments now. Exxon Mobil fought claims related to the 1989 Valdez spill for almost 20 years, confident it could

PRICE* CHANGE % CHANGE TIME Nymex Crude Future Dated Brent Spot WTI Cushing Spot OIL (¢/gal)

87.96 114.38 87.96

-1.44 -0.18 -1.44

-1.61% -0.16% -1.61%

09/16 09/16 09/16

PRICE* CHANGE % CHANGE TIME Nymex Heating Oil Future Nymex RBOB Gasoline Future NATURAL GAS ($/MMBtu)

300.89 278.41

-1.57 0.13

-0.52% 0.05%

09/16 09/16

PRICE* CHANGE % CHANGE TIME Nymex Henry Hub Future 3.81 Henry Hub Spot 3.84 New York City Gate Spot 3.99 ELECTRICITY ($/megawatt hour)

-0.07 -0.20 -0.23

-1.78% -4.95% -5.45%

09/16 09/16 09/16

PRICE* CHANGE % CHANGE TIME Mid-Columbia,firm on-peak,spot 31.23 0.78 2.56% 09/15 Palo Verde, firm on-peak, spot 35.55 -3.26 -8.40% 09/15 BLOOMBERG, FIRM ON-PEAK, DAY AHEAD SPOT/ERCOT HOUSTON 41.25 -12.69 -23.53% 09/15 • Bloomberg Oil Buyers Guide

beat down the massive sums sought by, and initially awarded to, its opponents. In the end, it was largely successful. But BP’s case is not seen to be as strong. The Valdez spill happened when a drunk captain guided his tanker onto a reef, while the official investigations put most of the blame for Macondo on BP management structures and decisions. The man hearing the civil damages claims against BP, Judge Carl Barbier, has set a February trial date. BP is likely to make a “significant” offer soon afterwards, the insider said. “I expect that early next year you will see the mother of all settlements,” another source close to the company said. BP estimates the cost of the oil spill will end up at around $42 billion, including all environmental costs, compensation, legal claims and fines. So far, it has spent around $25 billion. It has paid around $7 billion to compensate fishermen, hoteliers and cruise ship owners, mainly through the $20 billion fund it created under President Barack Obama’s direction, and expects to pay out another $7.4 billion, according to its regulatory filings. Lawyer Brent Coon, who is representing some of the claimants, says that from what he has seen, actual economic damages could be much higher. “So far they’ve been handling mainly the smaller cases.” Coon sees BP being forced to pay out another $10-20 billion to cover economic claims. Some legal experts believe the total could even be much higher. BP’s provision also includes $3.5 billion related to Clean Water Act fines. But if BP is found to have been grossly negligent, which it denies, it could be fined over $21 billion. Even before the conclusion of the highly critical official investigations, the government indicated it would press for the higher level of fines associated with gross negligence. However, the oil industry lobby’s growing strength in recent months, combined with the Obama administration’s wish to see the case resolved well before presidential elections in November 2012 could mean the DoJ accepts a discount to the maximum fine.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

43

HEALTH THE NATION

E-mail:- health@thenationonlineng.net

Efforts made to reduce the effects of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and other related diseases in Nigeria are being intensified. WALE ADEPOJU, who was at the tripartite meeting of the Nigerian Communications Company (NCC), the National Agency for the Control Aids (NACA) and telecommunications companies where it was agreed that a toll-free National Call Centre would help reduce the disease burden, reports.

How information from free-toll call centres can reduce HIV/AIDS

•From left: Director, Finance, NACA, Mr Nsikak Ebong; Director, Resource Mobilisation Dr Emmanuel Alhassan, and Prof Idoko

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O further reduce misconceptions surrounding HIV and AIDS, and avail people living with the disease with prompt care and attention, the National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) is exploring Information Communication Technology (ICT). Statistics from NACA showed that only 24 per cent of the country’s youths, under the productive age are knowledgeable about how to prevent the disease, which calls for more awareness. Rural dwellers are worst hit because the disease is more prevalent among them, hence its decision to go hightech to curb the disease. At the moment, the disease prevalence in the country is 4.1 per cent with 1.5 million people requiring anti-retroviral therapy (ART). NACA initiated a meeting with stakeholders in the ICT business in Nigeria at Eko Hotels and Suites, Lagos. They called for a toll-free National Call Centre. This, they argued, would help to scale up awareness on the disease and stop preventable deaths resulting from the disease. The meeting, which had the regulator of the industry, Nigerian Communications Company (NCC) and telecommunications companies represented, resolved to educate the public on ways to tackle the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) pandemic and other related diseases by educating the populace using the toll free medium. In the words of the United Nations Secretary-General, Ban Ki-moon: “Everybody

•Igoh and NCC Secretary Mr Felix Adeoye

must take ownership of his/ her health. Hence, the need to have a centre where people can call in to ask questions on HIV and AIDS and other related diseases”. The highlight of the meeting was the positive response given by the telecomm companies. The telecommunications companies agreed that there should be a short code that callers can use instead of dialing numbers. They agreed that the sort code centre

would serve the purpose for which it was established by educating the people on the preventive measures on the diseases. They said only trained personnel would respond to questions from the public. But the question is: will Nigerians avail themselves of the opportunity? NCC Chairman, Mr Peter Igoh, said: “It is a big step forward in the prevention and reduction of the disease.” Most of the people in the urban areas are

‘At the moment, the disease prevalence in the country is 4.1 per cent with 1.5 million people requiring anti-retroviral therapy (ART)’

informed and rural people now use mobile phone. So, it can get better with time. He said: “The telecoms companies have over 80 million subscribers. It is an opportunity to reach a wider population.” Igoh said telecoms companies and NACA agreeing to collaborate with NCC to help educate the public on the danger the diseases pose to families in the country and in other parts of the world was welcomed. He said his agency had been mandated to lead the process. This, he noted, was based on the agency’s demonstrated partnership with Airtel, which provided four toll free lines for telephone counselling in 2005. “Following the impressive result of the pilot project, it is being scaled up to a National Call Centre given that HIV/ AIDS is an entry point to other health issues and pivotal to achievement of all the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs),” he said. NACA Director-General, Prof John Idolo, said the strategy would help actualise the Federal Government Public-Private-Partnership (PPP) drive. He praised the telecom companies for their effort to support government’s initiative on HIV and AIDS prevention. Idoko stressed the need for the companies to prevent the disease to ensure the health and well-being of the public and to guarantee sustainability and growth of their market within the country. He said the National Call Centre would soon be inaugurated by the First Lady, Dame Patience Jonathan. He praised the telecom companies for joining hands with the Federal Government to provide E1 or equivalent machines for the call centre so that the people could access quality information from trained agents free.

Resident doctors’ factions come together to end six-year battle

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HE two factions of the National Association of Resident Doctors (NARD) have merged, ending a six-year quarrel. Peace came at a meeting in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital. According to a statement by NARD’s President, Dr Olarewaju Ekunji, the decision which is aimed at fostering unity, was upheld after the leaders demonstrated maturity, commitment and sacrifice. The statement said: “The two factions have been running independently one lead by Dr Ekujumi with its secretariat in Lagos University Teaching Hospital (LUTH) while the

By Wale Adepoju

other was led by Dr Chinomnso Nnebue with secretariat at Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital (NAUTH), Nnewi.” It said membership and voting strength, among others, were the contentious issues responsible for the split, adding that despite this the groups were still recognised by the Federal Government as they had been involved in negotiations and industrial actions in time past. It added: “While in time past the association consists of medical officers and resident doctors, now

only centres that offer any form of residency training are allowed to be members of NARD. Also, it’s been agreed that, henceforth voting shall be by membership strength such that the larger centres, such as LUTH, University College Hospital (UCH), Ahmadu Bello University (ABU) and others have higher votes compared to smaller centres as they contribute more financially to sustain the association.” It said that a Constitutional Amendment Committee had been set up to amend the changes in the constitution. “All of these measures and constitutional changes are be-

ing put in place to guide against future occurrence of such painful and retrogressive division in our midst.” It added. It said the Annual General Meeting (AGM) would hold today 20 and September 25 at the University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Abuja, where the new national officers would be elected. The newly unified NARD would be led by Dr. Achonwa of the Abuja University Teaching Hospital (AUTH), Gwagwalada. President of other NARD Group, Dr Nnebue said there had been inhouse problems, adding that using

the term factions may not really augur well because some people are still embitter about the progress made so far. He said: “We are together now, but we don’t want to recount things that happened in the past because we want to forge ahead. NARD is an affiliate of Nigerian Medical Association (NMA). “We had a group recognised by NMA which I led, but I wouldn’t want to go into the story of what happened. That is why I don’t want to go into details I know even when we reconcile some people are not happy.”


44

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

HEALTH Oyo State is benefiting from the eighth and ninth rounds of Global Fund financing, which supports the provision of comprehensive adult Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART) services in five sites in each of the 36 states of Nigeria and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT). OYEYEMI GBENGA-MUSTAPHA, who was at two of the sites in Oyo State, reports.

‘In Oyo, access to HIV services improving’ A CTIVITIES at National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) and Global Fund sites at the State Hospital, Oyo, Oyo East Local Government Area and the State Hospital, Saki West Local Government Area have increased following the delivery of HIV care and services at the community level. Through the Programme, the gap in access and coverage of HIV services in rural communities have been further decentralised. The Programme has also accelerated the scale-down for the prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) interventions. Data of service delivery at the ART unit of the State Hospital, Oyo, showed that a total of 1,437 enrolled for the programme between March 2008 and July 2011. Over the same period, 10,477 individuals were counselled and tested from which 1,077 tested positive. Under the institution’s Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV initiative, 8,458 pregnant women were counselled and tested, from which 256 tested HIV positive while 247 received prophylaxis. At the State Hospital, Saki, the Principal Medical Officer, Dr Kayode Ogunkunle, said the HIV care unit in the hospital has been up to the task, in the last three years, providing comprehensive care and support to the people living with HIV in the town and its environs. Though Ogunkunle praised the contributions and support of the global partners, he pleaded with the state government to increase the number of medical personnel in the health institution. He said the Saki HIV care unit attends to an average of 180 patients weekly “most of who seek services for PMTCT, AntiRetroviral Treatment (ART) prophylaxis and treatment of Opportunistic Infections (OIs)”. The Director, Programme Services, Oyo State SACA, Mr Kayode Bolarinwa, the HIV prevalence rate for the state is below 3.0 per cent. There are about 160,000 persons said to be HIV positive. “When there were funds, there were about 41 NGOs funded to carry out activities on the field, and the prevalence nosedived from 3.8 per cent to 1.8 per cent between 2004 and 2007. But as soon as funds stopped, the rate began to rise again. They are

awaiting funds from MAP 2, and were currently working with the global partners to deliver services and close the gaps within service provision. Oyo State SACA Project Manager, Mr Muritala Ayansiji Ganiyu, said there was continuous intensification on care and support for persons living with HIV and AIDS in the state. One of the areas of focus is the economic empowerment of those affected, particularly those not engaged in any vocation. We want to produce commendable results. “But, as the saying goes, he who wears the shoes knows where it pinches most. Positive people, and affected people said as the prevalence of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Oyo State is declining, the state government, other partners and stakeholders need to further build upon past and on-going efforts of the National Agency for the Control of AIDS (NACA) and the Global Fund to further reduce the impact of the epidemic in the state. Present at the HIV treatment sites at the ‘Heart-to-Heart’ centres in Oyo and Saki urged the state government not to relent in strengthening the capacity and technical base of the 10 existing HIV treatment sites in the state. They praised the efforts of NACA and the Global partners in ensuring availability and accessibility of comprehensive HIV care and support services at the grassroots. They, however, called on the state government through SACA to expedite action in ensuring that they (beneficiaries) are not shortchanged as a result of the winding up of activities of some of the global partners in HIV care and support in the state. According to a person living with HIV/AIDS, who wanted to remain anonymous, “NACA, the Global Fund and their partners are actively tackling HIV and AIDS in Oyo State. I can tell you that in this site and others in the state, their contributions have alleviated the challenge of travelling to other sites in distant towns to access HIV care and support services. It has, in the process, saved many lives, as with the availability of the care and support services, people living with HIV are now contributing to their society because they are catered for and empowered.”

•Some officials of the State Hospital, Oyo

•A pharmacist dispensing some drugs

•Some equipment acquired by the fund

Cancer expert urges women to check breasts regularly

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RADIOLOGIST, Prof Josbat Thomas Kofi-Duncan, has urged women to observe changes in their breast as this may be a sign of breast cancer. He said early detection of growth in the breast can prevent its progression because it is not a death sentence as people think. Duncan, who is the Head of the Department, Radiation Oncology, Eko Hospital, made this known at the breast cancer workshop for media professionals in Lagos. It was organised by Sebeccly Cancer and Support Care. According to him, breast self-ex-

By Wale Adepoju

amination (BSE) is an important way for women to detect the existence of breast cancer early. “This method is always advised to be carried out in the middle of the menstrual cycle or at a constant period every month, while women in the menopause should examine their breast at a particular time every month. Kofi-Duncan, who spoke on the topic Cancer prevention and early detection, said: “The BSE is done in four steps, which is lying down on their back with a pillow under the

right should, using the pads of the three middle fingers on the left hand to check their right breasts, press using light, medium and firm pressure in a circle without lifting the finger off the skin, and then follow an up and down pattern. Feel for changes in your breast, above and below the collarbone and in the armpit. “While bathing, women can use soapy hands to feel for any changes in the breast. They can, standing in front of the mirror and hold arms at the side, hold arms over the head, press the hands on the hips tighten the chest muscles and bend forward

with the hands on the hips. Women should then squeeze the nipples to check for bloody discharge. If a discharge is seen, they should note the exact location and immediately report it to the doctor.” Kofi-Duncan said women could also go for routine mammography to know the state of their breast. “This is the use of medical equipment to detect breast cancer. A trained radiologist usually performs this examination, which lasts five minutes. Mammography is the best screening method, but there are other methods, such as ultrasound, which can provide valuable infor-

mation, such as distinguishing types of lumps and other masses. There is also the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI).” Executive Secretary of Sebeccly, Dr O. Salako, said the objective of the workshop was to educate journalists on the accurate reportage of cancer and raise awareness on the disease, especially as it affects women. She said breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women in the country and across the world, adding that a lot of women have died as a result of late presentation of the disease.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

45

HEALTH

Experts canvass ear screening for pupils F

EDERAL and state governments have been advised to mandate their educational institutions, from primary to tertiary, to carry out ear screening tests (audiometric) on pupils and students before admission. This was the highlight of the communiqué issued at the end of a four-day national workshop on Identification and Rehabilitation of Persons with Hearing Impairment held at the Federal College of Education (Special), Oyo, Oyo State. The communiqué, which was jointly signed by the work-

From Bode Durojaiye, Oyo

shop’s Chief facilitator and Pioneer provost of the College, Prof Ayodele Bakare, and Dean, School of Special Education , Dr Theo Ajobiewe, noted that since three-quarters of what is being learnt is through the ear, audiology should be offered in progress in tertiary institutions. “State Houses of Assembly should make legislations that will enforce industrial policies, to ensure adequate hearing conservation measures for the workers in manufacturing sectors es-

pecially. All medical and paramedical professionals are advised to include basic audiological content in their general education programme, as this will equip them with information on some of their pharmacological practices that compromise the hearing ability of their patients (as in ototoxicity and drug abuse in different forms),” the workshop recommended. It also called for encouragement of all media houses to provide awareness and enlightenment programmes on social activities that are potential hazards

to hearing organs, as part of their social responsibilities. (e.g – noise exposure in converts, churches, music stores, markets, sawmills, industries, airports etc). “Every institution offering audiology should be provided with software in audiological practices, rather than relishing in outdate writings”, it said and called for early screening and identification, counseling of parents and prenatal guidance as important aspects of preventive strategies. It also called for “appropriate

regulatory policies and law enforced by assigned regulatory bodies, such as Nigeria Speech and Hearing Association, Medical Rehabilitation Therapists Board among others.” The workshop organised by the College’s School of Special Education, was aimed at equipping audiologists and allied professionals with modern techniques, and methods required to provide quality services to individuals with hearing impairments, and to also provide suggestions for hearing conservation.

Anti-counterfeit for products

G

REENLIFE Pharmaceuticals International Plc is set to launch a short message service (SMS)-based mobile telephony anti-counterfeiting technique as part of measures to further protect the integrity of its pharmaceutical brands in the market. This is in line with the resolve of the National Agency for Food and Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC) to collaborate with other stakeholders to rid the market of fake, adulter-

By Sulaiman Gbenga Idowu

ated and unwholesome pharmaceutical products. The new anti-counterfeiting measure known as Mobile Authentication Service (MAS) technology provides the consumers with an easy way to connect with the legitimate brand owners. This service, powered by the technology of SPROXIL Inc. a United States-based ICT firm, was initiated and launched by NAFDAC in Lagos last year.

Kwara political office holders to join insurance scheme

P •Residents of Ogudu, Ojota, Lagos taking part in an exercise by EVA fun walk.

How to treat depression

T

HERE is a wide variety of therapeutic approaches utilised for the treatment of depression. These appraises range from cognitive behavioral therapy, to behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, rational emotive therapy, to family and psychodynamic approaches. Both individual and group modalities are commonly used, depending on the severity of the depressive episode, the person’s financial resources and the local resources which are available. Cognitive-behavioural therapy is the most popular and commonly used therapy for depression treatment. Hundreds of research studies have been conducted which verify its safety and effectiveness in treating this disorder. Aaron T. Beck is considered the father of this technique having authored books and studies supporting cognitivebehavioral therapy. It consists of simple techniques which focus on the negative thought patterns, called cognitive distortions, which the depressed person may habitually use. Therapy begins by establishing a supportive environment for the patient. Educating the patient about how depression may be caused by cognitive distortions is the next step. The types of faulty thinking are discussed (e.g., “all or nothing thinking,” “misattribution of blame,” “overgeneralisation,” etc.) and the patient is encouraged to begin noting his or her thoughts as they occur throughout the day. This is done so that the individual may understand how common and often these thoughts are occurring. In cognitive-behavioral therapy, emphasis is placed on discussing the thoughts and the behaviors as-

sociated with depression rather than the emotions themselves. The rationale for this is that it is believed that by changing thoughts and behaviors the emotions will also change. Because of this approach, cognitive-behavioral therapy is short-term (usually under two dozen sessions) and works best for people experiencing a bit of distress related to their depression. Individuals who are able to approach a problem from a unique perspective and who are more cognitivelyoriented will to do best with this approach. Interpersonal therapy is another short-term therapy used in the treatment of depression. The focus of this treatment approach is usually on an individual’s social relationships and how to improve them. It is thought that good, stable social support is essential to a person’s overall wellbeing. When relationships are unhealthy, a person suffers from this. This therapy seeks to improve a person’s relationship skills, communication skills, expression of emotions, and assertiveness. It is usually conducted on an individual basis but can also be used in a group therapy setting. Most individual approaches will emphasise the importance of the patient being actively involved in his own recovery. Patients are usually encouraged to do homework assignments between sessions. If the patient is not yet able to participate actively in therapy, then the therapist may provide a supportive environment until medication begins to improve the patient’s state of mind. Psychoanalytic or psychodynamic approaches in the treatment of depression have little research to support their use at this time. Although some therapists may make use of psychodynamic theory to help con-

ceptualize an individual’s personality, there is much debate as to whether this is an effective treatment for depression. Family or couples therapy should be considered when the individual’s depression is directly affecting family relationships. Such therapy focuses on the interpersonal relationships shared among family members and seeks to ensure effective communication. The roles played by various family members in the patient’s depression may be examined. Education about depression in general way may also be a part of family therapy.

Hospitalisation Hospitalisation of an individual may become necessary when it is deemed that a patient has become a danger to himself or others. Care should be taken with regards to the hospitalisation procedure. When possible, the patient’s informed consent should be obtained and the patient encouraged to check him/herself in. Hospitalisation is usually until the patient becomes fully stabilised and the therapeutic effects of an antidepressant begin to take hold (three to four weeks). Because suicide is the most dangerous outcome of depression, suicidal ideation should be assessed during regular intervals throughout therapy. The beginning stages of medication are especially crucial. Often, as the medication begins to take effect, they will be at higher risk for acting on suicidal impulses. Patient’s should be monitored closely during the initial weeks of drug therapy. •Culled from: www.depression.about.com

OLITICAL office holders in Kwara State are to contribute a percentage of their salaries to the community health insurance scheme in the state, Governor AbdulFatah Ahmed has said. The governor, at the launch of Omolewa Safe Motherhood initiative, in Alapa, Asa Local Government Area of the state, said the directive was borne out of the desire to ensure accessible and affordable health care delivery system in the state. He described functional and effective health care delivery as one of the factors for measuring societal human capital development, saying no government could afford to toy with the sector. The initiator of the Non-Governmental Organisation (NGO), Omolewa Safe Motherhood initiative and wife of the governor, Mrs Omolewa Ahmed, said health indicators in the state shared that maternal death rate is 980 in every 10,000 births. Her words: “Most of these maternal deaths can be prevented through access to appropriate care during pregnancy, childbirth and post-delivery. In addition, under-five child mortality rate is one in every seven births. “The Omolewa safe motherhood initiative is designed to incorporate the most fundamental tenets of the

From Adekunle Jimoh, Ilorin

national Integrated Maternal, Newborn and Child Health policy (IMNCH). It is, indeed, an offshoot and a strategic component of LEAH Charity Foundation of which I am the trustee. “This initiative aims to augment the current efforts of the state government towards the attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) of reducing maternal and child deaths by 75 per cent and 67per cent by 2015. “The initiative seeks to improve accessibility to primary health care for pregnant women and children under five years, improve on quality care for pregnant women during antenatal, labour, delivery and postnatal care and provide facilities for quality and special care for children under five. “Our aspiration is to adopt 80 per cent of all primary health centres within the next four years. The NGO will be upgrading and equipping maternity units of the centres to acceptable World Health Organisation (WHO) standard. “Similarly, we will increase the number of skilled attendants and constantly train them for effective performance. Also, we will revitalise traditional birth attendants and midwife services scheme and provide them with safe delivery materials.”

Neimeth introduces antiseptic

N

EIMETH International Pharmaceutical Plc has introduced to the market, an antiseptic for oral care, personal hygiene, first aid and household use. According to the company’s outgoing President and Chief Executive Officer, Mr Sam Ohuabunwa, ncp as the product is named offers all round family protection. “It is user friendly and is available to every member of the family, either young or old.” He said at its launch in Lagos that it is an improvement on TCP. It has 27 uses as against its predecessor brand. “So, it is 21 plus six. It was developed in our labo-

By Wale Adepoju

ratory. So it is TCP plus,” he added. He said the product came to the country in1958 through Pfizer as TCP. Ohuabunwa said efforts are being made by the company to manufacture it locally so that it can be much more available and affordable to Nigerians. He said he was confident that the product would make a huge contribution to the medical profession, pharmaceutical practice, Nigerian pharmaceutical markets and every home in the country.


46

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

IN THE HIGH COURT OF LAGOS STATE OF NIGERIA PROBATE REGISTRY, IKEJA DIVISION WHEREAS the person whose names are set-out in the first Column under died intestate on the date and place stated in the said Column. AND WHEREAS the person or persons whose names and addresses and relationship (if any) to the deceased are set out in the second Column here have applied to the High Court of Lagos State for a Grant of Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal Properties of the deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY given that Letters of Administration will be granted to such persons unless a NOTICE TO PROHIBIT THE GRANT is filed in the registry within (14) days from the date hereof. S/N 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78.

S/N

NAMES OF THE DECEASED PERSON:

Mr George Lanre Ogunleye (Otherwise known as Ogunleye Gerorge Lanre ) late of Block 2, Flat 8, 411 Road, Gowon Estate, Ipaja Lagos State, deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of November, 1996 at Saala Orile. Mr Udochukwu Felix Nwokocha (Otherwise known as Mr Udo Nwokocha) late of 30, Alaba Street, Oworonsoki , Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of July, 2011 at Lagos. Igbekele Alfred (Otherise known as Alfred Igbekele) late of No. 28, Omuaran Street, Unity Estate, Egbeda, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 25th day of December, 2007 at Lagos State. Emmanuel Oshinowo (Otherwise known as Mr Emmanuel Oshinowo) late of 11, Rilwan Lawal Street, Haruna, Ikorodu, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 4th day of October, 2010 at Ikorodu. Mr Isaac Oluwafemi Ajiwo (Otherwise known as Oluwafemi Ajiwo ) late of 42, Oduguwa Street, Bariga, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of December, 2007 at Lagos. Adamu Yisa late of 13, Adeleye Close, Ajegunle, Lagos, deceased died intestate on the 4th day of December, 2010 at General Hospital Apapa, Lagos State. Emeka Abengowe (Otherwise known as Mr Emeka Abengowe ) late of 13, Olakunle Ajibade Street, Ojota, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of July, 2009 at Lagos. Awoyemi Bankole late of 6, Deji Oworu Street, Ketu, Lagos state deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of December, 2009 at Lagos. Emmanuel A. Oyediran (Otherwise known as Oyediran Emmanuel) late of 24, Onibiyo Street, Ojokoro Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of November, 2010 at Port Harcourt. Mr Chukwuma Bertrand Ikeghalu late of 1, idisu Street, Ojo Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of January, 2010 at Ghana. Mr M.K. Folorunsho (Otherwise known as Pa Olusegun Folorunsho Kolawole) late of 24, Ige Street, Iyana Ipaja, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 17th day of January, 2011 at Lagos. Ewarawon Monday late of Coker Campaound Era Ijanikin deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of June, 2010 Madam Gladys Ijeh (Otherwise known as Ijeh Gladys) late of 11, Bomardek Avenue Okota Isolo, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 31st day of May, 2007 at Delta State. Oguama Ignatus Ekejuga (Otherwise known as Mr Ignatus Oguama ) late of 9, Adeleye street, Sari Iganmu, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of September, 1980 at Lagos. Mr Kazeem Mudashiru Toyin (Otherwise known as Kazeem Mudashiru) late of 12B, Ketiku street, Isolo, Ipaja, Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of April, 2010 at Ikeja Lagos. Sunday Samuel Obadimeji (Otherwise known as Pa Sunday Obadimeji and Mr S.S. Obadimeji) late of Plot 4, Akinwole Street, Ajangbadi deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of July, 2009 at kings Hospital Ibadan. Joshua Adedeji Olunlade (Otherwise known as Joshua Olulade and Joshua Adedeji Olulade) late of 14, Shalon Street, Abule Odu, Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 11th day of June, 2010 at Mr Francis Adetunde Martins, late of No. 20, Iju Ogundimu Ajuwon Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of August, 2006. Mr Sunday Olaniyi (Otherwise known as Olaniyi Sunday) late of 25, Salami Shuaibu Street, Pedro Road, Palm grove Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of June, 2008 at Lagos. Yusuf Nosimot Adenike (Otherwise known as Mrs Nimota Adenike Yussuf ) late of 45, Adeoye Street, Mushin, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of March, 2009 at Lagos. Oloye Tabura (Otherwise known as Tabura and Tabura Oloye Alade) late of 5, Sagidan Street, Epe deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of April, 2001. Adeoluwa Adebowale (Otherwise known as Adebowale Ganiyu Adeoluwa and Adebowale Adeoluwa) late of Plot 62, Ikorodu Road, Anthony deceased who died intestate on the 22nd day of February, 2006. Mr Williams Edomiwandekhoe (Otherwise known as Mr Edom Williams) late of 29, Arikawe Street, Ijegun Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 29th day of October, 2010 at Alimosho General Hospital, Igando. Mr Isiaka Asimi Olawale (Otherwise known as Asimi Isiaka ) late of 43, Alafia Street, Oke Odo Alo, Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of August, 2009 at Lokoja . Akinrolabu E. Olabisi (Otherwise known as Akinrolabu Elizabeth Olabisi) late of 28, Audu Bale Street, Onike, Yaba, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of December, 2010 at Lagos. Mr Nsikak Edet Ekpema (Otherwise known as Ekpema Nsikak Edet) late of Continental Shipyard Apapa, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 7th day of September, 2009 at Lagos. Mr Omotoye Sunday late of 120, Nureni Yusuf Road, Surulere Bus Stop Alagbado, Kollington deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of July, 2011. Mrs Janet Bolajoko Orimobi late of 2nd Avenue, 21 Road, D Close, House 21, Festac Town, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of June, 2010 at Homerton University Hospital, Hackney London. Lucy Omoriola Adedeji late of Block 373, Flat 2, LSDPC Estate, Amuwo Odofin ,Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of August, 2007 at California. Mrs Florence Ojo (Otherwise known as Ojo Florence ) late of 25, Environmental Crescent, Unilag Estate, Magodo, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of August, 2009 at Lagos. Mr Ojasanya Adebayo (Otherwise known as Ojosanya Rasheed A. Adebayo) late of 21/23 Awotunde Street, Alagbado , Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of January, 2010 at Lagos. Arigbabu Nimota (Otherwise known as Alhaja Nimota Arigbabu) late of 10, Lagos Road, Ijebu Ode deceased who died intestate on the 10th day of January, 2009 at Lagos. Salau Otori Umar (Otherwise known as Salawu Umar) late of 3, Allen Street, Ojuelegba Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of April, 2010 at Minna. Mrs Ngozi Ayosiora late of 14, Alhaji Kadiri Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 19th day of April, 2011 at Lagos. Bridget O. Chukwumah (Mrs) (Otherwise known as Chukwumah Bridget) late of 30, Ayilara Street, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 7th day of March, 2007 at Lagos. Sanyaolu Hamzat Olatunbosun (Otherwise known as Sanyaolu H.O and Alh. Hamzat Olatunbosun Sanyaolu) late of 1, Agbeke Sanyaolu Street, Agungi Eti Osa deceased who died intestate on the 10th day of September, 1991 at Lagos. Mrs Olufunmilola Lufadeju (Otherwise known as Lufadeju Funmi) late of 25/27, Yinka Ogunfele Street, Ikorodu Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of June, 2008 at Ikorodu. Sunday Suru late of Olorunda LGA Araromi Badagry deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of July, 2009 at Lagos. Mrs Magdaline Chinyere Mba late of 31, Kole Awani Street, New Oko Oba Agege, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of February, 2004 at Lagos. Mrs Nurat Abike Ogunfemi (Otherwise known as Ogunfemi Nuratu) late of Clinic Bus Stop Isashi Town, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 21st day of December, 2007 at Abeokuta. Mr Essien Edem Essien late of 51, Osho Street, Ori Oke Ejigbo deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of January, 2011 at Cross River State. Balogun Sunday late of 21, Dawodu Lane Ebute Metta deceased who died intestate on the 12th day of February, 2011 at General Hospital Lagos. Emmanuel Ugochukwu Achogbio (Otherwise known as Achogbuo Emmanuel) late of 5B, Oseni Ewu Street, by Edun Junction, Mafoluku Oshodi, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 6th day of May, 2008 at Lagos. Mrs Hope Udeogu late of 9, Chukuma Close Jakande deceased who died intestate on the 11th day of January, 2011 at Owerri , Imo State. Christopher Elewachi late of 13A, Immam Menmudu Street, Coker Orile Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 12th day of September, 2006 at Lagos. Madam Beatrice Adeke Onwordi (Otherwise known as Onwordi Beatrice) late of 10, Tajule Street, Off AIT Road Alagbado, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 9th day of August, 2009 at Lagos. Alhaji Muslim TaiwoAdisa Ambali (Otherwise known as Ambali Muslim A. Taiwo) late of 5, Adisa Ambali Close Ojodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of November, 2010 Ogunleye Olakunle Joseph (Otherwise known as Oluwabori Samuel Ogunleye) late of 13, Mukadam Street, Off Adesan Mowe Ogun State deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of December, 2010 at Odufunke Memorial Hospital. Ogbuagu Veronica Ijeoma (Otherwise known as Ijeoma Ogbuagu) late of 24, Osemaka Street, Orile Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 7th day of July, 2010 at Lagos. Nwandu Nnamdi Emmanuel late of Freeman Estate, Erukole Street, Mowe deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of March, 2011 at General Hospital Lagos. Mrs Oluwafunmilayo Flora Alegbe (Otherwise known as Funmi Agbi, Flora Funmi Agbi and Alegbe Funmi Samson) late of 25, Awomodu Street, Ladi Lack Bariga, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 31st day of March, 1994 at Lagos. Mr John Okoro late of 15, Olatunde Ayoola Avenue Anthony Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of February, 2008 at Lagos. Olufemi Oluwole Ajayi (Otherwise known as Mr Olufemi Ajayi ) late of 14, Dosunmu Street, Ogba, Ifako Agege, Lagos,deceased who died intestate on the 25th day of April, 2010 at Lagos. Amazu Nonso Rowland (Otherwise known as Rowland Amazu) late of 9, Uzoka Street, Shibiri Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of November, 2009 at Lagos. Capt. Jimeta Abubakar Mohammed (Otherwise known as Jimeta Mohammed) late of Blk II Flat 2, 5/7 Abisogun Estate, Ogba deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of January, 2011 at Lagos. Osita Nwaneri a late of 5, Ogunleye Street, PPL Okokomaiko deceased who died intestate on the 28th day of February, 2011 at Lagos. David Nnachi Irem (Otherwise kown as Irem David) late of 11, Sanusi Ijeshatedo Iju Ishaga deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of January, 2011 at Luth. Obi Nwafor (Otherwise known as Mr Nwafor Obi) late of 219, Ojo Road, Ajegunle Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of December, 2005 at Luth, Idiaraba . Mr Sanusi Oluwarotimi Ibironke (Otherwise known as Sanusi Olurotimi (Nee Ojeniyi) late of 2, Prince Adebambo treet, Egbeda, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 29th day of December, 2009 at Lasuth. Sikiratu Idowu Osinubi (Nee Aniafe) (Otherwise known as Sikiratu Eniafe, Idowu Osinubi and Sikiratu Osinubi) late of 53, Shaki Crescent, Aguda, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of March, 2010 at Lagos. irabor Pius Omonde (Otherwise Known as Irabor Pius) late of Plt 15, Agbeni Street, Igbogbo Baiyeku Road, Ikorodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 29th day of November, 2010 at Ubaja Edo State. Barrister Elijah N. Dibia late of 3, Olaiya Street, orile Iganmu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 9th day of July, 2008 at Army Reference Hospital, Yaba. Chinweubu Nwosu (otherwise known as Chiwuba Nwosu) late of 20, Yekini Saka Street, off Victor Ogundipe Street, ishashi Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of March, 2010 at Lagos. Mrs Roselyn Adibeli Akozo (otherwise known as Akozor Roselyn Adibele) late of 67, Dr Fasheun Avenue Ago Palace Way, Ago deceased who died intestate on the 19th day of April, 2008 at Lagos. Doherty Oluyomi late of 4, Pastor Adebayo Close, Apostolic Estate Ketu, deceased who died intestate on the 17th day of February, 2008 at Lagos. Charles C.Eze (Otherwise known as Chukwuweike) late of 1, Ladokun Oyeyiola Street, Yakoyo Ojodu deceased who died intestate on the 29th day of March, 2011 at Federal Medical Centre. Mr Akpama James late of 32, Malad Street, idimu Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 11th day of November, 2009 at Lagos. Mr Victor Olufemi Adepegba late of Plot 125, Obadina Street, Omole Estate, Ph I Ojodu deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of May, 2009 at Ikeja General Hospital Ogungbesan Adedotun Oluwaseyi late of 25, Isaac Ademiga Street, Agileti Estate Mile 12, deceased who died intestate on the 11th day of June, 2010 at Ikeja. Mr Sgt. Olarinde Wasiu (Otherwise known as Sgt Wasiu Olarinde) late of 4, Adoga Street, Alagbado, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 25th day of June, 2009 Mrs Anela Chinyere Eze late of 1, Aina Street, Ahmadiya Agege, deceased who died intestate on the 24th day of October, 2008 at Chosen Hospital Ijesha. Dalial AdebayoBalogun late of 5, Ayuba Daodu Street, Mushin, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 10th day of May, 2006 at Lagos. Mrs Elizabeth B. Ogunsola (Otherwise known as Elizabeth Ogunsola ) late of 55, Akinola Close, Crescent Ikeja deceased who died intestate on th4e 17th day of November, 1994 at London. Omotunde Olabisi Komolafe (Otherwise known as Bisi Komolafe )late of No. 1 Ola Akinpelu Street, Off Dopemu Road, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 3rd day of September, 2010 at Luth Samuel Okafor Okoh (Otherwise known as Mr Okoh Samuel Okafor) late of Flat 4, Block 5, A Close 412 Road, Ipaja Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of June, 2003 at Lagos. Mrs Aduke Adelaja (Otherwise known as Adelaja Aduke) late of 2, Olaoluwa Street, Ojodu Ikeja, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of March, 2008 at Luth ,Lagos. Pa Michael I.Afiari (Otherwise known as Pa Michael Iwenwa Afiari) late of 17, Ohikere Street, Olodi Apapa, deceased who died intestate on the 19th day of April, 2011 at Lagos. Oladipo Olatunde Akinrele (Otherwise known as Akinrele Oladipo Olatunde) late of 1, Akinrele Close, Ijaiye Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of November, 2010 at Lagos.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78.

NAMES OF APPLICANT APPLYING FOR THE GRANT Mrs Grace Olamide Adeniyi, of No. 1, Odofin Street, Adiyan Ogun State, Muyiwa Abidemi Ogunleye O. of 9, Maborukoje Street, Ipaja Lagos State and Olajuwon Ogunleye of 15, Eleso Street, Agbara Ogun State, three children of the said deceased. Mr Chukwudinma Patrick Nwokocha of 51, Benson Road, Obele-Odan Surulere, Lagos, and Joseph Nwokocha of 11B, Iyere Close, Idimu, Lagos, two brothers of the said deceased. Mrs Oyinlola Alfred of No. 17, Omuaran Street, Egbeda, Lagos and Adelabu Alfred of 45, Isiba Oluwo Street, Egbeda, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Babajide Oshinowo and Bisi Aloba both of 11, Rilwan Lawal Street, Ikorodu, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Racheal Oluwafemi and Mr Olatunbosun Temitope Oluwafemi both of 42, Oduguwa Street, Bariga, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Iyabo Adamu and Abdusalam Adamu both fo 13, Adeleye Close, Ajegunle Lagos State, widow and nephew respectively of the said deceased. Gift Abengowe, Victor Abengowe, Chinyere Abengowe and Esther Abengowe all of No. 13, Olakunle Ajibade Street, Ojota, Lagos widow and three children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Awoyemi Olufunke and Miss Awoyemi Oluwaseun both of 6, Deji Oworu Street, Ketu, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Elizabeth A. Oyediran and Damilare Oyediran both fo 24, Onibiyo Street, Ojokoro Lagos and Folusho Ajayi of 14, Adenuga Street, Ahamadiya Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mr Ikechukwu Chukwuma and Miss Bridget chukwuma both of Zone B Block 1 Shop 55, Aspamda, Lagos brother and sister respectively of the said deceased. Pastor Oluwaseyi Folorunsho and Mrs Funmilayo Bankole both of 24, Ige Street, Iyana Ipaja , Lagos two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Victoria Ewarawon, Folake Ewarawon and Akinbayode Ewarawon all of Coker Compound Era Ijanikin, Lagos, widow and two children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Augustina Ndidi Ekwutozia and Mr Emaka Henry Ekwutozia both of 11, Bomardek Avenue, Okota, Isolo, lagos, one of the children and grand child respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Chinyere Oguama, Mr Chigozie Oguama and Master Echefulam Oguama all of 1C, Balogun Kuku Aguda Surulere, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Grace Kazeem and Miss Monsurah Kazeem both of 12B, Kitiku Close, Isolo Ipaja Lagos, widow and the only child respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Obadimeji Richeal of Plot 4, Akinwole Close, Ajangbadi and Mrs Temilade Oyedeji of 18, Sunmonu Street, Ogba, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Titilayo Adetoun Olunlade and Olusegun Adeoye Olunlade both of 14, Shalon Street, Abule Odu, Lagos State widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Bamijoko Aina Martins and Mr Anthony Adedolapo Martins both of 20, Iju Ogundimu , Ajuwon, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Adebola lbilola Olaniyi and Mr Olusegun Ola Olu Olaniyi both of C/O 2 Kujore Street, Off Ogudu Road, Ojota, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Yusuf Basiru Adesanya, Yusuf Wasiu Adeniyi and Yusuf Raimot Oyinlola all of 45, Adeoyo Street, Mushin, Lagos, widower and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Shakirat Oloruniwo Oloye, Nurudeen Adeoye Oloye and Surajudeen Adeyemi Oloye all of 5, Sagidan Street, Epe, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Tunde Adebowale and Bola Adebowale Daramola both o Plot 62, Ikorodu Road, Anthony Lagos,two of the children of the said deceased. Flora W. Edomiwandekhoe and Godwin W. Edomiwandekhoe both of 29, Arikawe Street, Ijegun, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Bushirat Funmilola Basirat Isiaka and Fatai Isiaka both of 43, Alafia Street, Oke Odo Alo, Lagos State, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Gbenga Agosu and Lekan Akan both of 60, Old Yaba Road, Ebute Metta, Lagos two brothers of the said deceased. Mrs Emem Nsikak Ekpema and Mr Effiong Edet Ekpema both of No. 9, Sule Abuka Off Opebi Road, Ikeja, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Omolara Omotoye and Muyiwa Omotoye both of 120, Nureni Yusuf Road, Surulere Bus Stop Alagbado Kollington ,Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mr Tokunbo Oke Orimobi and Mr Michael Bamidele Abayomi Orimobi both of 2nd Avenue, 21 Road D Close, House 21, Festac Town, Lagos, widower and the only child respectively of the said deceased. Olori Olufemi Adenuga and Miss Omoyemi F.Adedeji both of Block 373, Flat 2, LSDPC Estate, Amuwo Odofin Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Oluwatoyin Adeola Ojo and Mrs Tolulope Fadeke Osoba both fo 25, Environmental Crescent, Unilag Estate, Magodo, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Azeez Ojasanya and Rasaq Ojasanya both of 21/23 Awotunde Street, Alagabdo, Lagos, two children of the said deceased. Tokunbo Arigbabu of 10, Lagos Road, Ijebu Ode the only surviving child of the said deceased. Ozovehe M. Umar and Rukayat Umar both of 3, Allen Street, Ojuelegba Lagos, two children of the said deceased. Mr Chidiere Ayosiora of 14 Alhaji Kadiri Street, Olodi Apapa Lagos, and Mrs Janet Izejiora of 38, Muyiwa Opaleye Aguda Lagos, widower and sister respectively of the said deceased. Ikechukwu Chukwumah , Pauline Chukwumah and Paul Chukwumah all of 5, Shodipe Close, Surulere, Lagos, three of the children of the said deceased. Naseem O. Sanyaolu and Muslimot Abegbe Motayo both of 1, Sanyaolu Street Agungi Eti Osa , two of the children of the said deceased. Segun Lufadeju of 25/27, Yinka Ogunfele Street, Ikorodu, Lagos and Gbenga Orumuyi of 3, Adeyinka Morgan Street, Off Oke odo Ibadan , widower and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Suru Omotayo and Mr Suru Pius both fo 38/200 Road Ile Epo Araromi Badagry, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Azua Gilbert Mba and Amaka Maureen Mba both of 31, Kole Awani Street, New Oko Oba Agege, widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Alhaji Abdul Rasaq Ogunfemi of 12, Adeleke Adeleye Street, Araromi Olomore Abeokuta and Mrs Taofekat Omobolanle Lasisi of C15, Tejumola Estate, Fajol Obantoko Abeokuta , widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Regina Essien and Mr Victor Elijah Effiom both fo 51, Osho Street, Ori Oke Ejigbo, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Risikat Balogun and Segun Balogun both fo 21, Dawodu Lane Ebute Metta, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Charity Achogbuo of 4, Olafimihan Street, Ilasamaja, Mushin, Lagos and John Achogbuo of 25, Deji Adeoye Oshodi ,widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mbadiwe E. Udeogu and Austin A. Udeogu both fo 9, Chukwuma Close, Jakande ,widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Regina E.Elewachi of 33, Oduselu Street, Itire, Surulere, Lagos, and Mr Chubuike Elewachi of 41, Bakare Opesa Street, Ashafa Bus Stop Dopemu, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Chief Simon Onwordi and Mr Raphael Onwordi both of 8, Fadeyi Aladura street, Ikeja, two of the children of the said deceased. Alhaja Afusat Olayinka Ambali, Mr Ibraheem Kolapo Ambali and Miss Nimota Funmilola Ambali all of 3, Adisa Ambali Close Ojodu, Lagos widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Ogunleye Olalade Grace of 13, Mukadam Street, Adesan Mowe and Olotu Godwin of 17, Etunrenren Street, Ikorodu, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Ogbuagu Charles Okechukwu of 24, Osemeke Street, Orile Lagos, and Linus Orji of Ugbene Mgbidi Imo State, widower and father respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Rose Nwandu , Mr Tony Nwandu and Mr Mark Nwandu all of 10, Gani Williams Road, Osolo Way, Ajao Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Oluwayemisi Oshilagun (Alegbe) of 25, Awomodu Street, Ladi Lack Bariga, Lagos, the only surviving child of the said deceased. Mrs Onyinyae Okoro and Ben Njoku both of 15, Olatunde Ayoola Avenue Anthony , Lagos, widow and uncle respectively of the said deceased. Mr Olusola Yetunde Ajayi, Mr Olubanjo Taiwo Ajayi and Mrs Kehinde Olufunsho Ajumobi all of 14, Dosunmu Street, Ogba ,Ifako, Lagos, three children of the said deceased. Mrs Amazu Ogechi and Mr Pedro Amazu both of 6, Dispeneary Street, Amukoko, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Raissa Jimeta and Jimeta Abubakar both of Block II Flat 2, 5/7 Abisogun Estate, Ogba, Ikeja, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Izunna Nwameri , Nnamdi Nwaneri , Ikemba Nwaneri all of 5, Ogunleye Stree PPL Okomaiko and Stella Maris Ikokwu of 29, Olakinpelu Pako Bus Stop , brothers and sister respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Odinaka David of 11, Sanusi Street, Ijeshatedo Iju and Mr Kenneth Chima of 48, Aina Street, Aguda, Surulere, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Christiana Nwafor, Engr. Prince Enyinnaya Nwafor and Engr. Azuka Emmanuel Nwafor all of 4, Opeloyeru Street, Cele Egbe Elewe widow and two children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Ojeniyi Bolanle and Mr Ojeniyi Dare both of 14, Ijesha street, Sango Ota ,mother and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Modupe Fateye of 10, Olorunsogo Omo West Osogbo and Mr Aderemi Igi Ododo of 53, Shaki Crescent, Aguda Surulere, two children of the said deceased. Mrs Irabor Esther I. and Pastor Efosa Ebomese E. both of Pastor Efosa Street, Off Engr. Ogunlewe Way Igbogbo Ikorodu, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Friday Dibia of 3, Olaiya Street, Orile Iganmu, Lagos, and Emmanuel Ikwako of 20, Olowosile Street, Oke Ota Ona Ikorodu, Lagos, two brothers of the said deceased. Mrs Blessing Chinweuba Nwosu and Mr Chukwuebuka C. Nwosu both of 20, Yekinni Saka Street, Off Victor Ogundipe Street, Isashi Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mr Christian Ikechukwu Akozor and Emmanuel Chukwuka Akozor both of 67, Dr Fasheun Ave. Ago Palace Way, Ago ,Lagos, widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Oluranti Doherty and Mr Ogechi Nkwoji both of Blk 20, Flat 1, Avocado Drive M.K.O Abiola Garden ,widow and cousin respectively of the said deceased. Omonefe O. Eze, of 1, Ladokun Oyeyiola Street, Yakoyo Ojodu Berger Lagos and Sunny F. Eze of 6, Valley View Close, Valley Estate Dopemu, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Ikwe Akpama James and Lawrence Akpama James both fo 33, Malad Street, Idimu Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Olajumoke Adeola Sanyaolu and Mr Adeboye Olanrewaju Adepegba both of Plot 125, Obadina Street, Omole Ojodu, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Felicia Ogungbesan and Miss Bolanle Ogungbesan both of 25, Isaac Adenuga Street, Ajileti Estate, Mile 12, Lagos, mother and sister respectively of the said deceased. Adebisi Olarinde and Adekunle Olarinde both of 1, Adeyemi Street, Alapere Ketu, Lagos, father and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mr Eze Amos and Miss Nkokika Eze both of 1, Aina Street, Ahmadiya Agege, widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Daliatu A.Balogun and Mr Rashidi Balogun both of 5 , Ayuba Daodu Street, Mushin, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Joshua O. Ogunsola and Adeyinka Ogunsola both of 55, Akinola Cole crescent, Ikeja, widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Beatrice Aina Komolafe, Miss Oluwakemi Olawunmi Komolafe and Mr Michael Oluwatosin Komolafe all of 1, Ola Akinpelu Street, off Dopemu Road, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased Gabriel Okoh and Chiweta Joshua Okoh both fo Flat 4, Block 5, A Close, 412 Road Ipaja Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Adelaja Moses, Adelaja Oluwatoyin, Adelaja Oluwadamilare and Adelaja Elijah all of 2, Ola Oluwa Street, Ojodu Ikeja Lagos, widower and three children respectively of the said deceased. Michael O. Afiari and Joy (Afiari) Majikodumi both of 1, Aluform Avenue Igando, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Victoria Omotoke Akinrele and Miss Omotoyosi Olubukola Akinrele both of 1, AkinreleClose, Ijaiye, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased.

G.A SAFARI (MR.) PROBATE REGISTRAR


47

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

IN THE HIGH COURT OF LAGOS STATE OF NIGERIA PROBATE REGISTRY, IKEJA DIVISION WHEREAS the person whose names are set-out in the first Column under died intestate on the date and place stated in the said Column. AND WHEREAS the person or persons whose names and addresses and relationship (if any) to the deceased are set out in the second Column here have applied to the High Court of Lagos State for a Grant of Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal Properties of the deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY given that Letters of Administration will be granted to such persons unless a NOTICE TO PROHIBIT THE GRANT is filed in the registry within (14) days from the date hereof. S/N 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78.

S/N

NAMES OF THE DECEASED PERSON:

Gbemi Ajatta (Otherwise known as Mr Gbemi Ajatta) late of 181, Herbert Macaulay Street, Ebute Metta, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 22nd day of August, 2006 at Noble Hospital and Maternity Centre. Caroline Oluremi Bejide, late of c/o 322 Herbert Macaulay Street, Sabo Yaba, Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 17th day of Aprl, 2008 at 38, First Avenue Dagenliam London. Ojumi Akinyele late of Blk 1, Plot 17, Peace Estate, Isheri Olofin deceased who died intestate on the 7th day of January, 2008 at UCH, Ibadan. Godwin Ede (Otherwise known as Ede Gabriel Godwin) late of Block 6, Line B, Room 23, Ijeh Police Barrack deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of March, 2010 at Lagos state. Lovina Ekpenyong late of No9. Wewe Street, Sari Iganmu, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of September, 2008 at Lagos. Mr Tukuru Rasaki (Otherwise known as Mr Adewoye Rasaki ) late of 5, Asagoh Quarter, Badagry deceased who died intestate on the 3rd day of June, 2010 at General Hospital Badagry. Mr Bassey Okon Ikara (Otherwise knowna s Jicara Bassey) late of 11, Ade Akiode Street, Fagba, Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 9th day of September, 2010 at St. Nicholas Hospital, Lagos. Olasehinde Babatunde Adeniyi Martins (Otherwise known as Adeniyi Martins Babatunde Olaseinde) late of 10, Echo Crescent, Ikotun lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of September, 2007 at Lagos. Bada Albert Akin late of 3rd Cele Finayon Area ,Off Samuel Ekundayo Badagry deceased who died intestate on the 25th day of January, 2010. Mr Sunday Anodo (Otherwise known as Mr Anodo Sunday) late of Block 58, Jakande Housing Estate, Oke Afa Isolo, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of November, 2009 at General Hospital Isolo Anah Boniface Chukwudi late of 17/20 Kehinde Street, Meiran Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 9th day of November, 2010 at Lagos/Ibadan Expressway. Jaji A. Wasiu late of 59, Amudalat Street, Agodo Ikotun Egbe, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 3rd day of November 2010 at Lagos. Amarvi Rowland Anna (Otherwise known as Rowland Anna Amarvi) late of 42, Enigbokan Abule Egba deceased who died intestate on the 25th day of May, 205 at Ogun. Kenneth Ekezie (Otherwise known as Ekezie Kenneth) late of 24, Ogunbowale Street, Ilasamaja Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 28th day of June, 2010 at Imo State. Isaac Ojo (Otherwise known as Isaac Olatunde Ojo) late of 14 SS, Jemigbon Close, Apollo Estate, ketu deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of August, 2008 Yusuf Babagbemi late of Adeniran ogunsanya College of Education Staff Quarter Otto Awori deceased who died intestate on the 15th day of September, 2003 at State Specialist Hospital Ikare Awori. Chinyelu Helen Nwosu late of 24, Church Street, oshodi Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of January, 2011 Samuel Taiwo late of 16, Irepodun Street, Ijaiye Ojokoro, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 2nd day of May, 2011 at Lagos. Mrs Helen Ewa Ana (Otherwise known as Ewa Ana Helen) late of 15, Bada Street, Moshalashi Mushin, Lagos deceased who died intestate ont he13th day of October, 2010 at Lagos. Samson Olumuyiwa Olotu (Otherwise known as Olotu Samson O.) late of 26, Alarape Street, Iyana Oworo New Garage Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 24th day of October, 2010 at Niger State. Mr Okorie Onu Joe late of 50, Kayode street, Iyana Ejigbo Lagos State, deceased who died intestate on the 31st day of July,2009 at Ivuezizor Okposi-Okwu,Oha L.G.A. Ebonyi State. Eunice Ijeoma Onyeka (Otherwise known as Ifeoma Eunice Onyeka) late of 19, Olatilewa Street, Surulere, Lagos,deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of December, 2009 at London. Mrs Louisa Chioma Ezeonyim (Otherwise known as Ezeonyim Chioma Louisa) late of 5, Jimoh Bajulaiye Street, Ifako Gbagada, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 27th day of October,2007 at Lagos. Mr Adeleke Samuel Adekunle (Otherwise known as Oluewu Samuel Adekunle ) late of 3, Ifeoluwa Street, ori Okuta Ikorodu Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of August,2010 at Lagos. Ayedun Emily Ayobami (Otherwise known as Ayedun Ayobami) late of 24, Toyin Davies Street, Ejigbo, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 6th day of December, 2007 at Lasuth Ikeja Mr Isaac B. Dawodu (Otherwise known as Mr Dawodu Isaac) late of Ola Oluwa Ayawoele Ajuwon Iju deceased who died intestate on the 15th day of January, 2006 at Lagos. Nkwocha John (Otherwise known as John Nkwocha ) late of 8, Wewe Street, Sari Iganmu , Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of January,2009 at Lagos. Bakare Joseph Afefun (Otherwise known as Bakare A. Joseph) late of Nama Compound Cappa Oshodi deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of December,2007 at Ikeja, Lagos. Osuntuyi Lawrence Kayode (Otherwise known as Osuntuyi Kayode) late of 20, Aremu Lawal Street, Ahmadiya Ijaiye Ojokoro, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of August, 2010 at Lagos. Mrs Nwa Sam Ekanem late of 36, Akinhami Street, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 8th day of October,2006 at Railway Hospital, (F.M.C.) Muyibi Abina Muyibi Olarenwaju (Otherwise known as Muyibi Olanrewaju and Abina Muyibi Olanrewaju) late of 8, Moloney Street, Ebute Metta Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 29th day of March, 2010 at Lagos. Abina Risikatu Ashabi (Otherwise known as Alhaja Risikat A. Abina) late of 8, Moloney Street, Ebute Metta Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 3rd day of February, 1984 at Lagos. Wale Adeoye (Otherwise known as Adeoye Wale) late of 19, Seidu Ajibowu Street, Ikeja deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of November, 2009 at Lasuth. Mr Lawrence Okoro late of 12, Fadeyi Street, Owode, Ibeshe, Rabaka Estate, Ikorodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 10th day of June, 2008 at General Hospital, Ikorodu. Adegbemi Rhoda Tolu late of 12, Seriki Street, Papa Ashafa, Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 24th day of January, 2011 at Lagos. Mr Josiah Olawanle Oyebade (Otherwise known as Mr Oyebade Olawanle) late of 3, Ifelodun Street, Idimu Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of May, 2011 at Lagos. Dele Onabanjo late of 9, Kasumu Crescent Orile Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 21st day of June, 2008 at Lagos. Mrs Adedeji Grace (Otherwise known as Grace Olasunbo Adedeji (Mrs) late of 11, Ayodele Amuda Street, Pipeline Bus Stop, Idimu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of June, 2011 at Lagos. Emmanuel Agwegiokhe , late of 14, Jubril Shittu Street, Ikorodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 24th day of June, 2010 at General Hospital Ikorodu,Lagos. Ehigie Herrienta Adesuwa late of 6b, Bisi Barlin Street, Ikosi, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of May,2009 at Benin City. Mrs Mary Philomena Isumanu (Otherwise known as Mrs Mary Isumanu ) late of 35b, Rotimi Street, Tedi Town, Ojo, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 11th day of March, 2011 at Lagos. Paul Adepegba Ayoade late of 24, Yisa Oladimeji Street, Abule Egba, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of February,2009 at Abuja. Mrs Baiyewu Victoria Ayodele (Otherwise known as Mrs Victoria Ayodele Baiyewu) late of 1, Alhaji Kutere Street, Aga Ikorodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 6th day of December,2008 at Lagos. Mr Felix Gedzah (Otherwise known as Gedzah Felix) late of 23, Odofin Compound Ijanikin Lagos State, deceased who died intestate on the 31st day of March,2011 at Lagos. Ajibona Femi Dahunsi late of 15, Majiyagbe Street, Ipaja Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 31st day of October, 2007 at Ipaja Ayobo Area L.G. ,Lagos. Mr Jelili Ashiru late of 69, Kekereowo Street, Ilasamaja, Mushin, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of March, 2010 at 69, Kekereomo Street Elegbede Akanni Bolaji late of 10, Araromi Street, Shogunle, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of March, 2008 at Abeokuta Mrs Christianah Oyewunmi Adegbite (Otherwise known as Adegbite Oyewunmi Christianah A.) late of Block 527, Flat 5, LCHE Oke Afa, Isolo, Lagos State, deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of November, 2008 at Lagos. Mr Bankole Ogunniyi late of 25, Anjorin Street, Ijegun Lagos, deceased whodied intestate on the 29th day of July, 2008 at Luth. Mr Mukaila Ayilara late of 5, Agoro Street, Mushin, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 26th day of January, 2008 Miss Animashaun Olayiwola Samiat (Otherwise known as Miss Olayiwola Samiat Animashaun ) late of 7, Godwill Street, Iyana Cele Bus Stop Agbado, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 7th day of April, 2011 at Lagos. Cpl Muktar Yinusa (Otherwise known as Mr Yinusa Muktar) late of 563, Agege Motor Road, Shogunle, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of February, 2011 at Kogi. Dr Bayode Ayatian (Otherwise known as Ayatian ) late of 22 Road, E Close, Block 2, Flat 7, Festac deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of October, 2008 at Lagos. Olusola Enitan Ayatian late of 22 Road, E Close, Block 2, Flat 7, Festac Town, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 3rd day of January, 2009 at Marietta State of Georgia. Effiong Uduak, late of 27, Otta Road off Orile Agege, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 21st day of November, 2008 at Lagos. Olalere Thomas Niyi late of Block A 96, Federal Housing Anthority Surulere Estate, Alagbado, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of June, 2010 at Lagos. Mr Adekunle Akanni Adebayo (Otherwise known as Mr Adekunle Adebayo) late of No. 2A, Ajayi Bembe Street, Abule Oja Yaba Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 20th day of October, 2007 at Lagos. Sousa Sese Anathacie, late of 13, Karimu Street, Onipanu Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 15th day of December, 1973 at Lagos. Mr Lasisi Akanni Rafiu (Otherwise known as Mr Lasisi Akanni) late of 8, Ojo Oniyun Street, Apapa Road, Ebute Metta, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of July,2009 at Lagos. Mr Moses Adedeji Adesanya late of 21, Folarin Street, Alimosho, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of March, 2008 at Lagos. Prince Francis Bassey Duke (Otherwise known as Bassey Duke Francis) late of 4, Abibu Oki Street, Surulere, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of September, 1996 at Lagos. Enginneer Alade Mufutau Adio (Otherwise known as Mufutau Alade) late of 56, Mufutau Alade Street, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 3rd day of January, 2007 at Lagos. Adesegun Salami (Otherwise known as Mr Adesegun Salami) late of 9A, Goriola Oseni Street, oto Awori, Lagos State deceased who died intestate on the 25th day of March, 2002 at Badagry General Hospital. Emordi Chinedu (Otherwise known as Emordi Edwin Chinedu) late of 11, Ajayi Bankole Street, Agodo Egbe Ikotun Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 16th day of December 2008 at Luth. Ajide Joshua (Otherwise known as Ajide Joshua Sunday) late of 43, Olafela Street, Ikorodu, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 29th day of April,2011 at Lagos. Ojo John late of 62, Ikola Road, Off AIT, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of May,2004 at Ibadan. Felix Egobi (Otherwise known as Hon. Felix Ayodeji Egobi and Egobi Felix) late of 22, Lawani Street, Alakoto, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of January, 2006 at Irua Specialist Teaching Hospital, Irua Edo. Godwin Chukwudumogu Oyi (Otherwise known as Oyi Godwin Chukwudumogu Oyi) late of 25, Salawu Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 30th day of August, 2009 at Lagos. Dr. Akerele Flavius Abiola late of 53, Tokunbo Street, Lagos Island deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of October, 2008 at Lagos. Colonel Edward Mobolaji Osasona late of Block X45, Officer Village Ojo Military deceased who died intestate on the 23rd day of October ,2010 at Lagos. Mr Boniface Nwoye Ogba (Otherwise known as Ogbah Boniface Nwoye) late of 156, Idewu Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 14th day of November,2006 at Lagos. Nnamdi Azunnah (Otherwise known as Mr Nnamdi Azunnah and Mr Nnadi Azunnah) late of Block 13, Room 27, Queen’s Barracks Apapa, Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 5th day of August,2008 at Apapa. Ayedun Jacob late of 29, Fashina Street, Iwaya, Lagos, State, deceased who died intestate on the 12th day of July,2009 at Lagos. Arba Eunan late of 53, Ayanwale Street, Ojokoro Ijaiye deceased who died intestate on the 17th day of march,2010 at Lagos. Akinbo Jubril late of 31, igbehinadun Street, Shasha, lagos deceased who died intestate on the 18th day of January,2009 at Lagos. Mr Adebisi lateef Ayofe late of No. 20, Ajayi Ibe Street, Oko Oba Agege, Lagos deceased who died intestate on the 1st day of June,2009 at lagos. Okafor Ifeanyi late of 15, Oloje Street, Papa Ajao Mushin Lagos, deceased who died intestate on the 13th day of November,2009 at Lagos. Moshood Adekunle Kuye (Otherwise known as Chief Moshood Adekunle Kuye) late of Plot 2, Adekunle Kye street, Aguda, Surulere, Lagos, late who died intestate on the 1st day of march,1999 at Ijebu ode,Ogun State.

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78.

NAMES OF APPLICANT APPLYING FOR THE GRANT Mrs Olufunmilayo Akinkunmi and Mr Rotimi Aganga-Williams both fo 181, Herbert Macaulay Street, Yaba, Lagos, sister and brother respectively of the said deceased. Christopher Bejide, Ezekiel Bejide, Grace Adedeji and David Bejide all of c/o 322, Herbert Macaulay Street, Sabo Yaba, Lagos State four children of the said deceased. Ojumu Adetoun Kehinde and Ojumu Segun both of Blk 1, Plot 17, peace Estate Isheri Olorin, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mr Sunday Ede and Parick Ede both of Flat 466, Ikota Estate father and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mr Okon Bassey and Glory Eyo both of No. 9, Wewe Street, Sari Iganmu, Lagos, widower and sister respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Tukuru Kuburat and Mr Tukuru Lateef both of 5, Asagoh Quarters Badagry, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Patience Bassey Jemina Bassey both of 11, Ade Akiode Street, Fagba, Agege, Lagos widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Patricia Adeniyi Martins and Abayomi Michael Adeniyi –Martins both fo 10, Echo Crescent Ikotun Lagos (Ijegun) widow and the only child respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Olusola Adefunke Bada and Miss Aderonke Oluwaseun Bada both fo 3rd Cele Finayon Area Badagry, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Joy Anodo and Mr Izuchukwu Anodo both of Block 58, Jakande Housing Estate, Isolo, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Anah Esther Chizoba and Anah Daniel Chukwudi both fo 17/20, Kehinde Street, Meiran Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Omolara Raliat Jaji of 59, Amudalat Street, Agodo Ikotun , Egbe, Lagos, and Mudashiru Olasunkanmi Jaji of Blk 3, Flat 1, Phase 1, Jakande Estate, Adeniji Adele Road, Lagos ,widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Gabriel Amarvi and Grace Amorvi both fo 42, Enigbokan Street, Abule Egba, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Faith Ekezie of 24, Ogunbowale Street, Ilasamaja and Obinna Ekezie of 4, Busura Street, Ikotun, Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Temidayo Olatunde and S.T. Ojo both of 14 SS Jemigbon Close, Apollo Estate, Ketu, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Babagbemi Muinat O. and Miss Babagbemi Aminat O. both of Adeniran Ogunsanya College of Education Staff Quarter Otto, Awori widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Rev. Nwosu Nnaemeka and Chine Chizoba both of 24, Church Street, Oshodi , Lagos, widower and sister respectively of the said deceased. Taiwo james Abayomi , Olojakpoke Bamidele Abiola and Gbadebo Janet Kemi all of 16, Irepodun Street, Ijaiye Ojokoro, Lagos, three of the children of the said deceased. Pastor prince Ewa Ana and Elizabeth Ewa Ana both fo 15, Bada Street, Mosahlashi Mushin, two of the children of the said deceased. Esther Olufunke Olotu and Oyinkansola Comfort Olotu both of 26, Alarape Street, Iyana Oworo new garage , widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Hope Ngozi Okorie and Mr Dickson Nnamdi Okorie both of 50, Kayode Street, Iyana Ejigbo, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Edwin Onyeka of 8/10, Broad Street, Lagos, and Roselyn Onyeka of 19, Olatilewa Street, Surulere, lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Ezeonyinchukwuka and Mrs Ngozi Julie Oranye both of 5, Jimoh Bajulaye Street, Ifako gbagada, Lagos, two children of the said deceased. Mrs Adeleke Oluwabunmi Idowu and Mr Daniel Adeleke both of 3, Ifeoluwa Street, Ori Okuta, Ikorodu, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Ayedun Olajumoke and Mr Adebowale Sola Ayedun both fo 24, Toyin Davies Street, Ejigbo , widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Olubunmi Ajike Dawodu and Mrs Yewande Arinola Odimayo both of Ayawoele Road, Olaoluwa Villa Aja Owode Ajuwon Iju widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Nkwocha L.Robert, Nkwocha I. Fidelis, Nkwocha C. Pricilla and Nwachukwu G. Oluchi all of Blk D12, Flat Dinipetrol Estate, Satellite Town, three children and cousin respectively of the said deceased. Ojo Bakare and Okeowo Bakare both fo Nama Compound Cappa Oshodi two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Osuntuyi Titilayo ,Osuntuyi Olutosin Ayinde, Osuntuyi Omolola Ajoke and Osuntuyi Olufisayo Modupe all of 20, Aremu Lawal Street, Ahmadiya Ijaye Ojokoro Lagos ,widow and three children respectively of the said deceased. Mfon Jimmy of 1, Odunlade Street, Shomolu the only surviving child of the said deceased. Arole Otolorin Adenike and Arole Taofekat Tobi both of 8, Moloney Street, Ebute Metta, Lagos, two children of the said deceased. Arole Otolorin Adenike and Arole Taofekat Tobi both of 8, Moloney Street, Ebute Metta, two children of the said deceased. Adeyinka Olukemi Adeoye and Adebimpe Adeoye both of 19, Seidu Ajibowu Street, Ikeja, widow and only surviving child respectively of the said deceased., Lawrence Goddy and Lawrence Sunday both fo 12, Fadeyi Street, Owode Ibeshe, Rabaka Estate, Ikorodu, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Adegbemi Adeniyi Yohaness, Adegbemi Emmanuel, Olulana Oluwafemi and Samson Oluwafemi all of 12, Seriki Street, papa Ashafa Agege, Lagos, widower and three children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Grace Olufunmilayo Oyebade and Mr Olaniran Johnson Oyebade both of 3, Ifelodun Street, Idimu, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Onabanjo Tina and Adedapo Onabanjo both of 9, Kasumu Crescent Orile Agege, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Ebenezer Adedotun Adedeji and Temitope Ruth Adedeji both of 11, Ayodele Amusa Street, Pipe Bus Stop, Idimu, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Agwegiokhe E.Grace and Emmanuel Agwegiokhe both of 14, Jubril Shittu Street, Ikorodu, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Omoighe E. Samuel of 29, Unity Street, Off Okhoro Road Benin City and Okunbor Mary Pauline of 6b Bisi Barlin Avenue Ikosi Lagos, brother and sister respectively of the said deceased. Mr Kingsley Ikojoka Nduka of 4, Ovuru Street, Cassidey Okokomaiko, Ojo Lagos, and Mrs Theresa Ayika of 3, Akputu Road, Phase II Elijah Bus Stop, Araromi Town, Badagry, Lagos, one of the children and sister respectively of the said deceased. Florence Oyeade and Oyebade Ayoade both of 11, Oyewole Street, Ilupeju palmgrove, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Beiyewu Oluwaseun and Baiyewu Tolulope both of 9, Bammosu Street, Ebute Ikorodu, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Josephine Gedzah of 23, Odofin Compound Ijanikin Lagos and Mr Astu Gedzah of 13, Kasali Street, Ijanikin Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mr Amos Adelani Ajibona and Funmilayo Ajibona both fo 15, Majiyagbe Street, Ipaja, Lagos, father and sister respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Funmilayo Ashiru, Mrs Remilekun Ashiru, and Mr Akin Ashiru all of 69, Kekereowo Street, Ilasamaja, Mushin, Lagos, two widows and brother respectively of the said deceased. Dorcas Elegbede of 19, Ayetoro Road, Ladiko Street, Abeokuta and Christiana Elegbede of 10, Araromi Street, Shogunle, Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Rev. Adeleke Adegbite and Iyanuoluwa Ruth Adegbite both of Block 527, Flat 5, LCHE Oke Afa Isolo Lagos State, widower and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Clara Ogunniyi and Mr Olufemi Ogunniyi both of 25, Anjorin Street, Ijegun Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Bukola Ayilara ,Mr Mumuni Alabi Ayilara and Mr Ismaila Ayilara all of 5, Agoro Street, Mushin, Lagos, widow,one of the children and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Banjo Kofoworola (Nee Onabanjo) of 7, Godwill Street, Agbado, Lagos, the only surviving child of the said deceased. Sule Yinusa of 563, Agege Motor Road, Shogunle, Lagos, the only surviving child of the said deceased. Oluwafunsho Ayatian and Omolola Ayatian both fo 22 Road, E Close, Block 2, Flat 7, Festac Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Oluwafunsho ayatian and Omolola Ayatian both of 22, Road, E Close, Block 2, Flat 7, Festac two of the children of the said deceased. Ime Effiong of 27, Ota Road, Off Orile Agege, Lagos, Otobong Effiong of 8, Omilade Street, Mafoluku, Lagos, brother and sister respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Victoria M. Olalere and Miss Comfort O. Olalere both fo Block A 96, Federal Housing Anthority Surulere Estate, Alagbado, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Omotayo Adebayo and Miss Biola Adebayo both of No. 2A, Ajayi Bembe Street, Abule Oja Yaba, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Abayomi Baretto of 25, Omibiyi Street, Ogba, Ikeja, Lagos, and Toyin Reis of No. 13, Karimu Street, Odi -Olowo Mushin, Lagos ,two grandchildren of the said deceased. Mr Samusideen Lasisi, Miss Kudirat Akanni, Miss Adijat Akanni and Musiliu akanni allof No.8, Ojo Oniyun Street, Apapa Road, Ebute Metta, Lagos, four of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Matilda Kikelomo Adesanya, Mr Michael Adegbenga Adesanya and Mr Morounfolu Adeleke Adesanya all of 21, Folarin Street, Alimosho, Lagos, widow and two of the children respectively of the said deceased. Barr. Ekpo Bassey-Duke, Mr peter Bassey Duke and Barr. (Mrs) Helen Aruk Bassey Duke (Nee Bassey-Duke) all of 4, Abibu Oki Close, off Adeniran Ogunsanya Street, Surulere, Lagos, three of the children of the said deceased. Chief Mrs Alade Sefiat Mogbonjubola and Alade Rokeebat Oyetoro both of 56, Enginneer Mufutau Alade Street, Mosolasi Road, Egan Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Wusamot Salami and Mr Ademuyiwa Salami both of 9A Goriola Street, Oto Awori ,the widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Emordi Ngozi of 32, Ayanwale Street, Ikotun Egbe and Emordi Chuka Jasket of 22, Aludada Street, Okota Lagos, widow and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Florence Kehinde Ajide and Tolulope Ajide both of 43, Olowofela Street, Ikorodu Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mr Ojo Olubayo Moses, Mr Ojo Adewale and Mrs Ojo Oluyemisi all of 62, Ikola Road, Off AIT Lagos, three of the children of the said deceased. Egobi Franklin Omogbai , Victor Egobi both of 22, Lawani Street, alakoto, Lagos, and Egbeokhaiarhe Samson of Block 6, Flat 4, Kayode Street, NPA Quarters, M/B two of the children and brother respectively of the said deceased. Mercy Uchechukwu Oyi of 25, Salawu Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, Mr Arinze Sabinus Oyi of 24, Havana Street, Okota, Lagos, Dr Anthonia Ogechukwu Oyi of 195, Kirikiri Road, Apapa, Lagos, and Mrs Ezeh Rita Tobechukwu of 24, Havana Street, Okota, Lagos, widow and three of the children respectively of the said deceased. Akerele Sunday Foluso and Akerele David Oludayo both of 53, Tokunbo Street, Lagos, Island ,Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Janet Osasona and Mr Ekundayo Osasona both of Block X 45 Officers Village Miitary Ojo, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mrs Chidimma T. Ogbah of 156, Idewu Street, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, and Mrs Clara A. Ezeojih of 7, Ajakaiye Street, Unity Estate, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Mercy Azunnah and Chukwudi Azunnah both of Block 13, Room 27, Queen’s Barracks, Apapa, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Johnson Ayedun, Taiwo Ayedun and Olatunji Ayedun all of 29, Fashina Street, Iwaya, Lagos, three of the children of the said deceased. Akafore Sylvanus Eunan of 53, Ayanwale Street, Ojokoro Ijaiye and Daniel Eunan of 242, Army Barracks Ibereko Abule 2 Badagry Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Taibat Aderemi Adenola and Mr Shakiru Olalekan both of 31, Igbehinadun Street, Shasha Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased. Mrs Omowunmi Adebisi and Miss Rukayat Adebisi Adebomi both of 20, Ajayi Ibe Street, Lagos, widow and one of the children respectively of the said deceased. Wilson Okafor and Gladys Okafor both of 15, Oloje Street, Papa Ajao Mushin, lagos, father and mother respectively of the said deceased. Mufutau Adegbolahan Kuye of 2, Kaffo Crescent Lagos, and Adedolapo Ayodeji Kuye of 18, Olaboye Street, Iwaya Onike ,Lagos, two of the children of the said deceased.

G.A SAFARI (MR.) PROBATE REGISTRAR

August 8, 1


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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

POLITICS THE NATION

E-mail:- politics@thenationonlineng.net

• Dr Fayemi during the interaction.

Integration will change Southwest Ekiti State Governor Kayode Fayemi spoke with editors of The Nation when he visited the Lagos Corporate Headquarters of Vintage Press Limited on Southwest regional economic integration, the minimum wage debacle, challenge of governance, the proposed constitution amendment and clamour for a Sovereign National Conference (SNC). Excerpts: Minimum wage

T

HERE is no conspiracy against the national minimum wage. It has not received the most necessary critical analysis by the media and politicians. For us in the Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN), we believe that we should pay the National Minimum Wage. But we are also bound by the agreement of the Governors Forum with the Nigeria Labour Congress that it should be paid in a manner that reflects the realities and peculiarities of the state. I think that is what we are trying to achieve. There are issues. Fourteen governors were not part of the decision that produced the National Minimum Wage that was announced by the President, because we were not part of the negotiation that culminated into it. That does not mean that government is not a continuum or that we cannot inherit assets and liabilities. N18,000 is not too much; it is not up to a living wage. One hundred and twenty dollars is not a living wage; but payment should reflect the reality in the various states and zones. The minimum wage principle, which was pioneered by United Kingdom, is to protect the interest of workers that are either not tenured or workers in the lowest cadre. The governirs do not have problem with Level one to six. Where it breaks down is where 100 per cent increment is replicated for Levels Nine to 17. Labour did not want to compromise that.

Our strategy in Ekiti In Ekiti, I brought NLC chairman to the Fiscal Allocation Committee meeting to see the financial situation of the state. I exposed the comrade chairman of NLC in Ekiti to the financial books; the IGR, the federal allocation. After two meetings, he refused to come again. He said it was not his job to come to that meeting and that I as the governor should look for the money to pay the minimum wage. I have done much for workers since I assumed the reins. I have restored car loans, housing loans. I was the first to pay relativity wage in the Southwest. I obliged the demands of medical doctors and health workers. What exactly constitutes minimum wage? In Ekiti, we have the policy of reducing tuition for

students, who are children of workers; teachers, civil servants and others. Before, they paid N150,000 a tuition in the state-owned university. Some have two children, amounting to N300,000. They now pay N50,000 for each child, thus saving N200,000. Where should that social benefit be reflected? Is that part of the minimum wage or not? How should we classify that? That aspect is never included in the debate. We provide free health, free education , social security for the elderly. There is 200 per cent cut from tuition. We need a holistic debate on this issue. It is not that governors do not want to pay. There is a difference between a case of “won’t pay and can’t pay. I need to do everything to make sure that I make life easier for our workers. In Ekiti, we had settled for relativity wage, which other states in the Southwest have latched on to. In Ekiti, the minimum wage was N9,000. When we did relativity, it came N13,000. From N9,000 to N18,000, that is hundred percent increase. At that, the implication is that every month, we will be paying N200 million more. Where it breaks down is where you now ask governors to prorate the senior cadre; from Level Seven to 17 and replicate that 100 per cent increase. That is the problem. It is not that governors are opposed to it. Labour, on the other hand, is fighting for the interest of workers. NLC wants it reflected for all the workers. But we are also confronted with the campaign promises that we made. It is not a zero sum game and not one against the other. but the reality is that we made those promises and we must fulfill them. Infrastructure development is not cheap. Social service is not cheap. But if I use almost 80 percent of the resources of Ekiti State servicing less that a 100,000 workers, it is not sustainable. Apart from Lagos and Ogun,

which are not borrowing money to pay, in the Southwest, I am the only one that is so affected. I told workers that I wanted to do integrated bio-metric pay roll system, they were up in arms because they know what will come up at the end of the exercise. The salary bill of Ekiti should not be what it is now. Even, if I pay all the minimum wage, it should not be up to that. Something somewhere must be tackled and you need some level of boldness to do what is not popular, but it has to be tackled.

Regional Integration One of the things we need to do is to come together. Interestingly, Ekiti became the template that others decided to use. Lagos and Ogun are slightly different. But the four of us came together: Edo, Ekiti, Osun, Oyo; and we compared the figures and we reached a level of understanding. We discovered that our labour leaders always played us against one another. They would go to Ondo and say, Ekiti is already paying this or that. We had to agree on a fixed amount, rather than a prorated percentage amount for the rest of workers from Level Seven to 17. But it became a problem in Osun because Osun has not done relativity before the minimum wage debate. Ekiti had done it. Oyo quickly followed. Osun has now done it. That is part of the peer learning that has to happen to strengthen the workforce. The public service across the board is poor. There is a high level of de-motivation; there is no interest beyond salary. In Ekiti, one of the first things I started was that nobody should be automatically promoted in the service. The practice is that when you spend three years on level seven, you move to the next stage. Once I said the senior permanent secretaries would take ex-

‘The salary bill of Ekiti should not be what it is now. Even, if I pay all the minimum wage, it should not be up to that. Something somewhere must be tackled and you need some level of boldness to do what is not popular, but it has to be tackled’

aminations to become the Head of Service, everybody woke up. They knew that I was not going to choose anybody that is politically close to me. So, there was examination for the civil service. I called Prof. Ladipo Adamolekun from the World Bank and requested him to do the exam for the senior permanent secretaries. He did it and the person who came first became the Head of Service. Everybody was shocked. By the time we did the examination for the remaining permanent secretaries, those who failed were asked to leave. It was clear that they were leaving because they did not pass the exams. They were not happy, but it became a standard practice. By the time I got to the school principals, they accepted it a ‘Fayemi’s way’ and that they must do exams before they move to the next level. I believe that, gradually, things are going to improve. You cannot make it a one-way traffic. You cannot say people should do exams, if you don’t provide the right incentive to work with. That is part of what we are doing to change the tone and improve governance, including establishing an Institute of Governance for public servants, similar to what we had in Adebayo Adedeji’s Institute of Public Administration in those days for the training of civil servants. So, that is something we have decided to collectively share. There are other aspects that are critical to the peer learning process. We have decided to set up a technical committee to look at the mechanics of working together. We also decided that we must have somebody in charge of regional integration in each of our states. We all have things to share with one another, whether it is Abiye Maternal Programme in Ondo or the infrastructural development in Lagos, or job initiatives in Osun and Ekiti. We have things we can share. We decided at that meeting that, if we need to work together, we had to embrace the entire, original Western Region; from Lagos to Delta, rather than from Lagos to Ekiti. The regional economic integration is more concentrated, apart from the institutional development. Areas of cooperation cover power, integrated development, infrastructural development, and agriculture. We can make faster progress in all of those areas, instead of sticking to governance framework alone, though •Continued on page 18


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

POLITICS

Step Jonathan missed, by Senator S • Dr Fayemi, Commissioner for Information Mr Funminiyi Afuye, and Chief Press Secretary Yinka Oyebode.

‘Why we merged varsities’ •Continued on page 17

that will not be excluded.

Education I don’t agree with the suggestion of dramatic consolidation of our tertiary system. Who would like to associate with the three glorified secondary schools, which we called universities? Not even Lagos, with all its resources, has three universities. Lagos has LASU and it is still struggling. Rivers has University of Science and Technology. It is still struggling. Ondo State had two, but it has to step down the Science and Technology one that started under Agagu. There is Ambrose Ali University in Edo and DELSU in Abraka (Delta). Ogun has two; Tai Solarin University of Education and Olabisi Onabanjo University. Go and look at what is happening to education in Ogun. I am not suggesting that we cannot have many more universities than we have in Ekiti. But, if we do, it should be a conscious effort to turn Ekiti to the Massachusetts of Nigeria and where we actually export qualitative education and people come there for that purpose. Even in the Massachusetts we are talking about, of the 100 or so universities that are there, only about six are state-owned. others are private. They are doing very well, but they are private universities. And we felt that there was no need of keeping three universities, just in name only. It was not our decision per see. The education summit that we put together came up with that.

Secondary education We did not just do it at the university level, we also consolidated at the secondary level. We are probably the first state that did that in the country. We put together the junior and senior secondary schools in Ekiti. In my own old school (Christ School), we had four principals and they were fighting one another. It is the first school in Ekiti. They were even fighting over who would collect the rent for social events because they rent out the premises for social events every weekend. The junior school principal would say they were using part of his premises in the same school for social events. It became a major impediment. I asked the Minister of Education, when I visited her why we don’t have this artificial division in federal government colleges. She said ‘I don’t know. I don’t know why they do it in the states too, but I think what you have done is right and I will recommend it to other states’. That has necessitated the reduction in the number of principals in those schools, and “demoting” some of them to vice principal status. Again, this is not unique. When we were in school in the past, somebody could be a Vice Principal in Christ School and become a principal in Ayede Grammar School. It was the grade of the school that determined

what you are and the status you carried as a principal. These are the things we just need to make clear to our people, even if they are unhappy about it. No doubt, a lot of people are not happy about the steps I have taken on this issue, but I am convinced this is the right way to go to have quality education.

Infrastructure in the universities At the same time, we are looking at the question of infrastructure. We just advertised the position of the Vice Chancellor in the University of Ekiti now. And I have literarily handed off beyond the subvention we have increased to the university. I was determined to put together a Governing Council worth its name, not just appointing politicians who would go and collect contracts. So, I chose somebody I have a lot of respect for, not just because he is an old boy of my school, but because he knows much about education as the Chairman of the Governing Council, Prof.Jide Osuntokun. Other members are Prof. Pat Utomi, Dr Kole Shetima of the MacArthur Foundation, Prof. Agbede of UNILAG Law Faculty. I know that such people will turn the university around. Even, the university can generate resources, even, with the N50,000 that we reduced the fees to. The first problem is that Ekiti State University does not know the number of students that are in the university. So, how do you plan? I asked the Vice Chancellor: Can you give me the five-year strategic plan for this university? They did not have. This is the university where every money is depleted quickly, but the research fund is never touched because nobody applied for it. So, I believe we really need to do something drastic about it. And that is why we arrived at the decision to consolidate the university. It will be tough, but with determination, we can turn around the fortune of the university, particularly if we can get a solid academic, not a VC without a CV, into the position of Vice Chancellor to run the place.

‘The question of council poll is a very important one. The election that took place, which they called local government election in Ekiti, ACN did not take part in it in December 2008. We protested. We went to court. We decided that an incohate electoral agency cannot organise a legitimate election. It was also done outside of the time provided for under the electoral law’

Row over federal university It is one of the impediments resulting from the flawed federalism. The federal government wanted to set up universities in the six zones. They approached the governors to suggest the location. I did not suggest my village as many of my colleagues did. I said, given the spread of educational facilities in the state, it is better to locate it in the northern part of the state, where the largest community is Ikole. That was the town I suggested and that was what the minister, Kenneth Gbagi, took away to the federal government. It was surprising to me to hear that they had taken it to Oye. I refused. I thought it was not just about location, it was also about the authority of the governor in a federal system. Yes, you can give me a gift, but I should have a say in the way the gift is managed. But this is not a gift. We are also part of this federation. I don’t see it as a gift in that sense. I was put in an invidious situation because where they decided to put the university happens to be my own local government. So, my people felt that I was undermining my local government. I felt one must be fair in whatever he does. At the end of the day, it was resolved that the university, which focuses on agriculture, engineering and bio-technology, should be split between the two communities, Ikole and Oye, in a win-win situation for us in Ekiti.

Local government elections The question of council poll is a very important one. The election that took place, which they called local government election in Ekiti, ACN did not take part in it in December 2008. We protested. We went to court. We decided that an incohate electoral agency cannot organise a legitimate election. It was also done outside of the time provided for under the electoral law. We won that case eventually. The only reason we have not had local government elections in Ekiti was because we did not have electoral body. Why didn’t we have electoral body? The electoral commission is one of the statutory bodies in the Nigerian constitution. Those who were members of the commission under Mr Oni took me to court, saying that they were statutory appointees and should be allowed to serve out their tenure. There was no way I could have allowed something to be put on nothing. If the person who appointed you had been declared illegal, how can I then concur with the idea that you must stay in office? I would be condoning illegality. Consequently, there was a decision in their favour and we paid them off for the remaining period they were to remain in office, in order for us to be able to appoint a new set of commissioners. We are in a position to hold the elections within the next couple of months. In fact, the elections won’t be later than January.

ENATOR Akin Odunsi, who represents Ogun West Senatorial District in the Senate, numbers today among the most traumatised Nigerians. Reason: The worsening plight of ordinary Nigerians who have for long been starved of good things of life. Before his election in April, he had attained the status of an icon in the advertising world. he said his love for the common man led his to the different world of partisan politics. Indeed, from his discussion with The Nation it may not be a shock to many if in future, he pulls off his robes in the Senate in vehement defence of bills that can give a new lease of life to people of his constituency whom he claimed, are suffering pathetic neglect. “Why would this accomplished man plunge himself into Nigeria’s dirty politics?,” the reporter had wondered to his hearing. His response was instantaneous: “I had been enjoying my retirement quietly until I was called out by my people. I had to do their bidding because I saw it as an opportunity to serve the. Unemployment in my community ranks among the worst in the country. And when you have such a large army of unemployed people, you can sleep and be at peace. The restlessness in the district worries me as a person. That is why I’m working in collaboration with the state government, the local government and agencies to find solution to it. “On infrastructure, there is no single road in my district. When you get to Imeko and start going to the suburbs, you will know that there is no single motorable route there. It is appalling. During my campaigns, I toured those places and I got completely shattered by the level of abandonment of the area. I believe the state government is working at it and I also think we can collaborate and do something fast to bring succour to the residents.” When asked how prepared was the Senate to rise to the occasion to make Nigerians smile, Odunsi replied, exuding confidence: “With the quality of the debates so far held on the floor of the Senate, there is no doubt that the 7th National Assembly means well for Nigerians. He therefore unveiled his feeling about the Upper Chamber on the challenges ahead: “In the Senate, we don’t draw a line between parties. We are Senators of the Federal Republic of Nigeria and not of any party. To that extent, the idea of being in the opposition does not really matter. Of course, some of the discussions get coloured by political leanings and small parochial interests, but I think we all swore to an oath to serve our country. This, to a large extent, has really reflected in the quality of contributions on the floor of the Chamber. And quite interesting is the fact that the Senate President David Mark has done well at stabilising the House with perceptible impartiality.” He would not end the discussion without talking about the killings and bombings in the land. Almost in tears, the Senator said: “I’m worried and my heart goes out to the families of the victims of the criminal incidents that have spread fear all over the land. And I think that our security agencies need to learn more and do more. Our security agencies are only reactive and not proactive. They need to sniff out

By Dada Aladelokun, Assistant Editor

potential problem areas. Our security agencies need to be trained and well equipped.” Assessing President Goodluck Jonathan and his administration so far, he said: “I had expected that the President who knows that the Senators are there to work with him to meet with them, regardless of their party lines. I have spent almost three months in Abuja; I have not set my eyes on the President. It wouldn’t happen in America. The President would have welcomed and met with the Senators and show that he is actually the people’s President; not with our President. He might have met his party’s Senators, but by now, we are in governance and as such, politicking should have been over. He should have held a reception for the Senators in Abuja. That is how to build bridges and show that he wants to work for the nation. “So far, the President has not done anything tangible; rather, he has been chasing shadows. There is not power in this country; there are millions of jobless Nigerians; there is infrastructural decay. The President left such issues and started talking about tenure. The administration has left what it should do and busy over things of no relevance to average Nigerians. He has performed poorly. He has no made any key policy statement; rather, he has been making hasty decisions. Look at the issue of Justice Ayo Salami; look at the issue of Libya where he made hasty declaration of support for the new government there without having consulted with even the ECOWAS which he chairs; not even African Union. Look at the attack on Abuja UN Office, which might not be unconnected with such overzealous statements.” He, however, had a piece of advice for the aggrieved: “Nigerians should exercise a little more patience. They should understand that what is happening now is a script written somewhere by some people. They should realise that the worst civilian administration is far better than the best military regime. We need more dialogue. We need to talk more and even the media should do more to keep the government on its toes. We at the legislative end know that we have the duty to join hands with the executive in selfless service to our people. So, I preach more patience.”

•Odunsi


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THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

51


52

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

IN THE HIGH COURT OF LAGOS STATE OF NIGERIA PROBATE REGISTRY, LAGOS DIVISION WHEREAS the person whose names are set-out in the first Column under died intestate on the date and place stated in the said Column. AND WHEREAS the person or persons whose names and addresses and relationship (if any) to the deceased are set out in the second Column here have applied to the High Court of Lagos State for a Grant of Letter of Administration of the Real and Personal Properties of the deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY given that Letters of Administration will be granted to such persons unless a NOTICE TO PROHIBIT THE GRANT is filed in the registry within (14) days from the date hereof. S/N

S/N

NAMES OF THE DECEASED PERSON:

1. MRS. IYARE AGATHA LATE OF 22, ALEXANDER AVENUE, IKOYI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON 7TH DAY OF FEBRUARY 2003 AT LAGOS. 2. MRS. ABIMBOLA OTARU WALLS KNOWN AS OZOFU ABIMBOLA WALLS LATE OF 7B, CAMERO ROAD, IKOYI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 18TH SEPTEMBER, 2009 AT LONDON. 3. MRS. MILDRED ADUKE LADELE KNOWN AS LADELE MILDRED ADUKE LATE OF C2, OLANREWAJU ESTATE, YABA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTETSTAE ON THE 20TH DAY OF MARCH, 2009 AT LAGOS. 4. PA. SAMSON OLUWAFEMI BEJIDE LATE OF NO. 1, SADIKU STREET, IPONRI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 18TH DAY OF JUNE, 2007 AT LAGOS. 5. ENIFE MUJOH FRANCIS KNOWN AS FRANCIS IKIYOUADOU MUJOH LATE OF 37, AJAYI OLAIYA STREET, BARIGA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON 28TH SEPTEMBER, 2009 AT IKORODU, LAGOS. 6. AMINAT H.A KNOWN AS AHMED AMINAT ABIKE LATE OF 8, IWO STREET, JAKANDE AJAGBADI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 4TH DAY OF DECEMBER, 2010 AT PORT-HARCOURT, RIVERS STATE. 7. MR. DENNIS EIKOYI LATE OF 6, OGUNTAYO STREET, ABULE IJESHA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 5TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2010 AT LAGOS. 8. GORDON MORU EGBUSON LATE OF CLOSE 1, HOUSE 5, SATELLITE TOWN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 18TH DAY OF MARCH, 1984 AT LAGOS. 9. BAKARE WAHEED KNOWN AS BAKARE WAHEED AKANDE LATE OF 4, KASIM MOMODU STREET, BADORE VILLAGE, AJAH, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 6TH DAY OF FEBRUARY, 2011 AT LAGOS. 10. ISAAC ADENIYI ODESILO LATE OF 34, SIMPSON STREET, EBUTE METTA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 14TH MARCH, 1980 AT LAGOS. 11. ALHAJA NUSIRAT OSINOWO LATE OF 6, BABATUNDE STREET, SURULERE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 29TH DAY OF MAY, 2003 AT LAGOS. 12. CORPORAL SAIDU PINDAR KNOWN AS CPL. PINDAR SAIDU LATE OF M.T.D POLICE BARRACKS, IJORA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 8TH OF OCTOBER, 2010 AT LAGOS. 13. MR. RAPHEAL NWANKWO IKEDIOBI LATE OF 1, DAVID EAST STREET, IJEGUN ROAD, SATELLITE TOWN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 13TH DAY OF JULY, 1979 AT LAGOS. 14. OLADIMEJI SAMUEL AREMU LATE OF 6, OLADIMEJI STREET, OFF TUNDE OLOKO STREET, LANBE OGUN STATE WHO DIED INTETSTATE ON THE 4TH DAY OF APRIL, 2011 AT LAGOS. 15. CHIEF EMMANUEL FOLA OMIDIJI KNOWN AS OMIDIJI FOLA, OMIDIJI AKANNI, OMIDIJI EMMANUEL, OMIDIJI OSHO, OMIDIJI FOLAHAN, OMIDIJI OLUWATONI, OMIDIJI EMMANUEL FOLA, OMIDIJI SHOFOLAHAN, OSO AKANNI, OLUWATONI OSHO AND AKANNI FOLAHAN LATE OF 3, OMIDIJI CRESCENT, GUDUGBA STREET, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 22ND JUNE, 1994 AT IFO. 16. PA. SAMUEL BAKARE FARODOYE LATE OF 17, DESALU STREET, EBUTE METTA, APAPA ROAD, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 8TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 1977 AT LAGOS. 17. EZEUNALA BASIL LATE OF 9, ADEYEMO STREET, MAFOLUKU OSHODI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTETSTAE ON THE 13TH FEBRUARY, 2009 AT LAGOS. 18. ADEWOLE TAIWO LATE OF 30, SOMEFUN STREET, ADIYAN, ABULE EGBA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTETSTAE ON THE 24TH DAY OF MAY, 2009 AT LAGOS. 19. PA. EMMANUEL OMOKAYODE AJIBOLA ONAFOWOKAN KNOWN AS PA. EMMANUEL AJIBOLA ONAFOWOKAN AND ONAFOWOKAN AJIBOLA O. LATE OF 2A, ALADO QUARTERS, IJESHA, IJEBU WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 23RD MARCH, 2010 AT IKORODU, LAGOS. 20. STEPHEN OLUSANMI FOWOWE KNOWN AS FOWOWE STEPHEN LATE OF 9, YUSUF STREET, ORILE, OSHODI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 2ND FEBRUARY, 2008 AT LAGOS. 21. ALHAJI YUSUF AREMU OLA-LAWAL KNOWN AS AREMU OLAYOLE LATE OF 6, OLATUNJI STREET, IFAKO GBAGADA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 19TH JULY, 2007 AT LAGOS. 22. MRS. OLUFUNMILAYO SERIKI KNOWN AS FUNMILAYO HAMZA RAIMI AND SERIKI FUNMILAYO LATE OF 4, LAWSON ALLOY STREET, LAGOS ISLAND, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 16TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2008 AT LAGOS. 23. LUCKY ALFRED LATE OF 44, BUHARI STREET, OGUDU, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 16TH DECEMBER, 2010 AT LAGOS. 24. ABUDU GANIYU LATE OF 27, ADEBAYO STREET, BARIGA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 24TH AUGUST, 2009 AT LAGOS. 25. MR. JACKSON OLUGBUYI OGUNBANJO KNOWN AS MR. JACKSON LATE OF BLOCK A, FLAT 16, NEPA TESTING ESTATE OFFIN, IKORODU, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 21ST APRIL, 2010 AT LAGOS. 26. AFAM NESIKE KNOWN AS AFAM EFUN ENEMUO NOZIKE LATE OF 14 SAINT SAVIOUR STREET, OKOTA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 30TH DECEMBER, 2010 AT LAGOS. 27. FELIX AYEGBA KNOWN AS AYEGBA FELIX LATE OF LINE A, BLOCK 2, ROOM 9, IJEH POLICE BARRACKS, OBALENDE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 20TH DAY OF DECEMBER, 2008 AT KOGI STATE. 28. MOSES ADESANYA ASAIYE LATE OF 16, THEOKUNSI STREET, ALAPERE, KETU, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 22ND FEBRUARY, 1964 AT LAGOS. 29. MOSES ABIOYE ADE-GORITE LATE OF 7, WILLIAMS LADEGA STREET, MUSHIN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 2ND MAY, 2010 AT LAGOS. 30. SAMSON PAUL LATE OF 26, SHOMEFUN STREET, AJEGUNLE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 5TH MARCH, 2011 AT AGEGE, LAGOS. 31. MR. CHRISTIAN NWACHUKWU ANIKPE KNOWN AS CHRIS NWACHUKWU ANIKPE LATE OF 28, MARY STREET, OWODE-AJEGUNLE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 1ST MARCH, 2011 AT NEW DELHI, INDIA. 32. MRS. JULIANA ADETUTU AGBELUYI KNOWN AS AGBELUYI J. ADETUTU LATE OF 9, AWAWU STREET, MUSHIN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 25TH AUGUST, 2008 AT LAGOS. 33. MR. MUSIBAU AKERELE LATE OF 5, IBADIARAN STREET, ONIGBOBGBO, MARYLAND, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 13TH SEPTEMBER, 2009 AT LAGOS. 34. MR. ANTHONY UDEANI KNOWN AS MR. ANTHONY UDEANI C. AND UDEANI ANTHONY LATE OF 3, JESSICA SCHOOL CLOSE, FIDISO ESTATE, AJAH, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 31ST MAY, 2011 AT LAGOS. 35. ALBERTA KEHINDE SANYA KNOWN AS SANYA ALBERTA KEHINDE LATE OF PHASE 4, BLOCK 100, FLAT 4, ADENIJI ADELE HOUSING ESTATE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 6TH DAY OF JUNE, 1998 AT LAGOS. 36. MRS. MERCY JOMBO LATE OF 16, AIYEGUN STREET, ORILE IGANMU, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 6TH SEPTEMBER, 2010 AT LAGOS. 37. MR. LATEEF ATUNDE LATE OF 1, OLUWASANNU STREET, MAFOLUKU, OSHODI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 18TH JULY, 2010 AT LAGOS. 38. STEPHEN AREMU MAKINDE LATE OF 104, N.N.P.C PIPELINE ROAD, OKE- ADO ABORU, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 7TH FEBRUARY, 2008 AT LAGOS. 39. MR. JOACHIM OLUCHUKWU UMEH LATE OF 10, ADEKITAN STREET, MUSHIN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 7TH MARCH, 2010 AT LAGOS. 40. EMMANUEL ADEKUNLE OREDIPE KNOWN AS MR. OREDIPE ADEKUNLE LATE OF 1, FASORO LANE, SURULERE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 11TH JUNE, 2000 AT LAGOS. 41. NGOZI EBINUM KNOWN AS EBINUM NGOZI LATE OF BLOCK 32, FLAT 9, CVD BARRACKS, OJO, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 25TH SEPTEMBER, 2007 AT LAGOS. 42. MR. PATRICK ODU MADAGUA LATE OF BLOCK 5, FLAT 30 B, AYANGBURA JUBILEE ESTATE, IKORODU, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 6TH APRIL, 2010 AT IKORODU, LAGOS. 43. MR. FRANCIS CHUKS NWAZU KNOWN AS CHUKS NWAZU LATE OF 48, IJESHA ROAD, ITIRE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 26TH FEBRUARY, 2008 AT LAGOS. 44. MR. PAUL SIMON UDOH KNOWN AS PAUL SIMON UDO LATE OF FLAT 755, IKOTA HOUSING ESTATE, AJAH, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 28TH MARCH, 2010 AT IKOT. 45. TAJUDEEN OLAITAN LATE OF 22G, CLOSE, FESTAC TOWN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 1ST MARCH, 2010 AT LAGOS. 46. RAIMI AJANAKU KNOWN AS MR. AJANAKU RAIMI LATE OF 25, MOSHALASHI, MUSHIN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 23RD DAY OF MARCH, 2010 AT LAGOS. 47. MR. EMMANUEL EKEMEZIE LATE OF 3, EBUN OLORUN STREET, PEDRO, BARIGA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 26TH MARCH, 2011 AT LAGOS. 48. MR. AJAYI EMMANUEL LATE OF 12, ABARI COURY COMPOUND, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 19TH JULY, 2007 AT LAGOS. 49. MR. EMMANUEL AMENTO KNOWN AS MR. AMETO EMMANUEL LATE OF 43, OLODON STREET, IJORA, BADIA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 6TH MAY, 2008 AT LAGOS. 50. NZEDINMA OGUEGBE DANIEL LATE OF 10, ADEREMI STREET, BARIGA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 17TH MAY, 2004 AT LAGOS. 51. MRS. GRACE ALFRED KNOWN AS MRS. GRACE ALFRED SAMUEL LATE OF NO. 10, JUBILEE COLLEGE STREET, MEBANU OKOKO, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 5TH MAY, 2007 AT OGUN STATE. 52. EKE SAMUEL AKWAZEMA KNOWN AS EKE SAMUEL LATE OF 8, OLAIYA ADIO CRESCENT OBADIRE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 26TH OCTOBER, 2010 AT LAGOS. 53. MR. SADIKU AKANNI IBADIARAN KNOWN AS MR. SADIKU A. IBADIARAN LATE OF IKATE ELEGBUSHI ROYAL FAMILY WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 14TH FEBRUARY, 2003 AT LAGOS. 54. CHIEF RAYMOND EZE LATE OF 7A, ASA AFARIOGWU STREET, AJAO ESTATE, OSHODI WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 28TH OCTOBER, 1999 AT LAGOS. 55. OGUNMOLAWA JOEL OLUSOLA KNOWN AS JOEL OLUSOLA OGUNMOLAWA AND OGUNMOLAWA OLUSOLA LATE OF BLOCK 317, FLAT 5, ABESAN ESTATE, IPAJA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 25TH DECEMBER, 2007 AT OWO, ONDO STATE. 56. MRS. AYODELE EBUN KONU IDRIS ANIMASHAUN KNOWN AS MRS. A.E K IDRIS- ANIMASHAUN AND IDRIS- ANIMASHAUN AYODELE EBUN KONU LATE OF 5, AFINNI STREET, SURULERE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON 8TH JULY, 2009 AT LAGOS. 57. STELLA ADUNOLA ALAKIJA LATE OF 42, AYODELE OKEOWO STREET, GBAGADA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 6TH FEBRUARY, 2009 AT ROCHESTER. 58. MRS. JANE ABEBELE LATE OF 14, MUSBAU STREET, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 29TH AUGUST, 2010 AT LAGOS. 59. ABEL IVEANNUMU AKHIGBE KNOWN AS A.K.A DEDE MILAHO AND AKHIGBE ABEL LATE OF 14, JOHN ADEBIYI STREET, IKOTUN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 10TH MARCH, 2007 AT LAGOS. 60. MR. SAMUEL UMAR OBAKA KNOWN AS OBAKA SAMUEL LATE OF 20, ITAONI STREET, SHOGUNLE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 22ND MARCH, 2010 AT KOGI STATE. 61. SIMEON EFFIONG LATE OF 88, OJO ROAD, AJEGUNLE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 18TH JULY, 2009 AT LAGOS. 62. DR IGNATIUS ESE AKPELE LATE OF 2 NIYI ADEDEJI STREET, OGUDU GRA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON 30TH DECEMBER, 2010 AT ATLANTA, U.S.A. 63. OLUBAYO ADEFEMI KNOWN AS ADEFEMI OLUBAYO- OLALEKAN LATE OF ALLI-OWE ESTATE IKORODU, LAGOS. WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 18TH APRIL, 2011 IN GREECE. 64. MR. ABIOLA TAIWO KOLAWOLE KNOWN AS TAIWO KOLAWOLE ABIOLA OF NO. 3, KIKELOMO AYOLA CRESCENT, THOMAS ESTATE, AJAH, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 22ND OCTOBER, 2010 AT LAGOS. 65. MR. RAUFU TAIWO KNOWN AS TAIWO RAUFU LATE OF 60B, AGBAMU STREET, AMUKOKO, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 11TH MAY, 2008 AT LAGOS. 66. MRS. IRENE OMOBUBA JACKS KNOWN AS JACKS OMOBUBA IRENE LATE OF 60, MEDIUM BARRACKS, KIRIKIRI, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 13TH FEBRUARY, 2004 AT LAGOS. 67. CHIEF EZEKIEL OWOYEMI AINA LATE OF 22, CARDOSO STREET, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 7TH MARCH, 2002 AT LAGOS. 68. OKEKE ANAYO ROBINSON KNOWN AS ROBINSON ANAYO OKEKE LATE OF 12, IGBO UKWU STREET, IGBOELERIN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 30TH JANUARY, 2009 AT LAGOS. 69. MRS. SHINABA SYLVIA (S.A.N) KNOWN AS MRS. SYLVIA SHINABA AND SYLVIA EKPE LATE OF 26, BUSH STREET, MARYLAND, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON 23RD DECEMBER, 2010 AT LAGOS. 70. ABDULMALIK ADEKUNLE MEMUD KNOWN AS MALIK MAMUD LATE OF P& T QUARTERS, MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS, IPAJA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 11TH AUGUST, 2008 AT LAGOS. 71. OLADIPUPO OYEBANJI POPOOLA KNOWN AS OLADIPO OYEBANJI POPOOLA AND MR. POPOOLA OLADIPUPO OYEBANJI LATE OF 22, MARISU STREET, OGUN-OJULE IGANDO, EGAN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 2ND JULY, 2009 AT LAGOS. 72. YUNUSA BABATUNDE OWOLAWASE KNOWN AS OWOLAWASE YINUSA, YINUSA OWOLAWASE LATE OF 91, BUNMI AJAKAYE STREET, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 22ND MARCH, 2010 AT LAGOS. 73. MR. JAMES AZUOKWU LATE OF 15, ESIE STREET, IJEGUN SATELLITE TOWN, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 11TH SEPTEMBER, 2009 AT LAGOS. 74. MR. SAMUEL IKEDIONWU AJARHS KNOWN AS AJAH SAMUEL AND AJARH SAMUEL IKEDIONWU LATE OF 15, RAIMI STREET, SARI IGANMU, ORILE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 5TH JANUARY, 2008 AT UMUNACHI, IMO STATE. 75. ALHAJI WAHEED A. SHIYANBOLA LATE OF BLOCK N3, FLAT 4, LOW COST HOUSING ESTATE, OKE- AFA, ISOLO, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON 14TH OCTOBER, 2009 AT LAGOS. 76. TOMA GONJING KNOWN AS GONJING TOMA LATE OF BLOCK 13, FLAT S 9, BONNY CANTONMENT, V/I. LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 10TH JUNE, 2009. 77. GODFREY CHUKWUE NWANZE LATE OF 89/93, WASILATU DAUDDU STREET, IJESHA, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE O N THE 23RD OCTOBER, 2008 AT LAGOS. 78. FELIX NWOSU KNOWN AS NWOSU FELIX CHINWUBA LATE OF 19, ILE OGBO STREET, IJESHATEDO, SURULERE, LAGOS WHO DIED INTESTATE ON THE 3RD NOVEMBER, 2010 AT OWERRI.

G.A SAFARI (MR.) PROBATE REGISTRAR

August 8, 1

NAMES OF APPLICANT APPLYING FOR THE GRANT

1. MRS TASI GBAJUMO AND MARAIAM GIWA- OSAGIE BOTH OF 22, ALEXANDER AVENUE, IKOYI, LAGOS. ONE OF THE CHILDREN AND GRAND DAUGHTER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 2. MR. ANDREW SHORT WALLS AND MR. ADO IBRAHIM KADIR TEMITOPE MUSA BOTH OF 7B, CAMEROON ROAD, IKOYI, LAGOS. THE WIDOWER AND SON OF THE SAID DECEASED. 3. MS. OMOLOLA ABIODUN LADELE, MR. GBENGA LADELE AND MS. OMOBOLAJI AMOKE LADELE OF 20, OLORUNTOYIN STREET, PAPA AJAO, MUSHIN AND C2, ALANREWAJU ESTATE, YABA, LAGOS. THREE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 4. DEACONESS TAIWO BEJIDE AND MR. KEHINDE BEJIDE BOTH OF NO. 1, SADIKU STREET, IPONRI, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 5. MRS. ROSELINE MUJOH AND MR. PHILLIP MUJOH BOTH OF NO. 37, AJAYI OLAIYA STREET, BARIGA, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 6. DAUDA ABDUL SALAMI AND MRS. JIMOH BOLANLE BOTH OF 8, ALHAJI IWO STREET, AJAGBADI, LAGOS. THE BROTHER AND SISTER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 7. MARIA UGBO DENNIS AND REGINA EHI DENNIS BOTH OF 21, ANU OLUWAPO STREET, SOMOLU, LAGOS. THE TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 8. MRS. VERONICA A. EGBUSON AND LILIAN T. EGBUSON BOTH OF CLOSE 1, HOUSE 5, SATELLITE TOWN, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 9. ALHAJA MOJISOLA BAKARE AND QUDUS BAKARE BOTH OF 4, KASIM MOMODU STREET, BADORE VILLAGE, AJAH, ETI OSA, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 10. MR. ODEWOLE ODESILO, MR. ABAYOMI MORGAN, MR. OLUMUYIWA ODESILO AND MR. BABATUNDE ODESILO ALL OF 34, SIMPSON STREET, EBUTE METTA, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 11. MRS. ADENIKE BAJULAIYE AND MRS. OMOLARA ABAMS BOTH OF 6, BABATUNDE STREET, SURULERE, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 12. MRS. RECCA PINDAR MSHELIA AND MR. PATRICK MSHELIA BOTH OF N.T.D POLICE BARRACKS, IJORA OLOPA, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND BROTHER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 13. IFEANYI IKEDIOBI AND EMEKA IKEDIOBI BOTH OF 1, DAVID EAST STREET, IJEGUN, SATELLITE TOWN, LAGOS. TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 14. OLADIPO OLADIMEJI AND OLAIDE OLADIMEJI BOTH OF 6, OLADIMEJI OFF TUNDE ALOKO LAMBE, OGUN STATE. THE TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 15. MR. OLUWATONI OMIDIJI, MRS. MOYO OMIDIJI, REV. SAMUEL AJAYI ADEGBOYEGA AND ALHAJI CHIEF ABDUL GANIYU BADERU ALL OF 3, OMIDIJI CRESCENT, IJU, LAGOS. THE WIDOW, ONE OF THE CHILDREN, COUSIN AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 16. MR. JOHNSON OLAOSEBIKAN FARODOYE AND MR. ABRAHAM OLADIRAN FARODOYE BOTH OF 17, DESALU STREET, EBUTE METTA, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 17. MRS. CHIKA OLIVIA EZEUNALA AND MR. JOHNSON OKPALA BOTH OF 15/16D, LAWS PLAZA BBA TRADE FAIR. THE WIDOW AND NEPHEW OF THE SAID DECEASED. 18. MRS. JUMOKE AJEWOLE AND MR. AGUNSOYE ALABA BOTH OF 30, SOMETUN ADIGUN STREET.LAGOS THE WIDOW AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 19. MRS. MARY ADUNOLA ONAFOWOKAN, MRS. YETUNDE ADAMSON, MRS. ABIODUN OKPEKU AND MR. CHRISTOPHER ABIODUN ONAFOWOKAN OF 11, BABATUNDE STREET, OKE-IRA, OGBA, IKEJA, A.F FEDERAL HOUSING ESTATE, IKORODU AND 2, ADEDO QUARTERS, IJESHA- IJEBU. THE WIDOW AND CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 20. MRS. JANET A. FOWOWE, MR. ADEBAYO T. FOWOWE AND MR. SAMSON O. FOWOWE, ALL OF 9, YUSUF STREET, ORILE, OSHODI, LAGOS THE WIDOW AND TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 21. MR. NASIRUDEEN OLA-LAWAL AND MR. AKEEM OLA-LAWAL, BOTH OF 6, OLATUNJI STREET, IFAKO, GBAGADA, LAGOS. THE TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 22. AKEEM HAMZA AND RASHEED HAMZA BOTH OF 4, LAWSON ALLLOY STREET, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 23. MRS. YETUNDE ALFRED AND MR. SUNDAY ALFRED BOTH OF 44, BAHARI STREET, OGUDU, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 24. AJIRATU ABUDU GANIYU OF 27, ADEBOYE STREET, BARIGA, LAGOS. THE ONLY SURVIVING CHILD OF THE SAID DECEASED. 25. JOHNSON OLUGBENGA OGUNBANJO AND JULIUS OLUKOREDE OGUNBANJO BOTH OF BLOCK A, FLAT 16, NEPA TESTING ESTATE, OFFIN, IKORODU, LAGOS. TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 26. MICHAEL NOSIKE AND CHUKWUDI ANIKPATA BOTH OF 14, ST. SAVIOUR STREET, OKOTA, LAGOS. THE BROTHERS OF THE SAID DECEASED. 27. MRS. CHRISTIANA FELIX AYEGBA AND CLEMENT AYEGBA BOTH OF LINE A, BLOCK 2, ROOM 9, IJEH POLICE BARRACKS, OBALENDE, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 28. MR. KAYODE ASAIYE ADESANYA, PHARM KOLAWOLE ASAIYE ADESANYA AND MRS. BOLANLE KAZEEM, ALL OF 16, THEOKUNSI STREET, ALAPERE, KETU, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 29. KOLA ADEGORITE AND BOLANLE OLAGUNJU BOTH OF 7, WILLIAMS LADEGA STREET, MUSHIN, LAGOS. THE TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 30. OMOWUNMI PAUL, BOSE PAUL AND OJO PAUL ALL OF 26, SHOMEFUN STREET, AJEGUNLE, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 31. MRS. OZOEMENA H. ANIKPE, MISS IFEYINWA O. ANIKPE AND MR. OBINNA C. ANIKPE ALL OF 28, MARY STREET, OWOADE AJEGUNLE, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 32. OMOTOLA KAYODE, REBECA OLAPO AND COMFORT OYELEYE OF 22, TAPA STREET, LAGOS 17 A.U.P ROAD,OTA AND BLOCK 261, FESTAC, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 33. MISS KAFILAT B. AKERELE AND MISS SHAKIRAT O. AKERELE BOTH OF 5, IBADIARAN STREET, ONIGBONGBO, MARYLAND, LAGOS. TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 34. OGECHUKWU UDEANI AND ARINZE UDEANI BOTH OF JESSICA SCHOOL CLOSE FIDISO ESTATE, AJAH, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 35. BERNARD SANYA AND SILVERIA ABIOLA SANYA BOTH OF PHASE 4, BLOCK 100, FLAT 4, ADENIJI ADELE HOUSING ESTATE, LAGOS. TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 36. MR. ANTHONY O. JOMBO AND MISS EDITH I. JOMBO BOTH OF 16, AIYEGUN STREET, ORILE IGANMU, LAGOS. THE WIDOWER AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 37. MR. SULEMON ATUNDE AND MR. ABDULFATAI IDRIS BOTH OF 31, MORADEYO STREET, KUJE, AMUWO, LAGOS. THE BROTHER AND COUSIN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 38. MRS. ESTHER ASABI MAKINDE AND MISS VICTORIA OMOLABEKE MAKINDE BOTH OF 104, PIPELINE ROAD, ABORU, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND DAUGHTER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 39. MRS. UMEH FRANCISCA TOCHUKWU AND MR. CHARLES EZEANYIN OF 10, ADEKITAN STREET, IKOTUN, LAGOS AND 22, ROAD, FLAT 10, FESTAC, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND UNCLE OF THE SAID DECEASED. 40.ADEBOLA O. DOSUMU (MRS) ADELEKE O. OREDIPE AND DR. ADEMOLA O. OREDIPE ALL OF 1, FASORO LANE, SURULERE, LAGOS. THREE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 41. MRS. FELICIA IBOBO OF BLOCK 32, FLAT 9, CVD BARRACKS, OJO, LAGOS. THE MOTHER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 42. MRS. THERESA OLUREMI MADAGUA AND MR. AUGUSTINE AYANSHOLA MADAGUA BOTH OF BLOCK 5, FLAT 30B, AYANGBUREN ESTATE, IKORODU, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 43. MRS. IFEANYI FLORENCE EMEFIENA NWAZU AND MRS. DADA CHETEOGOM AKINRODOYE BOTH OF 48, IJESHA ROAD, ITIRE, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND SISTER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 44. EMMANUEL PAUL SIMON AND UDUAK PAUL SIMON BOTH OF FLAT 755, IKOTA HOUSING ESTATE, AJAH, LAGOS. TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 45. ALHAJA MUIBAT OLAITAN AND BABAJIDE OLAITAN BOTH OF 22, ROAD, G CLOSE, FESTAC TOWN, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND SON OF THE SAID DECEASED. 46. TAIWO BANIRE AND MRS. MUSILI AYENI BOTH OF 25, MOSHALASHI STREET, MUSHIN, LAGOS. THE DAUGHTER AND COUSIN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 47. MRS. EUNICE EKEMEZIE, MR. OBINWANNE EKEMEZIE AND MISS OGUGUA EKEMEZIE ALL OF NO. 13, EBUN OLORUN STREET, PEDRO, BARIGA, LAGOS THE MOTHER, BROTHER AND SISTER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 48. MR. AYOADE AJAYI AND MR. ADEGBOLA AJAYI BOTH OF 12, ABARI COURY COMPOUND, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 49. MRS. DEBORAH S. AMENTO AND MISS TEMITOPE S. AMENTO BOTH OF 43, OLODON STREET, IJORA, BADIA, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 50. MR. GODWIN NZEDINMA AND MR. UGOCHUKWU NZEDINMA BOTH OF 35, ORE-OFE STREET, IKOTUN- IJEGUN, LAGOS. THE TWO BROTHERS OF THE SAID DECEASED. 51. ALFRED I. SAMUEL AND PIUS ALFRED BOTH OF 10, JOBILLE COLLEGE STREET, MEBANU OKOKO, LAGOS. THE WIDOWER AND BROTHER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 52. EKEH CHIBUZOR KINGSLEY AND EKEH NDIDI PATIENT BOTH OF 8, OLAIYA ADIO CRESCENT, OBADORE, OKOKO, LAGOS. TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 53. MRS. MUYINAT S. IBADIARAN AND RISIKATU S. IBADIARAN BOTH OF IKATE ELEGUNSHI ROYAL FAMILY COMPOUND. THE TWO CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 54. MRS. HELEN C. EZE AND MR. WILSON C. EZE BOTH OF 7A, ASA AFARIOGUN STREET, AJAO ESTATE, OSHODI, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 55. OGUNMOLAWA OLUWAKEMI OF 15, AKINFE STREET, AJAO ESTATE, ANTHONY, LAGOS. THE ONLY SURVIVING CHILD OF THE SAID DECEASED. 56. MR. WAKEEL IDRIS ANIMASHAUN AND TITILOLA DOHERTY BOTH OF 5, AFINNI STREET, SURULERE, LAGOS.TWO OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 57. MRS. MOJISOLA I. BAFUNSHO AND ALH. RASHEED O. ADENUSI BOTH OF 3, VICTOR OLAIYA STREET, SURULERE, LAGOS. THE CHILD AND BROTHER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 58. GRACE WILSON AND ZILAYEFA VICTOR GEAORGE BOTH OF AGHI AVENUE, OJO, LAGOS. THE TWO CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 59. MRS. KUDIRAT AKHIGBE, MR. ABEL AKHIGBE (JNR) AND MR. SUNDAY AKHIGBE ALL OF 14, JOHN ADEBIYI STREET, IKOTUN, LAGOS. THE WIDOW , ONE OF THE CHILDREN AND BROTHER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 60. MR. TIJANI ATAWODI AND MR. PETER ANAJA BOTH OF 2, KEFFI STREET, OBALENDE, LAGOS. THE BROTHER AND COUSIN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 61. ROSE SIMEON EFFIONG AND PRECIOUS AKPAN MOSES BOTH 0F 88, OJO ROAD, AJEGUNLE, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND SISTER – IN –LAW OF THE SAID DECEASED. 62. MR TONY D. AKPELE AND MISS ANNA AKPELE BOTH OF 41 MASHA ROAD SURULERE, LAGOS. THE BROTHER AND NIECE OF THE SAID DECEASED. 63. MRS. TITILAYO ADEFEMI AND MR. ABIODUN ADESANYA ADEFEMI BOTH OF ALLI OWE ESTATE, IKORODU LAGOS. THE MOTHER AND BROTHER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 64. MRS. ABIOLA MOSUNMOLA AYOOLA AND MR. ABIOLA O.O BOTH OF 3, KIKELOMO AYOOLA CRESCENT, THOMAS ESTATE, AJAH, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND SON OF THE SAID DECEASED. 65. MR. SAIDI TAIWO OF 60B, AGBEMU STREET, AMUKOKO, LAGOS. THE FIRST SON OF THE SAID DECEASED. 66. AKINOLA ADEBAYO BAJULAIYE AND CHIDI TOCHUKWU UMEAKAZE BOTH OF IYA AGAN STREET, EBUTE METTA WEST, LAGOS. THE ONLY SURVIVING SON AND FAMILY FRIEND OF THE SAID DECEASED. 67. DR. ABAYOMI AINA AND OYETOLA AINA BOTH OF 22, CARDOSO STREET, LAGOS. THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 68. MRS. HELEN OKEKE AND MR. GABSON OKEKE BOTH OF 12, IGBO- UKWU STREET, IGBO- ELERIN, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 69. ENGR. MOHAMMED SHINABA AND MISS ADIAT SHINABA BOTH OF 26, BUSH STREET, MARYLAND, LAGOS. THE WIDOWER AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 70. HADIJAT KUBURAT MALIK AND AMINAT OMOTAYO MALIK BOTH OF P& T, QUARTERS, MINISTRY OF COMMUNICATIONS, IPAJA, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 71. MRS. ADEDOYIN POPOOLA AND MR. GBOLAHAN POPOOLA OF 22, NASIRU STREET, IGANDO, EGAN, LAGOS AND 3, AJALA CLOSE, ALIMOSO, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 72. RASHEEDAT TINUOLA OWOLAWASE OF 91, BUNMI AJAKAYE STREET, LAGOS. THE ONLY SURVIVING CHILD OF THE SAID DECEASED. 73. MRS. FAITH ENUOMA AZUOKWU AND MR. ALFRED AZUOKWU BOTH OF 15, ESIE STREET, IJEGUN, EGBE SATELLITE, TOWN, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ELDER BROTHER OF THE SAID DECEASED. 74. MRS. ANGELLA A. AJARHS AND MR. AJARHS KENNETH C BOTH OF 15, RAIMI STREET, SARI IGANMU, ORILE, LAGOS. THE FATHER AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 75. ALHAJA SIKIRAT A. SHIYANBOLA, USMAN OLADIPUPO SHIYANBOLA AND MURITALA O. SHIYANBOLA ALL OF BLOCK N3, FLAT 4, JAKANDE ESTATE, OKE AFA, ISOLO, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 76. GRACE T. GONJING AND ZAMANI GOMAN BOTH OF BLOCK 13, FLAT 19, BONNY CANTONMENT, VICTORIA ISLAND, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND BROTHER RESPECTIVELY OF THE SAID DECEASED. 77. NWANZE FRANCISCA NKEMDILIM, KINGSLEY ENWLIM NWANZE, ONYINYECHUKWU NWANZE AND TOBECHUKWU NWANZE ALL OF NO. 89/93, WOSILATU DAUDU STREET, IJESHA, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND THREE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED. 78. BLESSING IJEOMA NWOSU AND IFUNAYACHUKWU CHUKWU NWOSU BOTH OF 19, ILEOGBO STREET, IJESHATEDO SURULERE, LAGOS. THE WIDOW AND ONE OF THE CHILDREN OF THE SAID DECEASED.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

53

NEWS

How to tackle Boko Haram insurgency, by Yuguda

Ambrose Alli lecture for Thursday

•’Menace in class of OPC, Delta militants and Arewa Youth Vanguards’

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HE Boko Haram menace should not be treated as a religious phenomenon but as a reaction to the social problems in the country, Bauchi State Governor Isa Yuguda said yesterday. He said the insurgency by the group is beyond religious fanaticism, saying only dialogue, provision of jobs, tightening of security, remain the only ways to handle the security threat posed by the group. Yuguda spoke in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital, yesterday while on a commiseration visit to Oyo State Governor Abiola Ajimobi over the August 26 floods in Ibadan.

‘Gaddafi evading capture in a Mercedes’

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UAMMAR Gaddafi has escaped in a state-of-the-art armoured vehicle provided by Nicolas Sarkozy, it emerged yesterday. In the latest extraordinary twist to the Libyan rebellion, it emerged that the French President gave the ‘green light’ to the Arab dictator receiving the £3.5 million converted Mercedes 4x4 in 2008. Not only is it fitted with communications systems capable of keeping Gaddafi in touch with his forces, but it can foil the kind of tracking systems used by the military as they try to hunt him down. It was Mr Sarkozy who ordered French jets to start bombing Gaddafi’s forces back in March, and last week he and Prime Minister David Cameron enjoyed a triumphant trip to the newly liberated Tripoli. But investigative news site Mediapart has found documents proving that French technology firm Amesys was allowed to provide Gaddafi with the command vehicle. The revelation comes on the day pro-Gaddafi fighters fired anti-aircraft guns at revolutionary forces holding the northern gate of Bani Walid for a second day, as frustration with weeks of halting advances grew among the former rebel ranks. Libyan rebel fighters fire rockets as they pressed forward near Ouagadougou Conference Center in the outskirts of Sirte. A second front has reportedly opened up in the city’s east

From Bisi Oladele, Ibadan

He donated N10 million to the Oyo State Government to assist it in handling the problems created by the floods of fury. More than 100 people died in the floods besides property worth billions of naira destroyed. Yuguda, whose state is one of the core areas of operation of the group, likened the group to sectional militant groups like the Oodua Peoples Congress (OPC), the Niger Delta militants and the Arewa Youth Vanguard. He said most members of the group are either young men frustrated by unemployment or people merely fighting perceived injustices in the system. His words: “All these killings of policemen, bombing of police stations and shoot-

ing of politicians, and so on, are beyond offshoots of religious fanaticism like the Maitatsine of the past. “The Boko Haram is like other pressure groups such as the paramilitary arms of political parties or the youth organisations like the Niger Delta militants in the Southsouth, the OPC in the Southwest and the Arewa Youth Vanguard in the North. They seem to be protesting against social injustice notably mass unemployment. With the army of unemployed youths that we have in the country, we should be able to know that an idle hand is a devils’ workshop. “The Boko Haram is a social problem that requires dialogue and at the same time, the government should tighten up security against those that are criminally minded. In

doing this, those that are criminally-minded will be treated as criminals. We will criminalise those that are criminals and rehabilitate those that are merely agitating for social justice by creating jobs for them. Government should see to job creation and employment for the youths to stem restiveness in the country.” Yuguda stressed the urgent need for Oyo State Government in collaboration with the Federal Government to dredge the channels of all the major rivers in Ibadan with a view to preventing flooding. He said his donation will assist the government in its infrastructural reconstruction following the havoc wreaked by the flood across the city. Yuguda stated that he knows the terrain of Ibadan very well, having undergone

•Yuguda... yesterday his national youth service in the old Oyo State and as an honorary chieftaincy title holder in Oyo town. The Bauchi governor who spoke on the history of Ogunpa flood disaster, said something urgent must be done to put an end to Ibadan flooding. Ajimobi expressed appreciation to Yuguda, being the only governor after Ekiti State Governor Kayode Fayemi whom he described as an Ibadan resident – to visit the state over the flood.

THE fourth yearly Prof Ambrose Alli Distinguished Leadership Lecture series comes up at the Bishop Kelly Pastoral Centre, Benin on Thursday. A motivation book, The Portrait of Service, is also due to be presented as part of the programme organised in memory of the Second Republic governor of the defunct Bendel State. Hon. Ken Imansuagbon, a lawyer, educationist and philanthropist will deliver the lecture. He will speak on Unemployment and security question in Nigeria: The Leadership Challenge. Prof Friday Okonofua, fellow of the West African College of Surgeons and the Nigerian Postgraduate College in Obstetrics and Gynaecology and founder, Women’s Health and Action Research Centre (WHARC), will present the book, which Hon. Victor Osarenren will review. A former federal lawmaker and social commentator, Hon. Josef Omorotiomwan, will chair the event. The organisers, say the lecture is aimed at keeping the memory of Alli alive.

Mark salutes ‘orator’ Ndaguba From Onyedi Ojiabor, Assistant Editor

•Niger State Governor Dr. Mu’azu Babangida Aliyu (right) presenting appointment letter to Larai Alkali, an assistant education officer, at the flag off of the issuance of appointment letters to 1,900 Graduate Engagement Scheme candidates, at the Idris Legbo Kutigi International Conference Centre, Minna...yesterday. With them is the Civil Service Commission chair Alhaji Ndagi Aliyu

Mamora, Gani Adams, Adefuye for Yoruba Heritage award

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ENATOR Olorunnimbe Mamora is the winner of this year’s ‘Yoruba Heritage Award’, its organisers said in a statement in Lagos yesterday. The senator, who was nominated for the ‘Public Service category’ is expected to receive the award in United Kingdom on October 14 at Lighthouse Hall, Camberwell Road, London. A statement by the media consultant, Emmanuel Oghenede, listed other awardees as follows: Otunba Gani Adams (Cultural promoter), Senator Tony Adefuye (Construction), Adedeji

By Emmanuel Oladesu

Doherty (Event Centre of the year), Comrade Tokunbo Kodoro (Labour activism), Dr Rotimi Olulana (Property and Real Estate), and Chief Olayinka Amos (Political and social responsibility). Others are Odunlade Adekola, Toyin Aimaku (actor and actress), Dr Olufunmilayo Olapade (Breast cancer researcher), Femi Anikola, Director, World Bank, and Najim Mayegun (Sport).

SENATE President David Mark yesterday commiserated with the family of veteran broadcaster, Chief Ikenna Ndaguba ,who died on Sunday in Abuja . Ndaguba was former Executive Director of the Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria (FRCN). Mark, in a condolence message to the government and people of Anambra State as well as the family of the deceased, said Ndaguba’s death was a big loss to the media industry and the country. A statement by the Chief Press Secretary to Mark, Paul Mumeh, quoted him as saying that “though, Ndaguba is dead, his legacies remain with us.” “He was a seasoned professional who lived exemplary live and left a positive footprint on the sand of time,’ Mark added. The statement also described Ndaguba as “an extra-ordinary compere, orator and a good organiser” added “his velvet voice at the Federal Radio Corporation of Nigeria (FRCN) and at high profile public functions endeared him to all.”

Libya’s Transition Council denies abuse of black Africans

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IBYA’s National Transitional Council (NTC) yesterday pledged to treat foreigners accused of fighting for ousted leader Muammar Gaddafi well, and denied that anti-Gaddafi fighters had committed systematic abuse of Africans. Throughout the uprising against Gaddafi’s 42-year rule, his opponents accused Gaddafi of hiring fighters from neighbouring countries like Nigeria, Niger, Chad, Mali and Sudan. That has led to fears of mistreatment of blacks now that the former rebels are in charge.

A U.N. commission of inquiry on Libya, which has not been able to enter the country since Gaddafi was driven from power, said it had received many reports of ill-treatment of black Africans and dark-skinned Libyans by anti-Gaddafi fighters. Media reports from Libya have shown cowed blacks herded into trucks and raised accusations of summary executions. Blacks captured by anti-Gaddafi forces have told Reuters that they were innocent migrant workers mistaken for Gaddafi fighters.

Mohammed al-Alagi, identified as the minister of justice and human rights of the NTC, told the U.N. Human Rights Council that Gaddafi had used mercenaries to kill Libyans, but that any of them captured would be treated fairly. “The Gaddafi regime declared war on the Libyan people, and used foreign mercenaries,” al-Alagi said. “But when captured they will still have the right to an appropriate trial before an ordinary judge and according to international law.” He added: “We do not

make any distinction among people on grounds of colour. And we do not discriminate against our brothers from African countries.” Gaddafi’s loyalists also accuse their opponents of using mercenaries. They said yesterday they had captured 17 foreigners — some British and French — in what would amount to a severe blow to Libya’s new rulers and their international backers. Al-Alagi said that the NTC would investigate fully any violations of human rights committed by

its fighters There have been no war crimes (by anti-Gaddafi forces),” he said. “If anything illegal has happened, it was individual acts by revolutionaries who were not acting under instructions from the NTC. We have called on the revolutionaries to treat prisoners according to Islamic Shariah and international law.” Allegations of abuse by Libya’s new authorities are uncomfortable for the NATO countries that helped install them. U.S. ambassador Eileen Chamberlain Donahoe said

having a new government in Libya would make it easier to hold it responsible for human rights. “The important point today is that we have a new government and we have a credible partner to work with and to encourage in Libya,” she told reporters. “That is where our emphasis will be in the near term — to make sure that this new government gets off on the right foot and lives up to its responsibility with respect to accountability and creation of a secure situation for all.”


54

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

EQUITIES NIGERIAN STOCK EXCHANGE DAILY SUMMARY AS AT 19-09-11 2ND-TIER SECURITIES Company Name ADSWITCH PLC UNION VENTURES & PETROLEUM PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 1 2

Quotation(N) 1.71 0.63

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 1,500 2,445.00 400 252.00 1,900 2,697.00

AGRICULTURE/AGRO-ALLIED Company Name LIVESTOCK FEEDS PLC PRESCO PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 3 4

Quotation(N) 0.50 7.00

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 4,924 2,462.00 2,300 16,215.00 7,224 18,677.00

Quotation(N) 1.87 5.69

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 1,529,746 2,861,065.82 66,194 391,242.97 1,595,940 3,252,308.79

Quotation(N) 0.50 1.30

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 2,000 1,000.00 712,665 886,937.94 714,665 887,937.94

Quotation(N) 5.49 3.90 2.80 4.25 2.06 10.20 0.50 12.59 9.35 0.70 1.15 5.43 1.42 4.06 2.09 0.60 0.67 12.45

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 6,164,137 33,236,023.12 5,125,107 19,934,146.16 564,815 1,589,342.77 1,741,397 7,512,272.98 8,229,426 16,843,120.40 5,483,458 56,001,444.84 115,700 57,850.00 4,035,548 51,014,060.26 1,044,403 9,745,032.99 251,785 176,249.50 5,000 5,750.00 3,861,137 21,011,154.91 3,817,679 5,459,735.35 5,060,388 20,403,366.92 358,100 748,429.00 10,509,124 6,237,011.70 493,264 329,486.88 6,896,532 85,493,359.17 63,757,000 335,797,836.95

Quotation(N) 220.00 85.15

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 455,461 100,225,968.35 570,399 48,930,938.96 1,025,860 149,156,907.31

Quotation(N) 19.00 7.30 98.00 43.20

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 313,751 5,984,727.28 15,000 104,780.00 184,960 17,847,102.50 117,788 5,065,704.00 631,499 29,002,313.78

Quotation(N) 9.38 24.23 1.14

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 18,893 171,078.01 131,007 3,034,363.09 18,073 19,699.57 167,973 3,225,140.67

AIR SERVICES Company Name AIRLINE SERVICES AND LOGISTICS PLC NIGERIAN AVIATION HANDLING COMPANY PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 5 19 24

AUTOMOBILE & TYRE Company Name DN TYRE & RUBBER PLC R. T. BRISCOE (NIGERIA) PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 18 19 BANKING

Company Name ACCESS BANK PLC DIAMOND BANK PLC ECOBANK NIGERIA PLC FIRST CITY MONUMENT BANK PLC FIDELITY BANK PLC FIRST BANK OF NIGERIA PLC FINBANK PLC GTBANK PLC STANBIC IBTC BANK PLC INTERCONTINENTAL BANK PLC. OCEANIC BANK INTERNATIONAL PLC SKYE BANK PLC. STERLING BANK PLC UNITED BANK FOR AFRICA PLC. UNION BANK OF NIGERIA PLC UNITYBANK PLC WEMA BANK PLC ZENITH BANK PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 164 72 23 41 92 399 8 324 23 6 4 60 22 132 12 54 14 251 1,701 BREWERIES

Company Name GUINNESS NIGERIA PLC NIGERIAN BREWERIES PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 83 110 193 BUILDING MATERIALS

Company Name ASHAKA CEMENT PLC CEMENT CO. OF NORTHERN NIGERIA PLC DANGOTE CEMENT PLC LAFARGE WAPCO PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 30 2 25 21 78

MPR increase may worsen stock market’s returns T HE increase in the Monetary Policy Rate (MPR) yesterday by 50 basis points from 8.75 per cent to 9.75 per cent might further worsen the returns outlook of the Nigerian stock market, investment managers have said. Investment managers said the higher returns on fixed income securities implied by the increase in the MPR would lead to rebalancing of portfolios in favour of fixedincome securities. “An increase in MPR will further impact negatively on the market. This will result in investment switch from equities as liquidity will gravitate towards other fixed income securities as returns on them becomes attractive. This means stock market will be worse off. Already d market has hit an all time low within the 20,000 point. Increasing the benchmark interest rate will induce a further sell down,” economist and security adviser at Sterling Capital, Sewa Wusu said. Investment analysts had expected the Monetary Policy Committee to keep the MPR stable since the focus of the MPC has been stability in both inflation rate and the foreign exchange market, two objectives that have largely been achieved in recent months with the consecutive declines in inflation

By Taofik Salako and Tonia Osundolire

rate in the past two months to single digit and relative stability of the foreign exchange market. Inflation rate is currently at 12-month low of 9.3 per cent compared with a high of 13.6 per cent during the period. But the increase appeared to have spurred the bears on. Already, the stock market closed the first trading session of the week on the negative as apprehensive investors offloaded sale orders into a low-demand market. All the key indices at the Nigerian Stock Exchange (NSE) showed an overtly bearish market, which shaved off some N95 billion from market capitalisation. The All Share Index (ASI), the benchmark value index for the entire market, dropped by 1.40 per cent from 21,106.67 to 20,811.80. Aggregate market capitalisation of all equities dropped from N6.731 trillion to N6.636 trillion. The downtrend yesterday was orchestrated by losses recorded by many blue chip stocks including Dangote Flour, GT Bank, Flour Mills, Dangote Cement, Nigerian Breweries, Oando Oil and Dangote Sugar.

Total volume of shares transacted moved up to 180.2 million valued at N816.29 million in 3,259 deals as against 147.41 million shares worth N1.47 million exchanged in 3,387 deals posted on Friday. Volume grew by 22.2 per cent while value dipped by 44.5 per cent. In all, Fidson Healthcare emerged the most actively traded stock with 44.96 million shares valued at N60.7 million in five deals. Other equities that recorded significant volume today are Transcorp, Continental Reinsurance, Unity Bank and Fidelity Bank. Roads Nigeria led gainers’ table with 4.93 per cent or N0.18 price appreciation to close at N3.83. National Salt N0.21 to closes N4.49, NCR Nigeria N0.20 to close at N4.32, Wema Bank N0.03 to close at N0.67 and Red Star Express N0.11 to close at N2.46 were other major gainers. However, Julius Berger shed maximum five per cent price or N2.61 to close at N49.64 to lead losers’. Other strong losers were; Flour Mills N3.94 to close at N75.05, Dangote Flour N0.30 to close at N5.82, Sterling Bank N0.07 to close at N1.42 and Transcorp N0.04 to close at N0.82.

CHEMICAL & PAINTS Company Name BERGER PAINTS NIGERIA PLC CHEMICAL AND ALLIED PRODUCTS PLC DN MEYER PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 4 21 2 27

COMMERCIAL/SERVICES Company Name COURTVILLE INVESTMENTS PLC RED STAR EXPRESS PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 6 5 11

Quotation(N) 0.50 2.46

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 1,151,500 575,750.00 215,000 528,900.00 1,366,500 1,104,650.00

COMPUTER & OFFICE EQUIPMENT Company Name NCR (NIGERIA) PLC. OMATEK VENTURES PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 2 2 4

Quotation(N) 4.32 0.50

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 62,000 267,840.00 11,000 5,500.00 73,000 273,340.00

Quotation(N) 1.99 30.07 0.82 39.02 27.49

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 23,344 44,353.60 260,995 7,841,994.01 23,937,218 20,381,788.44 191,244 7,178,287.43 265,286 7,271,802.68 24,678,087 42,718,226.16

CONGLOMERATES Company Name A. G. LEVENTIS (NIGERIA) PLC PZ CUSSONS NIGERIA PLC TRANSNATIONAL CORPORATION OF NIGERIA PLC UAC OF NIGERIA PLC UNILEVER NIGERIA PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 4 46 96 32 40 218 CONSTRUCTION

Company Name JULIUS BERGER NIGERIA PLC ROADS NIGERIA PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 9 1 10

Quotation(N) 49.64 3.83

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 125,000 6,223,000.00 56,000 214,480.00 181,000 6,437,480.00

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Company Name CUTIX PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 1

Quotation(N) 2.18

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 625 1,300.00 625 1,300.00

FOOD/BEVERAGES & TOBACCO Company Name 7-UP BOTTLING CO. PLC CADBURY NIGERIA PLC DANGOTE FLOUR MILLS PLC DANGOTE SUGAR REFINERY PLC FLOUR MILLS NIGERIA PLC HONEYWELL FLOUR MILL PLC MULTI-TREX INTEGRATED FOODS PLC NATIONAL SALT COMPANY NIGERIA PLC NESTLE NIGERIA PLC NORTHERN NIGERIA FLOUR MILLS PLC UTC NIGERIA PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 22 19 164 49 70 13 1 20 62 1 15 436

Quotation(N) 45.15 16.50 5.82 8.90 75.05 3.32 1.62 4.49 401.00 22.61 0.50

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 36,162 1,645,528.70 79,875 1,256,269.50 5,313,389 31,012,732.02 1,478,259 13,209,795.57 688,744 51,690,237.20 36,287 114,765.02 1,000 1,540.00 304,766 1,360,315.27 103,762 41,590,084.79 1,000 21,480.00 414,000 207,000.00 8,457,244 142,109,748.07

Quotation(N) 0.94 1.48 27.00 3.61 1.15 0.50

Quantity Traded Value 2,024 44,955,663 406,961 8,940 2,287 57,400 45,433,275

Quotation(N) 7.50 1.54

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 1,000 7,130.00 1,602,875 2,451,733.65 1,603,875 2,458,863.65

HEALTHCARE Company Name EVANS MEDICALPLC. FIDSON HEALTHCARE PLC GLAXOSMITHKLINE CONSUMER NIG. PLC MAY & BAKER NIGERIA PLC. NEIMETH INTERNATIONAL PHARMACEUTICALS PLC UNION DIAGNOSTIC & CLINICAL SERVICES PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 5 17 7 3 1 34

of Shares (N) 1,821.60 60,698,225.55 11,308,111.85 30,664.20 2,515.70 28,700.00 72,070,038.90

HOTEL & TOURISM Company Name CAPITAL HOTEL PLC IKEJA HOTEL PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 39 40

INDUSTRIAL/DOMESTIC PRODUCTS Company Name B. O. C. GASES NIGERIA PLC VITAFOAM NIGERIA PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 4 11 15

Quotation(N) 6.90 5.70

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 31,150 214,935.00 668,703 3,812,637.10 699,853 4,027,572.10

NIGERIAN STOCK EXCHANGE DAILY SUMMARY AS AT 19-09-11 GOLDLINK INSURANCE PLC 3 GUARANTY TRUST ASSURANCE PLC 20 INTERNATIONAL ENERGY INSURANCE COMPANY PLC 1 LASACO ASSURANCE PLC. 7 LAW UNION AND ROCK INSURANCE PLC. 3 LINKAGE ASSURANCE PLC 1 MUTUAL BENEFITS ASSURANCE PLC 1 N.E.M. INSURANCE CO. (NIG.) PLC. 4 NIGER INSURANCE CO. PLC. 5 PRESTIGE ASSURANCE PLC. 1 SOVEREIGN TRUST INSURANCE PLC 2 STANDARD ALLIANCE INSURANCE PLC 3 UNIC INSURANCE PLC. 1 UNIVERSAL INSURANCE COMPANY PLC 2 Sector Totals 93

No of Deals 1 3 4

Quotation(N) 0.50 0.50

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 4,986 2,493.00 41,500 20,750.00 46,486 23,243.00

No of Deals 46 46

Company Name AFROMEDIA PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 1

No of Deals 30 3 1 5

17,875.50 514,000.00 60,225.50 32,494.50 15,000.00 4,855.00 500.00 127,500.00 11,425.00 1,490.00 200,500.00 12,500.00 4,968.50 105,000.00 25,431,096.24

Quotation(N) 0.86

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 1,079,577 951,776.08 1,079,577 951,776.08

Quotation(N) 0.51

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 1,000 510.00 1,000 510.00

MEDIA

MORTGAGE COMPANIES Company Name ABBEY BUILDING SOCIETY PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 1

Quotation(N) 1.44

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 500 685.00 500 685.00

OTHER FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS Company Name NPF MICROFINANCE BANK PLC ROYAL EXCHANGE PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 7 3 10

Quotation(N) 1.08 0.50

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 284,456 307,212.48 146,100 73,050.00 430,556 380,262.48

Quotation(N) 1.89

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 568,490 1,058,093.14 568,490 1,058,093.14

PACKAGING Company Name NIGERIAN BAG MANUFACTURING COMPANY PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 43 43

PETROLEUM(MARKETING) Company Name BECO PETROLEUM PRODUCT PLC MRS OIL NIGERIA PLC CONOIL PLC FORTE OIL PLC MOBIL OIL NIGERIA PLC. OANDO PLC TOTAL NIGERIA PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 5 26 37 9 96 8 182

Quotation(N) 0.50 63.86 33.00 11.58 148.00 27.02 203.32

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 3,838 1,919.00 2,100 127,474.57 111,227 3,691,714.85 149,422 1,652,130.98 26,032 3,776,265.88 797,798 21,664,704.28 13,470 2,604,725.90 1,103,887 33,518,935.46

PRINTING & PUBLISHING Company Name LONGMAN NIGERIA PLC UNIVERSITY PRESS PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 3 4

Quotation(N) 4.61 3.58

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 7,852 34,391.76 7,700 27,531.00 15,552 61,922.76

Quotation(N) 16.32

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 148,750 2,365,629.72 148,750 2,365,629.72

REAL ESTATE Company Name UACN PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT CO. PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 18 18

ROAD TRANSPORTATION Company Name ASSOCIATED BUS COMPANY PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 9 9

Quotation(N) 0.50

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 336,000 168,000.00 336,000 168,000.00

Quotation(N) 0.69

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 4,459 3,210.48 4,459 3,210.48

TEXTILES Company Name UNITED NIGERIAN TEXTILES PLC Sector Totals

No of Deals 1 1

THE FOREIGN LISTINGS

INSURANCE Company Name AIICO INSURANCE PLC. CONTINENTAL REINSURANCE PLC CORNERSTONE INSURANCE CO. PLC. CUSTODIAN AND ALLIED INSURANCE PLC

35,751 518,000 120,451 64,989 30,000 9,710 1,000 255,000 22,850 1,000 401,000 25,000 9,937 210,000 25,673,066

MARITIME Company Name JAPAUL OIL & MARITIME SERVICES PLC Sector Totals

INFORMATION & COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY Company Name CHAMS PLC STARCOMMS PLC Sector Totals

0.50 1.00 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 1.50 0.50 0.50 0.50 0.50

Quotation(N) 0.67 1.02 0.50 2.51

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 429,475 287,239.71 23,521,000 23,991,210.00 400 200.00 17,503 44,112.53

Company Name ECOBANK TRANSNATIONAL INCORPORATED Sector Totals Overall Totals

No of Deals 28 28

Quotation(N) 11.65

Quantity Traded Value of Shares (N) 373,494 4,405,699.63 373,494 4,405,699.63

3,257

180,177,337

860,914,102.31


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

55

MONEY LINK

Rescued banks’ staff jittery over pending shareholders’ approval

S

taff of the four rescued banks are apprehensive of what be comes of their jobs as shareholders decide on whether or not to approve transactions with prospective core investors. They are worried about the consequence on their careers and livelihoods, should the banks fail to recapitalise, The Nation has learnt. In the past, staff, whose performance ratings fall below industry average, have fallen victims of downsizing by banks.

Stories by Collins Nweze Senior Correspondent

Finbank, Intercontinental, Union and Oceanic Banks are the remaining four to sign agreements with healthy peers in recent months, paving the way for them to be recapitalised, in what shareholders hope will draw the curtain under the CBN banking reform. Shareholders of Intercontinental Bank will get one new share for

every seven held after Access Bank injects N50 billion to recapitalise the bank. In an appeal to shareholders to vote in favour of the deal on September 26, Intercontinental Chairman, Raymond Obieri, said the Access recapitalisation is preferable to nationalisation. In August 5, the CBN nationalised three rescued banks for failing to show enough ability to recapitalise in the wake of a $4 billion bailout of nine lenders two

years ago. CBN Governor, Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, had insisted that liquidating the banks that fail to recapitalise before the deadline will be the last option. The apex bank had also said it will withdraw its interbank guarantee by September 30, if the banks fail to recapitalise. Although non-of the banks have reneged in meeting its obligations to both local and international partners, but a withdrawal of such

Diamond Bank to give out N600m in promo

D

IAMOND Bank, has said it would give out N600 million (about $4 million) to its customers in the SavingsExtra promo in the next one year. This is N100 million higher than the N500 million dolled out in the last one year. Speaking during a media briefing in Lagos, at the weekend, the bank’s Senior Adviser, Retail Banking, Garry Marsh, said, the money is going to very good courses, as it has helped winners solved emergency problems and resuscitated their businesses. The bank has also retained the N2.5 million and N5 million prizes, as well as the Salary4Life prizes among others. Salary4life, enables the winner earn N100, 000 monthly for the next 20 years. “We started three years ago. In the first one year, we were trying to ensure that more people get to know SavingsExtra. Today, about 40,000 new customers open account every month across the country. We think it is something we must continue to do to reward more customers and improve the retail banking in the country,” he said. He said the bank has ensured that by subscribing to SavingsExtra, customers are losing nothing; rather they are getting additional benefits than what a conventional savings account offers.

At present, the bank opens about 40,000 accounts every month and about 500,000 accounts on annual basis, over 50 per cent of which are SavingsExtra customers. Customers also enjoy internet banking and can

money would be paid to the next of kin should the beneficiary die before the time,. He said: “Only N5,000 is needed to qualify a customer for each draw event, and multiples of N5,000 gives additional entry ticket for each draw

issue cheques to third parties without cost on turnover. The bank’s balance sheet has also doubled, in the last three years when the product was unveiled, he explained. He stated that the bank has also guaranteed the sum, saying the

T

HE Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) has given licence to ValuCard Nigeria Limited to operate as Payment Terminal Service Provider (PTSP). This would enable the firm extend its services to all acquirers and merchants in the country. The company was selected after a rigorous process, which involved screening of several other applicants by the apex bank.

A statement from the bank, said PTSP is an entity in the Nigerian payment space licensed by the CBN and charged with responsibility to ensure effectiveness of Point of Sale (PoS) operations and a proper support/maintenance infrastructure. Head, Acquiring and Merchant Services, ValuCard, Vivian Okolo, said: “As a card-neutral company, and with our many years of expe-

rience in payments, we are very well positioned to make a huge success of this project and ensure that Nigeria achieves a cashless economy. In demonstration of our support for the laudable initiatives of the CBN, ValuCard will invest significantly in creating acceptance infrastructure.” The company will also work with various stakeholders includ-

T

HE Tax Planning and Support Services (TPSS) is set to organ ise a two-day seminar to address legal and administrative problems on deductions from the emoluments of employees of tertiary institutions. The programme will be holding in Lagos between September 21 and 22.

There is a list of payroll taxes in Nigeria, including Pay As You Earn (PAYE), Pension, National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS), among others, all of which directly impact negatively on the ‘take home’ pay of employees. Deputy Managing Director, UNILAG Consults, Bola Oboh, said

Executive Director, TPSS, Abiola Sanni, explained that this is the first time that a seminar is being put together to address these issues. He said, payroll taxes are compulsory payments deducted from the salaries and emoluments of employees every month in furtherance of the provisions of certain laws.

Rate %

M/Date

3-Year 5-Year 5-Year

35m 35m 35m

11.039 12.23 13.19

19-05-2014 18-05-2016 19-05-2016

WHOLESALE DUTCH AUCTION SYSTEM Amount

Initial Current Quotation Price Market N8250.00 5495.33 N1000.00 N552.20

Price Loss 2754.67 447.80

INTERBANK RATES 7.9-10% 10-11%

PRIMARY MARKET AUCTION (T-BILLS) Rate % 10.96 9.62 12.34

Date 28-04-2011 “ 14-04-2011

GAINERS AS AT 19-9-11 SYMBOL ROADS NASCON NCR WEMABANK REDSTAREX FIDSON UAC-PROP ACCESS UNITYBNK BAGCO

O/PRICE 3.65 4.28 4.12 0.64 2.35 1.42 15.67 5.30 0.58 1.83

C/PRICE 3.83 4.49 4.32 0.67 2.46 1.48 16.32 5.49 0.60 1.89

CHANGE 0.18 0.21 0.20 0.03 0.11 0.06 0.65 0.19 0.02 0.06

LOSER AS AT 19 -9-11 SYMBOL JBERGER FLOURMILL DANGFLOUR STERLNBANK TRANSCORP JAPAULOIL NPFMCRFBK DANGSUGAR AIRSERVICE NB

O/PRICE 52.25 78.99 6.12 1.49 0.86 0.90 1.13 9.30 1.95 88.41

C/PRICE 49.64 75.05 5.82 1.42 0.82 0.86 1.08 8.90 1.87 85.15

Amount

Offered ($) Demanded ($)

MANAGED FUNDS

Amount 30m 46.7m 50m

due to under-deduction and under-remittance of taxes, institutions have been faced with huge liability of arrears with interest and penalty. The seminar is set to bridge the knowledge gap between the management, administration, union members and employees in payroll management.

DATA BANK

Amount N

Tenor 91-Day 182-Day 1-Year

ing NIBSS, operators of the Payment Terminal Service Aggregator and all Card Schemes, including MasterCard, Interswitch, e-tranzact and Visa.” In addition to the firm’s existing network, it hopes to establish presence in all major towns and cities to help Nigerians simplify their lives, using relevant technology.

Seminar on taxation, pensions coming

Tenor

OBB Rate Call Rate

event. The cut off for weekly draw events will be every Tuesday of the week and the draw will hold on the Friday of same week. The monthly draw event will hold on the last Friday of the month and the cut off will be the previous Tuesday,” he stated.

CBN grants ValuCard terminal licence

FGN BONDS

NIDF NESF

guarantee by September 30, will badly expose the banks. “I think it will be difficult to stop the banks from disengaging staff after recapitalisation deals are sealed,” the source who asked not to be named said. Responding to the development, Corporate Governance expert, Michael Solanke, said liquidating the banks will create problems in the sector and ruin the confidence customers have, even the healthy banks.

Amount

Exchange

Sold ($)

Rate (N)

Date

450m

452.7m

450m

150.8

08-8-11

250m

313.5m

250m

150.8

03-8-11

400m

443m

400m

150.7

01-8-11

EXHANGE RATE 26-08-11 CAPITAL MARKET INDEX Currency

Year Start Offer

Current Before

C u r r e n t CUV Start After %

NGN USD

147.6000

149.7100

150.7100

-2.11

NGN GBP

239.4810

244.0123

245.6422

-2.57

NGN EUR

212.4997

207.9023

209.2910

-1.51

149.7450

154.0000

154.3000

-3.04

Bureau de Change 152.0000 (S/N)

153.0000

155.5000

-2.30

Parallel Market

154.0000

156.0000

-1.96

NSE CAP Index

NIGERIA INTER BANK (S/N)

13-09-11 N6.7026tr 21,018.52

14-09-11 N6.760tr 21,199.16

% Change -0.87% -0.86%

MEMORANDUM QUOTATIONS Name

(S/N)

153.0000

DISCOUNT WINDOW Feb. ’11

July ’11

Aug ’11

MPR

6.50%

6.50%

8.75%

Standing Lending Rate ,, Deposit Rate ,, Liquidity Ratio Cash Return Rate Inflation Rate

8.50% 4.50% 25.00% 1.00% 12.10%

8.50% 4.50% 25.00% 2.00% 12.10%

9.50% 5.50% 30.00% 2.00% 9.4%

Offer Price

Bid Price

9.17 1.00 117.78 107.46 0.79 1.02 0.96 1,628.78 8.65 1.39 1.87 7,667.25 193.00

9.08 1.00 117.50 107.10 0.81 1.02 0.95 1,625.40 8.23 1.33 1.80 7,426.14 191.08

ARM AGGRESSIVE KAKAWA GUARANTEED STANBIC IBTC GUARANTE AFRINVEST W.A. EQUITY FUND THE LOTUS CAPITAL HALAL BGL SAPPHIRE FUND BGL NUBIAN FUND NIGERIA INTERNATIONAL DEB. PARAMOUNT EQUITY FUND CONTINENTAL UNIT TRUST CENTRE-POINT UNIT TRUST STANBIC IBTC NIG EQUITY THE DISCOVERY FUND • ARM AGGRESSIVE • KAKAWA GUARANTEED

CHANGE 2.61 3.94 0.30 0.07 0.04 0.04 0.05 0.40 0.08 3.26

• STANBIC IBTC GUARANTE • AFRINVEST W.A. EQUITY FUND

NIBOR Tenor 7 Days 30 Days 60 Days 150 Days

Rate (Previous) 24 Aug, 2011 9.0417 9.6667 11.2917 12.1250

Rate (Currency) 26, Aug, 2011 10.17% 11.46% 11.96% 12.54%

Movement

OPEN BUY BACK Previous

Current

04 July, 2011

07, Aug, 2011

Bank

8.5000

8.5000

P/Court

8.0833

8.0833

Movement


56

THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

57


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

58

NEWS Chime condoles with Iwuanyanwu From Chris Oji, Enugu

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OVERNOR Sullivan Chime of Enugu State has commiserated with frontline politician and publisher of Champion newspaper, Chief Emmanuel Iwuanyanwu over the recent loss of his wife, Eudora, who died recently in a London hospital. Chime, in a condolence message signed by his Chief Press Secretary, Chukwudi Achife, described the late Eudora as a humble woman who devoted her life to the service of mankind. He said the deceased was a pillar of support to her husband, Iwuanyanwu. He said: “It was with sadness that I received the news of the death of Lady Eudora Iwuanyanwu. Eudora was certainly a woman of sterling qualities whose humility, generousity and eagerness to serve the society were well known. “Nigeria has indeed lost a great woman and I sincerely appreciate the vacuum her demise has created in her family, particularly in the life of Iwuanyanwu. While praying for the repose of her soul, I urge Iwuanyanwu and the rest of her survivors to bear this irreparable loss with fortitude and to be consoled in the knowledge that she had lived a fulfilled life.”

Shopping mall opens in Enugu

T

HE biggest shopping mall in the country was at the weekend commissioned in Enugu. Governor Sullivan Chime said the Shoprite complex at the former Polo Field would boost socio-economic activities in the state. Chime, who spoke through his deputy, Sunday Onyebuchi, described it as a dream come true. He said the mall would also provide jobs for the people.

From Chris Oji, Enugu

General Manager of the company, Anton Waggnnaar, promised that the company would improve the state economy through payment of taxes and provision of jobs. Wife of the governor, Clara Chime, who accompanied the Deputy Governor to the opening ceremony, purchased items which she later donated to inmates of the Enugu State Motherless Homes.

Ebonyi to prosecute fake petroleum marketers

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BONYI State government has decried the increasing number of fake petroleum marketers lifting fuel from the Enugu depot of the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). Special Adviser to Governor Martin Elechi on Petroleum Products, Pricing and Distribution, Chidi Ejem, addressed reporters in Abakaliki on the distribution of petroleum products. The government warned marketers to desist from using the names of non-operational and non-existent stations to lift products on behalf of the state from the depot. He said the government would prosecute erring marketers. Ejem decried the high cost

From Ogbonnaya Obinna, Abakaliki

of kerosene and its adulteration by some dealers, adding that the state would no longer tolerate impersonation and diversion of products by marketers. The government had alleged that some marketers in the state were diverting petroleum products meant for the state, therebydenying the state of its mandatory monthly allocation from the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Enugu station. “I had a meeting with marketers and warned those without stations to forget even raising a draft because from the draft you raise, I will get you and if I get you, you will face the law as it concerns il-

legal diversion of petroleum products. “There are bad eggs among the petroleum dealers; these people are so money conscious to the detriment of the masses. Adulteration kills innocent people and they do not really care how many lives are lost. These bad eggs are the ones causing the hardship the masses are passing through in the state. In fact, if it is possible for these bad eggs to convert petroleum products into water for them to make their money, they do not care. So, they are really the people I am fighting with to ensure that such does not persist in the state. “The problem could be traced to the depot and refinery. You know every state has its allocation every month and

the allocation gets to Ebonyi State through the marketers. Many of them at the depot lift the product on behalf of Ebonyi State but the products do not get to the state and people have been working with them to achieve this falsehood.” He assured consumers of government’s commitment towards ensuring steady supply of products, adding that he would ensure regular monitoring of petroleum stations to check the activities of dubious petroleum product marketers. “Some of them do not have stations or have stations that are no longer functioning. So, they use the name of the station to lift products and sell them elsewhere. So, we are just having ghost stations.”

Govt tasked on reading culture

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ISTRICT Superintendent of Assemblies of God Church,The Rev. Michael Ogunbola has charged government at all levels to solve the problem of poor reading culture in the country. He spoke at the maiden edition of the Apapa Superintendent essay competition award ceremony in Lagos. “This essay competition was initiated as a result of the decline in reading culture and passion for leadership development. To be a good leader requires regular reading. I urge corporate organisations to support the government to inculcate reading culture in our youths,” he said. He said he embarked on the project to give youths a sense of belonging as education remains the best legacy. “This project was initiated because of the poor academic performance of our children and wards in school. It is our way of encouraging these young minds,” he said. Udom Joshua, Ibrahim Christopher and Tai Waimidi emerged winners of the competition. David Messan, an innovation strategist, also encouraged the children to imbibe reading culture.

Bank doles out N194m loans

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ATHOLIC Diocese of Enugu owned Umu chinemere Pro-credit Micro Finance Bank (UPMFB) has disbursed N194 million in micro financing as group/ individual micro loans, advances and micro leasing of certain life enhancing commodities to 2,338 people in the diocese in the first six months of this year. Providing details of the bank’s lending activities within the period under review, the Credit Manager Ikechukwu Ngene said the bank gave out N181.655m as group micro loans; N6.917m as salary over draft/advances and N6.8m in commodity micro leasing. Ngene stated that the bank gave 12 tricycles amounting to N5.3m and other forms of commodity micro leasing such as electricity generating

From Chris Oji, Enugu

set, refrigerators, computer sets and television sets to enhance the living condition of the poor in the area. He said the beneficiaries engage in small trades and low income earning jobs. He said people’s responsiveness to the bank’s products and services was very impressive and encouraging. He said: “When we work hard to groom the poor customers to take our group micro loan, the commercial banks will just come from nowhere and destabilise that by wooing the customers. They do not do critical analysis of the customers as we do. They are only interested in giving out money, without encouraging them to engage in profitable micro credit activities.”

Orji assures of peace From Ugochukwu Eke, Umuahia

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OVERNOR Theodore Orji of Abia State has restated his administration’s commitment towards ensuring peace and unity among communities to expedite the development of the state. Speaking at Abiriba in Ohafia Local Government during the New Yam festival of the community at the weekend, Orji said peace is the panacea for the development for any state. Orji hailed the return of peace in Abairiba after many years of in-fighting. The governor, who helped to broker peace among the feuding villages of Ameke, Agboji and Amaogudu shortly after he assumed office in 2007, pledged that his administration would deal with detractors.

•Cross River State Governor, Senator Liyel Imoke, attending to some accident victims on Calabar- Ikom Road.

NURTW warns members to desist from thuggery

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ATIONAL President of the National Union of Road Transport Workers (NURTW), Najeem Usman Yasin, yesterday warned its members to shun thuggery in its forthcoming election. Yasin spoke at the National Executive Council (NEC) meeting in Abuja. He said: “This time around, we will make thuggery a thing of the past. The present administration will not condone it. We are all stakeholders in the union. It is our fa-

From John Ofikhenua, Abuja

ther’s house, nobody is pushing anybody out of the house. Whether you like it or not, we have to join hands to take this union to the highest level. Anybody coming there is not bringing thugs. Our members should look like responsible people in the society.” Yasin said conducting a free and fair election in the state delegate conferences was his priority, adding that

his administration would not condone any division targeted at rigging elections. He said: “Our next priority now is to conduct State Delegate Conferences, bearing in mind that this must be approached with a high level of commitment and seriousness so as to ensure free and fair elections. I am also greatly pained to learn of cases where immediately after the National Delegates Conference, some state officers went back and engaged in the creation of new branches and dissolv-

ing existing ones in an effort to gain undue advantage during the state delegates’ conference. “This cannot be condoned because it could lead to violence and loss of lives and property. Conducting delegates’ conferences devoid of rancor, lawlessness and violence is a task that must be achieved.” Yasin declared null and void the creation or dissolution of branches to gain undue advantage during elections.

Workers’ strike cripples Imo

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HE industrial action embarked upon by the Imo State chapter of the Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC) two ago has crippled businesses and government activities. All government offices, banks and the state secretariat which accommodates all the ministries, are under lock and key. Many residents are grumbling that they cannot make purchases because of their inability to withdraw cash from banks. All the markets in the capital have been deserted.

From Emma Mgbeahurike, Owerri

On the first day of the strike, banks reportedly offered skeletal services to customers but later shut down in compliance with NLC’s directive. Commuters were stranded in some parks as there were no commercial vehicles to convey them to their destinations. Meanwhile, the state government has begun negotiation with the NLC with a view to ending the strike. NLC Chairman in the

state, Comrade Reginald Anyadike, told The Nation that government approached the NLC for a meeting last Friday in order to resolve the issues involved. He said they embarked on strike when they discovered that Governor Rochas Okorocha was not ready to implement the N18,000 minimum wage. He said the governor had agreed to pay workers on Grade Levels 01 to 06, leaving those on Grade Levels 07 and above. He said this led to the disagreement with the NLC,

•Okorocha

adding that the Labour met yesterday to review certain issues arising from their last week meeting with the governor.


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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NEWS NEW LEGAL YEAR

•Acting Chief Justice of Nigeria, Justice Dahiru Musdapher (right) with Justice Mahmoud Mohammed at a special session to mark the beginning of the new Legal Year at the Supreme Court, Abuja...yesterday

•Solicitor General of the Federation Abdullahi Yola (left) with Chief Richard Akinjide(SAN)

•Chief Joe-Kyari Gadzama (SAN) (left) greeting House Speaker Aminu Tambuwal at the session ...yesterday. With them is NBA President, Mr Joseph Daudu (SAN

•Lawal Rabana (SAN) right and his wife Neiia (SAN)

•Former Chief Justice of the Federation, Justice Muhammed Uwais (right) and former Independent Corrupt Practices and Other Miscellaneous Offences Commission (ICPC) Chairman, Justice Mustapha Akanbi also at the session

•Oyo State Governor Abiola Ajimobi flanked by members of the judiciary: Hon Justice M. O. Olagunju(left), Hon Justice M. O. Bolaji-Yusuf; Hon Justice M. F. Oladeinde; Hon Justice A. O. Bode; Hon Justice M. A. Adegbola (right); Hon Justice M. A. A. Abass (second right) and Hon Justice W. K. Olaifa at the Central Mosque, Oja-Oba, Ibadan... yesterday PHOTOS ABAYOMI FAYESE AND FEMI ILESANMI


THE NATION TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011

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http://www.thenationonlineng.net

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 2011 TRUTH IN DEFENCE OF FREEDOM

VOL. 7

NO.1,889

TOMORROW IN THE NATION

‘Modern solar energy can save government billions, reduce demand on PHCN and can be provided next month if the budget allocates solar funds and CBN gives soft solar loans. Nuclear may not be for Nigeria but solar TONY MARINHO certainly is’

COMMENT & DEB ATE EBA

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F there is one thing the attentive public in Nigeria agrees on, it is that the present Constitution is manifestly defective and that something ought to be done about it. Just what should be done, how, and by whom, are the issues in contention. There are those who hold that there is nothing wrong with the Constitution that a little patching now and again cannot fix. Then there are those who hold that a broad review is sufficient to cure whatever is ailing it. Then again, there are those who insist that the very architecture of the Constitution is incurably defective and that only a redesign can save it. I should acknowledge that there are also those who hold that there is nothing fundamentally wrong with the Constitution, only those who operate it. The point is well taken; there is indeed nothing so finely wrought that Nigerians will not rip it apart. But must Nigeria wait until it has brought forth the New Man and the New Woman before it can have a Constitution fashioned and warranted by the people? When the President alone has identified some 50 elements in the Constitution that need to be reconsidered, including his tenure-elongation scheme, and when the Senate says it proposes to examine aspects of the Constitution relating to, among other issues, creation of states, the local government system, devolution of powers, revenue allocation, state police, electoral matters, and minimum wage, it is clear that they are embarking on something much wider than a review. They are planning to write a new Constitution through the back door. The proper forum for such a momentous undertaking is not a self-absorbed, and to a large extent self-selected National Assembly working in cahoots with a president whose legitimacy is being contested in the courts, under the aegis of a political party for which power rather than the welfare of the people is the principal goal, if not the only one. The proper forum is a Constituent Assembly or a Constitutional Conference set up for the specific purpose of writing a new Constitution, and whose members derive their authority from the electorate. While the Constituent Assembly carries out its mandate, the National Assembly continues its business of making laws for the governance of Nigeria. So does the Presidency. Until a draft is presented to them for enactment, these latter institutions will play no part, except making a law to set up the Constituent Assembly. The Constituent Assembly, for its part, will not interfere with the business of the National Assembly; it will not seek to supplant the President. This arrangement disposes of the disin-

OLATUNJI DARE

AT HOME ABROAD olatunji.dare@thenationonlineng.net

Who is afraid of a people’s Constitution? ‘If it is designed to confine to seven-year cycles the tension and turmoil evocative of a civil war whenever it is election time in Nigeria, it does not go far enough. Ten or 15-year terms will do the job better. Abolishing elections altogether will be the perfect solution’ •Senate President David Mark

genuous claim often made in the Executive and the Legislative branches that there can be no two sovereigns in a political space at the same time. While the exercise lasts, each body will be sovereign in its own specific sphere. If the Constituent Assembly is vested with sovereign powers as a large section of the attentive audience is demanding, the National Assembly will have no power to make any substantive changes to its draft. If the Constituent Assembly is not vested with sovereign powers, the National Assembly can make changes to the draft, but such changes may not significantly alter its substance or spirit.

RIPPLES

HARDBALL

•For comments, send SMS to 08057634061

•Hardball is not the opinion of the columnist featured above

Surreptitious assault on free speech

ARBITRARY DESTRUCTION OF STRUCTURES NOT SOLUTION TO FLOOD–Engineer

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...it’s the beginning of the SOLUTION

Only a Constitution produced through such a process deserves to be warranted by the phrase, “We the people.” That, it now seems clear, is not the kind of Constitution the Presidency and the National Assembly want. But it is the kind Nigerians should insist on if they desire a product that reflects their will, their values, and their deepest yearnings. The odds against getting such a Constitution are daunting. Those profiting hugely from the present inequitable arrangements – the fictional federal structure and all the distortions that flow from it, those weaned on a sense of entitlement, command and control — and those

who have been conditioned to accept that they can only play ancillary roles in the scheme of things, will probably not be enthused. Despite withering public opposition, President Goodluck Jonathan remains fixated on his plan to institute a seven –year, singleterm tenure for the president and state governors. Even if he does not seek to profit from the arrangement, his reason for proposing it is less than persuasive, as my perceptive colleague Segun Ayobolu argued last Saturday in his column. If it is designed to confine to seven-year cycles the tension and turmoil evocative of a civil war whenever it is election time in Nigeria, it does not go far enough. Ten or 15year terms will do the job better. Abolishing elections altogether will be the perfect solution. In any case, Dr Jonathan’s proposal is founded on the assumption that political turmoil occurs only at election time. Tension and turmoil is never far from the surface of Nigerian politics –Boko Haram and the upheavals in Jos are cases in point — and the way to mitigate them is to pursue justice and create conditions in which the people can best realise themselves. The PDP, which recently graduated from threatening to govern Nigeria for 60 years to insisting that it will govern in perpetuity and the electorate be damned, will also stand implacably against any arrangement that could scuttle that obsession. But Nigerians who find themselves internally colonised, who demand that unity serve a higher purpose than cohabiting in the same space must, insist on a procedure that will guarantee a Constitution warranted by the phrase “We the people.” Over the years, the National Assembly has turned into empty “bow-and-go” rituals the serious business of confirming public officials. It has failed signally to bring the force of research and data to bear on its deliberations. In no way can it claim to represent the entire spectrum of the national population. It has provided asylum for fugitives from criminal justice. None of its members has earned praises as an authority or expert on any subject, not even on the cars that they are so fond of amassing, like disadvantaged children suddenly loosed on a toy shop. It would not honour the martyrdom of MKO Abiola but voted for “immortalising” Admiral Augustus Aikhomu, the recently deceased military vice president in the discredited regime of General Ibrahim Babangida. What qualifies such a body to write a new Constitution for Nigeria?

N what is probably the latest assault on free speech, a Boko Haram spokesman two days ago threatened that reporters would be attacked if they did not desist from misreporting the sect’s activities. Free speech was expected to fare well after civil rule was restored in 1999. It has not. Worse, for a number of reasons, some of them religious, cultural and political, the chances of free speech faring well in the near future are getting bleaker by the day. It never really took root in the First and Second Republics, it was battered under the military, and rather than the attacks against it to abate in the current dispensation, the attackers have become even more inventive. The three seemingly democratic governments voted into office since 1999 have done very little to nurture free speech, partly because they do not appreciate its role in the survival of democracy and its impact on the health of the polity. More attacks are expected. The consequences of intolerance in the First Republic were debilitating. Not only did it contribute to the collapse of the government of the day, it nearly wiped out a generation of leaders. After so many years of turmoil

under the military and the ill-fated Second and Third Republics, it was assumed that politicians had learnt some lessons. But instead of learning anything, politicians of the Fourth Republic, both at the state and federal levels, have learnt nothing and forgotten nothing. Like their counterparts in previous republics, they feel personally invincible, almost above the law, and they think their policies impregnable to any consequence. The same misconception of opposition politics that undermined previous republics is being replayed today, with the government fishing for every excuse to silence or intimidate critics. It never worked; it is unlikely to ever work. However, it is not only government that is subverting democracy and undermining free speech, sundry groups within the country, including militants and extremists, are also throwing their own dangerous darts. An example is the Boko Haram sect which has threatened to deal with the media over the way they report the sect’s activities. The threat was primarily meant for foreign media, which it says are misreporting the sect’s statements and activities, but it left no one in

doubt that the local media was not immune to attacks. A spokesman of the sect warned ominously that its operatives knew where media professionals lived, and they would not hesitate to attack them and their families if they persisted in misreporting the sect’s activities. Boko Haram obviously takes its cue from the government, which is equally intolerant of the media and constantly threatening to deal with them. The sect sees what the government does to the opposition, and it is persuaded that its animosity to the media is even milder. With the murder on Saturday of Babakura Fugu, the late Boko Haram leader’s in-law, the country must now contend with a sect that can deliver on its threat effectively and speedily, and is now splintered into perhaps more dangerous factions that are quick to anger and certainly not very reflective. If the government can find constructive corollaries to silence the opposition, whether it admits it or not, it is also indirectly promoting intolerance and recommending it to other extreme groups, especially one that has suddenly become dreaded and powerful.

Published and printed by Vintage Press Limited. Corporate Office: 27B Fatai Atere Way, Matori, Lagos. P.M.B. 1025,Oshodi, Lagos. Telephone: Switch Board: 01-8168361. Editor Daily:01-8962807, Marketing: 01-8155547 . Abuja Office: Plot 5, Nanka Close AMAC Commercial Complex, Wuse Zone 3, Abuja. Tel: 07028105302. E-mail: info@thenationonlineng.net Editor: GBENGA OMOTOSO

The Nation September 20, 2011  

The Nation September 20, 2011

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