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THE MUR R AY STATE

M

NEWS

www.TheNews.org

@TheMurrayStateNews

@MurrayStateNews

The View Apartments 270-978-7439 @TheMurrayStateNews

@MurrayStateNews

May 2, 2019 | Vol. 93, No. 28

Williams becomes highest NFL draft pick by round in Racer history

Page 9

Photo courtesy of Jaguars.com

NEWS

OPINION

SPORTS

FEATURES

UNIVERSITY DITCHES VIRTUAL DOCTORS

SHOULD COLLEGE TUITION BE FREE?

MEN’S BASKETBALL BRINGS IN FOUR FOR 2019

MSU DANCE COMPANY PERFORMS SPRING SHOWCASE

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News

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May 2, 2019

University ditches virtual doctors Primary Care will provide on-campus health services Daniella Tebib News Editor dtebib@murraystate.edu

Murray State awarded a contract to Primary Care Medical Center after concerns from students, faculty and staff were voiced. The new contract will go into effect on June 1. Health services will be located on the first floor of Wells Hall. President Bob Jackson said finding a health services provider that meets the needs of students, faculty and staff is a priority of the University. “In evaluating medical providers who submitted their materials for consideration, it was apparent that Primary Care Medical Center provides the necessary services, administered by an on-site physician, advanced nurse practitioner or other medical staff who bring a great deal of expertise, attention and care for patients,” Jackson said. Shawn Touney, director of communication, said when health services officially switches to Primary Care, a physician and staff will be on site to assist the needs of students, faculty and staff. The provider will also offer after-hours access to a physician via telephone and a smartphone app. Touney also said when utilizing health services, patients can use their health insurance. For those who don’t have insurance or do not wish to use their insurance, Primary Care will provide services based on a pay-per-visit model. Patients in need

of further additional assistance will have the option to visit Primary Care’s alternate location. “Patients who visit the on-campus location and are in need of additional treatment or consultation will receive priority service at the in-town 12th Street location by presenting their Murray State RacerCard ID,” Touney said. The Primary Care location on campus will be open from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. and from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday when class is in session. It will also be open during the summer from 9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday. Some students are happy with this change because they didn’t like the virtual doctor or flat fee provided by Fast Pace Connect Urgent Care, the University’s previous provider. “I’m very excited to see this change happening on campus,” Merrick Johnson, freshman from Carlisle, Kentucky, said. “Having an actual doctor present in the room over a doctor being there from a video conference call makes all the difference. It makes me feel like I’m getting my money’s worth when it comes to medical care.” When utilizing Fast Pace, students, faculty and staff were required to pay a flat fee of $85. This fee could be covered by the patients’ insurance or paid out-ofpocket for those without insurance or high deductibles. However, if patients required other services in the lab such

Nick Bohannon/The News Primary Care will provide health services on campus beginning June 1.

as x-rays, additional costs were added. J.T. Payne, previous Student Government Association president and current student regent, worked with the student senate to pass a resolution expressing its dissatisfaction with Fast Pace. “I appreciate Dr. Jackson and the entire University administration for making health services a top priority, especially after the expressed concern of the student senate earlier this year,” Payne said. “I was proud to work closely with Dr. Jackson

in bringing a solution where students, faculty and staff are given access to health care from in-person medical professionals, no matter their economic status. This is definitely a step in the right direction for on-campus health care without creating further hindrance to the overall University budget.” Current SGA President Trey Book said he is excited about the new health services, but wants to continue improving on-campus services throughout his term. “Since the University

first made the switch to outsourcing our health services it has been a concern for students,” Book said. “The administration has heard these concerns and is working to fix them, and I believe this switch is a step in the right direction. As Dr. Jackson says, we are going to try new things, and some of them may not work. If they don’t we will fix it and never do it again. It’s all about learning and finding out what truly is right for students. I will continue to fight for health care that students want and students deserve.”

Robert Hughes, managing partner of Primary Care, said they are excited about working with Murray State. “We are proud to be chosen to provide them with health care services for their students, faculty and staff both on campus and at Primary Care,” Hughes said. While Primary Care is transitioning in as the new health services provider, students, faculty and staff can access the provider by visiting the Wells Hall location to use complimentary transportation to their off-campus location.


News

May 2, 2019

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CPE approves tuition and fee increases

Daniella Tebib News Editor dtebib@murraystate.edu

Photo courtesy of Leigh Wright Keith Jaco, Nigel Walton and Keenan Hall presented on trauma journalism to local journalists.

Students train local journalists on trauma Daniella Tebib News Editor dtebib@murraystate.edu

Journalism students became the teachers on April 30 when they held a trauma journalism training for area journalists. Trauma journalism is defined as reporting on violence, conflict or tragedy with a focus on the aftermath and longterm impact of events on individuals, families and communities. Examples of traumatic events are shootings, terrorist attacks, physical or sexual abuse, deadly car crashes among others. Journalists from The Paducah Sun attended the trauma training, which served as a culmination of information learned throughout the semester for the three students. “Overall the presentation was a growing experience,” Nigel Walton, junior journalism major, said. “Instead of presenting in front of peers, presenting in front of future fellow employees and future people who work in my field helped me to step up my game.”

For the students, it was important for the presentation to have an impact on the community. “I feel like this presentation helped local journalists who haven’t dealt with trauma in the field of journalism see what’s possible and what the effects of being exposed to these tragedies can have on them,” Keith Jaco, senior journalism major, said. Journalists learned how to report accurately and compassionately on traumatic events, how to interview those involved in traumatic events and how to help journalists who may suffer from post traumatic stress symptoms after covering such events. The students discussed events they learned about throughout the semester including the 1999 Columbine High School shooting, the Virginia Tech massacre and the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. The journalists learned what the media did well and didn’t do well during each of these events. For example, senior journalism major

Keenan Hall talked about a journalist who entered the hospital immediately following the Virginia Tech shooting seeking a victim to speak with. She told officials she had a breast pump in her backpack, but it turned out to be a camera. Stephanie Anderson, professor of journalism and mass communications, said ethical concerns become of the utmost importance during traumatic events. “I teach all journalism students that there are two questions that should drive whether or not they proceed with a story,” Anderson said. “The first - what is the journalistic value of the story. The second - will running the story cause more harm than good.” Hall said while the presentation was difficult, it was worth it. “I felt that the experience was challenging, condensing an entire semester into one presentation,” he said. “I embraced the challenge and learned a lot in the process.” This was Anderson’s first time teaching the course.

The Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education approved tuition and fee increases on April 26 for Murray State students. Shawn Touney, director of communication, said undergraduate students will see a 1 percent increase in tuition go into effect fall 2019. This will add $42 per semester for resident students and $126 for non-resident students. However, tuition for graduate students will not be affected by this decision. Touney also said the CPE approved an asset preservation fee rate at $7 per credit hour to go toward building upkeep and deferred maintenance. However, this fee will be capped at 12 credit hours per semester and excludes online courses as well as Racer Academy dual credit courses. In addition to tuition increases, the Board of Regents have also discussed condensing regional tuition rates into one. “The University is

currently reviewing tuition and fees in order to determine a potentially simpler model for Murray State, effective for fall 2020,” Touney said. “One of the primary benefits through a simpler model would be an easier concept to market and communicate to prospective students.” Jackie Dudley, vice president of finance and administrative services, said the University currently has rates for Illinois, Missouri, Indiana, Arkansas, Alabama and Tennessee at the board meeting on April 5. “We are trying to consolidate those into a resident rate and then another rate for non-residents,” Dudley said. “The idea is to have a single non-resident rate or at least a discount rate that is common amongst all non-residents.” Dudley also said this could enhance recruiting, enrollment, retention and eliminate multiple undergraduate regional net tuition amounts. President Bob Jackson said by condensing the regional tuition rate into one, it will provide more clarification and trans-

parency. “Our goal is to redo all the regional rates to simplify the process greatly, and have one regional rate,” Jackson said. “We’re trying to simplify the process because every state is different. It’s confusing to students and parents, so we’re trying to make it a more transparent and open process.” Jackson said the University is working to find one rate for regional tuition somewhere in between the highest and lowest rates. “Some states [tuition rates] will actually go down, the new regional rate won’t be an average,” Jackson said. “Currently, Illinois is the highest and Tennessee is the lowest, so it’ll be somewhere in the middle from that standpoint. There won’t be any great increases and some states will actually see a decrease.” After the University comes to a consensus on one regional tuition rate, it will be presented to the board for approval. If approved, the rate will go into effect fall 2020, but will not impact current regional students’ tuition.

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News

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May 2, 2019

University offers students multiple resources for finals week Haley Penrod Staff writer hpenrod1@murraystate.edu

Murray State offers students resources to prepare for exams as finals week approaches. Finals take place from May 4 to May 10. To help students before and during the week, the University provides counseling and tutoring services. Angie Trzepacz, director of counseling services, provided tips for students to cope with stress and anxiety throughout the week. “Some of the best coping techniques include focusing on self-care: make sure you eat healthy meals, allow yourself time to get enough sleep, schedule time for exercise, be sure to get some fresh air and sunshine, try to balance study time with relaxation time and schedule some time with friends,” Trzepacz said. The counseling center is open during finals, and an on-call counselor is available from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday if students are in need of help. Sarah Verive, tutoring coordinator for the Center for Academic Success, said tutoring is available to help students prepare for finals. The Center for Academic Success offers tutoring Monday through Thursday from 2:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., depending on which subject is offered what day and time. “Tutoring can help students not only by clarifying information that a student is confused about, but also by teaching students different ways to study and new study skills,” Verive said. “For example, in

math, our tutors assist students with problems, but instead of giving them the answer, they try and teach the student how to come up with the answer so they can figure it out on their own during an exam.” Tutoring services are free for students and no appointments are required. However, May 3 is the last day tutoring is offered. “All you have to do is check which day and time the class you need assistance with is offered and just show up,” Verive said. “You can come by just once or as many times as you need. Our tutors are all Murray State students, so they understand how stressful finals can be, and they bring that understanding to each session.” Brian Martin, tutor from Ajax, Ontario, said he recommends making a study schedule for finals week. “Estimate the amount of time you need to study for each course, set aside time during the day to reach those goals, and make sure you adhere to it,” Martin said. “This should help avoid frantic, late night studying that will cut into sleeping. When it comes to tutoring, don’t leave it until the last minute. Come early in the week to have your questions addressed, leaving you plenty of time to practice and review afterwards.” Shauna Mullins, director of the Center for Academic Success, said when preparing for finals, it is important to study in a manner that works for you. “If you need total quiet, then you might want to find a quiet space in the library,” Mullins said. “If you study better with someone, form a study

group. Just remember to stay on task. Making notecards and rewriting notes also helps when studying for an exam.” Professors are also resources students can use if they are not comfortable with material covered in class. Michelle Casey, assistant professor in the department of earth and environmental science, said study groups are the best way to study. “Other students can help fill in gaps in your notes or your understanding,” Casey said. “Even helping other students by explaining a concept you understand to them is a great way to study. You are way more likely to remember something you’ve taught than something you’ve only heard. Students that form a study group show significantly higher exam scores and final grades than students that do not.” Gina Claywell, professor of English, said students should start studying now to get a grasp on the cumulative knowledge of the class. “Prioritize the work you need to get done, and then allocate a specific amount of time for each final,” Claywell said. “I recommend you limit your access to social media and other activities that lend themselves to procrastination.” Claywell also said studying for your finals early can result in less stress and less procrastination. “Finals week is just another hoop to jump through toward reaching your academic and career goals,” Claywell said. “Approach it with common sense and stubborn persistence, and you’ll succeed.”

Bryce Anglin/The News


May 2, 2019

News

Page 5

High Valley lights up ‘the bank’

Jaden

Michels

opened

for

High Valley, a Canadian country

music

on

duo

Saturday,

April 27, at the CFSB

Center.

The duo, made

up of brothers

Brad and Curtis Rempel, nominated the

2019

was for duo

or group of the year at the ACM Awards. Richard Thompson/The News


Our View

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Editorial Board

The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board.

Should college tuition be free?

Megan Reynolds Editor-in-Chief Sen. Elizabeth Warren plans 270-809-6877 to relieve student loan debt and mreynolds12@murraystate.edu make public universities free of cost. Bryce Anglin College students are expeProduction Manager riencing more debt than ever 270-809-5874 before. The total debt accumuzanglin@murraystate.edu lates to $1.56 trillion, according to Forbes. Daniella Tebib Warren proposes that famiNews Editor lies who make under $100,000 annually would have $50,000 270-809-4468 of student debt completely dtebib@murraystate.edu cancelled, according to CNN Politics. Claire Smith Further, tuition at public uniFeatures Editor versities and community col270-809-5871 leges would be free. The pool csmith110@murraystate.edu of those who are eligible for the Pell Grant will expand to Gage Johnson include more students. Sports Editor In other words, 75% of peo270-809-4481 ple would no longer have stugjohnson17@murraystate.edu dent debt, according to Vox. Warrens’s plan raises concerns on how the loans will Cady Stribling be paid off. Rather, the focus Opinion Editor should look at who will pay if 270-809-5873 not the students. cstribling1@murraystate.edu The answer is to increase taxes on America’s wealthiest David Wallace families. An increase of taxes Chief Copy Editor with no debt relief will generate 270-809-5876 about $2.75 trillion in ten years, dwallace15@murraystate.edu according to CNN Politics. Most students deal with debt and financial aid. The thought Connor Dame of free tuition seems far-fetched Ad Sales and Circulation since all this generation knows Manager is extreme cases of debt. 270-809-4478 Murray State recently cdame2@murraystate.edu increased its tuition by 1 percent, housing costs by 2 perBrock Kirk Photography Editor 270-809-5878 jkirk11@murraystate.edu

Kalea Anderson Chief Videographer 270-809-5878 kanderson29@murraystate.edu Dr. Stephanie Anderson Adviser • 270-809-3937 sanderson37@murraystate.edu 2609 University Station Murray State University Murray, Kentucky 42071-3301 msunews1927@gmail.com Fax: (270) 809-3175

TheNews.org

May 2, 2019

cent, and meal service costs by 2.63 percent. These small numbers make a large difference when it comes out of pocket. And for students already in a pile of debt, this is devastating. On top of all the stress college students experience, worrying about student loans should not be on the list. Yet the reality is that buildings must be managed, scholarships must be funded, and professors must be paid. Free tuition is inviting, but a plan that takes smaller steps to go into effect is more realistic. Slowly submerging into cheaper costs rather than a full dive might be the best solution. One way to gradually shift into Warren’s plan would be to drastically lower the costs of public universities, as well as tuition for community colleges and trade schools. Finding ways to help the middle class pay for tuition is essential. College costs are rising too quickly for the American income to keep up. This makes it difficult when a person’s income is too high to be eligible for genuine help from the university or government, yet too low to actually pay the price. An alarming number, 78 percent, of Americans are living paycheck to paycheck, according to Forbes. So, Warren’s idea of increasing taxes for the

Autumn Brown/The News

wealthy might not be such a bad thing. Wealth inequality is at record levels. The top 1 percent owns the same share of wealth as the bottom 90 percent of the population. To put that in perspective, Jeff Bezos, Bill Gates and Warren Buffet have the same amount of money as the poorest half of Americans, according to Inequality.org. On top of all this, the middle class is disappearing. Affording college is becoming impossible. The cycle of needing a degree to earn a higher wage but not being able to afford college is vicious.

Another way to dip our toes into the pool - or lack thereof - of student debt would be to hold students accountable. Similar to scholarships, requirements determined by the university could deem those that get reduced tuition and free tuition. Establishing a set grade point average that students would then maintain to keep their reduced prices might hold them accountable. If more Americans obtained a college degree and earned higher-paying jobs, then they would put money back into the economy. Therefore, free or reduced tuition pays for itself.

Cheers to summer!

Jeers to finals!

The sun’s coming out and summer is upon us. Take time to stop and smell the roses.

Finals have the entire campus in a tizzy. Make sure to take care of yourself!

The News welcomes commentaries and letters to the editor. Submissions should be 600 words or less, and contributors should include phone numbers for verification. Please include hometown, classification and title or relationship to the University. The News reserves the right to edit for style, length and content. No anonymous contributions will be accepted. All contributions should be turned in by noon on Monday of each week via email to mreynolds12@murraystate.edu.

Contributions to The News are the opinion of the author and not that of The Murray State News. The News is a designated public forum. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. The paper offers a hands-on learning environment for students interested in journalism. The campus press should be free from censorship and advance approval of copy and its editors should develop their editorial and news policies.

The News strives to be the University community’s source for information. Our goal is to present that information in a fair and unbiased manner and provide a free and open forum for expression and debate. The News is prepared and edited by students and is an official publication of Murray State University. The first copy is free. Additional copies are available for 25 cents at 111 Wilson Hall.


May 2, 2019

Opinion

Letter from the Editor-in-Chief

path to a world embracing diversity of all kinds. That path has to start somewhere, and why shouldn’t it start right here, at Murray State? After all, it’s in the friendliest small town in America, right? But, there’s the sad thing - we brag about being the “friendliest” town, and our campus, granted it is not by choice, plays host to white nationalism and a lack of appreciation for the diversity that graces our campus, the diversity that we should work to grow and to embrace as much as possible. Is racism considered friendly now? Yes, we may boast, but those boasts are empty. As Editor-in-Chief, I want to change that. No, we won’t highlight the perpetrators, that’s what they want, but we will start working harder to create a community aware of the injustice around it. With this awareness, we can band together, and we can eradicate those very injustices. I’ve always heard that injustice is just a part of life, that there will always be poverty, hatred, racism, sexism, what have you, but should that mean that I’m okay with it? That you’re okay with it? As long as it’s here, it will be fought against. So, as the Editor-in-Chief for The Murray State News, as the press, the voice of the people, I stand here asking you to welcome me and walk with me on this journey. Let’s change the world, one newspaper at a time.

TTERS TO TH E L

E ED

MI T

Always, Megan Reynolds

SE

ND

TO:

ITOR

S UB

To the Students of Murray State, Hello! My name is Megan Reynolds, and I am the new Editor-in-Chief for The Murray State News. Many of you may have already read some of my writing, I’ve been the opinion editor for the past semester. I’ve covered topics from racism, to feminism, to student debt. I’ve been all over the figurative board of writing. And now, as Editor-in-Chief, I am given a new opportunity. It will be accompanied by new challenges, but as Marie Kondo would want, this job sparks joy, so that is that. I have big plans for this position, not only in the newsroom, but out on campus as well. In the fall, you can expect to see more of the newspaper, as I plan to grow this paper as much as possible in my time as Editor-in-Chief. My fellow “Newsies,” as I like to call them, and I will be out on campus, handing out papers and tabling at events to keep you updated with what’s going on in your community. I want to encourage you all, students, faculty, staff and community members, to utilize the newspaper’s placement of mine and the other editors’ and writers’ emails. Hearing your feedback and your opinions is one of the driving forces of The News. In a sense, this paper is your voice, and I want you to speak, to yell as loud as you can. I’ve heard that yelling is a great form of stress relief, so that could be very good for you, potentially. When I graduate, I hope to become an investigative journalist. Think Eddie Brock: I want to bust down the doors of social injustice and help pave a

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cstribling1@murraystate.edu

Savannah Jane Walton/The News


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Sports

May 2, 2019

Sports

May 2, 2019

Page 9

Photo courtesy of GoRacers.com Quincy Williams was drafted in the third round by the Jacksonvile Jaguars on Friday, April 26.

Williams becomes highest NFL draft pick by round in Racer history Keith Jaco Staff writer

rjaco@murraystate.edu Every April, NFL hopefuls await the coveted chance to receive an offer to play for an NFL franchise after their college days are up. Over the weekend, this dream came true for three members of the Murray State football team. On Friday during the third round of the NFL Draft in Nashville, Tennessee, senior linebacker Quincy Williams was drafted 98th overall by the Jacksonville Jaguars. Williams became the 20th Racer in school history to be drafted and the highest-drafted Racer by round, trailing Cliff White, who was selected 72nd in 1942, for highest overall. Williams was the first Ohio Valley Conference player to be taken in 2019 while also becoming the first Racer draftee since Walt Powell in 2014. Williams joins

former Racer defensive end Austen Lane as the two Murray State players to be taken by the Jaguars. In his senior season,Williams put together an impressive stat sheet, compiling 111 total tackles, 78 solo, earning All-OVC honors and an invite to the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl.Williams also caught two interceptions in 2018 with each being returned for 80 or more yards and one resulting in a touchdown for the Racers. Williams says he was unsure if he’d be picked up in the draft or as a free agent. “I wasn’t really sure where I was going to go,” Williams said.“I had heard free agency and I heard anywhere from third or fourth [rounds].When I got the call it was kinda crazy, this is just a true blessing.” When asked why the Jaguars went with Williams at the 98th pick rather than a name from a larger school, the Jackson-

ville Jaguars GM Dave Caldwell said it’s just a testament to how highly they think of him. “We think he’s a pretty good player,” Caldwell said.“We do like the big school guys, but we’ll take a guy in that fringe range where you take the guy and trust your scouting staff.” Caldwell then went on to discuss what he had seen from Williams’ play that stood out to him. “His speed and his ability to strike people,” Caldwell said.“You watch some of the tape; he’s an explosive athlete and can close ground and make plays on the ball. He’s everything we preach on defense.” Senior quarterback Drew Anderson and cornerback Marquez Sanford were each picked up as undrafted free agents following the draft. Anderson was signed by the Arizona Cardinals while Sanford joined Williams

in Jacksonville. Anderson threw for 2,864 yards on 258-429 passing, throwing 20 touchdowns and 15 interceptions, completing 60.1 percent of his passes. Anderson was the Racers’ third leading rusher, picking up 378 yards on 82 carries with five touchdowns in his single season with the Racers. Anderson played two seasons at Diablo Valley College before transferring to Buffalo University where he set the school’s single-game record for passing yards and touchdowns against Western Michigan. Anderson threw for seven touchdowns with no interceptions and 597 yards. Sanford was an important part of the Racer defense this season, picking up 63 total tackles, 45 solo, with two fumble recoveries. In his four-year career, Sanford amassed 176 total tackles, five interceptions and 25 pass breakups.


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Sports

May 2, 2019

Sports

May 2, 2019

Page 9

Photo courtesy of GoRacers.com Quincy Williams was drafted in the third round by the Jacksonvile Jaguars on Friday, April 26.

Williams becomes highest NFL draft pick by round in Racer history Keith Jaco Staff writer

rjaco@murraystate.edu Every April, NFL hopefuls await the coveted chance to receive an offer to play for an NFL franchise after their college days are up. Over the weekend, this dream came true for three members of the Murray State football team. On Friday during the third round of the NFL Draft in Nashville, Tennessee, senior linebacker Quincy Williams was drafted 98th overall by the Jacksonville Jaguars. Williams became the 20th Racer in school history to be drafted and the highest-drafted Racer by round, trailing Cliff White, who was selected 72nd in 1942, for highest overall. Williams was the first Ohio Valley Conference player to be taken in 2019 while also becoming the first Racer draftee since Walt Powell in 2014. Williams joins

former Racer defensive end Austen Lane as the two Murray State players to be taken by the Jaguars. In his senior season,Williams put together an impressive stat sheet, compiling 111 total tackles, 78 solo, earning All-OVC honors and an invite to the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl.Williams also caught two interceptions in 2018 with each being returned for 80 or more yards and one resulting in a touchdown for the Racers. Williams says he was unsure if he’d be picked up in the draft or as a free agent. “I wasn’t really sure where I was going to go,” Williams said.“I had heard free agency and I heard anywhere from third or fourth [rounds].When I got the call it was kinda crazy, this is just a true blessing.” When asked why the Jaguars went with Williams at the 98th pick rather than a name from a larger school, the Jackson-

ville Jaguars GM Dave Caldwell said it’s just a testament to how highly they think of him. “We think he’s a pretty good player,” Caldwell said.“We do like the big school guys, but we’ll take a guy in that fringe range where you take the guy and trust your scouting staff.” Caldwell then went on to discuss what he had seen from Williams’ play that stood out to him. “His speed and his ability to strike people,” Caldwell said.“You watch some of the tape; he’s an explosive athlete and can close ground and make plays on the ball. He’s everything we preach on defense.” Senior quarterback Drew Anderson and cornerback Marquez Sanford were each picked up as undrafted free agents following the draft. Anderson was signed by the Arizona Cardinals while Sanford joined Williams

in Jacksonville. Anderson threw for 2,864 yards on 258-429 passing, throwing 20 touchdowns and 15 interceptions, completing 60.1 percent of his passes. Anderson was the Racers’ third leading rusher, picking up 378 yards on 82 carries with five touchdowns in his single season with the Racers. Anderson played two seasons at Diablo Valley College before transferring to Buffalo University where he set the school’s single-game record for passing yards and touchdowns against Western Michigan. Anderson threw for seven touchdowns with no interceptions and 597 yards. Sanford was an important part of the Racer defense this season, picking up 63 total tackles, 45 solo, with two fumble recoveries. In his four-year career, Sanford amassed 176 total tackles, five interceptions and 25 pass breakups.


Page 10

Sports

May 2, 2019

Photo courtesy of @ball_player_dee Incoming freshmen Demond Robinson, Chico Carter Jr. and Matt Smith all pose for a picture after announcing their commitment to Murray State.

Men’s basketball brings in four for 2019 Keenan Hall Staff writer

khall16@murraystate.edu After a historical campaign for Murray State men’s basketball in the 2018-2019 season, the coaching staff is on the hunt for the next Racer Hall of Famer. In November of 2018, Head Coach Matt McMahon and his staff announced they signed three incoming freshmen in Chico Carter Jr., Desmond Robinson and Matthew Smith. Carter is a 6’3” guard from Columbia, South Carolina, and played at Cardinal Newman High School. He led his team in scoring his junior year while averaging 21.8 points and 5.2 rebounds. McMahon said he loved that Carter is a gifted scorer, a willing passer and an all around great person with a tremendous work ethic. “Chico is a strong point guard who can really score and also possesses ex-

cellent play-making ability,” McMahon said.“He will bring leadership skills and a tremendous work ethic, both on and off the court, to Murray State.” Most recently, McMahon announced that they just signed Noah Kamba from Lynn, Massachusetts. Kamba is a 6’2” guard and also has over 1,700 career points at Dexter Southfield School in Brookline, Massachusetts. He averaged a double-double in his junior and senior years in high school, and also had a career-high 36 points his senior year. Kamba was named to the All-New England Preparatory School Athletic Council all four years in high school. McMahon welcomed Kamba with open arms and hopes to incorporate Kamba to the fast-paced style of the Racers. “We are extremely excited to welcome Noah Kamba and his family to Murray State University,” said McMahon. “Noah is a quick, versatile point guard who creates for others on the court and

can also score the ball at multiple levels. He brings great character and a strong work ethic to our program, as we believe Noah is a perfect fit for our culture and our style of play.” In recent years, the Racer basketball program has become a breeding ground for NBA guards after losing three to the NBA in the past seven years. While most of Racer nation foresaw All-American Ja Morant declaring for this summer’s NBA draft, the two freshmen guards will have a lot of expectations right out of the gate. Both Carter and Kamba will bring a continuity of fast-paced and high scoring offense that has become a trend in the Racer basketball program. McMahon and his staff are loading up to win a third consecutive OVC Tournament title. The team will also reintroduce redshirt freshman Daquan Smith to Racer fans, as the guard sat out last season due to injury. He, along with Carter and Kamba are

expected to try and fill in the shoes of Ja Morant at the point guard position. Murray State is getting some much needed additions to its frontcourt with Smith and Robinson. Robinson is a 6’8” forward from Montgomery, Alabama. Robinson played at Lee High School, leading his team in steals and blocks while scoring 15 ppg. He will join sophomore forward KJ Williams and senior forward Darnell Cowart in the frontcourt. McMahon said he was pleased with signing Robinson and believes he will contribute to the program in a huge way. “Demond is a powerful and skilled forward who can score in a variety of ways,” McMahon said. “He has a 7’5” wingspan that will allow him to help our team at both ends of the court. He’ll add great personality and charisma to our locker room and campus.”

,

see BASKETBALL page 11


Sports

May 2, 2019

Page 11

THE MURRAY STATE NEWS

BASKETBALL

From Page 10

ATHLETE OF THE WEEK

Smith is a 6’6” forward from Charlotte, North Carolina. Smith played at Independence High School and as a junior helped lead them to a 31-1 record. McMahon said Smith will bring some needed toughness, length and athletic ability to the team. “Matthew is a winner who plays with great energy and toughness on the court,” McMahon said. “We love his athleticism and versatility at the forward position. We look forward to him making an impact in our front court and our community.” Murray State is also awaiting the return of redshirt senior Anthony Smith next season. Smith is returning after missing most of the season due to a season-ending leg injury. He suffered the injury on Dec. 4 of the 2018-19 season, and was given a medical redshirt soon after. While Smith was sidelined, it gave other bigs the opportunity to step up and contribute early in the season. Freshman forward KJ WIlliams is coming off a successful first season for the Racers. Williams started in 22 of the 32

Quincy Williams became the highest drafted Racer by round in the 2019 NFL Draft when he was selescted 98th overall by the Jacksonville Jaguars in the third round. In his senior season, Williams compiled a total of 111, 78 solo, to go with two interceptions. These numbers allowed him to earn All-OVC honors and an invite to the NLFPA Colegiate Bowl. Photo courtesy of Racer Athletics

games last season while averaging 7.7 points a game and grabbing 4.8 rebounds. Cowart also stepped up to the challenge, earning a starting spot toward the end of the season. Starting 13 out of 33 games, he averaged 10.3 points a game and snatched 6.5 rebounds. Cowart was also voted to the All-OVC Newcomer team in his first season as a Racer.

Quincy Williams Linebacker Football

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Sports

Page 12

May 2, 2019

Racers continue push toward Marion Keith Jaco Staff writer

rjaco@murraystate.edu Following a weekend sweep of Eastern Kentucky, Murray State Racer baseball will look to continue its hot streak as it gears up for matchups with Southern Illinois and Morehead State this week. Despite coming off an 0-4 record last week, the Racers used consecutive come-from-behind wins to capture their first series sweep of the season over EKU. Murray State improved its home record to 15-10 and moved into fourth place in the OVC, improving to 13-8 in conference play. The Racers are currently battling adversity with senior center fielder Tyler Duke out with a broken pinky. Head Coach Dan Skirka has moved players around and implemented new lineups to accommodate the change. Redshirt sophomore outfielder C.J. Bush has helped contribute to the Racers in Duke’s absence, going 1-3 with two RBIs in two games over the Colonels. “We talked since day one about everyone being ready for their turn,” Skirka said. “I didn’t even bring it up to the team, they just knew it was someone else’s turn to step up.” Redshirt freshman first baseman Wes Schad also stepped up with a big weekend over EKU, going 3-10 with five runs and three walks while junior left fielder Ryan Perkins continues to be clutch for the Racers. Perkins crushed an important two-run home run in the bottom of the seventh in Sunday’s game against EKU to tie

the game 7-7, setting up the Racers’ eventual victory. Murray State will begin its week on Wednesday, May 1, hitting the road to face the Southern Illinois Salukis. The Salukis are on a downhill slide as of late, dropping 10 straight with a dismal 1-11 record in the Missouri Valley Conference. Despite SIU’s recent lackluster performance, the Salukis are 7-3 against OVC opponents this season, including two wins over OVC leader Belmont. Senior second baseman Nikola Vasic and junior designated hitter Phillip Archer have led the Salukis at the plate this season. Vasic is hitting .273 with 16 RBIs, 36 runs and a .397 on-base percentage while Archer is batting .254 with 21 RBIs, 24 runs and four home runs. On the mound, junior right-handed pitcher Mason Hiser has had the most success among Saluki starting pitchers. Hiser is 3-3 with a 5.15 ERA, tossing 50 2/3 innings with 31 strikeout and 12 walks. Out of the bullpen, junior right-handed relief pitcher Justin Yeager has shut down opponents. Yeager is 2-2 with a 3.13 ERA, throwing 23 innings with 31 strikeouts and 15 walks. The Racers will look to overcome the Salukis’ 12-7 home record by adding to their losing streak on Wednesday. Over the weekend, Murray State will travel to Morehead, Kentucky, for a three-game set with the Morehead State Eagles. The Eagles are having a solid season overall, posting a 28-17 record with a 12-9 mark in the OVC, good for fifth place

behind the Racers. Murray State will be tasked with slowing down the hottest home team in the OVC as Morehead State is an astounding 19-2 at Allen Field this season. The Eagles’ senior left fielder Jake Hammon has crushed opposing pitching this season, batting .368 with 34 RBIs, 44 runs and three home runs while stealing 10 bases. Senior center fielder Connor Pauly and senior catcher Hunter Fain have also had successful seasons at the plate. Pauly is batting .343 with 46 RBIs, 36 runs and eight home runs while Fain is hitting .350 with 29 RBIs, 36 runs and nine home runs to lead the team. Redshirt junior left-handed pitcher Dalton Stambaugh has started 11 games on the bump for the Eagles, posting a 5-2 record with a 3.68 ERA, tossing 63 2/3 innings while striking out 74 and walking 24. Freshman right-handed pitcher Landon Weins has made 15 relief appearances and has been the Eagles’ most reliable arm out of the pen. Weins is 4-2 with a 2.70 ERA, tossing 43 1/3 innings while striking out 35 and walking 15. Skirka says his team is ready for the weekend ahead despite Morehead’s recent success. “Morehead is always a very good offensive team and they are pitching very well too, but we are excited for the matchup,” Skirka said. Murray State will begin the week in Carbondale, Illinois, facing the SIU Salukis at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 1, at Itchy Jones Stadium.

Photo courtesy of Racer Athletics Junior pitcher Jase Carvelli begins to start his pitching motion.

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Features

May 2, 2019

Page 13

‘Oh, I wanna dance with somebody’ MSU Dance Company performs spring showcase Ciara Benham Staff writer cbenham@murraystate.edu

Jump, jive and wail? Pop, lock and drop? The Murray State Dance Company did it all at their spring showcase. On April 26 and 27, the Murray State Dance Company performed two shows for their spring showcase. The showcase titled “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” spotlighted a variety of dance styles and genres. Dance Company President Samantha Wells, sen io r from Memphis, Tennessee, was very proud of her fellow dancers. “I think the showcase went better than I could’ve imagined!” Wells said. “Everyone did such a great job!” The dancers have been preparing for their show since the fall semester. The dance company held auditions in September and the dancers have been working hard at weekly practices since. Sophomore Lindsey Hunter, Dance Company President for the upcoming fall semester, attested to the work the dancers put into their shows. “We spent the year working diligently to prepare the program,” Hunter said. “I am highly pleased with the quality that was achieved.” The shows consisted of 18 performances including groups, duets, solos and an appearance from the Murray State Steppers. All the dances were choreographed by members of the dance company.

Rose Bowman, dance company co-president, choreographed both the K-pop and closing dances. She said choreographing the students isn’t always an easy task, but it paid

I’m proud of everyone’s performance in company but after spending the year working with my dancers, I am especially proud of their performance and our final product.

-Lindsey Hunter, sophomore

off in the end. “I think the dancers all improved in following directions of the choreographers,” Bowman said. “At the beginning it was hard to really control everyone.” Hunter also choreographed pieces for the show and felt a sense of pride from seeing her dances come together. “My favorite part of the show was seeing the progress that the dancers in the pieces I choreographed accomplished,” Hunter said. “I’m proud of everyone’s

performance in company but after spending the year working with my dancers, I am especially proud of their performance and our final product.” The audience was thoroughly entertained throughout the show and could tell how much fun the performers were having. Each of the dancers had a great time and talked about some of their favorite moments. “My favorite part was just dancing alongside all of you and making my senior year such a great a experience!” Wells said. The magic wasn’t just happening on stage for the members; they had fun backstage as well. “My favorite part of the shows would have to be the backstage mayhem and little side jokes that all the company shared during our two seconds of downtime,” Bowman said. The dance company will start preparing for their next showcase in August under their new officers. The company announced that Lindsey Hunter will be their new president, Rose Bowman will be co-president and Jesus Lara, a freshman from Benton, Kentucky, will be vice president. “As president next year, I’m looking forward to growing the program and increasing our outreach,” Hunter said. “We are always looking to recruit new dancers and to spread the joy and expression of dance with others. I am excited to see where the program goes next year.”

Richard Thompson/The News Members of the MSU Dance Company performed various dance numbers.


Features

Page 14

May 2, 2019

A bird, a plane, a weather satellite TSM students to launch satellite Ciara Benham Staff Writer cbenham@murraystate.edu

Telecommunications Systems Management students are attempting to perform a feat that Murray State has never seen before: launching a weather satellite. Brock Kirk, Richard Thompson and Jacob Cox will launch a weather satellite as a part of their senior capstone project for Mobile Satellite Communications. For over two months, the students have worked hard to build and prepare the satellite. After beginning the project, both Kirk and Thompson discovered they had a lot to learn. “We had to physically assemble the satellite, install software and code, then test to make sure that it was functioning properly,” Kirk, a senior from Ballard County, Kentucky, said. “I also had to learn how to make antennas for the weather satellite. This

was something that I had never done before and was completely new for me.” The process was long and detailed to prepare for a smooth launch. “Our first step was to determine a goal that we wanted to achieve,” Thompson, a senior from Belize, said. “To be absolutely sure that we wouldn’t encounter any unexpected technical issues on the day of launch more testing and verification was done and after we were satisfied all we had to do was to launch, gather data, and hopefully retrieve the satellite once it returns to earth.” Making a satellite is no easy task, but the students were able to succeed through hard work and the help of outside sources. “Whenever we would climb over an obstacle there would be another, from functionality to the flight weather,” Kirk said. “We communicated with XINABOX (creators of

the satellite) a lot, learning as much as possible from them whenever we Skyped. We talked to Judi Sandrock, who was located in South Africa, to help us with any problems or information that we may have needed.” They were also guided by their mobile satellite communications professor Adbulrahman Yarali throughout the entire process. Kirk and Thompson need to meet certain requirements in order to be able to launch the satellite. “These launches are designed to attain an altitude of five kilometers or 16,000 feet to ensure no interference with commercial aircraft,” Yarali said. “To ensure that we can collect our data during the balloon mission, we need a radio with the WeatherSat to send the data and a ground station to retrieve the data. The GPS and I-sensors will give us data about our position as we move

Richard Thompson/The News Brock Kirk, Jacob Cox and Richard Thompson stand with their project.

about, and we can begin tracking how weather conditions change as we move about our town and county.” Weather permitting, the launch should be successful, and the students should be able to move on to the next steps with related data like temperature, humidity, pressure, UVA-UVB, etc. “Immediately after launch our main goal is to gather as much data as possible and if possible, retrieve the satellite after its return to earth,” Thompson said. “There is also a possibility that this project is going to expand. If this expansion is approved, we plan to develop a distributed terrestrial weather monitoring system that can provide accurate atmospheric information of specific locations.” The students will also have to comb through all the data to create graphs to see how the data corresponds to the altitude of the balloon. This will help them understand the gap between telecommunication and science. Yarali said he is very proud of Kirk and Thompson and their work on this project. “Brock and Richard are among top students in TSM and have shown determination and interest to be part of the research and handson projects in wireless activities,” Yarali said. “As a teacher, mentor and adviser my job and duty are to make sure that I pave the road for our students to gain employable quality and to explore their potentials and interest for landing their desired jobs.”

Lauren Morgan/The News The closet offers an array of bras to choose from.

Women’s Center supports the girls Claire Smith Features Editor csmith110@murraystate.edu

While clothing can be expensive, the Murray State Women’s Center recently opened a resource to alleviate the cost of bras. The Bra Closet gives students in need two free bras and students with extra gently-used bras a place to donate them. Abigail Cox, the Women’s Center coordinator, said the resource was announced in November 2018. The launch was announced through flyers posted in the residential colleges and social media announcements. “The Women’s Center has been looking for practical and tangible ways to support students,” Cox said. “A few years back, I had a couple of student workers who had mentioned in conversation how expensive bras are, and recalling that conversation was really the spark for this particular idea.” Hayden Petty, freshman from Scottsville,

Kentucky, said she would donate to the Bra Closet. “It’s important because it helps those who may not be able to afford nice bras,” Petty said. She said bras are vital and, while she doesn’t have a need for the closet, it’s something she would donate to. Precious Lynch, junior from Louisville, Kentucky, said bras are expensive and that if she had extra bras she would donate. “Not everyone can afford bras, and they’re pretty important,” Lynch said. This semester, four people have made use of the Bra Closet. Donations can be dropped off at the Women’s Center in suite C102 of the Applied Science Building. The Women’s Center also provides free feminine hygiene products and advocacy services. To make an appointment for the Bra Closet contact the Women’s Center. Appointments take place Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.


Features

May 2, 2019

Page 15

Running across America to fight cancer Alexis Schindler Staff writer aschindler1@murraystate.edu

Krystan Proctor, a junior at Murray State University and Murray native, will participate in a cross-country 4K this summer to support the fight against cancer. “ T h e U l m a n Foundation enables groups of college students to undertake cycling and running journeys across the United States with the goal of offering hope, inspiration and support to nearly 300 communities along the way,” according to the press release. Proctor has several ties to the cancer community, one being her mother, a breast cancer survivor, who was diagnosed when Proctor was 10 years old. “I do understand how traumatizing it can be and how drastically it changes everything and everyone around you,” she said on her 4K for Cancer fundraising page. “My perspective on life has changed so much since then. I have learned to appreciate the relationships I have, and I have done what I can to not only support the cancer community but to do everything I can to keep myself healthy and my body active so I can help those who can’t.” Proctor said the Ulman Foundation helps young adults in the fight against cancer. “There are so many young adults that are going through this and they feel isolated and alone,” she said. “Their career and schooling is put on hold. The Ulman Foundation does a lot to help young adults

through this process. They give them a home, resources and programs to help them through it.” Proctor said she learned about the Foundation and 4K from an Instagram ad. “It had a picture of a couple of runners at a national park,” she said. “It said ‘Do you want to run across the country for cancer?’ I said ‘Yes, I do.’” Proctor’s goal is to raise $4500 in support of the Ulman Foundation and their work. She is currently at $4,293.63 which is about 95 percent of the way to her goal. Proctor said it’s been hard to raise the money but through the process she has gotten to meet various people and make them more aware of the issue these young adults are facing. “I think it’s become more real for them as for me,” she said. According to the Ulman Foundation 4K for Cancer website, the Foundation’s mission is to “change lives by creating a community of support for young adults, and their loved ones, impacted by cancer.” There are two running teams, Boston and Baltimore, and two biking teams, Seattle and San Francisco. Each team will start and end in different places. Proctor’s team, the Boston running team, will start their journey in San Francisco on June 16 and will end it in Boston on August 3. During this 49-day journey, the team will travel over 4,000 miles as a whole. According to the Ulman Foundation 4K for Cancer website, “Our

participants ensure these miles count by dedicating them to others impacted by cancer and writing the dedications on the back of their legs, to draw strength from daily. Although our riders and runners begin their journeys dedicating their efforts to friends and family members who have been affected by cancer – that dedication naturally spreads to include the people whose stories we hear and the communities we support as we travel across the country.” There are set days for running and set days for resting. “On running days, participants run between 6 and 16 miles each. On rest days they volunteer in local hospitals, offering services to cancer patients, and providing two scholarships to young adults affected by cancer,” accrording to the press release. Participants were sent training schedules to prepare them for the 4K. Proctor said she never thought she would be running like she does now and some days it’s hard but she is excited for the race. “I never thought I could do it,” she said. “I really want to encourage other people that yes you can do it. Even if you can’t do the run you can do something else. You can volunteer or just give a little money here and there. Every little bit of volunteering, donating, moral support and raising awareness about different issues, it helps a lot.” Proctor said she hopes to get more people doing the cross-country 4K or one of the other

Photo courtesy of Krystan Proctor Krystan Proctor has been training for this summer’s 4K.

Ulman programs, such as 4K Trails, next year. “I’ve always wanted to make a difference,” she said. “They got the short end of the stick, and it really just hurts my heart that they are having to go through

this. I am physically able to run this and I’m capable of doing some other things as well. I want to do as much as I can so that they can live their best lives too.” For more information on how to donate to the

cause or how to participate in the 4K or other Ulman programs go to thenews.org. Visit Shaffer Coffee Co. today and mention Krystan Proctor or the 4K for Cancer fundraiser to help her reach her goal.


Page 16

May 2, 2019

Profile for The Murray State News

The Murray State News  

May 2, 2019

The Murray State News  

May 2, 2019

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