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THE MUR R AY STATE

NEWS

Rifle team wins OVC

Page 3

February 8, 2018 | Vol. 92, No. 17

March for Education Ashley Traylor || News Editor atraylor@murraystate.edu

College students from around Kentucky, including Murray State, took

to the steps of the capitol on Feb. 6 to stress the importance of higher education funding. The Rally for Higher Education is hosted by the Kentucky Board of Student Body Presidents and held annually in Frankfort, Kentucky. Student Government Association President Tori Wood represented Murray State, along with about 10 students. The rally is a time for state universities to unite on the steps of the capitol to voice their opinions as well as spend time one-on-one with their local legislators. The students opened the day with speeches from four of their peers, sharing stories of why higher education is important to them. Murray State student and president of the College of Republicans, J.T.... Payne, was one of the students who shared his testimony of higher education. Payne told his fellow students he knew early on in life that his parents would not be able to afford college. Because of that, he joined many clubs and organizations and held as many leadership roles as possible in addition to working part time and achieving high academic success. “I did these things because I wanted to be the first person in my family to

attend a 4-year university,” Payne said. Payne was rewarded for his hard work with a scholarship to Murray State where he has been able to continue his involvement. He posed a question to the students in attendance and the legislators they would later meet with. “How do we, as a Commonwealth, sustain a stimulated economy when the system that produces and trains our workforce is dismantled piece by piece and dollar by dollar,” Payne said. “Why is the foundation of our society, education, always the first to absorb budget cuts? The so called ‘fat’ that you are cutting simply leads to higher tuition and decreased opportunity.” Another student speaker, Hailee Waltz from Northern Kentucky University, said she lived most of her life in poverty. The first-generation college student said what kept her going through the difficult times was hope for a better future. “Without priority for higher education in our legislature, young people who grew up like I did may never see their dreams come true,” Waltz said. Following speeches on the steps of the capitol, students made their way inside to meet with legislators from their respective districts and counties to further discuss the issues facing higher education in the Commonwealth. Gov. Matt Bevin announced last month higher education will face yet another cut of about 6 percent.

Nick Bohannon/The News

Student Body Presidents across Kentucky universities host an annual Rally for Higher Education, inviting students to participate in political action outside of the capitol building.

Fire scorches Patti’s kitchen Michelle Hawks

Contributing writer mhawks@murraystate.edu

A date has not been determined for when Patti’s 1880s Settlement will reopen. The restaurant, located in Grand Rivers, was forced to close after a fire on Feb. 6 caused extensive damage to the kitchen and upstairs office areas. Some areas also received water damage. Ann Martin, the marketing director for Patti’s, said their goal is to be fully reopened by Mother’s Day in mid-May; however, a date cannot be definitively set until they can speak with a contractor. According to Facebook posts made by the restaurant following the fire, no employees were injured. The fire began just before 8 a.m., and the employees quickly sprang into action to attempt to put out the fire. When their efforts failed, they called 911. First responders arrived on the scene within seven minutes. “It was heartbreaking to watch as a Patti’s family,” Martin said. After news of the fire broke, rumors began to swarm that the establishment had burned to the ground, although Martin said this is not true.

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Martin said food – like the restaurant’s famous pork chops – can be cooked on any appliances. “The history is still intact,” Martin said. “That’s the important part.” Patti’s is a popular destination in the region, especially during holidays like Valentine’s Day and events like the annual quilt show. Martin said there were many reservations made for the upcoming months; however, because their reservation system was cloud-based, they were able to save that information. She said a team of employees

are working around the clock to contact everyone with reservations and reschedule them for a later date. Though the restaurant will be closed, Martin said they are working to open the stores as soon as they are able to get the computers and credit card machines back online. She said they hope to reopen those no later than Monday, and employees will still receive their pay. “A waitress may not be a waitress for a while – she might be a gardener,” Martin said, “but we are a team and a family, and we will rebuild together.”

Photo courtesy of Patti’s Facebook page

A fire destroyed Patti’s kitchen on Feb. 6. The restaurant hopes to reopen mid-May.

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Kentucky first state to adopt Medicaid work requirement James Turner

Contributing writer jturner34@murraystate.edu

Kentucky is the first state in the nation to be approved by federal authorities to implement a general work requirement for beneficiaries of Medicaid. During the State of the Commonwealth and Budget Address, Gov. Matt Bevin briefly discussed the approval of a section 1115 waiver that requires some beneficiaries of Medicaid to have general work requirements. Kentucky HEALTH is the Commonwealth’s new health insurance plan. Under the HEALTH system, there is a community engagement program called PATH, Partnering to Advance Training and Health. With HEALTH, lawmakers hope it will encourage people to be more active in their community and improve employability. PATH requires non-disabled Kentuckians ages 19 to 64 to work at least 80 hours per month to qualify for Medicaid. Individuals have the opportunity to get those hours from employment, volunteering or attending school. “Medicaid for able-bodied,

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working-aged men and women without dependents is going to change,” Bevin said. “The expectation and the opportunity and the incentive for the people to do for themselves is going to change.” Bevin said the new medical plan in Kentucky will be a model for the rest of the nation. Since Kentucky’s federal approval, the neighboring state of Indiana has also received the waiver approval. Eight other states have filed their applications. According to Kentucky Health’s website, the new health insurance will be available to non-disabled Medicaid members, low-income parents, caregivers, pregnant women and children. The plan is not for those who receive Medicare or on Medicaid for age or disability. U.S. Rep. John Yarmuth said the move was “dangerous and irresponsible.” Yarmuth lambasted the move saying that by approving Bevin’s waiver, the Trump Administration has agreed to end health coverage of 95,000 Kentuckians. James Clinger, professor of political science and director of the Masters of Public Admin-

istrations program, said part of the reason why reforming healthcare is so important to Kentucky is due to the aging population of the state. Clinger said senior citizens generally require a lot of high-cost healthcare, and a hefty portion of those in nursing homes are on Medicaid. He said Bevin is trying to encourage people to be more responsible for themselves and more engaged in the workforce, but there are always exceptions. “The state will have to determine who will be exempted from the work requirements,” Clinger said. “It may also have to monitor who is employed and who is not. That is why I think that the implementation costs may be significant for this proposal.” Without seeing the full plan, Clinger said it will be difficult to determine the impact this will have on Kentuckians. Clinger said should a court stop the waiver, Bevin will get rid of the Medicaid expansion. “That would be a dramatic, and I think unsuccessful, tactic,” Clinger said. Bevin said the new system will take effect in July 2018.

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The News

Page 2

February 8, 2018

News Editor: Ashley Traylor Assistant News Editor: Lindsey Coleman Page Designer: Savanna Hatfield Phone: 270-809-4468 Twitter: MurrayStateNews

News

Potholes wreak havoc after winter storm Destinee Marking Staff writer

dmarking@murraystate.edu

Winter weather has provoked damage on area roadways, creating potholes and drivers are noticing. Fluctuation in temperature and moisture is responsible for the increase in this issue. Ron Allbritten, street and solid waste manager for the city of Murray, said the Murray Street Department sees an increase of pothole reports every year during winter months but it is up to local residents to report them. “Potholes form from the bottom up,” Allbritten said. “When the gravel underneath the asphalt obtains moisture and that moisture freezes, it

expands. That’s what leads to a pothole.” Since the city has 250 miles of streets to look over, Allbritten said people must report the potholes they notice. “We really appreciate residents calling in and telling us about potholes, because they’re going to see them before we will,” Allbritten said. When it comes to repairing potholes, Allbritten said different departments do it different ways and the Murray Street Department has changed its process within the last couple years to tackle the root of the issue. “What we do is we go in and actually cut out a portion of the road and we repair the subgrade underneath where the pothole begins,” he said.

“Then we repatch the road.” Although this method costs more, Allbritten said it fixes the underlying problem, thus reducing the chances of the pothole reappearing. Once a pothole is reported, the department aims to fix it within 10 business days. According to the American Automobile Association, potholes are not just an inconvenience. Since 2011, at least 16 million drivers in the country have experienced pothole-related damage to their vehicles. Possible damage ranges from tire punctures to misalignment of the steering system. “To help protect yourself, your car and your wallet from pothole damage, keep tires properly inflated, eliminate driving distractions, look

ahead for road hazards, be wary of puddles that may hide potholes and keep a safe distance from other vehicles,” the AAA suggests. Depending on where potholes are spotted, different departments need to be notified. To report potholes in city streets, call the Murray Street Department at 270-762-0377. To report potholes in county roads, call the Calloway County Road Department at 270-753-4846. To re port potholes in state highways, call 1-800-PATCH-IT or visit the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet’s website to fill out an online form. The Kentucky Transportation Cabinet is responsible for maintaining over 27,000 miles of state highways.

Julie Boeker/The News

The city of Murray is relying on local residents for pothole reporting across its 250 miles of road.

Seventh week of influenza, vaccine 10 percent effective Destinee Marking Staff writer

dmarking@murraystate.edu

One hundred flu-related deaths have been reported in Kentucky this season, that is 24 more than the total number at the end of last year. Widespread influenza activity has been reported for seven consecutive weeks. According to the Kentucky Department for Public Health, there have been 3,872 confirmed flu cases this season. Amy Ferguson, public health director at Calloway County Health Department, said the number of flu cases, including hospitalization and deaths, is higher this year than last year. “This year is particularly bad because it is dominated by the

H3N2 strain, which tends to be more severe,” Ferguson said. “Severity of flu seasons are very unpredictable in that the flu strains that are circulating may not match the flu strains selected for the vaccine.” Although this year’s vaccine has been found to only be 10 percent effective, Ferguson said taking this measure is better than not protecting oneself at all. Flu strains are classified into three main categories, and Ferguson said H3N2 is categorized as Influenza A. This category contains quick-mutating viruses that most commonly cause illness in humans. “Influenza A viruses are constantly mutating from one flu season to the next,” Ferguson said. “The genetic changes that

occur in the circulating flu virus can go unrecognized by the immune system even if you had a flu shot the previous year. This is why it is recommended to get a flu shot every year.” Symptoms to be aware of include a cough, sore throat, shaking and chills, fever, body aches, headache, congestion and nausea. Ferguson said these symptoms can appear quickly, can be severe and can last one to two weeks. If an individual is experiencing difficulty breathing, pain or pressure in the chest, sudden dizziness or severe vomiting, Ferguson said that is when they should seek medical attention. With five weeks left of peak flu season, Ferguson said it is important to understand how

the virus is spread and how to avoid spreading it. “Flu viruses are thought to spread mainly from person to person through breathing in or touching droplets from the mouth or nose that are produced from coughing, sneezing or talking,” Ferguson said. According to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, those infected with the flu virus may begin infecting others one day before symptoms even develop. To avoid infecting yourself and others, Ferguson said wash hands with warm water and soap after touching public surfaces – using alcohol-based hand sanitizer when washing hands is not an option – cover your nose and mouth with a tissue while coughing or sneez-

ing, eat healthy and exercise. When it comes to lessening the chance of the flu becoming widespread on campus, Kimberly Paschall, director of Health Services, said one of the most important steps students can take is getting the flu vaccine. “Even if the current vaccine is not an exact match to what is going around, it will lessen the severity of symptoms,” Paschall said. If a student is experiencing flu-like symptoms, Paschall said they should stay home, drink plenty of water, rest and take over-the-counter flu symptom medications until the fever and other symptoms subside. Individuals with chronic health conditions, however,

should seek medical attention within 48 hours of noticing flulike symptoms. Paschall said antiviral flu medications, like Tamiflu, will be more effective in reducing symptoms this way. Medical attention should also be sought if an individual’s symptoms return. Paschall said secondary complications from the flu can occur. If a student with flu-like symptoms visits Health Services, Paschall said a flu test may be performed, and Tamiflu will be suggested. She said over-the-counter medications may also be recommended. Flu vaccines can be received at Walmart, CVS, Rite Aid, Walgreens, Walter’s Pharmacy and Fast Pace Urgent Care in Murray.

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The News

Page 3

February 8, 2018

Sports Rifle wins third OVC title Sports Editor: Bryan Edwards Assistant Sports Editor: Blake Sandlin Page Designer: Rosalyn Churchman Phone: 270-809-4481 Twitter: MSUSportsNews

Cory Sharber Contributing writer csharber@murraystate.edu

Brock Kirk/The News

The Murray State rifle team won its third straight OVC Championship with a 4707 aggregate score last weekend.

The Murray State rifle team took home its third-straight OVC Championship and numerous team and individual accolades over the weekend at the Pat Spurgin Rifle Range. The No. 4 ranked Racers had to compete against other opponents in the top-20, including No. 12 Jacksonville State, No. 17 Morehead State and No. 18 UT Martin. Murray State emerged as the victors with an aggregate of 4707 points. Morehead State placed second with 4637 points, Jacksonville State finished in third with 4626 points and UT Martin rounded out the competitors in fourth with an aggregate of 4599 points. Head Coach Alan Lollar said the success of the team was determined by the preparation that went into it, noting the different atmosphere in which the team had to compete in. “I think they prepared for the distractions of this week,” Lollar said. “It’s the biggest crowd we’ll deal with at home. We have family here and there’s a lot of things that make it a much different atmosphere.” Senior Ivan Roe, from Manhattan, Montana, finished as the top marksman in the tournament with an aggregate of

1176 and also claimed OVC First Team honors in both air rifle and smallbore. Senior Ben Estes, from Ozark, Missouri, and junior MacKenzie Martin, from Fairhaven, Massachusetts, both shot aggregates of 1175 each. Martin claimed the top smallbore spot with 589 points. Estes received OVC First Team honors in both air rifle and smallbore, while Martin was named to the Second Team in air rifle, First Team in smallbore and emerged as the 2018 OVC Smallbore Athlete of the Year. Senior Bobby Broadstreet, from Ozark, Missouri, emerged as the top air rifle marksman for the tournament shooting for a score of 595. Broadstreet also took home the 2018 OVC Air Rifle Athlete of the Year award and First Team honors in air rifle. Junior Barbara Schläpfer, from Gais, Switzerland, obtained an aggregate of 1172 for the tournament and received First Team honors in air rifle and smallbore. She noted the atmosphere had an impact on the tournament as it was more personal to play in front of their peers. “I think it’s always special to do that in front of a home crowd because you have all of your friends and family mem-

see RIFLE, page 4

Track and Field post second place finish

Contributing writer

zscott1@murraystate.edu

Murray State’s track and field team traveled to Carbondale, Illinois, over the weekend to participate in the Don Denoon Invitational. Out of 14 teams, the Racers scored 92 points, which was good enough for second place, finishing behind Southern Illinois’ 111. Austin Peay rounded out the top three with 45 points. Aubrey Main, a junior high-jumper, broke two personal records; one in the pentathlon and the other in high jump. In the Pentathlon, Main posted a 9.90 second for the hurdles, 1.61 meters in the high jump, 10.21 meters in the shot put, 5.18 in the long jump and a 2:29.25 in the 800-meter race. Main broke her High Jump record with a 1.69 meter jump during the event. Tamdra Lawrence, a junior sprinter, also tied her season best in the 60-meter hurdles this weekend with a time of

7.61 seconds, which was good enough for second place in the event. In the 200-meter race, Lawrence and Norma Abdur-Rafia, a sophomore sprinter took first and second place, respectively. Lawrence had a time of 24.87 seconds with Abdur-Rafia right behind at 25.10 seconds. Even though they didn’t leave Carbondale with a first-place finish, Head Coach Adam Kiesler said he was proud of the way his team finished the weekend. “On day two we had a lot of carry over from day one,” Kiesler said. “Everyone came out to compete and the performances showed. We came to win the meet and fell just short of our goal, but I think with where we are with training we are in a good spot. We look forward to next week and continuing to improve as a team.” The Murray State track and field team travels to Pittsburg, Kansas to participate in the Pitt-State Gorilla Classic on Feb. 9 and 10.

Rosalyn Churchman/The News

Zach Scott

Softball begins regular season after successful fall

Evan Tidwell

Contributing writer

etidwell@murraystate.edu

From the semi-warm weather in the air to the sound of chanting ringing out from the dugouts, it’s evident that Murray State softball is officially in swing. The Racers’ softball team had a very successful fall preseason by finishing 8-0 in the Saluki Fall Round Robin. This will be their eighth season under Head Coach Kara Amundson. The Racers hope to continue their winning ways when they kick off their spring season on Friday, Feb. 9, against East Tennessee State University. Amundson said the Racer softball team used the preseason as not only a way to grow and develop, but as a way to get acquainted and build chemistry. “The fall for us was honestly a super new team in general,” Amundson said. “Obviously it’s a new team every year, but we lost seven seniors who all started for a good chunk of their career. That turnover for us, we just didn’t know what we were going to get from our freshman and some of the transfers we had coming in, so I think for us as a coaching staff, it was a see what we’ve got kind of

thing.” The Racer softball team had to find new personnel to step up and play a pivotal role after the team graduated seven seniors. One position in particular was that of pitcher Mason Robinson, who has the career wins record. With Robinson leaving, the next person in line is senior pitcher Haven Campbell. “Haven Campbell, who is a senior this year, has been under Mason’s wings the past three years, and we think it’s kind of Hayden’s time to shine,” Amundson said. The Racers start their season on the road for the first five weekends in a row, then come back and host on the sixth weekend. “In this time we hope to piggyback off what we did in the fall and put some things together offensively,” Amundson said. Murray State begins its spring season on the road for a majority of non-conference play. It does get an opportunity to play in front of the home crowd as the Racers will have the second annual Racer Classic. The Racer Classic will be a three-day event consisting of five teams, which is slightly larger than last season’s field. The Racers will hope to start their season off on a bright note when they take on ETSU this Friday, Feb. 9, in Statesboro, Georgia.

Bryan Edwards/The News

Freshman Olivia Suski delivers a pitch during Murray State softball’s fall season. The Racers finished the fall undefeated.


The News

Sports

Page 4

February 8, 2018

Women’s basketball sets its sights on OVC rival Austin Peay Gage Johnson|| Staff writer gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

The Racers will look to bounce back from two straight losses when they take on Austin Peay on Thursday and Southern Illinois-Edwardsville on Saturday. Murray State comes into this week having lost 80-70 at the hands of SEMO and 87-65 to UT Martin on the road last week. They will return home for the first of two games this week, coming in at 8-15 overall and 4-8 in conference play. In order to make the tournament, the two games this week are crucial for the Racers. “Well, every game is big for us right now,� Head Coach Rechelle Turner said. “We’re just trying to claw our way to the tournament somehow, some way. Each game is important, and we’ve still got to try and figure out a way to win.� Their first matchup will be against OVC-rival Austin Peay. This will be the seventh event in the Battle of the Border competition between the two. They are currently tied at nine points. Austin Peay has defeated Murray State in football, volleyball and men’s cross country. Murray State has defeated Austin Peay in volleyball, women’s cross country and soccer. The team with the most points at the end of the school year will win the Heritage Bank Battle of the Border traveling trophy. The Governors come in at 13-10 overall and 6-6 in OVC play after defeating SEMO on the road 61-50 on Saturday Feb. 3. Austin Peay averages a shooting percentage of 39.9 percent, while opponents convert 42.3 percent of field goals against them. They are a balanced team in terms of scoring, with only one player averaging double figures. They are led in scoring by senior center Brianne Alexander, who is averaging 11.2 PPG.

“She’ll be a difficult matchup for us,� Turner said. “So we’ve got to figure out a way to send help and not put our kids in positions one-on-one. We don’t have any post presence, so anytime that matchup happens, it’s difficult for us. So we have to find a way to guard her collectively.� The Racers’ second matchup will take place on the road, as they will take on SIUE at Edwardsville, Illinois. The Cougars head into the week with two games on the schedule. They will take on Eastern Illinois Thursday, before taking on Murray State Saturday. SIUE sits at 13-10 overall and 10-2 in conference play. They are currently on a two-game win streak after defeating Tennessee

Tech and Jacksonville State at home. They shoot an average of 39.4 percent per game, while their opponents have a 39.3 percent from the field They are led in scoring by senior guard Donshel Beck with 14 PPG, along with senior guard Lauren White, who averages 13.7 PPG. Murray State converts on 40.3 percent of their shot attempts, while its defense allows its opponents shoot 46.9 percent on the hardwood. The Racers have the second- and sixth-highest scorers in the OVC in senior guard Ke’Shunan James, with 20.3 points per game, and senior forward Bria Bethea, with 16 points per game. Murray State will take on Austin Peay at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 8, at the CFSB Center.

Rosalyn Churchman/The News

RIFLE From Page 3

Bryan Edwards/The News

Senior Jasmine Borders scans the floor for a teammate during a loss to UT Martin.

bers here,â€? Schläpfer said. “It’s way more personal than at a place where you don’t know anyone.â€? Junior Alathea Sellars, from Puryear, Tennessee, shot for 578 in smallbore and took home Second Team honors in smallbore. Freshman Dana Buesseler, from Forest Lake, Minnesota, was selected as the 2018 OVC Freshman of the

Year. Murray State swept the team awards as champions in both smallbore and air rifle. Lollar also took home an award, as he was selected as the 2018 OVC Rifle Coach of the Year for the fifth time in his career. Lollar noted that it never gets old winning the conference and noted the hard work and dedication his shooters have given him all season, which resulted in a multitude of awards. “They’ve worked hard and they shoot the numbers,� said Lollar. “They put the work in at training and they’re the

most dedicated group of young people I’ve ever been around.� Martin complimented her coach, noting his dedication for the team and their success. “He says that we’re dedicated, but I think it’s important to know that he’s dedicated too,� said Martin. “I knew that he was going to be there the whole time I needed him.� Murray State will be competing in Oxford, Mississippi on Feb. 10 in a tri-match against No. 8 Ole Miss and No. 16 Memphis before the NCAA Qualifiers which will be held on Feb. 18.

     

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The News

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February 8, 2018 Features Editor: Emily Williams Assistant Features Editor: Nick Erickson Page Designer: Rachel Solomon Phone: 270-809-5871

Features

Hitting the bull’s eye

Nick’s Notes

Hesitancy

Murray State student places fourth nationwide in USCA competition Nick Erickson

Assistant Features Editor nerickson@murraystate.edu

Murray State’s Brandon Shaw has achieved national spotlight for both himself and archery, competing at the United States Collegiate Archery Association in January and placing fourth nationwide. The competition was the South Region match of the United States Intercollegiate Indoor Archery Championships held in Madisonville, Kentucky from January 25-28. Led by coach Tom Patterson, Shaw has made a name for both himself and the western Kentucky community. Shooting for over 10 years, Shaw began engaging in competitive archery during his freshman year of high school. Shaw, who recently started his first semester at Murray State, said he started shooting USCA during his final year of community college. “I competed with the Madisonville Community college team for the outdoor season and medaled in both tournaments we competed in,” Shaw said “I took both silver at the regional and bronze at nationals.” Shaw said with his time at community college coming to an end, he didn’t have much time allotted to shoot in the USCA. Once Murray State was in his sights, he realized he would be able to further his drive for the sport. “After deciding I would go to Murray State to finish my education, it was a great help

Brock Kirk/The News

Brandon Shaw placed fourth nationwide in the United States Intercollegiate Indoor Archery Championships and will compete in the USA Archery Nevada State Indoor Championships on Feb. 7. to know that I could continue shooting and compete at the college level,” Shaw said. Though his time before was limited, Shaw said he’s thankful to know he has at least a couple more years to develop as an archer at his current level. Shaw holds an abundance of fond archery memories, including numerous award-winning examples. “My favorite memory from

competing would probably be winning a National Field Archery Association (NFAA) indoor state championship on my first try,” Shaw said. “A tie for that could be when I finished third place at the college outdoor nationals in Yankton, South Dakota.” Shaw’s passion for his craft has not gone unnoticed by those close to him. Kody Applebee, Shaw’s friend and fellow archery competitor from

his time at Madisonville Community College said he has great faith in Shaw’s abilities. “Shaw and I have shot archery together since our freshman year of high school, and he’s always done amazing,” Applebee said. “His passion reflects on the rest of his life, as he’s very dependable and always willing to lend a hand to his peers.” Shaw is qualified to compete in the USA Archery

Nevada State Indoor Championships, taking place on Feb. 7. While archery is arguably not the most prevalent sport at a collegiate level, it undoubtedly holds its place as an engaging pastime. Shaw said he highly recommends it to anyone who is interested. “It is an extremely rewarding activity,” Shaw said. “Rest assured, you get out of it what you put into it.”

Alpha Gamma Delta spreads the joy of service Emily Williams Features Editor

ewilliams15@murraystate.edu

Tucked within the purpose statement of Alpha Gamma Delta, there is a line that states “...to welcome the opportunity to contribute to the world’s work in the community where I am placed because of the joy of service thereby bestowed and the talent of leadership multiplied.” Staying true to the vision and purpose of their sorority, all Alpha Gamma Delta chapters in the U.S. and Canada will hold their annual Week of Service on Feb. 11-17. This will be a week dedicated to special events, giving back to the community and getting their hands dirty for their philanthropic

focus, Fighting Hunger. Tressa Ross, advisor for Alpha Gamma Delta, said they have partnered with The American Red Cross to sponsor their annual blood drive that will be held in The Curris Center Stables on Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. “Right now there is a critical blood shortage and with the tragic event in Marshall County it is important that our blood resources not be low,” Ross said. “We are encouraging all students, faculty and staff to honor our neighbors in Marshall County and participate in the blood drive.” Lydia Swinney, Director of Community Service Alpha Gamma Delta, said she is in charge of putting the Week of Service together and setting things into motion.

“This week is so important to us at Alpha Gam because we feel a need to give back to our communities and we want to have a positive impact on a community that has helped shape us as a chapter,” Swinney said. “We want to spread awareness because we would like to prompt and encourage anyone that would like to get involved serving within their communities.” Swinney said on Monday and Tuesday, they will be handing out Valentines to employees that work at Murray State thanking them for all that they do and expressing their gratitude for their services here at the university. On Wednesday, the sorority will volunteer at Needline from open to close. “This is especially special to us because it gives us a way to

Photo courtesy of Lydia Swinney

The sisters of Alpha Gamma Delta prepare for their Week of Service, taking place Feb. 11-17. get involved with our philanthropic focus which is Fighting Hunger,” Swinney said. She said the Alpha Gamma Delta community are looking forward to serving and helping people during this Week of Service and she hopes to have a positive impact on

campus and within the community. Students who are interested in giving in the blood drive can preregister by calling American Red Cross at (1-800-733-2767) or by going to redcrossblood.org and entering the code MSUKY.

When you have finally overcome a period of writer’s block, it’s truly remarkable to look at Nick Erickson something Assistant Features t h a t was Editor once only a conscious thought of yours, now staring back at you from a piece of paper. Despite roughly four years of studying journalism, English, poetry and creative writing, I still struggle with articulating my thoughts properly. That alone has become a prominent subject in my own works. Sometimes when writing, I find hesitancy in putting my thoughts into words. I feel like it’s because it comes with feeling of permanence – as if extracting them from my head makes them more real, absolute or overpowering than they already are. It can be simply terrifying. With that being said, I’ve found that I have no choice but to push myself into working through it. For me, there is no better release from anything that’s been bothering me than to unleash it through not just writing, but creating something in general. Being able to open up is an ability I’ve grown to cherish. Even if what I expel never meets the eyes of another person, freeing my ideas from my head for myself to view is therapeutic. We are immersed in a world full of creation. Some may argue that it has become oversaturated. Other’s will argue that one’s own work, despite similarities, cannot be an exact replication of anything else, provided it comes straight from the heart, mind and soul. One of the biggest pieces of advice I’ve absorbed from these past four years of trying to figure myself out is if you have something to say, do your best to say it. Do whatever it takes to get the words you need to say out on paper, because they are less scary that way. Grab your guitar and write a song confessing your feelings about a special someone. Grab a canvas and paint how the calculus exam tore you up inside. Grab a pen and scribble down your anxious thoughts. Do whatever it takes for you to work through your adversary. We all are struggling with something; some are just better at hiding it. nerickson@murraystate.edu

Thinking outside the box (of chocolates) Unique ways to spread love to everyone this Valentine’s Day, not just your S.O. Amy Turner || Staff writer aturner32@murraystate.edu

When you think of Valentine’s Day, a slew of romantic rendezvous may come to mind. From chocolate hearts to a fancy candlelit dinner, you typically think in terms of romantic love for this February holiday. Or maybe you prefer to spend Valentine’s Day with close friends that have a special place in your heart. But have you ever thought that maybe Valentine’s love can extend beyond our romantic relationships and close friendships?

FOR THOSE WHO NEED A FRIEND

For some people, Valentine’s Day can be a lonely holiday. Visiting a nursing/ assisted living home can help alleviate some loneliness for

our more seasoned lovebirds. A simple visit full of smiles and cards can mean so much to someone spending the holiday alone. Find a group of friends to tag along and help spread a little extra love and cheer through an act of service this Valentine’s Day. With several homes near Murray State’s campus, you shouldn’t have to go out of your way to spread a little extra love and cheer through an act of service this holiday. Write little notes and leave them in random places all over campus. Someone just might need a little encouragement as their semester grows colder and more difficult. Leave a note in the laundry room or on your table at Winslow for someone to find. These don’t have to be overly sappy or really long.

Just remind people to smile and that today can be a good day if they want it to be.

FOR YOUR FRIENDS

Throw a galentine/bro’s day party. Hanging out with friends and simply enjoying the day can be the perfect way to spread some love. Romantic relationships don’t have to be the focus of the day. Grab your favorite snacks and enjoy some much-needed chill time watching your favorite movie or TV show. Get some board games and laugh the night away. If you have a friend who recently broke a romantic relationship off, try to get them a small gift if you can. Spend some extra time making sure they know that they are loved beyond a significant other.

Rachel Solomon/The News

Give them extra reasons to smile. These don’t have to be elaborate since the little things usually mean more than the extravagant. Grab an extra candy bar from the vending machine or let them pick the movie for your friend group.

FOR YOUR SIGNIFICANT OTHER

When planning the perfect date, try to think outside the box and plan something new. Find an activity you both have never done and try it. This could be as simple as playing a new board game or trying a new restaurant.

Maybe go thrift shopping to pick the other person’s dinner outfit. Just have fun and enjoy making new memories. As you are doing all this, make a list of new adventures you want to go on and memories you want to make together.


The News

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February 8, 2018

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The News

Page 7

February 8, 2018

Opinion

Opinion Editor: Tyler Anderson Page Designer: Tori Wood Phone: 270-809-5873

Our View

From tragedy comes change The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board.

Connor Jaschen Editor-in-Chief • 270-809-6877 cjaschen@murraystate.edu

Austin Gordon Production Manager • 270-809-5877 agordon4@murraystate.edu

Ashley Traylor News Editor • 270-809-4468 atraylor@murraystate.edu

Tyler Anderson Opinion Editor • 270-809-5873 janderson49@murraystate.edu

Emily Williams Features Editor • 270-809-5871 ewilliams15@murraystate.edu

The Marshall County High School shooting brought back feelings of fear, uncertainty and doubt not felt in the region since a similar incident at Heath High School in 1997. Families are coming to terms with their new reality. Some students are questioning what it means to be safe amongst their peers. Community members are struggling to accept what has led to unnecessary tragedy. But amidst the immense pain reverberating throughout the community, thoughts, prayers and support from across the state have flooded in to brace those affected in their greatest hour of need. The “Marshall Strong” hashtag has been the rallying cry for individuals and organizations looking to support the students and their families. Buttons bearing the hashtag in bright blue and orange, the Marshall Co. school’s colors, have

Bryan Edwards Sports Editor • 270-809-4481 bedwards16@murraystate.edu

Ginni Sisemore Chief Copy Editor • 270-809-5876 vsisemore@murraystate.edu

Chandler Cochran

been donned by locals and Kentuckians across the state. Kentucky Education Commissioner Stephen Pruitt promoted the hashtag and asked Kentuckians to wear the school’s colors in a show of support. In a statement following the shooting, Pruitt said “the healing and recovery process will be long, and… it is important that the residents of Marshall County know they are still on our minds and in our heart.” And Pruitt makes a good point. These scars won’t heal quickly. Years will pass and the western Kentucky community will not have forgotten the pain and panic of that January day. However, now is not only the time to grieve and send prayers but to ask the question most will avoid in the coming months: what do we do now? Gun violence has been addressed countless ways in the past few decades with no real solution having b e e n intro-

Ad Sales and Circulation Manager • 270-809-4478 ccochran3@murraystate.edu

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Dr. Stephanie Anderson Adviser • 270-809-3937 sanderson37@murraystate.edu

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duced in that time. The topic often draws the ire of those who don’t want to “politicize the issue.” As we’ve seen with similar incidents across the United States, not having the discussion is harming more than helping. And with school shootings on the rise, something, or really anything at this point, must be done. In an address posted to Facebook, Gov. Matt Bevin called upon the entertainment industry to be part of the movement to “figure out how to try to repair this fabric of America that’s getting shredded beyond recognition.” Bevin’s take on our current crisis is that we have become desensitized to violence, and are in fact encouraged to take part in it, due to what is portrayed in the media. Violent video games in particular have been the subject of such criticisms in the recent past, though any correlation between these games and violent behavior has been largely dismissed. “Gaming [is] unrelated to most mental health issues including attention problems or reduced social functioning, or total mental health difficulties,” according to reports from HuffPost on studies conducted in the Netherlands. But if media isn’t the root of the issue, what is? It would be foolish to try and narrow the cause of gun violence to one factor. However, we believe that underfunded and overstressed primary schools are a potential factor which must be addressed. Students spend up to nine hours a day in school until they are 18 years old. When money is stripped from our schools, teachers have less resources and are pulled in too many directions at once. Without proper supervision, supplies or opportunities beyond the classroom, students begin to feel the pressure, too. This scenario is not simulated; it is the reality of our schools at this exact moment. The one hindrance to violence which can be noted throughout history is education. When one has access to appropriate resources and is able to think critically about the world around them, they are more likely to fulfill a positive role in society. By letting lawmakers devalue education, we are allowing violence to grow. Gun violence won’t disappear overnight no matter how you try to solve it. This issue will require a multi-faceted approach enacted over several years to reverse just some of the damage done. But if we help our educators, we help ourselves. If we truly wish to be “Marshall Strong,” we must support the community, its educators and those working tirelessly to make a difference.

Looking Forward

The News welcomes commentaries and letters to the editor. Submissions should be 600 words or less, and contributors should include phone numbers for verification. Please include hometown, classification and title or relationship to the university. The News reserves the right to edit for style, length and content. No anonymous contributions will be accepted. All contributions should be turned in by noon on Monday of each week via email to janderson49@murraystate.edu. Contributions to The News are the opinion of the author and not that of The Murray State News. The News strives to be the university community’s source for information. Our goal is to present that information in a fair and unbiased manner and provide a free and open forum for expression and debate. The News is a designated public forum. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. The paper offers a hands-on learning environment for students interested in journalism. The campus press should be free from censorship and advance approval of copy and its editors should develop their editorial and news policies. The News is prepared and edited by students and is an official publication of Murray State University. The first copy is free. Additional copies are available for 25 cents at 111 Wilson Hall.

Tech on a dime Tyler Anderson

Opinion Editor

janderson49@murraystate.edu

Early adopters of new technology are known to shell out top dollar for the next great invention. The adrenaline rush that comes with owning each new i-device must outweigh the financial strain which comes with chasing this high. But in a world of constant technological innovation at competitive prices, there are fewer and fewer reasons to rationalize purchases of unpolished hardware. The Apple Inc. iPhone legacy is low-hanging fruit when it comes to criticizing price gouging for the newest tech. There’s certainly a lot of pride and work that goes into designing the hardware, and for the most part, the company’s work regularly impresses us. But for every hit, there’s a big miss. The Apple Watch was meant to revolutionize not only how we tell time, but how we make calls, video chat and even make purchases on the go. Its legacy has been tarnished by mediocre sales. Critics were skeptical of the item’s real-world applications and general usefulness. To be fair, this is far from being only an Apple issue. Samsung and other innovators in the electronic world often charge outrageous prices for

items that ultimately turn out to be little more than experiments to test the waters. And this innovation is important. It’s how we shape the future of technology and consumer-friendly policies. Many modern conveniences we enjoy have been refined because of consumer investment. To discredit this would be to discredit the advantages of a free market. The everyday person, however, would do well to resist these shiny temptations and explore options from companies offering similar experiences at much lower prices. We are at a point in our lives as college students where stretching each dollar is crucial; wasting money on high-priced gadgets simply because of brand recognition isn’t wise. Luckily, there are more than a few alternatives to the electronic giants most are familiar with. Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd., despite issues breaking into the western market, has become a company synonymous with impressive phone and tablet hardware at almost suspiciously low prices. The Honor 7X, for example, has been praised for providing features seen on high-end phones, but with a price tag of only $200. I am willing to sacrifice facial recognition features for the $800 savings that comes from not buying the iPhone X (and I bet many of you are too). AsusTek Computer Inc., or simply Asus as it is known in the states, has been offering high-quality

computers and tablets for quite a while now. In particular, their Chromebooks have garnered a lot of attention lately. Dieter Bohn of TheVerge. com praised the C302 model for “setting the standard” of expectations for Chromebooks. Asus’ Chromebook offering is exactly half the price of Google LLC’s Pixelbook, a product which offers a similar experience. I could make lists of these companies for days, but ultimately it is our job as part of a consumer society to seek out the best value for everything we purchase. Note that I didn’t say best price, as value and price don’t always go hand in hand. It is easy to be tempted by the $50 tablet you see at the corner store, but the bottom dollar price tag will likely come with too many compromises to make it worth even $10. Company ethics also play a part in modern consumer politics. So, it is up to the individual to make the best choice to meet their needs. I’m not saying you shouldn’t indulge in a frivolous purchase from time to time; instead, I am urging everyone to do their research. Make sure you can identify what you do and don’t need out of your technology. Understanding that most any purchase comes with compromises is important, too. Just be smart with your money, and only good can come from it.


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