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90 years

THE MUR R AY STATE

NEWS

of excellence

November 16, 2017 | Vol. 92, No. 12

University address warns of tough times Sabra Jackson Staff writer

sjackson30@murraystate.edu

Ashley Traylor

Y R D

News Editor

atraylor@murraystate.edu

Nick Bohannon/The News

Sigma Phi Epsilon’s headquarters announced Nov. 8 that alcohol will be banned from their 215 chapter homes by 2020. Murray State’s SigEp chapter has already adopted this policy.

Fraternity implements substance-free policy Destinee Marking Staff writer

dmarking@murraystate.edu

Sigma Phi Epsilon will become the first fraternity on Murray State’s campus to ban alcohol. The organization’s national headquarters announced on Nov. 8 that alcohol will be completely banned from chapter homes by 2020. “Sigma Phi Epsilon (SigEp) national fraternity announced that it has adopted a substance-free policy for all Fraternity facilities throughout its network of 215 chapters at colleges and universities in the United States,” the announcement read. Caleb Coomes, Murray State’s SigEp president, said this resolution was voted on by the undergraduate members and passed in August. Prior to the Substance-free Facilities policy, Coomes said Murray State SigEp members already follow strict rules. “In somewhere like Murray, where most all of the fraternity

houses are off campus, all the rules of the state and the city are followed first,” Coomes said. “Then if nationally, they restrict anything further, we follow that.” Coomes said this means that starting in August, anything involving alcohol, such as parties, cannot be held on the fraternity’s property; these events will have to be held elsewhere. He said they will however, still be able to hold social events. This announcement was not in direct response to the recent incident at Florida State University that left a fraternity pledge dead, but Coomes said occurrences like this prove the need to take action. “We decided that it’s time for a change,” Coomes said. “We’re not the first, but we want to help lead that change and show there’s a better way of how we can do things.” As of Nov. 6, all Greek life at Florida State was suspended indefinitely. Coomes said he and others want to avoid such restrictions at Murray State. He said Greek life is more

than the negative things that are reported; members get philanthropy and networking experience. Kim Newbern, coordinator of Greek life and student leadership programs, said this policy will help Murray State’s Greek life community promote moreso what it already does. “Our Greek life Community promotes an atmosphere where chapters and individuals can excel in leadership, scholarship, service and philanthropy and personal growth,” Newbern said. She said chapter advisers and consultants will be responsible for enforcing this new policy. “They work very close with their chapters to make sure they adhere to policies,” Newbern said. “In the case of SigEp, the National Fraternity will provide training for chapters and alumni volunteers who need help implementing this policy.” As this policy is intended to create safer environments and attract

prospective members to SigEp, Newbern said this policy should not negatively affect future SigEp recruitment. “SigEp’s nationally reported data shows that chapters that have some sort of substance-free policy actually have higher GPAs, higher recruitment/membership and fewer insurance claims,” Newbern said. “This policy is meant to create a new pool of potential members who are attracted to SigEp’s values.” Coomes said the new policy may make SigEp uninteresting to students who are looking to join Greek life for the party scene, but these are not the ideal recruits. “These changes will just be a different way of going about our social events and not negatively affecting us socially, but only promoting and creating an environment of learning, leadership and development to which every Greek organization should strive to create themselves,” Coomes said.

State opioid addiction on the rise

Destinee Marking

Staff writer

dmarking@murraystate.edu

Kentucky has fallen victim to the deadly opioid addiction epidemic, and college students are no exception to this nation-wide rampant. According to National Institute on Drug Abuse, opioids include prescription pain killers and illegal drugs like heroin and fentanyl. “These drugs are chemically related and interact with opioid receptors on nerve cells in the body and brain,” according to NIDA. “Opioid pain reliev-

ers are generally safe when taken for a short time and as prescribed by a doctor, but because they produce euphoria in addition to pain relief, they can be misused.” A survey conducted by Q Market Research of Minnesota in 2015, showed 16 percent of college-age youth reported using pain pills not prescribed to them. Of the respondents, 32.7 percent said this is because prescription pain killers are “easy” to obtain. Ben Chandler, president and CEO of Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky, said it is evident Kentucky is in the epi-

center of this crisis. Kentucky had 1,400 overdose-related deaths in 2016, and Chandler believes this number is lower than the actual figure. “Most of us think that is a conservative figure,” Chandler said. “We think there are a lot of deaths that were due to opioid usage, but weren’t reported as opioid deaths in coroner reports because families didn’t want it reported.” Looking back on this problem, Chandler said it began in the 1990s. He said in the mid-90s, opium-based drugs started being prescribed to

patients to ease pain. Before then, these drugs were not prescribed unless patients were terminally ill. “Opioids are tremendous pain killers, but they are incredibly addictive,” Chandler said. “In fact, you can get addicted within three to five days.” Chandler said opioid dependency is one of the most difficult addictions to overcome. “The problem is most of the solutions people come up with have to do with treatment, and there are two problems connected with treatment,” Chandler said. “One is treat-

ment is not prevention. It’s after the fact, so it doesn’t do anything for preventing the use of opioids in the first place. The second thing is it’s tremendously expensive.” Prevention is a key to fighting the opioid epidemic. Both the Murray Police Department and the Calloway County Sheriff’s office offer a disposal program for prescription drugs. “The Sheriff’s Office handles the bulk of it with an actual secure drop off bin,” said Sergeant Brant Shutt with the

see DRUGS, page 2

SGA helps students who can’t afford laptop

Katlyn Mackie

Staff writer kmackie2@murraystate.edu

Financial issues are no longer keeping students from having technology thanks to a new laptop bank program recently implemented by the Student Government Association. Clint Combs, former SGA president, said financial problems are often the leading cause of students dropping out of college, even if it is not a substantial amount. “When we can institute pro-

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grams that take these distractions away from our students, it allows for them to better focus on their academics,” Combs said. “I am still incredibly proud of this program, and with it integrated into programs like Racers Helping Racers and the meal swipe bank, it provides a security net for all students who might find trying times in college.” Tori Wood, SGA president, said the laptops available in the program are older and do not receive use from the university.

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“We thought it was obviously a great way to help students that need a laptop but aren’t able to provide it themselves,” Wood said. Students can apply on SGA’s website under the Services and Programs tab or fill out a paper application in the Center for Student Involvement. Students are asked on the applications about their employment, financial aid and reason for needing a laptop. From there, an SGA com-

see LAPTOP, page 2

@TheMurrayStateNews

President Bob Davies gave his State of the University Address Tuesday in Wrather Auditorium where he focused on funding issues plaguing postsecondary education in Kentucky. “In our own state, significant changes are not merely on the horizon, they are on our doorstep,” Davies said. Those changes, he said are performance funding where outcomes and measures of student attainment are prominent. Coupled with the pension crisis currently in the Commonwealth, the change in funding is creating higher levels of stress and uncertainty among those who work in higher education. “Additionally, based on the fiscal projections, the state is anticipating a significant budget reduction in the forthcoming legislative session,” Davis said. With the “new normal” universities are currently facing in higher education, Davis said it is more important than ever to establish priorities and actions for Murray State to focus on.

ENROLLMENT

Davies said the first priority and the most important was enrollment. “We cannot lose sight of the importance of increasing enrollment,” Davies said. “In these times when state appropriations are continually declining, we must drive our own revenues.” He focused on the university’s commitment to attracting, admitting and enrolling students, who have the highest possibility of being successful at Murray State in “our rigorous academic programs.” While the official enrollment numbers have not yet been released, Davies did allude to a decline in enrollment, especially among international students. It is not only an issue at Murray State but for schools all over the U.S. “In the past, we have relied on international student markets to boost enrollments, especially at the graduate level,” Davies said. “However, these once burgeoning markets are now bypassing the United States in large numbers.” He said it is important that the university continue to reinforce value and affordability when it comes to the tuition costs. Murray State is the third cheapest in the state when it comes to tuition and fees, lagging behind Kentucky State University and Morehead State University. “It is imperative that we enforce value and affordability,” Davies said. “This is why we must maintain a tuition model that continues to provide excellent value and return toward our students.”

RECRUITMENT

McKenna Dosier/The News

The application for a laptop can be found on SGA’s website under the Services and Programs tab.

@MurrayStateNews

@TheMurrayStateNews

The freshmen class of 2017 was on target to be one of the largest the university has seen recently but only produced slightly less than 2016. The admissions team is implementing a “robust plan” that Davies said will streamline the admissions process. “So we are the first to con-

see UNIVERSITY, page 2

@MurrayStateNews


The News

Page 2

November 16, 2017

News Editor: Ashley Traylor Assistant News Editor: Lindsey Coleman Page Designer: Savanna Hatfield Phone: 270-809-4468 Twitter: MurrayStateNews

DRUGS From Page 1 Murray Police Department. The program allows people to drop off unused prescriptions at various drop off locations around the city and county. “It helps to prevent accidental use by family members and also helps to prevent intentional use by addicts,” said Narcotics Investigator Michael Weatherford with the Murray Police Department. The disposal program is not just limited to prescription pills. There are also two drop off locations for used needles and syringes: the emergency room at Murray-Calloway County Hospital and the Murray North Fire Station. The reason people are turning toward illegal drugs like heroin, Chandler said, is because people who are addicted cannot always continue to obtain prescription drugs. “Because of the way prescription drugs were misused during the 1990s and early 2000s, in essence, what we did was we created a market for dealers of heroin and fentanyl,” Chandler said. The misuse of these drugs is widespread. Chandler said all

demographics have individuals becoming addicted to and abusing opioids. Abigail Cox, coordinator for Women’s Center and educational programming, said reasons individual college students start misusing substances vary. “It is common for substances to be used in order to cope with stress or other emotional distress, however, recreational use of substances is also very common among college students,” Cox said. While the opioid epidemic sweeps the Commonwealth and the nation, it is not the main drug of choice in Murray. Weatherford said the most devastating drug to families in Murray is methamphetamine. “I’ve seen a lot more college students using it,” Weatherford said. “It keeps them awake, and it’s cheaper than the pills (opioids).” Methamphetamine, while on the increase on campus, is not the drug of choice for Murray State students. Weatherford said marijuana is the most prevalent drug among students. “I can probably go out here (in a campus parking lot), stop five cars and I’ll find weed in four of them,” Weatherford said. “People say it is not a gateway drug; it is. I have seen it firsthand. They start

News LAPTOP From Page 1

Nick Bohannon/The News

Narcan Nasal Spray is used for those suspected of overdosing on opioids. smoking weed, went to heroin and meth.” According to the Murray State University Student Life Alcohol and Other Drug Policy, the university is committed to educating students and preventing them from general substance abuse. “A number of offices have combined to make available prevention and education materials for alcohol and other drug use to Murray State students,” according to the policy. “In addition to the annual distribution of our policies regarding alcohol and other drugs, all new students under the age of 25 are required to complete an

online alcohol education program during their first semester at Murray State.” While there is no substance abuse counseling available on campus, the policy lists Four Rivers Behavioral Health, Recovery Works, West Kentucky Drug and Alcohol Services and Drug Information Services for Kentucky as resources in the region. While there is no substance abuse counseling available on campus, the policy lists Four Rivers Behavioral Health, Recovery Works, West Kentucky Drug and Alcohol Services and Drug Information Services for Kentucky as resources in the region.

Financial services consolidate UNIVERSITY From Page 1

Lindsey Coleman

Assistant News Editor lcoleman7@murraystate.edu

Murray State students can now satisfy all their financial questions and needs in one building. President Bob Davies announced in late September that he decided to make organizational changes to improve financial services for students. His decision effectively created a Student Financial Services unit, which includes the Bursar’s Office, Student Financial Aid Office and the Scholarship Office, all located in Sparks Hall. Davies said Wendy Cain, Bursar, will be the head of the new unit of Student Financial Services. Although Davies said it will take a few months to develop procedures and a final organizational structure that will provide the best service to students; the work has already begun. All three offices are now housed in Sparks Hall, whereas before the switch, the Scholarship Office was located in the Curris Center. “This will not only eliminate redundancies, but will also deliver a higher level of customer service to students,” President Bob Davies wrote in an email to faculty and staff. Adrienne King, vice pres-

ident of university advancement, said evidence of best practices from other universities showed that the synergy between these types of units can be very efficient. After seeing success with Racer One Stop events in the spring and fall semester, King said they saw that these organizational changes could be worthwhile. Racer One Stop offered students a way to speak with representatives from the Bursar, Registrar, Scholarship and Financial Aid offices. One was held in January, and one in August. At the fall Racer One Stop, King said they served over 1,900 students. “The feedback that we got from that indicated that the students appreciated it and felt like it made their lives a lot easier, having these units closer together and working closer together enabled them to serve the students better.” King said. “It seemed like a logical next step for the institution to look for ways to increase that collaboration.” Wendy Cain, bursar, said these changes will not affect hiring in any of the offices. To notify students, Cain wants to work with student organizations and discuss how they can best serve them. King said since all the offices are now in the same building, students should find it easier to find the answer

they are looking for, without having to be sent across campus to a different office. “This is all about our students and how we can better serve you all and make your lives easier in this regard so that you can focus on what’s important – success in the classroom,” King said. “I’m really excited about it, and I think all the offices are excited to be working together more closely and be more efficient for students,” Cain said. Quinton Roberts, senior from Belleville, Illinois, said he thinks this is a smart decision on the university’s part. “I think that the change for all the offices to be in one building is very beneficial for freshman, because they will only have to go to one place now,” Roberts said. The Scholarship Office and Financial Aid are on the fifth floor of Sparks Hall, while the Bursar’s Office is located on the first floor. Cain said she plans to meet with student organizations to hear any feedback or suggestions about how the unit can best serve students, how they could address issues and be more helpful. To voice your opinions about how the university can better serve students with the Student Financial Services unit, email Cain at wcain@murraystate.edu.

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tact, first to admit and first to award scholarships to potential students,” Davies said. One of the priorities under recruitment is to convert admitted students to enrolled students. To excel this plan, the university has adjusted the scholarship offerings to include students with an ACT between 21 and 23, with a GPA of at least 3.0. In addition to the admissions team recruiting, Davies said he is personally visiting every high school in the 18 counties that Murray State serves as well as many of the adjacent counties and states. He also called upon faculty and staff to assist in the recruiting efforts. “Each of you are admission ambassadors as well and can assist in this process,” Davies said. “Each of you can talk to prospective students when they visit our campus; each of you can find ways to promote Murray State at our area high schools and community colleges and each of you, in working with potential and current students, have the ability to leave a positive influence that drives enrollment.”

LEGISLATIVE SESSION

Davies was “honest and blunt” as he spoke about the upcoming legislative session and the financial strain the un-

mittee reviews the application to decide if the student is admitted into the program. Once admitted into the program, the student signs a contract to return the laptop at the end of the loan period. If it is not returned, there is a $150 fee. Once a student is accepted into the program, the university will loan a student a laptop for a semester. Combs, who came up with the idea, said the program was inspired by a similar service at Western Kentucky University that recycles used Apple computers and gives them for free to students who complete a certain amount of community volunteer work. “If we were able to reduce the financial burden to students who might need a laptop, but couldn’t afford it, then the program would be a success in my eyes,” Combs said. The idea for the program was first brought to Dr. Don Robertson, vice president of student affairs, in Fall 2016. Combs said the logistics of the program were discussed and then brought to the attention of Keith Webber, chief information officer, to discuss the

funded pension system is having on education in Kentucky. “I am hopeful we could receive some relief for the increased pension costs and our infrastructure needs request has, to this point, been well received,” Davies said. “However, there is a high possibility of a significant reduction in our overall appropriation.” In the upcoming legislative session, Davies and the Board of Regents will focus to offset the pension costs and fund critical infrastructure needs, like the electrical grid system and steam plant for heating and cooling buildings on campus. Davies said his final request is additional funding to Murray State’s performance funding. The University receives funding based on its performance in comparison to other institutions in the state.

FISCALLY PREPARED

“We have several key pressure points that we cannot ignore,” Davies said. The first point he referred to was the pension liability. “We need to be prepared for our potential costs and inquiries, based on the recommendations of the state budget director, by $4.7 million in the upcoming fiscal year,” he said. It is expected that there will be a substantial reduction in state funding, totaling in the millions. Add to that, enrollment changes and increased health care, technology and utilities costs, among others, is expected to pack a hard

possibility of implementing this type of program at Murray State. The program was approved by the end of the previous academic year. Christian Barnes, senior from Nortonville, Kentucky and coordinator of the laptop bank, said depending on the availability of laptops, the loan period can be extended from one semester to a full year. Currently there are only 10 laptops available in the program, but Barnes said he hopes to see the number of laptops grow. “We want this to be a wellknown program on campus and we want it to be successful and to have more devices to hand out as well,” Barnes said. Combs said he hopes students who need the program will seek it out. He said he thinks the next step for the program would be for SGA to find funding to refurbish the computers. He also hopes for possible sponsorship opportunities where businesses provide funding to purchase new laptops to be loaned to students. The laptop bank was created with the combined efforts of SGA, Information Systems Office and Procurement Office. The program is currently in trial period with hopes of being permanent in the next academic year.

punch to the university’s bottom line. The lack of anticipated funds has put the university leadership team in what Davies called a challenging and difficult budget year. With that, “tough and arduous decisions” will have to be made in regards to priorities, projects and programs. “As part of this, we will need to analyze how we provide necessary services and determine whether we need to do so utilizing different and new models,” Davies said. The administration has asked each of the academic and administrative units to put together a rubric that he said will be utilized as a starting point for the difficult discussions on prioritization and budget setting. “During this process, we must look for new programs that can be implemented to generate revenues and we must find ways to reduce costs and increase efficiencies,” Davies said. He said through these difficult times, it is important for the university to stay committed to the four guiding pillars. “We will continue to focus on our commitment to excellence in all that we do,” Davies said. “We will further our experiential learning opportunities. We will remain focused on our vision to be the best student-centered university in America and we must maintain our sense of community.”


The News

Page 3

November 16, 2017

Sports Football wins home finale Sports Editor: Bryan Edwards Assistant Sports Editor: Blake Sandlin Page Designer: Rosalyn Churchman Phone: 270-809-4481 Twitter: MSUSportsNews

Blake Sandlin Assistant Sports Editor bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

When Tennessee Tech’s football team met Murray State’s Saturday night, both teams were playing for pride; but that didn’t stop the Racers from coming away with a 31-21 win. In the final home game of the season, the Racers gave the crowd something to cheer for, amassing over 400 yards of total offense in the process. Their 172 rushing yards marked the best rushing performance since week one as they’ve struggled to gain any traction on the ground all year long. The win snapped a threegame losing streak and gives Murray State some coveted momentum heading into the last week of the season. “We talked all week about trying to start a new streak these last two weeks, especially for the guys coming back with how much they owed to the seniors in the room,” Head Coach Mitch Stewart said. “I thought we did a nice job of starting off that streak.” The Golden Eagles broke out to an early 7-3 lead off of junior quarterback Luke Ward’s 28-yard pass to senior fullback Jerome Wright, but senior wide receiver Jordon Gandy would have none of it. In his last game at Roy Stewart Stadium, Gandy nabbed a 62-yard touchdown reception in the second

quarter to put the Racers ahead 10-7. Freshman running back DJ Penick got his first rushing touchdown since the Racers’ first game against Kentucky Wesleyan College with a monstrous 48-yard run that gave Murray State a two-possession lead going into halftime. The freshman back didn’t stop there. Penick added an 11-yard touchdown run just minutes into the third quarter to extend the lead to 24-7. However, the Golden Eagles wouldn’t go away, as Ward hit sophomore running back Andrew Goldsmith with a 24-yard pass to narrow the deficit to 10. Gandy countered, breaking free late in the third for a 42yard touchdown reception to record his second touchdown of the game, capping off the third quarter with a 31-14 lead. Gandy finished his final home game at Roy Stewart Stadium with a team-high eight receptions, 160 yards and a game-high two receiving touchdowns. Junior quarterback Shuler Bentley finished with 234 yards passing. A 3-yard touchdown catch from senior wide receiver Dontez Byrd in the final minutes of the fourth wasn’t enough to stop the rolling Racers, as the game ended 31-21. Stewart said the inception of a running attack that hasn’t otherwise been present for the Racers was paramount in opening up scoring opportunities for his team.

Bryan Edwards/The News

Freshman running back D.J. Penick outruns a Tennessee Tech defender in the Racers’ 31-21 victory over the Golden Eagles. “[The offense] got established a ton,” Stewart said. “That’s what you try to do defensively. You try to make an offense one-dimensional. For nine games straight we’ve been pretty one-dimensional. And for us to finally get that running attack going, I know

it helps you as a play caller.” The catalyst behind that running game, Penick, said he knew he was overdue for a big game this week. “During practice this week, I just told the coach ‘I’m feeling a big game’,” Penick said. “Especially with

the defense getting us ready. Our defense is vicious and nasty; they’re real good. So running up against them every day just prepares us even more for times like this and kind of makes it easy to run, and that’s just what happened today.”

Penick and company will need that ground effort working in their favor next week when the Racers (3-7) cap-off their season against Southeast Missouri State (2-8) at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 18 in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

Women’s basketball has new voice Evan Tidwell Contributing writer etidwell@murraystate.edu

Brock Kirk/The News

Play-by-play announcer Jeremy Rose calls his first game as the voice of Racer women’s basketball.

After a lengthy stint as the play-by-play announcer for Marshall County’s women’s basketball team, Jeremy Rose is bringing his talents back to his alma-mater. Rose accepted a position this summer to take over the play-by-play duties for Murray State’s women’s basketball team. He is no stranger to the realm of women’s basketball, as he has spent the last 24 years in the booth covering Marshall County’s women’s basketball team. Rose said he looks forward to announcing at Murray State after leaving the announcing job from a high school and community that has been such a vital part of his life. “I’m really excited about

the opportunity that I have been given here, going from my home town high school and doing games there, to announcing at my alma-mater,” Rose said. “It’s just something that I love to do.” After 24 years, Rose had grown comfortable at his play-by-play job for the Lady Marshals and wasn’t looking for change, but when Director of Athletics Allen Ward approached him with the chance to embrace some new scenery, he couldn’t pass up the opportunity. “It was something that Allen Ward proposed to me,” Rose said. “He met me for lunch one day and popped the question, surprising me because I had not been looking for a change. It was something that as soon as he said it, I thought ‘I’ve got to really look at this and see if it’s something that my family

and I can agree on. I prayed with my family about it and I just felt that the Lord was calling me here.’ ” Rose said he is anxiously awaiting the opportunity to announce for a team he thinks has a good chance to make a run in the OVC. “I know that last year they were one game over .500, but I think that the different style of play which Rechelle brings is so much of defense first that leads into transition baskets,” Rose said. “The girls seem like they have already bought into that, as noted by their exhibition win.” Rose launched the new chapter of his play-byplay career in the women’s home-opener on Nov. 12, at the CFSB Center when Murray State’s women’s basketball team took on the University of Butler.

Soccer ends in Knoxville Gage Johnson || Staff writer gjohnson17@murraystate.edu

Murray State women’s soccer had their NCAA title hopes cut short when they were defeated by the 20th ranked University of Tennessee 2-0 on Saturday. The Racers entered their second NCAA tournament game in three years with an overall record of 15-1-2 and a conference record of 8-02, after closing out the season as the 21st-ranked team in the nation and the OVC champions. The Volunteers came into the opening round as one of nine teams to make the NCAA tournament in the SEC (Southeastern Conference). They entered play with an overall record of 15-4-1 and a conference record of 6-3-1. The offensive attack between the two teams lead to a combined seven shots being

fired off in the first half. Neither were able to convert, and the teams went to the locker room at a 0-0 tie. Tennessee opponents have scored an average of .89 goals a game this season, while Murray State has allowed .61 goals a game this year. This showed as the game was scoreless for almost 59 minutes of play. It was the Volunteers that struck first on a goal by junior forward Danielle Marcano. Her second goal of the season put them ahead 1-0. Less than five minutes later, Tennessee was able to convert again on freshman forward Erin Gilroy’s fourth goal of the season, giving Tennessee the 2-0 lead. Head Coach Jeremy Groves still felt as though they executed their defense well despite the second half scoring from the Volunteers. “They didn’t really change much,” Groves said. “I thought

we defended well pretty much all game. The goals were just two long balls that were able to go through and score.” The Racers managed to get off four shots in the second half, but the Volunteers held their ground to claim a 2-0 victory and ending Murray State’s illustrious season. Tennessee will move on to play the winner of the University of Central Florida and Washington State University. Murray State ended the year with a 15-2-2 overall record, and will look to return to the NCAA tournament and continue their streak of three undefeated OVC seasons in 2018. The Racers will be losing seniors this year in Aaron Lankster, Lyssie Wright, Destiny White, Nyomi Devine and all-time leading goal scorer Harriet Withers. All of which started at some point this season. Rosalyn Churchman/The News


The News

Sports

Page 4

November 16, 2017

Football set to close out season on the road Blake Sandlin

Assistant Sports Editor bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

Murray State football will look to enter their off-season with a two-game winning streak and a 4-7 record with a win at Southeast Missouri State on Saturday. Awaiting the Racers is a SEMO team that is in a similar predicament in the latter part of the season. The Redhawks sit at 2-7 and are coming off of a 23-20 loss to Tennessee State last weekend. Their two wins came against OVC foes; a 31-3 win over Tennessee Tech and a 29-10 win over Eastern Kentucky – a team Murray State fell to 26-13. The Redhawks’ two-year starting senior quarterback Jesse Hosket has had success against the Racers in recent years. Last year, Hosket led his team to a tight 17-16 victory over Murray State, while throwing for 257 yards and two touchdowns. If Hosket hopes to have a repeat performance, he’ll have to do it against a Murray State squad that is coming off a 31-21 victory over Tennessee Tech. In that game, the Racer running backs ran for 167 rushing yards, a complete aberration from their usual play

that has them ranked last in the OVC in rushing offense at 73.4 rushing yards per game. Head Coach Mitch Stewart said his team completed the first step of their journey to end the season on a good note last Saturday, but in order to complete their mission, they’ll have to finish strong against SEMO. “That was the first step in our two-part process and what we wanted to do to end the season,” Stewart said of the Racers’ win against Tennessee Tech. “We talked a lot about taking care of business last week to give us a chance to start a new streak and be 2-0. That’s our focus leading into this week against SEMO – a team we haven’t matched up well with in the past couple meetings. It always seems like it’s a game that comes down to the wire.” Stewart is hoping for more of that action when they face SEMO. He said at this stage in the game, teams have to be prepared for anything. “I think you go into games like this knowing that there’s no sense in holding anything back,” Stewart said. The Racers will face their final test of the season at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 18 in Cape Girardeau, Missouri.

Bryan Edwards/The News

Freshman receiver DeQuan Dallas advances upfield after making a catch during the Racers’ 31-21 win over Tennessee Tech.

Basketball looks to bounce back Blake Sandlin

Assistant Sports Editor bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

Rosalyn Churchman/The News

Murray State’s men’s basketball team will look to bounce back after a crushing loss to Middle Tennessee State when they hit the road for Wright State University. Head Coach Matt McMahon said he saw several positives displayed by his team as they prepare to face their next test against the WSU on Saturday. “I thought our perimeter defense was really good,” McMahon said. “Their guards went 8-for-30 from the floor, around 26 percent. I thought offensively in the first half we played exceptionally well; very efficient on the offensive end and moving the ball and getting some good shots.” Although they’re only two games into their season, the Raiders have displayed a balanced offensive attack. Three players are averaging double-figures in scoring, with Mark Hughes averaging 14.5

Chalice Keith/The News

Freshman Ja Morant drives the lane against Middle Tennessee State. Morant led the Racers with 16 points in the 72-67 loss. PPG, Grant Benzinger averaging 13 PPG and Everett Winchester scoring 12.5 PPG. McMahon said Wright State will use multiple different lineup combinations in order to get the matchup it desires.

“They start a 6’11 player at the four, and then a 6’9 and 275 lbs really skilled five man that they had redshirted last year,” McMahon said. “They also go to some four guard lineups.”

The Racers will bring with them a balanced attack of their own, with four players averaging at least 12 PPG. The teams will tip-off at 6 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 18 in Dayton, Ohio.

Walk-on Hopewell eager for more Evan Tidwell

Contributing writer etidwell@murraystate.edu

Bryan Edwards/The News

Freshman guard Zach Hopewell gets his first minutes of action against Brescia.

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Becoming a Division I athlete and earning a scholarship is the dream for most high school athletes, and freshman guard Zach Hopewell is already halfway to achieving this goal after earning a walk-on position on the Murray State men’s basketball team this year. Hopewell, was a threeyear starter at Apollo High School in Owensboro, Kentucky, before he made his transition to Murray State’s men’s basketball program over the summer. The 2017 Mr. Basketball finalist, who was rarely seen sitting on the bench in his high school

days, went from averaging 30 minutes a game to sitting on the bench and encouraging his team. Hopewell said he is ready for the transition from high school to college ball and is excited for how the season looks. “The biggest difference would be the speed of the game is quicker, going from a smaller level of play to the highest level of basketball you can play besides professionally,” Hopewell said. “The ball gets up and down the court a lot faster than it did in high school. “ After his stint in high school, Hopewell grew to love being on the court, but when he made his decision to become a walk-on at

Murray State University, he knew he would be giving up playing time. “One of the biggest reasons I chose to come to Murray State was because both of my brothers were here, so it kind of connected with Murray,” Hopewell said. “They are predominantly known for their basketball program. They have been to the NCAA tournament 15 times and I felt like it would be a really good experience for me.” Hopewell isn’t satisfied with just being on the team, however. He said he is determined to work his way up to garner a key role and even earn a coveted scholarship spot. “Obviously I want to eventually earn a scholarship and

have a bigger role on the team other than bringing the team together as a whole,” Hopewell said. “I want to make these guys better and bend the team as whole. Hopewell has made a connection with the players on the basketball team and said some of his teammates will remain his friends forever. “Some of the guys on this team will be friends for as long as I am alive,” Hopewell said. “Brion Whitley, my roommate, is like my best friend. We do everything together and I’ve grown really close to him.” Hopewell said he looks forward to the season and hopes that he can have a more prominent role for the team as they go on.


The News

Page 5

November 16, 2017 Features Editor: Emily Williams Assistant Features Editor: Nick Erickson Page Designer: Rachel Solomon Phone: 270-809-5871

Features

Greek life rocks the stage to fight hunger Sydni Anderson Staff writer sanderson33@murraystate.edu

In a clash of chords and super-smooth moves, Alpha Gamma Delta’s Rock-A-Thon provided Murray State students a spectacle for entertainment and a cause to rally behind. Lovett Auditorium served as the battleground on the evening of Nov. 10 for fraternities and sororities rocking themed mashups and competing for the first place award. Fittingly, the stage was lined with rocking chairs occupied by Alpha Gamma Delta members. To kick off the evening, a slew of look-a-likes from seven sororities and six fraternities took the stage performing in short skits as their doppelgangers. Sigma Sigma Sigma reenacted Sharpay and Ryan’s Bop to the Top from High School Musical. Alpha Sigma Alpha threw on their matching jumpsuits as the Cheetah Girls and Pi Kappa Alpha’s look-a-like rocked Post Malone’s braids. Phi Mu Alpha stepped on the stage as the Notorious BIG. The Rock-A-Thon performances were up next. John Gafford, junior from Cumberland City, Tennessee is an active member of Sigma Phi Epsilon and was a performer in the organization’s Rock-AThon performance. Gafford said creating and practicing the performance was a huge time commitment for the performers and the coaches. “We started practice on September 19th and were practicing twice a week for two hours at a time for the first few weeks,” Gafford said. “After that, we moved it up to three practices a week, and, by the week of RockA-Thon, we were practicing almost every weeknight for two hours at a time.” Gafford said the constant practicing gets old but is always worth it in the end. He said his favorite part of Rock-A-Thon is working with his brothers and sharing all of that hard work with his peers at the event. In addition to performing, Gafford also helped the coaches construct props for the show. However, he said most of the work for the show isn’t done by the fraternity members. “All we do is learn a dance,” Gafford said. “It’s our coaches that not only had to choreograph our entire dance routine, but also painted our banner, helped us on props and put up with a

room full of guys who were constantly complaining about having to practice all the time.” Gafford said he thinks events like Rock-A-Thon do an excellent job of rallying Murray State’s Greek life together for a good cause. “There aren’t a ton of things that hundreds of college kids with an already full plate want to give such a significant amount of time to but Rock-A-Thon and its mission to fight hunger is definitely one of those things,” Gafford said. “The sisters of Alpha Gamma Delta do a really good job with their philanthropy.” Lindsay Crafton, junior from Bragg City, Missouri is a member of Alpha Gamma Delta and served as a coach for the RockA-Thon performance winners in the fraternity category: Phi Mu Alpha. Alpha Gamma Delta members serve as the coaches for each organization’s performance in Rock-A-Thon. Crafton said the event is one of the most cohesive aspects of the organization’s sisterhood. “While we are around each other often, the bond we have while raising money for a cause so dear to our heart is immense,” Crafton said. “Our passion and drive for making this event a success results in closer interactions and endless support.” Crafton said the event is planned well ahead of time and takes a lot of preparation to come together. “We must set the date, reserve the revenue, decide on a theme and start fundraising many months in advance,” Crafton said. “Our sisters begin coaching their teams in September and have long intense practices up until showtime. In totality, the hours put into Rock-A-Thon are immeasurable. Time, sweat, laughs, tears and love are all important factors that contribute to the event.” Crafton said she enjoyed every aspect of the show but watching Phi Mu Alpha win was very rewarding. “I have no dancing abilities whatsoever but I have loved getting to support my guys and be their number one fan for the past two years now,” Crafton said. “They will always have a huge place in my heart.” Hattie Ginn, junior from Princeton, Kentucky served as Rock-A-Thon’s coordinator. Alpha Gamma Delta raised $16,710 for their philanthropy Fighting Hunger last year. They were the number one sorority fundraiser on campus. Ginn

The frugal Friendsgiving A wallet-friendly guide to Thanksgiving in your dorm room Amy Turner || Staff writer aturner32@murraystate.edu

Thanksgiving is a time for full bellies, fun festivities and being surrounded by friends and family. A special twist on the beloved holiday has recently emerged, especially on college campuses, when students celebrate Thanksgiving together before separating for the long Christmas break. Friendsgiving is fun for your entire friend group but it can get expensive. Here are some quick, Friendsgiving tips to keep your heart full, your wallet fuller and your stomach the fullest. DECORATIONS Decorating a space will make your Friendsgiving party more inviting and set the stage for the oncoming Instagram pictures that are sure to be

taken. Just because you choose to decorate doesn’t mean it has to be expensive. One easy, inexpensive idea for your Friendsgiving celebration is DIY cute and colorful place mats. To make these, just weave together construction paper, using scissors to cut strips and tape to hold them together. Construction paper can be purchased at Walmart for two to three dollars. Scissors and tape are both common finds around residential colleges or the library. If you don’t have either of these, ask around and surely some friends will let you borrow them. The instructions for the craft can be found at https://web.kidsactivitiesblog. com/47194/paper-weavingcraft-for-kids. Another cheap and easy idea is to pick up some mason jars at Walmart, or find a friend that already owns a few. They

Photo courtesy of Katie Shoenborn

Delta Zeta owned the stage and claimed victory in Alpha Gamma Delta’s Rock-A-Thon in Lovett Auditorium this year.

ROCK-A-THON PERFORMANCE WINNERS SORORITY

FRATERNITY

Delta Zeta 2nd Sigma Sigma Sigma 3rd Kappa Delta 4th Sigma Alpha Iota 1st

Phi Mu Alpha 2nd Sigma Phi Epsilon 3rd Sigma Chi 4th Alpha Sigma Pi 1st

Photo courtesy of Katie Shoenborn

Rachel Solomon/The News

After many Taylor Swift and Kanye West references, the fraternity performances brought in the evening, followed by the announcement of the night’s winners. Sigma Sigma Sigma won the banner competition in the sorority division and Sigma Chi won in the fraternity division. Lambda Chi Alpha and Sigma Sigma Sigma also won in the look-a-like competition. The Sigmas would have reigned in the night with wins across the board if Delta Zeta had not claimed victory in the Rock-AThon performances. Phi Mu Alpha reigned superior in the fraternity performances.

said the sorority does not have an exact total for this year’s event but hopes to exceed their goal of $16,000. “We are the fourth leading chapter in all of Alpha Gamma Delta so we work very hard as a chapter to maintain that,” Ginn said. Ginn said the planning process included reaching out to other organizations and getting information around campus. She said the process was easy with the support from her sorority sisters. “Even though the event itself is stressful, we know that as a

sisterhood we can achieve anything that we set our mind to,” Ginn said. “These girls coach all the organizations and even reached out to different businesses to get donations to Fight Hunger. From the laughter to the crying from exhaustion, we know that we have each other while Fighting Hunger and that is all that matters.” Devin Chen, sophomore from Herrin, Illinois and an Alpha Sigma Phi member said the event was his second time experiencing Rock-A-Thon. He said the competition gets more competitive every year but

events like this bring everybody together, even individuals who don’t go to Murray State. “Everybody enjoys watching people perform and dance, especially when it’s for a good cause,” he said. Chen said a major aspect of Greek life is philanthropy and helping the community so it is always important to go to these events whenever possible. “It is always important to support events that are for a good cause,” he said. Chen said he thought Alpha Sigma Phi had the best overall performance because it was very creative and entertaining.

can be purchased for approximately three dollars. After you have your jars, search outside for acorns to fill them with. Find a few colorful leaves to place around the jar and a cute, Instagram-worthy table piece is created. The mason jars can also be reused in multiple ways, making them a worthwhile purchase.

easy recipes, run a Google search or head to Pinterest for some quick inspiration. To keep the grocery bill down, try to find off-brand, or store brand items to use in your food creations. This can save you some money.

‘Crazy for You’ to take the stage this weekend

FOOD

It may be called Friendsgiving, but we all know food is the main attraction for any Thanksgiving gathering. Turkey and the works can be expensive. So here are a few ideas to help create a wallet-happy feast. Your first option is to enjoy a warm, home-cooked meal provided by one of the restaurants around Murray. This will ensure no kitchen mishaps will occur while your celebration is on-going. Some restaurants near campus where you can eat Thanksgiving food such as mashed potatoes, turkey and stuffing include Cracker Barrel and Martha’s Restaurant. At both restaurants, dinner prices are around ten dollars, depending on what you order. Dining -out will also eliminate the decoration cost for the evening. Making the dorm kitchens work is also an option. There are several easy, dorm-approved recipes for creating a feast for friends. Another way to keep cost down is to split up and serve the meal, potluck-style, so each friend brings something. To find

ACTIVITIES To really bring the Friendsgiving event to life, plan a few fun activities to make memories that will last a lifetime. The activities can be super simple and still just as effective and fun. You can take the leftover construction paper from the placemats made for your celebration and cut out fun shapes to attach to popsicle sticks. This will create props for a fun photo session with your group of friends. The popsicle sticks will cost around three to five dollars and you can get them at places like Walmart or Dollar General. Check out board games from your residential college front desk to play with your crew. You can also bring along some crowd favorites that you may already own to play. A deck or two of playing cards can make several games possible for a large group of people. You can find a variety of card games ideas on Pinterest. At the end of your Friendsgiving festivities, take some time to discuss what you are thankful for. This will fill your heart with thanks once your stomachs are full of food and will allow you to get some encouragement while finals are drawing near.

Kennedy Morillo Contributing writer kmorillo@murraystate.edu

‘Crazy for You,’ a musical comedy written by Ken Ludwig, will premiere Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in Robert E. Johnson Theatre. Since late September, students, faculty and staff of the Music and Theatre Department have practiced heavily to prepare for the musical composed by Geore and Ira Gershwin. Alan Mckee, sophomore from Hopkinsville, Kentucky, and theatre and vocal performance double major said he is most excited for the music in the play. “It is Gershwin-composed so it’s really jazzy and a lot of fun,” Mckee said. Randall Black, professor of music said when in the planning process for a play, both departments must come to an agreement to find what is best for the show. Maribeth Crawford, assistant professor of music, said they assess their strengths and weaknesses before a show is picked and casted. “When working with two departments, there are plenty of ideas to go around,” Crawford said. “When the departments began the search for a musical, their first choice was unavailable due to music rights. Soon after that, the de-

partment got the ball rolling with Crazy for You.” Crawford said the whole production is a collaborative effort. “We have a strong jazz band,” Crawford said. “Dr. Todd Hill is a professional musician who knows what is he is doing.” Black said he had to make himself familiar with the various roles, vocal ranges and character types to find the perfect voice for each role. To make sure the flow of the show runs smoothly, Black said he listens carefully to the underscoring. “Because this is a dance show, tempo changes are critical,” Black said. Crawford said the central idea for the show is very similar to the town of Murray. “The play is about a small town and the artistic culture brings people to life in the town,” Crawford said. “It creates a buzz of excitement.” Crawford said all the elements of art create an enriched environment in ‘Crazy for You,’ just as it does in Murray. ‘Crazy for You’ will be performed at 7:30 on Thursday night, Friday night and Saturday night as well as 2:30 p.m. on Sunday afternoon. Entrance to the musical is free with verification of a student I.D. at the door and adult ticket prices will vary from 18 to 20 dollars.


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The News

Page 7

November 16, 2017

Opinion Editor: Tyler Anderson Page Designer: Tori Wood Phone: 270-809-5873

Opinion Our View

A Greek life makeover The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board.

Connor Jaschen Editor-in-Chief • 270-809-6877 cjaschen@murraystate.edu

Austin Gordon Production Manager • 270-809-5877 agordon4@murraystate.edu

Ashley Traylor News Editor • 270-809-4468 atraylor@murraystate.edu

Tyler Anderson Opinion Editor • 270-809-5873 janderson49@murraystate.edu

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Allison Laski Chief Videographer • 270-809-5878 alaski@murraystate.edu

Greek life at Murray State University is a far cry from what’s portrayed in movies like “American Pie.” The philanthropic culture which has thrived here often coincides with copious amounts of alcohol, but few situations become as dangerous as they do at other universities. This is not the norm, though. Other institutions are struggling with the deaths of students immersed in Greek life. Their responses to these crises have been controversial, and may be impeding the change these organizations need most. Most recently, Florida State University President John Thrasher suspended all fraternities and sororities in response to the death of a student following his death at a fraternity party. It has been a wildly controversial decision, prompting responses across the nation. Prominent drug abuse across these organizations was also taken into account before the decision was made. And this is quite far from an isolated occurrence. The University of Michigan fraternity council recently suspended all Greek life events due to allegations of severe hazing and abuse. West Virginia University banned activities for these organizations for a brief period in 2014. A similar move was made by Clemson University in 2014 as well following the death of Tucker Hipps, a fraternity pledge. The knee-jerk response was to

Autumn Brown/The News

immediately ban these organizations, though they were enacted as a short-term measure while further policies were written up. But is this the answer to the problem? Lisa Wade, an associate professor at Occidental College, expressed in a submission to Time magazine that “abolition is the only answer” to what she sees as a toxic system with no hope of reform. And if this was an overwhelming issue at all colleges, she

might be right. However, it’s not. All universities likely have issues with their Green organizations, but most definitely not to the extent of large “party schools.” What is the solution then? We concluded that any meaningful changes must come from within these organizations themselves. Because what good are policies and procedures if those involved care little about the po-

Dr. Stephanie Anderson

Cheers to ... Shep Smith

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CHEERS & JEERS

This Fox News anchor has caused a bit of a stir for breaking with the news organization on their coverage of President Donald Trump and accusations towards Hillary Clinton. It’s not cheer worthy because he disagrees with them, but because he has stood his ground against those who quite likely want him out of the picture.

Jeers to ... Childish tweets Whether or not you support the current administration is a moot point when it comes to the most recent tweets from the president. Exchanging schoolyard insults with the leader of a foreign nation? Really? Let’s hope Kim Jong Un has a sense of humor (he doesn’t).

Looking Forward

Homeless holidays Tyler Anderson || Opinion Editor janderson49@murraystate.edu

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tential repercussions? In recent years, there has been a cultural shift in which toxic masculinity and abuse by those in power have been heavily scrutinized. This is a sort of self-evaluation strategy with the intent of bettering one’s community and country. It’s a bit like pulling weeds out by the root. If you dig deep enough, you will find the root system. And if you remove that root system, the weed dies. Policies are all well and good, but universities are often criticized for using these simply as public relations tactics. There may be short-term benefits to these regulations. It will appear as if the university is being proactive. Many will tout minor decreases in dangerous incidents as reason to over regulate and stifle growth. But we come to college as young adults, and leave as adults. During that time, our values and character are fleshed out. We become who we will likely be for the rest of our lives in those four (or more) years. So, if we decide as a nation to make it known that these dangerous and predatory behaviors are unacceptable, change will happen on its own. It’s important these universities make these issues known, because the more we talk about them, the quicker change occurs. Blanket changes rarely accomplish either. Demonizing the majority for the behaviors of the minority is hardly ever the answer.

The time for family, friends and peppermint mochas is upon us. Most students will be greeted by decorations and warm meals when they arrive home. But as a gay man, I know that not everyone will be quite so fortunate this year. Those who identify as LGBT account for nearly 40 percent of homeless youth according to a study by the Williams Institute. Of those surveyed, 46 percent “ran away because of family rejection of sexual orientation or gender identity;” 43 percent said it was also due to being “forced out by parents because of sexual orientation or gender identity.” Our LGBT youth are still among the most vulnerable in our nation. Awareness is spreading thanks to organizations such as the Queer Youth Network and The Trevor Project, but there’s still plenty of work to do. Reagan-era politics set our history back de-

cades, but would come. Former President Barack Obama’s administration heralded a change in the government’s treatment of LGBT individuals and the policies which would affect us. But this progress is being lost. Many will criticize me for making homelessness a “political issue.” What they fail to realize is that the LGBT existence has always been deeply embedded in politics. Lawmakers decide funding, discrimination measures and who can live without fear. Those with a rigid belief system may have a hard-line stance on whose existence is acceptable or not. It has always been this way, and though I hope we might evolve beyond it, we’ll never see this come to fruition in our lifetime. Our current administration threatens progress. President Donald Trump tried to appeal to the LGBT community while campaigning for his first term. During an event, he was quoted saying “thank you to the LGBT community! I will fight for

you while Hillary brings in more people that will threaten your freedoms and beliefs.” So far, we’ve had an attempted ban of transgender citizens in the armed forces. The Department of Justice filed a legal brief detailing why sexual orientation should not be a status protected from discrimination. And his administration rescinded guidance aimed at protecting trans youth from discrimination in schools. The struggle did not end, or begin, with the fight for marriage equality. The Stonewall riots were led by Martha P. Johnson, an African American transgender activist, who was through with being treated as something less human. The Reagan administration ignored the AIDS Crisis simply because it was a “gay’s disease;” thousands of American citizens died as a result (you can imagine how I feel about the recent fashion trend surrounding “Reagan/Bush ‘84’” shirts). If everyone really, truly cared about the children, they would be fighting with us, not against us.


The News

News

Page 8

November 16, 2017

Tiny house trend develops in Murray Emily Combs

Contributing Writer ecombs5@murraystate.edu

If you were at the Murray State Homecoming Parade, chances are you saw “The Little Prince,” a 200-square foot tiny house. Designed and built by Mod Pod Tiny Homes, a local construction company. The midnight blue home on wheels has garnered a lot of attention in the area since its completion in September of this year. Currently, “The Little Prince” is the first and only home by Mod Pod Tiny Homes, but with the amount of interest shown in the tiny house, it likely won’t remain so for long. “There has been a lot of interest,” said Wade Rogers, the owner, builder and mastermind behind Mod Pod Tiny Homes. “You know, as with any change in the status quo, you’re going to get some people that the tiny home life is not right for. That’s to be expected. You get a lot of people that are interested, but to actually make the step into

tiny home living, and to make that investment, that takes a special person.” During a recent outing of “The Little Prince,” the home got some free advertising at Office Depot. “I really just went in to get a few brochures printed up... and we had about fifty visitors, and a possible sale out of stopping in the parking lot,” said Molly Rogers on Mod Pod Tiny Homes’ Facebook page. “I just really hope we’re gonna help people out… and help them find creative ways to get out of debt and live how they want to live.” “The Little Prince” is listed on Airbnb, a hospitality service allowing people to rent out their homes for short stays. “You test drive a car before you buy it,” Wade said. “You try on clothes before you buy them. Why wouldn’t you stay in a home before you buy one?” The company allows people to stay in “The Little Prince” for as long as they like, and then if they decide to purchase a home,

they can be refunded for up to an entire weekend. The house isn’t just for prospective homeowners though. Several people have stayed there simply passing through, as an alternative to a hotel. Tiny house living isn’t for everyone, but it is an option for some college students. Izel Leon, senior from Murray, was searching for an apartment in downtown Murray when the landlord asked to show her other places he owned. “He was like ‘Oh, I have these apartments over here, they’re two bedroom, and I think you’ll really like them,’” Leon said. She didn’t expect to join the tiny house movement, but found herself signing a lease for a tiny home. “We really liked them, and they were cute, there were two bedrooms, it was reasonably priced, and they were super close to campus, so I moved into a tiny house.” Tiny houses are sweeping the nation, and Murray is no exception.

Murray Police Department gets ‘hairy’ Emily Combs

Contributing Writer ecombs5@murraystate.edu

For the month of November, officers at the Murray Police Department left their razors on the shelves and grew beards in honor of “No-Shave November,” to acknowledge cancer patients who lose their hair while undergoing chemotherapy. “I think it’s great to try and produce some awareness,” Sergeant Brant Shutt of the Murray Police Department, said. “There are very few people you talk to anymore that haven’t been affected somehow by cancer.” Unfortunately, Shutt himself has been affected by cancer. “I’ve had people in my family pass away from cancer, so I really want to do something that can help produce awareness,” he said. “This is a fun way for the officers to do something to help.” People have participated in No-Shave November for many years. In 2009, it became a non-profit national organization, when a family from Chicago wanted to use it to honor their late father, who passed away from colon cancer in 2007. Since then, it has become a productive national tradition, raising funds and awareness for cancer. Last year all the money raised from the Murray Po-

Photo courtesy of Brant Shutt

Six of Murray’s police officers participating in “No-Shave November”. lice Department’s No-Shave November event was donated to the Gentry House, a local homeless shelter. This November, the department switched things up to include some friendly competition. Throughout the month, The Murray Police Department has been posting photos of the participating officers on the Murray Police Department Facebook page, where the public can vote for the officer who they think has the “best beard.” The winning officer will donate the money raised to a local charity of his choice. Shutt said he was doubtful

about his prospects in the competition, but knew what charity he would choose nevertheless. “I’d probably look toward St. Jude’s,” he said. “Not technically a local charity, but it helps local families.” St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital is a children’s hospital dedicated to finding cures for cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Members of the community are welcome to drop by the department to donate money to the cause, or visit the Murray Police Department Facebook page to cast their votes.

Brock Kirk/The News

“The Little Prince,” a tiny home paraded through this year’s homecoming parade, was built and designed by Mod Pod Tiny Homes.

Because you’re a woman...

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