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90 years

THE MUR R AY STATE

NEWS

of excellence

September 21, 2017 | Vol. 92, No. 5

Chick-fil-A plans fall through Destinee Marking

dmarking@murraystate.edu Staff writer

e incident

Graphic courtesy of Savanna Hatfield

This message appears when Equifax believes a user’s information was breached. The credit reporting agency offers those affected the opportunity to enroll in TrustedID Premier.

Were you affected? Nationwide breach exposes private data of millions Lindsey Coleman

Assistant News Editor lcoleman7@murraystate.edu

On Sept. 7, Equifax, one of the nation’s three credit reporting agencies, informed consumers that 143 million customers’ private information had been hacked. From May through July, the Federal Trade Commission said hackers had access to names, Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses and driver’s license numbers. 209,000 credit card numbers were also stolen. Personal information was also obtained from 182,000 customers who disputed issues on their credit report in the past. “In cases such as the Equifax hack, consumers are really at the

mercy of the hackers,” Stephen Lacewell, professor in the Arthur J. Bauernfeind College of Business at Murray State, said. “While banks and credit reporting agencies are constantly trying to improve their data protection process, there will always be individuals working hard to steal your data and use it for financial gain.” Those affected include roughly half of the American population, therefore, experts say every American should assume their information has been compromised and take precautions now. The first step is to see if Equifax believes you are one of the millions affected by this breach. Log on to www.equifaxsecurity2017.com/ potential-impact/ and enter your last name and the last 6 digits of

your social security number. Equifax will then tell you if you may be one of those affected. Too add to the confusion and frustration of customers, it was reported by The Verge on Sept. 19 that Equifax tweeted out the wrong website for the breach. Turns out the company tweeted out www.securityequifax2017.com instead. The problems didn’t stop there. Equifax offered breach victims a free year of its credit monitoring service but required customers to sign an agreement that they would not sue the company. The company later lifted that restriction after customer complaints. According to CNN, the SSRS research firm conducted a study about

see EQUIFAX, Page 2

Contrary to the discussion started last spring, a Chickfil-A restaurant will not be built on Murray State’s campus. In March, Paula Amols, former director of Dining Services, was looking into ways to expand on-campus dining options. She even met with Chick-Fil-A representatives for a site visit. Amols had in mind a ChickFil-A with a full menu and indoor seating. She said if approved, the restaurant would be located near the science buildings and students would be able to use flex dollars to purchase meals. During the Aug. 30 Student Government Associaton meeting, Jackie Dudley, vice president of finance and administrative services, said the Chick-fil-A franchise chose not to come to Murray State’s campus. Dudley said it was determined Murray State was not a market for the fast food chain. Zachary East, senior from Princeton, Kentucky, takes classes in Alexander Hall near where Chick-Fil-A would have been built. He said he sees a need for dining options in that area, as well as more options on campus in general. “We do have food options for a college campus,” East said. “However, I think if we were to bring in a couple of name brand restaurants, students would be much more content with on-campus dining options.”

Jessica Tillson, sophomore from Benton, Kentucky, said it is unfortunate our campus does not possess a larger chain restaurant. She said Murray State needs more options. “I believe Murray State needs to get up-to-date and develop a form of a food court like all of the larger universities have,” Tillson said. Tillson is a barista at Thoroughbrewed Café, and she said a new dining facility would have opened more job opportunities for students. “When the semester began, I would have one to three students during each of my shifts ask if the Café was hiring and how to apply,” Tillson said. “With the closing of Hart Cafe, I could potentially see the need for a new venue.” Javus Yandal, senior from Hickman, Kentucky, said he would like to see more variety on campus when it comes to eating options, but he is also fine with going off campus to get fast food. Yandal said he is content with Zaxby’s, which is similar to Chick-fil-A, but he understands the popularity. “Chick-fil-A is arguably a more requested and comparable, recognizable fast food chain that more people appeal towards,” Yandal said. Yandal, a supervisor at Thoroughbrewed Café, said the increase of different job opportunities that would have come with the restaurant would have been beneficial. “Dining services offers jobs, but the hours are limited, which upsets some people,” Yandal said.

Outsourcing hits Health Services Katlyn Mackie Staff writer

kmackie2@murraystate.edu

The days of getting free health care at Murray State’s Health Services may be coming to an end as the university is seeking alternative options including outsourcing. University officials updated students and faculty at a Sept. 14 meeting about the request for proposal process involving the future of Health Services, which is currently funded by the university.

PROPOSED CHANGES

During the summer, Murray State officials met with prospective vendors to see if there was any interest in coming to campus to provide health services. Vendors ranged from groups that specialize in college health to local operations such as hospitals and urgent care centers. Don Robertson, vice president for student affairs, said the need for a change in health services comes from “quality of service” as well as “finances” with the strained budget situation. Robertson said the intent is for the new model to be selffunded with no university money given to those operations. Considering this, Robertson said there is a good possibility that insurance will be billed or there will be a service fee charged as opposed to the free health care students are currently receiving. Robertson told the dozens

“We have been and continue to be a viable unit on this campus.” - Kim Paschall, director of Health Services

of people in attendance at the meeting that the reason for the proposed changes to Health Services is not due to dissatisfaction with the services currently being offered but rather because of the rising cost of higher education. “We want to make sure, if the change occurs, that we have the same quality of service and focus on the customer would be there,” Robertson said. The request for proposal was mailed out on Aug. 23 to fourteen vendors. It is unknown how many sent proposals back to the university by the Sept. 18 deadline. Some areas included in the 40 pages of the RFP are concerns for the current staff and their employment opportunities, providing and expanding laboratory services, funding options, expansion on health awareness and educational programming, experiential learning for students and services provided in conjunction with counseling services. Robertson said that University Counseling Services, which has licensed mental health professionals in the Counseling Center, is not part of this potential outsourcing. The Center provides an array of free services to Mur-

ray State students including individual therapy, couples therapy, group therapy, and family therapy, according to its website. University officials hope to have a decision by Oct. 25, based on what they hear from the vendor presentations. Robertson said they have asked for information such as what the cost will be for students who do not have insurance, what will the charge be for those with insurance, what would happen to the current staff, will they use the existing building or potentially construct a new one and what commission would the companies give to the university for allowing them to be on campus, among others. Robertson said the purpose of these vendor presentations is to be transparent with students and faculty. “We want to provide all the information we can to you,” Robertson said. “Your feedback is very important.” The service is expected to switch next academic year. The selected vendor would be required to sign a 3 year contract with the option to renew. Robertson said the Board Regents would have to approve any changes and hope to be able to present the changes at the December meeting.

Nick Bohannon/The News

Dozens of people turned out to the open campus meeting Thursday, Sept. 14.

HEALTH SERVICES NOW

Kim Paschall, director of Health Services, said the clinic currently operates under five health care professionals. She said the staff has over 40 years of college health experience and is “sensitive to the needs and concerns of college students, faculty and staff.” Health Services offers free and confidential health care for a variety of issues, which Paschall said often reduces the number of work and classroom absences. Most of the treatments are for respiratory and stomach illnesses, but they also tend to a significant number of injuries, urinary infections, and lab testing for STI’s, di-

abetes and pregnancy. There is also a 24-hour on-call telephone triage nurse available through campus police. Paschall said she often hears Health Services referred to as “a band-aid station” but that is not the case. “We have been and continue to be a viable unit on this campus, and I sincerely thank my staff for their hard work and dedication to our clients that come in,” Paschall said. Jennie Rottinghaus, director of development of the Jesse D. Jones College of Science, Engineering and Technology, said she has utilized Health Services since she was in college, and that she is a frequent customer.

“It’s so convenient to just be able to walk across campus, and in a few minutes, be seen quickly, professionally and not have to take the time to make an appointment with the doctor,” Rottinghaus said. Robertson said it is important for the service to stay on campus but that the $500,000 currently allocated to Health Services could be put back in the general fund for other uses on campus based on where the greatest need is. During the 2016 calendar year, health services treated 7,609 students and 1,454 faculty and staff. As of this August, they have treated 4,558 people thus far in 2017.


The News

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September 21, 2017

News Editor: Ashley Traylor Assistant News Editor: Lindsey Coleman Page Designer: Savanna Hatfield Phone: 270-809-4468 Twitter: MurrayStateNews

News

Push for flu shots Sabra Jackson Staff writer sjackson30@murraystate.edu

Flu season is around the corner, and Murray State Health Services and Calloway County Health Department are encouraging the community to get their flu shots. The peak of flu season begins late October and runs through February, with some cases occurring as late as March. Kim Paschall, director of health services, said protection starts by getting the vaccine. “Getting vaccinated is the first step in being proactive,” Paschall said. “Good handwashing and making sure you cover your cough when you’re sick are also important.” Paschall said college students are more at risk for the flu because their immune systems are weaker from not getting enough sleep, living in close quarters, social activities and poor diets. “The flu impacts campus because it spreads rapidly, and a person is often contagious before they realize they have the flu,” Paschall said. “Spread-

ing quickly and causing severe respiratory symptoms, the flu can cause absences in the classroom and in the workplace.” Along with getting the flu shot, she said students should get seven to eight hours of sleep each night, make healthy food choices and drink plenty of water to boost their immune system. Paschall said college students are not as likely to get the vaccine. “In the past, we have held free flu vaccine clinics on campus and always have a significant amount left unused,” Paschall said. Amy Ferguson, public health director at the Calloway County Health Department, said the department highly suggests getting the flu shot because the flu spreads quickly throughout the community. Since the immune system is more susceptible to the flu when it is weak, Ferguson said she recommends staying at home if an individual does not feel well during the peak of the flu season. “Sometimes it can be very life threatening for certain

people – people who are older or people who have chronic conditions that would weaken their immune system,” Ferguson said. Paschall said the State Department for Public Health will start monitoring lab-confirmed flu cases starting in October to see how many people the flu affects. Ferguson said she recommends getting the flu shot even if you already have the flu because it will make the case milder, and it can help take less of a toll on your body. Ferguson said roughly half of the community gets the flu each year. “There’s plenty of flu vaccines around the community this year,” Ferguson said. “I encourage all of the students to get that flu shot. It takes just a second to get vaccinated, and it can prevent some serious illness in the long term.” Flu vaccines are offered in most of the local pharmacies and physician’s offices, and many insurance companies offer full coverage for the shot. Flu shots are not currently available at Health Serivces.

Rhiannon Branch/The News

Flu shots are administered at local pharmacies and physician’s offices.

Hispanic culture interwoven into the fabric of Murray State Lindsey Coleman Assistant News Editor lcoleman7@murraystate.edu

From Sept. 15 to Oct. 15, America celebrates Hispanic Heritage Month. In the middle of national immigration conversation, three Hispanic individuals on campus situate themselves in a narrative of hope, family and rich culture.

LEON: BALANCING BOTH WORLDS

Izel Leon, senior from Murray, is a second generation Mexican-American. She grew up with what she said was the best of both worlds: living in America and visiting family in Mexico every summer. “I love sharing my culture with people and bringing those roots back,” Leon said. “It just enriches you as a person, regardless of the culture you’re exposed to.” For Leon, experiencing both worlds hasn’t always been easy,

but she said she’s met other students with similar backgrounds who have shown her that she’s not alone. “It’s been a journey trying to tie those two things together, because I’m sometimes too American for my Mexican friends, and I’m too Mexican for my American friends,” Leon said. “I think finding, especially in college, finding second generation Hispanics has been just incredible.” She said she grows in deeper appreciation and love for America by still maintaining her original heritage. “I think sometimes people get kind of scared when we hold onto our original identities because they think that makes us less American, but in my experience, it has made me love this country so much more,” Leon said. Through the Office of the Multicultural Affairs, Leon, along with other students,

launched Sueño Latino three years ago. Each semester, the group holds events such as Sabor Latino, which is a celebration of Latino culture. “I have never encountered racial hate,” Leon said. “MSU is very conducive for a racially inclusive environment.”

OROZCO: SHEDDING PREJUDICE

Angela Orozco, freshman from Glasgow, Kentucky, was born in America after her parents immigrated when they were 18 years old. “Whenever I decided to go to college, it was hard because I knew everyone was expecting me not to,” Orozco said. “If I did go, they probably expected me to drop out.” But at the same time, Orozco said it was a very proud moment for her, as she shed the prejudices people believed about Hispanic culture. “I hope I can help other Hispanics get into college and pur-

EQUIFAX From Page 1 the public level of concern about the hack. Two-thirds of respondents were concerned, while only 19 percent of respondents had taken any action to see if their information had been threatened. “Equifax is trying hard to soothe consumers’ fears, but this hack may have never happened if they had taken a more proactive approach with a patch to their system,” Lacewell said. In April, the University of Louisville notified employees that hackers had potentially gained access to their information from the W-2 service provider the university uses. “The suspicious activity involved access to or download of W-2 information from the W-2 Express website,” according to the Uni-

sue a career,” Orozco said. “I’m an elementary education major, and I want to help families know you cannot give up.” Orozco is the first of her six siblings to go to college, which she said makes her family very proud. She said Murray State celebrates diversity well, especially through the Office of Multicultural Affairs.

As a telecommunications systems management professor from Belize, Carlos Lopez has the opportunity to relate to international students at Murray

State. “Coming from a different country to here helps me understand what a student coming from a different location faces,” Lopez said. “I can relate to that because I went through it.” Lopez was the only one in his family to pursue higher education. He came to Murray State for his undergraduate degree in 1996 and his masters in 2005. Then he taught in Belize for several years. “Looking back on when I was [an undergraduate student], I met a lot of friends from different countries,” Lopez said. “They felt comfortable here, like they had a place and like they were acknowledged.” For the past four years, he has been teaching at the university. He travels back to Belize during breaks to spend time with his wife and teenage son and daughter. He said he loves Murray, which feels like a home away from home for him.

versity of Louisville human resource website. The service provider, Equifax Workforce Solutions, is a subsidiary of Equifax, Inc. “Equifax is aware of similar activity involving other organizations and is working with clients to resolve the incidents,” the website reported. It was later reported that almost 50 employees confirmed having some sort of fraudulent activity related to their W-2s. Equifax had identified up to 750 employees whose W-2 Express accounts had shown suspicious activity. Murray State also uses Equifax Workforce Solutions as it’s W-2 service provider. Officials tell The Murray State News they are working to safeguard employee’s private information. As one of the faculty staff advisers for Financial Literacy Empowers Everyone, Lacewell said Murray State

has been very proactive in increasing awareness. F.L.E.E. is a student-led financial literacy group which sponsors several financial literacy programs each year on campus. Krysta Winstead, senior from Dexter, Missouri, said even though the breach has not affected her personally, she has been checking her credit card account regularly to make sure there is no suspicious activity. “I don’t want this breach to affect me later on down the road when I am trying to apply for a bigger credit card or put money down on a new car,” Winstead said. She said she thinks college students are the easiest target, and they need to be more educated about credit threats. “I think this hurts college students because most of us are about to start trying to get some credit built up, and a lot of students don’t

pay that close of attention to their accounts or have alerts set up from their bank to tell them when there is suspicious activity on their account,” Winstead said. The credit reporting agency will also offer those affected the opportunity to enroll in TrustedID Premier, which provides credit file and social security monitoring as well as identity theft insurance. Experts say you should then change all of your passwords and login information and freeze your credit with all three reporting agencies, TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. Equifax states on its website that the company will remove fees for credit freezing through Nov. 21, 2017. Financial experts urge everyone to continue to monitor their credit and anyone who believes they are a victim of identity theft to contact the FTC through its website at IdentityTheft.gov.

“I think sometimes people get kind of scared when we hold onto our original identities... but it has made me love this country so much more.” - Izel Leon, senior from Murray

“They have so many cultures,” Orozco said. “It’s not just African-American. They are really diverse, and I like that.”

LOPEZ: ENCOURAGING STUDENTS


The News

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September 21, 2017

Sports

Sports Editor: Bryan Edwards Assistant Sports Editor: Blake Sandlin Page Designer: Rosalyn Churchman Phone: 270-809-4481 Twitter: MSUSportsNews

Track, Cross Country find new coach

Photo courtesy of Dave Winder/Murray State Athletics

New Murray State Cross Country and Track coach Adam Kiesler instructs his team at practice. Kiesler spent eight seasons as the assistant coach of the Racers.

Blake Sandlin Assistant Sports Editor bsandlin1@murraystate.edu After serving seven years as an assistant coach for track and field and cross country, Adam Kiesler recently received a promotion. Murray State Director of Athletics Allen Ward announced Monday that Kiesler would be filling the head coaching vacancy after Jenny Swieton accepted a coaching job at her alma-mater, University of Central Michigan, over the summer. “Since his arrival, Adam has played an important part in building our track program,” Ward said in a statement. “He’s fully prepared to move to the director’s role and I’m confident he’ll take our program to a championship level.” Kiesler’s promotion comes after coaching sprinters, hurdlers, throwers and multievents athletes as well as helping out with recruiting. He joined the coaching staff in 2010 after spending one season as a graduate assistant track and field coach at the Univer-

sity of Toledo and two seasons as an assistant coach at Central Michigan. Kiesler, a Rochester, Illinois native, actually coached Swieton when she was running for the Chippewas in her collegiate career. When Swieton accepted the Murray State coaching job in 2010, she called Central Michigan to recommend Kiesler join her staff, and he’s been a Racer ever since. Kiesler said he was thankful for the opportunity Swieton had given him. “I’m proud of the program we’ve built at Murray State and it means a lot to me to be able to build on our success going into the future,” Kiesler said. As the track and cross country teams are in the midst of the changing of the guard, Kiesler has big shoes to fill. Swieton earned OVC Coach of the Year honors in track and field in 2013, guiding multiple Racer athletes to 24 league championships. Kiesler said he can build on Swieton’s accomplishments by progressively developing his collective roster and recruiting

talented athletes. “We have a lot of talented student-athletes here,” Kiesler said. “Our goal here is to win a championship, and to do that I think we’re going to need a little more depth.” Ward handed down high praise in regard to Kiesler’s recruiting prowess in the past. “Coach Kiesler has been directly responsible for recruiting some of the finest student-athletes the Racer track program has ever seen and his commitment to academic excellence goes hand in hand with his recruiting philosophy,” Ward said. “He’s the perfect fit and I’m excited that he’s agreed to become our head coach.” Despite just being appointed, Kiesler is already setting a high standard for his teams. “I’m excited for the challenge of winning the OVC title,” Kiesler said. “I think there were a lot of good programs at Murray State that’ve done that since we’ve been here, and I think the jewelry on their hand is appealing, so that’d be something I’d like to wear around one day.”

Racer Band tuning up for 2017 season

Blake Sandlin

Assistant Sports Editor

bsandlin1@murraystate.edu

Cory Sharber

Contributing writer

csharber@murraystate.edu

If you’ve ever watched football at Roy Stewart Stadium, you’ve undoubtedly heard the sounds of Racer Band pridefully performing the Murray State fight song to a crowd of Racer faithful. But the band is much more than a supplementary source of entertainment at football games, it’s also a way of life for many students, performing in various local parades and off-campus marching band festivals. Similar to athletics, recruiting is a key aspect of Racer Band. The group currently has a roster made up of 208 members. The band performs in different areas throughout the year, in part to spark interest among aspiring students. Last weekend, the band performed at Butler County High School in Morgantown, Kentucky and Castle High School in Newcastle, Indiana. John Fannin is the assistant director of bands and is in his 23rd year directing the Racer Band. The success of the program’s self-promotion is evident in the influx of new members its gained. The group amassed 100 new

recruits this year, and Fannin said they haven’t disappointed. “We got a lot of really good new talent,” Fannin said. “The program has developed into something really special.” The development of the band is attributed mainly to its rigorous practice schedule. The band practices eight hours a week on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Contrary to sports where only some players are required to be playing in a game at a given time, Fannin said Racer Band requires all members to be functioning collectively as one cohesive unit. “We train really hard so it’s really on auto-pilot,” Fannin said. “Unlike sports, everybody starts. Everyone has to know exactly what they’re doing. We’ve got to coach everybody up.” Chemistry between members is also a major factor within the unit. Robbie Parsons, a student from Mayfield, Kentucky, is a sixth-year economics major and has been in Racer Band for just as long. “We spend so much time together,” Parsons said. “It’s like we’re the Racer Band family.” Racer Band may not be a university sanctioned sport, but don’t tell Parsons and his bandmates that. Parsons, a percussionist, said he and his section’s members spend time as a whole as well as individ-

ually in order to perfect their craft and ensure the band’s rendition of Racer traditions like “The Old Grey Mare” are music to fan’s ears. “Percussion practices for three hours on Tuesdays and Thursdays,” Parsons said. “They practice two hours on Fridays. They also practice on their own time, eight hours a week. We’re a smart group of kids and we get things done pretty easily.” Parsons has been involved in music since the sixth grade, and even helps out the band at Mayfield High School in his free time. The band will be performing during family weekend at Lovett Auditorium on Sept. 23 at 2 p.m. Tickets will be available for $10 at the door. Murray State will also be hosting the Festival of Champions on Sept. 30 at Roy Stewart Stadium from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. The event will also be shown on television in December on Kentucky Educational Television (KET). According to Racer Band’s website, 60-70 percent of members aren’t actually music majors. Yet despite differing interests and career paths, a passion for music ties the band members together. Simply put by Fannin, music is what brings us all together. “Without music, life would be devoid of beauty.”

Golf strikes another high finish

DJ Pigg

Contributing writer

dpigg@murraystate.edu

Murray State’s men’s golf team finished 14th overall this weekend in Eastern Kentucky’s Raising Cane’s Intercollegiate Tourna ment. Avery Edwards, sophomore from Paducah, Kentucky, followed his second place individual finish in the Murray State Invitational with another top-ten finish. Head Coach Eddie Hunt was very pleased with Edwards’ play thus far. He believes he is one of the top players in the OVC. “Avery has played great,” Hunt said. “He’s having a

great season and playing the best golf he’s ever played for us. He’s playing as well as anyone in the conference right now.” Edwards posted scores of two over par, 72, three under par, 67, and one over par, 71, for an even par total of 210, which left him in a tie for ninth-place overall. The Racers as a team had rounds of twelve over par, 292, ten over par, 290, and thirteen over par, 293. With an 875 team total, the Racers finished 14th in the tournament. Following Edwards was Gabe Wheeler, junior from Sikeston, Missouri, carding a total of five over, 215 (T-24th), Connor Coombs, freshman from Central City,

Kentucky, finishing eleven over, 221 (T-58th), Austin Knight, sophomore from Hopkinsville, Kentucky, with a twelve over, 222 (T-62nd), and both Lance Davis, junior from Mayfield, Kentucky, and Justin Wendling, sophomore from Lithia, Florida, with a 22 over, 232 (T-84th). Although the men didn’t follow up the win in their home invitational quite as well as they had hoped, it is still very early in the season. The Racers will spend the week practicing before leaving for SIUE’s tournament on Sept. 25 and 26 in Madison, Illinois at Gateway National Golf Club for the Derek Dolenc Invitational.

Bryan Edwards/The News

Freshman midfielder Izzy Heckman dribbles past a defender in the Racers’ 1-0 loss to Saint Louis University.

Soccer prepares for OVC play Bryan Edwards Sports Editor

bedwards16@murraystate.edu

Following its first loss of the 2017 season, the Murray State soccer team opens full-time Ohio Valley Conference (OVC) play this weekend against the Tennessee Tech Golden Eagles. The Racers defeated fellow OVC member Morehead State 1-0 in overtime and fell to 24th-ranked Saint Louis University 1-0 in a defense-filled contest. H e a d C o a c h J e r e m y Groves said the team had moments during the loss that they played well. “I thought in the big part of the games we played well,” Groves said. “I don’t think we deserved to win the game, but on the other side of it, I don’t really think we deserved to lose the game either.” The Racers might have lost the game but they have jumped to 56th in the RPI, the highest Murray State has been in the Groves era. Murray State is also the highest ranked women’s soccer team in Kentucky. Senior forward Destiny White said despite the loss, she thinks the team is headed in the right direction and will move on from losing. “Compared to other seasons, this is definitely one

of our best teams we’ve had,” White said. “Next training session it’s over with. We’ll start working harder and focus on the next thing that comes.” During the game against the Billikens, several Racers were on the bench nursing injuries. Groves said the injuries might have played a factor in the game. “We had to play some other kids,” Groves said. “We have a couple people stepping up. Losing those three, hopefully we can get them back sooner rather than later because they help us out a lot.” The three players Groves is referring to are senior midfielder Aaron Lankster, freshman midfielder Symone Cooper and freshman midfielder Izzy Heckman. Lankster is currently out with what Groves said to be an MCL sprain, Cooper has what is believed to be a torn MCL and Heckman injured her hamstring during the game Sunday. Heckman and Lankster were both starters before they were hurt, and Cooper was a key substitution off the bench during every game. Those injuries have caused players like White and freshmen midfielders Annamarie Arino and Allyson McAtamney to increase their playing time during

the last few games. Groves expects Lankster to return within the month. If Cooper has actually torn her MCL, she will miss the remainder of the season. Groves is still waiting to see how Heckman performs during practice this week. Whether or not the three injured Racers play, the show must go on. Murray State faces off first against another tough defense from Tennessee Tech. The Golden Eagles have given up just five goals in their eight games played this season. Groves said Tech will have a similar look to what the Racers saw against Saint Louis. “They’re a team that likes to possess the ball,” Groves said. “It’s their home opener in the OVC. Murray State’s coming to town, it’s probably going to be one of their bigger games on the schedule. We’ll expect to get their best shot.” Following their contest against the Golden Eagles, the Racers square off against the Jacksonville State Gamecocks, who began OVC play last weekend, losing to UT Martin and Tennessee Tech, both of which were 1-0 defeats. The Racers and Golden Eagles face off at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 21 in Cookeville, Tennessee.


The News

Sports

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September 21, 2017

Chalice Keith/The News

Sophomore outside hitter Rachel Giustino prepares to spike a ball in practice.

Volleyball takes two in final non-conference tournament Keenan Hall Staff writer

khall16@murraystate.edu

GAME ONE

Murray State volleyball stole three sets from Troy University to open the Crimson-White tournament with a win. The Racers began the first of their last three nonconference matches with a convincing sweep of the Trojans. Murray State ended their brief two match losing streak, winning three sets 2518, 25-18 and 25-23. The Racers completed a balanced attack on Troy. Sophomore setter Courtney Radle notched 37 assists in the match. The Racers also finished the match with three players in double-digits for kills. Junior outside hitter Dacia Brown and sophomore outside hitter Rachel Giustino had 10 kills, as well as sophomore outside hitter Megan Lindsay. Murray State wanted to play more efficient coming into the weekend after losing their last two matches. The Trojans were what Head Coach David Schwepker said was a good test for his team. “We needed to redeem ourselves against how we did the weekend before. I think Troy is very similar to the teams we played the weekend before,� Schwepker said. The Racers started the first set with an early 8-3 lead, resulting in a timeout from Troy. They led the entire first set, consistently scoring more points than the Trojans. Troy fought back and briefly tied the match at 10, but Trojan sophomore outside hitter Belle Waldrop’s attack error closed the book

on the first set for the Trojans. The Racers went on a 15-8 scoring run to win the first set 25-18. Troy tagged six errors in the run, while Murray State recorded nine kills. Brown also scored one of her two service aces during the late set surge by the Racers. The second set was similar to the first set, as the Trojans found themselves down early again. Murray State carried strong play into the next set, storming out to a 9-6 lead before Troy tied the game at 10 a piece. The Trojans had began to gain some momentum, as their hitting percentage reached .333 for the second set. The Racers’ outside hitters were firing on all cylinders and coming up with timely kills down the stretch in the second set. Sophomore libero Alex Kaufmann posted back-to-back service aces as the lead hit 16-12. Troy couldn’t close the gap as Murray State finished the second set 25-18. In the third set, Troy’s first lead of the match came at 13-12. Their biggest lead of the set was six, after they pushed their lead to 19-13. However, Murray State had a clutch resurgence, turning a deficit to a commanding lead. Giustino and Brown ignited the Racer attack, leading an 11-4 run to finish the Trojans off. Thanks to eight kills, a couple of Trojan errors and Brown’s second service ace Murray State won the third set 25-23. The win moves the Racers to 7-3.

GAME TWO

Murray State volleyball dropped their second game of the Crimson-White Tournament, losing to the University of Alabama in four

sets 21-25, 15-25, 25-22 and 15-25. Throughout the match, the Tide’s length was advantageous, as they had 14 blocks in the match compared to Murray State’s three. Alabama’s effective blocking held the Racers’ leading player in kills, Giustino to a .063 hitting percentage in the match. Alabama sophomore middle blocker Hayley McSparin led all players for the Crimson Tide with 11 blocks in the match and 14 kills. The Tide’s senior middle blocker Leah Lawrence trailed her teammate with 12 kills. Schwepker said Giustino needs to figure out how to adjust mid-game. “When she got a couple blocked against her then she started hitting balls out, then she started struggling,� Schwepker said. “That’s just something she needs to learn to control. If she is going to be a great player, which we know she is, she has to make sure she can control her emotions.� Brown finished with 12 kills on the game. Senior outside hitter Olivia Chatman stepped in at key moments and finished with 7 kills. Schwepker said their impact pushed the team to keep playing hard. “They did well, Olivia especially,� Schwepker said. “We moved her to a new position that we liked. Dacia had some big moments, she went on a string where they couldn’t stop her at all.� The first set was back and forth action, with Murray State scoring 13 kills. But costly errors held the Racers from maintaining a hold on the match, as they tallied nine in the first set. Alabama scored 14 kills and only recorded four errors in the first set. They also

had a .270 hitting percentage on 37 attempts. The first set ended with the Crimson Tide on top 25-21. After the first set, the Racers were on their heels with multiple attack errors in the match. Alabama recorded 12 kills and two attack violations in the second set. The Tide finished the second set with a .417 hitting percentage. While Giustino struggled to get back on track, her aggressive style of play forced her to play out of her slump. She finished the match leading all players with 16 kills. The Racers picked up their play midway through set number three scoring and defending better than in the first two sets. The Racers limited their attack errors in the third, recording their lowest on the match with four. Murray State’s counter-attack was more effective and more balanced in the third. Sophomore outside hitter Rachel Holthaus had seven kills and Callie Anderton dished 29 assists. The Racers’ hitting percentage rose to .257. The Racers took advantage and avoided the sweep by winning 25-22. Murray State started the fourth set down 10-5 early. But the Racers seemed to find their footing, and went on a 5-1 run to close the deficit. The Racers finished the set with 13 attack errors and 12 kills. Meanwhile, the Tide finished the set with a .320 hitting percentage and concluding the match with a 25-15 set win.

GAME THREE

Racer Volleyball swept Southern University in three sets to conclude nonconference play. The set scores were 25-22, 25-15 and 25-20.

Murray State kept the Jaguars winless for the season and finished their nonconference matches with a sweep. Giustino played like herself notching a double double with 13 kills, 10 digs and a .250 hitting percentage. Racers’ sophomore setter Courtney Radle trailed Giustino with nine kills, 38 assists and finished with a .727 attack percentage. “Southern up to that point hadn’t done well on paper, but they lost to Alabama by two points in every set and loss to Troy by two in every set,� Schwepker said. “It’s not like they were a bad team so we just knew it was going to be a good test.� The Jaguars opened the first set in control and forced Murray State to dig out a comeback late in the set. Southern scored two more kills than the Racers with 14, but only reached a .162 attack percentage in comparison to Murray State’s .200 hitting percentage. The Jaguars separated from the Racers midway through the second set. Southern’s largest lead was seven at 17-10. After a brief timeout from Schwepker, the Racers outside hitters found a rhythm and clawed back within striking distance. Murray State closed the gap behind sloppy errors by the Jaguars. As they trailed 21-18, Southern committed back to back attack errors, which was followed by a kill from Giustino, tying the set 21 all. A timeout by the Jaguars ensued after the Racers tied the set. But an attack error by Lindsay was the last point of the set for Southern. The final score was 25-22. The second set was dominated by Murray State. The Racers opened with a 9-3

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scoring run fueled by senior outside hitter Olivia Chatman and Giustino. Murray State played nearly error free in the second set with only two and hitting a .406 attack percentage. Southern recorded their lowest hitting percentage in the set with a .071. Lindsay had four kills in the set and one service ace as they closed the set winning 25-15. Murray State came out of the locker room maintaining momentum but they had eight attack errors that gave the Jaguars life. The Racers last set of the Crimson-White Tournament began with a kill by freshman middle blocker Katirah Jackson. The point was followed by a kill from junior middle blocker Paige Hall. There were seven lead changes and 13 ties in the third set. Murray State’s largest lead was five, however, momentum swayed back and forth down the stretch. The last tie of the match was at 19-19 before a 6-1 run by the Racers. Although Southern had a chance to force set number four, attack errors dampened their chances. Jaguars’ freshman outside hitter Ranaja Taylor had a team high six attack errors. Johnson and Radle scored two more kills in the final five points as Lindsay converted a kill to end the match 25-20. Murray State clinched an 8-4 record in non-conference play. The Racers start their Ohio Valley Conference play against Eastern Illinois University at 7 p.m. Friday Sept. 22, at Racer Arena. The Racers will also play at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 23 at home against Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville.

     

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The News

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September 21, 2017

Features

Features Editor: Emily Williams Assistant Features Editor: Nick Erickson Page Designer: Rachel Solomon Phone: 270-809-5871 Twitter: MSUNewsFeatures

Roomie rivalry among Racers Sydni Anderson Staff writer sanderson33@murraystate.edu

In college, having a roommate is as common as rainy days in Murray. In fact, roommates are a part of college culture. They’re someone you can study with, eat with, go to games with – or they’re none of those things at all. Sharing a room with a stranger can be a first for newcomers on campus. However, students should remember that there are plenty of people on campus who have gone through rooming pains.

THE

MESSY

THE ROOMMATE EXPERIENCE

Sydney Rice, junior from Grand Rivers, Kentucky is a residential advisor for Richmond Residential College. She said roommates can turn out to be best friends or enemies. “I’ve known people that get put with a random roommate and immediately hit it off and I’ve known people that move in with their best friend from high school and within a month they can’t stand each other,” Rice said. Rice has seen roommates fight over the temperature being turned down by two degrees. She said it always seems like a life or death situation. “If there is something to disagree about, they will,” Rice said. She said being roommates is a personal experience and each person should find out what works for them. Amanda Swift, sophomore from Bloomington, Illinois lives in New Franklin Residential College. Swift said she had a bad roommate last year. She said her roommate seemed to want different things out of college than her. “She really enjoyed partying so that made it especially difficult,” Swift said. “I got through it by being away from the room as much as possible, sometimes even resorting to staying in the rooms of my friends overnight.” Swift said she now lives with a different roommate who shared some of the same experiences as her. “We decided that since both of us needed new roommates and we thought the other one was nice, we’d be okay roommates but I definitely feel like I’ve hit the jackpot now,” Swift said. Jovondra Coffey, sophomore from Louisville

REALITY OF HAVING ROOMMATES Kentucky is Swift’s current roommate. She said she and her past roommate were a random pairing and never really talked. Coffey said her old roommate was extremely messy and would leave trash everywhere. “Because we didn’t communicate on a regular basis, it was hard to bring up any issues we had,” Coffey said. “When I did bring them up, she would respond like she would fix them but it would take her weeks to actually get it done.” Coffey said the way she got through the experience was changing her perspective. “Maybe she thought that I was the bad roommate because I kept the room too warm or that I was too worried about having a mess in the room,” Coffey said. “She never brought up issues with me, so I figured she was simply being nice and I felt that if she could live with me and not complain then I can live with her and not complain.” Peyton Raley, sophomore from Louisville, Kentucky said he also had a bad roommate his first two semesters of college. He said he barely knew his roommate prior to coming to Murray State and got through the experience the same way as Swift: spending time outside of his room. “I made friends elsewhere in my residential college and spent a lot of time in their rooms,” Raley said.

Rachel Solomon/The News

THE PROS AND CONS OF ROOM SHARING

Like everything else in life, there are benefits and costs to living with a roommate. Rice said one of the biggest cons is not having time alone. She said it can be hard to take a step back and not worry about hurting the other person’s feelings. However, she said the companionship can be a good thing. “Even on the roughest day, you know there’s someone waiting for you with a giant tub of ice cream when you get back from class,” she said. Swift said roommates can provide company and cheer someone up if their feeling lonely. She said they can teach social skills and responsibly as well as provide someone to split the cost of things with. Swift said the roommates can also make it difficult to have time alone. She said roommates have to share space and ask before doing things like rearranging the room or having people over.

TIPS FOR SHARING A ROOM

While there is no such thing as a roommate handbook at Murray State, there are some pieces of advice students can take into consideration when rooming with someone. Upperclassmen share the following tips for anyone having trouble adjusting to rooming

pains. Rice said roommates should always try to be courteous of each other. “If they like to shower in the dark while playing 80s pop, let them do it! That doesn’t hurt you,” Rice said. “But if you’re the other person, keep in mind that your roommate definitely does not want to hear you blaring Whitney Houston at the top of your lungs while they have a paper due at midnight.” Rice said rooming with another person is all about compromise and both parties need to be willing to cooperate. She said roommates should pick their battles but not be afraid to ask for something they want. “We sit down with each of our residents and do roommate contracts for a reason,” Rice said. “If you don’t like something that’s happening in your room, do not be afraid to be vocal about it. The other person might not even know that anything is wrong, and nothing can get fixed if we don’t know.” However, Rice said if there is a conflict between roommates the first thing they must do is make their RA aware of it. She said if a person is not confident enough to approach their roommate about an issue then they should talk to a RA one-on-one to decide what to do. She said there are very few problems that can’t be solved and if a student feels uncomfortable or unsafe around their roommate there is emergency protocol to help. “But we can’t help you if you don’t tell us what’s going on,” Rice said. Coffey said roommates should do what she did and learn to step into each other’s shoes. Coffey also stressed the importance of being open to each other’s ideas. “You might know exactly how you want your room set up and what you want it to look like, but your roommate might have a different idea,” Coffey said. “Don’t automatically throw their idea out just because it’s not yours.” Raley offered the same advice. “They won’t know what you want or how you feel if you don’t talk to him,” Raley said. Raley said the perfect roommate doesn’t exist and all roommates will encounter a problem at some point. Still, he said they should be able to work through it easily.

The college [app]etite The top ten apps students should know about Leigh Duncan Contributing writer hduncan4@murraystate.edu

Photo courtesy of Alex Ferrari

Country music star and Grammy Award winner, Maren Morris, will bring her Hero Tour to Murray State in October.

GRAMMY winner to take the stage at Murray State

Amy Turner Contributing writer aturner32@murraystate.edu

Maren Morris will take the stage at Lovett Auditorium on Saturday, Oct. 14 along with opening act singer/songwriter Ryan Hurd. Maren Morris released her first album June 23 of last year. A week after its release, the Hero album was number one on billboard country charts and number five on the top 200 chart. During the 50th Annual CMA Awards she received five nominations, one of which she won. She was named “New Artist of the Year.” Continuing on to this year, the artist took home a Grammy Award for “Best Country Solo Performance.” In addition to her Grammy, she received three other nominations, making her one of the most nominated country music artist at the 59th Annual GRAMMY Awards. She has gone on to win several other music awards and has been on a variety of celebrity talkshows including Ellen and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. Currently, Morris is on her Hero Tour. Morris’s winter/spring leg of the tour actually sold out according to a media alert sent from Fount Lynch from Sony Music Nashville. “Twenty-seven year old Columbia Nashville singer/songwriter Maren Morris has quickly established herself with vocal stylings that reflect her country, folk and pop influences,” the media alert brags. Helen Wharton, freshman from Florence, Kentucky, was skeptic of Morris and her music

while she listened on the radio. It wasn’t until the opportunity arose to attend a Sam Hunt concert with Morris as an opener that she quickly changed her mind. Wharton was impressed by the low price of the tickets. “Go while you have the chance. Our tickets were $80,” Wharton said. Tickets for the event starting at 8 p.m. can be purchased at the CFSB Center box office, which is open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. The ticket prices range from $20 to $25 depending on seating preferences. Tickets can be purchased from now up until the date of the show “I am really excited to see the concert especially because the price of the tickets are affordable for college students.” said Tristen Brown, junior from Livingston, Kentucky. Her opening act is Ryan Hurd, a singer/songwriter from Kalamazoo, Michigan. He has spent much of the time in his career writing songs that have been recorded by multiple artists such as Blake Shelton and Tim McGraw. Choosing to step into his own spotlight, he is now performing his work himself. His first song to hit Spotify, “We Do Us,” had over two million streams in just three weeks. Hurd has gone on a few different tours including his current tour with Maren Morris. Lynch from Sony Music said other tours he participated in are Thomas Rhett’s 2017 ‘Home Team Tour’ and Florida Georgia Line’s ‘The Smooth Tour’ 2017. “Anyone who likes country music should go. It is new country but has an old classic feel,” said Wharton.

QUICKVOICE

Everyone experiences struggle from time to time. Whether the struggle is with time management, academia, stress, budgeting or healthy eating, it exists. And one thing is for certain: the struggle is real in college. Luckily, in today’s tech-centered society, there are apps for everything. Here are ten apps that focus around managing those struggles.

VENMO

O w n e d b y P a y P a l , Venmo is designed to simplify transactions by linking all bank accounts, debit cards and credit cards to one place. A person can send money to friends, as well as receive money. With everything about college being so complicated, it is nice to have some simplicity every now and then.

QuickVoice is a cloud-based voice recorder. One can choose the quality at which files are recorded, which makes it perfect for recording a 9 a.m. lecture. Just make sure the professor is okay with being recorded first.

DICTIONARY.COM

Words are a complex matter, and sometimes, even with context clues and a great understanding of etymology, the definition is just not clear. Enter it into Dictionary.com’s mobile app, and fear no more. The definition of kismet is easily found with this app.

THESAURUS.COM

That paper could be a lot better if the word “great” was only used five times instead of 50. Fortunately, Thesaurus.com’s mobile app can help solve that problem. Papers with ‘too redundant!” written across them in red ink will become a thing of the past when you open up to the world of synonyms.

HEADSPACE

Headspace is a free-todownload guided meditation app that is useful for all stress-management needs. The “basic” pack of guided meditations is free, and you can purchase extra packs with additional meditations to follow. Just make sure to balance study and meditation equally.

MYHOMEWORK

Contrary to its name, myHomework is not simply a homework app. It allows you to customize your class schedule by day, as well as set up reminders to study. It essentially functions as a free planner, and free is great.

CHEGG

THE GOOGLE DRIVE APPS

These apps are portable and easy and while they lack certain aspects of the Microsoft applications on a laptop or desktop (like the ability to format a works cited page), they can stand in when needed. Not to mention, they are free. Google Sheets Rachel Solomon/The News is great for organizing your class schedule, too.

Chegg is essentially a textbook rental service with a great price rate. You can buy and rent textbooks and eTextbooks, new and used`. If you buy the physical book, you are given free seven day access to the eTextbook as you await the arrival of the printed version, Chegg also occasionally includes goodies such as Red Bull, coupons and Tide pods in their packages to help a poor college student out.

GROUPON

Discounts? Yes, please! The poor college student cliché is very well known, and unfortunately, very true. Groupon can help alleviate some of that financial burden. Go ahead and save $2 on your next bottle of shaving cream.

MYFITNESS PAL

That pizza in Winslow probably looks really good. So does the sushi at Market 22. So does the ham sandwich at Starbooks. Everything looks good, but not everything is good for you. MyFitness Pal helps you track your calorie intake, as well as calories burned.


The News

Features

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September 21, 2017

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The News

Page 7

September 21, 2017

Opinion Editor: Tyler Anderson Page Designer: Tori Wood Phone: 270-809-5873

Opinion Our View

Health disservices The staff editorial is the majority opinion of The Murray State News Editorial Board.

Connor Jaschen Editor-in-Chief • 270-809-6877 cjaschen@murraystate.edu

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Tyler Anderson Opinion Editor • 270-809-5873 janderson49@murraystate.edu

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The News 2609 University Station Murray State University Murray, Kentucky 42071-3301 murraystatenews@icloud.com Fax: 270-809-3175

TheNews.org The News welcomes commentaries and letters to the editor. Submissions should be 600 words or less, and contributors should include phone numbers for verification. Please include hometown, classification and title or relationship to the university. The News reserves the right to edit for style, length and content. No anonymous contributions will be accepted. All contributions should be turned in by noon on Monday of each week via email to janderson49@murraystate.edu. Contributions to The News are the opinion of the author and not that of The Murray State News. The News strives to be the university community’s source for information. Our goal is to present that information in a fair and unbiased manner and provide a free and open forum for expression and debate. The News is a designated public forum. Student editors have authority to make all content decisions without censorship or advance approval. The paper offers a hands-on learning environment for students interested in journalism. The campus press should be free from censorship and advance approval of copy and its editors should develop their editorial and news policies. The News is prepared and edited by students and is an official publication of Murray State University. The first copy is free. Additional copies are available for 25 cents at 111 Wilson Hall.

Our health care system’s identity crisis has been in the media spotlight for the past several years. Rising insurance and drug costs, along with uncertainties surrounding the future of the Affordable Care Act, have put many on edge about our nation’s health. Thankfully, students and staff here at Murray State University have been able to look within our own campus for medical care through Health Services. But as Murray State supposedly looks to cut costs across the university budget, our wellness and wallets may bear the most burden if Health Services are privatized as recent rumors and proposals suggest might happen. So, what does ‘privatization’ really mean? According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary, it is “to change from public to private control or ownership.” This process typically results in reduced operating costs and less privacy and insurance concerns for those relinquishing responsibility for said services. Privatization of university facilities is nothing new – for example, Western Kentucky University’s Health Services are now operated by Graves-Gilbert Clinic, a medical juggernaut in Bowling Green, KY. Campus food operations are another high-rate target of privatization efforts. Currently all fees for access to Health Services are built into student tuition. Of course, if one doesn’t utilize the facility this charge does not go away. If an outside entity were brought to campus, insurance billing and copays would almost certainly follow. And for the percentage of students who don’t have insurance, either by choice or due to financial concerns, this could mean the difference between having access to health care or none at all.

Autumn Brown/The News

However, the university may have just as much to lose by outsourcing campus wellness. Murray currently has several options when it comes to medical care including Fast Pace Urgent Care, Primary Care Medical Center and others. They have competitive payment options for both cash-paying patients and those with insurance. Plus, the services they provide far outstrip what is currently offered by Health Services. So what’s to keep the student body from going off campus for their medical care if there is no incentive to visit a privatized facility on campus? Location is a factor for those without private

transportation, but it’s hard to believe most don’t have a friend or guardian who would help if the need arises. Affordable cab services are cropping up every week as well. Any facility on campus would have to provide highly competitive pricing and services comparable to other providers in town to compete. However, it’s unlikely a private business would allow their services to become too devalued as making a profit would be their main goal. For those who have visited Health Services, it is obvious there is limited space. So to provide these expanded services, more space would logically be needed. This means more construction on campus and a hefty price to go along with it – but who would be responsible for these costs, the business or the university (i.e. tuition-paying students)? Since privatization would lessen the financial burden on the university, what then will happen to the charges built into our tuition? Will those be deducted from the consistently rising cost of attending Murray State? Our guess is no, but it is all pure speculation at this point in the process. Gov. Matt Bevin recently made comments regarding public state universities and their obligation to be fiscally responsible. Changes to campus operations in the form of privatization, among others, would without a doubt achieve this goal of saving money. But if changes are to be made, what are students willing to give up? And what is the university prepared to sacrifice in order to stay operable? Murray State University claims to always have the well-being of students and staff in mind. We must hold them responsible for their commitments. Here’s to hoping our health doesn’t bottom out to pad the university’s bottom line.

The library and privacy of analog Arthur “A.J.” Boston (MLIS) Assistant Professor aboston@murraystate.edu Vinyl records, print magazines, Moleskine notebooks, film photography and board games are all examples of analog “things” author David Sax describe as enjoying a relative resurgence of popularity. In his book, The Revenge of Analog: Real Things and Why They Matter, Sax makes a convincing case for why, in a digital era, we sensuous, tactile human beings may still crave to have and to hold these non-connected things in real life. Count me in Sax’s camp – my having read this book on a Kindle notwithstanding. Amidst recent tech news stories, one forgotten aspect of analog has struck me anew: the ever-shifting balance of our privacy as we increasingly enjoy the convenience of the digital. It’s an old story, but as an old man, I’m old enough to remem-

ber the moment when I consented to supplementing my paperback consumption to include ebooks several Christmases ago. I remember posting pictures on Facebook from an SD card in 2006 as a college student and when I started keeping to-do notes and composing mind-blowing rap lyrics on the Notepad app. I also remember the past few weeks, when Apple announced facial identification was going mainstream and when Equifax decided it was the Oprah of leaving social security numbers beneath every hacker’s seat. Strangers love to take my picture because of my extreme aesthetic niceness, but now I have to worry that maybe these strangers aren’t cataloging my peculiar charm for their personal collection, but rather IDing me and my wonderful credit score for nefarious causes. How old were you when you first shopped online, had your

picture uploaded to social media, texted mom or wrote something personal in an email? How could it have occurred to you that you were giving up some bit of your privacy, relative to the analog version of that thing, when you were that age, when this was the accepted practice of the world around you? I have a mission for each of you. At some point during the four or so years of your time as a Murray State undergraduate student, go to the bank and bring me a sample. But also, withdraw ten dollars for yourself. Drive, walk or cycle down to Terrapin Station. Or G’s Comics. Or Angel’s Attic. Switch your phone to airplane mode, go inside and pick out a paperback or comic book or any analog thing that suits your fancy. Buy it. Pay cash. Take it back to your dorm or apartment. Enjoy it. Read it. Commune quietly with its creator. Write on it, lend it to a pal, resell it. Leave the book in

the back of a Mama Nancy’s cab like you’re the Emma Watson of Murray. Toss it in a recycling bin if you so wish. Take a moment to meditate on what liberty you have with an object as elegantly untethered as this. Relish the pure privacy of paying cash for a book that’s utterly immune to a zero percent battery. The only trace of your financial transaction will fade just as the scent of burning incense on your shirt will in the wash. Big brother won’t erase or alter the text in your sleep or track your reading progress. No digital rights management software will prevent you from lending as you see fit. Jeff Bezos won’t follow you to Wal-Mart, making misguided recommendations for similar books. And if you throw the book away, you’re a monster. But a monster with peace of mind that once that poor paperback arrives at the pulper, it’s really gone and not logged in a cache.

Between You and Media

Small books, big lessons Rachel Wood Contributing writer rwood7@murraystate.edu Over the past few weeks, I’ve taken the time to revisit young adult books, both from my own adolescence and more recent publications. It’s not something I would normally do – between books for class and keeping up with new publications, there isn’t much spare time to re-read young adult books. Sometimes it’s easy to forget that young adult literature can be of great value. While re-reading some of these books, I’ve realized just how beneficial it would be if we all took a moment to value the lessons that these books teach. Young adult literature proves that adolescents are a lot smarter than we give them credit for. As I was reading my favorite young literature books, I remembered just how intricate and emotional the plot lines could get. One of my favorite historical fiction novels, Laurie Halse Anderson’s “Fever 1793,” tells the story of a fourteen-year-old girl who loses almost her

entire family to a fever outbreak in Philadelphia, and must learn to survive on her own. This novel is a wonderful display of perseverance and hope. In fact, young adult books offer some of the best advice on tough topics – advice that, even now, I find helpful.

I find I can still learn a lot from these books.

A few weeks ago, I fell in love with Claire Legrand’s 2016 novel “Some Kind of Happiness.” The story follows Finley Hart, a girl who has been sent to her grandparent’s home for the summer while her parents work through relationship problems.

Though the book is packed with whimsical tales of the Everwood Forest, Finley isn’t your typical headstrong protagonist; she regularly finds herself dealing with overwhelming fear and sadness on what she calls her “blue days,” a telltale sign of anxiety and depression. Though it’s written for a younger audience, her experiences are easy for adults young and old, myself included, to relate to. She even relays her experiences of going to therapy – a topic many adults struggle to talk about. At first glance, some might call the topic inappropriate for adolescents, but this novel could be a lifesaver for young adults who share Finley’s emotions. So, even as a college student, I find I can still learn a lot from these books. Well-written young adult literature does a great job of reminding us that our feelings are valid and universal. They remind us to be nicer to one another, and even to be nicer to ourselves. Sometimes, the most important encouragement we can have is knowing what we’re dealing with isn’t just happening to us, and a book might just be the perfect reminder.


The News

News

Page 8

September 21, 2017

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Petitioners discuss Confederate statue Paige Effinger

Contributing writer peffinger@murraystate.edu

Progressives in the region started a discussion on the West Kentucky Progressive Connection Facebook page about the removal of the Robert E. Lee statue in downtown Murray. The post stirred discussions, receiving 42 comments, 51 likes and 21 shares. The statue has been erect in the downtown court square since the early 1900s, but some Calloway County residents believe it represents the outdated values of the old south. Shelly Baskin, the group organizer for the Murray Confederate petition, said the West Kentucky Progressive Connection Facebook page was created for progressives in the region, and it was utilized to promote and organize the petition. Although, she said the organization of the petition is not led by the Kentucky Progressive Connection. Residents are free to start a countermovement, according to the Facebook post, but the discussion is not “Should we do this?” but “How do we do this?” Baskin said the group is still discussing and exploring dif-

ferent options for addressing the monument, like alteration, transfer or destruction. “A 17 foot tall monument, built during Jim Crow and topped by the leader of the Confederate armies, is a clear symbol of the institutions of slavery and legislated white supremacy that formed the backbone of the secessionist movement.” If it were to be removed, she said it would not cure racism or fix the effects of centuries of white supremacy, but it would be the first step toward progression. “The presences of such a monument on the courthouse grounds implies a community wide endorsement of what it represents,” Baskin said. Last Wednesday, Sept. 13, an event was held at the Bailey Pavilion by members of the petition group to discuss options for the Confederate statue, like alteration, transfer or destruction. A formal petition has not been started, and Baskin said they are in the process of developing a petition which addresses their preferred outcome and reasons for removal. “When we present our plan to the community, we want it to be thoughtful and actionable,” Baskin said.

Removing the statue is just one step they can take toward racial reconciliation, Baskin said. However, there are others who prefer to keep the statue such as Murray State student Kristyn Morse. Morse, junior political science major from Eureka, Missouri, is a member of the College of Republicans and previously worked as intern on campaigns for Republican candidates such as Rand Paul. Morse said these statues are a piece of history, and this message is what the Republican party is trying to fight for. Morse said she had ancestors fight in the Civil War, and statutes like Robert E. Lee remind her of how far the world has come and changed since that time. “If it is taken away the future generations won’t be able to understand the historical value of it, and it’s something that everyone should learn about,” Morse said. Morse said we should be proud of how far the United States has come since the Civil War. “We should look at these statues and remind ourselves of all we went through to create the America we have today,” she said.

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