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The Mountain Press ■ Sevier County’s Daily Newspaper ■ Vol. 26, No. 24 ■ January 24, 2010 ■ www.themountainpress.com ■ $1.25

Sunday

Forge audit up for approval

INSIDE

By DEREK HODGES Staff Writer

5WSCC ready to serve Culinary Arts department has full schedule of events on menu Mountain life, Page B1

Submitted

Heavy machinery sits in the lot at the Sinks parking area along Little River Road as work progresses on repaving there, one of many projects in the national park being funded by federal stimulus dollars.

5SEC showdown Vols travel to Athens, tangle with Dawgs Sports, Page A8

Smoothing the way Stimulus funds helping park fix long-awaited paving projects

Local

Good news for GSMNP Park gifted with increase in visitors for anniversary Page A5

Weather Today Mostly Rain High: 58°

Tonight Mostly Rain Low: 40° DETAILS, Page A6

Obituaries Jason Robinson, 37 Laura Cooper, 60 Elizabeth Griffin, 84 Thomas Bartleson Sr., 63 Troy Gilreath, 39 Brian Lee McCarter, 30 Joy Price, 84 Jack Hughes, 75 DETAILS, Page A4

Index Local & State . . . . . A1-6 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . A2 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . A8-11 Nation . . . . . . . . . . . A12 World . . . . . . . . . . . . A12 Classifieds . . . . . . . . B5-7

Corrections The Mountain Press is committed to accuracy. Please report factual errors by calling 428-0748 Ext. 214.

See audit, Page A3

Greenways workshop set for Tuesday

By DEREK HODGES Staff Writer NATIONAL PARK — Thanks to federal highway and stimulus dollars, riding on some of the most-traveled roads in Great Smoky Mountains National Park will soon be a much smoother proposition. There a number of projects being completed on both sides of the park with money from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), including $1.3 million for cemetery and trail work, and a $4 million investment in restroom rehabilitation and improvements. Still, the work that will be appreciated by the most folks will come in the form of new asphalt on a list of streets and parking areas. Work on many of the roads set to be resurfaced has been deferred for a decade or more as money has run scarce, park spokesman Bob Miller says. That’s why officials are so excited to see stimulus money suddenly flowing into the park like a torrent down a Mt. LeConte tributary in a heavy spring rain. “When ARRA came along, we submitted a number of projects that were eligible for See stimulus, Page A3

By ELLEN BROWN Staff Writer Submitted

Workers dig out an area in Great Smoky Mountains National Park that will serve as a much-needed addition to the Sinks parking area on Little River Road.

Planned resurfacing process good for budget, environment By DEREK HODGES Staff Writer NATIONAL PARK — It turns out a few of the roads set to be repaved in the current effort in the Smokies will be green when they’re finished, though the asphalt will still be black. The contractors working on the projects to resurface Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail and the Cades Cove Loop Road will be using a relatively rare practice that will enable them to conserve materials and gas, at the same time cutting costs for the work. For those two thoroughfares and couple other areas, like the Cosby Campground parking area, the existing blacktop will be reused in a process called full-depth reclamation (FDR). That’s a fancy name for a process that actually seems fairly elementary, but still isn’t used very often. In a normal repaving project, the surface of the road is scraped, or milled, down to a substrata that can support the new asphalt

without compromising the integrity of the new road. That material that is removed has to be trucked out of the area, creating extra fuel expense. However, in the case of the Smokies roads, the entire road surface will be broken down into pieces about the size of small gravel, National Park Chief of Facilities Alan Sumeriski explains. That material will then be reused to form the bed for the new road surface. “We view it as a sustainable approach to repaving,” Sumeriski says. “You’re not having to truck out all that material, so you’re saving gas and you’re reusing that material.” In addition to being a bit more earthfriendly, the technique offers some other benefits, including some that are specific to the work to be done in the park and one that will show up on the bottom line. “There is some cost savings involved,” Sumeriski says. See resurfacing, Page A3

‘Grin and bear it’ motto during closures By DEREK HODGES Staff Writer GATLINBURG — While there may be some worries running around the local business community about the impact the closure of some of the Smokies’ most popular roads will have, Chamber of Commerce and park officials say the general mood could be described as “grin and bear it for brighter days ahead.” After years of patch-

PIGEON FORGE — City Commission members will consider approving an audit of Pigeon Forge’s books when they meet in a regular session at 5:30 p.m. Monday in City Hall. The group got its first look at the annual report during a work session last week, during which they were told no “major issues” were found in the municipal accounting efforts. Representatives from Pugh & Company, the firm the city has contracted with for several years to handle the work, told officials they were presenting an “unqualified opinion,” which means they found the city to be in good financial health. The findings also indicate there weren’t any

ing over problem spots as they waited for sufficient funding to fix some serious issues, park officials say they are excited to see an influx of federal stimulus money coming into the area to resurface a number of troubled roads. Still, they’re not exactly pleased using the funds will mean putting gates across several of those thoroughfares concurrently this spring. “If we could have started this work during the win-

ter right after we got this money, we would have,” Chief of Facilities Alan Sumeriski says. “It does take some ramp-up time when we’re talking about projects of this magnitude, though. We’re talking about spending tens of millions of dollars here; there’s a lot of design and prep work that has to go into this.” While planning requirements and the need for certain weather conditions nixed the chance of starting

at the end of last year’s tourist season, the government’s demands on how the money is spent also cancelled the idea of delaying the work until the next winter. “We are required to have all our funds obligated by September because the (American Recovery and Reinvestment Act) expires Sept. 30,” Sumeriski explains. “We had to commit those funds and let the contracts so that we could See closures, Page A5

The city of Gatlinburg will host its second public workshop to discuss what’s next for the community’s Greenways Trail System master plan at 5 p.m. Tuesday in the City Commission chambers at City Hall. Gatlinburg staff and representatives of Barge, Waggonner, Sumner and Cannon Inc., will conduct the workshop, which will include preliminary cost estimates and phasing recommendations. “Everyone was very supportive and strongly endorsed (the greenways) at the first workshop,” said Marty Nicely, Gatlinburg Parks and Recreation director. Since the first meeting, BWSCI has compiled surveys and comments into a report and has used that information to establish the agenda for the second meeting. Nicely said the routes have been examined more closely, with one route possibly coming out of the plan. “There is one segment, which goes from Roaring Fork to Highway 321 with part of it bordering the National Park, that could come out because of vocation or because it is cost prohibitive.” Along with preliminary cost estimates and phasing recommendations, Tuesday’s meeting is expected to include examples of possible signage and construction details and refinement of trail routes. “This will only get accomplished after the master plan gets on the ground — community support is what will drive it,” Nicely said. n ebrown@themountainpress.com


A2 â—† Local

The Mountain Press â—† Sunday, January 24, 2010

community calendar Editor’s Note: The community calendar is printed as space permits. Only noncommercial, public events held in Sevier County will be considered. They are listed by date. To place an item phone 4280748, ext. 214, or e-mail to editor@themountainpress. com. Items may be faxed to 453-4913.

sunday, jan. 24 Walnut Grove Revival

Walnut Grove Church revival 7 p.m. today through Jan. 30. The Rev. Melvin Carr evangelist. 453-4302.

monday, jan. 25 GateKeepers

GateKeepers men’s community Bible study, 6:30 p.m., 2445 Scenic Mt. Drive, Sevierville. (865) 310-7831.

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 10 a.m. Seymour Heights Christian Church (last door on right), Chapman Highway n 1 p.m., Gatlinburg Inn, Gatlinburg

Seymour Story Time

Preschool story time 11 a.m. Seymour Library, 137 Macon Lane. 573-0728.

Blood Drive

Medic blood drive 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Walmart.

AARP Driver Safety

AARP driver safety classes noon to 4 p.m. today and Tuesday, Senior Center, Sevierville. 922-5648.

tuesday, jan. 26

Gatlinburg Greenways

Second workshop to develop Gatlinburg’s Greenways Trail master plan at 5 p.m. in City Hall. 436-4990.

Kodak Library

Friends Of Kodak Library membership meeting 6:30 p.m., 319 W. Dumplin Valley Road. Guest speaker, John Waters.

Caregiver Stress

“Understanding Caregiver Stress� 6:30-8 p.m. Jan. 28, Wellington Place of Sevierville. Includes desserts and beverages. 774-2221 by today.

wednesday, jan. 27 Middle Creek UMC

Worship services at 6:30 p.m. at Middle Creek United Methodist Church, 1828 Middle Creek Road, Pigeon Forge. 216-2066.

Seymour UMC

Celebrate Recovery meets Wednesday evening at Seymour UMC. Call 5739711 for details.

Sevierville Story Time

Preschool story time 10:30 a.m. at Sevier County Main Library. 4533532.

thursday, jan. 28 Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 9 a.m. UMC Pigeon Forge n 2 p.m. Blue Mountain Mist B&B, Pullen Road, Sevierville n 6:30 p.m. Sevierville UMC, Conference Room, Sevierville

Hot Meals

Smoky Mountain Area

Hot Meals

TOPS

TOPS weight loss chapter meets at 6 p.m., Parkway Church of God in Sevierville. 755-9517 or 429-3150.

Midway FCE

Midway Family, Community and Education meets 1 p.m. at Mountain National Bank, Kodak.

friday, jan. 29 Kid’s Night Out

Kid’s Night Out 6-10 p.m., Pigeon Forge Community Center. $10 for center members, $15 others. 429-7373.

New Center Baptist

New Center Baptist Church and Christian Academy meet and greet, meal and auction begin at 5:30 p.m. 7740210.

Walnut Grove Revival Walnut Grove Church revival 7 p.m. through Jan. 30. The Rev. Melvin Carr evangelist. 4534302.

Kodak Story Time

Preschool story time 11 a.m., Kodak Library. 9330078.

saturday, jan. 30 Women’s Care Center Women’s Care Center offering volunteer training for pregnancy and parenting consultant volunteers, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the center, 304 Eastgate Road, Sevierville. 428-4673.

Weekday Specials

Hot Meals for Hungry Hearts served from 5:30 to 6:30 p,m. Tuesdays at Second Baptist Church, Pigeon Street just off Chapman Highway.

Monday - Thursday 3KATEsPM PM BOOK YOUR NEXT PARTY NOW! 0RIVATE0ARTY2OOMS!VAILABLE #HURCH9OUTH'ROUPS On Snow Days - Special Day Session. /PENSATPM

GateKeepers

GateKeepers men’s Bible study, 6:30 p.m. 1328 Old Newport Highway, Sevierville. 908-0591.

Rescue Ministries provides hot meals 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church in Sevierville.

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Local â—† A3

Sunday, January 24, 2010 â—† The Mountain Press

stimulus

3From Page A1

Submitted

Natural history photographer Ken Jenkins, whose idea spawned Wilderness Wildlife Week, receives the first Friend of the Forge Award from tourism director Leon Downey. The award acknowledges individuals who have contributed to the city of Pigeon Forge’s success as a tourism destination.

Jenkins receives first Forge award From Submitted Reports PIGEON FORGE — Natural history photographer Ken Jenkins, who conceived the idea of Pigeon Forge’s annual Wilderness Wildlife Week, has received the city’s first Friend of the Forge award. Pigeon Forge created the award to acknowledge individuals who have contributed to the city’s success as a tourism destination. “Not only did Ken Jenkins bring us the idea for Wilderness Wildlife Week, but he also has been a driving force in its growth and development as an event to attract visitors in January. With the 2010 Wilderness Wildlife week, we have marked 20 years of a great idea,� said City Manager Earlene Teaster. After the first year, which offered four programs on one day, Jenkins advocated expanding to an entire week, according to Leon Downey, executive director of the Pigeon Forge Department of Tourism. “We made the jump immediately, and visitors really latched onto the idea. This year, we had more than 230 sessions, almost 60 hikes, dozens of volunteers and more than 150 expert presenters,� Downey said. Wilderness Wildlife Week has become a major compo-

nent of the city’s four-month Winterfest celebration, drawing visitors from many states for programs about Great Smoky Mountains National Park and topics related to the outdoors. Jenkins received an engraved award as the 2010 Wilderness Wildlife Week began. Later this year, a tulip poplar, the Tennessee state tree, will be planted in his honor along the Pigeon Forge Greenway. “I was surprised and honored, and I must say that the tulip poplar is a very touching and appropriate gesture. Wilderness Wildlife Week thrives because of Pigeon Forge’s backing and the support of so many volunteers. It is a joy to see how it has evolved,� Jenkins said. Jenkins, who photographs nature around the world, says the mountains were his inspiration for Wilderness Wildlife Week. He has two galleries, Beneath the Smoke and Heaven’s Eye, both in Gatlinburg.

that funding,� park Chief of Facilities Alan Sumeriski says. “We were thrilled when we got the news several of those were going to be in the awards for that money.� A total of $77.4 million will be coming to the park under ARRA, most of it to road projects. That cash will be supplemented by $19.4 million from the regular Federal Lands Highway Program money. The work will encompass several thoroughfares that are popular among local visitors, including the Clingmans Dome Road, Gatlinburg Bypass, Cades Cove Loop Road and Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail/Cherokee Orchard Road. At current, most of those roads are in an embarrassing state of disrepair, a patchwork of stop-gap repaving efforts over the years and pockmarked by countless potholes. “We receive numerous calls complaining about the condition of our roads,� Sumeriski says. “Really, they are in bad shape. It’s just because there hasn’t exactly been an influx of money coming into the national park for infrastructure maintenance. There really have only been three major development periods in the history of the National Park Service, and the last of those was about four decades ago.� Even in those drives to

audit

3From Page A1

instances in which money was mishandled, nor were there departments that spent beyond the amounts allocated for them, auditor Barrett Simonis reported. The city has a total of $72 million in debt and more than $34 million in its fund balance, the amount set aside as something of a rainy day fund. While there were no suggestions of impropriety, the auditors are expected to make some recommendations Monday evening on ways the city can better handle its accounting. Still, they offered praise for those who keep Pigeon Forge’s books. “Your staff here is really good to us and we really appreciate that,� Pugh staff-

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make the country’s natural lands more accessible — the initial founding push, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) and other New Deal efforts, and the Mission 66 initiative — the work that was done has not always stood the test of time. “We’ve got a lot of the CCC projects that are still standing, but some of the Mission 66 roads weren’t built in mind of perpetuity,� Sumeriski says. “I mean, when you really think about it the Cades Cove Loop Road is nothing more than an old farm road that they laid some gravel down on and paved. And it hasn’t been resurfaced since 1978.� Not that it hasn’t needed it, Miller points out. That’s why park officials regard the stimulus money, as Sumeriski says, as “the greatest possible gift for the 75th anniversary,� the milestone the park celebrated last year. In Cades Cove, one of the most popular roads in the park will be completely closed from March 1 to as late as May 21, though the contractor has been offered a sizable daily bonus for early completion. Efforts to replace culverts and do other preparatory work there have already begun as traffic proceeds normally, but doing the full resurfacing of the one-lane road will require shutting it down. Likewise, access to Roaring Fork Motor Nature Trail and Clingmans Dome will be limited to only construction vehi-

cles from Feb. 1 to May 28 for the former and Feb. 15 to May 28 for the latter. Heintooga Ridge Road (Oct. 2009-May 28), the Sinks parking area (Jan. 5-May 10), Smokemont Campground (March 10-May 28), and Little River and Jakes Creek trailheads parking area in Elkmont (July 5-Aug. 31) will also experience full closures. Meanwhile, work will progress under traffic on Cherokee Orchard Road Feb. 1 through May 28, as well as the Gatlinburg Bypass from the Spur to the Sugarlands Visitor Center from April 1 to May 28, though that latter route will be closed completely for two or three weeks in May. Also under construction with vehicles allowed will be Foothills Parkway West (May 10-June 30) and East (late spring through mid-August), and Newfound Gap Road on the North Carolina side from the Collins Creek Picnic Area to Cherokee (now through November). Additionally, the largest single ARRA project, at $24.7 million, will include design and construction of Bridge 2 on the unfinished portion of the Foothills Parkway between Wears Valley and Walland. For more information on the projects, visit the “Plan Your Visit� section of the national park’s Web site at www.nps.gov/grsm/planyourvisit/index.htm.

er Larry Elmore said. “They are always open to our suggestions and they welcome our assistance.� Also on the agenda for Monday’s session is: n A public hearing on Ordinance 987 that would rezone property owned by Cindy Owens and Credit Shelter Trust from R-1 (lowdensity residential) to C-2 (tourist commercial) n Voting on that ordinance n An in-lieu of property tax contract with the city of Sevierville n Consideration of a development agreement

with Holrob Pigeon Forge Partners and Transamerica Life Insurance Company in regards to access to parking spaces n Consideration of a mutual release and settlement agreement with MF Billboards regarding the relocation of a billboard n A request for water service for the proposed waterline extension along McMahan Sawmill Road for Kevin Blalock n A request to purchase Winterfest chaser lights.

n dhodges@themountainpress.com

n dhodges@themountainpress.com

resurfacing 3From Page A1

Beyond that, the process will make doing the work to improve the one-lane roads through Cades Cove and the Roaring Fork area a little easier. Getting all heavy equipment in and out of those areas on that narrow strip of blacktop can be a real ballet, park spokesman Bob Miller says. “Access into Cades Cove and Roaring Fork especially is very difficult with the size of the road and the size of the construction equipment we have today,� Miller explains. There’s a lot of logistics to that. They have their own traffic issues to work through, even though the road is closed to visitors. They’ve got to figure out how they can get those big trucks by each other on that road, and in and out of there.� Certainly no one understands that better than the folks who drive those rigs. “We’ve talked to some of the guys who were on the project when they paved those areas 20 and 30 years ago,� Sumeriski says. “They say you wouldn’t believe the challenge it was to get the trucks to where they needed to go in there.� Since the need for dump trucks carrying the old roadbed material out of the areas is eliminated, that will mean a few less ballerinas on the dance floor, a fact that should make the work easier. All that equals out to what park officials consider a better way to build a road. Unfortunately, it’s not practical in every setting. “When you’re doing it this way, you have to leave that asphalt to cure for 5 to 10 days,� Sumeriski says. “That can only work if you can shut down the entire road at once for a long period of time. Fortunately, that’s what we’re going to be able to do here. In the case of, for instance, the repaving of the Spur we did a couple years ago, we couldn’t use that because we didn’t close the road.�


A4 ◆ Local

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, January 24, 2010

obituaries In Memoriam

Jason Robinson

Jason Robinson, age 37 of Sevierville, passed away Friday, January 22, 2010. He was a member of Glades Lebanon Baptist Church of Gatlinburg, and he worked mostly as a cook in several area restaurants including Brass Lantern and Green Valley. He was an avid NASCAR enthusiast. Jason enjoyed a variety of music from bluegrass to Rage Against the Machine. He was preceded in death by his grandfather James Luther Feezel, uncle James (Jimmy) McElyea, and cousin Jeremy Wayne Gregg. Survivors: wife: Renee Robinson; daughter, Calinda Robinson; mother, Judy McElyea; stepfather, Lynn Feezel; grandmothers, Joy McElyea, Aileen Feezel; sisters, Sonya Robinson, Mallory McElyea; mother-in-law, Florence Thompson and husband Jim Lafferty; father-in-law, Everett Thompson and wife Barbara; sisters-in-law, Donna Green and husband Howard, Tammy Thompson and husband Brad, Carrie Francis and husband Rob, Magen Thompson and T.J. Huskey; brothersin-law, Everett Thompson and wife Roni, Rodney Thompson and Christy Gregg; aunts, Marilyn Gregg and Janet Ashley; uncles, Gary McElyea and Lynn McElyea; special friends, Thomas Jack Huskey, Ron Moore, Jack Huskey. and Daytona (his dog); many nieces and nephews. Special thanks to UT Hospice and Glades Lebanon Baptist Church and appreciation to his special cousin Casey Gregg off the Sevier County Ambulance Service. In lieu of flowers, donations to benefit the family (c/o Atchley Funeral Home) will be appreciated. Funeral service 7 p.m. Tuesday in the West Chapel of Atchley Funeral Home. The family will receive friends 5-7 p.m. Tuesday at Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville. n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

Troy L. Gilreath

Survivors: wife, Crystal McCarter; daughters, Brandy and Kaylee McCarter, and Zoe Cobb; sons, Gavin and Damon McCarter; mother Nancy Maples and husband Tim; sisters, Angela and Amanda McCarter; grandmother Kate Clabo; uncle, Billy Clabo; aunts Moleta McCarter and Mary Ann Knigee; several aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. Funeral service was held Saturday in the East Chapel of Atchley Funeral Home with Elder Shirley Henry and Pastor Charles Lawson officiating. Interment followed in Beech Grove Cemetery.

Troy L. Gilreath, 39 of Pigeon Forge, died Friday, Jan. 22, 2010. He was of the Baptist faith and enjoyed gardening and fishing. Survivors: children, Jochlyn, Brittany, Miranda, Troy Tilman, David, Alex, Eastenn; mother and stepfather, Georgia L. and Alfred Watson; former wife, Loretta Gilreath; sisters, Brigette Mathis and husband Mike, Stacey, Poppy; grandmother, Alline Shultz; aunts, Edna Williams, Esta Henry, Marty Hamilton, Elizabeth Braswell; uncle, David Shultz. Funeral service 7 p.m. Sunday in the West Chapel n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com of Atchley Funeral Home with Rev. David Ayers officiating. Interment 11 a.m. Monday in Joy D. Price Thurman Stafford Cemetery. Joy D. Price, 84, of East The family will receive friends Peoria, Ill., died Sunday, Jan. Sunday 5-7 p.m. at Atchley 17, 2010, at Wellington Place Funeral Home, Sevierville. in Sevierville. She was born Nov. 26, n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com 1925, in Sevierville. She married Otha M. Price on Feb. 13, 1946, in Pigeon Forge. He Anthony Brian Lee passed away Feb. 29, 1996, McCarter in Peoria. Anthony Brian Lee McCarter, Survivors: daughters, Carol 30 of Sevierville, died Price of Sevierville and Gail Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2010. Brown of East Peoria; one He was a fifth generation granddaughter; nieces and woodworker. nephews.

Laura Dianne Cowan Cooper

Elizabeth Ann Griffin

Laura Dianne Cowan Cooper, age 60, of Kodak, passed away in Somerset, KY on Thursday, January 21st as a result of complications from gastric bypass surgery. Laura was the daughter of the late Emmett Gregory Cowan and Marjorie Buchanan Cowan. She was born and grew up in Johnson City and was a graduate of Stark High School in Stark, FL. She received an Associate Degree in Engineering Technology from Trident Technical College in Charleston, SC and worked as a laboratory technician for several chemical companies. Laura was well known in the East Tennessee area as a genealogy researcher, consultant, and instructor. Although not a church member, she was the chief family history volunteer at the Sevierville Family History Center of the Mormon Church for over 12 years. She was a Board Member and Treasurer of the Sevier County Heritage Museum. She is survived by her husband, David A. Cooper of Kodak; her sister, Linda C. Cabaniss of Shelby, NC; her niece, Lynn C. (Matt) Myers and grand-niece, Kylie Brianne Myers of Greensboro, NC; her daughter, Andrea Tracey Savage of Knoxville; and her son, Gregory D. Worrock of Nashville. Family will receive friends at Stevens Mortuary on Monday evening, January 25th from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. with a graveside service at Greenwood Cemetery on Tuesday, January 26th at 11:00 a.m. The Reverend Arthur Heldman officiating. As an alternative to flowers, friends may wish to make a memorial contribution in her name to the Sevier County Heritage Museum, 167 Bruce Street, Sevierville, TN 37862. Mrs. Cooper’s guest book is available at www. stevensmortuaryinc.com.

Elizabeth Ann Griffin, age 84, of Dandridge, passed away January 22, 2010. She was a member of Hill Union Methodist Church and First Baptist Church of Gatlinburg. She enjoyed quilting and sewing and was very talented in both. She worked for Ole Smokey Candy Kitchen for over 20 years. She was preceded in death by her parents, Joseph and Mary Stover, sister, Helen Rollins, brothers, J.D., Lloyd, Douglas, Arville, and Elbert Stover, and infant daughter, Cheryl Griffin. Survivors: daughters and sons-in-law, Norma and Dale Dunlevey; grandchilden, Michelle and James Mottern and Darlene Ellis; great-grandchildren, Olivia Grace Mottern, Sierra Rose Ferrigno, and Hayden Aleczander Ellis; a host of relatives and friends. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to: Hills Union United Methodist Church, In Memory Of Elizabeth Griffin, 2483 Chesnut Hill Rd., Dandridge, TN 37725. The family will receive friends 5-7 p.m. Tuesday with memorial service to follow at Hills Union United Methodist Church. Cremations arrangements by Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville, TN.

Joy was an LPN at Methodist Medical Center in Peoria for 30 1/2 years, retiring in 1987. There will be no public services. Memorials may be made to the Alzheimer ’s Association, ADRDA, Knoxville Area Chapter, 544-6288. Online tributes may be made at www. RemmertFuneralHome.com.

n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

Jack Hughes, 75 of Sevierville, died Thursday, Jan. 21, 2010. He was a retired coal miner and attended Sevier County Church of God. Survivors: son and daughterin-law, Jack D. and Donnette Hughes; daughter and sonin-law, Debbie and Lawrence Smith; three grandchildren; two great-grandchildren; sis-

Thomas John Bartleson Sr.

Thomas John Bartleson Sr., age 63 of Knoxville, Tenn., went to join his wife, Karen, in heaven on Friday, January 22, 2010, at St. Mary’s Hospital. He was born in Wilkesbarrow, Pa. He was proud to serve in the U.S. Army, and was a fire fighter going up through the ranks to the rank of Assistant Chief. He was preceded in death by parents, William and Dorothy Bartleson and his precious wife, Karen. Brothers, Ed and Bill Bartleson. Survived by his children, Thomas Bartleson Jr. and wife Tonia of Sevierville, Sharon Galyon and husband Chris of Lenoir City, Kelly Bartleson, Michael (Mike) and Amanda Bartlesonof Knoxville; five grandchildren, Brittany Hayes, Thomas Bartleson lll, Blaine and Wyatt Galyon, and Savannah Bartleson; sister, Dorothy Casale of New Jersey, brothers, Ross and Jackie Bartleson of Pa. A memorial service will be conducted on Monday at 7 p.m. in the chapel of Gentry-Griffey Funeral Chapel, with Rev. Larry Cash officiating. The family will receive friends beginning at 6 p.m. Monday, January 25, 2010, prior to the service. You may sign the guestbook at www.gentrygriffeyfuneralchapel.com.

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Jack Hughes

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ter and brother-in-law, Billie Helen and Gary Spears. The family will receive friends 1-3 p.m. Sunday with memorial service to follow at 3 p.m. in the East chapel of Atchley Funeral Home with Pastor Steve Dawson officiating. Arrangements by Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville.

‘Guys and Dolls’ actress Jean Simmons dies

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Local â&#x2014;&#x2020; A5

Sunday, January 24, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press

Park gifted with increase in visitors for anniversary

Artwork by Beam chosen for exhibit

From Submitted Reports

From Submitted Reports Submitted

Mary Todd Beam of Cosby says her painting has been selected for the second time to represent the U.S. in the Invitational Exhibition of Contemporary International Watermedia Masters. The exhibit is sponsored by the Jiangsu Watercolor Research Institute and the Southeast University School of Fine Arts, both in Nanjing, China. The exhibit will run from May 28 to June 6 in the Jiangsu Province Art Museum Gallery.

Mary Todd Beamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s painting, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pieces of Time,â&#x20AC;? was recently chosen for inclusion in the Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alliance of Knoxvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s airport exhibit. Her painting has been selected for the second time to represent the U.S. in the second invitational exhibition of contemporary international watermedia masters.

closures

Vicki Simms says she personally hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t heard any complaints from business owners about the mass of closures, though that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean there arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worries. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Certainly there are always concerns when roads are closed in the park because of the popularity of the park and the draw that it is for visitors to our area,â&#x20AC;? Simms says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would guess there are people who are concerned it may have a negative impact on business. We hope that wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be the case, obviously.â&#x20AC;? Still, the need for the work is certainly evident and may itself be scaring some tourists off from making a trip to the Smokies. Plus, the long-term benefit will likely pay off for more than just the park. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are all roads that are in dire need and have been for some time,â&#x20AC;? Simms says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We certainly understand the national parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position that they have to spend the money when they have it and this is work that needs to be done. I think it will be a real benefit for the area when itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s completed.â&#x20AC;? In the meantime, Simms and other chamber officials say the best plan is to grin and bear it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a lot of other stuff for people to do in this area when those roads are closed, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be helping our visitors out with that if they contact us,â&#x20AC;? Simmms says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also be pointing them to some of the other wonderful areas of the park that are still accessible.â&#x20AC;?

3From Page A1

get the money.â&#x20AC;? Still, park officials believe they made the best choice they could to time the major closures, coming as they do just before the start of the heaviest tourist visitation time of the year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We looked at the visitor impact and our ability to get the work done when we were scheduling it,â&#x20AC;? Sumeriski says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We determined that we will impact the least visitors during the spring season. As far as our numbers go, the heavy traffic really begins at the end of May, in fact itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amazing how evident that is in our campground numbers. So we think wrapping up a lot of the work before then will enable us to lessen the impact on our visitors.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We timed the work as early in the season as we could because we knew we wanted to be finished before the end of May,â&#x20AC;? park spokesman Bob Miller says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unfortunately, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do this kind of work in the dead of winter because you have to have certain temperatures and conditions to do it. When you get into working in months like December and January, you start to lose efficiency because you may only be able to work a few days each month, particularly with the winter weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re having this year.â&#x20AC;? Gatlinburg Chamber of Commerce Executive Director

Her first painting selected for this exhibit, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where Crickets Dwell,â&#x20AC;? inspired by Little Cricket Creek in Cosby, was purchased by a businessman there and now has its home in Taiwan. Beam also is having a

duel exhibit of works at the Artworks Around Town in Wheeling, W.Va. Beamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s painting â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pieces of Time,â&#x20AC;? was recently chosen for inclusion in the Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alliance of Knoxvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s airport exhibit.

In 2009 during its 75th anniversary celebration, Great Smoky Mountains National Park saw the largest number of visitors in almost a decade and recorded a 5 percent gain over 2008 visitation. Despite rains and an economic slump, the park received just under 9.5 million visitors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The anniversary proved to be an excellent opportunity to showcase the beauty, the history, and the diverse resources of the Smokies,â&#x20AC;? said Park Superintendent Dale Ditmanson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Several major events in and around the park and the extensive

publicity generated by the anniversary helped to bolster travel to this area.â&#x20AC;? At yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s end, attendance at all of the parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s entrances was ahead of 2008. Gatlinburg reflected a 6 percent rise; Townsend and Cherokee a 4 percent gain. The outlying areas, a combination of 10-plus entrances in North Carolina and Tennessee, tallied a 4 percent increase. â&#x20AC;&#x153;While a good part of 2009â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s travel was due to a rewarding anniversary celebration, the rise in entries noted the last two months of the year were most likely driven by motorists who sought an alternative route through the park

along Newfound Gap Road (U.S. 441) due to a rockslide that closed Interstate 40 at the North Carolina/ Tennessee border on Oct. 25,â&#x20AC;? Ditmanson said. Another noteworthy trend in 2009 was record precipitation measured at the highest elevations. Annual precipitation recorded at Mount LeConte (6,491 feet) measured a record 104.3 inches (since the National Weather Service started keeping records in 1988), and 20.45 inches above normal. At the Elkmont weather station (2,100 feet), 74.3 inches of rain was recorded, 13.65 more than normal.

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A6 ◆

The Mountain Press ◆ Sunday, January 24, 2010

sunrise in the smokies

TODAY’S Briefing Local n

GATLINBURG

Greenways Trail topic of workshop

Citizen and business community participation and input are encouraged when the city hosts a second public workshop to discuss the next steps in the development of the Greenways Trail System master plan, including preliminary cost estimates and phasing recommendations. Gatlinburg staff and representatives of Barge, Wagonner, Sumner and Cannon Inc. will conduct the informational workshop at 5 p.m. Tuesday at City Hall. For more information, contact Marty Nicely at 436-4990. n

KODAK

Waters to be library speaker

Friends Of Kodak Library will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at the library, 319 W. Dumplin Valley Road. Guest speaker will be John Waters, a Sevierville native and longtime attorney. He served on the Board of Directors of the Tennessee Valley Authority, including a term as president. His autobiography, “Downbound,” details his time as chairman of the Appalachian Regional Commission. He will be discussing that book and one that he has just completed dealing with the history of Sevier County. n

GATLINBURG

Park photos on display in library

Photographs from the 1930s taken by Ed Hunt in Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and watercolors of mountain scenes painted by his daughter Mary Louise Hunt, are on exhibit in the Sue Bock Cafe inside Anna Porter Public Library. The exhibit is on display through Feb. 1. Call 436-5588 for more information.

State n

CLARKSVILLE

Man convicted in death of coach

CLARKSVILLE (AP) — A jury in Clarksville has convicted a man of criminally negligent homicide in the shooting death of a popular high school basketball coach and gym teacher. Jovan Dixon was found guilty Friday of the 2007 death of Willard Ross, who was working at his family’s fireworks stand in a Walmart parking lot when a gun battle started between two other men. A bullet intended for Dixon hit Ross, then 62. He had recently retired from Northwest High School after a 40-year teaching and coaching career in the ClarksvilleMontgomery County school system.

Nation n

ALABAMA

Weather service says tornado F-2

HUNTSVILLE, Ala. (AP) — The National Weather Service says a tornado that hit Huntsville this week measured EF-2 on the Fujita scale. Storms that spawned the tornado also peppered Madison County with heavy rainfall and small hail. The tornado touched down at 5:22 p.m. Thursday in the north Alabama city, snapping tree and utility poles and leaving thousands without power. Multiple homes also sustained roof damage, both from falling trees and high winds.

top state news

Lottery Numbers

Unemployed can’t reach operators JACKSON (AP) — Tennessee does not have enough phone lines to handle calls about unemployment benefits and many people are frustrated. Richard Thomas told The Jackson Sun he memorized the Tennessee Unemployment Insurance Claims hot line number after three days of calling it repeatedly to try to renew his unemployment benefits. Every time he called,

he got a busy signal or an automated recording saying no one was able to take his call due to the high call volume. “By the end, I was yelling at the phone, ’Just let me talk to a person!”’ 57-year-old Thomas said. “It was so frustrating.” T e n n e s s e e Department of Labor and Workforce Development spokesman Jeff Hentschel said the department is aware of the difficulty. Tennessee has five

call centers with about 300 telephone lines, he said. The department is using stimulus money to install a new phone system, but it won’t be running until the spring. “I know that isn’t what people want to hear, but we ask that they be patient,” Hentschel said. In the meantime, people can help reduce the number of calls by looking for answers to their questions on the department’s Web site.

Thomas, of Henderson, said he was laid off from Armstrong Floor Products in February 2009. He was told recently that he will be the next material handler called back to work, but he hasn’t gotten the call. “I’ve been looking for work, but no one wants to hire someone my age,” he said. “It’s hard, really hard. After paying my bills, I have about $30 (a week) left for spending and to put gas in my truck.”

Saturday, Jan. 23, 2010 Midday: 9-8-0 Evening: 6-0-1

17 07

Saturday, Jan. 23, 2010 Midday: 4-5-8-8 Evening: 0-5-0-7

25 12

Friday, Jan. 22, 2010 04-05-22-24-25

TODAY’S FORECAST

LOCAL: Rain

Friday, Jan. 22, 2010 01-04-10-25-30-35 x5

This day in history

High: 58° Low: 40°

Today is Sunday, Jan. 24, the 24th day of 2010. There are 341 days left in the year.

Windy

Chance of rain

n Last

90%

■ Monday Cloudy

High: 46° Low: 29° ■ Tuesday Flurries

High: 39° Low: 22° ■ Lake Stages: Douglas: 952.9 D0.2

n On

■ Ski Report: Base: 25-40 inches Primary surface: Machine groomed Secondary surface: Loose granular

n Five

Trails open: All open (Grizzly closes at dusk and Mogul Ridge not groomed)

Nation/world quote roundup “Except for miracles, hope is unfortunately fading.” — U.N. spokeswoman Elisabeth Byrs after the Haitian government declared the search and rescue phase for survivors of the earthquake over.

“It’s been bad for the Democrats for a while. They just haven’t realized it. This is the club over their head that wakes them up.” — Republican strategist John Feehery after Democrats now face an election year with campaign finance rules that favor Republicans and a Senate that can block Democratic initiatives.

“Every comedian dreams of hosting ‘The Tonight Show’ and, for seven months, I got to. I did it my way, with people I love, and I do not regret a second. I’ve had more good fortune than anyone I know, and if our next gig is doing a show in a 7-Eleven parking lot, we’ll find a way to make it fun.” — Conan O’Brien after his brief tenure as the host of “Tonight” ended.

The Mountain Press Publisher: Jana Thomasson Editor: Stan Voit Production Director: Tom McCarter Advertising Director: Joi Whaley Business Manager: Mary Owenby Circulation Distribution Manager: Will Sing (ISSN 0894-2218) Copyright 2008 The Mountain Press. All Rights Reserved. All property belongs to The Mountain Press and no part may be reproduced without prior written consent. Published daily by The Mountain Press. P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN, 37864, 119 River Bend Dr., Sevierville, TN 37876. Periodical Postage paid at Sevierville, TN.

this date

On Jan. 24, 1848, James W. Marshall discovered a gold nugget at Sutter’s Mill in northern California, a discovery that led to the gold rush of ’49.

Ober Gatlinburg

Staff

year locally

Shabby Antique Boutique owner Sonia Foster said she received an outpouring of support from the community after her Parkway antique shop burned to the ground. Sevierville firefighters remained at the scene throughout the day. Water from their hoses quickly froze under their feet or on the Parkway. They couldn’t salvage the structure but kept flames from spreading to nearby businesses.

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years ago

Authorities in Iraq said Sami Mohammed Ali Said al-Jaaf, an al-Qaida lieutenant in custody, had confessed to masterminding most of the car bombings in Baghdad. The United Nations broke with years of protocol and commemorated the 60-year anniversary of the liberation of the Nazi death camps, directly linking its own founding with the end of the Holocaust in some of the strongest language ever. n Thought

for today

“God gives us relatives; thank God, we can choose our friends.” — Addison Mizner, American architect (1872-1933).

Celebrities in the news n

Conan O’Brien

NEW YORK (AP) — On his final “Tonight” show, Conan O’Brien said walking away instead of accepting a demotion is the hardest thing he’s ever had to do. O’Brien Despite the rancor that led to his $45 million buyout, the redhaired comic urged fans not to be cynical and said their support made a sad situation “joyous and inspirational.” He thanked his viewers and even thanked NBC for more than 20 years of employment but not before getting in a few final jabs during an earlier monologue.


Mountain Views

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacably to assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” —United States Constitution, Amendment One

■ The Mountain Press ■ Page A7 ■ Sunday, January 24, 2010

commentary

80-year-old parachutist air apparent He’s done it 14,998 times. He’s done it by himself, in tandem and in groups as big as 100. He’s done it from an altitude of 42,000 feet, where the temperatures can reach zero degrees. He’s done it for the Air Force in special-ops missions he can’t even talk about. Rick Peppel loves to jump from airplanes. One of these days very soon — he’s so impulsive he can’t even say when — he’ll make his 15,000th jump. The guy is 80 years old and acts like one of his grandchildren. The Sevierville resident has been jumping since 1949 when, as an Air Force guy, he participated in secret missions. He spent 12 years in the military, and when he left in 1962 he couldn’t retire the love he had for leaping out of planes. He maintains a very simple philosophy when it comes to parachuting: Never let anybody in your will pack your chute. “With today’s modern equipment, landing is almost like stepping off a kitchen chair,” he said. “You don’t have the impact you used to have years ago. They used to call it crash and burn, when you’d land and your chute would drag you along. That’s a thing of the past.” Peppel moved to Sevierville five years ago in an unusual way. But first you need a little history. After leaving the Air Force in 1962 he opened a flying service in Paris, Tenn., west of Nashville. He and his crew did it all: crop dusting, repairs, charter flights, student training, even rebuilding planes. In 1982 he retired for the first time, then did something he calls stupid: He moved to Florida to live in a retirement community. “All they wanted to talk about was, this hurts, that hurts, this operation, that operation. I felt like they went there to die. I wanted to have fun, so I escaped,” he said. He spent time in Deland, Fla., the skydiving capital of the country, but after he remarried he and his new wife began life together as work campers. They would travel in their RV to campgrounds where they would work for 10 hours or so a week in exchange for their camper fees. They’d stay a few months, then move to another campground and do the same thing, handling chores such as maintenance, registration and repairs. Five years ago they arrived at Mountain Lake Christian Resort on Douglas Dam Road in rural Sevier County. After a few weeks it became clear to Peppel that he wanted to stay in Tennessee permanently. The couple bought a house and remained. He has a full-time position with Microtech Satellites. At every stop in his civilian life Peppel managed to find places to jump. Parachutists can drop onto airport grounds or use drop zones. Peppel often travels to Athens or Sweetwater or Sky Ranch, a drop zone between Alcoa and Knoxville not far from McGhee-Tyson Airport. What he really enjoys these days is formation jumping. Several people will rehearse a jump on the ground, fly to the drop spot, then jump — often so many jumpers they use several planes — and connect hands on the way down. He recently was part of a 100-person formation; the record is around 300. I know you must be wondering: Any close calls? Eleven times he has had to deploy his reserve chute. But reserve chutes these days don’t increase the impact of the landing. They must be packed by a federally certified technician and tagged to show when it was packed and by whom. A complete set of gear for someone wanting to parachute costs around $8,000. Peppel’s chute is showing some wear; he’s used it about 3,000 times. It can be patched, but only by someone certified. Peppel isn’t making a big deal out of his impending 15,000th jump. He notes that there are plenty of people out there who have twice that many jumps or more. But asked if he has encountered anyone his age in recent years, he admits he hasn’t. Jumping out of airplanes isn’t on the radar of too many octogenarians. Maybe if older Americans gave it some thought, though, they might jump at the chance. — Stan Voit is editor of The Mountain Press. His column appears each Sunday. He can be reached at 428-0748, ext. 217, or e-mail to svoit@themountainpress.com.

Editorial

Gettin’ it done General Assembly could teach a few lessons to our leaders in Washington Gov. Phil Bredesen, acting like anything but a lameduck office holder, has created a nice legacy for himself by getting the General Assembly to pass two significant education measures. He called legislators into special session to make major reforms to public education in order to qualify for Race to the Top federal money. Then he got the lawmakers to approve his plan for overhauling higher education to improve the state’s inadequate college graduation rate. He did all this by doing what our federal elected officials have been unable to do: bring people of both parties together for the common good to pass important bills. President Obama and members of Congress could learn a few things from the way Tennessee conducted state business the last two weeks. On Thursday legislators overwhelmingly passed Gov. Bredesen’s plan for overhauling the state’s higher education system. The graduation rate at public fouryear schools in Tennessee is 44 percent —

just 12 percent at community colleges. The state ranks 42nd nationally. The Senate voted 32-0 to approve the plan early Thursday, and the House approved its version 93-2 later that evening. A key element of the proposal will change the way the state pays for higher education by basing the funding formula on graduation rates and retention, rather than the number of students enrolled at a school. The measure also shifts all remedial courses from four-year schools to community colleges and automatically allows students with associate’s degrees to transfer as juniors to any four-year school except the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Rep. Henry Fincher, D-Cookeville, said he believes the legislation will “fundamentally increase the availability of higher education for Tennesseans.” The previous week legislators approved a law that changes the way the state evaluates teachers and how it addresses failing schools. Bredesen called those

changes key to Tennessee’s application for more than $500 million in federal “Race to the Top” money. The bills provoked serious and spirited debate, but it never got nasty and it never divided Republicans and Democrats. Both parties and their leaders saw the measures as beneficial to all students, and they agreed that our national rankings in both K-12 and higher education were dismal and unacceptable. There is no reason for our leaders in Washington to be so divisive and unbending, so indifferent to the needs and feelings of the people who elected them. They’ve all been sent some serious messages in recent weeks. People are fed up with both parties and their inability — or unwillingness — to get things done that help most Americans, not a privileged few. All politics is local, Tip O’Neill wisely said years ago. He meant those in Congress and the White House, who have forgotten the wisdom of that adage.

Political view

Public forum Inmate says God’s the reason he has been able to come back

to see my children. More than once I felt as if I was at the point of no return. I saw how people looked at me and I thought that no one would ever Editor: I recently read a letter to the editor from again see any good in me. Today, I am very a lady asking for an opportunity of employ- thankful that it wasn’t in the good Lord’s ment upon her release from being incarcer- plan for me to continue down that destrucated. As I read the article I began to think of tive path that I was speeding down. I’ve been clean for two years now, and how hard it is to find a job that will hire you with each new day that is granted to me I knowing that you have a past record. earn back more and more of the trust and Not many people believe that others can love that was taken out of my life by the drug change. The world is not a very forgiving abuse. I though I would never get the chance place. We should use this as a reminder to to be a part of some of my loved ones’ lives be very thankful that there is a forgiving ever again. God, who sent his own son to die for our I prayed that God would mend those relasins. tionships. That prayer is being answered. I am a recovering drug addict that has It has taken time, and by no means is the spent the past 10 years almost totally process complete. But it’s an honest work in destroying my life. I have lost nearly everything I ever had. I let drugs overtake progress. I have found that if people have truly me to a point that almost everyone I knew changed their lives and ways of living, others turned away from me. My family no lonwill notice and God will answer prayers and ger found trust in me. I was not allowed

open doors. Mistakes are made; people are not perfect. As Romans 3:23 reads, “For all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.” Pity is not what we seek, only an honest chance to right our wrongs and become productive members of society. My family long ago would have had every right to throw their hands up and walk away, never to look back, but they never stopped praying for me and they never gave up hope. I am so grateful that they did not, because prayers have been answered and God is moving in our lives. I want to thank everyone that never gave up on me, and even the ones that did but still kept open eyes and gave me a chance to show them the changes that I have made. Thank God for believers and thank God for forgiving and believing in me Scott Ownby Inmate Sevier County Jail

Letters to the editor policy and how to contact us: ◆ We encourage our readers to send letters to the editor. Letters must contain no more than 500 words. No more than one letter per person will be published in a 30-day period. Letters must be neatly printed or typed and contain no libel, plagiarism or personal attacks. All letters are subject to editing for style, length and content. Statements of fact must be attributed to a source for verification. All letters must be signed and contain a phone number and address for verification purposes. No anonymous or unverified letters will be printed. No letters endorsing candidates will be considered. The Mountain Press reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter. E-MAIL LETTERS TO: editor@themountainpress.com or MAIL LETTERS TO: Editor, The Mountain Press, P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN 37864. For questions, call (865) 428-0748, ext. 214. The Mountain Press and its publishers do not necessarily agree with the opinions expressed in letters and columns on this page.

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◆ Jana Thomasson, Publisher ◆ Stan Voit, Editor ◆ Bob Mayes, Managing Editor ◆ Gail Crutchfield, Community News Editor

◆ Rep. Richard Montgomery

◆ U.S. Sen. Bob Corker

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 1-5981; 207 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 rep.richard.montgomery@capitol.tn.gov

◆ Rep. Joe McCord

(202) 224-3344; Dirksen Senate Office Bldg., B40A, Washington, D.C. 20510

◆ U.S. Sen. Lamar Alexander

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1-800-449-8366 Ext. 1-5481; 207 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 rep.joe.mccord@capitol.tn.gov

◆ U.S. Rep. Phil Roe

1-800-449-8366 Ext. 10981; 320 War Memorial Bldg., Nashville TN 37243 sen.doug.overbey@capitol.tn.gov

◆ U.S. Rep. John J. Duncan Jr.

◆ Sen. Doug Overbey

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Sports

Visit: The Mountain Press.com View/Purchase Sports & News Photos

■ The Mountain Press ■ A8 ■ Sunday, January 24, 2010

TENNESSEE VOLUNTEERS BASKETBALL

Dawgs take a bite out of Vols Tennessee loses to Bulldogs for first time under Pearl ; 10-game streak over By CHARLES ODUM AP Sports Writer

ATHENS, Ga. — Trey Thompkins scored 21 points and Georgia led by double digits most of the way to beat No. 8 Tennessee 78-63 on Saturday and end the Vols’ seven-game winning streak. Georgia ended Tennessee’s streak of 10 straight wins in the series, including eight straight under coach Bruce Pearl. Georgia (9-8, 1-3 Southeastern Conference) made 7 of 12 3-point attempts to give first-year coach Mark Fox his first SEC win. The Bulldogs lost each of their first

three conference games by no more than four points. Scotty Hopson led Tennessee (15-3, 3-1 SEC) with 19 points and was the only Tennessee player to make a 3-pointer. The Vols made only 3 of 16 attempts beyond the 3-point line, including 3 of 6 by Hopson. Bobby Maze added 11 points. Travis Leslie had several jams and 19 points for Georgia, which beat Tennessee for the first time since Feb. 21, 2004. Senior Wayne Chism, who had only 6 points, launched an air ball on Tennessee’s first possession, setting the pace for a poor first half. The Vols led 4-2 before Georgia scored 12 straight points. Leslie had a breakaway reverse jam following a steal, and Jeremy Price added another jam for a 14-4 lead. Thompkins had 14 points in the first half, including a jam to give Georgia a 40-20 lead. The Bulldogs led 42-27 at the

half. Chism was escorted to the locker room after suffering an apparent left knee injury with 9:22 remaining in the first half. He suffered the injury when fouled by Price. Chism, the team’s second-leading scorer, was back in the game at the 7:51 mark. Tennessee guards Cameron Tatum and Melvin Goins played for the first time since they were reinstated to the team one week ago. Pearl suspended Goins and Tatum, along with forward Tyler Smith and center Brian Williams after the four were arrested on misdemeanor gun, drug and alcohol charges during a traffic stop in Knoxville on Jan. 1. Goins had 2 points. Tatum had 1 point. Williams is indefinitely suspended. Smith was dismissed from the team Jan. 8. David Manning/AP The Vols were denied Tennessee guard J.P. Prince nealy lands on forward Kenny Hall (20) their first 4-0 start in the after dunking the ball during the first half of the Vols game against conference in 21 years. Georgia at Stegeman Coliseum on Saturday in Athens, Ga.

Photo submitted

A bloodied Keith Olsen is still all smiles after a win. FIT FACTORY FIGHTING CHAMPIONSHIP

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

In this photo from last season Seymour’s Michael Raimondi attempts to pin a Pigeon Forge wrestler. Raimondi COUNTY WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIP

Seymour captures county title with 41-31 win over Pigeon Forge SEYMOUR — Robert Cate was fully aware of the trust placed in him by the Seymour High School administration this season, as he was handed the keys to Sevier County’s traditional powerhouse wrestling program at SHS. The first-year coach started paying dividends Thursday night, as he coached his team to their fifth-straight county wrestling title, thanks to a 41-31 win over the visiting Pigeon Forge Tigers. Not only did the match keep Seymour’s string of county championships alive, it avenged an early-season loss to a Tiger team that’s shaping up to be one of the best in school history. Five Eagle wrestlers won by pin, one by technical fall and two by decision, while Pigeon Forge had four pins, one major decision and one decision. The annual event also included the Sevier County middle

school wrestling championship, which was won by Pigeon Forge Middle School with Seymour Middle taking second. In the high school championship, the Eagles and Tigers kept the score nearly even throughout what was an exciting and hard-fought meet. Eagle wrestler Luke Hall, ranked first in the state in one poll at 125 pounds, won by a pin, as did Michael Raimondi at 135 pounds, Shane Chipley at 160 pounds, and Joe Wisell at 215 pounds. Also winning for Seymour were Trent Williams by a decision at 130 pounds, and Caleb Stoffle by a decision at 140 pounds. With the score nearly tied the entire meet, Seymour pulled ahead with a decision by Trent Williams at 130 pounds. Key wins for Seymour included a pin by Willie Stooksbury at 119 pounds, and a win by

technical fall by Zac Merriman at 152 pounds. Winning for Pigeon Forge were Caleb Pool at 103 pounds by a major decision, Joseph Dodgen at 112 pounds by a pin, Edward Holland at 145 pounds by a pin, Cody Davis by a pin at 171 pounds, Hayden Whaley at 189 pounds by decision, and David Kieta by a pin at the heavyweight class. In the middle school competition, Pigeon Forge defeated both Seymour and Sevier County to take the title. Seymour took second by beating the Sevier County Middle School team. The next match for the varsity Eagles will be at the regional dual meet Thursday, Jan. 26, at Maryville High School. The Seymour middle school team takes on Greenville at home Feb. 2. From submitted reports

Huge 21-match card slated for Saturday’s MMA blowout at SCHS Promoter: Show bigger, better By JASON DAVIS Sports Editor SEVIERVILLE — Sevierville MMA promoter Gene Click knows what mixed martial arts fans want, and he’s looking to give it to them. The Fit Factory owner and Team Fit Factory coach went out on a big limb in November when he introduced the community to an amatuer UFC-like event at Sevier County High School. Results were mixed — the fights were good and the venue proved more than adequate, but Click saw plenty of room for improvement. “We’re not going to have any down time, none. I want to wear (fans) out, man. I want them to leave exhausted (from all the fights),” Click said. To begin with, the card has 21 fights scheduled — more than double the MMA action of the November show. Secondly, Click and his crew have worked to improve the venue — upgraded lighting, more floor seating and an overall improved atmosphere is what the Fit Factory crew are going for.

“It’s going to have a lot more finished look,” Click said. And, as always, the promoter said he’s gearing the event to be totally family-friendly. “This is a family show. That was some of the best comments I got. Everybody assumes it’s going to be (wild), but this is a mixed martial arts event, not a brawl,” Click said. “I want the community to see the highest level of MMA around locally, and I want people to want to come back. “I’m a fighter first and a coach. I understand how the fighters want to be treated. And I’ve been a fan of MMA since its inception, so I know what the fans want. I want the guys that go out and train and look like it. Not everybody wants to see a bum fight.” Saturday night’s show will begin at 5 p.m. and is expected to provide about four hours of fights. “We’re going to start about 5 p.m. do about 8-9 fights, have a quick intermission, come back in, do another 8-9 fights, quick intermission and then the main event. Get everybody out by 9 p.m. and they can go and have dinner or do whatever,” Click said. Tickets for the event are $25 for floor seats and $15 for balcony seating. Any student, elementary up to college, is just $10 with student ID. mpsports@themountainpress.com


Sports â&#x2014;&#x2020; A9

Sunday, January 24, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press LOCAL GYMNASTICS

New Center girl wins big at Flip Fest 7-year-old wins 3 of 4 events at huge Knox meet By JASON DAVIS Sports Editor KNOXVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Last year Alexis Hicks gave quite a showing at the annual Flip Fest at the Knoxville Convention Center. The then 6-year-old placed in three events, earning second place finishes in two of those competitions. This month, a year older and a little wiser, the 7-year-old New Center first grader took the event by storm. Competing with girls up to two years her senior, Hicks brought the girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; age 7-9 all-around championship home to Sevier County. The annual event, which is hosted by former Olympic gymnasts John Roethlisberger and John Macready, hosted about 2,000 athletes from around the counPhoto submitted try. Alexis Hicks performing her floor routine at the Competing in four Flip Fest at the Knoxville Expo Center. events, Hicks took first

place finishes in three â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the balance beam, uneven bars and floor â&#x20AC;&#x201D; she finished second in the vault, the event with which she has the least experience. Hicks scored an astounding 9.55 on the floor and vault, while turning in a 9.5 on both the bars and beam for an all-around tally of 38.1, which was good enough for the all-around championship. Practicing nine hours a week may seem like a lot for a 7-year-old, but she said she loves â&#x20AC;&#x153;every minute of it.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d go more if weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d go (to the North Knoxville gym) more,â&#x20AC;? her mother, Kim, said. Instructed by Natasha and Sasha Gridnev at Premier Athletics, Hicks already has her eye on the ultimate prize for a gymnast â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Olympic games. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What does Natasha call you when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on the beam doing good?â&#x20AC;? Kim asked Alexis. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Olympic girl,â&#x20AC;? Alexis said with a grin. Alexis is the daughter of Travis and Kim Hicks of New Center. mpsports@themountainpress.com

Photo submitted

Alexis Hicks does her beam routine en route to the 7-9-year-old overall championship.

SEC BASKETBALL

No. 2 Kentucky dominates Arkansas Razorbacks 101-70 By JEFFREY McMURRAY Associated Press Writer LEXINGTON, Ky. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Darius Miller had a career-high 18 points and DeMarcus Cousins got his 10th double-double as No. 2 Kentucky coasted by Arkansas 10170 Saturday. The Wildcats kept alive the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only unblemished record and a near certain return to the top of the college basketball rankings. Kentucky (19-0, 4-0 SEC) hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t topped The Associated Press poll since 2003, but that streak is almost certain to end Monday courtesy of its dominating victory over UK alumnus John Pelphreyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Razorbacks, and top-ranked Texasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; consecutive losses against Kansas State and Connecticut. This one was practically over by tipoff. Kentucky scored the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10 points, stretched the lead to 30 by halftime, then added the first 14 points of the second half. With that much margin for error, the Wildcats easily avoided the kind of second half letdown that made recent wins

over Georgia and Auburn much closer than anticipated. Arkansas (8-11, 1-3) did make an 18-3 run midway through the second half, but by that time, Kentucky had plenty of cushion to withstand it. The Wildcatsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; largest lead was 46 after John Wall hit a jumper with 14 minutes left. The Razorbacks got it no closer than 92-62 with under 4 minutes to go. Arkansas was led by Courtney Fortsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 21 points, but it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t nearly enough to keep up with the Wildcatsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; scoring barrage. They ended the first half and began the second on a 21-0 run, including a 3-pointer by Ramon Harris at the halftime buzzer and later consecutive 3s by Miller. Miller connected on four of six attempts from long range. Cousins, who finished with 16 points and 14 rebounds, secured his double-double just seconds into the second half. He probably would have gotten it even sooner but was sidelined for all but nine minutes of the first half with a minor injury.

Every bounce seemed to go Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s way in this one â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even on the broken plays. Late in the first half, Patrick Patterson missed badly on a reverse dunk attempt, but Wall was right there to dish in the follow. Wall had 16 points and a game-high seven assists. For the most part, the Wildcats relied on athleticism â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not luck â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to overpower the Razorbacks. Just 18 seconds in, Patterson hit a baseline jumper in what turned out to be the game-winning basket. Cousins added a layup in traffic, followed by a Wallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three-point play and the first 3-pointer of the game by Miller. By the time Mike Washington ended the Kentucky run with a three-point play, Arkansasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lone basket in 11 shots, the Wildcatsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lead was 10. The win gave Kentucky

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Calipari tried to keep expectations low going into the Arkansas game, joking, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to happen the next day, we go to the electric chair?â&#x20AC;? One thing that did concern him was the Wildcats have been vulnerable against 3-point shooters this year, and Arkansas has one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best of those in Rotnei Clarke. However, Clarke

was just 2-of-9 from beyond the arc and the Razorbacks managed just one other 3. It was Kentuckyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third 100-point effort of the season and first in SEC play. Pelphrey has now lost all three meetings against his alma mater as an opposing coach.

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A10 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sports

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, January 24, 2010 SEC BASKETBALL

SCOREBOARD T V S P O RT S Sunday, Jan. 24 BOWLING 1 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PBA, Tournament of Champions, at Las Vegas GOLF 8:30 a.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; European PGA Tour, Abu Dhabi Championship, final round, at Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates (sameday tape) 4 p.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PGA Tour, Bob Hope Classic, final round, at La Quinta, Calif. 7:30 p.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Champions Tour, Mitsubishi Electric Championship, final round, at Kaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;upulehu-Kona, Hawaii NFL FOOTBALL 3 p.m. CBS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Playoffs, AFC Championship game, teams TBA 6:30 p.m. FOX â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Playoffs, NFC Championship game, teams TBA NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pittsburgh at Philadelphia RODEO 8 p.m. VERSUS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PBR, Tecate Light Invitational, at Anaheim, Calif. (same-day tape) SOCCER 2:55 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Spanish Primera Division, Malaga at Real Madrid TENNIS 11 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 7 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, Australia 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, Australia WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michigan St. at Minnesota 4 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Oklahoma St. at Colorado 6 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Arizona St. at Arizona 8 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Duke at Maryland Monday, Jan. 25 MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Georgetown at Syracuse 9 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Missouri at Kansas NHL HOCKEY 7 p.m. VERSUS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pittsburgh at N.Y. Rangers TENNIS 3 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, round of 16, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ohio St. at Purdue Tuesday, Jan. 26 MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michigan St. at Michigan ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clemson at Boston College 9 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kentucky at South Carolina NHL HOCKEY 7 p.m. VERSUS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Phoenix at Detroit TENNIS 3 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape)

9 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia

Saturday, Jan. 30 BOXING 10 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jorge Arce (52-6-1) vs. Angky Angkota (23-4-0) for vacant WBO super flyweight title, at Mexico City EXTREME SPORTS 4 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 27 ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE at Aspen, Colo. BASKETBALL 9 p.m. 7 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Notre Dame at Aspen, Colo. Villanova 1 a.m. 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Texas A&M at Aspen, Colo. (delayed tape) Oklahoma St. GOLF 9 p.m. 7:30 a.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Florida St. at Duke TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nationwide TENNIS Tour, New Zealand PGA 3 p.m. Championship, third round, ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, at Christchurch, New Zealand menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s quarterfi- (same-day tape) nals, at Melbourne, Australia 9:30 a.m. (same-day tape) TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; European PGA Tour, 9:30 p.m. Qatar Masters, third round, at ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, Doha, Qatar (same-day tape) womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinals, at 1 p.m. Melbourne, Australia TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PGA Tour, Farmers 3:30 a.m. Insurance Open, third round, ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian at La Jolla, Calif. Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinal, at 3 p.m. Melbourne, Australia CBS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, third round, Thursday, Jan. 28 at La Jolla, Calif. EXTREME SPORTS MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE Noon BASKETBALL ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, Noon at Aspen, Colo. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Louisville at West 9 p.m. Virginia ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; La Salle at Temple Aspen, Colo. 1 p.m. 2 a.m. CBS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; National coverage, ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at Duke at Georgetown Aspen, Colo. (delayed tape) 2 p.m. GOLF ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Indiana at Illinois or 9:30 a.m. Oklahoma St. Missouri TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; European PGA Tour, ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Indiana at Illinois Qatar Masters, first round, at or Oklahoma St. Missouri Doha, Qatar (same-day tape) 3:30 p.m. 3 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washington St. at TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PGA Tour, Farmers Washington Insurance Open, first round, at 4 p.m. La Jolla, Calif. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Vanderbilt at MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE Kentucky BASKETBALL 6 p.m. 7 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Notre Dame at ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wisconsin at Purdue Rutgers ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Seton Hall at South 7 p.m. Florida ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kansas at Kansas St. 9 p.m. 8 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mississippi St. at ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pacific at UC Arkansas Riverside 10:30 p.m. NBA DL BASKETBALL FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; UCLA at Oregon 11 p.m. 11 p.m. VERSUS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bakersfield at ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gonzaga at Santa Idaho (same-day tape) Clara RODEO NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. 8 p.m. VERSUS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PBR, Tampa TNT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Boston at Orlando Invitational, at Tampa, Fla. 10:30 p.m. SOCCER TNT â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dallas at Phoenix 9:55 a.m. TENNIS ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Premier League, 3 p.m. Fulham vs. Aston Villa, at ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, London menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinal, at Melbourne, TENNIS Australia (same-day tape) 3:30 a.m. 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship match, at Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinal, at Melbourne, Australia Melbourne, Australia WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Friday, Jan. 29 5:30 p.m. ATHLETICS FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Arizona St. at 8 p.m. California ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Millrose Games, at New York Sunday, Jan. 31 BOXING BOWLING 10 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Super middleweights, Jesse Brinkley (34-5-0) vs. Curtis Stevens (21-2-0), at Reno, Nev. EXTREME SPORTS Noon ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at Aspen, Colo. 7 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at Aspen, Colo. 1 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at Aspen, Colo. (delayed tape) GOLF 9:30 a.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; European PGA Tour, Qatar Masters, second round, at Doha, Qatar (same-day tape) 3 p.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, second round, at La Jolla, Calif. TENNIS 3 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s semifinal, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Australian Open, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s championship match, at Melbourne, Australia

1 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PBA, Dick Weber Open, at Fountain Valley, Calif. EXTREME SPORTS Noon ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at Aspen, Colo. 7 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at Aspen, Colo. 1:30 a.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Winter X Games, at Aspen, Colo. (delayed tape) GOLF 7:30 a.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Nationwide Tour, New Zealand PGA Championship, final round, at Christchurch, New Zealand (same-day tape) 9:30 a.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; European PGA Tour, Qatar Masters, final round, at Doha, Qatar (same-day tape) 1 p.m. TGC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, final round, at La Jolla, Calif. 3 p.m. CBS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PGA Tour, Farmers Insurance Open, final round, at La Jolla, Calif. MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. CBS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Regional coverage, Florida at Tennessee or Minnesota at Ohio St. 3:30 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; California at Arizona 5:30 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Maryland at Clemson 7:30 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Virginia at North Carolina NBA BASKETBALL 1 p.m. ABC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Denver at San Antonio 3:30 p.m. ABC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; L.A. Lakers at Boston NFL FOOTBALL 7:20 p.m. ESPN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pro Bowl, at Miami NHL HOCKEY 12:30 p.m. NBC â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Detroit at Pittsburgh RODEO 8 p.m. VERSUS â&#x20AC;&#x201D; PBR, Tampa Invitational, at Tampa, Fla. (same-day tape) WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. FSN â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Oklahoma St. at Texas A&M 3 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Purdue at Iowa 5 p.m. ESPN2 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Baylor at Texas

Warren leads No. 22 Ole Miss to 73-63 win over LSU Tigers

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Chris Warren scored all 14 of his points in the final nine minutes to help No. 22 Mississippi hold off LSU 73-63 on Saturday. Warren, who missed his first five shots, put the Rebels in front 56-54 on a 3-pointer with 8:45 left. After Storm Warren tied the game for LSU, Chris Warren knocked down his second straight 3 to pull the Tigers ahead. Storm Warren pulled the Tigers within 59-58 on a short jumper, but Ole Miss eventually rebuilt its lead to 68-60 inside the 2-minute mark. Chris Warren sank three more free throws down the stretch to help put the game away. Terrance Henry and Eniel Polynice also had 14 points for Ole Miss (15-4, 3-2 SEC). Bo Spencer led LSU (9-10, 0-5) with 22 points, Tasmin Mitchell had 16 points and 11 rebounds, and Storm Warren finished with 11 points. Terrico White and Murphy Holloway combined for three points after combining for 26 per game. The first half consisted of runs by both teams. Ole Miss scored the last eight points to take a 38-32 lead, and a basket by Polynice tied the score before the Rebels took a six-point advantage on 3-pointers by Trevor Gaskins and Henry. Trailing by two 8 minutes into the game, LSU outscored Ole Miss 9-1. Storm Warren sank three foul shots, and Mitchellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s field goal capped the run to put LSU on top 19-13. The Rebels answered with nine consecutive points. Henry started the outburst with a 3-pointer, and a field goal by Polynice at the 7:24 mark gave Ole Miss a 22-19 lead.

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Sports â&#x2014;&#x2020; A11

Sunday, January 24, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press PREP HOOPS

Hoop shots in Sevier County this past week

Jason Davis/The Mountain Press

Coach Stacy Marine (above) reacts to a questionable call on the court during Sevier Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s loss to Cocke County Thursday night. Sophomore Carly Pippin (left) scores two points on a layup against the Lady Red.

Cobey Hitchcock The Mountain Press

G-P sophomore Sami John (30), left, fires up a threepoint shot at Carter on Tuesday.

Cobey Hitchcock The Mountain Press

G-P junior Stephanie Taylor (14), right, draws two shots on this play Tuesday night at Carter.

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A12 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Nation/World

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, January 24, 2010

Haiti government calls off search

AP Photo/Mark Davis/Hope for Haiti Now

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Haitiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s government has declared the search and rescue phase for survivors of the earthquake over, the United Nations announced Saturday, saying there is little hope of finding more people alive 11 days after much of the capital was reduced to rubble. The statement from the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs came a day after an Israeli team reported pulling a man out of the debris of a two-story home and relatives said an elderly woman had been rescued. Experts say the chance of saving trapped people begins diminishing after 72 hours, but one mother still missing her children said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too soon to give up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a chance theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still alive,â&#x20AC;? said Nicole Abraham, 33, wiping away tears as she spoke of hearing the cries of her children â&#x20AC;&#x201D; ages 4, 6 and 15 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for the first two days after the Jan. 12 quake.

In this image released by Hope for Haiti Now, Stevie Wonder performs at the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hope for Haiti Now: A Global Benefit for Earthquake Reliefâ&#x20AC;?, on Friday in Los Angeles.

Stars unite to help Haiti in telethon NEW YORK (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Though the all-star telethon was titled â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hope for Haiti Now,â&#x20AC;? for most of its two hours, it was filled with tear-jerking, depressing moments, from mournful songs and grim-faced pleas from celebrities to the suffering faces of the quakebattered victims themselves. It took Haitiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own native son to lift Friday eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s despairing tone to one of hope and even revival. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enough of this moping, man, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rebuild Haiti, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s show â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em how we do it where we come from!â&#x20AC;? Wyclef Jean, the singer and producer, shouted after singing the downbeat â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rivers of Babylon,â&#x20AC;? with a Haitian flag around his neck. He segued into the joyful tune â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeleâ&#x20AC;? with an island beat, as musicians danced around him, singing the refrain: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earthquake, we see the earth shake, but the soul of the Haitian people will never break!â&#x20AC;? Jean showcased the resilient spirit of a nation in the midst of catastrophe. On Jan. 12, a powerful earthquake struck the already impoverished country, killing an estimated 200,000 people, displacing many more and reducing much of Haiti to ruins. The telethon, shown on all the major networks and streamed live on many Web sites, was quickly put together by George Clooney and MTV Networks, along with the help of others, to raise millions of dollars for the Caribbean country. The list of participating celebrities rivaled any top awards show: Justin Timberlake, Brad Pitt, former President

Clinton, Muhammad Ali, Beyonce, Madonna, Bruce Springsteen, Halle Berry, and many more. Luminaries like Steven Spielberg worked the phone banks, talking to donors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey Steven Spielberg, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really cool to talk to you,â&#x20AC;? one woman said to the Academy Award-winning filmmaker. John Mayer called in a $500,000 donation before the telethon began, according to a representative for MTV. Officials did not have an immediate total for the relief funds raised by the telethon. Some stars like Matt Damon and Clint Eastwood recounted tragic moments from the quake; others like Denzel Washington offered inspirational words. Most of the musical performances were downcast, emotional songs.

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reported. With the local government essentially incapacitated, the U.N. has coordinated rescue efforts alongside the U.S. and teams from around the world. Spokeswoman Elisabeth Byrs said the Friday afternoon decision does not mean rescue teams still searching for survivors would be stopped from carrying out whatever work they felt necessary. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean the government will order them to stop. In case there is the slightest sign of life, they will act,â&#x20AC;? Byrs told The Associated Press. She added, however, that â&#x20AC;&#x153;except for miracles, hope is unfortunately fading.â&#x20AC;? All told, some 132 people were pulled alive from beneath collapsed buildings by international search and rescue teams since the Jan. 12 disaster, she said. Some 49 teams â&#x20AC;&#x201D; down from 67 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; were still in Haiti as of Saturday, the U.N. said.

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Meanwhile Saturday, mourners gathered near the ruins of the shattered cathedral to pay final respects to the capitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s archbishop and a vicar in a somber ceremony that doubled as a symbolic funeral for all the dead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I came here to pay my respects to all the dead from the earthquake, and to see them have a funeral,â&#x20AC;? said Esther Belizaire, 51, whose cousin is among the dead. The 7.0-magnitude quake killed an estimated 200,000 people, according to Haitian government figures cited by the European Commission. The U.N. said Saturday the government had preliminarily confirmed 111,481 bodies, but that figure does not account for corpses buried by relatives. Countless dead remain buried in thousands of collapsed and toppled buildings in Port-au-Prince, while as many as 200,000 have fled the city of 2 million, the U.S. Agency for International Development

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Mountain Life ■ The Mountain Press ■ B Section ■ Sunday, January 24, 2010

Re-evaluating what’s really most important In his thought-provoking book, The Irresistible Revolution, East Tennesseeraised author Shane Claiborne points out the contrast between who many Christians are at church and who they — we — become when the worship service ends. Claiborne relates the tale of how he and about 40 other students from Eastern University took part in a protest at St. Edward’s Cathedral in Philadelphia. A number of homeless folks, some in families and some alone, had taken up residence in a nearby church that had been vacated and left to decay, finding literal sanctuary there. City officials decided to evict the transient residents of God’s house as neighbors grew concerned about what their presence there might mean. The college students came to live among the homeless in the church in an effort to save their makeshift home. Though an interesting decision in itself, what really piqued my interest about the story is the banner St. Edward’s hung outside their building. It read, “How can you worship a homeless man on Sunday and ignore one on Monday?” It’s an interesting thought to be sure, Jesus as a homeless man. But, when it really comes down to it, it’s apt. The man millions call savior had no permanent home during the three-year ministry that changed the world. He and his disciples, instead, relied on the kindness of strangers for their basic needs, a fact he himself points out in Matthew 8:19-20. “Then a certain scribe came and said to Him, ‘Teacher, I will follow You wherever You go,’” the text reads. “And Jesus said to him, ‘Foxes have holes and birds of the air have nests, but the Son of Man has nowhere to lay His head.’” The simple fact is Jesus taught and warned more against the dangers of affluence than any other subject, including the ones that provoke the most heated debates today, some of which he personally never even discussed. He also preached more about the need for helping others than anything else, for “comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable,” as the phrase is turned. That somewhat cliché statement has been rolling around my head a lot in the last few days as we’ve all watched the devastation wrought by the massive earthquake in Haiti. I concede I’ve become too comfortable. I do what I can to help those in need here at home, but I couldn’t bear to look at much of the coverage coming out of the poorest nation in our hemisphere. It shames me to live such a good life while others struggle so. Still, I haven’t felt a serious calling that I surrender my comforts in favor of a life like the one Claiborne lived among the homeless of Philadelphia. The dichotomy of the “big news” in East Tennessee over the last couple weeks has puzzled me. I’ll admit that, had Roy Williams decided to drop out of his job as head basketball coach at North Carolina at a key time in the recruiting process, I’d be upset about it, too. I’m certainly not trying to be holier-than-thou. Still, it’s striking the way news of the shake-up in the UT football program has trumped stories about a country destroyed. Generally we at The Mountain Press don’t like to give a nod to other media outlets in our area. But as Bill Shiell, the phenomenal pastor at Knoxville’s First Baptist Church, pointed out Sunday, The NewsSentinel’s front pages the week before last were a fascinating study in local culture. On Jan. 14, the paper had two lead stories with two interesting pictures. The first on the left side was about how local folks were mad about Lane Kiffin’s departure from Big Orange Country and included a picture of the man preparing to board a private jet. The other story was headlined, “Heartbreak in Haiti,” and was accompanied by a picture of a severely injured child with what appear to be dirty rags serving as bandages as she sat on a blanket in the street. Certainly, as I said, I don’t fault Vol fans wanting the latest about Kiffin. I myself have read everything I can about the Conan/Leno battle — I’m with Coco, for the record — investing emotion in a silly squabble between people I’ll never meet. Still, it’s sometimes interesting to step back and re-evaluate our priorities in a comfortable nation amid a world of affliction. Just some thoughts for a Sunday morning to put my religion degree to use. Hope I don’t sound preachy. — Derek Hodges is a reporter for The Mountain Press. Call 428-0748, ext. 218 or e-mail to dhodges@themountainpress.com.

File

Guests at Walters State Community College’s Seafood Feast on Sept. 24, pile their plates with the selections offered.

WSCC ready to serve Culinary Arts department has full schedule of events on menu By GAIL CRUTCHFIELD Community Editor SEVIERVILLE — The students and staff at Walters State Community College’s Rel Maples Institute for Culinary Arts are getting back into the swing of things at the start of the spring semester. They are planning numerous special dining events as well as operating a cafe and bakery. The special events, cafe and bakery are all teaching tools for the students, but the public reaps the benefits in the food they prepare under the tutelage of the WSCC staff. The curriculum-driven dining events are based on the class schedules, said Jeri Haun. The special events usually seat about 50 people and reservations can be made by phone or e-mail. Two of the special events require payment beforehand, while the others can be paid at the door or at the table after the meal. The cafe is open to the public from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday. It will be open through April 28, but will close the week of spring break, March 8-11. A different blue plate special is offered each day, including a drink. There is also a new sandwich, soup, vegetarian and dessert meal offered each day. Appearing daily on the menu are a salad, hamburger and grilled chicken sandwich. The prices range from $1 for a dessert, $3 for a salad or sandwich, to $5 for the blue plate special. Groups of five or more are asked to call ahead to schedule seating. The bakery is a new enterprise this year. It will be open every Thursday starting Jan. 28 from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. “We’re going to set it up in the student dining area,” Haun said. There will be display cases featuring the cinnamon rolls, muffins, cakes, pies and other baked goods made by the students. For Valentine’s Day week, the bakery will add chocolate truffles and holidaythemed cupcakes and cookies to the Feb. 11 menu. Future plans include taking orders for Administrative Professionals Day with the offerings included cookie bouquets, cupcakes and other pastries to give as gifts. For all of these events, the students are put in charge of everything from the menus to service to clean up. On a rotating schedule the students are given different tasks to perform, be it as head chef, cafe owner, server or cashier.

On the menu Walters State’s Rel Maples Institute for Culinary Arts is offering dining opportunities in spring semester. All events are in the ConnerShort Center. n Cafe: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday-Thursday through April 28 n Bakery: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. each Thursday n Special events: Numerous events from Feb. 5-May 5; see list in story n Phone: 774-5817 n E-mail: jlhaun@ws.edu n Web: ws.edu/businessdiv/hospbusiness

Curt Habraken/The Mountain Press

A hamburger is one of the everyday offerings at Walters State’s cafe, open 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Thursday in the college’s Conner-Short Center. Diners can add the mushrooms and/or cheese to the burger. “One week you’ll be the store owner who designs the menu, then the sales person or cake baker,” Haun said, using the bakery as an example. “It’s the same way in the hot food classes. For each class a student is assigned as executive chef. Each student has their own assignment.” The process gives the students the practical experience they’ll need in the work force. “It gives them technical experience cooking for large groups, time management is important, too,” Haun said. Call Haun at 774-5817 or e-mail to jlhaun@ws.edu at to make reservations. Notifications of daily menu items can be received by sending your e-mail address to Haun.

Culinary arts student shuck oysters while guests at the Seafood Fest add some of the delicacies to their plate.

File

Dining events schedule

The schedule for WSCC’s spring dining events, with the time, date, theme and/ or planned entree and cost are as follows: 6 p.m. Feb. 8, cuisine of the New England States, broiled stuffed cod, $12 *7 p.m. Feb. 13, Valentine’s dinner, beef tenderloin and shrimp, $40 11:30 a.m. Feb. 15, cuisine of the Mid-Altantic states, crab cakes, $12 6 p.m. Feb. 22, cuisine of the Southern states, Country Captain Chicken, $12 11 a.m. Feb. 25, brunch, $12 11:30 a.m. March 1, cuisine of Louisiana, duck and sausage gumbo, $12 6 p.m. March 2, breakfast at night, $12

6 p.m. March 15, cuisine of Florida and the Caribbean, Cuban pot roast, $12 11:30 a.m. March 22, cuisine of the Midwestern states, stuffed pork chops, $15 6 p.m. March 23, Italian buffet, $12 6 p.m. March 29, cuisine of the Plains state, Chuckwagon Stew, $12 11:30 a.m. March 30, salmon, $15 11:30 a.m. April 5, cuisine of the Southwestern states, pork tenderloin with ancho and pasilla chiles, $12 11:30 a.m. April 6, beef filet, $15 6 p.m. April 12, cuisine of the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, California and Hawaii, marinated flank steak, $12 11:30 a.m. April 13, supremes of chicken, $15 *7 p.m. April 15, musical dinner theater with “Back Beat”, $35 11:30 a.m. April 19, cuisines of the Mountain states, braised beef short ribs, $12 11:30 a.m. April 20, roast pork loin with red cabbage, $15 11:30 a.m. April 27, leg of lamb, $15 6 p.m. May 3, American regional bounty, $20 6 p.m. May 5, Cinco De Mayo Fiesta, $20 * Indicates pre-paid reservations only.

Curt Habraken/The Mountain Press

The first $5 blue-plate special offered for the spring semester on Thursday included sauteéd chicken with red pepper sauce, rice and vegetables. The blue plate special changes daily.


B2 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Local

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, January 24, 2010

Closing school no easy decision

Rotary speaker

By Debra Cline Guest columist

Submitted

Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Redhawkâ&#x20AC;? Eldridge, president of the Smoky Mountain Storytellers Association, presented a program for Sevierville Sunrise Rotarians recently. Eldridge, a member of the Sappomy Tribe, discussed the Cherokee culture and the educational opportunities available to Cherokee students. Sevierville Sunrise Rotary meets every Thursday at Smoky Mountains Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home.

Ducks Unlimited event set From Submitted Reports

SEVIERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Smoky Mountain Ducks Unlimitedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual banquet and auction will be held Feb. 5 at 6 p.m. at the River Plantation Conference Center. Ducks Unlimited is committed to saving the North American wetlands. The banquet and auction begin at 6 p.m.; cocktails will be served. Dinner will be served at 7:30. At 8 the live auction begins with items including guns, safes, decoys, chances on a War Eagle Boat, collectable prints and more. The ticket price includes a Ducks Unlimited membership. Tickets are $40 for one, $60 a couple, or $15 for youths. Table sponsorships are also available. Reserve tickets by calling Brian Cagle at 428-3443 or (423) 237-3845.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Rock Gatlinburgâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to begin From Submitted Reports GATLINBURG â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The fourth year of the Gatlinburg Recreation Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rock Gatlinburgâ&#x20AC;? program is planned. The purpose of this program is to provide aspiring musicians the opportunity to meet and receive assistance from professional musicians. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rock Gatlinburgâ&#x20AC;? will be held at the Community Center every Thursday at 4 p.m. beginning Feb. 4, and will run until March 4. All entries will have a chance to learn about the process involved in putting on a professional performance. All musicians will receive a DVD recording of their act. The program will conclude with a final com-

petition, judged by local celebrities, at the Smoky Mountain Brewery. For more information, contact Laurence Evans or Dave Anderson at 4364990.

and our county. With this in mind, I realize that the Director of Schools has to balance his desire for our It is early on a cold winter morning and the world children to be in school is unusually still. The dark- each day with the need ness of the sky is magnified to protect their physical by the light snow that gen- safety. To use a good old Sevier tly flurries to the ground. County phrase, the Director The temperatures are of Schools must always err well below 30 degrees. In on the side of safety. I am designated houses phones thankful that this has been ring, and across Sevier and continues to be his County lights some men approach to decision maktumble quickly out of ing on bad-weather days. bed. After donning warm In recent days, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve heard apparel, each jumps into a many questions about the vehicle and begins the job of checking county roads to value of opening school one or two hours late or closgather information about ing one or two hours early. driving conditions. My daddy always told me In one house in Gatlinburg, the man who is that when daylight comes the guardian of over 14,000 we see the world through children on 180 days a year clearer eyes. I believe he was a very intelligent man. listens to weather reports, In frigid temperatures, talks to law enforcement one or two hours (and officers and emergency daylight) can make a big responders, and anxiously difference in seeing black awaits information from the transportation supervi- ice. One or two hours can also significantly impact sor and his assigned crew as well as â&#x20AC;&#x153;spottersâ&#x20AC;? across the comfort and safety of a small child standing at the county. Jack Parton a bus stop in 10-degree knows that on such a morning the safety of thou- weather. One or two hours can also allow the full picsands of school children ture of road conditions to rests with his decision on whether roads can be safely become obvious â&#x20AC;&#x201D; particularly in the case of flooded traveled by buses. Many roads are mountainous and roadways. An early dismissal due to narrow. Some roads even wind beside creek beds and impending hazardous road conditions is also a way to along ridge tops. avoid children trapped at On some snowy days, school or stranded in buses the call is easy. On other on the road. I would much days, the call is harder rather dismiss a little early because only some areas than to have children at have snow. On a few days, school overnight or awaitthe call is gut-wrenching; bad weather doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always ing the arrival of voluncome right on time as pre- teers to transport them home. dicted by meteorologists. Our school system has Ice and snow have even been known to arrive when an automated phone over 14,000 students are at system as well as a text message system to make school. emergency announceAs a community, we ments. Area media outlets know the significance of also supply information a school day. Each of the to parents. The school 180 instructional days is important, and there is much to be done each day to make sure that the children of Sevier County master learning goals and objectives. As a community, we love our children â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the most important treasure this county holds. A good education is essential so that the best future is possible for our children

districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website is continuously updated. However, I also realize that communication does not supply answers to parents who suddenly need to arrange childcare or who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand why their child is home when the roads look clear in their community. For the most part, parents are able to secure contingency plans for childcare. Most people understand that a little inconvenience can never be allowed to control the decision-making process. Sevier County is a unified school district on one school calendar and answerable to the State Department of Education. The Director of Schools makes a decision that takes into account the best interests of the whole school district, not just one school community. Sevier County students attend school for 30 minutes extra each school day to make 13 emergency closure days available. In most years, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use all of those days and accrue extra learning time. In some years, we use more than the 13 days and have to make a few days up. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snow Billâ&#x20AC;? was wisely made possible by the General Assembly a couple of decades ago. Several systems around us do not build in extra instructional time.

The fact that all systems do not accrue the extra instructional time and are therefore not eligible for the snow days is often misunderstood. Sevier County is the place I grew up. I love our mountains. I respect our people. I treasure our culture. We are a destination for millions of visitors. But for me, Sevier County is my home. Our children stand as the future of this place that I love. This fact is never far from my mind when I daily evaluate the progress of our school system and its responsiveness to needs of our children. The 2009-2010 school year has brought many challenges. Concerns over H1N1, the struggles of an extremely frigid winter, the repercussions of a budget deficit, and the understanding that the stakeholders of our school community must work together to implement a rigorous curriculum have significantly impacted every administrative action and reaction. Decisions are not made lightly, and I celebrate that on a cold winter morning I can always feel comfortable in knowing that the call by our Director of Schools is made with one thing in mind: the safety and wellbeing of the children. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Debra Cline is director of curriculum and instruction in Sevier County Schools.

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Local ◆ B3

Sunday, January 24, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

Sleep is a mystery to scientists

Sevier County School breakfast and lunch menus for Monday through Friday are as follows:

eggs; milk Lunch: Choice of pizza, cheese bread sticks, salad bar or bowl; mixed raw vegetables with ranch dip, California blend vegetables, mixed fruit, marinar sauce, or manager’s choice; Jello with fruit; milk.

Monday

Breakfast: Choice of juice/fruit, cereal (hot/ cold), toast, chicken biscuit; milk. Lunch: Choice of hamburger, cheeseburger, salad bar or bowl; lettuce/tomato, pickle/ onion, baked potato wedge, fresh apple or manager’s choice; pudding; milk.

Thursday

Breakfast: Choice of juice/fruit, cereal (hot/cold), breakfast pizza, breakfast burrito, Danish/sweet roll; milk. Lunch: Choice of grilled cheese sandwich, salad bar or bowl; vegetable soup, chicken noodle soup, carrot sticks, peach halves, crackers or manager’s choice; cinnamon rolls; milk.

Tuesday

Tonight when you crawl under the blankets give a shout out to all those giraffes that only sleep two hours each day. Think about it. If you were a giraffe and went to bed at 9 p.m., you’d have to set your wake-up for 11 p.m. Bless their hearts! Be thankful that you are not a 19 foot tall sleepdeprived giraffe. That is just how it looks from my log cabin. — John LaFevre is a local speaker and coauthor of the interactive national park hiking book series, Scavenger Hike Adventures, Falcon Guides, Globe Pequot Press. E-mail to scavengerhike@aol.com. G. Webb of Pittman Center does the artwork for the column. Visit Gwebbgallery.com.



Squirrels and birds call their sleeping accommodations nests, and some fish like to doze under a branch at the bottom of the pond. Leopards sleep on branches and bats sleep upside down. I can sleep anywhere. Scientists say our muscles don’t need any sleep and our bodies are still idling during sleep, so the real need remains an unsolved mystery. There are a few common theories, but one of the more popular ones is that the rest time is needed for the brain to upload information and restore itself. Some scientists believe that information and current memories are gathered up and filed in memory during sleep. You could say sleep is like “de-fragging” your brain and deleting temporary internet files. Even though fish don’t have eyelids, they slow down and rest to the point

that it could be called “sleep.” Set your alarm for 3 a.m. and then go surprise your goldfish. It will likely be at the bottom of the fishbowl with hardly any movement — fast asleep. Dolphins are able to let one-half of their brain sleep while the other half stays on watch. After a while the other side of the brain goes into a rest state. A dolphin can truly swim along half-asleep. Hey, even fruit flies take naps and migrating birds can sleep while flying south. Sleep is a mystery to scientists, but a wonderful hobby for humans. I enjoy sleeping in my gravity chair along the river at Elkmont campground, and I always enjoy getting more sleep than I need. When we fall asleep we travel to another place somewhere over the rainbow where problems and deadlines disappear. There is no unemployment rate in dreamland. Is there any joy greater than sleeping in a tiny tent on a cool rainy night in the backcountry? Sleep is a gift given to kings and queens and us.

Breakfast: Choice of juice/fruit, cereal (hot/cold), pancakes/ waffles, toast, sausage biscuit; milk. Lunch: Choice of beef-a-roni, lasagna, spaghetti, baked ziti, salad bar or bowl; salad bowl, Italian style vegetables, corn, fruit or manager’s choice; cookie; milk.

Friday

Breakfast: Choice of juice/fruit, cereal (hot/ cold), sausage biscuit, toast, gravy; milk. Lunch: Choice of chicken nuggets, fish nuggets, fish on bun, salad bar or bowl; pinto beans, peas and carrots, slaw, fruit or manager’s choice; fruit/cookie; milk.

Wednesday Breakfast: Choice of juice/fruit, cereal (hot/ cold), sausage/biscuit, French toast sticks,

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Well, this past week I was looking down into the holler toward Webb’s Creek thinking about how I am so thankful I am not a giraffe. It has nothing to do with the fact that a giraffe is six feet tall when it is born or that it eats about 140 pounds of food each day (“I’ll have a 50 pounder and super-size the sprouts, please”). I could work with that. Full grown giraffes are the tallest non-basketball playing mammal in the world and are majestic and beautiful as they gallop across the African savannah. I ran cross country in high school and I’d like to give tall a try. There is only one major hurdle with the giraffe lifestyle that I could never handle. Of all the mammals on the planet earth, giraffes get the least amount of sleep. They get less than two hours of shuteye each day, and even during those brief periods they keep one eye open with ears still listening for predators! Is it any wonder that giraffes aren’t known for playfulness or playing fetch? Possums, on the other hand, sleep about 18 hours a day. I agree that a galloping possum is not as spectacular as a giraffe, but there is a lot to be said for well rested. Sleep is one of my favorite things to do. Scientists know more about rocks than they do sleep. Sleep remains quite a mystery, but is generally described as periods of time with minimal movement, in a special “sleep” posture, with reduced responses to stimuli. My wife suggests that I’m occasionally in that state while listening to her, but she can’t prove it. Humans have designed entire rooms dedicated for sleep known as bedrooms.

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Tennessee Shindig plans western jamboree

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FREE! FREE! FREE! First Time Homebuyers Class! Location: Eagles Ridge Club House 2910 Eagles Ridge Way Pigeon Forge, TN Thursday, January 28th, 2010 4:00 PM LEARN HOW YOU CAN BE ON THE PATH TO OWNING YOUR OWN HOME!

Receive insider information from the professionals about the entire process of buying your first home. You will gain the knowledge and confidence! Easier than you think! You can receive up to $8,000 with the First Time Homebuyers Tax Credit! RSVP now for an entry into the grand prize drawing!

Call 865-850-3779! Walk-ins welcome too! Food, drinks & door prizes provided by the sponsor companies below

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PIGEON FORGE — Tennessee Shindig presents “Tennessee Saddle Up Shindig!” Feb. 26 and 27. It’s the theater’s fifth annual western jamboree held in conjunction with the city’s “Saddle-Up!” celebration. The jamboree will be held each day at 7 p.m. and feature two acts for two nights. Tennessee residents will get $10 off the regular admission price. The Tennessee Shindig band will be performing western music and humor along with the jamboree’s 2010 headliner Riders in the Sky. Riders in the Sky is a two-time Grammy award winner for “Woody’s Round Up” in Pixar’s “Toy Story 2” and for

Pixar’s album “Monster’s Inc. — Scream Factory Favorites.” They have made over 5,400 concert appearances in all 50 states and 10 countries. They wrote the musical score for Pixar Animation’s 2002 Academy Award-winning short “For the Birds.” They also composed the theme song for the internet cartoon show “Thomas Timberwolf” by Bugs Bunny creator Chuck Jones. The Riders are members of the Grand Ole Opry, Western Music Association’s Hall of Fame, the Country Music



From Submitted Reports

$15.00 OFF 1 HOUR MASSAGE Expires 2/28/10


B4 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Religion

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sunday, January 24, 2010

P u bl i c p u lp i t

New coach Dooley translates the Golden Rule in great way By ARNE WALKER When I arrived in Sevier County in 1986, I received the kind advice to refrain from planning anything on Fridays or Saturdays during football season. I watched our Church Conference plan longrange events with the Volsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; football schedule in hand. Thanks to my wife who is a UT grad, my blood has run increasingly orange. The only competition that I personally have taken on is to be sure to give blood in the annual UT vs. Kentucky blood drive competition. This is my way of introducing why I listened with ears wide open to Coach Derek Dooleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening remarks and the questionand-answer period that followed. I heard a number of gems that are applicable to many jobs including the ministry. This is especially true in making a strong beginning in a new position. Coach Dooley was sensitive to the fact that the football program was here before he arrived and will be here after he leaves. He included the names of those whose foundations he is building upon. It is important to know and learn as much of the culture in which you will do your work. Baited to express some negatives regarding the past, he refused to get hooked. That Coach Dooley found as a waste of time and energy which is best directed towards implementing the foundation for the new days ahead. How many people coming upon a new job scene and similarly baited fall prey to the destructive use of energy in the hopes of gaining personal support? Coach Dooley spoke of his strong organizational skills, his solid work ethic, and, although carrying influences from others, that he is his own unique person. Anyone who comes into a new position is wise to know who they are and

not be a chameleon who blends into whatever background to please others. In the church we find it important to be clear about oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s talents and spiritual gifts and the work ethic that will help fulfill that mission that is your trust. It is equally important that one be aware of their weaknesses so as to surround themselves with people needed to complement themselves. Few people may have heard with the same ears what I heard when Coach Dooley spoke of NOT going forward with his ears. He would get to know each individual for himself or herself. I recall coming into a new parish and being warned about a pastor to avoid. I listened politely and got to know this person myself and he became a lifelong friend. I have learned that many times when people speak about others and especially in the negative, that they are saying more about themselves than the person that they are talking about. Did it take you by surprise when Coach Dooley asked not to be trusted? He staked the claim that trust is to be earned. How many people come into new positions seeking to ride on their past laurels? In a new position you begin from square one and develop your respect and trust anew for you are in a new place. For me that has been interesting in serving now seven different parishes in six different states. This has especially applied to my work with court-related youth where you truly have to earn anew respect and trust from youth who have considerable background which says that adults are not to be trusted. Integrity goes a long way in any job that you choose to do. It is critical to keep your word. Coach Dooley comes with a record from Louisiana Tech that does not sound

stellar. He found that program where it was and brought it a long way. Some pastors do not have success records as the world accords the same for they have felt the call to go to difficult places which grow from the spiritual insides but not in the statistic department. Coach Dooley is comfortable with that. When my father-in-law was dying, I was with him when a group of large 65-year-old men came to see him. They greeted him with warm affection and respect after being members of his teams over 50 years ago. They still called him coach. He had coached several state championship teams while the teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original coach was called into active duty. Another championship team was set to go when the original coach returned and, although my father-in-law was offered the chance to continue, he stepped aside so that the former coach could take what he saw as the rightful place. We model in our respective positions our words translated into deeds that will have an impact upon the development of young lives who have been entrusted to a coach. Coach Dooley understands this and embraces it. So I heard a man with warmth and humor share some gems. If you counted seven, you put your own meaning to that. I truly hope that his deeds match his words and wish Coach Dooley only the best. And to you dear reader, glean from this what will serve you best as you employ your gifts in the mission that is your trust. Coach Dooley, thanks for clearly translating the Golden Rule to do unto others as you would have them do to you in such a wonderful manner. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Rev. Arne Walker is a semi-retired pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America who resides in Gatlinburg.

The Lord Will Provide Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a classic old â&#x20AC;&#x153;storyâ&#x20AC;? about a man who was caught in the midst of a flood. Realizing his desperate situation, he prayed that God would deliver him from certain doom. Being a man of great faith, he fully believed his prayer sufficed for his physical salvation. Therefore when the flood waters entered the ground floor of his house and became waist high, he didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fear. About that time, a rescuer in a boat floated up to his house and urged him to get into the boat to be taken to safety. He refused, stating confidently that the Lord would save him. A while later the man had to ascend to the second story of his house because the flood waters were still rising and had reached higher than the first floor ceiling. Another rescue boat came by, and once again the man refused to get in, stating that the Lord would save him. Not long after that the man had to climb up onto the roof as the waters had almost completely covered the whole house. This time a rescue helicopter flew overhead and let down a basket. The man refused to get in and waved the helicopter away shouting that the Lord was going to save him. Well, the man drowned, and when he got to heaven he went right up to God and said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I prayed for you to save me, and I fully trusted you would, but you didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;tâ&#x20AC;?! To which God replied, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, I sent you two boats and a helicopterâ&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? Now, I could attempt to make a lot of theological applications from that little story, but suffice it to say, life (and God) sometimes has a way of directing us, we just need to pay attention and follow the directions. I feel that way about where I am now and how I got here. About 5 years ago, I was preaching for a congregation in Knoxville when I was approached by a long-time friend of the family who owns a vacation cabin near Wears Valley. He told me he had recently found out that a church building was available for sale between Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge and he wanted to raise some funds to buy it. Since he lived in Northern Alabama, he asked is I would help coordinate matters â&#x20AC;&#x153;up hereâ&#x20AC;? and I agreed. At first I thought the extent of my involvement would be a little bit of activity for a little while running things here and there and making phone calls. But as I prayed more about the church getting started and talked with my wife about our future and considered my then-current situation, it began to be apparent to me that I needed to be more involved with the church here than what I originally thought. Soon I had resigned from the church in Knoxville and dedicated myself full-time to the work of the King Branch Road Church of Christ. Immediately I began experiencing things I never had before. Where, in the past at churches I preached for in other places, we would have a few visitors on occasion; here we consistently have visitors that greatly outnumber the local members. And these visitors are in a special sort of â&#x20AC;&#x153;moodâ&#x20AC;? that comes from being here in the beautiful Smoky Mountains area. I am greatly blessed to have been guided to this place to call my home and to be so close to not only the grandeur of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s creation in nature, but also to people who truly are the â&#x20AC;&#x153;salt of the earth.â&#x20AC;? I hope to return some of the encouragement and blessings I have received from the wonderful people of this area as I set about to write articles for the Mountain Press on a regular basis. I hope the readers of these articles will be able to learn a little more about God and what he provides for us. In that way, I hope to contribute a little to pointing out the â&#x20AC;&#x153;boatsâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;helicoptersâ&#x20AC;? each of us are sent by the providential hand of our Lord. Please make plans to check back each week and see what is written here. And if you would like to hear more of Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s word, please come visit us during one of our worship services or Bible studies at 560 King Branch Road.

Church of Christ

560 King Branch Road (off the spur)

Roger Williams, Evangelist Sunday 10 am Bible Study 10:45 am Worship Wednesday 7 pm Bible Studay Bible-based worship

www.kbrcofc.org

rel i g i o n br i e f Airline clerk appeals rulings

LONDON (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A devout Christian is asking Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s High Court to force British Airways to admit it was wrong in demanding she stop wearing a Crucifix at work. Airport check-in clerk Nadia Eweida became the center of a national debate over religious symbols in public life when she was sent home in November 2006 for refusing to comply with rules banning employees from wearing visible religious symbols.

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Lunch Mon - Sat, 11am - 3pm MENTION THIS AD AND RECEIVE 10% OFF YOUR TOTAL PURCHASE. exp. 02/08/10

Dinner Mon - Thurs, 3pm - 10pm Fri & Sat, 3pm - 11pm Sun, 12pm - 10pm

CRICK CENTER

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453-2887

0ARKWAY 3UITEs3EVIERVILLE 4.

Maryville: (865) 982-0768 Sevierville: (865) 428-3168

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Brown Truss Company 7ILKINSON0IKEs-ARYVILLE

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908-1904 www.thediner.biz

To place your ad here, call Whitney Shults at 428-0748 ext. 213

278668MP


The Mountain Press ‹ Sunday, January 24, 2010

Legals

600 Rentals

200 Employment

700 Real Estate

300 Services

800 Mobile Homes

400 Financial

900 Transportation

Online

Deadlines

500 Merchandise

100 Announcements

Classifieds ‹ 5B

Edition

Deadline

Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Good News In The Smokies

Friday, 10 a.m. Friday, 11 a.m. Monday, 10 a.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. Wednesday, 10 a.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. Friday, 10 a.m.

Corrections

http://www.themountainpress.com OR, www.adquest.com

A publication from The Mountain Press

Thursday, 10 a.m.

After the first insertion, want ads scheduled to be published again on Tue., Wed., Thu., or Fri. may be canceled or corrected between 8 a.m. and 10 All line ads published in The Mountain Press are a.m. on the day prior to publication. For ads on placed FREE on a searchable network of over Sat., due Thu., prior to 3 p.m., for Sun., Fri., prior 500 newspapers’ classifieds located at to 10 a.m. and Mon., prior to 11 a.m. http://www.themountainpress.com Notice of typographical or other errors must be WANT TO KNOW WHEN A CLASSIFIED ITEM given before 2nd insertion. The Mountain Press IS AVAILABLE? does not assume responsibility for an ad Go to http://www.adquest/request/ to register your beyond the cost of the ad itself and shall not be request and we wil notify you by e-mail when it liable for failure to publish an ad for a typographical error. becomes available in the Classifieds.

Where is your career headed? The road to a better job begins with the “Employment” section of the classifieds. Browse hundreds of new listings every week. Find jobs in your own area of expertise or set out on a new career path.

So don’t delay; turn to the classifieds and get started today!

Call

428-0748 110 SPECIAL NOTICES

FIND HIDDEN CASH Sell your unused household items with....

CLASSIFIEDS

428-0748

does not recommend or endorse any product, service or company. For more information and assistance regarding the investigation of FINANCING, BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES AND WORK AT HOME OPPORTUNITIES, this newspaper urges its readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 2633 Kingston Pike, Suite 2, Knoxville, TN 37919, Phone (865)692-1600.

110 SPECIAL NOTICES

Unauthorized use of The Mountain Press tubes for circulars or any other advertisement authorizes a minimum $250 charge for which the advertiser will be billed.

110 SPECIAL NOTICES

Classifieds

Call. Collect.

Classifieds: 428-0746 SOLICITATION OF BIDS Charles Blalock & Sons, Inc. will be receiving quotes for Cocke CNJ906, Call 005 * * Denotes DBE/WBE Goal In the Tennessee Department of Transportation Letting - Feb. 5, 2010

We are interested in receiving quotes from Disadvantage Business Enterprises for any work or materials on the above referenced project. If you need further information you may contact us at our office in Sevierville, Tennessee at (865) 453-2808 or FAX (865) 453-9181. Charles Blalock & Sons, Inc. is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Corrections

After the first insertion, want ads scheduled to be published again on Tue., Wed., Thu., or Fri. may be canceled or corrected between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. on the day prior to publication. For ads on Sat., due Thu. prior to 3 p.m.; for Sun., Fri. prior to 10 a.m. and Mon., prior to 11 a.m. Notice of typographical or other errors must be given before 2nd insertion. The Mountain Press does not assume responsibility for an ad beyond the cost of the ad itself and shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad for a typographical error.

Deadlines

Edition Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Good News in the Smokies

Deadline Friday, 10 a.m. Friday, 11 a.m. Monday, 10 a.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. Wednesday, 10 a.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. Friday, 10 a.m. Thursday, 10 a.m.

Online

http://www.themountainpress.com OR, www.adquest.com All line ads published in The Mountain Press are placed FREE on a searchable network of over 500 newspapers’ classifieds located at http://www.themountainpress.com. WANT TO KNOW WHEN A CLASSIFIED ITEM IS AVAILABLE? Go to http://www.adquest/request/ to register your request and we will notify you by e-mail when it becomes available in the Classifieds.

110 SPECIAL NOTICES

236 GENERAL

PHOTOS SUBMITTED If you submit a photo for publication, please pick it up after it runs in the paper within ONE MONTH of publication date. Our photo files will be discarded each month. Thank You!

Mark Our Words: You’ll Find It in the Classifieds! 428-0748

236 GENERAL 8

Temporary Farm Workers needed 2/1/10-12/1/10. Workers will perform a variety of manual animal & crop raising tasks on farm under close supervision. Guaranteed 3/4 of contract hours. Tools provided at no cost. Free housing provided for non-commuting workers. Transportation & subsistence reimbursed to worker upon completion of 50% of contract. Pay rate is $9.16/hr. Worksite in Sevier Co. TN. Applicants should report or send a resume to

the nearest Tennessee Department of Labor & Workforce Development office & reference job order # TN 7084713. Swann Stables Farms/Holt Farm/ Mountain View Farm/Ogle Farm.

236 GENERAL

236 GENERAL

236 GENERAL

Accountant in Pigeon Forge F/T or temp. BS or equivalent through any suitable combination of education, experience or training. Background, prepping tax returns, balance sheets, etc. Mail resume to H. Bhula, Smoky Hospitality, 2735 Parkway, Pigeon Forge, TN 37863.

Local resort now hiring Part-time Maintenance Representative and Part-time Housekeepers. Must be able to work weekends and have dependable transportation. Experience preferred. Applications are available at 746 Ski Mountain Road, Gatlinburg or resumes can be faxed to 865/4364657.

Experienced Fiddle Player needed. 428-3303.

Bring a Smile to the Elderly! 236 GENERAL Help brighten the lives of elderly in our community. Provide non-medical companionship and home-care services to help seniors remain at home for as long as possible. To learn more, contact Home Instead Senior Care Toll-free employment line: 1-877-581-5800 or homeinstead.com/ 428

Full Charge Bookkeeper with minimum 2 years exp. Proficient in Quickbooks, knowledge of CSA Software and taxes preferred. Full time. Fax resume to 865429-2408.

236 GENERAL

Quality Control Earn up to $100 per day. Evaluate retail stores. Training provided. No experience required. Call 877-696-8561.

238 HOTEL/MOTEL

Hampton Inn Gatlinburg Now Hiring Part Time Night Audit Sunday and Monday Nights and Part Time Front Desk 2nd Shift. Apply in person at 967 Parkway, Gatlinburg. 242 RESTAURANT Mr. Miyagi’s Japanese Grill in Food City Shopping Center in Kodak hiring servers and kitchen help. Will be accepting applications on January 28.

SEVIER COUNTY CENTRAL E-911 DISPATCH The Sevier County E911 Central Dispatch Center is currently accepting resumes for the position of E911 Dispatcher.

We Are Now Accepting Application For: (Temp to Hire)

Cabin Cleaners

($9.00 Per Hour) Plus Gas Allotment Valid Driver’s License, Car Insurance, Comply with Drug Policy Comply with Background Check

MUST BE ABLE TO WORK WEEKENDS WE OFFER HOLIDAY/VACATION PAY, AND INSURANCE!! 1240 Fox Meadows Blvd., Suite 1, Sevierville Mon-Wed-8am-10am & 1pm-3pm

865-428-1412 EOE

This position requires the applicant to be available for all varieties of shift work and the flexibility to cover other shifts in the event of absences or any other unforeseen cirumstance. The position to be filled will be primarily second and third shift relief. This job requires the availability of the applicant for all weekends and Holidays. We offer a competitive salary with an excellent benefit package. All applicants must be 18 years of age and a graduate of high school or a GED equivalent as required by State law. Previous dispatching experience is not required but would be advantageous. Applicants will be tested on a number of related skills including but not limited to Decision Making, Data entry, Call Summarization, Cross Reference, Memory Recall and Map Reading. This is a timed test designed to see the applicants response to intense real life situations. Resumes may be submitted online to judyhtucker@bellsouth.net or they can be mailed to: Sevier County Central Dispatch ATTN: Judy Tucker P.O. Box 4572 Sevierville, TN 37864 Please no attachments or training certificates at this time. The deadline for submission of resume is January 31, 2010 Sevier County E911 is an equal opportunity employer


The Mountain Press Â&#x2039; Sunday, January 24, 2010

6B Â&#x2039; Classifieds 247 MAINTENANCE Maintenance Man Needed. Motel in Gatlinburg. Drug Free Work Place. Excellent Starting Pay. Ability to Multi-Task, Carpenter Skills/with own tools, Plumbing Experience, Electrical Experience. Send resume/application to: Maintenance Position P.O. Box 769 Gatlinburg, TN 37738

356 STORAGE BUILDINGS

10X10 or 10X20 SELF STORAGE Convenient Location! 411 South, left on Robert Henderson Rd., 1/4 mil on right at Riverwalk Apts.

429-2962

R E S E RVAT I O N I S T: Fast paced rental company. Benefits, good work environment. Apply in person at Eden Crest, 652 Wears Valley Road, Pigeon Forge or fax your resume to 7741713

2006 Golf Cart. $5500. Lift kit. Many mor options. 865-2060961. 43

inch HDTV w/ stand. 5 piece BR set, secretary desk, marble coffee table, couch, recliner, end tables, Nascar collection. 436-7248

605 BUSINESS RENTALS

Townhouse

FOR LEASE

A-1 pre-owned dryers, washers, ranges & refrigerators All with warranty. Cagles Furniture and Appliances

Spacious, Furn or Unfurn 2 story & Garage W/D, D/W, Balcony Weekly or Monthly

453-0727

865-789-1427

589 FURNITURE

Space for lease in climate control building. Hwy 321 East Gatlinburg. OfďŹ ce space for rent. 850-2487

577 HEAVY EQUIPMENT 439 BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Five Oaks Riding Stables For Lease in Sevierville. For info call 850-2004 500 MERCHANDISE

For Sale Case Backhoe and Float and other accessories $7500 Call 6543093

Chihuahuas for sale. 865-428-4685.

Shih-tzu puppies CKC. Very small. Female $350 Male $300 cash. 712-8890

556 FIREWOOD Firewood for sale. All hardwood. $45 rick. 865-977-8903

105 YARD & TREE SERVICES

2 new recliners $398 Cagles Furniture & Appliances 2364B Pittman Center Rd.

105 YARD & TREE SERVICES

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

IMPROVEMENT

FIREWOOD

      

â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘ Electrical â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Plumbing â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchens â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Bathrooms â&#x20AC;˘ Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Licensed & Insured

  

Lic & Insured 254-3844 Senior Discounts

Sperry Van Ness/ R.M. Moore,LLC (865) 453-8111

DIG UP great finds in the Classifieds.

Sevier Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only Daily Newspaper

Quality Work - Reasonable Prices

STANLEY LANDSCAPING

Call Doug Morgan (865) 603-2832

If you have a problem with the delivery of your morning Mountain Press, please call the Circulation Department at 428-0746, ext. 239 & 231 Monday - Friday and your paper will be delivered to you on the same day. Newspapers from calls after 10:00 a.m. will be delivered with the next dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paper. On Saturday, Sunday and holidays you may dial 428-0748 extensions 239 & 231. If complaints are received between 8:00 and 10:00 a.m., papers will be delivered the same day. Newspapers from calls received after 10:00 a.m. will be delivered with the next dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s paper. This applies to in-county home delivery only.

KELLYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOME

     

4UVNQ(SJOEJOHt-BOE$MFBSJOHt)ZESPTFFEJOH #PCDBUt(VUUFS$MFBSJOHt-FBG3FNPWBM 'SFODI%SBJOTt3FUBJOJOH8BMMT

OfďŹ ce Space & OfďŹ ce Bldg. 1250 to 3755 sf.

453-0727

 4REE3PECIALIST

Sevierville & Pigeon Forge

Who ya gonna call?

581 PETS

NEW YEARS SPECIAL

        

For Sale

601 TOWNHOUSES FOR RENT

Eliminating complete nightly rental chalet furnishings. Call 865-453-9862

589 FURNITURE

105 YARD & TREE SERVICES

589 FURNITURE

605 BUSINESS RENTALS

249 RESERVATIONIST

Reservationist/Office Work. Part time to full time. Call 865868-1470.

557 MISC. SALES

Call Ty 368-2361

McKinney Lawn Service New Years Special Landscaping, French Drain All Drain work, Bobcat work All your yard service needs. !LLODDJOBSs1UALITY7ORK Senior Discounts

654-9078

CART away unwanted items in the Classifieds.

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

111 HOME & OFFICE CLEANING

115 ROOFING SERVICES

C B Builders

Knoxville Skylights

BIG DADâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Home Service

House Cleaning s%XPERIENCED s(ONESTs2ELIABLE Free Estimate. 0LEASECALL  OR 577-1295

                 



  

  

113 MISC. SERVICES

117 ELECTRICAL

Experienced local carpenter Does all types remodeling Additions & Repairs Licensed & Insured

Call Conley Whaley 428-2791 or 919-7340(cell)

DCC Construction

Residential & Commercial s.EW#ONSTRUCTION s2EMODELING s2OOlNG s#ONCRETE s#ARPENTRY s$ECKS Licensed & Insured 865-360-4352

5 Star Skylight Specialist

New Installs, Replacements, Sun Tunnels Lic. Bonded & Insured

865-438-9030

All Types of Home building repairs. Need it Done Call

865-654-7648

or 865-475-7628

B &W

Kitchens, Bath, Decks,Windows, Doors, Trim, Sheetrock, Painting, Plumbing & Electrical, Vinyl & Laminate Flooring ALL REPAIRS 24 HOUR

865-740-7102 755-0178

Computer Services PC setup, repair, virus removal, speed-up, retrieve lost documents/ pictures. Network setup, repair. Will train in PC basic skills, word, excel, emails, internet. Free estimate. 865-774-7394.




Classifieds Â&#x2039; 7B

The Mountain Press Â&#x2039; Sunday, January 24, 2010 605 BUSINESS RENTALS

 

   



  

7 offices, conf. rm, work area, reception area, break rm, 4 baths, 2500 sq ft storage w/ loading dock. $2900 per mo Sevierville 865-3380790.

Professional office space for rent or lease. 1400 sq ft. For more information call Joanna 865-774-8885 or 1800-586-1494. EOE M/F/H

693 ROOMS FOR RENT

Affordable Housing in Gatlinburg Rooms for rent, weekly rates, furn., cable TV.

436-4471 or 621-2941

DOWNTOWN SEVIERVILLE

428 Park Rd. near trolley stop CHEAP$100 weekly Includes All Utilities. Cable, Laundry, Kitchens, Clean Rooms, NO PETS.

800-359-8913

Days Inn Apple Valley Weekly Rates Available. Call 865-428-3353 Gatlinburg Walking distance to town. Low weekly rates. Furn/cable TV, micro, fridge, phone. 436-4387

610 DUPLEX FOR RENT

696 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

2 & 3 BR duplexes for rent in Kodak.

Townhomes Sevierville

865-932-2613

3BR Duplex Hardwood, All appliances. $500 deposit $750 rent. In Seymour off Chapman 919-1324

696 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

696 APARTMENTS FOR RENT

697 CONDO RENTALS

1BR apt. Private yard with patio. Utilities incl. Non smokers. 1st & last rent. $450. 429-6059.

*WEARS VALLEY 1BR/1BA $525/mo. + Dep. Walk-in closet All kit appl + W/D conn Some Pets OK. 865-654-6507

Condo for rent 3BR 2BA, 2 car garage, 1 level, new construction. Downtown Sevierville. $1200 mth + damage deposit. Call Phyllis 455-5821



!"    "   # !"!  

     

  "    

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WALK TO WALMART Furn, W/D On Trolley Route Large 2 Bedroom Weekly, Bi-Weekly or Monthly 865-789-1427 WALK TO

DOWNTOWN

2 BD / 2BA Very Nice $ 645.00

GATLINBURG

(incl. water & sewer.)

View of the mountains Weekly/monthly

865-908-6789 1BR apt for rent $600 mth Electric included. East Gatlinburg. 654-9238 1BR Apt. near Gat. W/D, DW, water, private ent. $575/mo.,$575 dep. 556-1929.

Furn./Unfurn. Lg. 2 BR

865-789-1427 *CABN .CA?IH$ILA? "OJF?R  0  FF;JJF5"LS *;LA?$;GCFS0G 5II>$FLM  

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693 ROOMS FOR RENT

Weekly Rentals Includes Phone, Color TV, Wkly Housekeeping Micr./Frig. Available $169.77+ Family Inns West

Pigeon Forge

â&#x20AC;˘

865-453-4905

1BR Studio apartment on trolley route, walking distance to downtown for rent in Gatlinburg TN, first mth rent of $500, security deposit of $150 Water & sewer included 865-436-5691

Private Motel Room Great for 1 person! 1 bed, full size frig. microwave, cable TV $120 weekly $50 deposit 436-7745 Gatlinburg

1 BR / 1 BA IN SEVIERVILLE $380.00 + DEPOSIT NO PETS 865-712-5238 LEGALS

BIG BROKER BOBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s REALTY 865-774-5919

SILO APARTMENTS in Sevierville Offers 1/2 BR Units Pet Friendly

       $  MO  

    

550/

Townhouse close to hospital. New carpet. $600 month. Small Pets ok. 865-384-4054 or 865-384-1054

Pigeon Forge, Townhouse Condo. Large 1300+ sq ft, 2 Bdrm, 2-1/2 bath. Covered porches, great kitchen, W/D connect, disposal, dishwasher, refrig. $600 per month. 1st and last month + $200.00 refundadable cleaning deposit. Small pets OK, w/$250 nonrefundable pet deposit. References reqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d. Realty Executives Smoky Mountains 4535265 or 774-4307. 698 MOBILE HOME RENTALS

PIGEON FORGE 2BD/2BA APARTMENT

EFFICIENCIES All Utilities Included

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN SEVIERVILLE 2 bedroom 1.5 bath townhomes Call 428-5161

NICE, CLEAN

Gatlinburg Beautiful 2BR 2BA Furnished Condo with Fireplace, Overlooks stocked trout stream and has heated pool. Walk to downtown Gatlinburg, includes water, cable, Flat screen TV. Immediate occupancy, Minimum 1 Year lease $875 mth. 865-771-9600

Wears Valley 1BD/1.5BA Pet Friendly

2BR 2BA triplex PF. 2BR apt Sev. No pets. Clean & convenient. 453-5079. 2BR Apartments for Rent $475, $500 & $550 a month. 908-7805 or 3681327 922 Burden Hill Rd (Triplex) 3 minutes to downtown Sevierville. Clean 1BR 1BA, city view, $450. Pets ok. 865-286-5070 Commerical/2BR apt on Dolly Parton Pkwy downtown Sevierville for rent. 1150 sq ft $500 mth + utilities. Call 865-368-8301. CROSSCREEK 2BR/1.5BA $545 2BR/2BA Large Garden apartment $570.00 to $580.00 865-429-4470 Gatlinburg 2BR/1.5BA Wd. Fireplace. Quiet & safe neighborhood. Kit appliances , w/d connections. No Pets $600 Mo. $400 deposit. 1 yr lease 865-654-3615. Great 1/1 Downtown Sevierville. $475 mth includes water. 904-806-3318 McCarterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Efficiency Apts 221 Newman Rd, $420 month everything except power and phone. Gatlinburg. No pets. Call 865-8502542 or 865-4364589. RIVERWALK 1BR/1BA TO 2BR/2BA $545.00 to $695.00 865-429-2962 Sevierville Duplex 2BR 2BA Whirlpool. $650 mo. No pets. References. Tony414-6611 Single size apt. $425 mo. Incl utilities. No pets. Near Dollywood. 621-7897. Spacious 1100 sq ft 2BR 2BA Almost new. 4 minutes from town. 865742-6176 697 CONDO RENTALS

Peaceful Settings Mountain View

865-933-0504 2BR & 3BR Central H/A. Close to Douglas Lake. $400 & up + deposit. Call 865382-7781 or 865933-5894. 2BR Mobile Home in Pigeon Forge $400 a month. 1BR Apt in Gat. $650 a month utilities furnished. 865-2011439 2BR on Douglas Lake No pets. $400 mth $400 dep. 4282310. 3BR/2BA rent to own. Seymour. $595/mo No pets. 865-7657929. Kodak area. 2BR 2BA $450 mth $450 dep. No pets. 3824199. KODAK: 3BR/2BA, no pets, references. 933-6544. Nice 2BR 2BA with cathedral ceilings, fresh paint, nice yard, near Sevierville. No pets. $575 mo. 1st, last, dep. Call Rebecca 6216615.

699 HOME RENTALS

$600 to $950+. Wanda Galli Realty Exec. 680-5119 or 7744307.

Beautiful 3BR log home, private wooded mountain type setting, firplace, jaccuzi, central H/A, water furnished. $850 + dep. 933-5894 or 382-7781

Nice Homes in Kodak. 2 BR 1 BA $385 2BR 2BA $465 Each has C H/A, deck appliances. No pets.

865-368-6602 Boyds Creek 3BR, 3BA. Large rooms & other amenities. Appliances included, $900 + dep.

428-5212 328 Ownby St, Gatlinburg; 3 bed 2 bath home, $700 per month with $700 deposit. Tenant application required $35. 423307-1552 3BR 1.5BA Newly renovated. Sevierville. Garage. $925 mth + dep. 654-0222.

Seymour Hinkle Sub 3BR 2BA $975 mth. + dep. 6801032

3BR 2BA house. Country setting, level yard with small pond and covered bridge. $1100 mth + sec dep. 865-850-1198

Wears Valley Mountain Cabin 1BR/1BA. Gated community, paved roads. Nonsmokers. $650 a month. 865-7058327.

4BR/2.5BA For Sale or Lease Call Sarah Gordon at 865696-5601- Marty Loveday and Associates 908-9330 Available now! 3BR/ 1BA, 2 story Farm House. Dead end road. Secluded. No neighbors. CH/A, off exit 412 of I-40. $600/mo + $600 dep. 865-933-5894 or 865-382-7781. Belle Meadows 4BR/2BA 2 car garage 2200 sq ft +/$1,200 per month 865-429-2962 For Rent 3BR, 2BA house. Pigeon Forge. $850/mo. 573-7997.

3BR 2BA in Red Bud Subdivision. Appliances included. $750 & up + deposit. 428-5212 NEAR WAL-MART 3Br/2Ba 2400 Sq. Ft. & Full Bsmt, Corner Lot, Fenced, Huge Mstr & Kitchen All Appls, W/D

$

1125 mo.

1st/last/dep/no pets

865-898-7925 NICE, CLEAN IN KODAK

4 BD / 2 BA + GARAGE 4 MILES FROM EXIT 407 $950/MONTH + DEPOSIT. NO PETS. 865-712-5238

s3PACIOUS"EDROOMS s7ASHER$RYER(OOKUPS s#EILING&ANS s&ULLY%QUIPPED+ITCHEN

HUD PUBLISHERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE All real estate advertised herein is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, family status or national origin, or intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discrimination. State laws forbid discrimination in the sale, rental or advertising of real estate based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law. We will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-6699777, The Toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Furn 2/2 2 story with loft. Log. $1000 per mth. Realty Exeuctives Smoky Mountains 865774-4307 Gatlinburg Cobbly Nob 2BR 2BA, $850 per month. 1BR 1BA furnished on creek $700 per month. Fireplace, Cathedral Ceilings, Hot tub and whirl pool tubs. 423487-5020 or 865719-7000 Gatlinburg Glades 3BR 2BA fireplace, jaccuzi. No pets. $900 mth 4284073 Home In Kodak 3BR/2BA with unfinished basement & 2 car garage. Stove, fridge DW & W/D conn Approx 1250 sq ft 865-429-4470 House for Rent 4260 Booger Town Rd. $550/mo., $300 deposit. 776-9636

699 HOME RENTALS

New Homes for Rent. 3BR/2BA starting at $700 - $850 & $1000 per month. No pets. 865-850-3874

Hwy 321 Pittman Center area. 1&2 BR cabin on creek. Fully furnished. Utilities included. $225 & $250 wk. 850-2487 Mountain View Resort 2 bedroom, 2 baths, 3rd floor, double balcony. Fully furnished and equipped kitchen. $1350 per month and $400 damage deps. Call 865539-2914 ask for Emily.

Hwy 321 Pittman Center area. 1&2 BR cabin on creek fully furnished Utilities included. $225 & $250 wk 8502487. LONG TERM RENTAL, VACATION PERKS 4 min from Walden's Landing off Wears Valley Rd. Cedar cottage, picturesque views from covered deck with hot tub. 1440sf, 2 bedroom, 2 bath, vaulted ceilings, open floor plan. Fully furnished with cabin decor. Huge master suite with corner jacuzzi, king bed, and fireplace. Knotty pine walls and hardwood floors in main area. Live every day like you're on vacation! (Propane heat, central air, Comcast broadband available. Maid service available. Sorry, no smokers or cats.) $900 and worth it. Call for details 865-8628769.

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2BR 2BA P.F. Fully furnished condo 7th floor. Spectacular view. 30 ft private balcony. $1050 mth. 1st & last mth 425-9226988

2-3 BR Homes

699 HOME RENTALS

710 HOMES FOR SALE **Historic Home For Sale** 3BRHardwoodFloors, 8ft.ceiling,crown molding,sunroom, garage,basement, mature plantings Large fenced corner lot, Downtown Sevierville, close to schools.654-7907 ************************** 1600 sq ft home w/garage, Great Location to school etc. Newly Remodeled. Great Starter Home Must see. $144,000 OBO 680-4290 or 6965721

2704 WEARS VALLEY RD. By owner, 2 story Farmhouse, 3BR, 1.5 BA, Outside ofďŹ ce, 1acre Z-comm, Rmdl $179,500 Inspection Sat-Sun. 10-5 HOUSE WILL BE SOLD SUNDAY NIGHT TO HIGHEST BIDDER

(404)461-8836

710 HOMES FOR SALE

721 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY

BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 br, 2 ba cottage on wooded lot. Special financing available. $98,900. Bruce Webb, 9225500. Webb Properties.

Building for lease formerly Creekside Wedding Chapel. Parkway Gatlinburg 850-2004.

BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 br, 2 ba, 2 car garage, 6 yrs old w/unfin. bsmt. On 1+ acre! Much more & only $143,500. Bruce Webb, 922-5500. Webb Properties.

OWNER FINANCE $2,200 per month Sale or Lease Option, New 5000 sf warehouse/ ofďŹ ce/storefront with loading dock, 1/2 acre plus parking, will ďŹ nish inside to suit, Kodak, near interstate, 865-654-6691

BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4 yr old, 4 br, 3 ba, many features! Only $149,900. Brittany LeTourneau, 922-5500. Webb Properties. BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fully furnished log cabin in Sky Harbor. Special financing a v a i l a b l e . $144,900. Bruce Webb, 922-5500. Webb Properties. BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; HARTFORD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Spacious, open floor plan, cedar sided cabin home w/2 br, 1.5 ba on 5 acres next to Cherokee National Forest. Many features. Special financing available, only $130,000. Dagan Greene, 865/9225500. Webb Properties. BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Huge, detached garage w/ this 3 yr old, 3 br, 2 ba home on 2.5 acres. Need some space? This is it! Special financing a v a i l a b l e . $144,900. Bruce Webb, 922-5500. Webb Properties.

BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SEVIERVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 yr old, 3 br, 2 ba home on 2/3 acre. Needs TLC, but only $96,000. Special financing available. Brittany LeTourneau, 9225500. Webb Properties. For Sale. Forclosure $109,900. Jones Cove area. Bring out the Horse Lover in you. Log cabin in a horse resort 2 bedroom 2 bath 1.5 story with a pond on 2.23 acres. Call Concord Real Estate. 865-539-2914 Private Estate for sale. Pittman Center area 26 acres, gated entrance 2BR 2BA ranch/360 surround deck w/ full basement and storage building. Great Location!! Privacy! Privacy! Privacy! Asking $385,000. Brackfield & Associates Thomas King 865654-0588 or 865691-8195 711 CONDOS FOR SALE BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; DUPLEX. Both units have 2 br. & great location. One unit needs repairs, but priced @ only $98,500! Dagan Greene, 922-5500. Webb Properties 718 LAND FOR SALE

4BR 2.5BA Seymour. Newly remodeled. 428-0664 or 3083770

722 BUSINESS BUILDINGS

1.5

Acre Slopping Wooded Lot in Pigeon Forge. 1 mile off Parkway. (423)258-9697

829 MANUFACTURED HOME SALES

NEW HOME 1900 Sq. Feet 1/2 Acre-Ready Easy- Loan by Phone 865-453-0086

First Time Buyers Your Job is Your Credit New Single Wides & Double Wides CREDIT HOTLINE 865-453-0086

BANK OWNED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Beautiful 1 yr old 2 br, 2 ba doublewide in exclusive Keenland farms. Rare opportunity for only $89,900! Bruce Webb, 9225500. Webb Properties. 837 CAMPER SALES 06 Fleetwood Class A Motor Home. 3 yr warranty. $34,000 865- 206-0961

941 SUV SALES 1995 Blazer 4x4 $1500 firm. Call 865-3238161. 943 AUTOMOBILE SALES

1996 Saturn SC2, white, Great shape and many new parts Car needs no work and has a Pioneer 7000bt radio. Drive today for $2500.00. Call 865 368-4288 for details

2003 Ford Taurus SEL 127,000 miles $3500 OBO. 865776-3388 78

Lincoln Towncar Beautiful antique. Loaded. $2000. 865-206-0961

For Sale. 1992 Nissan 240 SX Call 865604-9465. 945 TRUCK SALES

2005 GMC Box Truck. $10,500. Exc. cond. Everything works. 206-0961 950 MOTORCYCLE SALES

2006 Hayabusa LTD. White many extras Only 3000 miles. Call 654-6299


B8 โ—† Local

The Mountain Press โ—† Sunday, January 24, 2010

Sunrise Rotary program

All about food

Sevierville Sunrise Rotarians had a program featuring Dave Coburn, executive chef of Fee/Hedrick Entertainment, who used fresh fruits and vegetables to construct tray garnishes and edible table centerpieces. Coburn was presented with the Service Above Self Award for his contributions to the community.

Rotarian Rose Borpujari recently presented a program to Sevierville Sunrise Rotary on being a Rotarian in India and what led her to becoming director of the local Widows Ministry.

Submitted

Submitted

Teen drivers target of program

McNelly Whaley Ford Lincoln Mercury Presents the 2010 Ford Taurus

From Submitted Reports SEVIERVILLE โ€” In an effort to improve the driving abilities of younger drivers, the Sevierville Police Department has scheduled a 12-hour Collision Avoidance Training seminar from 4:45 to 9 p.m. March 26 at the police department, and from 7:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 27 at Smokies Stadium. The training is for drivers aged 16-20 years old who have a valid driverโ€™s license. The seminar is taught by officers using a nation program. The program fee of $60 covers course materials and instructors. Registration is limited to 10 students. Participants will receive both classroom and practical driving in a controlled environment using their own vehicle, so that they can become familiar with the vehicle they will likely be driving on the road. Participants will receive instruction and practical experience in evasive maneuvers, cornering, backing, skid recovery, off-road recovery and emergency braking. The training will provide young drivers with the knowledge and skills to be safer. During the past nine years thousands of teens have completed this program and to date less that 6 percent of the students have been involved in a crash of any severity. CAT students receive 60 percent less traffic citations than students that have not had this class. This is due to an attitude change. For more information or to register your son/daughter contact officer Preston Parrish at 868-1845 or e-mail to pparrish@seviervilletn.org; or contact Sgt. Rebecca Cowan at 8681866 or e-mail to rcowan@ seviervilletn.org.

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Adult soccer leagues eyed From Submitted Reports

SEVIERVILLE โ€” The Sevierville Parks and Recreation Department is attempting to gauge interest in starting an adult soccer league. Games would be played at City Park starting this spring. If there is enough interest, a league may be created for competitive players, as well as recreational players. Any feedback or interest in such a league is welcome. Contact Patrick Oxley, athletic supervisor with the Parks and Recreation Department, at 453-5441, or the City Park office at 453-6616 to express an interest. The league would operate probably from April through June. If there is enough interest, the city will begin to establish the leagues, create rules and attempt to start adult soccer. There will be entry fees established to cover costs. The league would be open to both male and female players 18 and over.

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Sunday, January 24, 2009