Page 1

The Mountain Press ■ Sevier County’s Daily Newspaper ■ Vol. 26, No. 1 ■ January 2, 2010 ■ www.themountainpress.com ■ 50 Cents

Saturday

Bundle of joy

INSIDE

Little girl first baby of 2010 for Sevier County By JEFF FARRELL Staff Writer

5He’s outta here Tennessee’s Eric Berry forgoes 2010 season for NFL draft sports, Page A8

5Lighten up on lighting up N.C. law banning smoking in bars, restaurants takes effect Region, Page A3

Nation

Still on the air Extended deadline keeps Fox showing bowl games Page A5

Weather Today Mostly cloudy High: 28°

Tonight Mostly cloudy

SEVIERVILLE — Sevier County got its first new resident of 2010 about 11 hours into the year. Kylee Jade Symington was resting Friday afternoon wit her mother, Katrina Symington, and father, Kevin Salisbury. Initially, she wasn’t due until Jan. 21. But by this week, her parents started thinking she could be the New Year’s baby. “About a week ago, everybody started talking and saying it’s going to happen on New Year’s,” Kevin said. So he started getting their bags packed and made sure everything was ready for the big moment. “He’s just that way,” Katrina said. “He had everything ready.” Thursday night, they were watching the Vols take on the Hokies at her parent’s home when they realized it was time to go. They came to the hospital at about 10:30 p.m., and al little more than 12 hours later, they met Kylee. “Everything went perfect,” Katrina said as she cradled the sleeping baby. Kylee already has one more person anxiously

DETAILS, Page A6

Obituaries Don Crabtree, 86 Billy Ray Pack, 79

DETAILS, Page A4

looking forward to seeing Symington, figured out packing bags. was lots of it.” “I think he felt the enerher. Her 10-month-old something was up around brother, Brady Russell the time his dad started gy,” Kevin said. “There n jfarrell@themountainpress

Food, family part of holiday tradition By JEFF FARRELL Staff Writer

Low: 12°

Jeff Farrell/The Mountain Press

Proud parents Katrina Symington and Kevin Salisbury hold Kylee Jade Symington, the first child to be born this year at Fort Sanders Sevier Medical Center.

If you wanted to have some traditional New Years’ grub Friday and you didn’t want to cook, Clint’s Bar-B-Que and Family Restaurant had the whole traditional menu. “We’ve got black-eyed peas, and cornbread and ham hocks,” Clint Carnley said as he poured some tea. There were plenty of people there to enjoy it, too. They included Mary Martinez and Carlos

Perez, who came up from Miami along with other family members to celebrate the new year. “We love the weather up here,” Martinez said. “It’s a break from sunny Miami. We love the people, too.” Perez was trying some black-eyed peas courtesy of Carnley. They try to do something as a family every New Year, Perez said. “”The most important thing is that we spend time with family and friends.” James Hannah, of Sevier County, and

Jeff Farrell/The Mountain Press

Carlos Perez, left, tries some black-eyed peas from Clint’s Bar-B-Que and Family Restaurant while restaurant owner Clint Carnley joins him at the table.

Richard Grabowski, of tradition; they’d decided and then we came here,” Florida, would seem to to have dinner after visit- Hannah said. agree. They said they didn’t ing their grandchildren. have any big New Year’s “We went to Ohio first n jfarrell@themountainpress.com

Index

Former Tenn. Lt. Gov. John S. Wilder dies at 88

Local & State . . . . . A1-6 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . A2 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . A7 Sports . . . . . . . . . . . A8-12 Advice . . . . . . . . . . . A14 Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . A14 Classifieds . . . . . . A12-13 Nation . . . . . . . . . . . . A5

By LUCAS L. JOHNSON II Associated Press Writer

Corrections The Mountain Press is committed to accuracy. Please report factual errors by calling 428-0748 Ext. 214.

AP Photo/State of Tennessee Photographic Services, Jed DeKalb, File

Sen. John Wilder, D-Mason, shows his appreciation March 20, 2008, for words spoken by another senator after Wilder announced during a session of the Tennessee Senate that he will not seek re-election. Wilder, a wily, eccentric and towering figure in Tennessee politics as lieutenant governor/Senate speaker for 36 years, died early Friday.

NASHVILL — John S. Wilder, a wily, eccentric and towering figure in Tennessee politics as lieutenant governor/Senate speaker for 36 years, died early Friday at a Memphis hospital. He was 88. Wilder’s son, Shelton Wilder, confirmed that his father died at 12:10 a.m. at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis. John Wilder was hospitalized earlier this week following a stroke. “He was at peace,” Shelton Wilder said Friday. When John Wilder’s 36-year tenure as Senate speaker ended in 2007, he was the longest serving presiding officer of a legis-

lative chamber in modern U.S. history, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures. His friends and colleagues called that a unique feat. “He was an innovator,” Rep. John Deberry, a Memphis Democrat and chairman of the Tennessee Black Caucus, said Friday. “To be speaker of such a politically divided organization as the Senate for as long as he was, is truly a remarkable feat. He’s ... made a mark on the history of this state and I hope the people of Tennessee truly realize what a great treasure he was.” Senate Speaker Ron Ramsey agreed. “He was a very unique See Wilder, Page A4


A2 ◆ Local

The Mountain Press ◆ Saturday, January 2, 2010

Community Calendar Editor’s Note: The community calendar is printed as space permits. Only noncommercial, public events held in Sevier County will be considered. They are listed by date. To place an item phone 4280748, ext. 214, or e-mail to editor@themountainpress. com. Items may be faxed to 453-4913.

Saturday, Jan. 2 Cove Clothes Closet

Medic Blood Drive

Retired Citizens

Retired Citizens of the Smokies meets at 1 p.m. at Gatlinburg Community Center. Program on Porters Creek and spring wildflowers by Kenny Jones. 4363010.

Youth Baseball

Gatekeepers

Monday, Jan. 4 Prayer In Action meets 6 p.m. Pigeon Forge UMC for a time of prayer for the United States and its government. Nondenominational.

GateKeepers

GateKeepers men’s community Bible study, 6:30 p.m., 2445 Scenic Mt. Drive, Sevierville. (865) 310-7831.

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 10 a.m. Seymour Heights Christian Church (enter last door on right), Chapman and Boyds Highway n 1 p.m., Gatlinburg Inn

Photographic Society

LeConte Photographic Society club competition 6:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Sevierville. Judy Cravy to present program on architectural photography in area. lecontephotographic.com.

Seymour Story Time

Preschool story time 11 a.m. at Seymour Library. 573-0728.

Democrats

Sevier County Democrats meet 7 p.m., third floor of courthouse. Visit sevierdemocrats.com or call 617-2145.

Gatlinburg Gardeners

NARFE

National Association Retired Federal Employees meets at 6 p.m., Holiday Inn Pigeon Forge. 4534174.

Prayer In Action

Thursday, Jan. 7

Tuesday, Jan. 5

Cove Clothes Closet, 3238 Pittman Center Road at Old Richardson Cove Church, open 9-3 Saturdays only. Free clothing. 453-4526. Smoky Mountain Youth Baseball Association (SMYBA) league sign-ups Sevierville Community Center next to bowling alley. Registration 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. $30 per player. USSSA baseball is for ages 3-15. Birth certificates required. (865) 388-7672.

Pigeon Forge, beginning Wednesday worship services, 6:30 p.m. every Wednesday. Rev. Steve Pross, 216-2066.

Medic blood drive, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Food City Gatlinburg.

Gatlinburg Garden Club will meet at 1 p.m. at Community Center. Club will present “Tea Time Tidbits” by Kappy Lapides, Black Bear Tea Co. Meeting canceled if weather closes schools.

Gatekeepers men’s Bible study, 6:30 p.m. 1328 Old Newport Highway, Sevierville. 908-0591.

Hot Meals

Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries provides hot meals 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church in Sevierville.

Video Contest

Sevier County Right To Life video contest open to high school students in Sevier County. Entries due today. 654-7685 or e-mail to sevcrtl@bellsouth.net.

TOPS

TOPS weight loss chapter meets at 6 p.m., Parkway Church of God in Sevierville. 755-9517 or 429-3150.

Kindness Counts

Kindness Counts meets 7 p.m. at Sevierville IHOP. 654-2684.

Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 9 a.m. UMC Pigeon Forge n 2 p.m. Blue Mountain Mist B&B, Pullen Road n 6:30 p.m. Seymour UMC, Chapman Highway, back entrance n 6:30 p.m. Sevierville UMC, conference room

Pokemon League

Sevierville Pokemon Trading Card Game League meets noon to 2 p.m. in community room at Sevier County Library on Court Avenue. 310-5140.

Angel Food

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245.

Blood Drives

n Gatlinburg First Baptist Church, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. n Sevier Farmers Co-op, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Angel Food

Wednesday, Jan. 6

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4-7 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245.

Sevierville Story Time

Preschool story time 10:30 a.m., Sevier County Main Library. 453-3532.

Blood Drive

Medic blood drive, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Evergreen Presbyterian Church, 1103 Dolly Parton Parkway, Sevierville.

Friday, Jan. 8 Angel Food

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd., Pigeon Forge. 429-2508. n 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and

Middle Creek UMC

Middle Creek United Methodist Church, 1828 Middle Creek Road,

4 to 7 p.m. First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245. n 3 to 6 p.m. River Of Life Outreach, 110 Simmons Road, Seymour. 679-6796.

Kodak Story Time

Preschool story time 11 a.m. at Kodak Library. 9330078.

Blood Drive

Medic blood drive at Sevierville Post Office, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Boyds Creek Revival

Boyds Creek Church of God winter revival 7:30 p.m. today and Saturday, 11:30 a.m. Sunday. Bishop G.R. Hill from Cleveland to speak.

Lions Club Rummage

Sevierville Lions Club indoor charity rummage sale 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. today and Saturday, 122 Bruce Street, downtown Sevierville. 453-2025.

Saturday, Jan. 9 Angel Food

Celebration of the Sanctity of Life program begins 2:45 p.m. in the theater.

GateKeepers men’s community Bible study, 6:30 p.m., 2445 Scenic Mt. Drive, Sevierville. (865) 310-7831.

Wednesday, Jan. 13

Cancer Support Group

Garden Club

Smoky Mountain Cancer Support Group meets at Senior Center. Supper 6 p.m. program 6:45 by Barbara Edwards on stress. 428-5834 or 654-9280.

Sevierville Garden Club will meet at noon at Sevier Senior Center. Lunch served. Tom Leonard, manager of Sevier Solid Waste Inc., to speak on recycling. Board meeting at 11.

DAR

Angel Food

DAR Spencer Clack Chapter meets 7 p.m., Sevier County Library. Program on history of silver by Carrie Murphy.

Angel Food Orders n 5 to 6:30 p.m., River Of Life Outreach, 110 Simmons Road, Seymour. 679-6796.

Angel Food

Middle Creek UMC

Middle Creek United Methodist Church, 1828 Middle Creek Road, Pigeon Forge, worship services 6:30 p.m. Rev. Steve Pross, 216-2066.

Thursday, Jan. 14 Women’s Bible Study

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 9 a.m., Pigeon Forge UMC n 2 p.m., Blue Mountain Mist B&B, Pullen Road, Sevierville n 6:30 p.m., Seymour UMC, Chapman Highway, back entrance n 6:30 p.m., Sevierville UMC, Conference Room

Sevierville Community Center gym closing Jan. 11-13th for maintenance. To reopen for regularly scheduled activities at 6 a.m. Jan. 14. 453-5441.

Sunday, Jan. 10

Sevier County Right to Life invites residents and visitors to their memorial march leaving the Pigeon Forge Community Center at 1:45 p.m. and walk silently to Country Tonite Theater.

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd., Pigeon Forge. 429-2508. n 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245.

Garlands of Grace women’s Bible study: n 10 a.m. Seymour Heights Christian Church (enter last door on right), Chapman and Boyds Highway n 1 p.m., Gatlinburg Inn

Gymnasium Closing

Commemorative March

Angel Food

Women’s Bible Study

Cove Clothes Closet

Boyds Creek Church of God winter revival 11:30 a.m. Bishop G.R. Hill from Cleveland to speak.

Gatekeepers men’s Bible study, 6:30 p.m. 1328 Old Newport Highway, Sevierville. 908-0591.

GateKeepers

Angel Food orders: n 2 to 5 p.m. Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd., Pigeon Forge. 429-2508. n 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245. n 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., River Of Life Outreach, 110 Simmons Road, Seymour. 679-6796.

Boyds Creek Revival

Gatekeepers

Monday, Jan. 11

Angel Food orders: n 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Gum Stand Baptist Church, 3031 Veterans Blvd., Pigeon Forge. 429-2508. n 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and 4 to 7 p.m., First Smoky Mountain Church of the Nazarene, 2652 Upper Middle Creek Road. 9081245. n 10 a.m to 2 p.m. River Of Life Outreach, 110 Simmons Road, Seymour. 679-6796. Cove Clothes Closet, 3238 Pittman Center Road at Old Richardson Cove Church, open 9-3 Saturdays only. Free clothing. 453-4526.

428-2445, ext. 107.

Hot Meals

Tuesday, Jan. 12

Smoky Mountain Area Rescue Ministries provides hot meals 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church in Sevierville.

S.I.T.

Seniors In Touch (S.I.T.) meets 6 to 7:30 p.m. at MountainBrook Village, 700 Markhill Drive, Sevierville. 428-2445.

TOPS

Alzheimer’s Support

TOPS weight loss chapter meets at 6 p.m., Parkway Church of God in Sevierville. 755-9517 or 429-3150.

Alzheimer’s Support group at MountainBrook Village meets from 5-6 p.m. Program by Bobby Fields of Alzheimer’s Association.

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Local/Region â—† A3

Saturday, January 2, 2010 â—† The Mountain Press

U.S. mine deaths hit record low in 2009 FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The number of miners killed on the job in the United States fell for a second straight year to 34, the fewest since officials began keeping records nearly a century ago. That was down from the previous low of 52 in 2008. U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration documents show 18 of the deaths occurred in coal mines, down from 29 in 2008; and 16 were in gold, copper and other types of mines, down from 22 in 2008. Most involved aboveground truck accidents on mine property, though some of the deaths resulted from rock falls and being struck by machinery. Obama administration mine safety czar Joe Main said the numbers are encouraging, but he won’t be satisfied until no miners are killed on the job. “I think that’s accomplishable, if you look at where we came from, and where we’ve come to,� Main said. The latest statistics are vastly improved, he said, from a century ago when hundreds, sometimes thousands of miners were killed each year. The deadliest year in recorded U.S. coal mining history was 1907, when 3,242 deaths were reported. That year, the nation’s most deadly mine explosion killed 358 people near Monongah, W.Va. Main credits the decrease in deaths over the past year to beefed-up enforcement and stricter regulations in the wake of a series of mining disasters over the past four years in Kentucky, Utah and West Virginia.

A rrests

AP Photo/Gerry Broome

In this Thursday, , 2009 photo, David Brathcher, from Durham, smokes a cigarette at Satisfaction Restaurant & Bar in Durham, N.C., Dec. 17. The restaurant sits inside a former tobacco warehouse.

Tobacco-rich N.C. bans smoking in bars, restaurants By GARY D. ROBERTSON Associated Press Writer DURHAM, N.C. — In dozens of states, Gary Richards wouldn’t have been able to light up a Marlboro before tucking into his meat-lover’s pizza, as he did at Satisfaction Restaurant & Bar this week. But in North Carolina, the nation’s leading tobacco producer, limits on indoor smoking have lagged behind those in much of the country. That changes today, when smoking in restaurants and bars is banned in the state that is home to two major tobacco companies and where the golden leaf helped build Duke and Wake Forest universities. “There’s smokers and there’s nonsmokers. We’ve gotten along in the past,� Richards, 52, said this week during a premeal smoke at the restaurant inside a former tobacco warehouse. “Why can’t I come in here and have my beer and a couple of slices of pizza and a cigarette?� The dangers of secondhand smoke to employee health and complaints from patrons about the smell finally won out when the Legislature approved the ban in 2009 after years of failures. “This law doesn’t tell anybody they shouldn’t smoke,� said state Rep. Hugh Holliman, a lung cancer survivor whose sister died of lung cancer. He led the charge for the legislation. “It’s saying nonsmokers should have the same right to breathe clean air.� North Carolina is a relative latecomer to tobacco prohibitions in public places. North Carolina is at least the 29th state

to ban smoking in restaurants and 24th for bars, according to the American Lung Association. The new prohibitions represent a dramatic turn for a state that produces nearly half of the nation’s tobacco. The headquarters for R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. and Lorillard Inc. remain in North Carolina, where colonists began growing tobacco in the 1600s. The leaf became the top cash crop by far for eastern North Carolina farmers. But the golden leaf’s role has changed dramatically as the state shifted from a predominantly agricultural economy to one led by manufacturing, and most recently by services and technology. In 1978, tobacco accounted for 34 percent of all farm income in North Carolina, or $1.1 billion. Thirty years later tobacco production fell to $687 million, or only 7 percent of farm income, according to federal agricultural data. The amount of tobacco grown also fell during the same period from about 850 million pounds to 390 million pounds. Still, about 21 percent of the state’s adult population smoked in 2008, compared to 18 percent nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Other traditional tobacco-growing states have few, if any, statewide restrictions on smoking in public places and work sites. Virginia passed a statewide ban that took effect Dec. 1 but restaurants and bars can get around it if they have separate ventilation systems for smoking and nonsmoking sections.

Bluegrass shows bring more visitors to caverns

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Shortly afterward, Mayo called WSM radio to propose a bluegrass show that could tie in with the legendary country music station and asked Jones cavern operators were interested in putting music in the Volcano Room. “It was a marketer’s dream,� Jones said. “We’re now the opening act for the Grand Ole Opry, for goodness sake. People come here from all over the country for the show, and it’s a great tie-in for us.�

Bluegrass artist Chris Volpe was one of the first to play the Volcano Room. He helped Mayo conduct tests with a sound engineer to determine whether the cave had good acoustics for concerts. “I thought it was really, really cool,� Volpe said of the experience. “I had never done anything quite like that. I drove two hours into the middle of nowhere, then went 400 feet down a hole. But it’s pretty awesome in there, and the acoustics are perfect.�

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for a better way to increase our business in the middle of a recession,â&#x20AC;? Jones said. The caverns were discovered in the early 1800s and have been open to the public since 1956. In the past, the attraction has relied on tourists who like to see natural attractions during road trips and vacations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting a segment of the population that never considered going to a hole in the ground for fun,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This has opened a whole new audience to us.â&#x20AC;? Concert tickets typically cost $20, with a cave tour available for an extra $10 or $15, depending on the length of the visit. Mayo, who is co-owner of Nashvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mayo Gossett Media Group, got the idea after visiting the caverns with his family on Memorial Day last year. His tour ended in the Volcano Room, a giant natural auditorium carved out of the limestone by running water over thousands of years.

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NASHVILLE (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bluegrass music is breathing new life into one of Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest private tourist attractions. Cumberland Caverns, about 90 miles southeast of Nashville, has become the venue for Bluegrass Underground, a series of live concerts in a giant natural concert hall 333 feet below ground. The event brings a capacity crowd of 300-plus visitors to its monthly concerts and provides programming for a weekly broadcast on WSM radio prior to the regular Grand Ole Opry performance on Saturday nights. The concert series started in July 2008 and was the idea of Nashville market executive Todd Mayo. Caverns General Manager Teddy Jones told The Tennessean the shows have created so much publicity for the attraction near McMinnville that visitor attendance will top 36,000 in 2009, a 40 percent increase from a year earlier. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have asked

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Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Note: The following information was taken from the intake reports at the Sevier County Jail. All people listed within this report are presumed innocent unless proven guilty in a court of law. u Wilmer Canelas Amador, 36, of Knoxville, was charged Dec. 31 with a misdemeanor warrant from general sessions court. He was being held. u Herman Carlos Arwood, 51, of Mascot, was charged Jan. 1 with DUI and violation of implied consent law. He was being held in lieu of $1,500 bond. u David Ben Branam, 26, of 2348 Bluff Heights, Sevierville, was charged Dec. 31 with violation of pre-trial release bond conditions. He was being held. u Rebecca Faye Eichenberger, 46, of 901 Hidden Harbor Drive, Sevierville, was charged Jan. 1 with DUI and violation of implied consent law. She was being held in lieu of $2,500 bond. u Robert Michael Farmer, 53, of New Market, was charged Dec. 31 with assault. He was released on $1,000 bond. u Patrick Lee Howell, 23, of 1208 Green Court,

Seymour, was charged Dec. 31 with public intoxication. He was being held in lieu of $250 bond. u Katherine Selvy Kemp, 45, of 1113 Blue Bonnet Drive, Sevierville, was charged Dec. 31 with burglary and theft of property. She was being held in lieu of $5,000 bond. u David Wayne Maples 32, of Sevierville, was charged Dec. 31 with violation of probation. He was being held. u Garry Lynn Ogle, 29, of 3240 Robeson Road, Sevierville, was charged Dec. 31 with aggravated domestic assault. He was being held in lieu of $5,000 bond. u James Dean Ogle, 19, of 3134 Noland Drive, Pigeon Forge, was charged Dec. 31 with violation of probation. He was released. u Kevin Justin Price, 25, of Whittier, N.C., was charged Jan. 1 with DUI and traffic violations. He was being held in lieu of $500 bond. u Shannon Eugene Ward, 38, of 2519 Sportsmans Way, Sevierville, was charged Jan. 1 with domestic violence assault. She was being held in lieu of $1,500 bond.


A4 ◆ Local/Nation

The Mountain Press ◆ Saturday, January 2, 2010

Foreign govt’s among Clinton donors

Obituaries In Memoriam

announced at a later date. The family requests that in lieu of flowers donations be made to Middle Creek United Methodist Church 1828 Middle Creek Road Sevierville, TN. 37863. Rawlings Funeral Home is in charge of local arrangements.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Foreign countries including Norway and Oman contributed to former President Bill Clinton’s charity, and donors including Donald Trump, multinational soft drink company Coca-Cola and singer Elton John’s foundation also pitched in as Hillary Rodham Clinton served her first year as secretary of state. A donor list released on New Year’s Day by the William J. Clinton Foundation shows that in all, Norway has given $10 million to $25 million to the charity since its founding roughly a decade ago. Oman gave $1 million to $5 million over the years. The list gave cumulative donation totals and didn’t say how much each contributor gave last year. The foundation provided The Associated Press with a donor list Friday morning under the heading “William J. Clinton Foundation Publishes Names of 2009 Contributors on Foundation Website” but later said the disclosure, which included many more foreign governments, covered donors dating back to the charity’s inception, and that it wouldn’t identify who gave in 2009. The foundation changed course Friday afternoon and updated the list to specify 2009 donors. The Clintons agreed to annually disclose the names of donors to the foundation to address concerns about potential conflicts of interest between the former president’s fundraising abroad and his wife’s role in helping direct Obama administration foreign policy. Then-President-elect Barack Obama made the disclosure a condition of his selection of Hillary Rodham

Speaker Jimmy Naifeh, D-Covington, said Wilder was one of the most honest men he has ever known. “When you look up the word statesman in the dictionary, you’re sure to find John Wilder’s name,” Naifeh said. As speaker, Wilder was empowered to appoint standing committees and name chairmen. He remained lieutenant governor so long by appointing Republicans to some committee chairmanships and gaining GOP support when the full Senate elected the speaker every two years. Supporters long cited Wilder’s light touch in controlling the 33-member Senate, letting it take a path of its own choosing. Wilder’s mantra of “the Senate is the Senate” was often followed by expressions of pride in the members’ actions — no matter what they might have been. Democratic Sen. Douglas Henry of Nashville was a close friend of Wilder’s and the only senator who was already in office when Wilder came to the Senate. He is still serving. “John Wilder single-handedly made the Tennessee Senate, while he was there, what a Senate should be,” said the 83-year-old Henry. “He gave every member time and encouragement to

promote what he wanted. He never told any member how to vote. He believed in a senator being a senator, as he used to put it. And that’s a gift that hasn’t been given to many legislators in my opinion.” Critics called Wilder a crafty politician whose only real goal was to remain speaker — even at the expense of his own party’s goals. Wilder was first elected to the state Senate in 1959 for a two-year term, but then was out of office until winning election again in 1966 to another two-year term. He won his first four-year Senate term in 1968. His cooperation with Republicans did not always sit well with fellow Democrats. In 1987, the State Democratic Executive Committee censured him for giving Republicans control of four of nine Senate committees. “I have an unequivocal commitment to be fair and impartial, regardless of race, creed, sex or political affiliation,” Wilder said at the time. A year later, the same committee voted not to send him as a delegate to the Democratic National Convention. Wilder also participated in one of Tennessee’s strangest political events — the removal of fellow Democrat Ray Blanton

Billy Ray Pack Billy Ray Pack, age 79 of Sevierville, formerly of Logan, W.V., passed away Wednesday, December 30, 2009. He was a member of the Great Smoky Mountains Church of Christ and a retired meatcutter/ manager of A & P Tea Company. He was preceded in death by his parents, Kay and Mary Pack and a brother Johnny Pack. He is survived by his loving wife of 61 years, Polly Gore Pack; son and daughter-in-law, William Guy and Donna Pack; daughters and sons-in-law, Deborah and Tom Elkins, Kathy and Fred Murray, Valarie and Kenny Kitchen, and special doggy, Woody; brothers, Jerry and Tom, both of Logan, W.V.; sisters, Kathryn of Ohio and Toni of N.C.; grandchildren, Kristi Nelson, Thomas (Bub) Elkins, Bethanie Robinette, Shawna Justus, Samantha and Angelica Pack, Michael, Mikayla, and Kendyll Kitchen and special grand-doggie, Molly Murray; great grandchildren, Brittany, Steven, Scottie, Brandon, Nicholas, Nathan, J.K., and Zara. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Bill’s memory to GSM Church of Christ Building Fund, PO Box 173, Pigeon Forge, TN, 37868. The family will receive friends 2-4 p.m. Sunday in the Chapel of Atchley Funeral Home with the funeral service immediately following with Minister Al Behel officiating. Bill will return home to Logan, W.V. for interment service to be held 11 a.m. Tuesday, January 5, 2010 at the Mausoleum in Forest Lawn Cemetery. Arrangements by Atchley Funeral Home, Sevierville. n www.atchleyfuneralhome.com

Don Crabtree Don Crabtree, 86 of Pigeon Forge, died Dec. 30, 2009. Survivors: wife, Kaye Crabtree of Pigeon Forge; brother, Gordon Crabtree of Florida; sister, Arline Gavitt of Rhode Island; several nieces and nephews. Funeral arrangements will be

Wilder

3From Page A1

individual,” said the Blountville Republican. “He’ll go down in the history books as one of those people that helped make Tennessee a better place to live.” Wilder was hospitalized five days in February 2008 for pneumonia, but returned to work at the Capitol one day after being discharged. Then in March 2008, at age 86, he announced on the Senate floor that he would not seek re-election, calling the Senate “more a part of me than anything else I’ve done.” Wilder, a Democrat from Mason, was last elected to the post in 2005 at age 83. It was his 18th consecutive term. He lost it to Ramsey in 2007 when he failed to get the crossover GOP support he had enjoyed in the past and a Democrat voted against him. As of 2007, Wilder had served a total of 43 years in the Senate — 36 as Senate speaker. “All my life I’ve wanted to make a difference,” he told his colleagues in announcing he was leaving public life. “I wanted to do what God wanted me to do, and I didn’t know exactly what that was.” As Senate speaker, Wilder also was the state’s lieutenant governor and the first in line to succeed the governor in the event of death or resignation. But he never ascended to the governorship. In a statement, Gov. Phil Bredesen called Wilder “one of the toughest men I’ve ever known.” “It was a privilege to know this unique Tennessean,” he said. “I wish it could have been for a longer time.” Former House

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Former President Bill Clinton, right, listens as Microsoft chairman Bill Gates speaks Aug. 14, 2006, during their conversation session at the 16th World Aids Conference in Toronto. A donor list released on New Year’s Day by the William J. Clinton Foundation shows that the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation gave to the former president’s charity. Clinton for the post, and the two senior lawmakers on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, John Kerry, D-Mass., and Richard Lugar, R-Ind., said when the first list was released in December 2008 that the disclosure “is designed to establish greater transparency and predictability with regard to the activities of the Clinton Foundation in the context of Sen. Clinton’s service as secretary of state.” The William J. Clinton Foundation works in the United States and around the world on such issues as health care, particularly HIV/AIDS; climate change, and economic development. It also runs the Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock, Ark., which includes Clinton’s presidential library. “I am deeply grateful to

the many generous contributors who made it possible for my foundation to accomplish so much in 2009, including increasing the number of people on lifesaving HIV/AIDS treatment, helping cities reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and inspiring millions of children to lead healthier lives,” Bill Clinton said in a written statement. Several foreign governments that appeared in the foundation’s first disclosure in December 2008 didn’t give last year, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Qatar and Brunei. In releasing the list Friday, the foundation didn’t identify individual contributors’ employers, nationalities or any other details. It gave only cumulative ranges rather than precise donations, and didn’t provide a fundraising

total. But it did say that more than 90 percent of the gifts it received last year were in donations of $250 or less. The 2009 donors included three who ranked as the foundation’s all-time biggest givers, topping $25 million each since Bill Clinton founded the charity: the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; Canadian mining tycoon and Radcliffe Foundation chief executive Frank Giustra, and UNITAID. Bill Clinton joined Giustra on a 2005 trip to Kazakhstan; within days after the pair met with Kazakhstan’s president, Giustra’s business lined up preliminary deals giving it rights to buy into uranium projects controlled by a Kazakhstan state-owned enterprise. Bill Clinton has said he had nothing to do with that.

as governor on Jan. 17, 1979. Wilder and other Democrats were concerned that Blanton, in the last days of his administration, would add to the 52 pardons and commutations he had just issued. Wilder and the others decided to swear in Republican Gov.-elect Lamar Alexander three days early to head off further Blanton actions. In the early 1960s, during racial unrest in his native Fayette County, Wilder refused to punish black tenants by evicting them or calling in crop loans. He attended the University of Tennessee’s College of Agriculture and was a graduate of the Memphis State University Law School. He was a farmer, businessman, cotton ginner and practicing lawyer. He was a pilot and flew his own plane. Later in his career, Wilder was known for his disjointed speeches, and some of his sentences became known as “Wilderisms.” In June 2002, as the Legislature was at an impasse over the state

budget, he told the Senate: “It may be, it may be and I don’t think it is, it may be one or two people in here don’t know what right is, but I don’t know that that’s true.” Later in the same speech, Wilder said: “Likes repel and likes attract. In the inorganic world there’s a positive and a negative force. It’s

constructive and destructive. It’s good, it’s bad. It’s love, it’s hate. It’s God and the devil. And the sum total of both forces add up to put us where we are.” Over the years, members of the Capitol Hill media corps posted clippings containing some of Wilder’s most memorable quotes on the walls in the press room.

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Nation â&#x2014;&#x2020; A5

Saturday, January 2, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press

Few called market turn, fewer predict it will last NEW YORK (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Few analysts forecast this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s remarkable stock market rebound as major indexes were plunging to 12-year lows last March. Now, with most experts predicting the pace of stocksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gains will slow in 2010, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reason to believe they will be proven correct. Stocks began the dramatic turnaround in March after Citigroup Inc. and other big banks said they were making money again, and then climbed at a fairly steady pace as signs of an economic recovery from the Great Recession became more pronounced. Investor fears about a potential financial system collapse played a big role in the early year slump in stocks. Once it was clear that wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to happen, the Standard & Poorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 500 index roared back 64.8 percent from its early March low, the biggest move since the Depression. For the full year, the index rose 23.5 percent, its best showing since 2003. But sustaining that momentum in the new year likely would require a big drop in the unemployment rate and strong corporate profit gains, along with stable borrowing costs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a combination few analysts

are forecasting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The easy money has been made already,â&#x20AC;? said Bill Stone, chief investment strategist for PNC Wealth Management. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to see another 65 percent move in the next nine months.â&#x20AC;? In the last day of the year, more signs of healing first pleased investors, then had them concerned about the economyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to thrive without government help. Light trading volume exaggerated the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s moves, sending the Dow Jones industrial average down 120.46, or 1.1 percent, to 10,428.05. The yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stats tell an incredible story across the financial markets: n By March, the Dow Jones industrials had tumbled 53.8 percent from a record high in October 2007 to a low of 6,547.05, its lowest level since 1997. It then rocketed 59.3 percent in the final nine months of the year . The Dow is still down 26.4 percent from its 2007 peak of 14,164.53. n U.S. stocks have gained about $5.2 trillion in value since the low in March, putting the gain for the year at $2.6 trillion. But the climb was still not enough to give investors

a win for the decade. The S&P fell 24.1 percent from 2000-09, its first loss for a decade. S&P says it managed to advance during the Depression thanks to dividend payments. n A share of Citigroup Inc., one of the banks hit hardest by the 2008 financial crisis and the recession, reached a high early in the year of $7.59, then fell to 97 cents in March. It ended the year at $3.31. n Technology and financial stocks posted some of the biggest gains in market value in 2009. Among

them: Apple Inc., Microsoft Corp., Google Inc., Bank of America Corp. and IBM Corp. n Stock mutual funds are valued at about $4.6 trillion, up from $4.04 trillion at the beginning of the decade. n The Chicago Board Options Exchangeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Volatility Index, known as the marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fear index and a measure of investor worry, is down 45.8 percent for the year, and also down about 76 percent from its high of about 89, reached at the height

Football fans in limbo but Fox broadcasts stay on LOS ANGELES (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Fox television network pulled back from the brink on Friday, allowing its signals to continue for millions of cable subscribers beyond a midnight deadline as it continued to seek higher fees for its programming. The News Corp. broadcaster had threatened to force two cable companies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Time Warner Cable and Bright House Networks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to drop the Fox broadcast signal from 14 of its TV stations and half a dozen of its cable channels as a contract expired at midnight Thursday. Even as talks continued into Friday, the conciliatory stance made it appear a disruption would not occur â&#x20AC;&#x201D; likely preserving access to the Sugar Bowl college football game (starting at 8:30 p.m. EST) and other programming for more than 6 million cable subscribers in New York, Los Angeles, Orlando, Fla., and other markets. It was unclear how long the reprieve would last, however. That left fans looking forward to the Florida-Cincinnati bowl matchup in doubt about whether they would need to head to sports bars with a satellite TV hookup to cheer on their teams. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It leaves some people up in limbo as to whether to leave their homes to watch the game,â&#x20AC;? said Dan Beiley, 28, president of the Gotham Gators, a University of Florida alumni club in New York. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly unfortunate that it came to all this.â&#x20AC;? Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass, who earlier urged the companies to preserve TV access throughout the college football bowl season, said he was â&#x20AC;&#x153;pleasedâ&#x20AC;? at the decision to keep Fox programming on cable while talks went on. Fox spokesman Scott Grogin said at about 1 p.m. EST Friday the companies were â&#x20AC;&#x153;still negotiating.â&#x20AC;? Time Warner Cable Inc. Chief Executive Glenn Britt said the ball was now in Foxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s court. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done everything

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of the financial crisis in the fall of 2008. It ended 2009 at 21.68. n The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, used as a benchmark for interest rates on mortgages and other consumer loans, stands at 3.84 percent, up from 2.22 percent a year ago. Investors are no longer fleeing to the safety of U.S. government debt. n The ICE Futures US dollar index, which measures the dollar against a basket of currencies, fell 4 percent for the year. The dollar gained 4 percent

in December on expectations that a strengthening economy will lead to an increase in interest rates and make the dollar a more attractive investment. Analysts expect the dollar will remain strong early in 2010 but are divided over whether it can hold its gains if the economy struggles. n Gold gained 24 percent for the year, rising as high as $1,227.50 and closing at $1,096.20 as investors looked for high returns ways to shield their money from inflation.

Obama begins new year reviewing intel system

we can to reach a fair agreement and now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really up to Fox,â&#x20AC;? Britt said in a statement Friday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope they will agree to a deal thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reasonable for everyone.â&#x20AC;? Fox wants to be paid $1 per cable subscriber each month for the broadcast signal it now gives away freely from the stations it owns. Other Fox affiliate stations that are owned by different companies have already cut deals to be paid by cable operators for a fraction of that fee. Fox says it can no longer give away its stationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; signals because the network is facing stiff competition from cable channels, such as the Walt Disney Co.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ESPN, which earn subscriber fees on top of advertising dollars. That dual revenue stream allowed ESPN to outbid Fox for high-priced events such as the college football Bowl Championship Series â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including the Sugar Bowl, Fiesta Bowl and Orange Bowl that are now on Fox â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from 2011 to 2013.

HONOLULU (AP) â&#x20AC;&#x201D; President Barack Obama is reviewing reports from homeland security officials as his administration tries to determine what U.S. policy and personnel failures preceded the attempted Detroit jetliner bombing. Intelligence officials, meanwhile, prepared for what was shaping up to be uncomfortable hearings before Congress about miscommunication among anti-terror agencies and sweeping changes expected under Obamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s watch. Democrats joined a chorus led by Obama

in declaring the governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intelligence procedures in need of repair. Among them, Rep. Jane Harman, D-Calif., said that when the government gets tipped to trouble as it did before a 23-year-old Nigerian man boarded the Northwest Airlines jet with explosives, â&#x20AC;&#x153;someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair should be on fire.â&#x20AC;? One senior administration official told reporters traveling with the vacationing president: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The failure to share that information is not going to be tolerated.â&#x20AC;?

AP Photo/Time Warner Cable

In this advertisement released by Time Warner Cable, a warning that FOX has threatened to pull the plug on Time Warner Cable customers at midnight, New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve, unless the cable company gives in to demands for massive price increases.

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EVIER COUNTY NewHSISTORICAL PRINT

25

$

each

plus tax & shipping

BY LOCAL ARTIST

2891 PARKWAY PIGEON FORGE, TN (LOCATED AT TRAFFIC LIGHT#4 IN PIGEON FORGE)

  s77730).#)4953!#/â&#x20AC;&#x153;HISTORICAL OGLE CABINâ&#x20AC;? Special Commemorative Painting Celebrating Artist Randall Ogle 40th Year of Painting 1969-2009

â&#x20AC;&#x153;HISTORICAL MARTHA JANE OGLE CABINâ&#x20AC;? 3IGNED.UMBEREDs,IMITED%DITIONs&ITShXv&RAME

William Ogle was on a hunting trip from South Carolina when his Cherokee companions led him to the Smoky Mountains. He fell in love with the area and felt he had found paradise on earth and planned to move his family to the area. He planned a cabin and even cut the logs in 1803. He returned to the Greenville, South Carolina area to get his family and return with them to their new home. But he got sick with the plague - thought to be malaria - and died the same year. But his dream was kept alive by his determined wife Martha Jane Huskey Ogle. In 1807, four years later, she traveled to Gatlinburg with her 7 teenage children - 5 sons and 2 daughters - and her bother Peter Huskey. She was determined to fulfill the dream of her husband, and with her children and brother, she did. Located in downtown Gatlinburg, the cabin logs are made from American Chestnut, which is now extinct. The logs were hand hewn, squared off an notched on the ends to fit together. The Ogle name is a prominent and well-known name in the Sevier County area of the Great Smoky Mountains. it was said that in the mid 1950â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about 80% of the people who lived in Gatlinburg all their lives could trace their ancestry to the Ogleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s who built and lived in the Ogle cabin. Smoky Mountain native artist, Randall Ogle, traces is family to this first cabin.

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428-0746 www.RandallOgleGallery.com


A6 ◆

The Mountain Press ◆ Saturday, January 2, 2010

sunrise in the smokies

TODAY’S Briefing Local n

SEVIER COUNTY

Hospice in need of new volunteers UT Hospice is looking for mature volunteers to serve patients in the Sevier County and surrounding areas. The only requirement is a willingness to serve others. No medical experience is necessary. Training is provided. For more information, call Brenda Fletcher at 544-6277.

n

GATLINBURG

City Commission cancels meeting

The Gatlinburg City Commission meeting scheduled for Tuesday has been cancelled due to the holiday schedule. The next regular meeting of the commission will be Jan. 19. City officials will meet at 9 a.m. Jan. 13 at Mills Conference Center for their mid-year budget review.

n

On Jan. 21, Sevier County Extension will be offering an Arthritis Foundation tai chi program. The seven-session program is designed for people with arthritis. Classes will be held every Thursday, Jan. 21 through Feb. 25, with one additional class on Feb. 23. Each class will be from 6-7 p.m. at the Extension Office near the fairgrounds. The cost of the seven sessions is $40. For more information or to sign up, contact Linda Hyder at 453-3695 or e-mail to lhyder@utk.edu. Registration is needed by Jan. 15. SEVIERVILLE

Coed volleyball league forming

The Sevierville Recreation Department is accepting roster and entry fees for the coed volleyball league. Play will begin Jan. 14 at the Community Center. Entry fee is $125 and is due by Thursday. Packets can be picked up at the gym office at the Community Center. This league is open for persons who are 18 years of age or older. Serious volleyball players can join the “A” division, or those who want to have fun can play in the “B” division. For more information call Patrick Oxley at the Community Center, 4535441.

State n

Lottery Numbers

Judge tosses Blackwater case WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge cited repeated government missteps in dismissing all charges against five Blackwater Worldwide security guards accused of killing unarmed Iraqi civilians in a case that inflamed anti-American sentiment abroad. U.S. District Judge Ricardo Urbina dismissed the case against the guards accused of the shooting in a crowded Baghdad intersection in 2007. The shooting in busy Nisoor Square left 17 Iraqis dead. The Iraqi government wanted the guards to face trial in Iraq. Officials there said they would

closely watch how the U.S. judicial system handled the case. The five guards are Donald Ball, a former Marine from West Valley City, Utah; Dustin Heard, a former Marine from Knoxville, Tenn.; Evan Liberty, a former Marine from Rochester, N.H.; Nick Slatten, a former Army sergeant from Sparta, Tenn., and Paul Slough, an Army veteran from Keller, Texas. Urbina said the prosecutors ignored the advice of senior Justice Department officials and built their case on sworn statements that had been given under a promise of immunity. Urbina said that violated the guards’ con-

stitutional rights. He dismissed the government’s explanations as “contradictory, unbelievable and lacking in credibility.” “We’re obviously disappointed by the decision,” Justice Department spokesman Dean Boyd said. “We’re still in the process of reviewing the opinion and considering our options.” Prosecutors can appeal the ruling. Ali al-Dabbagh, the Iraqi government spokesman, said in a statement Friday that the government was dismayed by the court’s dismissal of the case. “The Iraqi government regrets the decision,” he said.

NASHVILLE

Ornament causes diversion of flight

NASHVILLE (AP) — A suspicious package that caused a Detroit-toOrlando, Fla., flight to be diverted to Nashville turned out to contain a Christmas ornament. Delta Air Lines spokesman Carlos Santos said it was not immediately clear why the package had been deemed suspicious. He said the flight had been diverted “out of an abundance of caution.” The 75 passengers and 5 crew members on Northwest Airlines flight 2364 were taken off the plane Friday morning at around 8 a.m. while dogs searched it. They were allowed to reboard about two hours later. Delta Air Lines owns Northwest Airlines.

Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Midday: 1-3-9 Evening: 4-4-0

13 8

Friday, Jan. 1, 2010 Midday: 4-4-8

16

Thursday, Dec. 31, 2009 Midday: 9-0-7-0 Evening: 6-3-0-5

16 14

Friday, Jan. 1, 2010

TODAY’S FORECAST

Midday: 6-0-1-8

LOCAL: Mostly cloudy

Today is Saturday, Jan. 2, the 2nd day of 2010. There are 363 days left in the year. n

Winds 10 mph

Chance of flurries ■ Sunday Mostly sunny

High: 28° Low: 13° ■ Monday

n

High: 31° Low: 15° ■ Lake Stages: Douglas: 958.5

n

Ten years ago

Retired Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt Jr., known early in his career for modernizing the Navy and later for ordering the spraying of Agent Orange in Vietnam, died in Durham, N.C., at age 79.

■ Ski Report: Base: 12-25 inches Primary base: Machine groomed Secondary base: Hard packed Trails open: Bear Run, Castle Run, Cub Way, Ski School, Mogul Ridge

n

quote roundup “We will be following the intelligence down the rabbit hole to see where the breakdown occurred and how to prevent this failure in the future. Somebody screwed up big time.” — Sen. Kit Bond of Missouri, top Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee, in announcing hearings this month as part of the investigation into the attempted Detroit jetliner bombing.

“Those who fell yesterday were far from home and close to the enemy, doing the hard work that must be done to protect our country from terrorism. We owe them our deepest gratitude, and we pledge to them and their families that we will never cease fighting for the cause to which they dedicated their lives — a safer America.” — CIA Director Leon Panetta in a statement confirming the suicide bombing deaths of seven CIA employees in southeastern Afghanistan.

“This decade’s over. Let’s get a better one going.” — David Fraley of Las Vegas, who lost his job as a supermarket liquor clerk in March.

The Mountain Press (ISSN 0894-2218) Copyright 2008 The Mountain Press. All Rights Reserved. All property belongs to The Mountain Press and no part may be reproduced without prior written consent. Published daily by The Mountain Press. P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN, 37864, 119 River Bend Dr., Sevierville, TN 37876. Periodical Postage paid at Sevierville, TN.

On this date

On Jan. 2, 1960, Sen. John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts launched his successful bid for the presidency as he announced his intention to enter the New Hampshire Democratic primary.

Mostly sunny

Publisher: Jana Thomasson Editor: Stan Voit Production Director: Tom McCarter Advertising Director: Joi Whaley Business Manager: Mary Owenby Circulation Distribution Manager: Will Sing

Last year locally

There may be no other meal throughout the year so laden with superstition as the New Year’s Day dinner. The traditional southern version of the meal most often includes greens, representing success with money, black-eyed peas to bring over-all good fortune and some sort of pork as an assurance of never going hungry.

High: 28° Low: 12°

Staff

15

This day in history

SEVIERVILLE

Tai chi classes begin in January

n

top state news

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Five years ago

NFL teams joined Venus Williams, Maria Sharapova and other sports figures around the world in assisting the relief mission for the tsunami-earthquake catastrophe in southern Asia. n

Thought for today

“It is good to have an end to journey towards; but it is the journey that matters, in the end.” — Ursula K. Le Guin, American author.

Celebrities in the news n

Rush Limbaugh

HONOLULU (AP) — As conservative radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh underwent tests for c h e s t pains in a Honolulu hospital, caller after caller to his show sounded Limbaugh their wellwishes. Fans were asked to simply say “ditto” — a traditional Limbaugh catchword — to express their support Thursday so they could get on with questions and comments on social and government issues on the national talk show. Limbaugh experienced chest pains Wednesday and was rushed from the Hawaii resort where he’s vacationing to The Queen’s Medical Center.


Mountain Views

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peacably to assemble and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.” —United States Constitution, Amendment One

■ The Mountain Press ■ Page A7 ■ Saturday, January 2, 2010

Three Cheers

commentary Dead Christmas trees now bring a return

Merry Christmas al-Qaida Style It was puzzling to read opinion pieces in liberal newspapers like The New York Times and Newsday lamenting the Christmas Day al-Qaida attempt to blow up a Northwest Airlines jet. Most of the liberal press agreed: That was not a nice thing to do, and those terrorists should stop the attacks this very minute. But no actual solutions to stopping terrorism were put forth by the progressive press. Of course, 23-year-old Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, a loser from Nigeria, was not exactly 007 in executing his mission. That might speak to how badly al-Qaida has been downgraded by aggressive measures put in place by the George W. Bush administration. Now, the al-Qaida agents of slaughter are smuggling explosives in their underwear instead of trying to hijack the entire plane. Instead of being handed over to the military, this Umar nitwit will be tried in civilian court so the world can understand that the U.S. justice system really, really works. Like the world cares. Apparently, Abdulmutallab was trained in Yemen — the same Yemen that on Dec. 20 accepted six Guantanamo Bay detainees. That’s another puzzling deal. In the fall of 2007, the United States sent two other Gitmo terrorists to Saudi Arabia for “rehabilitation.” Now one of those guys, Said Ali Shari, is reportedly a top al-Qaida commander in — wait for it — Yemen! As the Church Lady once said, “How convenient! I am beginning to think we are in the “Twilight Zone” in this country. The liberal press screams all day long about closing Gitmo and providing civilian trials for captured foreign terrorists. Then when an overseas terrorist almost blows up 300 innocent people, the press goes, ‘Gee, that’s not acceptable.” Also, everybody except Al Franken knows that Yemen is an al-Qaida stronghold, but the Barack Obama administration sends six incarcerated terror suspects to Yemen? Paging Rod Serling. This would be laugh-out-loud absurd if lives were not at stake. I mean, why don’t we just close Gitmo and send the misunderstood inmates there directly to the mountains of Pakistan? Why delay the process with stops in the Arabian Peninsula? I’m surprised at CIA chief Leon Panetta. He surely understands that countries like Yemen are chaotic cauldrons of violence where terrorists openly roam. Leon, why are you sending Gitmo bad guys there? Help me, I’m trying to understand. Most Americans, I believe, have little idea how dangerous the jihad really is. If they did, the Obama administration and the liberal press could never get away with the lunacy that is now underway. The latest al-Qaida fanatic may have gotten tangled up in his underwear, but some other killer will do better down the road. And don’t be surprised if he’s from Yemen. — Veteran TV news anchor Bill O’Reilly is host of the Fox News show “The O’Reilly Factor” and author of the book “Who’s Looking Out For You?” To find out more about Bill O’Reilly, and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate web page at www.creators.com. This column originates on the Web site www. billoreilly.com.

For up to a month they bring happiness and warmth to many people, brightly decorated and with presents stacked beneath them. Then Christmas comes and goes and, within a week, the live trees that have adorned so many dens and living rooms, have outlived their usefulness. Something needs to be done with them. Many of those trees in years past have wound up on curbs, waiting for garbage collectors to haul them away to wherever they took them. What happened to them, it mattered not, as long as they were gone. That has changed, thanks to the cities of Sevierville, Pigeon Forge and Gatlinburg. Exchange programs have been instituted. Simply drop off the used and dead (or dying) tree and receive a sapling or small tree in return. In Sevierville, at least, the used trees will be mulched and reused for a required daily cover at the Sevier Solid Waste landfill. “It’s a win-win,” Sevierville Parks and Rec Director Bob Parker said. Indeed.

One more salute to Friday Night Heroes

They are the boys — and men — of autumn, and they toil in weight rooms yearround, struggle through two- and three-aday practices under scorching August suns to become Friday Night Heroes. On Christmas Day, many of them earned all-county honors from The Mountain Press. Each deserves a second round of applause. Sevier County’s Steve Brewer was Coach of the Year. SCHS quarterback Zach Flynn was chosen Most Valuable Player; Pigeon Forge running back Chase Travis was Offensive Player of the Year; Seymour lineman Nick Smith was Defensive Player of the Year; and Sevier County kicker Jared Baker was Freshman of the Year. Further, SCHS placed three players on first-team offense, five on defense and five on second-team; PF had two on firstteam offense and five on second-team; Gatlinburg-Pittman had two on first-team offense, six on defense and five on secondteam; Seymour four on first-team offense, three on defense and four on second-team; and The King’s Academy one on first-team offense and one on second-team.

Haley Ham gets it done statewide

Often in this space, young people in our community are commended for things they have done — athletic accomplishments, raising money for homeless shelters or food ministries, and other achievements. Haley Ham of Sevierville got a law changed. Statewide. How many young people can say that? When her two dogs were poisoned intentionally by antifreeze, Haley contacted state legislators, attended committee meetings and spoke with the media in support of what has become known as the Haley Ham Law. The law, which went into effect on Friday, requires a bittering agent in all antifreeze sold in Tennessee. Ethylene glycol, an ingredient in antifreeze, is toxic to humans and animals — an estimated 10,000 animals and 1,400 children across the U.S. ingest it each year. Presumably, this new law will remedy the situation. Manufacturers have been contacted and are expected to comply. Penalty of noncompliance is a Class C misdemeanor. Now thousands of pets are safer because of a Sevierville youth.

Political view

Public forum Tennessee’s the Bible state? It’s a joke, this writer says

Editor: Everyone knows the saying, you practice what you preach. First off, my bitterness is not about God, it’s about what people in Tennessee know and don’t do anything about. Same still goes: Everyone has their own opinion, but still nothing is done to help. Wake up, Tennessee. If it’s the Bible state, start helping your fellow man instead of letting things fall through the cracks. If you don’t try to do anything, should you deserve any help? Not in my opinion, but when you are doing your best and you’re hit with problems beyond your control and ask for help and no one wants to help, again I say, Tennessee the Bible state? What A joke. Billy Rinck Sevierville

Homeless not well served by agencies, people in county

Editor: In a recent letter a man mentioned that there is a lot of help here for needy people. I remember when we first moved here in 1990, there wasn’t hardly any place to go get help. Now, there are many churches and private organizations that reach out. There are many Americans all over that are one paycheck or sickness from being homeless. When someone says a homeless person wants to be homeless, some of that is true. But each person has a breaking point. No one has any idea what made them be homeless. Many homeless veterans have terrible nightmares about what they have seen or done. So many can’t function around society. We have given many uncaring people an education on the perils of being homeless. One young man I met had a job that paid very

little. He had no insurance. He got out of a chair and fell straight back. His mother took him to our hospital. They told him to take aspirin. His mother took him to different places, still no help. With him crying in pain, they finally went to U.T. Hospital. He went into emergency surgery within an hour. He still didn’t have feeling in his feet. But at least U.T. cared for him. We have help for the needy, but you must have an address. I tell my homeless the truth: They are not welcome here. We can get our veterans to Johnson City VA Hospital. We try to get our other homeless folks to Knoxville where we can get them some help and shelter. Maybe the writer of the letter should get out of his or her comfort zone. They might get an education on humanity. We serve our country by helping the needy. We also help seniors who have to decide to buy food or buy medicines. Thomas Bordeaux Sevierville

Letters to the editor policy and how to contact us: ◆ We encourage our readers to send letters to the editor. Letters must contain no more than 500 words. No more than one letter per person will be published in a 30-day period. Letters must be neatly printed or typed and contain no libel, plagiarism or personal attacks. All letters are subject to editing for style, length and content. Statements of fact must be attributed to a source for verification. All letters must be signed and contain a phone number and address for verification purposes. No anonymous or unverified letters will be printed. No letters endorsing candidates will be considered. The Mountain Press reserves the right to refuse publication of any letter. E-MAIL LETTERS TO: editor@themountainpress.com or MAIL LETTERS TO: Editor, The Mountain Press, P.O. Box 4810, Sevierville, TN 37864. For questions, call (865) 428-0748, ext. 214. The Mountain Press and its publishers do not necessarily agree with the opinions expressed in letters and columns on this page.

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Sports

Visit: The Mountain Press.com View/Purchase Sports & News Photos

■ The Mountain Press ■ A8 ■ Saturday, January 2, 2010

SEC HOOPS

Vols’ basketball has 4 arrested By BETH RUCKER AP Sports Writer

KNOXVILLE — Four Tennessee basketball players, including starting senior forward Tyler Smith, were charged with gun possession and other counts after a Friday traffic stop. The Knoxville Police Department said Smith, 23, junior point guard Melvin Goins, 22, junior center Brian Williams, 22, and sophomore guard Cameron Tatum, 21, were arrested during a traffic stop for speeding near Tennessee’s campus. According to a police report, officers smelled marijuana coming from

the car and found a handgun with an altered serial number, a bag of marijuana and an open container of alcohol. Tatum was driving. Officers could not determine whether any of the players were under the influence of marijuana, though the strong odor suggested marijuana had recently been smoked in the car, the police report said. Tatum was charged with unlawful possession of a firearm and having an open container of alcohol. Smith was charged with unlawful possession of a firearm and possession of a firearm with an altered serial number,

SEC GRIDIRON

which is a felony. Goins and Williams both face gun and drug possession charges. Tennessee coach Bruce Pearl said in a statement that the team takes such matters seriously. “We are still gathering information. Once the appropriate authorities have provided us with all of the facts, we will act accordingly,” Pearl said in the statement. It was not immediately clear if any of the players had attorneys. The Volunteers won at Memphis 66-59 on Thursday afternoon and face Charlotte in Knoxville on Wednesday.

MEN’S HOOPS

Chism, Tennessee beat Memphis 66-59 MEMPHIS — Wayne Chism had 15 points and nine rebounds, and 14thranked Tennessee dominated inside for a 66-59 victory over Memphis on Thursday. J.P. Prince added 12 points and Tyler Smith had 11 points for the Volunteers (10-2) as Tennessee outrebounded Memphis 47-28. The Volunteers held a 30-12 scoring advantage in the paint. Tennessee defense, meanwhile, held the Tigers to 31.4

Erik S. Lesser/AP

Tennessee safety Eric Berry listens during a Chick-fil-A Bowl news conference Monday in Atlanta. Berry says he’s entering the NFL draft.

UT’s Berry says he’s entering NFL draft Lance Murphey/AP

Memphis guard Willie Kemp, left, and forward Wesley Witherspoon, back, try to defend against forward Tyler Smith during the first percent shooting (16 of 51), although the Vols shot only 35.8 (19 of 53). Doneal Mack led Memphis (9-3) with 15 points before fouling out with 3:32 left.

Elliot Williams, the Tigers’ leading scorer at 20.7 points a game, had 13 points, despite missing his first six shots. Wesley Witherspoon added 11 points.

ATLANTA (AP) — Tennessee safety Eric Berry is skipping his senior season and entering the NFL draft. Berry said after Thursday night’s Chick-fil-A Bowl loss to Virginia Tech that he played his final college game. Berry, the Jim Thorpe Award winner as the nation’s top defensive back, says he wants to help his parents “sit down and relax.” The announcement was no surprise, as Tennessee coach Lane Kiffin said he expected to lose Berry. Berry, a junior from Fairburn near Atlanta, is expected to be a high first-round pick. “I really did go over every possible situation and scenario,” Berry said. “I went over it with my coach, I went

over it with my parents. Coach just told me this would probably be the best thing for me to do, just to go ahead and go to the draft.” He had four tackles, including one for a loss of 6 yards, in the Vols’ 37-14 loss to Virginia Tech. Berry was one of the last Tennessee players to exit the locker room and speak with reporters after the game. “I kind of had to get myself together because I really don’t want to leave, but I feel like this is just something that I need to do to help my family,” Berry said. “It was something that I could do to just let them sit down and relax and show them my appreciation for what they have done for me.”

NCAA GRIDIRON NFL GRIDIRON

McDaniels benches star WR By ARNIE STAPLETON AP Sports Writer ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Denver Broncos coach Josh McDaniels says he is benching Pro Bowl receiver Brandon Marshall for the team’s critical season finale against Kansas City. McDaniels wouldn’t directly address the reasons for his decision, although he mentioned accountability and said several other players will play Sunday

John Bazemore/AP

with injuries worse than Marshall’s. Marshall tweaked his right hamstring at practice Wednesday. Marshall said he didn’t want to get into a war of words with McDaniels, but he did note that his coach never played in the NFL to realize how difficult it is to play hurt. The two had a rocky start together, culminating in Marshall’s suspension during training camp for insubordination, but they had patched up their differences during the season.

NBA HOOPS

A Tennessee fans watches from the stands during the first quarter of the NCAA college Chick-fil-A Bowl football game against Virginia Tech on Thursday in Atlanta.

Report: Arenas, Crittenton pull guns

Williams runs for 2 TDs to lead Virginia Tech past UT

NEW YORK (AP) — Washington Wizards teammates Gilbert Arenas and Javaris Crittenton drew guns on each other during a Christmas Eve locker room argument over a gambling debt, according to The New York Post. Citing an anonymous source, the newspaper reports in Friday’s edition that the standoff was sparked when Crittenton became angry at Arenas for refusing to make good on a gambling debt. That prompted Arenas to draw on Crittenton, who then also grabbed for a gun, league security sources tell the Post. Asked by the Post about the confrontation, Arenas denied pulling a gun on Crittenton. “This is unprecedented in the histo-

By CHARLES ODUM AP Sports Writer ATLANTA — Ryan Williams had a recordsetting game and powered Virginia Tech past Tennessee 37-14 in the Chick-fil-A Bowl on Thursday night.

The Hokies (10-3) took the lead with a field goal in the final seconds of the first half and outscored Tennessee 20-0 in the second half on their way to a sixth straight 10-win season. The only team with a longer active streak is Texas with nine.

Williams, a redshirt freshman, had 117 yards rushing and two touchdowns to become Virginia Tech’s single-season rushing leader with 1,655 yards. Williams also set Atlantic Coast Conference records with 21 rushing touchdowns and 22 total touchdowns this season.

ry of sports,” Billy Hunter, executive director of the Player’s Association, tells the Post. “I’ve never heard of players pulling guns on each other in a locker room.” The Wizards said on the night of Dec. 24 that Arenas had stored unloaded firearms in a container in his locker at the arena and that the NBA was looking into the situation. On Tuesday, Washington, D.C. police said they were investigating a report that weapons were found inside a locker room at the Verizon Center. Now, the federal government is also involved. Ben Friedman, a spokesman for the US Attorney’s Office in DC, tells the Post “we’re working with the Metropolitan Police Department on the investigation.”


Sports â&#x2014;&#x2020; A9

Saturday, January 2, 2010 â&#x2014;&#x2020; The Mountain Press NCAA GRIDIRON

Bowden goes out a winner in Gator Bowl, 33-21 By TIM REYNOLDS AP Sports Writer JACKSONVILLE, Fla. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bobby Bowden watched the clock run down to :00, then took his last walk to midfield as his Florida State players jumped up and down, thrusting their helmets into the air. The coach went out a winner, carried off by the Seminoles. Jermaine Thomas ran for two touchdowns, Florida State scored 20 straight points to take control and the Seminoles knocked off No. 18 West Virginia 33-21 in the final game of Bowdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storied 44-year career as a head coach. Bowden finished with a 389-129-4 record, and most importantly to him, a 33rd consecutive winning season. Next week, Jimbo Fisher takes over at Florida State, which finished 7-6 for the third time in the last four years. That run of mediocrity was the 80-year-old Bowdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s downfall â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he wanted to stay at least one more season â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but

Rick Wilson of The Florida Times-Union/AP

Florida State head coach Bobby Bowden waves to the crowd and is carried on the shoulderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of his players after the Seminoleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 33-21 win over West Virginia in the Gator Bowl on Friday in Jacksonville, Fla. on this day, none of that mattered to the Florida State faithful, which serenaded him with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bobby! Bob-by!â&#x20AC;? chants throughout the day, saving their loudest cries for the very end.

With 1:39 left, Bowden trotted down to the Florida State band section, removing his autographed white cap and tossing it into the seats â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and the celebration began. When it was over,

Bowden was surrounded by a wall of photographers, trying to make his way over to shake the hand of West Virginia coach Bill Stewart â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who was a 177-pound walkon for Bowdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first

Mountaineers team in 1970. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got to be memorable,â&#x20AC;? Bowden said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my last dadgum ballgame after 57 years of coaching.â&#x20AC;? Bowden leaves as major college footballâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secondwinningest coach. Joe Paterno earned his 394th victory Friday in the Capital One Bowl as Penn State beat LSU 19-17. Bowden spent much of the afternoon hugging his former players who lined the sidelines. Some of them now were middle-aged men, their hair tinged with gray. Noel Devine rushed for 168 yards and a touchdown for West Virginia (9-4), which ran out to a 14-3 lead, then sputtered the rest of the way. There was even a â&#x20AC;&#x153;wide rightâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; in Bowdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favor, for a change. This was Bowdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s day, and the Seminoles made sure he wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be denied. Everything about the matchup was arranged with celebrating Bowden in mind, and that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change on game day. More than 350 of

Bowdenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former players were there as guests, and thousands of fans â&#x20AC;&#x201D; many of whom arrived 2 hours before Bowden â&#x20AC;&#x201D; braved 52-degree air and steady rain to line the route the coach and his wife, Ann, would take into the stadium, followed by the rest of the Seminole roster. There was a pregame video of Bowden highlights. He got a new car, a gift from Toyota and the Gator Bowl. And then came a rare treat even for Bowden, the right to take the flaming FSU spear from Chief Osceola and slam the point into the turf at midfield, one of Florida Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most revered pregame traditions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m very excited. Ann and I are very excited to be here in front of the Seminoles and also the Mountaineers,â&#x20AC;? Bowden said from the field to a sold-out crowd moments before kickoff. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help but get nostalgic when I heard the West Virginia band play their fight song. And then also, to hear the Seminoles play ours.â&#x20AC;?

NFL GRIDIRON

NCAA GRIDIRON

Coker has NFL shot after struggles with drug use

No. 11 Penn St. nips No. 13 LSU 19-17 at Cap One By GENARO C. ARMAS AP Sports Writer

By BRYAN MULLEN of The Tennessean

ORLANDO, Fla. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Collin Wagner kicked a 21-yard field goal with 57 seconds left to lift No. 11 Penn State to a 19-17 win Friday over No. 13 LSU in a sloppy Capital One Bowl. The Nittany Lions (11-2) gave up a 13-point lead in the second half after Stevan Ridleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1-yard touchdown run put LSU (9-4) ahead 17-16 with 12:49 left.

NASHVILLE â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Phillip Fulmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s desk was black and shaped like a giant T. It sat on a platform, about a foot above the office floor, and was as imposing as the man peering down from it. LaMarcus Coker sat in front of that desk two years ago. The coach was about to kick him off the Tennessee football team. Coker knew he had failed his fourth drug test, all for marijuana. He smoked it the week before, knowing if he failed one more test, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be gone. But he lit up anyway. It was 3:44 p.m., Nov. 2, 2007. It was the end of Cokerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennessee career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had reached the point where I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be helped,â&#x20AC;? he said of his life at the time. Now 23 and living in Nashville with his parents, Coker has a changed outlook. Coming off a productive senior season at Hampton (Va.) University, he will begin training this week for the NFL Draft in April. According to www.NFLdraftscout.com, which ranks draft prospects, Coker is the 14th-best running back and could be selected as early as the fifth round. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of guys donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get back to this point,â&#x20AC;? he said last week, standing inside an empty football stadium at Antioch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel blessed to even be here. It could have gone a different way.â&#x20AC;? Hundreds of colleges and universities wrote to Coker in high school trying to persuade him to play for them. He still has a duffel bag filled with the letters. It weighs 24 pounds. But Coker always knew he wanted to play for the Vols. During his junior year at Antioch he visited Tennessee and told the coaches he wanted to play for them. Fulmer was ecstatic. By his own accounts, Coker had a normal high school experience. He had a stable home life, was surrounded by a loving family and avoided trouble.

NCAA GRIDIRON

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marijuana and alcohol were always present when I was in high school, at parties, things like that,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was easier for someone to get marijuana than a bottle of Grey Goose (vodka). But I never understood why people smoked. The first time I tried it was at Tennessee.â&#x20AC;? It happened at a party during his freshman year with a few teammates. He said peer pressure and curiosity were factors. Yet guilt quickly ate at Coker. He walked into Fulmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office a few days later and said he had used marijuana. Strike one. Coker thought he might play as a true freshman but instead was redshirted. After his redshirt season, Coker thought he would start. He wound up fourth on the depth chart. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was surSilver prised,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember

telling my mom, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;By the fourth game, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to be the starter.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153; He was off by one game. Against Florida, he scored his first touchdown on a 48-yard pass play. Against Marshall, he ran for an 89-yard touchdown. Against Memphis, he started and rushed for 126 yards â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;My breakout game,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. In the days leading up to the Outback Bowl, however, Coker failed another drug test. Strike two. Fulmer suspended him for five practices as well as the first quarter of the bowl game. Then Coker scored Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only touchdown on a 42-yard run in the loss to Penn State. See COKER, Page A10

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By FRED GOODALL AP Sports Writer TAMPA, Fla. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wes Byrum kicked a 21-yard field goal in overtime and Auburn stopped Northwesternâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s final trick play of the game to hold on Friday for a 38-35 victory in the Outback Bowl. The Tigers intercepted Mike Kafka five times â&#x20AC;&#x201D; twice in the end zone â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and shut down a fake field-goal play to end Northwesternâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gallant bid to end a 61-year stretch of postseason futility. Kafka threw for a

career-best 532 yards four touchdowns. He rallied Northwestern from a 14-point deficit in the closing minutes of the fourth quarter, and the Wildcats wasted a chance to win it in regulation. Auburn (8-5) finished its first season under Gene Chizik with the second-most wins by a firstyear coach in school history. Only Terry Bowden, who went 11-0 in 1993, produced more wins in his initial season on the job. Northwestern (8-5) fell to 1-7 all-time in postseason games.

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But quarterback Daryll Clark led the Nittany Lions on the game-winning, 12-play drive in crunch time. Penn State had two critical third-down conversions to help set up Wagnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gamewinner â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one of four field goals on the day for kicker. Penn State coach Joe Paterno got his record 24th bowl win and handed Les Miles his first loss in five bowls as LSU coach. A driving rainstorm at the start of the game made the field a muddy mess.


A10 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sports

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Saturday, January 2, 2010

coker

3From Page A9

â&#x20AC;&#x153;LaMarcus has a very engaging personality,â&#x20AC;? Fulmer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He was very exciting and very fun to be around. LaMarcus enjoyed the game and enjoyed people.â&#x20AC;? He also enjoyed marijuana. Another positive test came back just before his sophomore year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They sent me to a rehab center in Knoxville,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was within walking distance to where I was living off-campus. The first two nights was rough.â&#x20AC;? So he sneaked out one morning, walked home, got into his car and drove to Fulmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I said, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think I can do this,â&#x20AC;?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Coker recalled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach Fulmer said, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;If you want to be a part of this team, then you will do it.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; I was back at the rehab center before lunchtime.â&#x20AC;? Coker spent a week there. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My counselor did not think I had a marijuana problem,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She said it was depression. This was around the time the economy was going bad and both of my parents were laid off from General Motors. I was real stressed. I did not cope the correct way.â&#x20AC;? As to why he kept smoking, knowing he would get in trouble again, Coker said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had reached a point where I was sabotaging myself. I drifted into my own world. I was not hanging out with teammates and the people I should as a University of Tennessee football player. I felt stresses that I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think anyone would understand.â&#x20AC;? Coker worked his way back onto the field. There was another drug test before the South

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Carolina game, but the results wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come back for a week. Coker had two big plays, helping Tennessee to an overtime victory. In the locker room, Fulmer handed him the game ball. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew it was my last game there,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one else knew. I knew I had failed the drug test.â&#x20AC;? Now he struggles to explain why he was so drawn to the drug that proved to be his undoing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The coaches knew I had a problem, and they did everything within their power to help, but I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mature enough that I could accept help,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When someone has an addiction no one can help them if they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to be helped.â&#x20AC;? Fulmer had a special fondness for Coker. Not only was he a superb athlete, he was a good student and one of the more articulate, insightful and thoughtful players on the team. But it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t up to Fulmer anymore. Under Tennesseeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policy, a fourth failed drug test for marijuana triggers immediate dismissal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think he truly loved Tennessee and wanted to be in the program,â&#x20AC;? Fulmer said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt like at the time we did all we could possibly do for him.â&#x20AC;? That night, more than a dozen Division I-AA schools called Coker. He could transfer to any I-AA school and not have to sit out one year, unlike if he transferred to another I-A school. He decided on Hampton, which had an enrollment of 6,152 and a football stadium with a capacity of 17,000. Tennessee had 27,739 students and a stadium that seats 100,011. Coker was drawn to the smaller, private school environment, and to Coach Donovan Rose.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I sat him down and told him about Hampton and that we have a zero-tolerance policy,â&#x20AC;? Rose said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He said he just wanted a second opportunity. We sat down with his parents and we were very straightforward and honest.â&#x20AC;? Coker played well in 2008, rushing for 622 yards in a passfirst offense. Football was important, but Coker spent more time staying clean and surrounding himself with mature, responsible teammates. Heading into the 2009 season, Rose selected Coker to be a team captain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was a very emotional time,â&#x20AC;? Coker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even here at Antioch, I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a team captain. My whole life people told me I had leadership qualities and that I just needed to tap into it. Being named a captain, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when things changed. I was already heading in the right direction, but it catapulted me even further.â&#x20AC;? ThisseasonCokerwastheMidEastern Athletic Conferenceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading rusher, totaling 1,027 yards and six touchdowns for the Pirates, who finished with a 5-6 record. He is hoping NFL teams will recognize the changes in his personal life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to just say something that will make everybody believe you,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The only thing I can do is keep doing the right things.â&#x20AC;? In 2008, Chris Johnson set an NFL Combine record by running the 40-yard dash in 4.24 seconds. At the East Coast Bowl in Petersburg, Va., last month, Coker ran the 40 in 4.28. NFL Draft experts believe Cokerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s size, speed and ability will be too much for a team to pass up.

nca a bowl gl ance Saturday, Dec. 19 New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque Wyoming 35, Fresno State 28, 2OT St. Petersburg (Fla.) Bowl Rutgers 45, UCF 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday, Dec. 20 New Orleans Bowl Middle Tennessee 42, Southern Miss. 32 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tuesday, Dec. 22 Las Vegas Bowl BYU 44, Oregon State 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wednesday, Dec. 23 Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego Utah 37, California 27 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thursday, Dec. 24 Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu SMU 45, Nevada 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Saturday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit Marshall 21, Ohio 17 Meineke Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. Pittsburgh 19, North Carolina 17 Emerald Bowl At San Francisco Southern Cal 24, Boston College 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sunday, Dec. 27 Music City Bowl At Nashville, Tenn. Clemson 21, Kentucky 13 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Monday, Dec. 28 Independence Bowl At Shreveport, La. Georgia 44, Texas A&M 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tuesday, Dec. 29 EagleBank Bowl At Washington UCLA 30, Temple 21 Champs Sports Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Wisconsin 20, Miami 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wednesday, Dec. 30 Humanitarian Bowl

At Boise, Idaho Idaho 43, Bowling Green 42 Holiday Bowl At San Diego Nebraska 33, Arizona 0 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thursday, Dec. 31 Armed Forces Bowl At Fort Worth, Texas Air Force 47, Houston 20 Sun Bowl At El Paso, Texas Oklahoma 31, Stanford 27 Texas Bowl At Houston Navy 35, Missouri 13 Insight Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. Iowa State 14, Minnesota 13 Chick-fil-A Bowl At Atlanta Virginia Tech 37, Tennessee 14 â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Friday, Jan. 1 Outback Bowl At Tampa, Fla. Auburn 38, Northwestern 35, OT Capital One Bowl At Orlando, Fla. Penn State 19, LSU 17 Gator Bowl At Jacksonville, Fla. Florida State 33, West Virginia 21 Rose Bowl At Pasadena, Calif. Ohio State (10-2) vs. Oregon (10-2), 5 p.m. (ABC) Sugar Bowl At New Orleans Florida (12-1) vs. Cincinnati (12-0), 8:30 p.m. (FOX) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Saturday, Jan. 2 International Bowl At Toronto South Florida (7-5) vs. Northern Illinois (7-5), Noon (ESPN2) Cotton Bowl At Arlington, Texas Oklahoma State (9-3) vs. Mississippi (8-4), 2 p.m. (FOX)

PapaJohns.com Bowl At Birmingham, Ala. Connecticut (7-5) vs. South Carolina (7-5), 2 p.m. (ESPN) Liberty Bowl At Memphis, Tenn. East Carolina (9-4) vs. Arkansas (7-5), 5:30 p.m. (ESPN) Alamo Bowl At San Antonio Michigan State (6-6) vs. Texas Tech (8-4), 9 p.m. (ESPN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Monday, Jan. 4 Fiesta Bowl At Glendale, Ariz. Boise State (13-0) vs. TCU (12-0), 8 p.m. (FOX) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Tuesday, Jan. 5 Orange Bowl At Miami Iowa (10-2) vs. Georgia Tech (11-2), 8 p.m. (FOX) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Wednesday, Jan. 6 GMAC Bowl Mobile, Ala. Central Michigan (11-2) vs. Troy (9-3), 7 p.m. (ESPN) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Thursday, Jan. 7 BCS National Championship At Pasadena, Calif. Alabama (13-0) vs. Texas (13-0), 8 p.m. (ABC) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Saturday, Jan. 23 East-West Shrine Classic At Orlando, Fla. East vs. West, 3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Saturday, Jan. 30 Senior Bowl At Mobile, Ala. North vs. South, 4 p.m. (NFL) â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Saturday, Feb. 6 Texas vs. The Nation AllStar Challenge At El Paso, Texas Texas vs. Nation, 3 p.m. (CBSC)

ST. JOSEPHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S THE CARPENTER EPISCOPAL CHURCH 1103 Dolly Parton Parkway

(0n the right just past Larry Hill GMC)

(865) 428-3001

Sunday Services: 8:00 Holy Eucharist 9:15 Christian Education 10:30 Holy Eucharist

345 Hardin Lane Sevierville, 865-453-0943

Pastor: Henry C. (Brad) Bradford Worship Time 10:30 AM Sunday School: 9:15AM Middle School Youth: Sun. 5:30PM Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s & Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bible Studies: Wed. 6:30PM Senior HighYouth: Wed. 6:30PM

Sevierville Church of God

Pastor Stacy Pearcy

Millican Grove Missionary Baptist Church Sunday School 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm year round Singing 4th Sunday Night Fellowship Lunch 2nd Sunday Pastor Robert â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockyâ&#x20AC;? Ball

Pathways Church

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Innertainment for the Heartâ&#x20AC;? pathway2church.com

Pentecostal Church of God 908-7190

Service Location 1126 Wagner Dr., Sevierville, TN Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday: Family Enrichment 6:30 p.m.

Roberts United Methodist Church *AYELL2Ds3EVIERVILLE 865-429-1933 Janet Edwards, Pastor 3UNDAY3CHOOL^AM 3UNDAY-ORNING 7ORSHIP^AM .URSERYAND#HILDRENS #HURCH0ROVIDED We Offer You Christ

(across from SCHS off Industrial Park Dr.) Saturday Service 6:00 Sunday Morning Service 9:00 & 10:45 Church Office: 865-428-6312

SEVIERVILLE Second Baptist CHURCH OF CHRIST Church of Sevierville 208 Hicks Dr.

453-8009

202 PIGEON STREET

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Smoky Mountain Christian Church

125 South Blvd. SUNDAY SERVICES 9:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church 6:30 p.m. Wed. Eve. - Church 5:45 p.m. Meal (Sept-May) Phil Curry, Minister sery

Nur Provided

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Sports ◆ A11

Saturday, January 2, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

tv sports Today

COLLEGE FOOTBALL Noon ESPN2 — International Bowl, South Florida vs. N. Illinois, at Toronto 2 p.m. ESPN — Papajohns.com Bowl, South Carolina vs. Connecticut, at Birmingham, Ala. FOX — Cotton Bowl, Oklahoma St. vs. Mississippi St., at Arlington, Texas 5:30 p.m. ESPN — Liberty Bowl, Arkansas vs. East Carolina, at Memphis, Tenn. 9 p.m. ESPN — Alamo Bowl, Michigan St. vs. Texas Tech, at San Antonio MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, Arizona at UCLA or Gonzaga vs. Illinois, at Chicago 3:30 p.m. CBS — National coverage, Louisville at Kentucky ESPN2 — Villanova at Marquette 5:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Kansas at Temple 7:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Seton Hall vs. Virginia Tech, at Cancun, Mexico NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Orlando at Chicago PREP FOOTBALL 11 a.m. ESPN — All-America Game, Team Nitro (Black) vs.

Team Blur (White), at St. Petersburg, Fla. RODEO 8 p.m. VERSUS — PBR, Baltimore Invitational WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m. FSN — California at Stanford Sunday, Jan. 3 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 3 p.m. FSN — Florida at N.C. State 5:30 p.m. FSN — Xavier at Wake Forest 7:30 p.m. FSN — Clemson at Duke NFL FOOTBALL 1 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader FOX — Regional coverage, doubleheader 4:15 p.m. CBS — Regional coverage, doubleheader game FOX — Regional coverage, doubleheader game 8:15 p.m. NBC — Teams TBA RODEO 8 p.m. VERSUS — PBR, Baltimore Invitational (same-day tape) WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Oklahoma at Tennessee Monday, Jan. 4 COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:15 p.m.

FOX — Fiesta Bowl, TCU vs. Boise St., at Glendale, Ariz. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Pittsburgh at Cincinnati NHL HOCKEY 7 p.m. VERSUS — Boston at N.Y. Rangers WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Notre Dame at Purdue Tuesday, Jan. 5 COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:15 p.m. FOX — Orange Bowl, Georgia Tech vs. Iowa, at Miami MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Minnesota at Purdue ESPN2 — Texas at Arkansas NHL HOCKEY 8 p.m. VERSUS — Minnesota at Chicago Wednesday, Jan. 6 COLLEGE FOOTBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — GMAC Bowl, Cent. Michigan vs. Troy, at Mobile, Ala. MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Memphis at

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Thursday, Jan. 7 COLLEGE FOOTBALL 8:37 p.m. ABC — BCS National Championship Game, Texas vs. Alabama, at Pasadena, Calif. GOLF 9:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Africa Open, first round, at East London, South Africa (same-day tape) 3:30 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, SBS Championship, first round, at Kapalua, Hawaii MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN2 — Michigan at Penn St. Friday, Jan. 8 BOXING 10 p.m. ESPN2 — Middleweights, Dionisio Miranda (20-4-2) vs. Roman Karmazin (39-3-1), at Glendale, Calif. GOLF 9:30 a.m.

GATLINBURG CHURCH OF CHRIST

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b n li

Syracuse 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Duke vs. Iowa St., at Chicago 10:30 p.m. FSN — UCLA at California NBA BASKETBALL 10:30 p.m. ESPN — L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers

Trinity Lane & Reagan Dr., Rod Rutherfod, Minister Sunday Bible Study 9:30 Sunday Morning Worship 10:30 Sunday Evening Worship 6:00 Wednesday Bible Study 7:00 RADIO BROADCAST: “What the Bible Says” SUN: 8am WPFT 106.3 FM SUN: 10am WSEV 105.5FM www.gatlinburgchurchofchrist.com

Jerry Ogle, Pastor

Looking for a church home?

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Come worship with us in a caring and friendly environment

Called equipped & Sent to boldly proclaim the love of Jesus Christ to all people.

423 Historic Nature Trail (Traffic Light 8), Gatlinburg, TN

Gatlinburg Presbyterian Church 237 Reagan Drive (from Parkway turn uphill at Ripley’s Believe it or Not)

Worship Opportunities: Saturdays 5:30 pm till Labor Day (no service 7/4) Sundays 10:30 am

Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Worship: 11:00 a.m. Casual Dress Welcome Free Parking in rear of Church

Pastor Janet Volk 436-5641 www.joinusinworship.com

(865) 436-5592

TGC — European PGA Tour, Africa Open, second round, at East London, South Africa (same-day tape) 6 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, SBS Championship, second round, at Kapalua, Hawaii NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. ESPN — Boston at Atlanta 10:30 p.m. ESPN — Cleveland at Denver Saturday, Jan. 9 GOLF 9:30 a.m. TGC — European PGA Tour, Africa Open, third round, at East London, South Africa (same-day tape) 6 p.m. TGC — PGA Tour, SBS Championship, third round, at Kapalua, Hawaii MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon ESPN — Connecticut at Georgetown ESPN2 — Florida at Vanderbilt 2 p.m. ESPN — Duke at Georgia Tech ESPN2 — Kansas St. at Missouri 4 p.m. ESPN2 — N. Iowa at Illinois St. VERSUS — UNLV at New Mexico

6 p.m. ESPN2 — Murray St. at Austin Peay 10:30 p.m. FSN — Southern Cal at California NBA BASKETBALL 8 p.m. WGN — Minnesota at Chicago NFL FOOTBALL 4:30 p.m. NBC — Playoffs, Wild-card game, teams TBA 8 p.m. NBC — Playoffs, Wild-card game, teams TBA PREP FOOTBALL 1 p.m. NBC — All-American Bowl, at San Antonio RODEO 8 p.m. VERSUS — PBR, New York City Invitational SOCCER 7:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Premier League, Hull City vs. Chelsea, at Hull, England WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL Noon FSN — Kansas at Kansas St. 2 p.m. CBS — National coverage, Ohio St. at Michigan St. FSN — Missouri at Colorado 4 p.m. CBS — National coverage, North Carolina at Connecticut FSN — Oregon at Oregon St.

Cosby Church of Christ

15 miles East of Gatlinburg ST RD 321 Sunday 10AM - 5PM Wednesday 7 PM Visit us if you want to hear the truth. Olie Williamson, Min.

423-487-5540

3UNDAY3ERVICES #ONTEMPORARYAM 4RADITIONALAM 3UNDAY3CHOOLAM

ROARING FORK BAPTIST CHURCH

Roar Fork Rd., Gatlinburg Pastor: Rev. Kim D. McCroskey

436-9403

Sunday School - 9:45am Sunday Morning Worship - 10:45am Sunday Evening Service 6:00pm Sunday School - 9:45am Wednesday 6:30pm - 7:30pm

Sunday Morning Worship - 10:45am Family Life Center Sunday Evening Service 6:00pm Nursery Provided Wednesday 6:30pm - 7:30pm

BUS MINISTRY AVAILABLE “Changing Lives, Creating Hope, Claiming Victory through Jesus Christ.”

HILLS CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH

Attend the Church of Your Choice

“Your Church In The Smokies” Near The Greenbrier Entrance To The Park

154 Hills Creek Rd Pittman Center Rev. Lowell Wilson. Pastor

Phone: (865) 436-7639

Music Director Needed Call (865) 556-9981 for information

Wednesday "IBLE3TUDY$INNER Children, Youth and Adults PM

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Sunday School @ 9:45 a.m. Worship @ 11:00 a.m. Sunday Evening @ 6:00 p.m. Wed. Evening @ 7:00 p.m.

GATLINBURG

0ARKWAYs   Jane Taylor, Pastor Sunday Morning Worship AMAM 3UNDAY3CHOOLAM -ANAFEST3ERVICEPM

Phone: (865) 250-2518 Ron Blevins, Minister

Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church 1765 Ridge Rd. Pigeon Forge, TN 37863 Sunday School - 9:30 am Worship Service - 10:30 am Sunday Night Service 6:30 pm Wednesday Night Service 7:00 pm

Children’s Church

Ko d

ak

Sunday Morning - 10:30 am Wednesday Night - 7:00 pm Pastor Rev. Bill Helton Youth pastor Rev. Danny Manning Van Transportation 428-8666 leave message

Mountain View Church of Christ Kodak Inn Kodak Quality Quality Inn Meeting Room Meeting Room Sun. 10am Sun. Class: Class: 10am Sun. AM Worship: 11am Sun. AM Worship: 11am SunSun. PMPM Worship: Worship6pm 932-2039 askfor forTim Tim 939-2039 ask Correspondence Courses Courses Available Correspondence Available

Rocky Springs Presbyterian Church Pastor: Tom Sterbens 2450 Winfield Dunn Pkwy., Kodak Sunday Morning Worship - 10:00am

Children’s & Youth Ministry Music Ministry Senior Adult Ministry Women & Men’s Ministry Single’s Ministry www.newhopeforall.com Church - 932-HOPE(4673)

To love God...love people... learn hope... live truth,...and lead others to do the same!

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Union Valley Baptist Church

Sunday Liturgy 8am and 10:30 a.m. Vigil (Saturday) 5:30p.m. Divine Liturgy, Sunday 5:30pm Rev. Ragan Shriver, Pastor 307 Black Oak Ridge Rd. - Seymour (865) 573-1203

855 Union Valley Church Rd. Seymour Hudson Chesteen Pastor, 865-453-8606

Sunday School Sunday Morn. Worship Sunday Eve. Worship Wednesday Eve. Service Children & Youth Singing 5th Sunday Night

9:30am 10:45am 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm

“A Small Part of God’s Heart” 2656 Boyd’s Creek Highway Sevierville, TN 37876

Sunday School 9:15 am Worship Service 10:15 am 387-3575 621-1436 www.rockyspringspcusa.org For Rates and Information on The Mountain Press

CHURCH DIRECTORY

Please Contact Pat O’Brien (865) 428-0748 X222 pobrien@themountainpress.com


A12 â&#x2014;&#x2020; Sports

The Mountain Press â&#x2014;&#x2020; Saturday, January 2, 2010

SCOREBOARD

Saturday. 6. West Virginia (11-0) did not play. Next: at No. 4 Purdue, Friday. Sevierville Bowling Center 7. Duke (11-1) beat High scores through Tuesday. Pennsylvania 114-55. Next: Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games: vs. No. 21 Clemson, Sunday. Beverly Hill 222, Sherry 8. Villanova (11-1) did not Bevins 201, Toni Alexander play. Next: at Marquette, 190, Tammy Finamore 189, Saturday. Jean Maples 188, Stephanie 9. North Carolina (11-3) did Lanier 185, Zenadia not play. Next: at College of Rodriquez 182, Mary Garst Charleston, Monday. 182, Shasta Garst 179, Tomi 10. Connecticut (9-3) did Hutton 171 not play. Next: vs. Notre Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series: Dame, Saturday. Sherry Bevins 566, Beverly 11. Michigan State (10-3) Hill 564, Toni Alexander did not play. Next: at No. 25 532, Zenadia Rodriquez 509, Northwestern, Saturday. Shasta Garst 498, Stephanie 12. Kansas State (12-1) did Lanier 489, Mary Garst 486, Jean Maples 481, Betty Bevins not play. Next: vs. South Dakota, Sunday. 480, Tammy Finamore 478 13. Georgetown (10-1) beat Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games: Wes Boyd 280, Tim Bevins St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 66-59. Next: at 268, Mark Oppie 262, Chris DePaul, Sunday. Smith 259, Jim Garst 248, 14. Tennessee (10-2) beat Nate Hatfield 240, Aaron Memphis 66-59. Next: vs. Beckett 237, Cody Ferguson Charlotte, Wednesday. 236, Jim Far;ey 233, David 15. Ohio State (10-3) lost Cope 232 to No. 23 Wisconsin 65-43. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series: Next: at Michigan, Sunday. Tim Bevins 726, Chris Smith 16. Mississippi (11-2) did 705, Aaron Beckett 696, Mark not play. Next: vs. UCF, Oppie 690, Wes Boyd 677, Tuesday. Ernest Lamon 663, Tommy 17. Washington (10-2) beat Garst 658, Cody Ferguson Oregon State 76-70. Next: 652, Mike Moyers 644, vs. Oregon, Saturday. Rodney Lee 634 18. Temple (11-2) did Submitted by: not play. Next: vs. No. 1 Charlie McFalls Sr. Kansas, Saturday. 19. New Mexico (13-1) did not play. Next: vs. Dayton, ncaa hoops Friday. 20. Texas Tech (10-2) did not play. Next: vs. McNeese State, Friday. Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top 25 Fared 21. Clemson (12-2) did not Thursday play. Next: at No. 7 Duke, 1. Kansas (12-0) did not Sunday. play. Next: at No. 18 22. Florida State (12-2) beat Temple, Saturday. Alabama A&M 81-34. Next: 2. Texas (12-0) did not play. Next: vs. Texas A&M- vs. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi, Monday. Corpus Christi, Saturday. 23. Wisconsin (11-2) beat 3. Kentucky (14-0) did not No. 15 Ohio State 65-43. play. Next: vs. Louisville, Next: at Penn State, Sunday. Saturday. 24. UAB (11-2) did not play. 4. Purdue (12-0) did not Next: at Arkansas, Saturday. play. Next: vs. No. 6 West 25. Northwestern (10-2) did Virginia, Friday. not play. Next: vs. No. 11 5. Syracuse (13-0) did not Michigan State, Saturday. play. Next: vs. Pittsburgh,

local bowling

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Top 25 Fared Thursday 1. Connecticut (11-0) did not play. Next: at Seton Hall, Saturday. 2. Stanford (10-1) did not play. Next: vs. California, Saturday. 3. Notre Dame (12-0) beat No. 18 Vanderbilt 74-69. Next: at Purdue, Monday. 4. Tennessee (11-1) did not play. Next: vs. No. 14 Oklahoma, Sunday. 5. Baylor (12-1) did not play. Next: vs. Texas State, Saturday. 6. Ohio State (15-1) beat Northwestern 86-60. Next: vs. Michigan, Sunday. 7. North Carolina (11-1) beat ETSU 104-65. Next: vs. Winston-Salem, Saturday. 8. Duke (11-2) beat Temple 70-62. Next: vs. Providence, Sunday. 9. Georgia (13-0) did not play. Next: at Alabama, Sunday. 10. Texas A&M (11-1) did not play. Next: vs. Lamar, Monday. 11. LSU (11-1) did not play. Next: at South Carolina, Sunday. 12. Florida State (12-2) did not play. Next: vs. Temple, Sunday. 13. Nebraska (12-0) did not play. Next: at Vermont, Monday. 14. Oklahoma (10-2) did not play. Next: at No. 4 Tennessee, Sunday. 15. Xavier (9-3) did not play. Next: at Missouri, Tuesday. 16. Michigan State (10-4) beat Michigan 86-71. Next: at Indiana, Sunday. 17. Texas (9-3) did not play. Next: vs. Arkansas-Pine Bluff, Saturday. 18. Vanderbilt (11-2) lost to No. 3 Notre Dame 74-69. Next: vs. Mississippi, Sunday. 19. Arizona State (8-3) did not play. Next: vs. Southern Cal, Friday. 20. Pittsburgh (11-2) beat Mount St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Md. 57-47. Next: at Marquette, Saturday. 21. Kansas (10-2) did not play. Next: at New Mexico State, Sunday.

Win

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428-0746

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Are you ready to join an EXCITING TEAM in 2010 that is going to REVOLUTIONIZE long term care? If so, S i g n a t u r e HealthCARE is the place for you!! We are currently recruiting for passionate and experienced LPNs/RNs and RN Leadership positions. We also have openings as an Activity Assistant, as well as in Medical Records (LPN ideally with RHIT experience) at our skilled nursing facility we own and operate in Pigeon Forge, TN.

236 GENERAL

Local cabin company taking applications for Reservationist, Assistant Manager, and Cleaners. Apply in person at: 333 Ski Mtn. Rd. Gatlinburg.

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and Jacksonville loss and N.Y. Jets loss OR 9) Pittsburgh loss and Houston loss and Jacksonville loss and N.Y. Jets loss OR 10) N.Y. Jets loss and Baltimore loss and Houston loss and Jacksonville loss or tie Pittsburgh â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clinches a spot with: 1) Win and Houston loss or tie and N.Y. Jets loss or tie OR 2) Win and Houston loss or tie and Baltimore loss or tie OR 3) Win and N.Y. Jets loss or tie and Baltimore loss or tie and Denver loss or tie Houston â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clinches a spot with: 1) Win and N.Y. Jets loss or tie and Baltimore loss or tie OR 2) Win and N.Y. Jets loss or tie and Denver loss or tie OR 3) Win and Baltimore loss or tie and Denver loss or tie Jacksonville â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clinches a spot with: 1) Win and Pittsburgh loss and Baltimore loss and Denver loss and Houston loss OR 2) Win and Pittsburgh loss and Baltimore loss and Denver loss and N.Y. Jets loss OR 3) Win and Pittsburgh loss and Baltimore loss and Houston loss and N.Y. Jets loss OR 4) Win and Pittsburgh loss and Denver loss and Houston loss and N.Y. Jets loss OR 5) Win and N.Y. Jets loss and Denver loss and Houston loss and Baltimore loss Miami â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Clinches a spot with: 1) Win and N.Y. Jets loss and Baltimore loss and Houston loss and Jacksonville loss or tie

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http://www.themountainpress.com OR, www.adquest.com All line ads published in The Mountain Press are placed FREE on a searchable network of over 500 newspapersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; classifieds located at http://www.themountainpress.com. WANT TO KNOW WHEN A CLASSIFIED ITEM IS AVAILABLE? Go to http://www.adquest/request/ to register your request and we will notify you by e-mail when it becomes available in the Classifieds.

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W L T Pct PF PA 10 5 0 .667 368 292 7 8 0 .467 302 275 5 10 0 .333 267 373

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22. Wisconsin-Green Bay (11-0) did not play. Next: at Cleveland State, Saturday. 23. Virginia (9-3) did not play. Next: at Colorado, Saturday. 24. Georgia Tech (12-2) did not play. Next: vs. Army, Saturday. 25. James Madison (10-1) did not play. Next: at Drexel, Sunday.

Home repairs, Remodeling Additions, Elect, Plumbing, Kitchen, Bath, Painting, Flooring Big or Small, we do it all Licensed & Insure

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Interested candidates can apply in-person at our Pigeon Forge Care and Rehab skilled nursing facility, which is located at 415 Cole Drive, Pigeon Forge, TN or you can contact Cara Solitario at 888364-8013 or please submit your resume and salary history/requirements to csolitario@signaturehealthcarellc.com or via fax to 561364-8016.

115 ROOFING SERVICES

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Tree Removal Stump Grinding Storm Clean up Leaf Removal

     

        

      

  

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After the first insertion, want ads scheduled to be published again on Tue., Wed., Thu., or Fri. may be canceled or corrected between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. on the day prior to publication. For ads on Sat., due Thu. prior to 3 p.m.; for Sun., Fri. prior to 10 a.m. and Mon., prior to 11 a.m. Notice of typographical or other errors must be given before 2nd insertion. The Mountain Press does not assume responsibility for an ad beyond the cost of the ad itself and shall not be liable for failure to publish an ad for a typographical error.

Deadlines

Edition Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Good News in the Smokies

FIND HIDDEN CASH Sell your unused household items with....

McKinney Lawn Service New Years Special

KELLYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOME IMPROVEMENT

Quality Work - Reasonable Prices

â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry â&#x20AC;˘ Electrical â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Plumbing â&#x20AC;˘ Kitchens â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Bathrooms â&#x20AC;˘ Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Licensed & Insured

Call Ty 368-2361

... give the Classifieds a try.

Trash it,

200 Employment

700 Real Estate

300 Services

800 Mobile Homes

400 Financial

900 Transportation

110 SPECIAL NOTICES

If you submit a photo for publication, please pick it up after it runs in the paper within ONE MONTH of publication date. Our photo files will be discarded each month. Thank You!

428-0746

237 HEALTHCARE

Are you ready to join an EXCITING TEAM in 2010 that is going to REVOLUTIONIZE long term care? If so, S i g n a t u r e HealthCARE is the place for you!! We are currently recruiting for passionate and experienced LPNs/RNs and RN Leadership positions. We also have openings as an Activity Assistant, as well as in Medical Records (LPN ideally with RHIT experience) at our skilled nursing facility we own and operate in Pigeon Forge, TN.

236 GENERAL

DIG UP

Quality Control Earn up to $100 per day. Evaluate retail stores. Training provided. No experience required. Call 877-696-8561.

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

C B Builders

Coplen Construction

great finds in the Classifieds.

Experienced local carpenter Does all types remodeling Additions & Repairs Licensed & Insured

Call Conley Whaley 428-2791 or 919-7340(cell)

DCC Construction

236 GENERAL Grand Crowne Resorts is celebrating their 25th anniversary by opening a new resort in Pigeon Forge. We are hiring Sales Reps Average pay 50k to 75k per year Paid training. Full benefit package No experience required. Limited number of positions available. Call 865-804-5672 or 865-428-9055 ext. 225

Local cabin company taking applications for Reservationist, Assistant Manager, and Cleaners. Apply in person at: 333 Ski Mtn. Rd. Gatlinburg.

Thursday, 10 a.m.

428-0748

106 HOME IMPROVEMENTS

654-9078

600 Rentals

Online

105 YARD & TREE SERVICES

Landscaping, French Drain All Drain work, Bobcat work All your yard service needs. !LLODDJOBSs1UALITY7ORK Senior Discounts

100 Announcements

Deadline Friday, 10 a.m. Friday, 11 a.m. Monday, 10 a.m. Tuesday, 10 a.m. Wednesday, 10 a.m. Thursday, 10 a.m. Friday, 10 a.m.

http://www.themountainpress.com OR, www.adquest.com All line ads published in The Mountain Press are placed FREE on a searchable network of over 500 newspapersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; classifieds located at http://www.themountainpress.com. WANT TO KNOW WHEN A CLASSIFIED ITEM IS AVAILABLE? Go to http://www.adquest/request/ to register your request and we will notify you by e-mail when it becomes available in the Classifieds.

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FIREWOOD

does not recommend or endorse any product, service or company. For more information and assistance regarding the investigation of FINANCING, BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES AND WORK AT HOME OPPORTUNITIES, this newspaper urges its readers to contact the Better Business Bureau, 2633 Kingston Pike, Suite 2, Knoxville, TN 37919, Phone (865)692-1600.

110 SPECIAL NOTICES

Legals

Residential & Commercial s.EW#ONSTRUCTION s2EMODELING s2OOlNG s#ONCRETE s#ARPENTRY s$ECKS Licensed & Insured 865-360-4352

Home repairs, Remodeling Additions, Elect, Plumbing, Kitchen, Bath, Painting, Flooring Big or Small, we do it all Licensed & Insure

Call Carl 865-654-6691

Professional Painter for hire 1st class guaranteed work. Over 25 yrs. exp.

Phone Sam 865-453-6811

Interested candidates can apply in-person at our Pigeon Forge Care and Rehab skilled nursing facility, which is located at 415 Cole Drive, Pigeon Forge, TN or you can contact Cara Solitario at 888364-8013 or please submit your resume and salary history/requirements to csolitario@signaturehealthcarellc.com or via fax to 561364-8016.

115 ROOFING SERVICES

Sevier County RooďŹ ng Quality Work s3HINGLESs-ETAL s7OOD3HAKE *Senior Discounts *10 yr Warranty

Free Estimates countyrooďŹ ngcorp.com 865-236-2698

CART away unwanted items in the Classifieds.


A14 ◆ Comics Family Circus

The Mountain Press ◆ Saturday, January 2, 2010 Close to Home

Advice

Wife not happy with frequent overnight visit by husband’s friend

Zits

Blondie

Baby Blues

Beetle Bailey

Dear Annie: For the five years I have been married to “Joe,” I have had the dubious privilege of enduring frequent, spur-of-the-moment overnight visits from his best friend of 40 years. Joe says “Derek” comes two or three times a week because he is too drunk to drive home. Derek is a married man with a family. A few weeks ago when my husband’s snoring was too much, I slept on the sofa. Derek came through to use the bathroom, and I could sense him staring at me and hear his breathing. He stood there for quite some time. An hour later, he came back. I was so desperate to get out of the house that I went to work three hours early. At first, I didn’t tell Joe because I was afraid he wouldn’t believe me, or that he would somehow make me feel as if I were overreacting — which is exactly what happened when I finally mentioned it. I have repeatedly asked my husband to curtail some of these visits, but he won’t. Finally, two nights ago, I gave him the ultimatum — Derek or me. He countered with, “How about he comes once a week?” I don’t really want to leave my husband. I have no place to go and have invested too much time and money in this relationship and in this house. Joe is a kind, generous, gullible person, and I believe Derek takes advantage of him. Derek’s marital problems shouldn’t become mine. Derek’s wife is aware of how unhappy I am, but she apparently likes to get him out of the house.

Am I overreacting? — The Bad Guy Dear Bad Guy: Hardly. Overnight guests who drop by two or three times a week are intrusive. If Joe were single, he could do as he pleased, but he has an obligation to be considerate of the woman who is sharing his home. He may believe once a week is a reasonable compromise, but it’s still too often to put up with a man who watches you while you sleep. Tell Joe the only way Derek can fix his marriage is by going home and dealing with it. Then put your foot down, and tell him your compromise is once a month. Any more and you are staying at a hotel. Dear Annie: A good friend of mine has a 10-year-old son and a 7-year-old daughter. Her husband has a monthly subscription to Playboy magazine. She also enjoys the magazine. OK, it’s their business. My problem is, she leaves it on the kitchen counter and lets her children thumb through it. She says the human body is beautiful and there is nothing wrong with looking at the pictures. I disagree. I don’t believe this magazine is appropriate for children. It is provocative and soft-core pornography. Am I a prude? — Too Much Dear Too Much: The photos in these magazines are intended to

t o d ay ’ s p u z z l e

Garfield

Barney Google and Snuffy Smith

For Better Or Worse

Tina’s Groove

titillate and excite. They objectify women and can give young girls an unrealistic body image and teach them that their job is to sexually satisfy men. You might point these things out to your friend for her daughter’s sake, but beyond that, please stay out of it. Dear Annie: You missed the boat when you told “Husband of a Sudden Bisexual” that his marriage may not be reconcilable if his wife is bisexual. Bisexual people are just as inclined toward monogamy as anyone else. Millions of bisexuals may be getting fishy looks from their partners over the breakfast table because of your claim. Please set the record straight. — Happy Monogamous Bisexual Dear Bisexual: We didn’t mean to give the impression that bisexuals cannot be monogamous. But a wife who cheats with two different partners doesn’t seem inclined toward monogamy, and a husband who is surprised to discover she is bisexual may not be willing to reconcile. That was our point. Sorry it wasn’t clear. Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie’s Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, IL 60611. To find out more about Annie’s Mailbox, and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.


Saturday, January 2, 2010 ◆ The Mountain Press

◆ A15


A16 ◆ Nation

The Mountain Press ◆ Saturday, January 2, 2010

Thousands line up for Pasadena’s Rose Parade

AP Photo/Julie Jacobson

Christina Buckless of Baltimore, Md. takes photos of her friends while celebrating New Year’s Eve on Times Square Thursday in New York.

Times Square revelers mark end of difficult decade NEW YORK (AP) — For all those reflecting glumly on the last 10 years of terror attacks, war and recession, Gail Guay has some advice: “Don’t look back.” The 50-year-old Guay, from Raymond, N.H., was among the hundreds of thousands of revelers who rang in 2010 in a chilly Times Square as the famous Waterford crystal ball dropped at midnight Thursday, marking the end of a difficult decade that many wanted to leave behind. But a sense of starting fresh remained elusive for many, who wondered what sort of legacy would begin on Jan. 1. “Nothing seems to be going well,” said John O’Donnell, of Hazleton, Pa. “People are losing their lives overseas. People are unemployed. It doesn’t seem like it’s about to end soon.” Las Vegas welcomed some 315,000 revelers with fireworks from casino rooftops, celebrity toasts at nightclubs and a traffic-free Las Vegas Strip. David Fraley attended a

separate gathering in Sin ily and make a family even City’s downtown estimated bigger.” at 35,000 people. “This decade’s over. Let’s get a better one going,” said Fraley, 56, who lost his job as a supermarket liquor clerk in March. Bob Batchelor, a professor of mass communications at Kent State University and author of “The 2000s,” published before the decade was even done, said the meaning of the new decade would be “diminished by the hangover of the last decade.” “That,” he said, “makes it tough to be as optimistic as Americans usually are.” But New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg was more tempered in his assessment. “If you put it in the context of what people are suffering around the world, we’re in very good shape,” he said from Times Square. Some were hopeful. “I have many wishes for 2010!” exclaimed Ramona Vlada, 28, of Romania. “I wish to be healthy, love and to be loved at the same time, be with the fam-

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Flower-covered floats, marching bands and a heroic grand marshal kicked off one of the nation’s biggest New Year’s celebrations Friday as thousands lined up to watch the Tournament of Roses Parade. Chesley Sullenberger — the pilot who landed a stricken jetliner on New York’s Hudson River — led the 121st annual spectacle, themed “A Cut Above the Rest.” Onlookers gasped when Honda’s three-masted sailing ship float boomed and shot sparklers and smoke rings out of its cannon, right at the bleachers. A float celebrating Mexico’s bicentennial featured Mexico City’s landmark Angel of Independence and an intricate flower Aztec calendar, as well as dancers

AP Photo/Richard Vogel

Leading the 121st Rose Parade, Grand Marshal Capt. Chesley B. “Sully” Sullenberger, the hero pilot who guided a US Airways plane to a safe landing in New York’s Hudson River last January, waves as he makes his way along Colorado Blvd in Pasadena Calif., on Friday. costumed in traditional regional dresses. A swarm of children on rollerblades with butterfly wings also got a round of applause as they twirled in front of a float depict-

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TN residents pay tax, title, & license. Advertised offers only in select in stock units. Dealer retains all rebates & incentives. Price includes $499.00 DOC fee. Ad expires 1/4/10. *All competitors’ prices must be in writing on dealerships’ buyers order signed by a dealership manager, must assume identical incentives & MSRP, and must be quoted within 48 hours of Thomas Hill Burgin purchase to qualify for $1,000 Price Guarantee. Thomas Hill Burgin reserves the right to purchase vehicle from competitive dealership.

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January 2, 2010  

The Mountain Press for January 2, 2010

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