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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 3, 2011

Berkeley Springs, WV

Volume 118, Number 31

85¢

The Morgan

Messenger Founded in 1893 by S.S. Buzzerd

Teen pregnancies sound alarm for community by Kate Evans In early June, nine Morgan County high school girls were confirmed as pregnant. “One is too many,” said School Superintendent David Banks, who has led three meetings this summer on what can be done to prevent teen pregnancy. The meetings have been attended by students, school board members, county commissioners, doctors, nurses, school counselors, social workers and representatives from local and regional agencies. Discussions have included a curriculum that addresses teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases as well as how to educate parents on talking to their kids about these issues and getting the community more involved in supporting youth.

“Reducing the risk” The health curriculum focuses on reproductive health, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and different forms of contraception in eighth grade. Banks said the State Department of Education’s future plans include a program called “Reducing the Risk: Building Skills to Prevent Pregnancy, HIV and STD.” The program teaches abstinence, the facts about conception and protection, refusal skills, delaying tactics and avoiding unprotected sex. It also discusses the risks and consequences of becoming a teen parent and of becoming infected with HIV or STDs. The program involves role-playing and making smart decisions and also has an element of birth control,

Banks said. It is adaptable to different age groups. Cynthia Hinkle, a regional adolescent pregnancy prevention specialist, is certified to teach “Reducing the Risk” as well as “Wise Guys,” a program used in the past at the middle school. “Wise Guys” focuses on personal responsibility, making good choices and healthy relationships as well as prevention of teen pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. More needs to be done Berkeley Springs High School nurse Sherry Ambrose said more needs to be done. Some girls have no idea that sexually transmitted diseases can be transmitted through oral sex. Some can’t get to a doctor or to the Health Department for a pregnancy test.

“They didn’t think it would happen to them,” she said. Warm Springs Middle School nurse Gina Mellott said she deals with seventh and eighth graders who need to confirm whether they’re pregnant. It happened in the heat of the moment and they had no access to condoms, she said. One meeting participant said there were kids with low self-esteem and depression. They may know about the risks and diseases, but still choose to have unprotected sex. Some of the pregnant girls aren’t sure who the father is. Hinkle said they’ve had pregnant 10-year-olds elsewhere in the state. Kids were using the “pull and pray” method. One high school in southern West Virginia had chosen to give out condoms to high schoolers, she noted.

Hot time at the county fair

Know where your kids are Mellott said parents should know that the best of kids get into trouble. “Be vigilant about where your child is,” she said. Mellott said that in “Grow-up Talks” for fifth graders, she tells students to talk with their parents or someone they trust. Kids are getting information from siblings, the internet and friends, but need to get accurate information from a properly informed source, Banks said. Community involvement Rev. Andrew Cooney of First United Methodist Church said teen pregnancy is symptomatic of other issues.

see TEEN PREGNANCIES page 3

Travel group sees upturn in tourism Inn still behind on taxes

The Morgan County Fair’s first Hot Dog Eating Contest drew quite a crowd of participants and spectators in the blazing sun on Saturday afternoon. For the winners, see page 10.

Brenda Hutchinson brought a turkey and chickens and urged everyone to bring more farm animals next year. More fair pictures on page 20. photos by John Douglas

This Week Opinions . . . . . . . . . page 2 Lottery . . . . . . . . . . page 3 Obituaries. . . . . . . . page 8 Police News . . . . . . page 9 Round the Town . . . . . . . . . . page 10 Reading The Messenger . . . . . page 10

Cooking at the Paw Paw Library page 11 Public Notices . . . . page 14 Classifieds . . . . . . . page 16 Real Estate. . . . . . . page 18

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Cally with owners Kim and Eugene Weaver won people’s dog show ribbons for Best of Show and Congeniality. Cally was chosen by the kids who came to the show without dogs. See dog show winners, page 20.

Bath water losses down to 2% by David Abner Chief Water Operator Terry Largent recently reported to the Bath Town Council that water losses at the Water Works were down to 2% last quarter. “Down from 64% when I started in 2007 to 2% last quarter,” Largent said. Over the past several years, the town has contracted for and completed two major water line replacement projects. In addition, the West Virginia Public Service Commission raised water rates and ordered the town to put aside $140,000 a year for local repair of water lines by Largent and his crew. Largent said the 2% loss, if not the best, compares favorably with any water system in the state. “That’s success. That is success for any water

Town of Bath water plant. system,” Mayor Susan Webster said. Asked if there was another big project ahead in the future, Largent said 10,000 to 12,000 feet of water line still needs to be replaced under Washington Street and up near War Memorial Hospital.

He said the water plant needs some upgrades along with upgrades to the communication system between the town’s water towers and the plant. “The plant structurally needs a good bit of work,” Largent said.

by Kate Shunney Travel Berkeley Springs (TBS), the group that promotes tourism to Morgan County, is seeing evidence of more travel activity in the area as they review lodging receipts from hotels, motels and inns from April, May and June. TBS is funded through a 4% tax on lodging rooms in the county. Guests pay $4 in lodging tax on every $100 they spend on an overnight stay. The travel group receives half of that tax, while the other half is distributed to community groups engaged in beautification, cultural or recreational projects. Organizations like the Foxglove Garden Club, Boys & Girls Club, Morgan Arts Council and Morgan County Fair receive hotel tax funds. County collecting more TBS received $12,192 in hotel tax funds from April through June, the fourth quarter of the last fiscal year, according to Laura Smith of TBS. Last year, the group got $8,294 during that same quarter. The $3,900 increase represents a 47% hike in lodging receipts. The majority of the increase came from businesses outside the Town of Bath limits. County hotel tax

receipts went up $3,500 – roughly 53% over the same quarter last year. Town hotel taxes went up just $373 over last year, likely due to the increase of the lodging tax from 3% to 4% in June. The Bath Town Council is still seeing a shortfall of hotel tax revenue, in large part because of collection issues with the town’s largest lodging establishment – The Country Inn. Town officials have an active lawsuit against the Inn to collect $30,000 in overdue lodging tax revenue from 2009 and 2010. The town’s attorney, Richard Gay, said the Inn has submitted hotel tax reports in a timely way in 2011, recording how much tax they’ve collected from their guests each month. But the Inn has not turned over that tax money to the town since February. During the 2010-2011 fiscal year, Town of Bath collected $17,385 in hotel tax from about a dozen lodging businesses. According to their budget, they expected to collect $30,000. Morgan County’s tax office collected $92,000 in lodging tax for the last fiscal year — $2,000 more than they had expected. see TOURISM page 3

Property taxes: who gets what? This year’s Morgan County property tax bills were mailed by the Sheriff’s Tax Office last month and many homeowners saw a slight decrease from last year’s bills. The following breakdown shows how property tax revenue is divided among the school system, county government, town councils and state tax services. The sample bill is based on an owner-occupied home with a market value of $180,000. Since the assessment is 60% of appraised value, the home would be assessed for taxation at $108,000. The tax rates used were approved earlier this year by the Morgan County School Board, Morgan County Commissioners, and the Bath and Paw Paw town councils. Each governing bodies’ proportionate share would remain the same whether a homeowner’s bill is higher or lower.

Home in unincorporated Morgan County

Total bill for $180,000 home: $1,142.43. Morgan County Schools share: $857.74 (75.1% of total). Morgan County Government share: $279.29 (24.4% of total). State share: $5.40 (.5% of total). Home in Town of Bath Total bill for $180,000 home: $1,314.80. Town of Bath share: $172.37 (13.1% of total). Morgan County Schools share: $857.74 (65.3% of total). Morgan County Government share: $279.29 (21.3% of total). State share: $5.40 (.4% of total). Home in Town of Paw Paw Total bill for $180,000 home: $1,412.43. Town of Paw Paw share: $270 (19.1% of total). see PROPERTY TAXES page 3

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Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

OPINIONS

• editorial • letters • columns

Editorial

Challenging time for Morgan County towns Since nearly 94% of Morgan Countians live in the unincorporated county, most of us don’t worry much about the local town governments. While Morgan County continued to show population gains in the last decade, the towns of Bath and Paw Paw both showed slight population declines, a trend seen in many small towns across the region. Nonetheless, the recent town election in Paw Paw showed a real contest with nine candidates after the five town council seats. We hope this signals renewed leadership for the western Morgan County town, which had 508 residents according to the 2010 Census. The new Paw Paw Council faces serious issues, such as improving the general climate and town appearance by removing condemned and burned structures, and replacing the town’s sewer system. Town of Bath, with 624 residents, had a different election story in June. Only incumbent Susan Webster ran for mayor and no one filed for town recorder. Only two of the five council members filed to stay onboard. So, the council wouldn’t even have had a quorum for meetings until a write-in candidate emerged and took office with the others on July 1. This lack of interest in the municipality that’s our county seat is distressing. Mayor Susan Webster told us that she believes other council members will be found and appointed in the months ahead, but who knows what the future holds? It wasn’t many years ago that so few people voted in the Bath election that the town was actually in danger of losing its charter, so the disinterest is nothing new. Since it’s unlikely Bath officials will ever convince adjoining property owners to become part of the corporation, it may be time to look at other ways of governing Ye Olde Town. One idea we’ve heard from business people is to make the downtown into more of an historic district within the county, with some sort of tax collection ability. The taxes collected could help pay for additional sheriff’s deputies to patrol the town limits instead of a town police force. Other towns have worked out such deals. Perhaps the biggest public service that the present Bath Town Council can do is put some time and effort into studying the possibilities. They should take an honest look at how services like the water system, trash collection and street repair might be handled in the future. Maybe they could appoint a committee of town residents and business owners to do some of the lifting. We wish both the Bath and Paw Paw town councils well. Even though the vast majority of county residents don’t live within the two towns, they are community and business centers that are important to the lives and livelihoods of most of us. We all benefit from them being viable and efficiently run.

Her roots are showing This atmospheric scene of a Sycamore tree along – or in – Sleepy Creek along Fish Hatchery Road was snapped by Jody Crouse. She said the exposed roots always remind her of Medusa of Greek mythology or Ursula of “The Little Mermaid.”

If you have a great “Photo of the Week” – of roots or routes, mythical figures or mermaids in the creek, from Southern Morgan County, or northern, eastern or western, why not lend it to The Morgan Messenger?

Letters to the editor... American exceptionalism?

Too hot to trot

Dear Editor: In a recent letter, the term “American Exceptionalism” was used. I do feel that once that term certainly applied. I do not feel it does today. However to make America exceptional again, and it can be done, these things must be done. 1. Get money out of politics. Many in both parties are little more than paid representatives of giant moneyed interests, more and more even foreign based. Our representatives or theirs? 2. Scrapping or radically rewriting of trade agreements. They are awful. Trade agreements, like NAFTA have caused the current job crisis. It is shamefully cynical for politicians to talk about “job creation” only to ship those jobs to foreign countries while Americans line up at the unemployment office. Scrap trade agreements! 3. Creation of a viable third political party that would again represent regular, average Americans. I am 60 years old and it is painfully obvious to me that neither Democrats or Republicans do. Don’t delude yourself. Joe Mogus Berkeley Springs

Under the dome

Dear Editor: Another Morgan County Fair has come and gone. It has grown into one of the finest in the area. Only thing is, I have not been able to enjoy it for the second year in a row because of the extremely high temperatures. Now, I know this summer has been unusually hot for a long period of time, but hot, dry weather seems to be a pattern every summer in late July and early August in Morgan County. It upsets me to know how many older people like me, and younger as well, refrain from attending the fair for the same reason. I did learn about a young couple who had started out to the fair only to find themselves in bumper-to-bumper traffic. Combine this mess with the intense heat of the day and they did exactly what I would have done. They turned around and headed back home. The high temps are not only hard on people, but what about the caged animals that are on display at the fair? They can’t speak up, but it’s gotta be hard on them. Think about how much more money would be generated at the fair if it was held during a cooler time of year. What’s wrong with a Spring Fair? Do you think that would be possible? Elle Kronyak Berkeley Springs

Special legislative session under way

Wish I’d said that

by Tom Miller This week’s special session of the West Virginia Legislature is mainly to allow lawmakers to draw new boundaries for the state’s three congressional districts. There’s also the need to draw new legislative districts for members of the House of Delegates and State Senate using the 2010 U. S. census numbers. But Acting Governor Earl Ray Tomblin is also campaigning to be elected the actual governor in a special statewide election in October. So he wants to cut the sales tax on food by another half-penny January 1 to improve his image with voters. There are also proposals to let coal-producing counties keep an additional 5% of the coal severance tax as well as supplemental appropriation bills using some of this year’s budget surplus. But redistricting and the tax cut figure to grab the spotlight. Republicans currently hold two of the state’s three seats in U.S. Congress despite the state’s 2-1 Democratic majority of registered voters. So one of the early proposals to change congressional districts would put those two Republicans — Shelley Moore Capito of the present 2nd District and David McKinley of the 1st District — into the same new congressional district. A more modest plan would simply move Mason County from the Capito’s district to the 3rd District, now represented by Congressman Nick Joe Rahall.

The wrong Davison David Bohrer of Silver Spring, Md., called in the first correction to last week’s feature story, “When there was a market in every block.” #6 on the list of two dozen food markets that once graced Berkeley Springs was the Davison & Martin Store on North Washington Street. Bohrer says Rockwell Martin’s partner was Lester Davison, not Alvin Davison.

State Senator Herb Snyder (D-Jefferson County) is sponsoring the bill to create a new district stretching from Morgantown to Martinsburg. Republicans argue this is an attempt to create an open seat for State Senator John Unger (D-Berkeley), who filed as a congressional candidate in 2008 but withdrew. Unger denies it, but many Democrats believe that would give their party the best chance to re-capture one of the two seats from the GOP. Key issues in the legislative redistricting battle will be just how many more single member districts will be created in the House of Delegates where only 36 of the 100 delegates are currently elected that way. The other 64 House members come from districts that include one with seven delegates in Kanawha County; one with five members; three with four members; six with three members and 11 with two members. In the 34-member State Senate, there are 17 separate senatorial districts and one of the two senators from each district is elected every two years to a four-year term. The major concern here seems to be that Kanawha County, which now has two separate senatorial districts that both elect two senators countywide, will be divided up and combined with part of another county (probably Putnam County) to make a new senatorial district. The remainder of Kanawha County will constitute the other senatorial district. Gambling revenue up The state’s share of profits from the West Virginia Lottery increased more than $10 million during the fiscal year that ended June 30 — the first time in four years that this number has exceeded the previous year’s amount. The actual figure is slightly more than $615 million, still far below the record $640 million the state earned in 2006-2007. Lottery Director John Musgrave told members of the Lottery Commission last week that this doesn’t include $68 million raised in bidding for 7,500 new 10-year limited video lottery licenses. One member of the commission described the numbers as “remarkable” in light of national economic conditions. The success of table games at the Charles

Town Hollywood Casino is clearly the reason for the overall 3% increase in total state lottery revenues of $1.39 billion for the past year. In June alone, table games at Charles Town grossed $12.15 million — more than twice the amount generated at the state’s other four casinos combined. For the entire fiscal year, table game revenues doubled from less than $32 million to more than $68 million because table games began at Charles Town last July. Coal production down Finally, coal production in West Virginia peaked 13 years ago at about 181 million tons per year and is expected to drop to 100 million tons by 2015. Now a state that has relied so heavily economically on valuable natural resources is hoping that development of valuable natural gas deposits in the Marcellus Shale strata will fill that gap in the state economy. But a recent report by the West Virginia Center on Budget & Policy suggests that the gain is only temporary at best based on this state’s experience with King Coal. Of greater concern is the report’s conclusion that residents of coal-producing counties face greater health, education and economic problems. The bottom line is that West Virginia needs to act now to levy and collect higher severance taxes on these minerals to provide for the welfare of its residents when the minerals are gone.

Correction Last week’s report of an accident involving a Hancock fire truck erroneously said the truck was run off River Road by a West Virginia Division of Highways truck. Morgan County Deputy Sheriff Cliff Cobern said initial police reports that a state roads vehicle ran the fire truck off the road were false. Instead, he found that a privately owned, gold-colored car was involved in the incident. Letters To The Editor over 400 words will not be published.

Three things in human life are important. The first is to be kind. The second is to be kind. And the third is to be kind. —Henry James (1843-1916), American writer * * * * * The moment we begin tolerating meanness, in ourselves and others, we are using our authorial power in the service of wrongdoing. We have both the capacity and the obligation to do better. —Martha Beck, American sociologist & writer These thoughts were contributed by readers. If you have a “Wish I’d said that,” send it in.

ARTICLES MAY BE EDITED Articles submitted to The Morgan Messenger may be edited for clarity, style and content and to conform to the newspaper's policies and protect against libel.

The Morgan

Messenger 1869-1959 S.S. Buzzerd 1904-1995 James S. Buzzerd Publisher The Morgan Messenger, Inc. President: Jim Buzzerd Editor: John Douglas Managing Editor: Sandy Buzzerd Office Manager: Pauline Waugh Staff: Todd Buzzerd, Bev Buzzerd, Jody Crouse, Flip Henry, Rebecca Cain, Kate Evans, Kate Shunney, David Abner, Horace Blankenship

Telephone: 304-258-1800 Fax: 304-258-8441 Web site: www.morganmessenger.com e-mail: news@morganmessenger.com (ISSN 0895-1594) Entered at The Post Office at Berkeley Springs, WV November 16, 1893 as 2nd Class Matter Published weekly except the last Wednesday of the year at 16 North Mercer St., Berkeley Springs, WV 25411-1539. Periodicals postage paid at Berkeley Springs, WV. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Morgan Messenger, P.O. Box 567, Berkeley Springs, WV 25411. Subscription rates: $30.74 a year in Berkeley Springs, Paw Paw & Great Cacapon; $33.92 a year in West Virginia; $39 a year in PA, VA, MD, DC; $45 a year in all other states.

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The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

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County health officials highlight top concerns by Kate Evans Smoking and tobacco use, obesity, substance abuse and teen pregnancy are the top concerns of Morgan County Health Department officials. Health Department Administrator Lee Fowler, said wherever he goes there are people puffing on cigarettes all the way to the door and employees smoking outside. He sees smokers in vehicles and wonders how many have children in the back seat. “We need to look at it as an addictive substance,” he said. Tobacco is more addictive than heroin, he emphasized. The push is on again to increase taxes on cigarettes, but Fowler said it will only increase the poverty of people who are addicted since they will still buy tobacco. There will just be less money going to food and care of children. Causes death The only way to reduce how many people are using tobacco is “to increase programs to talk about its addictive qualities, that it’s expensive, that it causes death and that it’s one of the main reasons for the high cost of medical insurance in this country,” Fowler said.

The key to stopping smoking is more psychological than physiological. One has to make up their mind that they’re going to stop and decide what one needs to do to achieve that goal, said Fowler, an ex-smoker. Health Department Nurse Angel Bloom said the biggest thing that bothers her, besides the damage that smokers are doing to themselves, is the damage they’re doing to others. “They have no idea of the health concerns of those around them,” she said. Fowler noted that smoking while pregnant and smoking with young kids in the car were both harmful. He reminded people that the Health Board’s smoking regulations say smoking must be done 15 ft. away from a building, not 15 ft. away from the door. He often finds employees smoking within three feet of an entrance and will tell the manager that it’s against regulations. “They don’t have the right to affect my health,” Fowler said. He advised patrons to do the same. If management doesn’t pay attention to their concerns, call the Health Department, he said.

Mount ain Musings by Kate Evans

Summertime memories Images of summertime run across the decades from childhood to now: Fields and backyards full of glittering fireflies. Childhood cries of “First see streetlight” in the city. Watching the 4th of July fireworks over the Pittsburgh skyline from my parent’s front porch. Neighbors along our stretch of the street also came outside to enjoy them so it was like a big block party. Chicory, day lilies and Queen Anne’s lace lining the roadsides, fresh handpicked berries, climbing trees, Tarzan rope swings and camping out in the back yard. Recalling games of tag, Mother May I, riding bicycles, hopscotch, jump rope, shooting hoops, walks in the woods, picking wildflowers and playing hide and seek. The hot, humid haze of July and August dog days, heat waves, the cooling relief of a swimming pool or lake, a front lawn slip and slide, fishing, boat rides, picnics and barbecues, corn on the cob, lemonade and a long-awaited break from school. Lawn chairs, porch sitting, straw hats, bandanas, the whirring of multiple fans and the welcome summer breeze wafting through open windows. Shorts and tank tops, sandals and swimsuits, practically living at the library, reading mythology, science fiction, mysteries, biographies, biking to a nearby school playground, roller-skating, kickball and playing Frisbee and catch with my brothers and sister. Pirate baseball games at Forbes Field and Three Rivers Stadium, the aroma of popcorn and peanuts, the cheering crowds and the pipe organ’s building crescendo, Roberto Clemente’s home runs sailing over the fence, the slugger Willie Stargell at bat, pitcher Dave Giusti’s ninth inning saves—World Series champs and “We are Family.” The family packed into the station wagon at the drive-in on a sweltering summer night, cooling off in a backyard nighttime swim, shooting archery into a bale of straw, sidewalk chalk, miniature golf and carnival rides. Summer vacation trips and gazing at endless dark mountain silhouettes through the car window. Visiting the Washington Monument, the Capitol and the White House, the somber stillness of Arlington National Cemetery and the Gettysburg Battlefield, picnicking on the shores of Lake Erie and wandering the beach at Chesapeake Bay. I remember rafting through the Youghiogheny River rapids, hurtling through the downhill tunnel on the Thunderbolt rollercoaster at Kennywood Park, Dad taking us to Kings Dominion and going to the Highland Park Zoo with family and siblings in strollers. Treks to Wildwood and Ocean City, the boardwalk hum of commerce, salt water taffy, fudge, amusement parks, the magnificence of an ocean sunrise, looking for seashells in the sand and being mesmerized by the rolling waves. Music around the campfire, the sounds and sights of the Cacapon State Park Homecoming, Patsy Cline Day at the Troubadour and the Morgan Arts Council’s summer music concerts at the state park and the Morgan County Fair. I’m enjoying summer garden goodies, homegrown tomatoes, thirst-quenching iced tea and ice water, macaroni salad, outdoor grilling and the hummingbirds zipping by to the feeder. The birds are singing happy songs and the world is green. Assorted critters are looking after their young and having some summer fun too. It’s a great time of year. Take a walk through your summertime memories. There are more of them than you’ll expect.

Anyone have a ladder?

Substance abuse Bloom said injectable drug use is really bad here. Hepatitis has been a problem for several years, but there aren’t many new cases. HIV is also a concern with shared needles. “Again we’re looking at addiction,” Fowler said. The drug use affects all ages. Kids are doing it and so are 40 and 50 year-olds. The Morgan County Partnership is working on local substance abuse issues. Obesity Obesity is another reason why we’re having high medical insurance costs, Fowler said. Most of the diseases that people die from are connected to obesity and smoking. What causes Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is exposure to smoke, he said. A lot of joint, leg and knee problems are related to a person carrying around a lot more weight than they should. “Obesity is something that is affecting everyone in the United States,” Bloom said. Some health conditions and medications may contribute to a person’s size, she said. Fowler said when he gets back to

his diet and exercise program, he feels better. He has been following the Omega3 diet that Dr. Bill Lands of FAST has promoted. After six months of being on the diet, his serious arthritis has subsided. The diet emphasizes foods that are high in Omega 3 fatty acids and low in Omega 6 fatty acids. Fowler eats no meat or fowl, but has seafood four to five times a week—generally salmon, tuna or halibut. He uses only olive oil and canola oil in cooking and also buys walnuts, flax and flax milk. “You have to do more than take a little fish oil pill,” he said. Stay active Bloom advised staying active and finding an activity one can do that’s enjoyable. The area has several gyms, she noted, and there are exercises that wheelchair patients and people with limited mobility can do. Parents can play Wii Nintendo sports activities with their children. Bloom particularly likes Wii golf. Seniors like the Wii games at the senior center. She urged that people talk to their doctor before starting any diet or activity plan.

“You need to know what you can safely do,” Bloom said. Teen sexuality Teen pregnancy is another huge county concern. Bloom felt the biggest thing that can be done was to educate teens on sexually transmitted diseases. Antibiotics can get rid of Chlamydia and gonorrhea, but they’ll be stuck with HIV and herpes, she said. Bloom is amazed at teens who know about sexually transmitted diseases, but not their long-term ramifications. “It’s the old idea of being a teenager and ‘it won’t happen to me,’” Fowler said. Bloom said she grew up with the Life Cycle books from the 1970s that explain this is what happens to your body to adolescents. She bought the series for her 11-year-old daughter. During a 20-minute drive to babysitters, Fowler said he talked to his daughters about everything. Any subject was possible and all questions would be answered honestly. Fowler recommended that parents talk to their children about these important issues.

Teen pregnancies (from front) Cooney’s subcommittee recommended getting the community involved by nurturing 40 developmental assets identified as beneficial to youth. These assets include having family support, caring neighborhoods and school climates, clear rules and boundaries at home and school, commitment to learning, selfesteem and a sense of purpose and being involved in constructive activities. Young people who have more of these assets are less likely to engage in risky behavior, Cooney said. In 2001 and a 2006, asset surveys were made of Morgan County students. Cooney’s group proposed working with county organizations and businesses on developing various assets. They would survey kids in two years to see what effect the community’s efforts had.

Working it out Since access to care and information are issues, the possibility of creating schoolbased health centers is being investigated. These in-school health centers would be generally staffed by a nurse practitioner or a physician’s assistant. School-based health centers can offer a range of services. Parents don’t have to leave work to get their sick children at school and take them to the doctor, said Starting Points Director Audrey Morris. Morgan County Health Department officials were open to coming to schools and providing information to students on pregnancy prevention and sexually transmitted diseases. Banks preferred that the information come from home. Talking about it in a health class with 30 kids wasn’t an ideal situation, he said.

Glascock’s farm competes for state conservation award by Kate Shunney Mark and Laura Glascock’s farm operation is now in the running for State Conservation Farm of the Year, after judges chose them as the area’s Conservation Farm winner last month. Glascock’s Produce will be one of four farms across West Virginia to be judged for soil and water conservation practices at the end of August. Glascock’s Produce has grown a wide variety of vegetables and fruits at their Highland Ridge farm for over 20 years. They sell their produce and jarred sauces, jams and butters at local and regional farmer’s markets. The operation is tied to the family orchard, which has operated in Morgan County since the 1950’s.

The annual farm awards are sponsored by the West Virginia Conservation Agency. Judging will be done in the next month by officials from the conservation agency, West Virginia Department of Agriculture, Division of Forestry, Department of Environmental Protection, Farm Service Agency, the National Resource Conservation Service, WVU Extension Service, WVUDavis College of Agriculture and the WV Association of Conservation Districts. Winners will be announced at the end of October, said Sherry Duncan of the Eastern Panhandle Conservation District. Winners will receive a cash award and 200 hours of use of a brand-new tractor.

This Week in West Virginia History from The West Virginia Encyclopedia West Virginia Humanities Council 1310 Kanawha Blvd., E. Charleston, WV 25301

August 3, 1897 - Fire destroyed much of downtown Lewisburg. The town rebuilt and became the hub of one of the state’s major farming areas and a center for education and the arts. August 3, 1907 - Harley Orrin Staggers Sr. was born in Keyser. Staggers served in the U.S. House of Representatives for 32 years, longer than any other West Virginian. August 4, 1824 - John Jay Jackson Jr. was born near Parkersburg. Jackson was a prominent judge who became notorious among those trying to organize labor unions in West Virginia. He blocked an effort by Mother Jones and United Mine Workers leaders to organize the miners of northern West Virginia.

Now Online

August 4, 1897 - Musician William Jennings ‘‘Billy’’ Cox was born near Charleston. Cox, known as the ‘‘Dixie Songbird,’’ ranked as one of West Virginia’s premier country music vocalists and songwriters during the 1930s. August 7, 1893 - Parsons became the county seat of Tucker County. Parsons was named for Ward Parsons, a prominent resident and the largest landholder. August 9, 1954 - Don Chafin died in Huntington. As sheriff of Logan County, Chafin was a bitter foe of union organizers and, with financial support from coal companies, used his many deputies to keep labor organizers out of the county.

One idea was to create a video similar to the anti-bullying video that would help parents talk to their children about these issues. School Social Worker Gary McDaniel expressed concern about the children whose parents wouldn’t discuss the subject with them. It was better that children have the opportunity in the classroom to practice refusal skills through role-playing, he felt. Banks promised to send the group his suggestions on curriculum and other ideas. He said that as the father of a girl going into fifth grade, he planned to consider the subject carefully. “Kids are now asking for advice that we aren’t prepared for,” the superintendent said.

Property taxes (from front) Morgan County Schools share: $857.74 (60.7% of total). Morgan County Government share: $279.29 (19.8% of total). State share: $5.40 (.4% of total). Other taxable property Vehicles, taxable personal property, business inventory, and business and rental real estate are taxed at twice the rate as owner-occupied homes. The revenue is divided in the same proportions among the government entities. Senior citizen discount Senior citizens and disabled persons are eligible for a

Homestead Exemption from part of the property tax on their residences. The exemption can reduce the tax bill on a local home by more than $200 since $20,000 of a home’s assessed value is exempt from taxation. To qualify for the Homestead Exemption on next summer’s tax bill, a homeowner must be at least 65 years old by June 30, 2012, or be disabled, and must have lived in West Virginia since at least July 1, 2010. Application for the Homestead Exemption must be made to the Assessor’s Office by December 1.

Tourism upturn (from front) Better lodging, not retail Smith said local lodging businesses have reported feeling a rebound recently, though retail shops haven’t felt the same upswing in business yet. “Visitors will come, stay and eat, but they won’t buy that art or other item they might have in the past,” said Smith. “That’s discretionary money.”

TBS members will meet soon to evaluate their advertising strategies for the coming months, Smith aid. TBS promised members they would renew promotional efforts with money generated by the 1% Hotel/Motel tax increase that took effect this spring. The tax is now 4% at both town and county lodging businesses.

West Virginia Lottery Numbers Daily 3

Daily 4

Tuesday, July 26 - 191 Wednesday, July 27 - 647 Thursday, July 28 - 709 Friday, July 29 - 090 Saturday, July 30 - 216 Monday, August 1 - 342

Tuesday, July 26 - 4871 Wednesday, July 27 - 3168 Thursday, July 28 - 3879 Friday, July 29 - 1758 Saturday, July 30 - 9351 Monday, August 1 - 5696

Hot Lotto Wednesday, July 27 2-6-14-36-39 HB: 13

Saturday, July 30 3-9-10-16-39 HB: 5

Cash 25 Tuesday, July 26 4-5-7-14-17-20 Friday, July 29 2-4-8-20-22-24

Thursday, July 28 5-7-8-9-14-20 Monday, August 1 2-4-5-11-18-25

Powerball Wed., July 27 - 38-40-41-51-59 Power Ball: 33 Power Play: 2x Sat., July 30 - 20-40-41-47-55 Power Ball: 19 Power Play: 2x

Mega Millions Norma Clark needs a ladder to pick the tomatoes from son Shorty Clark’s super-sized tomato plants in eastern Morgan County.

BOOKMARK THE MORGAN MESSENGER WEB SITE: www.morganmessenger.com

Tues., July 26 - 20-25-35-52-55 Mega-Ball: 10 Megaplier: 3x Fri., July 29 - 8-10-22-47-48 Mega-Ball: 35 Megaplier: 4x

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK BROADSHEET TEMPLATE 04052001


4

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

What’s Happening Where? • meetings • concerts • programs • festivals •

Flea circus August 7 Professor Mike’s Amazing Flea Circus will be in Hancock to provide an even bigger and better show this Sunday, August 7, at 3 p.m. at the Town Hall’s newly renovated Performing Arts Center. The Springs Chamber Ensemble under the direction of Linda Whitesitt will accompany these tiny talents. Members of the Ensemble will join their small companions and provide acts of their own. This is all to the accompaniment of live music. This event is sponsored by the Hancock’s Arts Council and is free to the public, however donations will be accepted to help fund future programs aimed at supporting the Arts in the community. For more information call 717-294-3182.

Historical Society meeting Morgan County Historical & Genealogical Society meeting will be held Tuesday, August 9, 1:30 p.m. in the social hall of the First United Methodist Church on Green Street. There will be a Cemetery Committee meeting at 10:45 a.m. This will be an important meeting. Must make some definite decisions as to what the next step will be in dispersing of the Newbraugh/Eppinger collection. Everything should be out of the Largent Implement building as soon as possible. If unable to attend, but have suggestions, contact one of the officers.

Art in The Park

Sunday, August 7 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Berkeley Springs State Park Downtown Berkeley Springs

Berkeley Springs Art Fair Featuring Local and Regional Artists For More Information Call 304-258-6419

Rotary Club gave back $12,600 to community In the past year, the Rotary Club of Berkeley Springs gave back $12,600 to organizations, charitable groups and students in the local area. Included in this amount, $1,000 was donated to foreign missions undertaken by county residents. Money was raised from the community by projects such as raffles, a Tri-State High School Basketball Tournament, a Super Bowl Party and Golf Tournament. This money was given back to the community in such projects as: Three $1,000 scholarships for Morgan County High School Aid Fund; Over $4,000 to four local high schools participating in the Basketball Tournament; U.S. Savings Bonds to Students of the Month; Dictionaries to all third graders; Donations to the Boys & Girls Clubs and Starting Points and $1,000 to two community residents sponsoring missions to Honduras.

Rotary is a global network of community volunteers. Rotary club members are business, professional, and community leaders in the locality who meet regularly to plan and implement community service activities and network with other professionals. For those interested, members can also choose to become involved in international humanitarian service efforts. More than 1.2 million men and women in over 200 countries and geographical areas belong to over 33,000 Rotary clubs. Rotary builds international understanding through scholarships, exchange programs, and humanitarian grants. Throughout the world, Rotary clubs participate in a broad range of educational, intercultural, and humanitarian activities designed to improve the lives of others. Officers for this past year were: Michelle Sirbaugh, president; Buzz Chamberlain, first vice president; Mike Pearse,

second vice president; Steve McBee, secretary and Matt Close, treasurer. Next year’s officers, installed on July 14 are: Buzz Chamberlain, president; Mike Pearse, first vice president; Sean Forney, second vice president; Steve McBee, secretary and Matt Close, treasurer. In the coming year, the Rotary will work with local businesses to establish a Shop Berkeley Springs Discount Card. A credit-card size card will offer purchasers discounts at up to 20 local participating businesses. The goals are to attract more customers to the businesses and raise funds for Rotary to give back to the community over the next year. The Shop Berkeley Springs Discount Card will be sold by club members and participating businesses starting in September. They will also be sold at the Rotary Booth at the Apple Butter Festival and other Rotary events.

Arkansas Roots Band at Summer Concert in park Driven by gentle harmonies and award-winning songwriting, 3 Penny Acre brings their popular folk/Americana sound from the Ozarks to Berkeley Springs State Park on Saturday, August 6 at 5:30 p.m. Rain location for the Morgan Arts Council’s summer concert series is the nearby Ice House. All three of the band mem-

BINGO

American Legion Berkeley Springs

PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT Starting At $1500 Minimum Payout

For Any Game - $35.00

Every Wednesday • 6:30 p.m. Doors Open at 5:30

SMOKE FREE

Bring This Ad and Get Free Jackpot Card

VFW POST 4019 Berkeley Springs

TOOL SALE

bers write songs and sing. Their instrumentation ranges from Bernice Hembree on upright bass to Bryan Hembree on guitar and Bayard Blain on mandolin. Throw in brush bucket and hand crafted bouzouki and the result is a unique and distinct sound that is soundly based in roots music tradition. For this East Coast tour, 3 Penny Acre has added their friend David Glasser for another guitar and inspired four-part harmony. 3 Penny Acre writes virtually every song they play with a few from other songwriter friends.

Although they’ve been performing only three years, the trio has accumulated honors and awards enough to fill a long career including a regional award for best album. They just released a double CD that brings their total count to four. This concert is funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and West Virginia Commission on the Arts as well as hotel/motel tax from the town and county. For a full schedule and links to the music of the remaining concerts in the summer series, check online.

Frog Valley Artisans help clean up Cold Run Valley Road As part of their on-going commitment to the Adopt-aHighway program the artists at the little art center up the hill known as Frog Valley, plan to pick up the litter along the northern part of Cold Run Valley Road. On Saturday, August 6, local stained glass artist Veronica Wilson heads up this effort and rides her electric mobility scooter along the road. She has Multiple Sclerosis (MS) but continues to do what she can to clean things up. Along with Mark Schwenk, metal sculptor at Frog Valley

and Kat Braun another local glass artist from River House WV Arts & Glass plus a few other friends, they will begin cleaning up the road starting around 9 a.m. this coming Saturday, August 6. The process takes a few hours but you can volunteer for any or all of it. Anyone wishing to help can call 304258-3541 to volunteer. The first 10 volunteers get a $10 gift certificate from Frog Valley that can be used to purchase art from their gift shop and galleries.

Thursday, August 4 – Alanon, 7:30, First U.M. Church – Pleasant View Com. Center meet, 7 p.m. – Rotary Club, noon, Country Inn – Kaw Kaw Peyon 4-H, 7:30, homes – Cub Scout Pack 27, 6 p.m., Grace U.M. Church – Starting Points Play Group, 12:30 – AA, St. Mark’s, 7:30 – Hancock Legion & Auxiliary #26, 8, post home – TOPS, 8:45, Presbyterian Church – Boy Scout Troop 27, Grace U.M. Church, 7 p.m. – Morgan CC Band, 7-9 p.m. WSMS – Bingo, Hancock Vol. Fire Dept., 6:30 p.m. Friday, August 5 – Junior Order, 7 p.m. – Deford Lodge, 88, 7:30 – Game night, Hancock Legion, 7 p.m. by Hancock Rescue – Car meet, 7 p.m., Dairy Queen – Winchester Connection, Lee Jackson, Winchester, Va., 6:30-8:30 – Bingo, Reynolds Store VFD, Early Bird 7 p.m. – AA Cacapon Campfire Group, Cacapon State Park, 8 p.m. – AA Trinity Asbury Church noon Saturday, August 6 – AA, 7:30, St. Mark’s Church – Bingo, South Morgan VFD, 6:45 p.m. Sunday, August 7 – Attend Church Today Monday, August 8 – Kiwanis Club – Boy Scout Troop 12, 7 p.m., First Church – AA, Trinity Asbury Church, Noon – AA, St. Thomas Parish Hall, Hancock, 7:30 – Rescue Service Auxiliary, 7 p.m. – Car meet, 7 p.m., Herb’s Auto Tuesday, August 9 – Morgan Co. American Cancer Society, 12 noon, hospital conference room – Berkeley Baptist food pantry, 11-1

– CAP – OES – Lions Club – Starting Points Reading Night, 6:30 – Blood-sugar testing, 8:309:30, Cacapon Fire Hall – School Board, 7:30 – AA & Alanon, 7:30, Paw Paw U.M. Church – Eagle 4433 Auxiliary 7 p.m. – AA, St. Thomas Parish Hall, Hancock, 7:30 p.m. – Weight Watchers, Senior Center, 5:30 – Sons of American Legion, 7 p.m. Wednesday, August 10 – Loyal Order Moose, 8 p.m. – AA, 7:30, St. Mark’s – AA, Trinity Asbury Church, Noon – Enon Homemakers – Settlers 4-H, 7 p.m. – BS Jaycees, 7 p.m. – VA representative, BS American Legion – Commission on Aging Board of Directors, 1 p.m. Thursday, August 11 – Rotary Club, 12, Country Inn – Apache 4-H Club, Pl. View School – Alanon, 7:30, First U.M. Church – Post 60 American Legion Auxiliary – Cub Scout Pack 27, 6 p.m., Grace U.M. Church – Greenwood PTA, 7 p.m. – S.S. Representative, Senior Center – AA, St. Mark’s, 7:30 – St. Vincent Holy Name Society, 7 p.m. – TOPS, 8:45, Presbyterian Church – Boy Scout Troop 27, Grace U.M. Church, 7 p.m. – Morgan CC Band, 7-9 p.m. WSMS – Bingo, Hancock Vol. Fire Dept., 6:30 p.m.

To Update Your Listing Call 304-258-1800 or email news@morganmessenger.com

Letters To The Editor over 400 words will not be published.

Songwriters compete at the Avalonfest The 14th annual Avalonfest will be held Friday, August 12 through Sunday, August 14 near Paw Paw. Each year Avalonfest hosts a competition to recognize talented performing songwriters. Songwriters were invited to submit two songs that have not yet been released for sale. This year’s four finalists are: Doug Brouder, Kyle Carey, Kathy Moser and Sarah Pinsker.

They will perform at Alavonfest before a panel of judges and the Alavonfest audience on Friday afternoon, August 12. The winner will receive a paid performance spot in Saturday’s festival program. Avalon Resort is a clothingoptional resort and campground, affiliated with the American Association for Nude Recreation and The Naturist Society.

(New & Used) Saturday, August 13 • 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Bar-B-Que Chicken/Pork Dinners from 11:00 a.m. till Gone Tables for Tools or Yard Sale Items Available to Rent for $10.00 a Table

BEAT the Heat Come Play Bingo! HANCOCK RAIDER CHEERLEADERS

Basket Bingo Sunday, August 7 • 1 till ? Doors Open at Noon

Berkeley Springs American Legion

Food & Tip Jars Available

20 Games for $25.00 Donation Tickets Sold at the Door or Call Carol Willison at 301-678-5306 Debbie Truax at 301-678-6920 DOOR PRIZES ALL BASKETS ARE FILLED

SOUTH MORGAN VFD

10166 Winchester Grade Road Berkeley Springs, WV 25411

BINGO

THU.-SUN. • 8 p.m. Plus Sunday @ 2 p.m.

Sat., August 6 Payouts Now Starting

CARS 2

Lightning McQueen and his trusty tow truck pal, Mater, head overseas for the World Grand Prix to determine the world’s fastest car. Mater is distracted from helping McQueen by falling into an espionage adventure that leads to car chases and shoot-outs through Japan and Europe.

at $40 Regular Games & $60 Special Games MORE PEOPLE THE HIGHER THE PAYOUTS Early Birds at 6:45 p.m. Regular Play at 7:00 p.m.

PROGRESSIVE NUMBER $1,500 JACKPOT Doors Open at 5:30 p.m. Refreshments Available INFO: 304-258-4092 Bring This Ad & Receive 2 Jackpot Cards Free

NEXT TRANSFORMERS

ANNUAL DINNER & YARD PARTY at

GREENWOOD U.M. CHURCH Winchester Grade Road near Unger • Berkeley Springs, WV

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6 Ham or Chicken Dinner Served 3-6:30 p.m.

Adults - $7.00

Entertainment 5-6:30 p.m.

Children - $3.00

Auction 7 p.m.

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK BROADSHEET TEMPLATE 04052001


4

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

What’s Happening Where? • meetings • concerts • programs • festivals •

Flea circus August 7 Professor Mike’s Amazing Flea Circus will be in Hancock to provide an even bigger and better show this Sunday, August 7, at 3 p.m. at the Town Hall’s newly renovated Performing Arts Center. The Springs Chamber Ensemble under the direction of Linda Whitesitt will accompany these tiny talents. Members of the Ensemble will join their small companions and provide acts of their own. This is all to the accompaniment of live music. This event is sponsored by the Hancock’s Arts Council and is free to the public, however donations will be accepted to help fund future programs aimed at supporting the Arts in the community. For more information call 717-294-3182.

Historical Society meeting Morgan County Historical & Genealogical Society meeting will be held Tuesday, August 9, 1:30 p.m. in the social hall of the First United Methodist Church on Green Street. There will be a Cemetery Committee meeting at 10:45 a.m. This will be an important meeting. Must make some definite decisions as to what the next step will be in dispersing of the Newbraugh/Eppinger collection. Everything should be out of the Largent Implement building as soon as possible. If unable to attend, but have suggestions, contact one of the officers.

Art in The Park

Sunday, August 7 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Berkeley Springs State Park Downtown Berkeley Springs

Berkeley Springs Art Fair Featuring Local and Regional Artists For More Information Call 304-258-6419

Rotary Club gave back $12,600 to community In the past year, the Rotary Club of Berkeley Springs gave back $12,600 to organizations, charitable groups and students in the local area. Included in this amount, $1,000 was donated to foreign missions undertaken by county residents. Money was raised from the community by projects such as raffles, a Tri-State High School Basketball Tournament, a Super Bowl Party and Golf Tournament. This money was given back to the community in such projects as: Three $1,000 scholarships for Morgan County High School Aid Fund; Over $4,000 to four local high schools participating in the Basketball Tournament; U.S. Savings Bonds to Students of the Month; Dictionaries to all third graders; Donations to the Boys & Girls Clubs and Starting Points and $1,000 to two community residents sponsoring missions to Honduras.

Rotary is a global network of community volunteers. Rotary club members are business, professional, and community leaders in the locality who meet regularly to plan and implement community service activities and network with other professionals. For those interested, members can also choose to become involved in international humanitarian service efforts. More than 1.2 million men and women in over 200 countries and geographical areas belong to over 33,000 Rotary clubs. Rotary builds international understanding through scholarships, exchange programs, and humanitarian grants. Throughout the world, Rotary clubs participate in a broad range of educational, intercultural, and humanitarian activities designed to improve the lives of others. Officers for this past year were: Michelle Sirbaugh, president; Buzz Chamberlain, first vice president; Mike Pearse,

second vice president; Steve McBee, secretary and Matt Close, treasurer. Next year’s officers, installed on July 14 are: Buzz Chamberlain, president; Mike Pearse, first vice president; Sean Forney, second vice president; Steve McBee, secretary and Matt Close, treasurer. In the coming year, the Rotary will work with local businesses to establish a Shop Berkeley Springs Discount Card. A credit-card size card will offer purchasers discounts at up to 20 local participating businesses. The goals are to attract more customers to the businesses and raise funds for Rotary to give back to the community over the next year. The Shop Berkeley Springs Discount Card will be sold by club members and participating businesses starting in September. They will also be sold at the Rotary Booth at the Apple Butter Festival and other Rotary events.

Arkansas Roots Band at Summer Concert in park Driven by gentle harmonies and award-winning songwriting, 3 Penny Acre brings their popular folk/Americana sound from the Ozarks to Berkeley Springs State Park on Saturday, August 6 at 5:30 p.m. Rain location for the Morgan Arts Council’s summer concert series is the nearby Ice House. All three of the band mem-

BINGO

American Legion Berkeley Springs

PROGRESSIVE JACKPOT Starting At $1500 Minimum Payout

For Any Game - $35.00

Every Wednesday • 6:30 p.m. Doors Open at 5:30

SMOKE FREE

Bring This Ad and Get Free Jackpot Card

VFW POST 4019 Berkeley Springs

TOOL SALE

bers write songs and sing. Their instrumentation ranges from Bernice Hembree on upright bass to Bryan Hembree on guitar and Bayard Blain on mandolin. Throw in brush bucket and hand crafted bouzouki and the result is a unique and distinct sound that is soundly based in roots music tradition. For this East Coast tour, 3 Penny Acre has added their friend David Glasser for another guitar and inspired four-part harmony. 3 Penny Acre writes virtually every song they play with a few from other songwriter friends.

Although they’ve been performing only three years, the trio has accumulated honors and awards enough to fill a long career including a regional award for best album. They just released a double CD that brings their total count to four. This concert is funded in part by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and West Virginia Commission on the Arts as well as hotel/motel tax from the town and county. For a full schedule and links to the music of the remaining concerts in the summer series, check online.

Frog Valley Artisans help clean up Cold Run Valley Road As part of their on-going commitment to the Adopt-aHighway program the artists at the little art center up the hill known as Frog Valley, plan to pick up the litter along the northern part of Cold Run Valley Road. On Saturday, August 6, local stained glass artist Veronica Wilson heads up this effort and rides her electric mobility scooter along the road. She has Multiple Sclerosis (MS) but continues to do what she can to clean things up. Along with Mark Schwenk, metal sculptor at Frog Valley

and Kat Braun another local glass artist from River House WV Arts & Glass plus a few other friends, they will begin cleaning up the road starting around 9 a.m. this coming Saturday, August 6. The process takes a few hours but you can volunteer for any or all of it. Anyone wishing to help can call 304258-3541 to volunteer. The first 10 volunteers get a $10 gift certificate from Frog Valley that can be used to purchase art from their gift shop and galleries.

Thursday, August 4 – Alanon, 7:30, First U.M. Church – Pleasant View Com. Center meet, 7 p.m. – Rotary Club, noon, Country Inn – Kaw Kaw Peyon 4-H, 7:30, homes – Cub Scout Pack 27, 6 p.m., Grace U.M. Church – Starting Points Play Group, 12:30 – AA, St. Mark’s, 7:30 – Hancock Legion & Auxiliary #26, 8, post home – TOPS, 8:45, Presbyterian Church – Boy Scout Troop 27, Grace U.M. Church, 7 p.m. – Morgan CC Band, 7-9 p.m. WSMS – Bingo, Hancock Vol. Fire Dept., 6:30 p.m. Friday, August 5 – Junior Order, 7 p.m. – Deford Lodge, 88, 7:30 – Game night, Hancock Legion, 7 p.m. by Hancock Rescue – Car meet, 7 p.m., Dairy Queen – Winchester Connection, Lee Jackson, Winchester, Va., 6:30-8:30 – Bingo, Reynolds Store VFD, Early Bird 7 p.m. – AA Cacapon Campfire Group, Cacapon State Park, 8 p.m. – AA Trinity Asbury Church noon Saturday, August 6 – AA, 7:30, St. Mark’s Church – Bingo, South Morgan VFD, 6:45 p.m. Sunday, August 7 – Attend Church Today Monday, August 8 – Kiwanis Club – Boy Scout Troop 12, 7 p.m., First Church – AA, Trinity Asbury Church, Noon – AA, St. Thomas Parish Hall, Hancock, 7:30 – Rescue Service Auxiliary, 7 p.m. – Car meet, 7 p.m., Herb’s Auto Tuesday, August 9 – Morgan Co. American Cancer Society, 12 noon, hospital conference room – Berkeley Baptist food pantry, 11-1

– CAP – OES – Lions Club – Starting Points Reading Night, 6:30 – Blood-sugar testing, 8:309:30, Cacapon Fire Hall – School Board, 7:30 – AA & Alanon, 7:30, Paw Paw U.M. Church – Eagle 4433 Auxiliary 7 p.m. – AA, St. Thomas Parish Hall, Hancock, 7:30 p.m. – Weight Watchers, Senior Center, 5:30 – Sons of American Legion, 7 p.m. Wednesday, August 10 – Loyal Order Moose, 8 p.m. – AA, 7:30, St. Mark’s – AA, Trinity Asbury Church, Noon – Enon Homemakers – Settlers 4-H, 7 p.m. – BS Jaycees, 7 p.m. – VA representative, BS American Legion – Commission on Aging Board of Directors, 1 p.m. Thursday, August 11 – Rotary Club, 12, Country Inn – Apache 4-H Club, Pl. View School – Alanon, 7:30, First U.M. Church – Post 60 American Legion Auxiliary – Cub Scout Pack 27, 6 p.m., Grace U.M. Church – Greenwood PTA, 7 p.m. – S.S. Representative, Senior Center – AA, St. Mark’s, 7:30 – St. Vincent Holy Name Society, 7 p.m. – TOPS, 8:45, Presbyterian Church – Boy Scout Troop 27, Grace U.M. Church, 7 p.m. – Morgan CC Band, 7-9 p.m. WSMS – Bingo, Hancock Vol. Fire Dept., 6:30 p.m.

To Update Your Listing Call 304-258-1800 or email news@morganmessenger.com

Letters To The Editor over 400 words will not be published.

Songwriters compete at the Avalonfest The 14th annual Avalonfest will be held Friday, August 12 through Sunday, August 14 near Paw Paw. Each year Avalonfest hosts a competition to recognize talented performing songwriters. Songwriters were invited to submit two songs that have not yet been released for sale. This year’s four finalists are: Doug Brouder, Kyle Carey, Kathy Moser and Sarah Pinsker.

They will perform at Alavonfest before a panel of judges and the Alavonfest audience on Friday afternoon, August 12. The winner will receive a paid performance spot in Saturday’s festival program. Avalon Resort is a clothingoptional resort and campground, affiliated with the American Association for Nude Recreation and The Naturist Society.

(New & Used) Saturday, August 13 • 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Bar-B-Que Chicken/Pork Dinners from 11:00 a.m. till Gone Tables for Tools or Yard Sale Items Available to Rent for $10.00 a Table

BEAT the Heat Come Play Bingo! HANCOCK RAIDER CHEERLEADERS

Basket Bingo Sunday, August 7 • 1 till ? Doors Open at Noon

Berkeley Springs American Legion

Food & Tip Jars Available

20 Games for $25.00 Donation Tickets Sold at the Door or Call Carol Willison at 301-678-5306 Debbie Truax at 301-678-6920 DOOR PRIZES ALL BASKETS ARE FILLED

SOUTH MORGAN VFD

10166 Winchester Grade Road Berkeley Springs, WV 25411

BINGO

THU.-SUN. • 8 p.m. Plus Sunday @ 2 p.m.

Sat., August 6 Payouts Now Starting

CARS 2

Lightning McQueen and his trusty tow truck pal, Mater, head overseas for the World Grand Prix to determine the world’s fastest car. Mater is distracted from helping McQueen by falling into an espionage adventure that leads to car chases and shoot-outs through Japan and Europe.

at $40 Regular Games & $60 Special Games MORE PEOPLE THE HIGHER THE PAYOUTS Early Birds at 6:45 p.m. Regular Play at 7:00 p.m.

PROGRESSIVE NUMBER $1,500 JACKPOT Doors Open at 5:30 p.m. Refreshments Available INFO: 304-258-4092 Bring This Ad & Receive 2 Jackpot Cards Free

NEXT TRANSFORMERS

ANNUAL DINNER & YARD PARTY at

GREENWOOD U.M. CHURCH Winchester Grade Road near Unger • Berkeley Springs, WV

SATURDAY, AUGUST 6 Ham or Chicken Dinner Served 3-6:30 p.m.

Adults - $7.00

Entertainment 5-6:30 p.m.

Children - $3.00

Auction 7 p.m.

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK BROADSHEET TEMPLATE 04052001


The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Boys and Girls Club had a great summer

Boys & Girls Club of the Eastern Panhandle members Jasin DeMarinis, Jacki Kelley, Jordin DeMarinis and Emily Aronhalt enjoy a game of checkers at the Morgan County club’s summer program. More than 50 children attended this summer, said unit director Chris Risinger. Activities included indoor and outdoor games, arts and crafts, cooking class, science experiments, an antibullying class, Minute to Win It games and swimming at the Berkeley Springs State Park pool.

Tie-dying t-shirts at the Boys & Girls Club summer program were assistant program coordinators (left) Shelley Fischer and (right) Amy Glascock with Boys & Girls Club members (left) Seth Lantz and (right) Maddie Risinger, Chris Stotler and Jasin DeMarinis. The six-week summer program began June 20 and ended July 29. Participants have attended the July Morgan County Public Library summer storyteller events at Warm Springs Middle School through transportation funding provided by FAST and the Friends of the Library. End-of-the-summer activities included water balloon wars, relay races and the annual trip to Lakemont Amusement Park near Altoona, Pennsylvania.

Reese Wilkinson, Victoria Lantz and Tyre Truax are seen working out to Just Dance 2 on Wii Nintendo at the Boys & Girls Club summer program on Friday, July 22. The club had a great summer and kids are having a lot of fun, unit director Chris Risinger said. Seven or eight teens volunteered regularly. They could always use more volunteers and help with fundraisers, he said. Upcoming fundraisers include doing refreshments at the Cacapon State Park Homecoming and having a booth at the Apple Butter Festival. The club is accepting applications for the school year after-school session. photos by Kate Evans

Letters Policy Letters to the editor are invited. They must be signed, typed and doublespaced. The writer must include a phone number and address for verification. No more than two letters from any individual will be printed in a four-week period. Letters are subject to editing. Letters longer than 400 words will not be published. Nor will letters that are libelous, too personal or not of general interest to the public. Letters are a way for citizens to comment on current issues. They are not meant to provide anyone with a platform to write again and again about their philosophy, group or business. Thank you notes and political endorsements are considered advertising. Form letters are often discarded.

Citizens Assisting & Sheltering the Abused (CASA) 116 W. Baltimore St. Hagerstown, MD 21740

301-739-8975

Deadline Notice All correspondents and advertisers are reminded the deadline for submitting copy to this publication is 12:00 Noon Monday each week.

IN THE WILD by Dan Stiles Wildlife Biologist It gets really cold in Alaska! Many years ago my friend Jim Miller, USDA's National Program Leader for Fish and Wildlife, and I traveled to Alaska. Our purpose was to meet with the Extension Service personnel at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. This is the interesting part. It was early in December. Our plane landed first in Anchorage, and the pilot casually announced that the outside temperature was 45 degrees below zero. The other passengers moaned in a complaining way, probably because most of them lived there and knew about cold temperatures. Jim and I remained on the plane that was continuing its flight to Fairbanks. We didn't know anything about these really cold temperatures. When we landed in Fairbanks, the pilot announced it was 55 degrees below zero. Some passengers grumbled, but everyone scrambled into heavy coats, boots, gloves and head gear. It was a 50 yard walk between the airplane and the airport buildings. There was a fog of ice crystals hanging in the air, and it was strangely quiet. We were met by the Extension forester and learned that the temperature was not all that unusual. He told us that Fairbanks was situated in a bowl - at a lower elevation with hills on all sides. Cold air, of course, flows downhill and settles in the bottom of the bowl, and the wind rarely blows in Fairbanks. He said in all seriousness that snow that fell on a barbed wire fence in September most likely stayed there until it melted in April. It was Saturday, and our meetings were scheduled for Monday at the University. The forester suggested that Sunday would be a good day to tour the area, and he would introduce us to some interesting people. One of the people on his list was a lady who had participated in the 1,150 mile dog sled race from Anchorage to Nome, the famous Iditarod. Her name was Mary Shields. It was incredibly, life-threateningly cold with two feet of snow covering the ground all around Fairbanks. When we arrived at her home, we were met by a dozen dogs standing in the snow outside their little individual dog houses - all barking continuously - their idea of welcoming guests I suppose. Later they seemed to pay no attention to the bitter cold as they curled up

County residents receive degrees from Shepherd Six hundred and fifty six students received degrees during Shepherd University’s 138th Commencement on May 14. Jim Lehrer, executive editor and anchor of the PBS Newshour, delivered the commencement address. Lehrer was also awarded an honorary doctorate. Receiving degrees were: Berkeley Springs — Philip Grandle Bailey, Jessica Marie Detrick, Joseph Henry Gilroy, Jennifer Kay Hobday, Ashley Blair Hovermale, N. Leigh Jenkins, Ashley D. Jones, Eric James Morris, Cynthia Frances Stotler, Jacob Ray Waugh, Caitlin Clark Michael, Robert Lee Dugan III and Ryan Martin Yost. Great Cacacpon — Edward Raymond Cope III. Paw Paw — Darwin Joseph Fredman.

Jimmy Joy’s

comfortably in the snow watching us with just one eye open. Following our forester friend's example, we stepped into Mary Shield's home and immediately removed our snow covered boots. I tried several times to close the door, but the entire home was so well insulated, it took steady, continuous pressure to push it shut. Mary Shields asked if I would like to go for a dog sled ride, but she insisted that I wear her husband's heavy winter clothes. She hitched up seven dogs that were unbelievably anxious to begin pulling. I was told to sit in the sled under a heavy blanket, and she placed her feet on the sled runners behind me and grasped the sled's handles. We were off! It was so still and so cold. Mary spoke very softly to the lead dog, and as if by magic he immediately turned left or right. We were traveling through sapling size trees, alders I suppose. I had no idea where we were or where we were going, and ahead of us was nothing but an endless expanse of the same. We stopped and Mary asked if I would like to ride on the sled's runners and guide the dogs back home. She assured me they knew their way back. I liked it perfectly well where I was, but somehow I found myself standing on the runners all alone, as lost as anyone could possibly be, with seven wild dogs running full speed through the silent, frozen trees - and Mary was somewhere else walking home. In about 10 minutes of pure terror for me, the dog kennels miraculously appeared ahead. You can't imagine what a relief it was to realize that these unguided dogs really did know their way home, and fortunately they had sense enough to stop - I had no idea how to stop them. Mary arrived after what seemed a long time later and looked at me with some concern. My left ear lobe had become uncovered and exposed to the cold temperatures and unbeknownst to me it had frozen solid. She later autographed her book about her Iditarod experiences with a note that said, "For a long time your ear will remind you of the pleasant day you spent with us in Alaska." And, she was right! With all this terribly hot weather we are having, I'm hoping my West Virginia friends will be refreshed a little by this true story.

LOG CABIN INN Steakhouse Bar & Grill

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Also Serving Steamed Clams & Mussels Ice Cold - 16 oz. Pint Drafts

FREE MUSIC ON THE DECK Every Friday & Saturday Evening Acoustic Rock - Blues - Variety

DINNER SPECIALS Wednesday and Thursday Ahi Tuna - $12.00

w/sesame seasoning or blackened w/rice and vegetable

Baseball Size Lump Crab Cake w/1/2 lb. Steamed Shrimp & Old Bay Fries - $14.00

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1/2 Price Appetizers During Happy Hour 4-6 p.m.

LUNCH SPECIALS 12-3 • Wednesday, Thursday and Friday

PARTNER OF THE MONTH FOR JULY:

BLT w/pesto mayo w/chips & drink - $4.99 Chicken Salad Sandwich w/chips & drink - $4.99 House or Caesar Salad w/seasoned chicken & drink - $5.99

Heather Lorigan

Specials Cannot Be Combined With Any Other Coupon Offers Carry-Out Not Available on Specials or Happy Hour Items

English Teacher at Berkeley Springs High School

Hours: Sunday-Thursday 12-8; Friday and Saturday 12-10 98 N. Washington Street • Berkeley Springs, WV 25411 www.ambraehouse.com email: ambraehouse@yahoo.com

Ms. Lorigan has supported the Morgan County Partnership’s drug and alcohol prevention efforts in many ways. Here are some of the highlights: • WV Zine Advisory Board Member • Supervisor for the WV Zine After School Program • Organized the fundraiser for the WV Zine Program • Adult supervisor of the National Youth Leadership Institute • Adult Supervisor for the Anna’s Hope Leadership Day Camp • Judge for the Morgan County Film Festival

Thank You, Heather, for your tremendous contributions to Morgan County’s drug and alcohol prevention efforts!

5

304-258-2333 Pictured (L-R) Heather Lorigan, English Teacher at Berkeley Springs High School and Megan Scott, Director of the MCP.

The Morgan County Partnership: Working Together to Empower Young People to Make Smart Choices. Engage. Educate. Empower. For More Information, Please Contact: The Morgan County Partnership 26 Chapman Street Berkeley Springs, WV 25411 304-258-7807

Monday-Thursday 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday & Saturday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Sunday Noon-8:30 p.m.

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CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK BROADSHEET TEMPLATE 04052001


6

Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

Wouldn’t it be great if people just got along together? That is the notion that many of us long for and wish for every day. A few days before the debt ceiling deadline, many of us wish our Congress could work together. While this does happen sometimes - reality, though, asserts that we are often the problem. We each have our small view of truth, but we cannot comprehend, nor are we willing to accept that others may also know something that is true and pure and good. So, we square off – blaming others for the same mistakes of arrogance that we ourselves commit every day. Even the religious sometimes tar ourselves and each others with this same brush. But that is not the way of the Godly. Good Christians, Jews, and others can and do learn how to listen, to reconcile, and to reach out to one another and the world. In Mark 9: 40-41 Jesus offers this wisdom to his followers: “Whoever is not against us is for us. 41For truly I tell you, whoever gives you a cup of water to drink because you bear the name of Christ will by no means lose the reward.” The same is true in reverse. Jesus encouraged us not to be so judgmental in our ignorance towards one another, and to give thanks for every act of grace. Truly, there is more to our faith than people sometimes take for granted. Rev. Bob Osborne Berkeley Springs Prebyterian Church THE CLERGY ASSOCIATION OF MORGAN COUNTY P.O. BOX 782 • BERKELEY SPRINGS, WV 25411

These Firms Invite You To A House Of Worship Each Week

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St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 180 South Washington Street, Berkeley Springs, 304-2582440 - Sunday service 9 a.m. Alpine Charge of the United Methodist Church, 304-258-2847 - Alpine: Worship service 8:30 a.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. Wednesday Seminar 1:30. Mt. Pleasant: Worship service 10 a.m. Sunday school 11:15 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. Highland: Worship service 11:15 a.m. Sunday school 10:15 a.m. Pastor Brett Bever. Union Chapel United Methodist Church, 10123 Valley Road, 522 south, 304-258-2107 Sunday school 9:45 a.m. Sunday worship 11 a.m. Simeon and Anna Squad (ages 60+) 1 p.m. on Wednesday, adult choir practice 7:30 p.m. on Thursday. Pastor Patricia Watson. St. Vincent de Paul Catholic Church, Corner of South Washington and Liberty Streets - Weekend Liturgical (Mass) schedule: Saturday, 5 p.m., Sunday, 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Reconciliation (Confession) Saturday, 4:30 p.m. and Sunday 7:30 a.m. Religious Education Classes Sunday, 9:15 to 10:15 a.m. Holy Day: Vigil (day before) 7 p.m.; 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Rev. Leonard A. Smith. Michael’s Chapel U.M. Church, Michael’s Chapel Road off Route 9, Sunday worship service 8:45 a.m. Sunday School 10 a.m. Pastor Grant Spong

Bethel Independent Church, Sleepy Creek - Sunday school 10 a.m. Sunday worship 7 p.m. Wednesday evening prayer and Bible study 7:30 p.m. Pastor George Lashley. Sleepy Creek U.M. Charge, 304-258-4443 Grace: Located at the intersecton of River and Householder Roads near Sleepy Creek. Morning worship 9:30 a.m. Sunday school at 11 a.m. Cherry Run: Located in Cherry Run. Morning worship 11 a.m. Sunday school at 10 a.m. Mt. Zion: Rt. 9 Sunday school 9:45 a.m. Worship service 8:30 a.m. Pastor Daniel Montague. Trinity-Asbury United Methodist Church, Congress and Wilkes Streets, Sunday school 11 a.m. Worship 9:30 a.m. Pastor Richard Craig. Paw Paw Church of Christ, Corner of Winchester and River Streets - Sunday school 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship 10:45 a.m. Sunday evening worship 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. Richard White, minister. Open Arms Ministries, three and one half miles west of Hedgesville on Rt. 9 Johnsontown, 304-754-8245 or 304-258-4256 Sunday morning 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening 7 p.m. and Tuesday Bible worship and youth night 7 p.m. Senior Pastor David Risley, Mike Conway and Ed Yelton, Associate Pastors.

Wesley Chapel U.M. Church, Pious Ridge Road, just off Route 9. Sunday School 11:15 a.m. Sunday worship 10:15 a.m. Pastor Grant Spong

Church of Christ, 290 South Green Street, Berkeley Springs, 304-258-5175 - Sunday Bible study 9:30 a.m., worship 10:15 a.m. Evening service 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. for all ages. Doug Petty, Evangelist.

Word of Deliverance Center, 304-258-2148 - Sunday school 10 a.m., Sunday evening 7 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting 7:30 p.m. Free food and clothes available first and third Saturdays 9-11 a.m. at God’s Storehouse, 304258-4591. Pastor Lisa Unger.

Berkeley Baptist Church, Route 522 and 13, 304-258-4101 - Sunday school 9:30 a.m., worship service and children’s church 10:45 a.m. Evening worship service 6:30 p.m. Wednesday evening Bible study all ages 6:45 p.m. Pastor Dennis Sieglaff.

Snyders Bible Church, on Rt. 9 midway between Martinsburg and Berkeley Springs, 304-258-3930 - Sunday worship 9 a.m. Sunday school 10 a.m., evening worship 7 p.m. Wednesday night prayer and Bible study 7 p.m. Wednesday Faith Weaver 7 p.m. Pastor Donald Dick.

Morgan Charge United Methodist Church - Greenwood: Worship 9 a.m. Sunday school 10 a.m. Mt. Olivet: Sunday school 10 a.m. Worship and children services 11 a.m. Dr. Dennis Jackman.

Paw Paw U.M.C., 304-947-5289 - Sunday service 11:15 a.m. Sunday school 10 a.m. Lay Pastor John Farris.

Timber Ridge Pentecostal Church, Whitacre, Va. - Sunday morning 10 a.m. Sunday evening 6 p.m. Wednesday evening 7 p.m. Rev. Andrew Collins.

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK7

The Refuge Community Church, 33 Union Street, 304-279-0179 - Sunday school 9:30 a.m. Morning worship 10:45 a.m. Pastor Mike Rosensteel.

Paw Paw Bible Church, McCoole Avenue, Paw Paw - Sunday service 10 a.m. Fellowship 10:30 a.m. Sunday morning worship and children’s church.

Faith in God Chapel, south of Berkeley Springs on 522 and east on Tabor Road three miles, 304-258-9637, 301-678-7133 or 304258-5146 - Sunday school 10 a.m. Childrens church 11 a.m. Morning worship 11 a.m. Evening service 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible study and worship 7 p.m. Free food for all in need at Faith in God Food Pantry. Youth Pastor David Kerns, Associate Pastor Bob Donadieu and Pastor Ken Dyar.

Lighthouse Assembly of God, three and half miles south of Paw Paw on Rt. 29, 304-9477280 - Sunday school 10 a.m., morning worship 11 a.m. Evangelistic service 6 p.m. Wednesday 7:30 p.m. Rev. L. Earl Travis, Jr.

God’s Church, one mile east on Rt. 9 turn right on New Hope Road, 304-258-5100 Sunday school 10 a.m. Worship service 11 a.m. Sunday evening 7 p.m. Thursday night 7 p.m. Pastor Vernon Rankin, Jr. Berkeley Springs Nazarene Church, 915 Harrison Avenue, 304-258-4412 - Church school 10 a.m., worship celebration 11 a.m. Sunday evening 6 p.m. Third Sunday of each month is misssionary service 6 p.m. Bible study 7 p.m. Rodney Truax. First U.M. Church, 49 South Green Street, Berkeley Springs, 304-258-2766 - Sunday school 9:30 a.m. Morning worship services 8:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Pastor Andrew Cooney. Seventh-day Adventist Church, 3606 Valley Road, three miles south of Berkeley prings on Rt. 522, 304-258-6620 - Saturday Bible study 9:30 a.m., worship service 11 a.m. Wednesday prayer service 7 p.m. Pastor Hal Butman. Berkeley Springs Presbyterian Church, 101 Mercer Street, 304-258-1352 - Sunday school 9:45 a.m. Worship Service 11 a.m. Pastor Bob Osborne. Calvary Bible Church, 2065 Valley Road, Berkeley Springs, just south of Dairy Queen on top of hill, 304-258-1099 or 304-258-1192 Sunday school 9:45 a.m. Sunday worship 11 a.m. and 6:30 p.m. Wednesday prayer meeting and Bible study 7 p.m., Awana club for K through 6th., Friday evenings 6:30-8:30 p.m. Pastor B.J. Worley.

Paw Paw Church of God, Rt. 29 south Sunday worship 11 a.m. Sunday evening worship 6 p.m. Pastors Matthew and Rosemary Shrout. Sulphur Springs U.M.C. - Worship service 10 a.m. Sunday school 11 a.m. Lay Minister Barney Piper. Saint Thomas’ Episcopal Church, Church and High Streets, Hancock, 301-678-6569 Sundays 7:30 a.m. Holy Communion 10 a.m. Parish Family Communion 11:15 a.m. Sunday school and adult education 5 p.m. youth fellowship. Mondays and Tuesdays: 7:30 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous in lower parish hall. Rev. F. Allan Weatherholt, Jr., Rector. St. Peter’s Catholic Church, 16 E. High Street, Hancock, 301-678-6339 - Weekend Mass schedule: Sunday morning: 7:30 a.m. and 10 a.m. Weekday Mass schedule: Monday, 7 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday-Saturday, 7:30 a.m. Mission Church-St. Patrick’s, Little Orleans: Saturday Vigil Mass at 5 p.m. Rev. John J. Lombardi. Back Creek Valley Full Gospel Church, Shanghai - Sunday school 10 a.m., praise and worship 11 a.m. Evangelistic serivce 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible study 7:30 p.m. Pastor Thomas D. Snyder. Beacon Baptist Church, Timber Ridge Road at the Va. Line, 304-258-6391 - Sunday school 10 a.m., morning worship 11 a.m. Wednesday night 6:30 p.m. Pastor Daniel Armentrout. Hancock (USA) Presbyterian Church, 17 East Main Street, 301-678-5510 - Sunday worship 11 a.m. The Lord’s Supper is served every first Sunday. Wednesday prayer fellowship 1 p.m. Rev. Carol Davis.

Wesleyan Chapel Church, 612 Harrison Avenue, Berkeley Springs - Sunday school 10 a.m., morning worship 11 a.m. Sunday evening service 6 p.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. Rev. William C. Swope.

Grace Christian Fellowship, 130 Pennsylvania Avenue, Hancock, 301-678-6036 - Sunday school 10 a.m., worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. Rev. Edward Guyer.

Independent Church of God, nine miles east of Berkeley Springs on Rt. 9 - Wednesday night 7 p.m. Sunday morning 9:30 a.m. Sunday night 6 p.m. Pastors Lynnie and Ada Ambrose.

Hancock Assembly of God, 431 North Pennsylvania Avenue, 301-678-5313 - Sunday school 10 a.m., worship service and kid’s church 11 a.m. Evening service 7 p.m. Wednesday activities 7 p.m. Women’s ministries first Tuesday of each month. Pastor Don Preston.

Love Assembly of God, 4 miles south of Berkeley Springs on Rt. 522 - Sunday praise & worship 10 a.m., children’s church and youth services 11 a.m., Wednesday family night 7 p.m. Pastor Dave Kidwell. Ridersville Wesley Chapel United Methodist, Rt. 9, Pious Ridge Road - Sunday worship 10:15 a.m. Sunday school 11:15 a.m. Pastor Rick Vance. Gospel Light Tabernacle, 21 Gospel Lane on Williams Street, Berkeley Springs - Sunday school and worship/children’s church 10 a.m., Sunday evening service 6:30 p.m. Thursday Bible study 7 p.m. Pastor M.L. Trail. Warm Springs Baptist Church, 3683 Pious Ridge Road, Berkeley Springs, 304-258-0311. - Sunday SVCS 9:45-11 a.m. Sunday SVC 6:30 p.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. Pastor Robert Burton. Hancock Grace Church of the Nazarene, 304-258-7712 - Sunday school 9:45 a.m., Sunday morning worship 10:45 a.m., Sunday evening service 6 p.m., Wednesday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Pastor Willis Swope. Faith Bible Church, five miles west of Hedgesville or 10 miles east of Berkeley Springs on Rt. 9, 304-754-3851 - Sunday school 9:30 a.m., morning worship 10:30 a.m. Sunday evening worship 7 p.m. Wednesday night services 7 p.m. Pastor Andrew Hamrick. The Front Porch, Rankin Physical Therapy - Sunday morning 10 a.m. The People’s Assembly of God Church, Great Cacapon - Sunday school 10 a.m., worship 11 a.m. Sunday evening evangelistic service 7 p.m. Wednesday night: girls missionettes, boys royal rangers and adult Bible study 7 p.m. Rev. Jeff Dissmore. Emmaunel Baptist Church, Great Cacapon - Sunday Bible study 9:30 a.m. Sunday worship 10:45 a.m. Wednesday prayer and Bible study 6:30 p.m. Rev. Larry Tomlinson. Paw Paw Christian Center, Winchester Street, Paw Paw - Sunday school 10 a.m., worship service 11 a.m. Adult Bible study Thursday 7 p.m. Friday prayer meeting 7 p.m. Food pantry Saturday 9 a.m.- noon. Pastors Frank and Linda Lambert.

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, five miles west of Hancock, Resley Road, 301-678-7180 Adult Bible and Sunday school 8:45 a.m., worship service 10 a.m. Pastor W. Kenneth Stottlemyer. Stone Bridge Church of the Brethren, Hollow Road, Rt. 2, Hancock, 301-582-4135 Sunday school 9:30 a.m., worship 10:30 a.m. Rev. Harry F. Strite, Pastor Emeritus and Rev. Glen R. Winters. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Douglas Street, Hancock - Sacrament meeting 9 a.m. Sunday school 10:20 a.m. Priesthood/Relief Society 11:10 a.m. Mika Ah Loe Bishop. Hancock Church of God, 7528 Millstone Road - Sunday school 10 a.m., morning worship 11 a.m. Sunday evening services 6 p.m. Wednesday evening services 7 p.m. Pastor B. Terry Goodwin. Victory Tabernacle, Rt. 9 Martinsburg Road, 304-258-7810 - Sunday school 10 a.m. Sunday worship 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Wednesday 6:30 p.m. Pastor Carl Clark. New Vision Baptist Church, 11346 Valley Road, Rt. 522 south across from Morgan County Business Park, 540-869-4719 - Sunday school 10 a.m. Sunday worship 11 a.m. Wednesday Bible study 7 p.m. Pastor Jeff Rose. Tomahawk Presbyterian Church, Presbyterian Church Road off Back Creek Valley Road, Hedgesville, 304-754-8869 Sunday worship 9 a.m. Paul Wolverton Commissioned Lay Pastor. Mt. Olivet Presbyterian Church USA, Exline Road, Hancock, 301-678-6038 Worship service 9:30 a.m., church school 10:45 a.m. Pastor Phillip Unger. Hancock United Methodist Church, 170 West Main Street, Hancock, 301-678-6440 Alternative service 8:45 a.m. Sunday school 10 a.m. Worship service 11 a.m. Social hour third Sunday of each month 12 noon. Duane L. Jensen, Pastor.

Mahne’s U.M. Church, off Pious Ridge Road on Culp Road - Sunday school 9:30 a.m., worship service 10:30 a.m. Guest speakers.

Woodrow Union Church, Rt. 9, Paw Paw Sunday school 10 a.m. Worship service 11 a.m. Women’s auxiliary first Wednesday 7 p.m. Ken DeHaven.

Calvary U.M. Church, Great Cacapon, 304258-3455 - Sunday school 9:45 a.m., worship service 11 a.m. Lay Pastor Dick Voorhaar.

ARTICLES MAY BE EDITED

Mt. Zion U.M.C., Orleans Cross Roads 304-258-3455 - Sunday school 10:45 a.m., worship service 9:30 a.m. Lay Pastor Dick Voorhaar.

Articles submitted to The Morgan Messenger may be edited for clarity, style and content and to conform to the newspaper's policies and protect against libel.


The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Hospice and community reps discuss hospice in county Hospice of the Panhandle liaisons, board members, volunteers and community representatives met July 19 at Trinity Asbury United Methodist Church to discuss the utilization of hospice care in Morgan County. Hospice of the Panhandle Marketing Director Kathie Campbell provided information about hospice care along with statistics that illustrated

the challenge Hospice faces in helping people utilize hospice services. Campbell also discussed hospice myths and misunderstandings that become barriers to access. The group discussed ways to eliminate these barriers. Many of the attendees shared their own personal experiences with hospice and how being involved with hos-

Homecoming at Michael’s Chapel

pice helped them understand the value of the service for their loved ones who were ill and for themselves as caregivers. The participants plan to reach out to organizations, businesses, schools and clubs in the coming months to dispel myths and share accurate information about hospice.

Happy Birthday To Residents AUTUMN ACRES PERSONAL CARE August 11 - Dorothy Solenberger; August 13 Nina Dodson; August 14 Norman Kesecker and August 22 - June Elbin.

BERKELEY SPRINGS REHABILITATION & NURSING

Attending the meeting to discuss how to share information about hospice with Morgan County residents, clockwise, around the table: Marilyn Gantnier, Louise Spring, Mary Ellen Largent, Susan Trump, Donna Selby, Karen Perry, Iva Lou Breeden, Jay Russell, Betty Harmison, Sylvia Thomas, Irene Hedrick and Linda McGraw.

EMMERLING

Amy and Nicholas Emmerling of Berkeley Springs announce the birth of their son, Andrew Jonathan Emmerling weighing 7 lbs. 9 ozs. at City Hospital, Martinsburg on July 24, 2011. Maternal grandparents are Richard and Donna Blank, Mt. Savage, Md. Paternal grandparents are Robert and Maureen Emmerling, East Liverpool, Ohio. Maternal great-grandparent is Mildred Nigh, Mt. Savage. Paternal great-grandparent is Mildred Emmerling, East Liverpool.

August 5 - Lou Bell Owens; August 8 - Edgar Jackson; August 15 Wallis Boland and Doris Miller; August 16 - Ina June Ambrose; August 17 Helen Smith; August 19 Ollie Georgia Catlett and Robert Daniels.

Senior Life Services Activities

Menu

Thursday, August 4 - Senior trivia; line dancing 1. Friday, August 5 - Bingo 10. Monday, August 8 Isometric exercise 8:45; canasta 9, computer class 10; current events; line dancing 10:30; brown bag bingo 1. Tuesday, August 9 - Bingo 10. Wednesday, August 10 Chris Strobel from Shelley Moore-Capito’s Office will be at the center at 11:30; isometric exercise 8:45; canasta 9; seated exercise 10; brown bag bingo 1; bridge 2.

Thursday, August 4 - Cold cut sub, potato chips, pickles and banana. Friday, August 5 - Spaghetti with meat sauce, green beans, garlic bread and fruit. Monday, August 8 Pancakes, sausage, cucumber and onion salad and stewed apples. Tuesday, August 9 - Sloppy joes, baked potato, broccoli with cheese and fruit. Wednesday, August 10 Hot dogs, baked beans, cole slaw and applesauce.

Koontz-Anderson wedding

Michael’s Chapel United Methodist Church Annual Homecoming will be Sunday, August 7. Worship service 10:30, speaker is Rick Vance. Special music by Rick and Lynn Vance, Chelsea Hessler and Katrina Stevens. At noon a covered dish lunch in the pavilion. Outdoor gospel concert featuring “The New Crossroads.” Special guest Mollie Rebuck at 1:30. Take lawn chairs. For more information call 304-2582563.

August Birthdays!

BIRTH

7

Robert W. Koontz and LeEsta Anderson were united in marriage on June 25, 2011 at the Berkeley Springs Church of Christ by Minister Doug Petty. The bride wore a rose colored knee length dress and carried a bouquet of white and pink roses. She was escorted down the aisle by her grandsons, Aaron Payne and Aaron Brown. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the Jr.

OUAM Lodge. The bride’s granddaughter, Anna Maylett, decorated the 2-tier cake in pink roses. The toast to the couple was given by Aaron Payne and photos were taken by Chris Maylett, grandson of the bride. Music was provided by Lost in the 50’s DJ Entertainment. Following a honeymoon to Finger Lakes, N.Y. and Cape Cod, Mass., the couple resides in Berkeley Springs.

Happy 55th Anniversary Mom & Daddy August 5

Happy 16th SCOTT STOTLER August 2, 2011

May His light shine down upon you to bless this special day. We Love You!!! Bill, Phil, Tammi & Families

OLD FASHIONED

TENT REVIVAL August 19 - 29

Nifty Nifty Look Who’s

Services 7 p.m. Nightly Sunday Service 6 p.m.

50

Grounds of Hancock Church of God Pastor Terry Goodwin 7528 Millstone Road • Hancock, Md.

(Rt. 615, Exit 5, I-70 Behind Log Cabin Restaurant)

LEARN TO READ LEARN TO READ BETTER Free Help

Call 264-0298 sponsored by Literacy Volunteers of the Eastern Panhandle

Michael’s Chapel United Methodist Church

ANNUAL HOMECOMING

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Berkeley Springs Rehabilitation & Nursing and Autumn Acres Personal Care Center Invites You to Become Involved in Our Volunteer Program Every Day is an Opportunity to Brighten the Lives of Others The Activity Department Strives to Increase Their volunteer members to Maintain and Enhance Quality of Life of the Residents Through Our Volunteer Projects

WAYS IN WHICH YOU COULD VOLUNTEER • Schedule a Day to Provide Visitations • Hold a Prayer Group, Bible Study or Church Service • Offer Your Assistance in Writing Letters • Lead a Garden Project Outdoors or Window Planters • Entertain with Your Musical Talents • Share Your Vacation Videos • Donate Magazines, Movies or Books • Assist with Holiday Decorations • Take a Resident on a Walk or Wheelchair Ride • Become a Bingo Caller or Donate Prizes • The Main Area of Need is: To Be Someone to Talk To, A Friend Have You Ever Felt Your Life Could Be More Fulfilling? Volunteering – Is The Missing Ingredient

For More Information and Details Contact the Activity Department at 304-258-3673 SET YOUR OWN TIME AND FREQUENCY!!!

Sunday, August 7

10:30 a.m. - Worship Service Speaker Rick Vance Special Music Rick and Lynn Vance, Chelsea Hessler and Katrina Stevens

Granite & Bronze Markers For All Cemeteries

Noon - Covered Dish Lunch in the Pavilion

RECEIVE $25.00 OFF ANY MEMORIAL PURCHASED Must Present Coupon

Valid Through August

See Our Display at

Hunter-Anderson Funeral Home & Cremation Service 1:30 p.m. - Outdoor Gospel Concert Featuring “The New Crossroads” Special Guest Mollie Rebuck Bring Lawn Chairs

For More Info Call 304-258-2563

36 S. Green Street Berkeley Springs, WV

John Anderson 304-258-1997

Great Gospel Singing • Powerful Preaching Anointed Ministry • Special Music • Praise and Worship Speakers Pastor Delmas Bard, Faith Assembly of God & Pastor Gene Harding, Whips Cove Church EVERYONE WELCOME

KIMBLE FUNERAL HOME Paw Paw, West Virginia

304-947-5200 – Director –

KEITH A. KIMBLE Established In 1883

HUNTER-ANDERSON

Funeral Home & Cremation Service Pre-Arrangements ~ Traditional Funerals Cremation ~ Monument Services John A. Anderson, Director 36 South Green Street • Berkeley Springs, WV

304-258-1997

www.hunter-anderson.com

Family Matters: An informative message on a sensitive subject.

“What if I can’t afford the

A funeral is not the time to worry about costs, and we know that. That’s why we offer a wide range of cost options so we can create a service within a budget that is comfortable for you...because it’s what’s in your heart that matters – not what’s in your wallet.

Helsley-Johnson Funeral Home & Cremation Center 95 Union Street • Berkeley Springs, W.Va.

funeral?”

304-258-1015 DIRECTORS: Douglas C. Sensel, L.I.C. & Ellen Sensel

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Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

Line dancing at Senior Center The Senior Center Line Dancing Class was joined by staff person Larry Dodson on Monday, August 1. “The music was just too inviting,” he said. Janice Hammer teaches the free class which is held on Monday mornings at 10:30 a.m. and Thursday afternoons at 1 p.m. She loves to dance and it shows in her happy go lucky attitude as she teaches.

Class is basically an hour long but sometimes goes longer. She donates her time and skills teaching the seniors for free. Dodson can be seen often dancing with a broom or mop or sometimes just dancing on his own to the tunes of the line dancing music as he works his job. Seniors from the community are welcome to join the line dancing any time.

Some that already have joined are Dorothy Everett, Ada Fletcher, Ruth Jones, Mary Wolfe, Marlene Hannon, Loretta Norfolk, Ed Adamkewitz, Elizabeth Collins, Patricia Miller, Cindy Fleagle, Edie Johnson and Joyce Bonner.

Line dancing, left to right, line dancing teacher Janice Hammer, Mary Wolfe, Ruth Jones, Dorothy Everett, Larry Dodson, Loretta Norfolk, Ada Fletcher and Marlene Hannon.

Audubon Society offering free summer concerts The Potomac Valley Audubon Society will again offer a series of free outdoor concerts this summer at its Yankauer Nature Preserve north of Shepherdstown. The Society's Eighth Annual "Music in the Cedars" concert series will consist of nine concerts in all. The concerts will be held every Tuesday evening in August and September, with each one running from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. The concerts will be held rain or shine in the Preserve's covered pavilion. There is no fee and anyone is welcome to attend. The schedule will be: August 2: The Outpatients. Three part harmonies, blazing instrumental, and all around "newgrass" jamming. August 9: Erik Janus. A local rock and jazz musician with delusions of folkdom stripped down to just his voice, his songs (along with creative

covers) and an acoustic guitar. August 16: Greg Lloyd and “The Kids." Greg Lloyd, Bob Dean and their “kids” join forces to bring an evening of folk tunes with guitar, banjo and voice. August 23: Chelsea McBee. Traditional tunes and originals highlight her unique, inviting voice paired with the distinctive sound of her 5-string banjo. August 30: The Rolling Coyotes. A blend of countrytinged folk with diverse instrumentation and vocals describing unique places, characters and themes. September 6: The Dilletantes. Jeff and Trudy Roth perform well-known acoustic folk songs with voice and guitar. September 13: To be announced. September 20: Betty Jo, Betty Jo. Scott and T-Roy. Favorite folksongs and new

originals resonate with stirring rhythmic depth as Betty Jo's singing is accompanied by guitars and various hand drums. September 27: Steve Cifala. This dynamic performer is influenced by Rhythm & Blues, Little Feat, & Eric Clapton. Those who attend the concerts are welcome to take their own picnic suppers but the preserve does not have trash pickup, so everyone is asked to carry out everything they take in. Picnic tables will be available in the pavilion on a firstcome, first-served basis. Attendees may also take their own chairs or picnic blankets for their comfort. Leave pets at home. Directions to the nature preserve are posted on the PVAS website.

BOOKMARK THE MORGAN MESSENGER WEB SITE: www.morganmessenger.com

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Call 717-294-3954 or 717-404-7081 Letters To The Editor over 400 words will not be published.

Woodland workshop near Largent A Multiple Woodland Resource Management and Use Walking workshop will be held Saturday, September 17, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. in Morgan County, near Largent off of Route-9, on the WV Woodlands of Nick Casto. Sponsored by the WV Woodland Owners Assoc., WVU Extension, and the WVU Appalachian Hardwood Center, this event is led by Nick Casto. He will highlight and demonstrate “first hand” some of the various techniques used to cultivate wildlife food plots and habitat areas, and desirable tree species such as oak, black cherry, hickory, yellow poplar, etc. in West Virginia woodlands. Tree planting, road development, invasive plant control and much more will also be discussed. The tour will include uphill walking, but will not be strenuous. Appropriate clothing and walking footwear are recommended. Pre-registration for this “free” event is recommended and lunch will be provided. For more information and directions to the location contact Dan Magill, Forester at the WVU Appalachian Hardwood Center by phone at 304-293-9419.

OBITUARIES Rowena E. Doak Rowena E. Doak, 81, of Greenwood, died Monday, July 25, 2011 at Parkersburg. She was born August 3, 1929, near Greenwood, the daughter of the late Samp Wells, Sr. and Edith M. Smith Wells. She had been employed by the former Economy Industries of Harrisville and Pennsboro Manufacturing of Pennsboro. She was a member of the Pennsboro Church of Christ. She liked cooking, gardening, canning and quilting. She is survived by four children, Ora Emerson Doak, Sr., Lorain, Ohio, James A. Doak and Regina Richards, both of Greenwood and Dennis Doak, Berkeley Springs; five grandchildren, Ray Richards III, Eric Richards, Jimmy Doak, Elaine Doak and Danielle Doak; three step grandchildren, Tracy Howe, Lisa Strakal and Keith Howe; four great-grandchildren and six step great-grandchildren. In addition to her parents she was preceded in death by her husband, Ora E. Doak, Sr.; three brothers, Samp Well, Jr., Albert Wells and James Wells and two sisters, Zonetta Harris and Olive Murphy. Funeral services were held Thursday, July 29 at the McCollough-Rogers Funeral Home Pennsboro, with W. Terry Varner, Evangelist, officiating. Interment was at the Masonic Memorial Park, Crystal Lake near West Union.

David G. Whitacre 1989-2011

David Glen Whitacre, 21, of Winchester, VA, died on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 at the Winchester Medical Center as a result of an automobile accident. David was born on October 7, 1989 in Winchester, VA, a son of Christine “Chris” Whitacre Temple of Winchester, VA and the late Barry J. Whitacre. He was a 2009 graduate of James Wood High School and loved the outdoors. Surviving with his mother is his step-father: David Temple of Winchester, VA; one brother: Barry Jason Whitacre and his wife Emily of Winchester, VA and paternal grandmother: F. Eloise Whitacre of Gore, VA. David leaves behind a very large loving family. He is preceded in death by his grandparents: J.C. Whitacre, Opal and Johnnie Wills, and Edward Payne. Funeral services were held at the New Hope Baptist Church (Old Redland Chapel) in Whitacre, VA on Friday, July 29, 2011 at 2:00 PM. Officiating was Rev. Michael Kendall. Interment was in the Woodlawn Cemetery in Whitacre, VA. Family received friends at the Giffin Funeral Home in Capon Bridge, WV on Thursday, July 28, 2011 from 6-9 PM. Memorial contributions may be made to the Woodlawn Cemetery, 1595 Whitacre Rd., Gore, VA 22637. To sign an online guest book, please visit giffin funeralhome.com.

Harry W. Smith, Jr. 1941-2011

Charles R. Miller 1939-2011

Harry Wilson Smith, Jr., 70, of Great Cacapon, died Tuesday, July 26, 2011 at his residence. Born July 25, 1941 in Frederick, Md., he was the son of the late Harry Wilson, Sr. and Rosalie Biddinder Smith. He retired as a roofer from the Vest Roofing Company in Rockville, Md. He was an avid fisherman and was a member of the Citizens Band Radio Club with a handle of “Super Sport.” He is survived by his wife, Patricia Lee Marshall Smith at home; three daughters, Tamara Simmons, Wilson, N.C., Jackie Smith Jordan, Middletown, Md. and Billie Jo Smith, Hagerstown, Md.; two step-daughters, Denise Mitchell, Crisfield, Md. and Sandra Judkins, Ephrata, Pa.; two step-sons, Robert Faucette, Gaithersburg, Md. and David Faucette, Martinsburg; five sisters, Jo Ann Osborne, Rebecca Russell, Martha Jean Smith, Patricia “Pat” Barney and Sharon Martin; seven brothers, Wayne, Calvin “Pete,” Robert Allen, James, Paul, Wilbert and Ronald Smith and a number of grandchildren, nieces and nephews. In addition to his parents he was preceded in death by his first wife, Valerie Smith Presley; one sister, Beverly Sue Smith and one brother, Joseph Smith. Services and interment will be private. Arrangements being handled by Helsley-Johnson Funeral Home & Cremation Center, 95 Union Street, Berkeley Springs.

Mildred E. Wilkins 1939-2011

Mildred Elaine Wilkins, 72, of Berkeley Springs, known to many as “Sissy” or the dog lady, died on Monday. Born April 19, 1939 in Baltimore City, Elaine was the daughter of the late Ernest Alfred Ruby and Mildred Smith Ruby. She was the loving mother to her only son, Eugene Wilkins, his wife Jeri, and step grandsons, Jeff and Jordan. Sissy was an advocate for rescuing all animals, especially dogs. She worked with the SPCA providing food and shelter and placement of animals. She established a program called “Teddy Bears for Kids” with the West Virginia State Police. Surviving in addition to her son, are her brother, Earnest Gary Ruby and wife Paula Lynn of Manchester, MD; nephew, Earnest Gary Ruby, Jr. and his wife, Jenn; niece, Rachel Lynn Seeds of Hanover, PA and four great nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at a later date, please contact the family for specific details. Memorial contributions in her memory may be made to any of the ASPCA Chapters. Arrangements by Hunter-Anderson Funeral Home & Cremation Service.

The Morgan Messenger 16 Mercer Street • Berkeley Springs

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Charles R. “Bubbie” Miller, died at Province Hospital, Columbia, S.C., on July 16, 2011. He was a retired Sgt. First Class and served 22 years of active duty in the United States Army. He was a member of the 101st Airborne Division. He served two tours in Vietnam. He also served in Germany and Korea. He was a recipient of many military decorations and citations. He was also a P.O.W. of Vietnam. He was a member of the V.F.W. in South Carolina. He was the son of the late Charles E. Miller and the late Winona M. Youngblood Miller Robinson. He was born in Bayton, Pa. December 22, 1939. He attended Great Cacapon Elementary School and Berkeley Springs High School. He was a avid hunter and fisherman. He is survived by his wife Dorthey Buchanan Miller; one son, Charles E. Miller; one daughter, Winona M. Conover, Sabastian, Fla.; five grandchildren; two greatgrandchildren; two sisters, Lois Jean Farris, Martinsburg and Beverly Clark, Berkeley Springs; one aunt and many nieces and nephews. Besides his parents he was preceded in death by his first wife Kim Yong Ja “Linda Lou” Miller and one brother, Denver A. Youngblood. Arrangements were handled by Caughman-Harman Funeral Home, West Columbia. Burial services with graveside full military honors was held at Southland Memorial Gardens Cemetery on July 19.

Charles B. Hale Charles Boyd Hale, 90, of Berkeley Springs, died Monday, August 1, 2011 at his home. He was the son of the late Charles Henry Hale and Minnie Clara Fink Hale. He was retired from Glen L. Martins Aircraft Manufacturing in Baltimore, Md. He was of the Protestant faith. He was also preceded in death by a sister, Edna Kendig and two brothers, George and Stewart Hale. He is survived by his wife, Margaret Ruth Lewis Hale; one son, Jeff L. Hale, Berkeley Springs; four grandchildren, Jeremiah and Ruth Hale, Miriam Tillman and Christina Ridley; five greatgrandchildren and two nephews. Services and burial will be private. Memorials can be given to Hospice of the Panhandle, 122 Waverly Ct., Martinsburg, WV 25403. Arrangements are by the Hunter-Anderson Funeral Home & Cremation Service, 36 South Green St., Berkeley Springs.

Soldier killed in Iraq Acting Governor Earl Ray Tomblin ordered all U.S. and state flags at state facilities lowered on Saturday, July 30, in honor of Captain David Edward Van Camp, a native of Elm Grove, Ohio County. Captain Van Camp died on June 29 in Badrah, Iraq, from injuries sustained as a result of a rocket attack by insurgent forces. Van Camp was commanding officer of G Troop, 2nd Squadron, 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment, III Corps at Fort Hood, Texas. In 2005, Van Camp served his first tour in Iraq, followed by several additional tours. After being injured by the detonation of a bomb in 2006, he was awarded the Purple Heart and Bronze Star. Upon recovery, he returned to active duty.

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The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Morgan County

Sheriff’s Report 304-258-1067 Sheriff Vince Shambaugh reports the following calls, investigations and reports this past week: July 24

Report of a suspicious person in the area of Morgan Woods. Spoke with subject and advised. Breaking and entering complaint taken on Clone Run Road. July 25 Assisted BSVFD with a commercial structure fire on Radio Station Road. Assisted Town of Bath Police Department at 7Eleven. Report of a reckless driver on Martinsburg Road. Unable to locate. Welfare check at Sheetz. Subject was secure. Report of suspicious subjects on Coughlin Lane. Subjects spoken to, along with the father. July 26 Report of suspicious activity on Cherry Lane. Checked the area, unfounded. Two vehicle crash on Rock Gap Road. Property damage only. July 27 EMS assisted on Harrison Avenue. Disorderly subject at War Memorial Hospital. Arrest of Thomas Whittaker, Jr., for disorderly conduct and public intoxication. Burglary complaint taken on Kilgore Road. Motorcycle crash on Hancock Road. Two injuries. Charges to be filed. Arrest of Misty Clingerman on two warrants. Arrest of Charles Stansbury on a capias for battery. July 28 Physical domestic disturbance on Spriggs Road. Arrest of William Brown for domestic battery. Report of destruction of property on Fairview Drive. Citations issued.

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Welfare check on Mawani Terrace. Subjects all secure. Emergency protection order served on Cacapon Road. Arrest of Ronald G. Cobb, Sr., on a bench warrant for failure to appear. Illegal dumping complaint taken at the Catawba Club. Larceny complaint taken on Cacapon Road. Burglary complaint taken at the Sheriff’s Office. Fraud complaint taken at the Sheriff’s Office. July 29 Check of suspicious subjects near Paw Paw. All secure. Report of a suspicious person on Valley Road. Cancelled en route. Assisted Town of Bath Police Department on Longview Drive. Assisted Town of Bath Police Department with two vehicle crash on Washington St. EMS assisted at the Berkeley Springs State Park. July 30 Verbal domestic disturbance on Eckard Lane. Advised subjects of options. Report of a reckless driver on Martinsburg Road. Spoke with subject. All secure. Burglary complaint taken on Shirley Drive. Arrest of Nathan Spielman for burglary and grand larceny. Assisted WVSP in Berkeley County with K-9 unit. Single vehicle crash on Winchester Grade Road. Property damage only. Arrest of Chauncy Brothers III, for DUI with minors. Noise complaint on Iroquis Trail. Subjects advised to keep the music down. EMS assisted on Kesecker Factory Lane. Noise complaint on Poole Road. Subjects advised. Arrest of Michael Fleece for DUI-1st offense.

Grant received for Teen Court and deputy at the high school

The Morgan County Commission was recently given $69,600 in grants to fund Teen Court and the Prevention Resource Officer at the Berkeley Springs High School. Shown at a July 12 grant ceremony in Charleston are, from left: Delegate Daryl Cowles, Kristin Willard of the Morgan County Partnership, Acting Governor Earl Ray Tomblin and Deputy Kevin Barney of the Morgan County Sheriff’s Department. Funding came from the U.S. Department of Justice’s Office of Juvenile Justice & Delinquency Prevention.

Magistrates Report Recent sentences by Magistrate Kermit Ambrose: Scott Randolph Heward, 20, of Paw Paw was given a suspended sentence of six months in jail and placed on a year’s probation for receiving or transferring stolen goods. He must also pay $191 court fees. Rochelle Dawn Heward, 23, of Atlantic Street, Paw Paw, was given a suspended sentence of six months in jail and placed on a year’s probation for battery. She must also pay $166 fees. Adam Michael Bright, 28, of Slanesville was given a suspended sentence of six months in jail and placed on a year’s probation for domestic battery. He must also pay $166 fees. Regis Joseph Stohl, 23, of Stickey Kline Road, Berkeley Springs, was sentenced to a day in jail and ordered to pay $391 in fines & fees for obstructing an officer. Bernie Kuykendall, Jr., 59, of Berkeley Springs was ordered to pay $266 fine & fees for burning without a permit.

William Thomas Sorensen, 49, of Arabran Place, Charles Town, was ordered to pay $176 fine & fees for a registration violation. Recent sentences by Visiting Magistrate Donald Sharp: Stephanie Kay McIntire, 41, of Siler Road, Winchester, was given a suspended sentence of six months in jail and placed on a year’s probation for possession of a controlled substance. She must also pay $166 court fees. Andrew Bell Michael, 33, of Valley Park, Winchester, was ordered to pay $266 fine & fees for driving while his license was suspended. Clarissa Lea Montgomery, 31, of Yellow Poplar Lane, Hedgesville, was ordered to pay $201 fine & fees for violating motor vehicle inspection laws. Linda Marie Weller, 57, of Wilkes Street, Berkeley Springs, was ordered to pay $176 fine & fees for a registration violation.

Plans being worked out for State Business Court Hunting season changes for fall Several important changes in the state’s fall hunting seasons for squirrel, white-tailed deer, black bear and wild turkey, the new senior hunting, trapping and fishing license and a new otter trapping season, are included in the 20112012 West Virginia Hunting and Trapping Regulations Summary brochure, according to Division of Natural Resources Director Frank Jezioro. The publication is now available at all West Virginia hunting and fishing license agents, DNR district offices, Elkins Operation Center and South Charleston Headquarters. The 2011-2012 West Virginia Hunting and Trapping Regulations Summary is also available online. Hunters and trappers are encouraged to carefully review these regulations due to the numerous changes in hunting seasons, especially squirrel, wild turkey, bear and deer hunting, as well as otter trapping, which will be in place this fall. Major changes for 2011- 2012 (see brochure for details) include: The statewide squirrel season will open September 10. The statewide archery deer season will open on October 1. The West Virginia Chronic Wasting Disease Containment Area has been expanded to now include all of Hampshire County, that portion of Hardy County which lies north of Corridor H and WV Rt. 55 from Wardensville to the Virginia Stateline, and that portion of Morgan County which lies west of US Rt. 522. Black bear hunting seasons in 2011 include nine counties open September 26-28; 11 counties open September 26–October 1; seven counties open November 21–December 3 during the Buck Firearms Season; and all 55 counties open December 5-31. The daily bag limit is one bear and the season limit is two bears, provided at least one bear comes from Boone, Fayette, Kanawha, Logan, McDowell, Raleigh or Wyoming counties.

Fall wild turkey hunting season has been reduced this year with 11 counties open October 22-29, seven counties open October 22–November 5, and 14 counties open October 22–November 19. The new Lifetime Senior Hunting/Trapping/Fishing License (Class XS), which is available beginning January 1, 2012, is required for resident hunters and anglers who reach the age of 65 on or after January 1, 2012, except that those seniors who hold a valid Class A-L or AB-L license will not need to purchase the Class XS license to hunt or trap. The otter trapping season will open November 5, and close February 29, 2012, with an annual bag limit of one otter, which must be checked at an official game checking station. Otter trappers should obtain a plastic CITES seal for each otter pelt they plan to sell out of state. Hunters can now use green, as well as amber and red artificial lights to hunt coyotes at night from January 1 through July 31. It is illegal to bait or feed wildlife on public land September 1 through December 31 and during the spring gobbler seasons.

The West Virginia Supreme Court has given the go-ahead to developing rules and procedures to create a State Business Court. “This should not be misunderstood as the court’s approval of a business court at this point. The final approval of the rules is still some months ahead,” said Supreme Court Administrative Director Steve Canterbury. The Business Court Committee has met twice and has come to a consensus on several issues. The Committee plans to have written rules available for public comment and public hearings before the end of 2011 and proposed legislation available for the 2012 legislative session. The proposed business court should be called a Complex Commercial Litigation Court. It would have five to seven judges who also would be active circuit judges with a background in business or commercial litigation. The proposed Complex Commercial Litigation Court would have statewide jurisdiction and operate in five to seven regional divisions based around the state’s largest population areas. Mediation would be mandatory in all cases assigned to the new court. The Complex Commercial Litigation Court judges would act as the mediators. Cases that the court would be required to handle would include: — Disputes between two or more businesses involving contracts, sales, and Uniform Commercial Code disputes; and the purchase or sale of a business. — Non-consumer debts and securities cases. — Internal affairs of a business (like shareholder disputes). — Trade secrets and intellectual property cases. — Malpractice lawsuits involving corporations, corporate lawyers, corporate accountants, corporate consultants, corporate executives. —Lawsuits between businesses.

The types of cases that could never be handled by the new court would include: — Consumer litigation, including product liability, personal injury, wrongful death and consumer class action cases. — Employee occupational health and safety cases involving injuries in the workplace. — Consumer environmental actions, like cases involving toxic spills and chemical exposure. — Consumer malpractice lawsuits, including lawsuits against doctors and hospitals. — Administrative lawsuits against government agencies, including tax disputes. — Consumer or residential real estate or landlord disputes. — Domestic relations and criminal cases, even those involving a business. “The goal of this committee is to design a court that can focus on the complex issues that arise in commercial litigation that can get bogged-down in a busy circuit court docket and also to relieve busy circuit court judges from a significant burden of handling a novel or complex issues that they may not be equipped to handle,” said Judge Darrell Pratt, chairman of the Business Court Committee. The Business Court Committee will meet in August to refine its plan for rules and procedures. It then will invite a group of defense and plaintiff’s attorneys and representatives of business to work with it on refining the written rules before releasing them for public comment and public hearings, Judge Pratt said. Members of the committee from Northeast West Virginia are Judge Donald Cookman of the 22nd Judicial Circuit (Hampshire, Hardy and Pendleton counties), and Judge Christopher Wilkes of the 23rd Judicial Circuit (Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan counties).

Senators trying to get funds to complete Corridor H The Corridor H Authority has praised U.S. Senators Jay Rockefeller and Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Richard Shelby of Alabama for introducing a bill that would allow existing funds to complete the Mountain State portion of the highway. Three-quarters of Corridor H, a highway that eventually will link I-79 at Weston with I-81 near Front Royal, Va., will be complete within the next 18 months. The Corridor H Authority, a state agency, has been working with the Hardwood Alliance Zone, a seven-county coalition that promotes the hardwood industry, to seek funding sources to com-

plete the highway in a timely manner. “You can’t overstate what the completion of Corridor H will mean to our region. Corridor H links I-79 to the junction of I-66 and I-81 where the Virginia Inland Port is located,” said Steve Foster, Chairman of the Corridor H Authority. “This gives us direct access to the port at Norfolk, where deep draught ships coming through the Panama Canal after the 2014 dredging will anchor.” Corridor H is the last section of Appalachian Development Highway System in West Virginia. The Appalachian Development Highway System was conceived in the early 1960s and 3,090 of the original

miles, or 85% of the system, are complete. The money targeted in the RockefellerManchin-Shelby bill comes from states that have projects that might never be built. Each year, those states receive funds for the unconstructed miles under a funding formula by which the federal government pays 80% and the state matching the remaining 20%. The bill would fund the system for the next six years and would reallocate funds that states do not use to other states with approved highways under construction. West Virginia, South Carolina, Mississippi, Georgia and New York are close to completion of their parts of the Appalachian Highway System.

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On the public docket All local government meetings are open to the public. Morgan County Government Wednesday, August 3. Morgan County Parks & Recreation Board meets. 7 p.m. Thursday, August 4. Morgan County Commissioners meet at 9:30 a.m. Agenda includes interviews and decisions for vacancies on several county boards starting at 10:15 a.m., and a discussion about police cruisers at 11 a.m. At 11:30 a.m., they will meet with the Comcast Franchise Renewal Committee. Wednesday, August 10. Morgan County Solid Waste Authority meets. 10 a.m. Wednesday, August 10. Warm Springs Sewer System board meets. 3:30 p.m. Morgan County Schools Saturday, August 13. Back to School picnic for Pleasant View Elementary at Pleasant View Community Center. 6 p.m.7:30 p.m. Tuesday, August 16. Morgan County School Board meets. 7 p.m. Wednesday, August 17. First day for faculty and staff for 2011-2012 school year. Wednesday, August 17. Freshmen orientation at Berkeley Springs High School. 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Town of Bath Tuesday, August 9. Town Streetscape Committee meets at Chamber of Commerce office. 3 p.m. Tuesday, August 16. Bath Town Council meets. 8:30 a.m. Town of Paw Paw Monday, September 12. Paw Paw Town Council meets. 7 p.m.

Sex Offender Registry A Morgan County resident has been added to the Sex Offender Registry maintained by the West Virginia State Police. The complete registry, including the current addresses of those listed, is available at the State Police website: www.wvstatepolice.com.

KEVIN MICHAEL FUNT Age: 31. Height: 5 ft., 6 in. Weight: 180 lbs. Eyes: Hazel. Hair: Brown. Residence: North Washington Street, Berkeley Springs. Offense: Sexual abuse, first degree. Victim: Adult female acquaintance. Conviction year: February 2004. Served seven years in prison, now on parole.

ARTICLES MAY BE EDITED Articles submitted to The Morgan Messenger may be edited for clarity, style and content and to conform to the newspaper's policies and protect against libel.

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Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

County Fair had a healthy side

Hot dog eating contest winners — front row, left to right, Kevin McLaughlin and Christian Guzman. Back row, Geoff Blankenship, Kevin Close and Caleb Murray.

Hot dog eating winners The Morgan County Fair looked more like Coney Island on July 30, with a hot dog eating contest taking center stage in the scorching summer heat. The contest was split into two divisions, youth (10-17) and adult (18 and up). Christian Guzman took first place in the youth division after downing eight hot dogs in five minutes, while Caleb Murray ate six to earn second place. In the adult division, Kevin McLaughlin took first place with seven and Geoff Blankenship earned second place after eating six. Letters To The Editor over 400 words will not be published.

Drama ensued when both divisions needed a tiebreaker for second place; as a result, the contestants had to eat two hot dogs faster than their opponent. Murray and Blankenship ignored what their stomach’s told them to do, and secured second place wins. The fundraiser was sponsored by the Morgan County Partnership to raise money for specific programs that will help teens in the community become more engaged, as well as educated on topics such as drug prevention, healthy eating habits, and basic assets that are

crucial to being successful in school. A number of community organizations generously donated for the cause: Rankins Fitness, Temptations Café, Ambrae House, BTM Accounting, CNB, State Farm Insurance, Tim Close Insurance and Dairy Queen. The planning committee was led by Kevin Close. Morgan County Partnership’s Summer VISTA recruited other youth in the community to assist in the planning. Other members helping included Brady Smith, Korinne Cowles, Jenna Hansroth and Jacob Montague.

Denise Shives (left) takes a fair attendee’s blood pressure. Sitting next to Shives at the Valley Health booth are Keith Beddow, Rhett Beddow and Michelle Walter. photo by Dave Abner

Reading the Messenger

Having fun this summer

National Child Abuse Hotline 1-800-4-A-CHILD

Jonathan Demarinis took his friends and The Morgan Messenger with him when he was invited to be a guest of Baltimore Orioles owner Peter Angelos and sit in the Owner’s Box at Camden Yards. Shown are, from left: Devon Mellott, Aaron Ruffner, Mikayla Mellott, Jonathan Demarinis, Daemon Kelley, Mark Dilley and Anthony Stotler.

Alex Gloyd, Austin Gloyd and Tyler Arbaugh carried The Morgan Messenger with them to Walt Disney World on a June trip to Florida.

CALL 304-258-1800 For All Your Advertising Needs

Round The Town —OLD KID’S RIDDLE: Why does a stove smoke? Easy, because it can’t chew. —OLD LORE: Never carry a hoe through the house for it will bring bad luck. —Congresswoman Shelley Capito’s mobile office will visit Paw Paw and Berkeley Springs in the next week to assist residents with problems with federal agencies. They will be at the Paw Paw Senior Center from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Thursday, August 4, and at the Berkeley Springs Senior Center from 11:15 a.m. to 12:45 p.m. on Wednesday, August 10. —Those who own real estate, vehicles or taxable personal property in Morgan County, and haven’t received a property tax bill this summer, should contact the Sheriff’s Tax Office at 304-258-8562. —Be warned about walnut caterpillars and orange-striped oakworm, not to forget ambrosia beetle damage, advises the West Virginia Dept. of Ag. —Winners of The Morgan Messenger free subscriptions were: Frank Strader, Berkeley Springs and Tim Vaughan, Fairfax, Va. —Mt. Olivet United Methodist Church will have their annual festival Saturday evening, August 20 beginning 4:30 p.m. Ham and chicken dinners. More details later.

—Though it’s not a prime year for cicadas, Marshal Bailey came across this one while working in Greenway Cemetery, Berkeley Springs. —The “Old Dogs” Duplicate Bridge Club winners for July 26 were: First: Larry and Victoria Scriggins. Second: Mary Virginia Nichols and Marie Hardy. —The “Sharps Minds” Bridge Club winners for July 28 with three and a half tables playing were: First: Jay Russell and Rebekah Metzler. Second: Audrey Carroll and Janet Cantone. This club plays at the Cacapon Park Lodge and donated their dues this week to Starting Points. —The Berkeley Springs Duplicate Bridge Club winners for July 29 were: North & South: Sharon Sudbrink and Peggy Helmick. East & West: Jim Arbogast and John Locke.

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The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

The Morgan Messenger

Section II Boys just being boys

11

• public notices

• sports • school news

• classifieds • real estate

Paw Paw Public Library is a community asset

These two boys had obviously just had a fun outing on a muddy day when Kate Lehman snapped their picture. She titled it: “Boys being boys – In the mud or got Tide?”

Summer reading at the Morgan County Library This week, the Morgan County Public Library’s summer reading program, “One World, Many Stories,” will be visiting “Down Under,” (Australia), with Miss Sheila and her surprise guests. Australia, known for its unusual birds, mammals and reptiles, is also home to a rare breed of animals, she has learned to tame and she will show how to tame them.

This is a family-friendly program, and is appropriate for all ages. It will take place at 1 p.m. on Thursday, August 5, at the Earth Dog Café. It’s free and open to everyone. If registered for the summer reading program, take reading log, extra credit and passport. Next week will be visiting Central America with Flor Lorenzo and her son Christian Guzman. Miss Sheila

Chip Shots by Jim Buzzerd Then there were two West Virginia University football fans are anxiously awaiting the upcoming football season and the unveiling of new head coach Dana Holgorsen’s offense. With a solid cast of offensive skill players returning, including junior quarterback Geno Smith, and Holgorsen’s reputation as an offensive genius in college football over the last five years, the excitement would seem legit. The expectations Holgorsen brings to WVU have been discussed over and over in this space. So have been Smith’s exploits, including the fact that he put up good numbers in a stagnate offense a year ago. The mind really wanders thinking what Smith may be able to do in an offensive system designed to put up huge offensive numbers. We will be able to get a glimpse of that offense in about a month when the Mountaineers open their season in an unprecedented Sunday home game against Marshall on September 4. What we will also be watching is a team with two quarterbacks. There has also been discussion here about how the battle to be Smith’s backup was between two true freshmen that enrolled in January so they could compete in spring ball. How West Virginia was left with just one quarterback on its roster after last year is a good question. Sure, had highly recruited Barry Brunetti stayed on board the quarterback position would be very strong, but still thin. Now it is thin and inexperienced. Texan Paul Millard won the number two spot during spring drills beating out fellow freshman Brian Athey. On Monday we may have our first clue at just how far Millard was ahead of Athey as the latter announced that he is leaving the program and transferring to Illinois State. Hard to say for sure, but this could be a good news/bad news development. Bad news that West Virginia is down to two quarterbacks, but good in the sense that Millard may be so talented that Athey simply saw no way to get ahead of him. Another factor could be the verbal commitment from another Texas quarterback. Ford Childress will be a senior this fall in Houston and has been a WVU verbal for several months. Childress, the son of former Oiler (a teammate of Oliver Luck) All Pro defensive tackle Ray Childress, was an under the radar prospect a few months ago, but has become a hot topic in recruiting circles since he committed to WVU. Keep an eye on this one folks, because there will be schools still pursuing him. For now the Mountaineers are scary thin at quarterback. While Smith is poised to have a great year, an injury could change everything. No matter how good Millard may become, it is unreasonable to expect him to come in as a true freshman and have command of the offense. In that regard, Smith has only had a few months with the new system, so he may have a learning curve as well. As fall camp begins all eyes will be on the quarterback position to see what Holgorsen does to find a number three quarterback. Receivers Coley White and Brad Starks have worked out at the position during their careers at West Virginia, but not in an offense like this one.

Freshmen football practice Anyone going into eighth or ninth grade, interested in playing freshmen football, practice will start August 8, 8 a.m. at high school. Should have physical. Call Mike Burks 304-2584120 or Tony McKee 304258-9738 for more information.

SPORTS TRIVIA 1. True or False: Mickey Mantle hit a home run that was said to have carried 634 feet at Briggs Stadium in Detroit, Michigan during the 1960 season? 2. Some of you are old enough to remember the home run Reggie Jackson hit in the 1971 All Star game in Detroit. It was a massive shot that hit the light tower above the roof in right field at Tiger Stadium, Physicists have estimated that the ball would have traveled: a. 469 feet , b. 507 feet, c. 532 feet, d. 617 feet. 3. Which player holds the Baltimore Oriole season record for official at bats? a. Cal Ripken, Jr., b. Brady Anderson, c. BJ Surhoff, d. Paul Blair.

Helene Kerns likes her time at one of the Paw Paw Public Library computers. by Kate Evans Stop into the Paw Paw Public Library on Moser Avenue and you’ll find people looking for a good book, children having storytime, and teens and adults at the computers. The library also has free wireless internet, said librarian Nellie Leach. People can take their own laptop computer or public computers are available. Leach is working on organizing an adult computer class. They are also going to have an adult composting class later this summer, she said. For most of the year, the library has storytime yearround on Friday mornings at 10 a.m., except in bad weather or on holidays. During the July summer reading program only, story hour is at 1:30 p.m. on Wednesdays. Leach and children’s librarian Jennifer Delawder are the two regular library staff persons. Job assistance A job service person comes to the library twice a month to help people prepare resumes. The library also has the Job & Career Accelerator program on computer, which allows patrons to explore occupations and decide which one best suits their interests. They can also search millions of job postings, create resumes and cover letters and learn interviewing skills. Meeting space People come to the library to do family historical research, Leach said. They can get on the Martinsburg Library web-

site for general research. Leach hopes to get a computer set-up so patrons can search local records. The library offers public meeting space for military organizations, Hospice, census workers and Friends of the Library. They also have C & O Canal information. People may put up displays., Now one exhibit is a pictorial history called “The Rise and Fall of Magnolia, West Virginia.” Friends of the Library The Friends of the Library does library fundraisers such as pancake suppers and bake sales. They raised enough money for a safe to house library records, Leach said. The organization did the flower bed, rocks and outdoor landscaping for the building. They are also doing portraits of retiring librarians that worked there. Other services The library is part of the interlibrary loan system and also provides tax forms and booklets. Leach said she helps Paw Paw Schools with West Virginia Book Month and assisted with Energy Express last year. The Paw Paw Public Library receives financial support from the Morgan County Commission, Morgan County School Board and Town of Paw Paw. As well as the State Library Commission. Future plans include putting a new roof on and eventually moving the West Virginia materials to one room with the genealogy research computer.

Books, DVDs Leach is especially excited about the new collection of books about other countries that they got for the summer reading program “One World, Many Stories.” They’re trying to put together a new section for young adult graphic novels and easy readers for beginning readers. They have also started a DVD and CD audio book collection. School classes come to visit the library once a month when school is in session. They give kindergarten kids a library card application in case they don’t have one yet, she said. Well-used The library has 927 patrons and issues 8 to 10 new library cards a month. Sometimes people are waiting at the door when she arrives and also at lunchtime when they’re closed. Library patron Helene Kerns likes to see the new books and likes mystery and fiction. They have a huge selection and always get her favorites, she said. Kerns also likes to watch the kids’ storytime programs. “They provide a great service and are an asset to the community,” Kerns said. Hours The Paw Paw Public Library is open 41 hours a week. Hours are noon to 5 p.m. on Mondays, 9 a.m. to noon and 1-5 p.m. on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays, 11-2 p.m. and 3-7 p.m. on Thursdays and 8 a.m.-noon on Saturdays. For more information, call 304-947-7013.

Deadline Notice All correspondents and advertisers are reminded the deadline for submitting copy to this publication is 12:00 Noon Monday each week.

Last Wednesday Erik de Rochard, who owns Cafe de Paris in Columbia, Md. was at the Paw Paw library for France Day which was organized by librarian Jennifer DeLawder.

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Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

School calendar highlights Back-to-school nights Saturday, August 13 Pleasant View Elementary, 6 p.m.-7:30 p.m. Picnic Pleasant View Community Center. Wednesday, August 17 Berkeley Springs High, Freshmen Orientation, 6-8 p.m. Thursday, August 18 Warm Springs Intermediate, 3:30-5 p.m. Open House. Warm Springs Middle School, 5:30-7:30 p.m. - Open House. Friday, August 19 Widmyer Elementary, 55:45 p.m. - Kindergarten, 66:45 p.m. - Second Grade, 77:45 p.m. - First Grade. Thursday, August 25 Greenwood Elementary, 4-6 p.m. Open House. Paw Paw Schools, 6-7:30 p.m. Open House. Schedule August 22 - first day for students, K-12. August 30 - first day for Doddlebugs pre-kindergarten students. August 31 - first day for Widmyer pre-kindergarten students and Headstart.

Honor Roll Greenwood Elementary Fourth nine weeks “A” honor roll Third grade — Kendal Williams. Fourth grade — Trinity Vanorsdale and Carl Feather, Jr. Fifth grade — Rhett Mauer and Anthony Lawhorne. “A/B” honor roll Third grade — Joseph Weltz, Dante Stotler, John Stohl, Olivia Shick, Michael Myers and Jacob Harpring. Fifth grade — Hannah Stohl, Joshua Bowers, Amanda Lupton, Robin Plake, Saleen Schmeling and Emily Sipes.

September 5 - no school, Labor Day. September 22 - three hour early dismissal, staff development. October 4 - no school, Special Election. October 7 - no school, ISE Day. November 11 - no school, Veteran’s Day. November 21-25 - no school, Thanksgiving vacation. December 23 - no schoolISE day. December 26-30, no school, Winter vacation. January 2 - no school - New Year’s Day. January 16 - no school, Martin Luther King’s birthday. February 2 - Three hour early dismissal - staff development. February 20 - no school, ISE day. April 6 - no school, ISE day. April 9-13 - no school, Spring break. May 8 - no school - Primary Election. May 24 - last day for students (if no snow days). May 25 - no school - continuing professional development. May 28 - no school Memorial Day. May 29 - no school Parent/Teacher conference. June 7 - no school, ISE day. May 30-June 6* - no school, OS days. * Days that will be rescheduled as make-up days for any lost instructional days.

Deadline Notice All correspondents and advertisers are reminded the deadline for submitting copy to this publication is 12:00 Noon Monday each week.

COLD RUN DRIVING RANGE & MINIATURE GOLF HOURS: Sat. & Sun. 9:00 a.m.-Dark Mon., Thurs., Fri. 11 a.m.-Dark

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Alex Frye graduate of Cushing Academy Alex Frye, of Hedgesville, a student from the class of 2011, graduated from Cushing Academy, Ashburnham, Mass. on May 29. Frye was also awarded the letter of commendation for the 2011 spring term in recognition of outstanding growth and dedicated commitment to academic tasks. Cushing Academy, an independent, coeducational boarding school for students in grades nine-12 and post-graduate, centers its curriculum around the Cushing Institute for 21st Century Leadership. The 162-acre campus is located in a bucolic setting approximately one hour west of Boston, Massachusetts.

Sports Trivia Answers:

1. True; according to the Guinness Book of World Records, the longest estimated home run in Major League Baseball history was hit 634 feet by Mickey Mantle, in September 1960 at Briggs Stadium in Detroit (Briggs Stadium was later renamed Tiger Stadium). 2. c. 532 feet. Scientists, taking into account the height of the impact, the time it took to reach the light standard from home plate, along with wind velocity and temperature, at the time of the home run, have estimated that the ball would have traveled 532 feet. 3. c. Surhoff; in 1999 Surhoff set a club record with 673 official plate appearances.

Lady Pirates Volleyball Practice Begins Any Paw Paw High School girl in grades 9-12 interested in playing volleyball should meet at the gym on Monday, August 8 at 3:30 p.m. Students must have achieved at least a 2.0 grade point average from the previous semester and have a current WVSSAC physical. Contact Coach Holly Palmer at 304-947-7960 For Further Information

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Filling In The Blanks by Horace Blankenship

Top 25 Countdown -Number 4; Florida State Many of the preseason publications have the Seminoles ranked in the lower half of the top 10. Here is why I disagree: Schedule, 16 returning starters on offense and defense, special teams, and a convincing win over South Carolina in the Chick-fil-A bowl. Let's start with the schedule. Florida State plays Oklahoma in the third game of 2011. When the Sooners visit Tallahassee and the Seminoles will be fired up after the way they were embarrassed in Norman a year ago (4717); Head Coach Jimbo Fisher will not let them forget. Florida State really doesn't have another scary opponent on the schedule until the regular season finale when they travel to Gainesville for their annual showdown with Florida. Virginia Tech is off the schedule, though they could conceivably face the Hokies in the ACC title game. It may not be a cupcake schedule, but it certainly isn't the most daunting one you will ever see. It is quite manageable and gives the Seminoles a real chance to make some serious noise. I usually mention special teams in passing. But, as discussed last week, it is an important part of any team, and could be especially important to Florida State's success this season, since they could have the best special teams unit in all of college football. Place kicker Dustin Hopkins, punter Shawn Powell and kick return specialist Greg Reid each return, after putting up impressive numbers in 2010. Hopkins converted on 22/28 field goals last season, including 17/19 inside the 40-yard line, with a long of 55 yards. He was also 53/53 on extra points and had 41 touchbacks on kickoffs. Powell averaged 44.3 yds/punt (top 20 nationally) and had 16 punts downed inside the opponents 20-yard line, while Reid averaged 10.13 yds./punt return and 23.9 yds./kickoff return. He had seven punt returns of over 20 yards which was fourth best nationally. All the pieces are in place for special teams to really be special. They could be the difference in a couple of games this year...........maybe against Oklahoma and Florida. The Seminoles also return 16 starters on offense and defense, as well as 50 of 62 lettermen. On offense, Florida State lost quarterback Christian Ponder, who was a first-round NFL draft choice, but return a talented, and experienced, QB, in junior, EJ Manuel. Manuel, a highly touted quarterback coming out of high school, started several games last year for the injured Ponder and acquitted himself nicely. Manuel, more of a dual threat QB despite his size (6-4, 234), led the Seminoles to bowl victory over South Carolina and had an excellent game in the conference championship game against Virginia Tech. Manuel was very efficient against the Gamecocks, completing 11/15 passes for 84 yards and a TD, while rushing the ball seven times for another 46 yards. When forced to throw the ball against Va Tech, Manuel stepped up the challenge completing 23/31 passes for 288 yards and a TD. Manuel ended the season completing 65/93 passes for 861 yards with four TDs and four Int's, while netting 170 yards on 41 carries with one rushing touchdown. He has all the tools and if he makes good decisions with the ball, the Seminole offense should be very good, given the experience, and talent, around Manuel. The top four wide receivers return, tailback Chris Thompson, tight end Beau Relford and three starting offensive linemen. The returning offensive linemen, left tackle (Andrew Datko), right tackle (Zebrie Sanders) and center (David Spurlock), return to arguably at the three most critical positions on the line, Datko will protect Manuel's blind side, while Spurlock is responsible for making all the line checks. Bert Reed, a senior, will start at one wide receiver position, while junior Willie Haulstead

will likely get the nod on the other side. Reed and Haulstead led the team in receiving yards last season. Reed had 58 receptions for 614 yards and two touchdowns, while Haulstead reeled in 38 balls for 587 yards and six scores. Taiwan Easterling, a starter in the three wide receiver look, snared 43 catches for 551 yards and five touchdowns, while reserve Rodney smith caught 31 passes for 448 yards and three TDs. Running back Chris Thompson gained 845 yards on the ground in 2010, averaging 6.3 yds/carry. He is a home run threat that had touchdown runs of 90, 83 and 70 yards last year. If he is Florida State's version of lightning, then incoming freshman James Wilder, Jr. might provide the thunder. Ranked as the second best running back in the 2011 recruiting class by Rivals.com, Wilder at 6-2, 220 pounds, is a bruising downhill runner that should excel in short yardage and goal line situations. If the name sounds familiar it is because his father, James Wilder, Sr., had a distinguished NFL career playing primarily for Tampa Bay. The offense which, in 2010, finished in the middle of the pack, should be much improved in 2011. The defense in 2010 was sub par compared to FSU standards, but the one thing they still did very well was pressure the quarterback. The Seminoles generally have tremendous speed on the defensive line and make it quite uncomfortable for opposing QB's to set up in the pocket. 2011 should be no different with three starting defensive linemen returning to a unit that finished tied for first in the nation in sacks (48) last season. Brandon Jenkins headlines the defensive front after recording 13.5 sacks in 2010; third best in the nation. Seven of the top defensive linemen were either freshman or sophomores a year ago. That is a scary statistic when you consider that they led the country in sacks and were 29th in rush defense. Not only do seven experienced linemen return, but FSU added the top rated junior college player, Tank Carradine, to the defensive front. He is expected to start at defensive end opposite Jenkins, giving Florida State an even more lethal pass rush. The Seminoles must replace two starting linebackers but do return leading tackler Nigel Bradham at one of the outside linebacking spots. Bradham recorded 98 tackles in 2010, with five sacks and five passes defended. Florida State has plenty of talented replacements for departed seniors Mister Alexander and Kendall Smith, like sophomores Christian Jones and Jeff Luc, but will be lacking some experience at the second level of their defense. That is not a problem in the defensive backfield. Second year defensive coordinator, Mark Stoops, has all four starters returning to a unit that football analyst Phil Steele ranks as the fifth best secondary in college football. Cornerbacks' Greg Reid and Xavier Rhodes are outstanding. Reid broke up 14 passes and intercepted three a year ago, while Rhodes was credited with 12 passes defended and four interceptions. The pair do their job very well as do returning safeties Nick Moody and Terrance Parks. Moody was third on the team with 79 tackles, 3.5 behind the line of scrimmage, defended three passes and had an interception, while Parks recorded 44 tackles and broke up six passes. The group ended 2010, 37th in pass efficiency defense. They should only improve this season with the added experience and the pressure provided by the front four. Jimbo Fisher had a tough job replacing legendary coach Bobby Bowden. But, Fisher assembled a strong coaching staff and won ten games his first year. If he can build off that momentum, and keep recruiting to FSU standards, he will likely have a long tenure in Tallahassee. When you add everything up, it is hard to count the Seminoles out.

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Monday Afternoon - 12:30 p.m. 3 to a Team - Mixed - An Enjoyable Way to Spend Your Lunch Break! Monday Mixed - 7:00 p.m. 4 to a Team - Mixed - We’re Bringing it Back! In League Singles Tournament Spices Up This League! Wednesday Warriors - 12:30 p.m. 3 to a Team - Mixed - Originally a Mid Season League Now Going Strong as a Full Season League for the Second Season! Wednesday Mixed - 7:00 p.m. 4 to a Team - Mixed - Hump Day Never Had It So Good! Wednesday Fraternal - 7:00 p.m. 5 to a Team - Mixed - Low Level Competition But Lots of Fun! Thursday Starlight Mixed - 6:30 p.m. 4 to a Team - Mixed - Very Popular. Always a Great Time! Thursday Moonlight - 9:00 p.m. 3 to a Team - Mixed - Start Your Weekend Off Early Every Week! Friday Night Allstars - 8:00 p.m. 4 to a Team - Mixed - Drinks, Bowling and Good Friends. The Ingredients to a Great Friday Night! Saturday Youth Leagues - 10:00 a.m. & 12:00 noon 4 to a Team - Kids Only! Sign Ups in August! Sunday Pro Jersey League - 7:00 p.m. 4 to a Team - Mixed - Every Bowler Gets an Authentic Jersey from Their Favorite Foodball, Baseball, Hockey or Basketball Team! WINTER PROMOTION! Every League Bowler Gets 5 Entries to Win a 37” LCD Flat Screen TV and Receives 1 Entry For Each Week on the League! Call and Reserve Your Spot Today!

BERKELEY SPRINGS BOWLERAMA 4909 Valley Road • Berkeley Springs, WV • 304-258-1815

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The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

13

Graduating class of 1961

The class of 1961 will be honored September 24 at the Mount Wesley, Bath District and Berkeley Springs High School homecoming: Left to right, front row: Emma Jo (Aulabaugh) Santana, Rebecca (Yost) McIntyre, Diann Risinger, Judy (Penwell) McBee, Virgie (Unger) Gibson, Regina (Clark) Unger, Mary Lou (Courtney) Holiday, Mary Belle (Rhoe) Danner, Susie (Kuykendall)

Barker, Leanna (Mason) McCullough, Judith (Henry) Lee, Katherine (Miller) Marshall, Esta Lee (Cain) Thatcher, Douglas McCoy, Patricia (Everett) Mosco, Marilyn (Eckerd) Hall and Opal (Stotler) Peck. Second row: Virginia (Corbett) Sullivan, Judy (White) French, Virginia (Thompson) Crofts, Linda (Michael) Tracey, Karen (Whisner) Bushman, Carol Ann (Stotler) Grohs, Judy (Yost) Shade, Darlene

(Sensel) Miller, Judy (Myers) Baisden, Barbara Spitzer, Iris Jean (Rankin) Duckwall, Nancy (Perry) Beddow, Virginia Lea (Kyne) Fletcher, Sam Stotler, Ronald Wilson Ned Kershner and Max Mellott. Third row: Larry Shade, Donald Fearnow, Chuck Weigle, Frank Weigle, John McDonald, Jackson Hendershot, John Dawson, Ronnie Grove, Selba Jean (Nestor) Potter, Joe Leary, Lowell (Tommy) Perry, Jon Everett,

Eugene McManus, Dayton Yost, Raymond Bernhard and Robert Henry. Fourth row: Richard Cain, Richard Payne, Sherman Potter, Dennis Everett, Willis Plotner, Lee Orme, John Householder, Gary Duckwall, Robert Bohrer, Ronald Wachter, Rick Bell, Philip Rockwell, Robert Burke, Douglas Allemong and Earl Whisner.

Robbie Mann majoring in bluegrass Free programs offered by Kate Evans As a six-year-old child, Robbie Mann chose violin as the instrument he wanted to learn. His choice led him to 12 years of violin, with seven years of classical training and five years of playing fiddle. His instrument became the path for his future. Mann, who is now 18-yearsold, was accepted into the bluegrass program at Glenville State College. He will major in bluegrass and minor in vocal performance and starts his studies this fall. Mann, a Great Cacapon resident, is a lifelong homeschooled student who also took some morning classes at Berkeley Springs High School. Mann learned about the Glenville State College when instructor Buddy Griffin came to the high school several years back to talk to a few classes about the school’s music department. After hearing that Mann was a fiddler, Griffin mentored him and helped guide him with college course selections. Courses Mann will take include music theory, bluegrass ensemble, band ensemble and choral group along with classes like English 101 and computer science. As part of the bluegrass ensemble, Mann will perform at festivals all over the country. Music studies Mann started his classical violin studies with two teachers at Shenandoah Conservatory and later studied with violin teacher Linda Whitesitt. At age 13, Mann decided to try fiddle. He was awarded a six-month apprenticeship with renowned Critten Hollow String Band fiddler Joe Herrmann through the Augusta Heritage Foundation.

Robbie Mann will major in bluegrass and minor in vocal performance at Glenville State College. Another year and a half of fiddle lessons with Herrmann followed his apprenticeship. Mann learned his first fiddle tune when he was around eight years old and said he kept wanting to learn more of them. What got him interested in playing the fiddle was that it had fewer boundaries than the violin and that he could do more improvising and experimentation with it. With classical violin, you have to make it sound how the composer intended it to be heard, Mann said. There’s a lot more regulation to the sound you’re trying to produce. With fiddle music, you have more room to play with it. “You’re given a general idea and then you make it your own,” he said. Mann said he always keeps an open book about learning and being exposed to different sounds and styles. Sometimes he’ll let one style of fiddling bleed into another as he’s playing, making the sound a little bluesier or Irish.

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A great experience Mann said that working with Herrmann was a great experience. Herrmann taught him a lot and kept him going in the direction that Mann wanted to go, whether it was learning waltzes or ragtime. “He always kept it fun and something to look forward to each week,” Mann said. Herrmann had known Mann since he was four-years-old, had watched him grow up and then helped him with his fiddle studies. “It was pretty neat,” Mann said. Mann said some of his favorite fiddle tunes to play

were “Ragtime Annie,” “Over the Waterfall,” “Cuffy,” “Old Joe Clark,” and “Magpie.” Besides Herrmann, other fiddlers and musicians whose music Mann had listened to or who he had played music with were Steve Hickman, John Devine, Buddy Griffin, George Ward and Pete Gordon. Mann said Gordon introduced him to playing fiddle with a group or duo. Future plans Mann said he’d like to go back and teach at the college when he finishes his degree. He plans to get a master’s degree in education while he’s teaching. After he’s finished his education, Mann said he would like to come back to Morgan County to establish a full orchestra in the school system. There is a marching band, a concert band and a jazz band here, but nothing to cater to the stringed instruments, he said. Mann has played in the Berkeley County middle school orchestra and in the Shenandoah Conservatory orchestra. Excited about school Mann said he spent years looking for a good music school, but all he found before were classical schools. It’s the only four-year college with a major in bluegrass. He said he is really excited about going to Glenville State College and doing “what I love to do.”

Rubber Stamps & Supplies

The Jill S. Weekley Learning Center at the James Rumsey Technical Institute offers a variety of free programs to students 16 years of age and older who are out of the public school system. All classes and programs are completely free of charge and are available during both day and evening hours. Some programs available are: GED preparation, Math Review, Grammar Review, Computer Tutorials, Basic Study Skills/Vocabulary and Essay Writing, LPN Preparation and more. All students are required to attend an orientation session prior to beginning Learning Center programs. Sessions include information and explanation of the center’s programs, class schedules, goal setting and testing and placement appointments. Daytime orientations are held in the Learning Center on the first, third and fifth Monday of each month from 8-10 a.m. or 12-2 p.m. for GED and Basic/Computer Skills.

Evening orientation is held on the first Tuesday of each month from 6-8 p.m. for GED and Basic Skills/Computer Skills. Orientation dates are as follows: Monday, August 1, 15 and 29 at 9-11 a.m. or 12-2 p.m. and Tuesday, August 2 at 6-8 p.m. The Official Practice Test will be given on the second and fourth Monday of each month at 8 a.m. and the first Thursday of each month at 4 p.m. GED registration will be held on the second and fourth Tuesdays at 1 p.m. and the first Thursday of each month at 8 p.m. The Learning Center is open on Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. and Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12 noon to 9 p.m. The Learning Center’s summer hours will run from June 22 through August 26. The Learning Center will be open Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. or Thursday and Friday 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Call 304-754-9712 for additional information.

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Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger TRUSTEES` SALE OF VALUABLE REAL ESTATE

PUBLIC NOTICES “BECAUSE THE PEOPLE MUST KNOW” PUBLIC NOTICE The meeting of the Medical Staff Executive Committee of City Hospital, Inc, will convene at 12:30 p.m., Friday, August 12, 2011 in the City Hospital Board Room (8th Floor), Martinsburg, WV. This meeting is open to the public. 8-3-1tm FIDUCIARY NOTICE To the Creditors and Beneficiaries of the Estate of Helen Kelly Hovermale. All persons have claims against the estate of the said Helen Kelly Hovermale, deceased, whether due, or not, are notified to exhibit same, with the voucher thereof, legally verified, to the undersigned, at the Law Office of Harmison and Associates, 11 N. Washington Street, Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, on or before the 25th day of October, 2011; otherwise they may be excluded from all benefits of said estate. All beneficiaries of said estate may appear on or before said day to examine said claims and otherwise protect their interests. Given under my hand this 19th day of July, 2011. C. William Harmison Fiduciary Commissioner Morgan County, West Virginia 7-27-2tm NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE Notice is hereby given that default having occurred in the payment of a certain indebtedness secured by a Deed of Trust dated December 14, 2007, between Milam Rutledge, Kelly Rutledge and Paul Altamere, Trustee, recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the Commission, Morgan County, West Virginia in Deed of Trust Book No. 321 at Page 508, which Deed of Trust authorizes the beneficiary to remove, substitute, or add a Trustee, at its option, and the beneficiary having exercised its option and substituted Emmanuel B. Loucas, Connie Kesner, and Tressia Blevins as its Trustees, to act in the enforcement of said Deed of Trust in person, and the undersigned Substitute Trustees having been requested by the beneficial owner of said indebtedness to enforce said Deed of Trust, will sell at a public auction to the highest bidder, the following hereinafter described real estate on: FRIDAY, AUGUST 12, 2011 AT 11:55 AM IN FRONT OF THE MORGAN COUNTY COURTHOUSE BERKELEY SPRINGS, WEST VIRGINIA All that certain parcel of real estate, together with all the rights, rights-of-way, easements, privileges, improvements and appurtenances belonging thereto, situate in Sleepy Creek District, Morgan County, West Virginia, more particularly described as follows: all that certain lot or parcel of real estate containing 2.94 acres, more or less, also known as Lot 1B, in Hawks Nest II, as surveyed by Berkeley Land Surveys dated January 4, 2004 as shown on that certain plat recorded among the Morgan County Land Records in Deed Book No. 197 at Page 725. Tax Id: 2-1.3 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 76 Coon Hollow Trail, Hedgesville, West Virginia 25427 Property is sold subject to prior trusts, encumbrances, restrictions and easements of records, if any. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser's expense. FEDERAL TAX LIEN: In the event that there are Federal Tax Liens against the property, the United States would have the right to redeem the property within a period of 120 days from the date of such sale or the period allowable for redemption under local law, whichever is longer. TERMS OF SALE: A deposit of $15,000.00 by certified check or cashier's check at sale made payable to Mancini & Associates, the balance in cash or by certified check at closing. Certified funds must be presented to Trustee for inspection at start of sale in order to be qualified to bid. Conveyance will be by Special Warranty Deed subject to all easements, covenants, rights-ofway, conditions and restrictions of record. The property is sold in "as is" condition. The beneficial owner of the Deed of Trust does not make any representations or warranties as to the physical condition of the property. Any and all legal procedural requirements to obtain physical possession of the premises after the closing are the responsibility of the purchaser. Risk of loss or damage will be purchasers from and after the foreclosure sale. All taxes and utility charges will be the responsibility of the purchaser. All settlement fees, costs of conveyance, examination of title, recording charges, and transfer taxes are at the expense of the purchaser. The purchaser will be required to complete settlement within 30 days of the date of the sale, failing which the deposit made will be forfeit and the property resold at the risk and expense of the purchaser. Trustee makes no representations regarding state of title. If Trustee cannot convey insurable or marketable title, purchaser's sole remedy is a return of deposit. The Trustee reserves the right to continue sale of the subject property from time to time by oral proclamation, which continuation shall be in the sole discretion of the Trustee. Daniel J. Mancini, Esq. Mancini & Associates 201A Fairview Drive Monaca, PA 15061 Phone (724) 728-1020 Fax (724) 728-4239 7-27-2tm

MORGAN COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC NOTICE The Morgan County Planning Commission will conduct a Final Plat Public Hearing for the following proposed minor subdivision. 1) Windy Acres, property owned by Phyllis G. Webster, located in Rock Gap District, west side of Highland Ridge Road, 370’ north of intersection with Spriggs Road. The proposed subdivision consists of 1 lot totaling 2.71 acres. Waiver Requests: Reduction of scale of plat to 1”=100’ Reduction of plat size to 8.5”x11” (Morgan County Subdivision Regulations Section 13.3.a.1) The purpose of the Public Hearing is to determine if the development meets the technical requirements of the Morgan County Subdivision Regulations as adopted September 8, 1983, and amended. The public is invited to participate in the hearing to be held Tuesday, August 23, 2011 beginning at 7:00 p.m. in the County Commission Room, Morgan County Courthouse Complex, Berkeley Springs, WV. 8-3-1tm NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain deed of trust, made and delivered by Dessie F. Eaton and Lloyd E. Robison, to Charles S. Trump IV or George I. McVey, either of whom may act, as Trustees, to secure a promissory note in the original amount of One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000.00), which deed of trust bears date the 2nd of March, 2005, of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Morgan County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book No. 256, at Page 628, and the said default by the said Dessie F. Eaton and Lloyd E. Robison not having been cured, corrected or rectified by the said Dessie F. Eaton and Lloyd E. Robison, the undersigned Charles S. Trump or George I. McVey, either of whom may act, as Trustees, having been requested in writing to do so by the Beneficiary of said note, will publicly offer for sale at the front door of the Morgan County Courthouse of Berkeley Springs, West Virginia on Friday, August 19, 2011 at 10:00 AM, EST Situate in Rock Gap District, Morgan County, West Virginia, being more particularly described as follows: “BEGINNING at (1) a capped T-Bar at the north corner of the original tract of 88-1/2 acres, at a fence corner - one dead, fallen Maple tree at the East foot of Warm Springs Ridge; thence with the original boundary, reversed, S. 17 W. 100.49 feet to (2) a T-Bar in said line; thence leaving the original line, and into the tract, S. 65 E. 915.46 feet to (3) a TBar at the West side of U.S. Route No. 522 Right-of-Way; thence with said West side of U.S. Route No. 522 N. 2242-20 E. 100.00 feet to (4) a T-Bar at the West side of said road, in the North boundary of the original tract, in Miller’s line; thence with the original boundary No. 65 W. 925.46 feet to the beginning, containing 2.113 acres.” As surveyed by W. Thomas Biggert, Surveyor, 18 April, 1968. BEING the same real estate granted and conveyed unto Kenneth M. Eaton and Dessie F. Eaton and Lloyd E. Robison, by Kenneth M. Eaton and Dessie F. Eaton and Lloyd E. Robison and Carolyn Robison, by deed dated the 7th day of October, 1993, of record in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Morgan County, West Virginia, in Deed Book No. 167 at page 578. NOTE: This real estate shall be sold subject to all real estate taxes, fire fees, maintenance fees, and lot assessments. The purchaser shall be responsible for securing possession of the real estate. TERMS OF SALE: 10% cash on the day of sale, the balance to be paid within thirty (30) days or upon delivery of deed. FEDERAL TAX LIEN: In the event that a Federal tax lien is recorded against the property, the United States would have the right to redeem the property for a period of 120 days from the date of the sale or the period allowable for redemption under local law, whichever is longer. George I. McVey Trustee 8-3-3tm

ATTENTION MORGAN COUNTY

DOG OWNERS 2011-2012 Dog Licenses Are Due July 1st

Morgan County Assessor’s Office COUNTY FEE: $3.00 CITY FEE: $6.00 (IN TOWN LIMITS)

ATTENTION TAXPAYERS OF MORGAN COUNTY If you have not received a personal property tax form please call the Assessor’s Office 304-258-8570. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday, Tuesday and Friday; 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday and 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday. It is the responsibility of each taxpayer to file a personal property tax form with the Assessor’s Office not earlier than July 1, 2011, nor later than October 1, 2011.

The undersigned Trustees, by virtue of the authority vested in them by that certain deed of trust dated August 30, 2005, and duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Morgan County, West Virginia, in Deed of Trust Book 271, at page 138, Scott Facello did convey unto Mitchell Lee Klein, Trustee, certain real property described in said deed of trust; and the beneficiary has elected to appoint Teays Valley Trustees, LLC as substitute Trustees by a Substitution of Trustee recorded in the aforesaid Clerk`s Office; and default having been made under the aforementioned deed of trust and the undersigned Trustees, having been instructed by the secured party to foreclose thereunder, will offer for sale at public auction at the front door of the Morgan County Courthouse, 77 Fairfax Street, Berkeley Springs, West Virginia 25411 on: August 18, 2011 At 04:30 PM All that certain parcel of land situate in Sleepy Creek District, Morgan County, West Virginia, on the southern side of Country Route 1/4 about 860 feet west of County Route 1 "River Road", and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at (1) a found 5/8 inch rebar at the northwestern corner to Robert L. Essex, Sr. (DB 175, Pg 667); thence though the original tract or which this parcel is a part N. 82 Deg. 07` 37" W. 150.29 feet to (2) a set 5/8 inch rebar; thence N. 85 Deg. 17` 41" W. 151.22 feet to (3) a set 5/8 inch rebar; thence N. 89. Deg 54` 33" W. 149.60 feet to (4) a set 5/8 inch rebar in the line of Lawrence H. Robinson (DB 106, Pg 551), thence with said Robinson N. 33 Deg. 27` 30" E. 639.98 feet to found T. Bar on the southern bank of an existing road bed, the same course continued 12.33 feet farther (in all 652.31 feet) to (5) a point within a 16.5 foot wide right of way which leads to the land of said Robinson; thence with Beverly Johnson (DB 859 Pg 400) N. 70 Deg. 57` 30" E. 198.00 feet to (6) a set 5/8 inch rebar; thence N. 14 Deg. 20` 48" E. 163.37 feet to a found T-Bar, the same course continued 35.42 feet farther (in all 198.79 feet) to (7) the northern margin of County Route 1/4, thence with same S. 85 Deg. 38` 31" E. 137.94 feet to (8); thence N. 89 Deg. 52` 00" E. 91.62 feet to (9); thence crossing said Route 1/4 and through said original tract S. 00 Deg. 25` 23" E.53.13 feet to a found 5/8 inch rebar, the same course continued 218.43 feet farther (in all 271.56 feet) to (10) a found 5/8 inch rebar, corner to Matthew E. Michael (DB 175, Pg 214); thence with said Michael S. 01 Deg. 12` 22" E. 300.68 feet to (11) a found 5/8 inch rebar; thence again through said original tract S. 04 Deg. 45` 10" W. 361.51 feet to the beginning, containing 8.75 acres more or less, as surveyed by Charles P. Dawson, WV LLS No. 808, on February 9, 1998, and as shown on Berkeley Land Surveys Plat No. 98032, a copy of which is attached to a deed recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission, Morgan County, West Virginia in Deed Book 184, at page 301. Less and excepting 4.59 acres, more or less, which was conveyed to John F. Myers and Deborah M. Myers by deed from Scott A. Bolyard and Cherilyn M. Bolyard dated October 13, 1998 and recorded in the aforesaid Clerk`s Office in Deed Book 184, at page 624. Subject to and together with that certain 16.5 foot wide right of way at the northwestern area of the above- described parcel, the location of which as shown on said Plat No. 98032. Being the same real estate conveyed unto Scott W. Facello by Henry J. Baniak, by deed dated August 30, 2005, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County Commission of Morgan County, West Virginia in Deed Book 216, at page 487. 115 Promenade Lane, Hedgesville, WV 25427 The aforesaid property is SUBJECT TO any and all easements, rights-of-way, conditions, covenants and restrictions of record or in existence. The sale of the foregoing real property will be made subject to all exceptions, reservations, rights of way, easements, conditions, covenants, restrictions, leases and other servitudes of record, if any, pertaining to said real estate, subject to all matters disclosed by an examination and inspection of the property, subject to any and all unpaid taxes as recorded against said property, and to any further matters announced at said sale. The property is sold subject to an accurate survey at purchaser`s expense. The sale of the foregoing real property will also be made expressly subject to any and all other deeds of trust, judgments, liens, and all other encumbrances of any nature whatsoever, if any, having priority over the deed of trust referred to herein. The Trustees reserve the right to adjourn the sale, for a time, or from time to time, without further notice, by announcement at the time and place of sale described above or any adjournment thereof. The Trustees reserve the right to reject any and all bids. The subject property will be sold in "AS IS" condition. The Trustees shall be under no duty to cause any existing tenant or person occupying the subject property to vacate said property. The Trustees will deliver a trustees` deed to the purchaser without any covenant or warranty (express or implied) in the form prescribed by W. Va. Code §38-1-6. The Trustees make no representations and warranties about the title of the real estate to be conveyed. If the Trustees are unable to convey insurable or marketable title to purchaser for any reason, purchaser`s sole remedy is return of deposit. TERMS OF SALE: $20,000.00 cash in hand at the time of sale in the form of a certified check or cashier`s check made payable to "Teays Valley Trustees, LLC," and the balance in cash closing within 30 days of the date of the sale. Purchaser shall pay for transfer stamps and recording fees. Additional terms of sale may be announced prior to the sale. Member Teays Valley Trustees, LLC 600 A-1 Prestige Park Hurricane, West Virginia 25526 (304) 757-7956 http://foreclosure.closingsource.net 8-3-2tm

Letters To The Editor over 400 words will not be published. WEST VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Division Of Highways NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS Bids will be received electronically by the West Virginia Department of Transportation, Division of Highways through the Bid Express Bidding Service (www.bidx.com) and by sealed proposals (only when prequalification is waived) being received at its office in Building 5, Room A-748, 1900 Kanawha Boulevard East, Charleston, West Virginia until August 23, 2011 at 10:00 AM (Eastern Standard Time). The bids will be downloaded and/or opened and read publically thereafter for the construction of the following project(s): Call: 012 Contract No.: 1115299 State Project: R085-0REM/GR012.00 00 Description: Guardrail, Install or replace guardrail, Various RTES. County: Mineral, Jefferson, Grant, Other. Proposals will be received from prequalified and West Virginia licensed contractors only except that on FederalAid Projects a contractors’ license is not required at time of bid, but will be required before work can begin. Registration is required with the Department of Administration, Division of Purchasing, in accordance with Chapter 5A, Article 3, Section 12 of the West Virginia Code. All contractors submitting bids on project(s) must include one of the following forms properly executed with each proposal: Proposal Guaranty Bond, Cashier’s Check, or Certified Check for $500.00 or 5% of total bid, whichever is greater. *These are projects on which any contractor with a Category “W” Prequalification Rating may be eligible to bid. The West Virginia Department of Transportation, Division of Highways reserves the right to defer, delay or postpone the date for receiving and publicly opening proposals for any project designated in this advertisement, without the necessity of renewing such advertisement. All bidders holding valid bidding proposals will be notified of such deferment, delay or postponement and the date that proposals will be received and publicly opened. The West Virginia Department of Transportation, Division of Highways hereby notifies all bidders that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, minority business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex or national origin in consideration for an award. WEST VIRGINIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Division of Highways Robert L. Pennington, P.E. Director of Program Planning and Administration 8-3-2tm

ATTENTION FARMERS Deadline for Farm Applications September 1st MORGAN COUNTY ASSESSOR’S OFFICE

ATTENTION SENIOR CITIZENS If You Will Be 65 By June 30, 2012 You May Apply For Homestead July 1, 2011 through December 1, 2011. MORGAN COUNTY ASSESSOR’S OFFICE

ESTATE AUCTION Saturday, August 6, 2011 at 9:00 a.m. WE WILL BE OFFERING THE FOLLOWING ITEMS FOR THE ESTATE OF CLETUS (SLIM) AND ALICE McCUMBEE AT 100 HOWARD STREET IN BERKELEY SPRINGS, W.VA. DIRECTIONS ARE AS FOLLOWS: TAKE RT. 522 NORTH, TURN RIGHT ONTO WILLIAMS STREET, GO TO NEXT INTERSECTION AND TURN LEFT ONTO HARRISON AVENUE, GO APPROXIMATELY 1/4 MILE AND TURN RIGHT ONTO HOWARD STREET. HOUSEHOLD: Lane cedar chest, sewing machine in cabinet with chair, chess table, quilt rack, card table, bar stools, Maytag dishwasher, microwave, Speed Queen washer, 40’s Gibson electric stove, pool table, massage table, 50’s metal table and chairs, GE dryer, dehumidifier, metal glider, porch swing, rocking chairs, single bed, baby crib, lamps, Zenith floor model TV, 6 cane bottom chairs, drop leaf table, old wooden rocker, mahogany secretary, dining room table and chairs, hutch, dressers and many more numerous items. COLLECTIBLES: Costume jewelry, old watches, Standard and Waltham pocket watches, Glassware including set of bubble dishes, W.Va. glass, Moonstone, Fenton, Pyrex 4 pcl. bowl set, depression glass, Viking glass, cut glass, Sad irons, planes, apple boxes, mowing scythe, old wooden ironing board, hay rake, corn choppers, 1/2 bushel baskets, Pennzoil oil cans, dynamite box, 3 wooden ladders, old garden tools, Griswold #6, Griswold #8 skillets, graniteware roasters, old lunch box, large assortment of Christmas decorations, large assortment of quilts and afghans made by Mrs. McCumbee. To be offered: 1965 G.I. Joe doll with outfits, dog tags, Barbie 20th Anniversary doll plus many other numerous items. EQUIPMENT: Yard Machine push mower, gas cans, grill, wheelbarrow, seeder, Black & Decker trimmer. REAL ESTATE: To be offered at 11:00 a.m. 2 story house with living room, kitchen, dining room, 2 full baths and 4 bedrooms with stove, refrigerator and oven included, oil heat, hardwood floors and carpet with wrap around concrete porch with 2 Amish built storage buildings on a corner lot 97.5x132 feet. TERMS OF REAL ESTATE: $10,000 down (non-refundable) on day of sale with certified check or personal/business check with bank letter of credit, balance due at closing not to exceed 30 days. Home to be sold “AS IS” with no guarantee. For inspection of real estate call Brooks McCumbee at 304-258-5324. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: Deed Book 62, Page 119. TERMS: Cash or approved check. Lunch Rights Reserved Not Responsible for Accidents Announcements Day of Auction Supersede All Written Ads FOR PICTURES VISIT: Auctionzip.com AUCTIONEER: Raymond Childers, WV License #13

RAY CHILDERS’ AUCTIONEERING SERVICE 1-304-258-3353 IN THE COUNTY COMMISSION, IN AND FOR MORGAN COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA PROBATE DIVISION NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION Notice is hereby given that in the estate of the decedents set forth below, the Morgan County Commission has granted Letters Testamentary or of Administration to the person(s) named. Any claims against the estate must be filed in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 44, Article 2 of the West Virginia code as amended. Any interested person objecting to the validity of the will must make a complaint in accordance with the provisions of section eleven, twelve or thirteen, article five, chapter forty-one of the West Virginia code as amended. Any interested person objecting to the qualifications of the personal representative or of the venue or jurisdiction of the court, shall file such objections with Debra A. Kesecker, Morgan County Clerk, at 77 Fairfax Street, Suite 1A, Berkeley Springs, WV 25411 within ninety (90) days after the date of the first publication or within thirty (30) days of service of the Notice of Personal Representative, whichever is later. In addition, settlement of the estates of these decedents will proceed without reference to a fiduciary commissioner unless within ninety (90) days from the first publication of this notice a reference is requested by a party in interest or an unpaid creditor files a claim and good cause is shown to support reference to a fiduciary commissioner. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is August 3, 2011. ESTATE: PAUL WAYNE WACHTER PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: LEWIS BRAITHWAITE 20 SWALLOW COURT BERKELEY SPRINGS, WV 25411 ESTATE: RODNEY HARDING EATON, JR. PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: ROBERT EDWIN EATON, SR. P.O. BOX 397 SLANESVILLE, WV 25444 ESTATE: RUTH PROFFEN STORHAUG PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: CHERYL MURPHY 712 PARK RIDGE DRIVE MT. AIRY, MD 21711 ESTATE: GERALDINE ANN SMITH PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE: HUNTINGTON SMITH P.O. BOX 545 BERKELEY SPRINGS, WV 25411 Debra A. Kesecker, Clerk Morgan County Commission 8-3-2tm

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MORGAN COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA IN RE: CHANGE OF NAME FROM Christina Alexandra Malone TO Christina Alexandra Bernstein 11-P-35 LEGAL NOTICE OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME PROCEEDING CIRCUIT COURT OF MORGAN COUNTY, WEST VIRGINIA Notice is hereby given that on the 9th day of September, 2011 at 1 o’clock p.m. on said day, or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, before the Honorable Judge John C. Yoder will apply by Petition to the Circuit Court of Morgan County, WV for the entry of an order by said Court changing his/her name from Christina Alexandra Malone to Christina Alexandra Bernstein, at which time and place any interested party may appear and be heard, if they so desire. You are hereby notified that his matter may be rescheduled without further notice or publication. A copy of said Petition can be obtained from the undersigned Clerk at his/her office at 202 Fairfax Street, Berkeley Springs, West Virginia 25411. Entered by the Clerk of said Court this 27th day of July, 2011. Kimberly J. Jackson Morgan County Circuit Clerk By: Helen H. Morris Deputy Circuit Clerk 8-3-1tm

REQUEST FOR BIDS WARM SPRINGS RUN FLOOD CONTROL STRUCTURES MOWING AND BRUSH REMOVAL SCOPE: The work shall consist of mowing the dam fill, the emergency spillway and the adjacent borrow areas of each of the eight flood control dams near Berkeley Springs, WV. Brush and debris are to be removed from designated areas including the trash racks on the risers and vegetation along the shore line of the permanent pool. Also, any animal burrows will need to be filled with soil and leveled. SPECIFICATIONS: Vegetation at the site will be mowed to a height of three (3) inches. Brush will be cut to ground level and disposed of off site. Any vegetated area disturbed as a result of these operations will be seeded, fertilizer applied and mulched. Costs incurred as result of the seeding will be at the expense of the contractor. Seedling operations will be completed and inspected prior to payment. DATES: Work is to commence within seven (7) days of acceptance of the bid and will be completed by October 1, 2011 unless otherwise specified by the Eastern Panhandle Conservation District. DISCLAIMER: The Eastern Panhandle Conservation District and its representatives will not be held liable for injuries or equipment damage incurred during mowing and associated activities. The District reserves the right to reject any and all bids. The Eastern Panhandle Conservation District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Written Bids Are To Be Submitted By August 15, 2011 TO: EASTERN PANHANDLE CONSERVATION DISTRICT 151 Aikens Center, Suite 1 MARTINSBURG, WV 25404 304-263-4376 7-27-2tm

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The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Day of Caring Committee seeking projects and volunteers The Morgan County Day of Caring committee is seeking projects and volunteers for this year’s Day of Caring, which is scheduled for Tuesday, September 13. This year marks the 17th year that the United Way has coordinated a Day of Caring in the Eastern Panhandle. Day of Caring provides community members with a chance to participate in projects that benefit local nonprofit organizations and their clients. “This is an opportunity to tackle projects for both organ-

izations and families in need,” said Morgan County Chair Nancy White. “In previous years, projects have ranged from building wheelchair ramps to gardening to organizing offices. Projects for individuals will be directed through an organization.” For more information, to submit a project, or to volunteer, contact Nancy White at 304-258-2430 ext. 16 or Trina Bartlett at 304-263-0603 ext. 224.

FAMILY REUNIONS NELSON

BISER

Biser reunion will be Sunday, August 7 at Cacapon State Park. Eat at 1 p.m. Meat and drink provided. Take covered dish.

The annual Nelson reunion will be held on August 7 at the Slanesville Ruritan building. Take a picnic lunch and an item for the “silent auction.”

FLEECE

The descendants of Charles and Emmie Weigle will hold the 68th annual reunion on August 20 at the State Farm pavilion at War Memorial Park off of Tennessee Avenue, Martinsburg at noon. Take covered dish. Auction to help cover costs for next year. pd7-27-2tm

Denver Kerns Cancer Fundraiser A word of thanks to all my family and friends for your support and prayers. Also Hillbilly Heaven, Skyroom Lounge, Nan & Pops, Oasis, Longbranch Bar & Grill. An extra great thank you Mary & Nat, Paul Rankin, Danny Lescaleet and bands, Randy Laing and Heather Smith and Kay and Todd Bishop.

People Really Do Care $5,158 Thanks - Denver

THANK YOU To my wife, family and friends for a most memorable day for the celebration of my 60th birthday.

Kirk Light

The Morgan Messenger

304-258-1800

LAW OFFICE OF

TINA ANN BYERS

CIVIL LITIGATION - DIVORCE - CUSTODY - SUPPORT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE - CRIMINAL DEFENSE WILLS AND ESTATES - COMMERCIAL - CONTRACTS BUSINESS FORMATION - PERSONAL INJURY

304-258-2625

Audibel Hearing Aids for Every Lifestyle & Budget!

1.877.585.4327 Tuesdays by Appointment (Inside Rankin Physical Therapy)

SELL IT IN

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Cathy Ann Nester Over 10 Years Experience

CASH-N-GO Cash in a Flash!

Pawns On Almost Anything Tools-Gold-Electronics Pawns On Auto Titles Cash on Personal Checks up to $500 180 West Main Street • Hancock

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WEIGLE

The annual Fleece reunion will be held Sunday, August 21, at the Cacapon State Park, Nature Pavilion. Meat and drinks provided, take covered dish. Auction to help cover costs for next year. All friends and relatives welcome. pd8-3-3tm

WHISNER

SPIELMAN

The reunion of the late Edward and Rose Ann Spielman will be held Sunday, August 7 at the Cacapon State Park. Take covered dish. Eat at 1 p.m. All friends and relatives welcome. pd7-27-2tm

The descendants of John and Anna Whisner will hold their annual family reunion on Saturday, August 6 at Camp Frame from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Lunch 12 Noon. Take covered dish. Swimming pool open 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. pd7-27-2tmh

NOTE OF THANKS On behalf of the Relay for Life of Morgan County, the relay committee would like to take this opportunity to thank the businesses and organizations that helped make our event a success. U.S. Silica, CNB Bank, Inc., Helsley-Johnson Funeral Home & Crematory Service, Blankley Auction & Tent Service, Morgan County Schools, Soundworkz, Alderton-Dawson Post 60, Berkeley Springs American Legion Ladies Auxiliary, First United Methodist Church, Morgan Messenger, Angus & Ale, Clark’s, War Memorial Hospital, Dawson’s Home Center, Hunter’s Hardware, Treasure Troves, Morgan Sanitation, Berkeley Springs State Park, Return Engagement, Martin’s of Martinsburg and Hagerstown, Target Hagerstown, Nature Niche, McDonald’s, New World Pasta, Younker’s Meat Market, Homewood Retirement Center, Leeza Buckley - Fighting Tigers, Tari’s Premiere Café, Chick-Fil-A of Martinsburg and Hagerstown, Himalayan Trade, Berkeley Springs Moose Lodge #1483, Douglas Motors, Inc., Family Medicine of Berkeley Springs, Close Insurance Agency, Jerry & Linda McGraw, State Farm Insurance, Boy Scout Troop #81, Girl Scouts from the Berkeley Springs Service Unit, committee chairs and team captains.

J

n i g g n A a r H o un d t s u

CUSTOM FRAMES MATS and MOUNTING 1 mile East of Sheetz on Rt. 9

297 New Hope Road • Berkeley Springs 304-258-3132

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Law Office of Richard G. Gay, L.C. 31 Congress Street Berkeley Springs, WV 25411

304.258.1966

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Toll Free – 800-619-4740 We are a Debt Relief Agency We Help People File for Bankruptcy Relief Under the Bankruptcy Code

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Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

e n i l n o eds i f i s clas

E E FR

Classifieds www.morganmessenger.com

Classified Ads - 25 cents per word first week, 15 cents per word for the same ad in each issue thereafter. Minimum charge $1.00. An additional charge of $1.00 for each ad not paid for when placed. FOR SALE

AUTOS

RENTALS

DOUBLE Roll Coupon Tickets $8.00. For sale The Morgan Messenger and The Hancock News offices. pd1/1-tfmh YARD sale signs now available at The Morgan Messenger and The Hancock News offices. Also many other signs including Posted, No Trespassing and No Hunting. 1/1-tfmh NEW PROSPECT PEAK PICTURES $5.95. BERKELEY SPRINGS STATE PARK PICTURE $4.50. Suitable for framing. Available at The Morgan Messenger office or add $2.55 for shipping. pd1/1-tfm YAMAHA black lacquered piano, must see to appreciate the quality, $2,000. 304-671-2443. pd7/30-tfmh MASONRY materials, brick, block & stone, small or large quantities, pick up or delivery, 304582-9018. 3/30-tfmh TANNING bulbs, 304947-7782. pd5/25-tfmh MAID of honor dresses. Purple size 14, worn once. Light blue size 8, never worn. 304-7020404 or 304-947-7782. pd5/25-tfmh WATERBED, California King heated, complete with frame, mirrored headboard & mattress. Seven years old. $350. 304-947-7782. pd6/15-tfmh AFFORDABLE housing 2 BR, 2 bath mobile home in Largent, Paw Paw area. Very good condition. $9,500 OBO. 304947-7050 after 5 p.m. pd7/20-3mh HAY, 2011 Brome Grass. “Horse Hay” Quality, No Rain. Call 304-258-1946, after 7 p.m. Clip and save. 7/27-2mh FIREWOOD, seasoned hardwood, cut, split and delivered. Greater Berkeley Springs area. Approximately 1 1/3 cords, $215. 301-3317454. pd7/27-14m HAY for sale - 5x4 rolls, $20 and square bales, $3, 304-258-7896. pd7/27-2m 1986 Honda Goldwing, 1200cc motorcycle, includes helmets, CB, extra windshield, cover, trailer, etc. As is $2,500. 304-258-8141. pd8/3-1m

DOUBLE CARPORTS starting at $695 installed. 304-258-9700. 10/1-tfmh AUTO Loans Guaranteed. Guaranteed credit approval on auto loans, 304-258-9700. 1/14-tfmh 74 Maverick, antique, nice, 80,000 miles, vinyl top, four door, $5,500. 304-258-3713, John. pd8/3-2mh

ONE bedroom, stove, refrigerator, water/sewer, trash pickup included. 1 year lease, no pets, nonsmoker, 3 miles on Fairview Drive, Berkeley Springs. Call 304-2582043. 9/15-tfmh OAKVIEW Motel, unfurnished rooms, weekly rates, 304-6765609. 5/11-tfm HOUSE for rent close to town and school, no pets, nonsmoker, 304258-1268. 6/8-tfm STUDIO apartment, some utilities included, $375/month. 304-2584000. 6/15-tfm LIVE-IN work out of retail shop, central heat & air. $475/month. 304258-4000. 7/6-tfm HANCOCK, MD., $750./utilities included. 1 BR, 1 FB Apt. with large foyer, large LR, big fully equipped kit., full size washer/dryer. Great yard. 2 porches - open front & screened in back. High Street location is close to everything. Refs. & deposit required. 301482-1051. 7/13-tfmh 3BR, 2BA trailer, Needmore. $600. per mo., $600. sec. dep., 717573-2252. Adults preferred. 7/13-tfmh ONE bedroom apartment in Hancock, unfurnished. No credit check, no pets. $140. per week. Phone 240-291-1484. 7/13-tfmh TWO bedroom trailer, $475. per month plus security. No utilities included. Suitable for 1 child only. Buck Valley area. Phone 717-2946295. 7/13-4mh THREE BR, 1 bath house in town, $650/month + security deposit, 304-258-9068. 7/13-tfm GARAGE for rent in town, 30x40, $350/month + deposit, 304-258-9068. 7/13-tfm TWO bedroom apartment in town. $450/month, security deposit required. Utilities not included. Owner pays trash pick-up. NO PETS; Efficiency apartment, partially furnished. Utilities included except electric. $475/month. Security deposit required. NO PETS. call 304-7023751. pd7/13-4m NEW one bedroom apartment located in a quiet Berkeley Springs neighborhood. Wall to wall carpet, central air conditioned. Sound proof for maximum privacy. Modern kitchen with refrigerator, stove and garbage disposal, central vac system, extra large bedroom, plenty of closet space. Coin operated washer and dryer on the premises. $495 a month. One year lease required. 304-258-3610. 7/27-tfmh

Certified Childcare Mountainheart Accepted Call Rhonda 304-258-9506

ANIMALS LEONA’S POODLE GROOMING - also other breeds. Bathing dogs only and boarding also available. 304-258-1268. 1/1-tfm PET Grooming for small to medium breeds. 30 years experience. Martha Thompson, 304258-0945. 10/8-tfmh FREE to good homes, 3 puppies, 3 months old, 2 females, 1 male, Chow & Husky. Call 301-3313739 or 304-886-7637. pd8/3-1m

WANTED WANTED: Any scrap metal, unused appliances, lawnmowers, etc. Free pick up. Call 304-2584216. 12/1-tfmh DIABETIC test strips needed, cash paid, most types, call 304-716-4209. 1/19-tfmh PART-TIME, Hancock Town Tavern. Apply with-in. 6/22-tfmh DUGAN’S GUN SHOP. Part-time. 301678-5691 or 301-6786732. 7/27-tfmh DRIVERS: Regional Flatbed, $2K Sign-On Bonus. Home Daily. Full Benefit Package.Paid Holidays! CDL-A, 6 mos recent Flatbed exp. Hauling building materials. 800-992-7863 x160. pd7/27-2mh NEED living room suite or couch (free if possible) for senior citizen, 304-258-1183. pd8/3-1mh WANTED to buy standing oak and pine pulpwood and timber, paying top dollar. 304258-6844 or 304-6767220. 8/3-5m PT coordinator for an admin, logistics and oversight of new local holistic center. Candidate should be experienced in spa/fitness/beauty and/or holistic health, w/solid references. Please send resume w/income history to beyondorganic lifestyle@gmail.com. 8/3-2m MASSAGE therapist/wellness pros w/solid references for local holistic center. Please send resume w/income history to beyondorganic lifestyle@gmail.com. 8/3-2m

Allegheny Decorating Center MHIC - 44102

WV - 011947

163 West High Street • Hancock, MD 21750 • Replacement Windows • New Construction Windows • Mobile Home Windows OPEN BY APPOINTMENT

• for sale • rentals • help wanted

HOUSE, 3 BR, 2 BA on 3 acres, south of Paw Paw. C/A, laundry, garage, basement. $975/month plus utilities. 304-947-7693 or 917439-4018. pd7/27-2m DOUBLE Wide for rent: 3 BR, kitchen, living room, 2 baths. $700 a month. 1st month, security deposit and last month rent due up front, $2,100. No pets. One year lease. No more than 4 people. Phone 304-258-8107. pd7/27-2m TWO & three bedroom apartments, Hancock area. Phone 301-4913116. pd8/3-2mh RENTING out upstairs, includes own bathroom, 2 bedrooms, downstairs kitchen privileges, $350./negotiable. Call 717-294-3592 evenings or 301-6786330 daytime. pd8/3-1mh TRAILER - 2 bedroom, 2 bath, Hancock area. Phone 301-6786551. 8/3-1mh RENT or own. Owner financing 3 BR, 2.5 bath, Berkeley Springs. Call Jay leave message 304267-2899. 8/3-4mh SHARED house with private room with TV, phone, high speed Internet and all utilities included, $300 per month, country setting in Berkeley Springs, 304258-0480. 8/3-1mh PRIVATE stand alone property with good parking, 2 bedroom apartment in Berkeley Springs, $675 month with 1,400 sq. ft. commercial space downstairs also available $675 month or $895 for both. Security deposit required. 304-725-1953. 8/3-2mh HOUSE on 4 acres with privacy and beauty. 2 bedroom, 1 1/2 bath, huge eat-in kitchen, large dining room, large family room, enclosed back porch. Available immediately. All of this for only $850. 540-931-7315. 8/3-1mh TWO BR mother-inlaw apartment, 1 level, no yard work, $675/month + security deposit. No smoking. 304-671-3121. 8/3-tfm ONE BR apt, furnished, utilities included, references required, single, no pets, located on Fairview Drive, Berkeley Springs. 304-279-8508, 304-270-7036. pd8/3-2mh

SERVICES OFFICE SUPPLIES for sale at The Morgan Messenger office, 304258-1800. pd1/1-tfm LAWN care, landscaping, JUNK/DEBRIS CLEAN UP/ REMOVED, Bobcat services, other misc. services. 304-258-3446 or 304-582-8443. Henry & Sons. WV034557. 11/27-tfm STEVE’S Painting & Repair. Over 25 years experience. Call today for your free estimate. 304-258-5185. Steve Unger, owner. WV037504. 11/12-tfm JUNK autos removed 304-258-3446 or 304582-8443. Henry & Sons. WV034557. 12/22-tfm HANDYMAN Services: Interior and exterior maintenance and repairs. Priced within your budget. Please call Andy at 304-258-9616 for estimates. Licensed and insured, WV038529 MHIC 18152. 4/6-tfmh CALL 304-258-5279 PERRY ENTERPRISES: Painting, Cleaning, Power Washing, Trash Removal, Brush & Landscape Maintenance. Licensed and Bonded. 9/7-tfm WILL purchase junk vehicles for up to $100 plus, will also pick up at your location. 301-7397159 or 301-797-8358. 3/21-tfmh HANDYMAN Services: Trash removal, painting, small carpentry, 304-258-6433. Steve Dawson. 1/16-tfm WINDOW blinds measured and installed. Free estimates. Creative Spaces Interiors. 304258-5185. 10/1-tfm ROOFING and Siding Repairs and Replacement. Also carpentry, painting, flooring and tile. For all your remodeling needs call Matt Dawson, LLC. Licensed and insured. 304-258-4166 or 304676-8635. WV007199. 3/25-tfm

STEVENS’ Handyman Service - Quality Service at Reasonable Rates. Lawn Care, Painting, Window & Siding, Minor Repairs, Junk Removal, Landscaping, Small Engine Repairs. No Job Too Small. Free Estimates. Call for additional services. Licensed in WV & MD. 304-671-8254. pd4/1-tfm GLEN Smith Septic Pumping, Tri-State Area. MD. License 094, PA. DET 99027. 301-6785233. pd4/8-tfmh FREE PICKUP & FREE DELIVERIES for all lawn equipment. We work on garden tractors, push mowers, weedeaters, chain saws, etc. contact Joe 304-2585450. 12/2-tfm SERVING the community for over 20 years in painting, carpentry, home improvement & repair. Lic. Call David S. Weaver 304-258-2929. 3/3-tfm TILE & vinyl installation and repair. Also painting int. & ext. Licensed & insured in WV, WV047039. Contact Marco 304-261-2032. 10/6-tfm TRASH removal, free estimates. Free metal removal. Contact Marco 304-261-2032. 10/6-tfm STUMP GRINDING, Brush Hogging. WV#027248. John Spencer 304-2589640/540-931-6780. 3/23-tfm POWER Washing: Decks, driveways and houses. Free estimates. Licensed and insured. 304-268-6545. pd7/27-13m

LEARN TO PLAY

Guitar, Drums & Bass at BLACK CAT MUSIC SHOP 304-258-4440

CAR WASH

Benefits American Cancer Society Relay for Life

YARD SALES YARD Sale Saturday & Sunday, 5822 Milo School Road, Great Cacapon. Free Tables. 304-258-2267. 9 West 7 miles to Detour Road, 4 miles to Milo School Road, 1 mile on left. Antiques, collectibles and stuff. pd6/8-12m CAROLYN’S Closet Friday-Saturday, 10-5, 304-258-1398. 6/15-tfm 212 JACKSON Street, Hancock, Thurs., Fri. & Sat., 8 a.m. till ? pd8/3-1mh AUGUST 5 & 6, 73 Broadway, Berkeley Springs, (across from Warm Springs Rest.) Country items, snowmen, household. Rain Date Aug. 12 & 13. pd8/3-1mh HUGE, Thursday, Friday, Saturday from 8-2, 1144 Henry O Michael Road. Some of everything, (household goods, TV’s, women’s clothes, house plants, much more). All priced to sell. pd8/3-1m FAIRVIEW Drive to Fairview Subdivision, Berkeley Springs. Friday, August 5, Saturday, August 6. pd8/3-1mh VERY large yard sale, August 4 thru 6, 8-4, Greenway Drive, Berkeley Springs. pd8/3-1mh

FOR RENT

House at Southridge 1 Mile from Berkeley Springs, WV 3 Bedrooms 2 1/2 Baths w/Kitchen Appliances, Tenant Pays All Utilities

$1100/Month + Security Deposit

304-258-4115

HELP WANTED Regional carrier for NAPA has a need for

EXPERIENCED FORKLIFT OPERATORS to work on busy cross dock operation in Hancock, Md. Positions will be part-time, 20 hours a week. Rate of pay will be $11.00/hour. Previous experience with counterbalance forklifts a must.

If Interested Contact Sue Mellott at 301-678-2963

Lavender, never opened, bought for $200.

Sell for $75

California King Waterbed w/Frame & Mirrored Headboard 7 years old.

$350

304-947-7782 FOR RENT

Efficiency Apartment Includes Elec., Heat & Air, Water, Sewer, Trash Pickup and Cable TV

$450/Month with Deposit

1 Bedroom Apartment Includes Elec., Heat & Air, Water, Sewer, Trash Pickup and Cable TV

$650/Month with Deposit

304-258-4115

Beautiful Scenic Wooded Area 300 Meyers Road • Berkeley Springs 1 Block From US Route 522

1, 2, 3 & 4 BR Garden & Townhouse Type Apartments

(Rain Date - Saturday, August 13) DONATIONS ONLY THANKS FOR YOUR SUPPORT

345 N. Penna. Ave. Hancock, MD 21750

301-678-6508 Luke H. Bowers

Bedsheets California King Flannel

304-258-0202

Pittman’s Market

COMMERCIAL

FOR SALE

Catawba Club Brand New Community in

EOE

M/F/ON

This Institution is An Equal Opportunity Provider & Employer

PARTS DEPARTMENT ASSISTANT FULL-TIME Receiving, packaging, shipping, ordering parts and inventory control. Good customer service skills and basic computer knowledge a must! Mechanical knowledge is a plus. $8-$10 per hour.

C 294-6752. condition. Phone 717- pd6/21-4mh rniture-any 5 & 4 or antique fu ildren ages E for 3 ch Monday, Tuesday 2. 94-675 5 pd6/21-4mh 4, my CHILDCAR to ur preferred, 9 Wednesday and Th d 5 & 5 d home ildren ages sed E for 3 ch Monday, Tuesday an . Friday, 12 to ult, nonsmoker, licen ay rred, 9 to 5 nesday and Thursd er. Responsible ad 83. to 5 Wed moker, licensed driv 304-702-34 pd7/12-2m ns vern. A e adult, no k Town Ta E, Hancoc h 83. pd7/12-2m Apply PART-TIM tfm 19 7/ gymn vern. with-in. for installing . k Town Ta RER wanted8-4642 leave message BO E, Hancoc 7/19- tfmh LA m 4-25 of Training tomna besiuProvided in the30Fields equipment. pd7/19-2mh stalling gy . in lp r he fo s ed ed sage R want Construction, and Heavy Equipment illiterate nedividual f 42 leave mes -2mElectrical h in ! Computer t. 304-258-46 pd7/19 g HELP into Ipod. Will pay help loadin . ic s 79 us ed m 87 ne 825 te their itera m at omputer ill pay individual for time. call Pa pd7/19-1m t ill een Pagean to Ipod. W 8779. King and Qu 30. W m BO -1 IN 19 7/ Pam at 258RA pd ll 304-229-01 Ca st g. gu ur sb Au t Pagean 27, Martin pd7/19-6m usekeepers, and Queen Ho OW King ll 304-229-0130. openings: time pd7/19-6m ening RESORT rson. Full and part- lary, tinsburg. Ca Pe Ev sa y dr rs, un pe La ekee petitive us m ns Ho Co r io : sit gs s po e. ailabl benefit fo RT openin Full and part-time resort avembership. Great ntal and 40 salary, m y Person. petitive l, de e ica r ed tim pe m ll in fu m g C di A l

106 Penn. Ave. Hancock, MD

TWO/THREE BEDROOM APARTMENT Kitchen, living room, full bath, front porch, washer/dryer hook up, off street parking for 2 cars, stove and refrigerator, no pets.

$600 Per Month Plus Security Deposit Available 8/1/11

Call David Pittman 301-678-6200 Ext. 6

Attention Women

Step-Up For Women is Now Recruiting For Their Free 2011 Fall Classes Only Interested Candidates Who Want to Work in These Trades Apply Please

Call Melissa at 304-754-9258 For More Information

DECKS POWER WASHING Indoor/Outdoor PAINTING Call Van

304-258-2383

CALL 304-258-1800 FOR ALL YOUR ADVERTISING AND PRINTING NEEDS

DAVE’S UPHOLSTERY Work Guaranteed Fabric Selection Free Estimates Largent, WV

Full/Part-Time “Barista” Position Now Hiring Managers & Shift Leaders Visit

Hardee’s of Hancock 42 E. Main Street • Hancock, MD 21750 301-678-6307 Independent Owner & Franchisee of Hardee’s Food Systems, Inc. EOE

Must Be Self-Starting, Motivated & a High School Graduate Kitchen Experience a Plus

APPLY TO

FAIRFAX COFFEE HOUSE 23 Fairfax Street • Berkeley Springs, WV Contact Jessie Reed at 304-258-8019

Wilkins Farm & Home Supply 12327 Buck Valley Road Warfordsburg, PA 17267

(717) 294-6184 HOURS: Mon. through Fri. 8-5 Sat. 8-2

WOOD PELLETS NOW AVAILABLE

WV025738

304-947-5135 or 947-7289

FOR RENT NEW & USED MOBILE HOMES In a Quiet Park No Smoking and No Pets Single & Double Wides Suitable for 2 No More Than 3 People

304-676-9209

JOB OPPORTUNITY

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

FOR RENT

HELP WANTED

BEDDOW DRYWALL

WV010969

Sponsored by the Ladies Aide Old-time sled, wooded apple stirrer, exercisers, baked goods, too much to mention. For More Info Call 301-678-5423

TDD 1-800-982-8772

APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE AT CUSTOMER SERVICE

Berkeley Springs, WV 25411

Orchard Ridge Church of God

TOWNHOUSES FOR RENT

Email resume to cameron@leslaundry.com or Fax to 304-258-9064

RESIDENTIAL

Aug. 4 & 5, 9-5 Sat., Aug. 6, 9-1

Pittman’s Grocery Store • Hancock, MD

401K • Paid Vacation • Paid Sick Days Paid Holidays • Group Health Care

DENNIS E. BEDDOW

3 DAY YARD SALE Thurs. & Fri.,

Saturday, August 6 • 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

POSITION AVAILABLE FULL-TIME COOK

(304) 258-5274

• autos • services • animals


The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Classifieds

• for sale • rentals • help wanted

• autos • services • animals

17

Free nutrition program offered War Memorial Hospital’s Center for Rehab & Wellness will offer a free nutrition program “Healthy Eating Made Easy” on Monday, August 22, at 4:30 p.m. Sara Kuykendall, a registered and licensed dietitian with Valley Health Wellness & Fitness Services, will discuss ideas for making healthy food choices a part of one’s lifestyle. The class is open to the public, but registration is required. For more information or to register, call 304258-8377. War Memorial Hospital’s Center for Rehab & Wellness is located at 261 Berkmore Place, Suite 2A, in Berkeley Springs.

Martinsburg VA Medical Center needs volunteers Volunteers have been one of the keys to the Martinsburg VA Medical Center’s outstanding record of patient care for 65 years. Join the corps of dedicated volunteers by attending one of the orientations this summer. Orientations are held at the Martinsburg VA Medical Center, 510 Butler Avenue, Martinsburg, in Room 1B114. Volunteer orientations are Tuesday, August 30, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and Thursday, September 30, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. They are looking for a variety of skills. Assignments include Ambassadors, van drivers, clinical and administrative areas, patient assistance including feeding and visiting with patients. For more information regarding this event or ways to help veterans, call Voluntary Service at 304-2630811, extension 3309 or 3310.

National Child Abuse Hotline 1-800-4-A-CHILD

“HIGH TECH DIAGNOSIS” Gas ~ Diesel ~ Import ~ Domestic ~ European PA. INSPECTION NOW AVAILABLE Computerized Engine Control Service & Repair A/C Service • Fuel Injection Cleaning • Brake Exhaust • Emission Testing & Repair Diesel Repair & Performance Work Truck & Auto Transmission Repair & Build-Up For Performance Towing • NAPA Auto Care Center • ASE Certified 717-294-6399 or 717-294-6092 674 Johnsons Mill Road 3 Miles North of Hancock on Pa. Ave. Extended

9588 Old 126 • Warfordsburg, PA

814-735-2293 FOR OUR COMPLETE INVENTORY CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE

townhillautosales.com 04 Jeep Liberty Columbia Edition 4x4 Loaded, Sunroof, Power Everything!. . . .$8,995 02 Ford Explorer XLT 4x4, Leather, Super Nice. ............................$8,295 02 Ford Escape XLT 4x4, Super Nice. ........................................$6,675 01 Ford Escape 4x4, Leather, Super Nice. ..................................JUST IN 91 Mustang LX 5.0, 5 Spd., Loaded, Leather, Sunroof, More!....................SOLD 06 Kia Optima LX White, 4 Cyl., Auto, Loaded, Very Nice!.........................$7,995 04 Hyundai Sonata Blue, V6, Auto., Loaded with Sunroof and All............$5,795 00 Mercury Sable Maroon, Loaded, Leather, Sunroof. ..........................$4,995 00 Saturn L300 Green, Loaded with Leather, Sunroof and Everything................. $4,895 02 Ford ZX2 2 Dr., Red, 4 Cyl., 5 Spd., Hail Sale Price! Was $4,995.. . . . .Now $3,295 00 Dodge Neon 4 Cyl., Auto., 4 Dr., Dark Blue....................................$3,495 00 Saturn Wagon Green, 4 Cyl., Auto. ...........................................$3,595 97 Mercury Tracer Station Wagon, Lt. Blue, 4 Cyl., Auto. Hail Sale!..........$2,295

NO CREDIT ANYTIME IN HOUSE CHECKS!!! AUTO RENTAL WARRANTY

Bad Credit As Low As $19.95 Per Day or No Credit HONEST Repair Are OK Here! Shops DO exist! We are BUY HERE! PROFESSIONALS PAY HERE! You Can TRUST!

Until Vehicle is Paid For As Long As All Payments are Current

Douglas Auto Sales.net Specializing in Affordable Pre-Owned Vehicles If We Don’t Have What You Are Looking For, Call Me, Frank, And I’ll Try and Get It For You! 421 S.Washington Street • Berkeley Springs, WV 25411

304-258-4646 800-491-3548 Auto and Truck Detailing Available

TRACTOR SPECIAL!

BARD’S

Tym & McCormick Tractors with Loaders Starting at

$9,999.00 MCCONNELLSBURG MOTOR & IMPLEMENT 875 Lincoln Way East • McConnellsburg, PA 717-485-3181 • lylemm@earthlink.net

AUTO SALES (717) 573-4233

(301) 678-7881

6583 Great Cove Road • Needmore, PA

Visit Us On Our Web Site: bardsautosales.com 2

CARS 2010 Ford Focus S........................................$13,995 2008 Chevy Cobalt LS Coupe........................$8,995 2007 Nissan Sentra.........................................$9,995 2007 Ford Focus ZX-5 SES...........................$8,995 2007 Kia Optima LX Sedan...........................$8,995 2006 Chevy Cobalt LT Coupe........................$8,995 2006 Ford Mustang.......................................$10,995 2006 Chevy Cobalt LT Sedan.........................$8,995 2005 Ford Five Hundred SEL........................$9,995 2006 Ford Taurus SE......................................$8,995 2005 Saturn Ion 2...........................................$7,995 2005 Chevy Cobalt LS Coupe........................$7,995 2004 Chevy Corvette LS1............................$20,995

2004 Chevy Cavalier......................................$5,995 2003 Ford Escort ZX-2...................................$6,995 2003 Volkswagen Jetta GL Sedan.................$7,995 2003 Ford Focus SE Sedan.............................$6,995 2002 Saturn SC-3 Coupe................................$6,995 2002 Hyundai Elantra GLS............................$5,995 2002 Ford Escort SE Sedan............................$4,995 2000 Toyota Camry Solara SE.......................$5,995 2000 Pontiac Sunfire SE.................................$4,995 2000 Ford Escort ZX-2...................................$4,995 1999 Saturn SL2.............................................$4,995 1999 Buick Century Custom..........................$4,995 1995 Chevy Camaro Z-28..............................$6,995

VANS, TRUCKS & 4x4’s 2007 Ford Edge SEL....................................$17,995 2007 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited.............$16,995 2006 Ford F150 FX-4 Off Road...................$17,995 2006 Dodge Durango SLT ............................$13,995 2006 Chrysler Town & Country Limited. . . . . .$11,995 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT...................$9,995 2005 GMC Sierra Crew Cab.........................$16,995 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT...................$8,995 2005 Chevy Trailblazer LS.............................$9,995 2005 Ford Explorer XLT ................................$9,995 2005 Chevy Trailblazer LS.............................$8,995

2004 Dodge Durango SLT ............................$12,995 2004 Mercury Mountaineer............................$8,995 2004 Chevy Silverado Quad Cab..................$12,995 2003 Chevy Silverado Z-71 Quad Cab.........$14,995 2003 GMC Sierra Quad Cab.........................$11,995 2002 Dodge Durango SLT Plus......................$7,995 2001 Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab................$12,995 2001 Ford F250 Super Duty...........................$9,995 2000 Chevy Silverado 1500 Quad Cab........$10,995 1998 Chevy Silverado 1500 Ext. Cab............$7,995 1998 Chevy Tahoe LT .....................................$5,995

Take I-70 into Pennsylvania, Take Exit 168, Turn right onto 522 North, Bard’s Auto Sales is 7 Miles on the left.

CYAN MAGENTA YELLOW BLACK BROADSHEET TEMPLATE 04052001


Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

Licensed & Insured MHIC #0068259

Beddow’s SEPTIC SERVICE, INC.

Kimmel Construction Poured Basements, LLC

Serving the Tri-County Area For More Than 40 Years

304-258-1527 or 304-671-1773

Walls • Footers • Slabs • Walks Decorative & Stamped Concrete Patios

Your #2 Is Our #1

Colonial Realty

Celebrating 30 Years in Business

Tim Broker/Owner 304-676-0779

www.Century21ColonialRealty.com

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME” “Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

STUNNING BRICK COLONIAL With Many Upgrades! Desirable Location, Just Minutes From Town & New Hospital

540-539-5113

540-539-7761

VA 2705-081045A

MD 21375121

G875

G721

LeeAnne

Associate Broker

304-261-8209

MO7357802

$79,900

G864

BE7629267

$159,900

CALL TODAY FOR THE CURRENT MARKET VALUE OF YOUR HOME

Justin Agent 304-258-6099

Ashley Agent 240-291-7515

304-283-2031

Licensed & Insured

HUNTER’S HARDWARE, INC. INSTALLATION & SERVICE

(304) 258-2442 Let Us Test Your Water and Make a Recommendation

Pam Agent 304-671-7339

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

“We’ll Work Doggone Hard for You”

Midsize Front End Loader • Backhoe Brush Hogging • Ditches • Post Hole Auger Lawn Seeding & Reseeding • Landscaping Sewer Line Installation M

ASK FOR LANCASTER!

Cam Agent 304-616-0481

THIS WELL MAINTAINED HOME Is Ready for New Owner! Features 4 BRs and Large Level Lot with Fenced Back Yard

Lancaster’s fully automatic water softener features our easy-to-operate six cycle programmed valve with automatic timed regeneration. Constructed of noncorrosive materials, these units virtually last a lifetime!

Nettie

$325,000

First Alarm Earth Works

AUTOMATIC WATER SOFTENER

304-676-7299

MO760974

RENOVATED CABIN On Very Private Wooded Lot The Perfect Weekend Getaway and Affordable Too!

WATER TREATMENT

Realtor, ABR, GRI

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME” “Century 21 Your Pathway HOME” “Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

Wray Kimmel

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

92 N. Washington Street Berkeley Springs, WV (304) 258-3460 (Local) 800-635-0478 (Toll)

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

David Kimmel WV 037649 “Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

CALL: 800-581-3765

FREE Auto Pool Vac with Every Pool Ordered by August 31, 2011 (COMPLETE LINE OF ABOVE AND INGROUND POOLS)

JOHN’S PLUMBING Residential & Commercial

E

30 Years Experience

Free Shop at Home Service

19x31x4

ment contracting to expand their business. Specialized SBA contracting programs geared to provide women, minorities, service disabled veterans and historically underutilized businesses (HUBZone) an advantage when it comes to securing a government contract will also be covered. The program will conclude with an open forum from 3:30 to 5 p.m. where answers to small business questions will be provided. There is no charge to attend Small Business Day. The event will incorporate a two hour window between sessions (11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.) for a lunch break. For questions or additional information, contact Melissa Loder at 304-623-7448 or Christina Lundberg at 304-596-6642.

Letters To The Editor over 400 words will not be published.

WV017935

OL BREE Z

(301) 331-6969

Deck, Ladder, Filter & Fencing

The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) and the Small Business Development Center of the Eastern Panhandle (SBDC) have teamed together to bring Small Business Day to Martinsburg on Tuesday, Aug. 9. This free event will be held in the main conference room at HMS TECHNOLOGIES located at One Discovery Place in Martinsburg. Small business will be the focus of this day-long event which kicks off at 9:30 a.m. with the SBDC program Managing Cash or Seven Ways to Improve your Cash Flow. The afternoon session, which begins at 1:30 p.m., is all about government contracting. Melissa Loder, Business Development Specialist, from the SBA will present how a small business can use govern-

Delivulch ery & Main Lawn tena nce

Will Service Household Appliances

No Payments Till Next Year!

$

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HOME IMPROVEMENT WV #000728

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ALL POOLS MUST GO!

• homes • lots • land • farms

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Real Estate

• new homes • previously owned

Licensed & Insured

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The Eastern Panhandle Community PhoneBook™

Licensed & Insured

Don’t Be Left Out! Advertising Sales Close Soon!

258-9627

“Century 21 Your Pathway HOME”

• Targeted Distribution

PERRY REALTY 71 N. Washington Street • Berkeley Springs, WV

304-258-3681

Connie Perry, Broker

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

877-737-7973

• Affordable Rates • Proven Usage

View All of Our Listings Online at www.perryrealty.com

The Community PhoneBook™ PUBLISHED BY ®

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Subsidiary of Volt Information Sciences, Inc.

(304) 262-4265

PEACEFUL VACATION HOME Teresa White Realtor® 304-258-9740

on 3.52 acres, featuring 2 BR, 1 BA, Kitchen/Great Room with large eating bar, table area and woodstove. Enjoy relaxing on the screened in porch and swimming & fishing from the common lot in Cacapon River Colony. This is a beautiful wooded lot just 1/10 mile from the sparkling Cacapon River. MO7376911 $113,000

CUTE LITTLE CABIN IN THE WOODS This little getaway on 2.23 acres has everything you need in a small space: Washer, dryer, dw, range, refrigerator are all included. Enjoy a full wall of windows to watch the seasons change and a loft bedroom and smaller main floor bedroom for guests. Must see to appreciate! MO7615570 $109,000

Sharon Palmeri Realtor® GRI, ABR 304-258-6273

DOWNTOWN BERKELEY SPRINGS Enjoy living in historic Berkeley Springs. Remodeled in 2006 this two story home can be used as two rentals, full time residence with in-law suite or live in one and rent the other. 4 BR, 2 BA, 2 Kitchens, DR, LR, heat pump/CAC, front and back porches, off street parking. MO7557719 $237,500 Dawn Kyne Realtor® GRI, ABR 304-258-4472

Connie Perry Broker

Serving Our Hometown for 39 Years

MAKE THIS YOUR GET-A-WAY Small wooded lot in Coolfont Mountainside S/D where you can enjoy the mountainside amenities. This contemporary home is fully furnished and features kitchen, dining area w/wood burning fp, LR with cathedral ceiling and exposed wood beams, 2 BR, 2 BA, family/game room, screened porch and decks. MO7294372 $219,900

WEEKEND RETREAT

BRICK HOME ON UNRESTRICTED 3.38 ACRES

Very well maintained cabin on 2.76 wooded acres featuring a wet weather stream w/small walking bridge. Efficiency kitchen, full bath, LR, sleeping loft and large screened in porch make this a perfect get-a-way. MO7345995 $95,500

Features: 3 BR, full bath and two half baths, wood floors, summer kitchen in partially finished basement, sunroom, garage, patio, barn, shed. Public sewer available, city water, paved drive, pond and more! MO7389408 $199,900

COMMON ACCESS TO SLEEPY CREEK 3 BR, 2 BA, spacious home with eat in kitchen, DR with hardwood floor, LR w/gas FP, FR with enclosed back porch, enjoy the view from the 2.66 level acres. Detached 2 car garage, office space. MO7476722 $209,500

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The Morgan Messenger Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Real Estate BLUE FLAME, INC.

Free Estimates • Experienced • Licensed & Insured

AFFORDABLE RATES Lot Clearing • Tree Removal • Tree Trimming Topping • Storm Service • Chipper Available Tractor Service & Brush Hogging

www.rjhaynescontracting.com

1834 Valley Road ~ Berkeley Springs, WV

WV028369

(304) 258-3495 ~ (301) 678-6712

MHIC 50723

VA02682A

Call 304-258-9278 or 1-800-799-9278

Williams Custom Carpentry L.L.C. NEW HOMES

• Additions • Decks • Garages

• New Homes • Log Homes

Ask About our Propane Service, Fireplaces & Stoves

• homes • lots • land • farms

Michael Merchant’s Tree Service

RJ Haynes Contracting

Providing Warmth and Comfort To Our Community

Additions Garages Decks

• new homes • previously owned

19

304-258-5473

DL CONSULTING PLLC

LAND SURVEYOR

Remodeling Cabins Vinyl Siding

HOME INSPECTIONS • RADON TESTING • CONSULTATIONS

• Boundary Surveys - Lot Corners Marked • Elevation Certificates (For Flood Insurance) • Minor Subdivisions & Mortgage Inspections

Licensed & Insured • License #WV024490 Chris Williams, Owner P.O. Box 1016 304-258-5172 Berkeley Springs, WV 25411

$25 Discount at Time of Service With Ad Professional Home Inspector Accredited Nationally Certified

Morgan, Berkeley, Jefferson & Hampshire Co.

Donald Lambert, PLS 304-947-5999

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Radon is a Naturally Occurring Radioactive Gas That Causes Lung Cancer

Farris Grading & Paving

SCHULTZ TREE SERVICE

Berkeley Springs, West Virginia

UNLIMITED PAVING

BRYAN UNGER CONTRACTING

Tree Trimming Removal • Lot Clearing Chipper Available • Stump Grinding

Sealcoating • Hauling • Land Clearing • Shale • Stone Firewood • Post Hole Drilling & Fencing • Junk Removal

Free Estimates

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LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY HOME IMPROVEMENTS • NEW CONSTRUCTION PAINTING • DECKS • ADDITIONS • GARAGES

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REASONABLE RATES CALL JR SCHULTZ 304-258-8743 Cell 304-676-8237

304-676-8286 Licensed • Insured • All Work Guaranteed

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62 Dale Lane • Berkeley Springs, WV 25411 MD TREE LICENSE #000974

EPA CERTIFIED RENOVATOR

Morgan Sanitation Inc.

30 Years Experience • Free Estimates

Residential – Commercial – Industrial Full Service Rubbish Removal Prompt Courteous Service • Weekly Job Service SATISFACTION GUARANTEED OR DOUBLE YOUR TRASH BACK

HOFE’S Well Drilling Paul J. Hofe Certified by National Ground Water Assoc.

“Our Business is Picking Up”

304-258-3544

Larry A. DeMarco

Residential, Commercial & Monitoring Wells Licensed in WV, VA, MD & PA WV001762 Bonded Estimates Insured

& Team 304-258-5111 (Direct)

(304) 754-3961

RANKIN HOMES

GREAT CACAPON 4 BR/15.91 Acres Beautiful Views Many Amenities MO7563296 $399,900

NEW DOUBLE WIDE 3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths

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FINANCING AVAILABLE

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888-485-1977

Central Air Conditioner or Heat Pump Summer Tune Up

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B&E SERVICES

LOT/LAND LISTINGS

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Evenings and Weekends No Extra Charge

RE/MAX® Real Estate Group

304-262-6969 Heatmanhvac.com 304-839-7361 Cheapest Prices in the Panhandle

All Makes and Models Serving the Tri-State Area

Craig Loy, Broker

1314 Edwin Miller Blvd., Suite 200 • Martinsburg, WV 25404

304-263-2600

KESECKER REALTY, INC. 304-258-1492 INC.

Victoria

Michael Pearse, Broker Mary McBee, 304-283-8374 Tammy White, 304-582-0090 Terri Walter, 304-839-5390 Gina Wood, 304-279-1579 Elaine Clark, 304-671-4918 Sabrena Funk, 304-261-6020

1515 Valley Road • Berkeley Springs, WV 25411

KESECKER REALTY

Cheryl

Berkeley Springs - $40,000 - 7.69 acres w/run flows through property & septic permit. Great Cacapon - $19,800 - 4.22 acre lot has road frontage, near Potomac River. Berkeley Springs - $18,000 - 1.6 acres w/lake access and current septic permit.

For All Your Heating and Cooling Needs

301-678-7910

Laurie

Lindal Cedar Home Needs Finishing Touches on 2.3 Acres on Rt. 9 MO7641793 $149,000

Furnaces as low as $1299 Installed A/C as low as $999 Installed Heat Pumps as low as $1199 Installed

$69.95

Nicole

5 BR Farmhouse on 7.64 Acres with Barn, Pond and Outbuilding MO7498414 $185,000

Heatman HVAC Local Techs ~ All Services

For Only Per System (Parts and Repairs Extra if Needed)

Larry

Private Retreat w/ Guest House, Workshop and Much More, Located on Approximately 3 Acres! MO7573135 $279,000

Prompt, Dependable & Cost Effective Waste Removal Service for Residential & Commercial Businesses of Morgan County, W.Va.

Sales, Service, Installation Residential/Commercial

WV#031646

Visit Us on the Web at www.KeseckerRealtyInc.com Few Restrictions 10.4 acres located in Longview Subdivision. Can have doublewide on permanent foundation. Great place to build. Asking $49,900. Call Terri.

Quiet Neighborhood

Backyard Oasis

Berkeley Springs Charm

This 3 BR, 1 BA home has a large living room with an open stairway, is located on a 1/2 acre double lot in Great Cacapon and includes a $3,000 carpet allowance. $81,500. Call Mary.

Relax after a long day on the covered patio, dine alfresco or relax in the hot tub. This upgraded home offers radiant floor heat & granite counters. $260,000. Call Tammy.

Lovely 2 story home with many options - you can reside, retreat or run your own business. Don’t miss your chance to own a piece of history. $245,000. Call Gina.

Ready to Build 6.47 acres located in River Ridge subdivision. This is a beautiful, level lot with access to the Cacapon River. Has a current septic permit. Asking $58,000. Call Terri.

Looking for Business!

Not Your Average House

Cleared UNRESTRICTED 1.88 acres with stream on 522 at the south end of town. Awaits your plans for fast food, greenhouse or whatever you can dream up! $110,000. Call Sebrena!

Looking for a retreat that stands out? This 3 BR home is designed to entertain & blend w/the natural surroundings. Includes access to the Cacapon River in River Ridge! $349,900. Call Elaine.

View these properties and much more at KeseckerRealtyInc.com Woodland Delight

VA Commuters

4.14 unrestricted acres. Seller has current septic and driveway permits. Fronts on a state maintained road so access is easy. Buy now and build later if you want. $45,000. Call Gina for details.

3.08 wooded acres near the Va. line in lovely Deer Spring Woods. Perfect for a commuter or just that awesome getaway! Lot is on a cul-de-sac and has road frontage on two sides for easy access. $32,900. Call Sebrena!

Roundtop Lane Ready to Scale Down? This 2 BR, 2 BA home has a fully equipped kitchen with oak cabinets and breakfast bar and you can walk to the doctor, drug store, bank and McDonalds. $145,000. Call Mary.

Attention - Gardener Needed Relax in your swing after working in the gardens within this peaceful and quiet neighborhood. Includes a 3 BR, 2 BA home on 2.6 acres. $145,000. Call Tammy.

Lovely wooded lot with mountain views. Current septic permit. Buy now, build later, but always enjoying the nature that surrounds you. Cacapon State Park nearby with hiking, fishing and the Robert Trent Jones designed golf course. $55,000. Call Gina for details.

Anything is Possible! This 4 acre lot on 522 south has 400 ft. Waterfront Lot of road frontage! Perfect location to Bring your camping & fishing gear! This build your home and have a business in 1.4 acre lot is by the Cacapon River. We your front yard! Close to Cacapon State know how hard it is to find waterfront Park too! Well & septic permits. property, so don’t miss this opportunity. $29,900. Call Sebrena! $45,000. Call Teri.

Paddlers Retreat Bring your boat & fishing pole to spend a summer on the Cacapon River! When your day is over, return to your cozy 2 BR riverfront cabin to roast marshmallows! $150,000. Call Elaine.

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Wednesday, August 3, 2011 The Morgan Messenger

A rocking good time at the Morgan County Fair

The Hillbilly Huxters rocked the crowd at the Morgan County Fair on Sunday. The band features local rockabilly artist Dave Moore, right. photos by Kate Evans & Dave Abner

Nick Michael, Collin McLaughlin and Katherine McLaughlin race through the Morgan County 4-H watermelon-eating contest at the county fair on Sunday.

Despite the Saturday heat, Boy Scouts were slaving over a hot grill cooking burgers.

Jill Klein Rone performs with her accordion.

Jonathan McBee introduces guitarist and vocalist Kate Evans. McBee handled the sound system for the fair’s performers.

Checking out the ribbon winners of the fair’s annual photo contest.

Winners of the People’s Dog Show

Codi and Mason Roberts finished first in the Dog/Owner Lookalike Contest. Asked why they looked alike, Roberts said, “We’re both cute.” Finishing second were Bella and Jennie Hobday. Third were Fancy and Lila Rain Hocherl. Porkchop took first for Best Trick, and is shown with Jared, Jayda and Peyton Thompson. Second was Sugar Bear, owned by Sara & Teresa Veara. Third was Joey, owned by April Roberts.

Max, a/k/a Black Bart, shown with Wesley Colyer, was the Best Dressed winner. Second was Porkchop, owned by Jared and Peyton Thompson. Third was Fancy, owned by Lila Rain Hocherl. Max/Black Bart also won the ribbon for Longest Tail.

Lucy, shown with owner Tina Ann Byers, won the blue ribbon for Shortest Legs.

Princess Emma, shown with voice coach Pat Springer, won the Best Singer Award. photos by John Douglas

Sadie, shown here with friends, won the blue ribbon for Basic Obedience at the annual People’s Dog Show on Sunday afternoon at the Morgan County Fair. Placing second was Sugar Bear, owned by Sara & Teresa Veara. Third was Lacy, owned by Sandy Golden.

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