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undermine the sale? Also, does the non-Jew really intend to buy the chometz, or does he think that this is all make-believe, and that he is not really purchasing it? This would, of course, undermine the sale. The Tosefta (Pesachim 2:6) provides us with background to these questions: A Jew is traveling by ship and has with him chometz that he needs to dispose of before Pesach. However, the Jew would like the chometz back after Pesach, because there is a dearth of kosher food available. The Tosefta rules that the Jew may sell the chometz to a non-Jew before Pesach, and then purchase it back afterward. Alternatively, the Jew may give the chometz to the non-Jew as a present, provided no conditions are attached. The non-Jew may then return the present after Pesach. Thus, we see that one may sell or give away chometz to a non-Jew and expect it back, without violating any halachos, provided the agreement

Since this may have the appearance of a charade, the sale must be performed in a way that halacha recognizes as a valid sale. Since these laws are very intricate, it is better that a lay person not handle the arrangements for mechiras chometz by himself.

does not require the non-Jew to return it. In contemporary times, people usually do not undertake to sell their chometz themselves, but instead appoint a rav to sell the chometz for them. The reason for this is that we do not have the non-Jew take the chometz with him; we leave it in our houses. Since this may have the appearance of a charade, the sale must be performed in a way that halacha recognizes as a valid sale. Since these laws are very intricate, it is better that a lay person not handle the arrangements for mechiras chometz by himself. One of the standard methods we use for guaranteeing that the sale of our chometz to the non-Jew is fully valid is to rent to him the area where the chometz is stored. Thus, we have a question as to whether I am now permitted to enter that area for my own purposes. There is also another concern

involved in entering the area where the sold chometz is located: The Gemara states that it is permitted to have a non-Jew’s chometz in one’s house on Pesach, provided that a barrier the height of 10 tefachim (about 40 inches) is constructed around the chometz, presumably to guarantee that no one mistakenly eats it. So we have two concerns: Does entering the area invalidate the sale, and is it prohibited because of the concern that I might eat the chometz? Regarding the first question, whether entering the area designated for rental violates the sale agreement, several authorities rule that it does not (see Chok Yaakov and Machatzis Hashekel, Orach Chayim 472:1). Regarding the second issue,

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