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something they didn’t eat all Pesach, warmly recalls this as their Achron Shel Pesach treat. “And let’s not forget freshly squeezed juices,” she says. “No beverage compares to this delicious Pesach treat.” The first thing that comes to Libby’s mind is chocolate sponge cake that contains no oil. “It is a piece of fluff, and the minute the cake is in the oven,

So many fondly remember these treats — which rarely made it into the shopping cart year-round — suddenly filling up the refrigerator by the dozen. we know that to get us through yom tov, we’ll need about 30 cakes. And that’s not an exaggeration!” “Borscht, to me, signifies Pesach like nothing else. Just the smell sends me on a trip down memory lane,” Nissi Unger shares. “Nut brittle is another warm trigger, despite the scar I still carry on my right hand from the hot sugar that landed there while making it…” With the turn of the century came the discovery of mayonnaise, and with it, the entrance of varied salads and dips. “Nobody, but nobody, makes potato salad like my mother,” Leah says. “And Pesach didn’t deter her. Once we discovered how to make mayonnaise the Pesach way [with oil, eggs and lemon juice], potato salad was on the menu to stay, with lots of thinly sliced purple onion making up for the ingredients we don’t use on Pesach.” “I’d visit my grandmother’s house and go straight to the pantry for some of her famous Pesach egg kichel, and then we started baking batch after batch at home,” Chany remembers. “In our home these crackers were the best snack,” Sury, Chany’s aunt, adds. “We’d enjoy them with the endless supply of eggplant dip and mock

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The Monsey View

Issue 194  

The Monsey View