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DECEMBER 1, 2016 VOL. 39 EDITION 36

Proudly Serving the South Peace

AGRICULTURE

Riders warned to watch for snowed-in crops A4

OLYMPIANS ARRIVE

Swimmers teach students winning ways A17-A18

www.dawsoncreekmirror.ca

Tumbler researchers ‘discover’ uncharted waterfall

PAVING • Residential • Commercial • Industrial • Roads • Driveways • Parking Lots COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL GRAVEL SALES AND DELIVERY

Never-before-described caves, waterfalls hint at bigger discoveries JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

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A VISIT WITH SANTA Molly Auger meets up with Santa Claus Friday night prior to the Pouce Coupe truck light parade and food bank fundraiser. ROB BROWN PHOTO

Continued A4

Annual Toy Drive

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Charles Helm was scanning grainy satellite images on Google Earth this summer when he spotted a white dot at the base of a cliff in the wilderness southeast of Tumbler Ridge. For Helm, the town doctor and author of Exploring Tumbler Ridge, those few pixels were worth investigating. A short time later, Helm and a group of hikers made their way to the spot on the map and found a 120-foot high waterfall pouring out of a depression between two cliff faces. They decided to call it Sync Falls. “Nobody in Tumbler Ridge, or nobody we’ve ever encountered, actually knows about it,” he said. Researchers at the area’s Global Geopark say the fact they’re still stumbling across uncharted waterfalls and caves suggested there are even more spectacular finds in the hills, mountains, and canyons around Tumbler Ridge. Helm, who led the town’s push to become a UNESCO Geopark, hesitates to use the word “discovery” to describe Sync Falls. Someone has almost certainly seen the waterfall before, whether a helicopter pilot, hunter or First Nations person, he said.

Drop Off Unwrapped Toys at Any Car Dealership in Dawson Creek: This week’s customer is Paula Coutts from Tumbler Ridge. Paula needed a new vehicle and her friends recommended she call Rob and give Ford a try. Rob showed her a new Escape and she loved it, and with No Charge winter tires and 0% financing the deal was easy!

Why not get yourself a Capital deal from Rob today?!

Capital Ford • Peace Country Toyota Inland Auto Centre • Aspol Motors Browns’ Chevrolet Buick GMC

Until December 15th Help Us Help Those In Need This Christmas


A2 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

NEWS

CONTENTS Then & Now ...................2 Weather ..........................2 Local News ....................4 Letters ............................8 Opinion ..........................9 Sports ...........................17

Arts .............................. 20 Community ................ 22 Calendar ..................... 24 Kidscoop ..................... 25 Coffee Corner ............. 26 Classifieds................... 28

THEN AND NOW

RECREATION *FREE! Somerville Aecon Family Open Gym Be ready to have some fun! Children must be accompanied by a parent. Date: Wednesdays, November 30th to December 14th Times: 5:30pm - 7:00pm Location: O’Brien Gym

GAS WATCH KNOWBEFOREYOUGO PREVAILING PRICES Dawson Creek

103.7

Fort St. John

112.7 91.9

Alberta-B.C. border

*FREE! Yoga in the Gym (Ages 16+) Co-sponsored with Somerville Aecon Dates: Thursdays, December 1st to December 15th Times: 4:45pm to 5:45pm Location: O’Brien Gym

Fort Nelson

129.9

Groundbirch

112.9

Chetwynd

115.9

Tumbler Ridge

115.9

Prince George

101.9

Free Public Skate – Sponsored by Mayor and Council Date: Sunday, December 18th Time: 5:00pm-6:30pm Location: Memorial Arena

Grande Prairie

84.4

Open Skate (Hockey Shinny & Public Skating) • Friday, December 2nd 5:30pm-6:30pm (Mem) • Friday, December 30th 5:30pm-6:30pm (Mem)

Calgary

83.4

Edmonton

76.4

Vancouver

115.9

Victoria

113.9

B.C. avg

111.1

Try-A-Sport – December 5th – NID Children 8 to 12 years old can register to try out Pickle Ball, Badminton, Basketball, end the day with our Rainbow Bouncy Castle along with some fun Christmas activities. Children required to bring a lunch. Time: 9:00am - 3:00pm Location: O’Brien Gym located at 10512 13th Street Fee: $32.00 ARENA Skate With Santa Date: Sunday, December 4th Time: 5:00pm-6:30pm Location: Memorial Arena Bring the family for a night off skating, hot chocolate, hot dogs, face painting, prizes and a visit from a special guest! Regular fees apply.

Toonie Skates $2 • Saturday, December 3rd 6:00pm-7:00pm (Mem) • Saturday, December 17th 3:00pm-4:30pm (Mem) • Friday, December 23rd 5:00pm-6:00pm (Kin) • Tuesday, December 27th 5:00pm-6:30pm (Mem) Youth Drop In Hockey 13yrs –15yrs • Saturday, December 17th 4:45pm-6:00pm (Mem) • Tuesday, December 20th 1:45pm-3:00pm (Kin) • Thursday, December 22nd 1:45pm-3:00pm (Kin) • Tuesday, December 27th 9:30am-10:45am (Mem) • Friday, December 30th 3:45pm-5:00pm (Mem)

So apparently Dawson Creek used to have an outdoor swimming pool? According to one longtime resident, it was located over by the library. Now we have the Kenn Borek Aquatic Centre which is infinitely more functional but somehow less charming. JONNY WAKEFIELD/SOUTH PEACE HISTORICAL

KENN BOREK AQUATIC CENTRE Upcoming Events • Toonie Swim/Toonie Climb: December 11th (1:00-5:00pm) • Family Pool Party: December 17th (11:00am-1:00pm). Regular fees apply. • FREE Swim & Climb, courtesy of Mayor and Council: December 24th (12:00-3:00pm)

CAD$ per litre, Regular (Unleaded). Source: GasBuddy.com

Did you know that if you haven’t tried our Climbing Wall yet, your first time up the wall is FREE? Anyone ages 4 years and older can try the wall – all you need is a signed waiver and we’ll handle the rest (waivers must be signed by a parent or legal guardian for those under the age of 19). Give us a call for information on times and available classes!

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Are you interested in becoming a lifeguard? Not only do you learn skills that could one day save a life, but it’s also a great job to have while away at school, or even during the summer! The first step to becoming a lifeguard is to register for the Bronze Medallion/Bronze Cross Combo course. Course runs December 19 – 23, 2016 (9:00am-5:30pm, daily). Cost is $418.52. Pre-requisite: 13 years old. Call us at 250-782-SWIM (7946) for more information.

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Krista Forshner was baking up a storm on the Home for the Holidays tour in Dawson Creek over the weekend. The tour, a fundraiser for the local arts society, featured seven unique homes decorated in the latest holiday trends. Forshner, a baking artist at Krista’s Kreations Gourmet Custom Baking, added some cheer to Nyla Lepine’s 50’s-era home on 92nd Ave. JONNY WAKEFIELD PHOTO

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A3

The Dawson Creek Mirror

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A4 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

news

snowmobilers warned about damaging snowed-under crops The rolling snowdrifts settling on the fields around Dawson Creek this month might look like perfect terrain to a snowmobiler out for a rip. But a rider’s organization is warning sledders someone’s livelihood could be under that snow. After a wet summer and early snowfall caught many Peace Region farmers with crops still in the field, the Paradise Valley Snowmobile Association is reminding its members that a careless joy ride can make a bad situation even worse for hard-hit farmers.

“Driving back from Rolla, I saw how many crops are still laying out there in the fields,” said Richard Cronier, past president of the association. “It’s more of a proactive thing: we haven’t seen (anyone riding on the fields), but we’re just being proactive to try and help the farmers in the community.” Many local farmers were unable to harvest their crops due to a soggy summer and early snowfall this winter. Freeze-up has also been delayed, meaning some farmers still have thousands of dollars worth of wheat, hay and canola stuck under snowdrifts in muddy fields. The poor conditions have affected farmers across Western Canada. Alberta

was harder hit by the early snow, with some counties declaring states of agricultural disaster. It’s not the first time sledders have risked damaging snowed-in crops. The last time a significant amount of crop was buried was 2004, according to an article in the Peace River Block News. An Oct. 15 snowfall had made things so bad that the Sweetwater Parkland Farmers Institute issued a plea to local snowmobilers to stay off the fields. “We need to notify the public not to trespass with snowmobiles,” Nick Parsons, chair of the institute was quoted as saying. “We’re not sure of the value of the crop in the spring. It may be nil, but

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there could be some salvage value.” “There’s going to be strong words if we see people on the fields this winter,” he added. “The value of our grain is so low at the moment, combined with the extreme weather this fall, farmers are going to be sick to see someone who just assumes they’ve got freedom of the fields.” Vibrations from snowmobiles risked shattering grain kernels, the News reported, while snowmobiles could also tear out swathes of crop in shallow snow. Cronier said snowmobilers want to be good neighbours at a tough time for the local agriculture industry. reporter@dcdn.ca

wATeRFALLs FRom A1

www.dawsoncreekmirror.ca

JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

“This thing would be marked on the topographical map, it’s not like some surveyor missed it,” said Helm. “What we mean by ‘discover’ is nobody we’ve ever encountered knows about it. And we’ve gone to the people who know the area very, very well.” Sync Falls could just be the tip of the iceberg. Sarah Waters, manager of the Geopark, says she knows of even more waterfalls and caves that have never been described. She spotted one this summer on a flyover of Monkman Park to take photos for tourism brochures. “You’ve got this massive limestone wall, and there’s just this big waterfall coming out of it,” she said. “I don’t think that one is on the map.” Finding a waterfall in 2016 is extremely rare. In 2013, explorer Adam Shoalts plunged over an uncharted waterfall while canoeing on the Again river in Northern Quebec—a find which made international headlines. Bigger than the headlines, though, are the implications for the region’s biodiversity, Waters says. Tumbler Ridge’s geopark lies between Banff and Jasper National Parks and the MuskwaKechika wilderness area, which wildlife biologists call the Serengeti of North America for its diversity of large mammals. “Our population density and the way exploration has

been approached in the past (means), yes, there are still amazing discoveries out there,” Waters said—including rare and potentially undocumented species. “They’ve studied the areas to the south, and they’ve studied the areas to the north, but they haven’t really studied us,” she said. “We’re the gap in between.” Established in the 1980s as a coal town in the foothills of the Rockies, Tumbler Ridge became a UNESCO Global Geopark in 2014 in a bid to shore up tourism after a series of devastating mine closures. In 2001, UNESCO created the geopark system to recognize and preserve areas of global geological significance. Tumbler Ridge’s geopark now includes what may be the largest dinosaur track site on earth. The area is now one of 120 geopark sites worldwide and only the second in North America. Helm said Tumbler Ridge is one of the few areas in the Global Geopark system where new “discoveries” are being made. “I think we’re pretty darn unique,” he said. “Everyone else knows what they’ve got. Some of these European parks, they’ve been at it a long time and the area is so well-known. So when we go to the UNESCO conferences and show them this stuff, they’re so envious. It’s cool to be discovering.” reporter@dcdn.ca


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A5

The Dawson Creek Mirror

December 2016 Invasive Species Awareness

The Regional Board authorized staff to work with the Invasive Species Council of BC to create and install signage in the five Regional Parks to highlight the undesirable effects of releasing non-native aquatic species into rivers and lakes in the Peace River Regional District

Chair

Vice Chair

Agricultural Advisory Committee (AAC)

2017 Board Chair and Vice Chair Elected

The Regional Board approved the following recommendations from the AAC:

Electoral Area “C” Brad Sperling was elected the PRRD Chair and Electoral Area ”E” Director Dan Rose was elected Vice Chair. Both were acclaimed the Chair and Vice Chair respectively for the Hospital Board.

Season’s Greetings from the Board & Staff of the Peace River Regional District  Wishing you all the Joys of the Season & Happiness throughout the coming year

Building and Plumbing Inspection Services

The District of Chetwynd requires a qualified Building Inspector on a temporary basis. The Peace River Regional District and District of Chetwynd will enter in to an agreement for the PRRD to provide building and plumbing inspection services at the hourly rate of $60.00, plus applicable taxes.

Potable Water Service Update

On October 20, the Rural Budgets Administration Committee (RBAC) approved funding to determine the feasibility, design and cost of developing potable water sites in Electoral Area ‘B’. A Request for Proposals to carry out the feasibility study will be publicly issued. Director Goodings is in the process of forming an Electoral Area B Water Advisory Committee to assist in developing a potable water service proposal for residents in Area ‘B’. Based on the input received from the Advisory Committee members, the Director will work with staff on finalizing proposal details that will be used to prepare a Service Establishment Bylaw to bring forward for the Board’s consideration.

Annual Grant

The Board approved a $3,000 grant to the Peace Country Beef Promotional Society for the purpose of hosting the Peace Country Beef Congress on January 6 and 7, 2017.

Delegations & Presentations UNESCO Tumbler Ridge Global Geopark

Sarah Waters and Dr. Charles Helm updated the Board on the activities of the Tumbler Ridge Global Geopark over the past year.

World U-17 Men’s Hockey Challenge

Barry Reynard from the City of Dawson Creek and Wally Ferris from the City of Fort St. John made a presentation to the Board about an upcoming sponsorship opportunity for the 2017 World Under-17 Hockey Challenge taking place October 26 to November 4, 2017. The Canadian Hockey League and BC Hockey are in discussions with Dawson Creek and Fort St. John to co-host the event. They invited the Regional District to assist in the planning, marketing and hosting the event once the negotiations are completed with Dawson Creek and Fort St. John.

Building Inspection Update

The Regional Board adopted the following resolution: “That the Building Inspection function remain as is and a sub-regional Building Inspection service not be pursued at this time.”

➡ Next Board meetings

Edition IX

Hazardous structures built without permit

1. The invasive plant education program will be expanded to include methods for composting bagged invasive plants. 2 A copy of the “Discussion Paper regarding the review of ALR Applications” will be sent to each AAC member organization and members at large, requesting that they respond in writing stating their position (including reasons) regarding whether the Regional District should, or should not, discontinue reviewing and responding to ALR applications. The responses will be reviewed by the AAC prior to any decision on the matter by the Board.

The Board will impose a remedial action requirement in response to hazardous conditions of a structure on the property of Darrell and Barbara Williams in Electoral Area “C”. This action is pursuant to section 305 of the Local Government Act and Division 12 of Part 3 of the Community Charter; Hazardous structures built without OCP Zoning Amendment permit, contrary to BC Building Code and located in an area subject to The Board adopted the Cushway OCP amendment landslides. application to amend the OCP from Ag (Agriculture) to C (Civic) and to amend the zoning from A-2 (Large Public question period at Board meetings Agricultural Holdings Zone) to P-2 (Civic, Assembly and The Board approved that at the Order of Business at Regular Board Institutional Zone) for a ~2 ha portion of the subject Meetings will include a section directly following the ‘Adoption of property to ensure the existing school is zoned correctly. Agenda’ section, titled, “Gallery Comments or Questions”. Further, that comments or questions be limited to items and topics appearing 2017- 2020 Communications Plan on the current Board meeting agenda. Further, that each individual The Board received the 2013–2016 Communication question or comment be limited to two (2) minutes and the maximum time allotted for this agenda item be limited to 15 minutes. Plan Strategy Audit Report Card for information. The Further, that the Board may resolve by a two-thirds (2/3’s) majority Board approved the 2017–2020 Communication Plan to waive compliance with any part of these procedures. Staff were Strategy. The strategy and the report card can be viewed directed to bring forward a Board Procedure Amendment Bylaw. at http://prrd.bc.ca/engage/communications-strategyconsultation/

U-17 Legacy Fund

The Board authorized staff to investigate partnering with other organizations to provide a coaching symposium to the public, to be partially paid for using legacy funds from the 2015 World Under-17 Hockey Challenge. A report will be brought back to the Board with more detail.

2017 Board Meetings January 12

Dawson Creek

June 22

Dawson Creek

January 26

Dawson Creek

July 13

Dawson Creek

February 9

Dawson Creek

July 27

Charlie Lake

The Board approved forwarding the Harroff and Duncan subdivision in the ALR applications to the ALC.

February 23 Dawson Creek

Aug 10

Dawson Creek

March 9

Fort St. John

Aug 24

Dawson Creek

South Bank Recreation Sites – Site “C” Project

March 23

Taylor

Sept 7

Fort St. John

April 13

Dawson Creek

Sept 21

Dawson Creek

April 27

Dawson Creek

Oct 12

Dawson Creek

May 11

Dawson Creek

Oct 26

Dawson Creek

May 25

Dawson Creek

Nov 9

Dawson Creek

June 8

Fort St. John

Nov 23

Dawson Creek

Agricultural Land Reserve Applications

The Board authorized staff to work with the District of Chetwynd to conduct a public consultation regarding the proposed plans by the District of Chetwynd to use funding available from BC Hydro, through the Site C Dam Project, to develop recreation opportunities on the south bank of the Peace River. As part of the District of “Chetwynd Community Agreement Amendment #1” BC Hydro has committed to making a payment of $200,000 to the District of Chetwynd for the creation of south bank recreation sites.

January 12 Dawson Creek January 26 Dawson Creek

December 8 – Friday

visit our website at www.prrd.bc.ca to register online. Peace River Regional District Official Page

31109

Fort St. John


A6 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

NEWS

Twins make huge deposit at RBC as they pay it forward ROB BROWN Managing Editor

COME BE A STEAKHOLDER Until Dec. 21, Mr. Mike’s is helping out a local family in need by collecting gift certificates, non-perishable food items and cash donations at its Dawson Creek location. Anyone who dines at the restaurant is encouraged to bring a food item, while Mr. Mike’s will match any cash donations. Mr. Mike’s GM James Vetter (left) and Donald Ward unveiled the program Nov. 25. JONNY WAKEFIELD PHOTO

A DC set of twins has turned $150 into nearly $7,000. Eryn Minifie and her sister Hanna were chosen by the Dawson Creek branch of the RBC to receive $150 to pay forward. They turned it into $6,700 in one week. “We were challenged to make 150 count,” said Eryn as the pair were making a deposit at RBC Friday. Each RBC Branch across Canada has chosen a deserving youth they believe to be a leader leader and has already made a mark in their community. “It was such an honour to be selected to participate in this opportunity,” said Minifie, explaining that a few emails were all it took to get the ball rolling. “We came up with idea to increase the

amount of money we can pay forward by asking our community business leaders to match the $150.” After an email to the DC Chamber of Commerce, fundraising was on like Donkey Kong and the money was rolling in. The twins plan to have the money go towards local families in need. “We plan to use this money for local families in need; we will work with the Salvation Army, local churches, and the Nawican Friendship Centre to purchase Christmas presents for children who might not otherwise receive them and give any gift cards to their parents to help them purchase groceries.” editor@dcdn.ca

Eryn Minifie and her sister Hanna were chosen by the Dawson Creek branch of the RBC to receive $150 to pay forward. They turned it into $6,700 in one week. ROB BROWN PHOTO

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The Dawson Creek Mirror

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A7

news

truck stop would alleviate Dawson Creek Veterinary Clinic traffic concerns, council hears Join us on

Saturday, December 3 From 12pm-3pm

Providing a rest area for truck drivers along the Dangerous Goods Route would alleviate traffic concerns in the city of Dawson Creek, a study recommends. FILe Photo JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

Encouraging developers to build a truck stop on the outskirts of town would alleviate concerns about heavy commercial traffic in Dawson Creek, city council heard Nov. 23. It was one of the messages in a report on road safety, and the latest step in an overhaul of how Dawson Creek controls traffic on the roads within its boundaries. Council ordered the review after a hit and run in early 2015 left a woman dead. While the city is already moving on some of the traffic safety study’s recommendations—including widening curbs in the downtown core to slow traffic in busy pedestrian areas—the province controls both 8th Street and Alaska Avenue. That puts the city in the position of lobbying the government for any new safety measures on its two busiest roads. Earlier this summer, TransSafe Consulting delivered a report recommending turn lanes, speed controls and new signage at dangerous intersections on 8th and Alaska. On. Nov. 21, city council met with Angie Allwood, district manager with the ministry of transportation and infrastructure, to discuss the report’s recommendations regarding provincial highways. While the report includes suggestions on everything from lane width to pavement markings, proposed restrictions on truck traffic through the city garnered the most discussion. Among TranSafe’s recommendations: requiring heavy trucks to use the Dangerous Goods Route bypass, lobbying the B.C. Trucking

Association to discourage truckers from driving through Dawson Creek, and pushing the ministry to build a truck stop or rest area on either side of town. It’s unlikely council would approve any restrictions on truck traffic, which would hurt businesses that rely on commercial haulers. It’s also unclear whether truck restrictions would make roads safer: Chief Administrative Officer Jim Chute noted 87 per cent of accidents in the study involved cars. Coun. Cheryl Shuman said she wasn’t opposed to truck traffic in the city, but was in favour of looking at services on nearby highways. “We could be encouraging having less truck traffic if we were to have development on the periphery that could provide services to them,” she said. “I’m sure many (truck drivers) don’t want to have to drive through the community, if there were alternative services available for them.” Coun. Paul Gevatokoff spoke against any restrictions, saying “we rely on trucks.” “I think we need to deal with all traffic, (not) eliminating trucks,” he said. Director of Development Services Kevin Henderson said the city was already upgrading signage, lighting and roads under its jurisdiction, which he called “low-hanging fruit.” Anything involving the province is a long-term project. “The stuff within the city is relatively small. It’s the corridor that has the biggest pieces for sure,” he said. “Those are going to be longer (term) discussions.” reporter@dcdn.ca

DC Mirror Carriers in Focus

By Donation to our Emergency Care Fund All photo proceeds benefit injured animals and the financial burden on their families. Make sure your pet is either in a carrier (especially cats as there will be many dogs) or on a leash. Bring treats and toys that will keep your pet occupied while you wait in line.

www.dcvet.ca Small Animal: 250-782-5616 Large Animal: 250-782-1080 238-116th Avenue, Dawson Creek, BC Across from the Fairgrounds

Have something to say? editor@dcdn.ca 250-782-4888

PEACE RIVER REGIONAL DISTRICT

PEACE RIVER REGIONAL DISTRICT NOTICE of PROPOSED AMENDMENT TO BOARD PROCEDURE BYLAW In accordance with the Local Government Act, notice is hereby given that the Peace River Regional District Board intends to consider adoption of amendments to Peace River Regional District Board Procedure Bylaw No. 2200, 2015 at the January 12, 2017 Regular Board Meeting which starts at 10:00 a.m., in the Board meeting room at the Peace River Regional District office, 1981 Alaska Avenue, Dawson Creek, BC. In general terms, the proposed amendments which will be presented in Board Procedure Amendment Bylaw No. 2278, 2016 include the following: • Adding a new section titled, “Gallery Comments or Questions” to the order of business at Regular Board Meetings; • Setting time limits and general procedures to be followed when accepting comments or questions from the gallery.

Jo-Anne Frank Corporate Officer Nelson is our Carrier in Focus this week! He has been a Mirror carrier since March and goes to Canalta School. He likes his route in the south because residents of DC and readers of the Mirror are very friendly. Nelson enjoys soccer and basketball, and he is saving his Mirror money for holidays. DAn PRZYBYLsKI Photo

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A copy of the draft Board Procedure Amendment Bylaw No. 2278, 2016 is available for viewing at www.prrd.bc.ca or in person at the Peace River Regional District offices at either: 1981 Alaska Avenue, Dawson Creek, BC or 9505 100th Street, Fort St. John, BC between the hours of 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (closed from 12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.), Monday through Friday, except Statutory Holidays. Written submissions may be delivered to either of the above addresses or sent via email to: Reception.dc@prrd.bc.ca.

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A8 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

OPINION

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OPINION

The Site C Dam comes with too many costs REGIONAL MANAGER

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At a projected cost of $8.8 billon, the approved, but yet-to-bebuilt, Site C dam is the single most expensive public infrastructure project in British Columbia’s history. However, far more is at stake than just our pocketbooks when assessing the costs of Site C. So before returning to the appalling economics behind the project, consider the following: If built, the dam would flood more than 100 kilometres of the Peace River’s forest and wetlands, and those of important tributaries including the Moberly and Halfway rivers. These lands are rich in wildlife and fisheries resources that have sustained the region’s First Nations people since time immemorial and they are subject to the terms of Treaty 8. Are we comfortable with the knowledge that this project could have permanent, irreversible impacts on Indigenous rights that go far beyond the scope of any other industrial project underway or contemplated in BC? Certainly members of the West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations are not. They continue fighting the project in the courts, a legal battle most British Columbians remain oblivious to. If built, Site C would also destroy more than 6,000 hectares of farmland. Almost as much land again falls within a “stability impact zone” that could subsequently slough into the dam’s reservoir. Are we content to idly watch the single largest assault on BC’s

Agricultural Land Reserve unfold? Ken and Arlene Boon certainly aren’t. Passionate critics of the project and third-generation Peace River valley farmers, the couple face imminent expulsion from their home and land. If built, the Site C dam would take a deadly toll on local fish, animal and unique plant species. Will we be silent as the Peace River valley’s rich biological diversity - interior BC’s equivalent to the Great Bear Rainforest - is lost forever? Certainly, the Tsay Keh Dene people living in the remote communities of Fort Ware and Ingenika will not. More than 50 years ago, their rivers and lands disappeared when the W.A.C. Bennett dam created the seventh largest artificial body of water on earth. A water body now so poisoned with mercury that Indigenous people and anglers are still warned not to eat its fish. But if dollars and cents are what move you, Site C means more dollars and makes no sense. Economists have said so. A former head of BC Hydro has said so. And, most recently, former BC premier Mike Harcourt added his voice to the growing list of critics warning about Site C’s economic implications. With major work on the dam not even started, our hydro bills are already climbing well beyond inflation, in part because of costs coming due on repairs and upgrades at existing dams, and questionable investment decisions by BC Hydro. By 2018, we will pay nearly 30 per cent more for our

power than we did in 2013. Far greater increases await us as Site C’s costs come due. And you can count on those costs escalating. They have everywhere else. In 2014, research published in the journal Energy Research & Social Science showed that of 61 hydroelectric projects analyzed worldwide, the average cost escalation was 70.6 per cent. Translation? Site C could be a $15-billion boondoggle. Not a chance, you say? Tell that to the people of Newfoundland and Labrador who now face potential monthly hydro increases of $150 due to the more than $4 billion in projected added costs at the Muskrat Falls hydro project. The same research, by the way, noted that large solar power installations had no such cost overruns and actually came in an average of $4.2 million less than projected. These sobering findings come against an even more stunning backdrop: According to BC Hydro itself, Site C’s power may not be needed here for 20 to 40 years.

The day we might need more power is far off, and a host of other power options - wind, solar, geothermal, and low-impact pumped storage hydro – are largely dismissed by BC Hydro and its political masters. BC’s next election looms in May. The governing party vows to push Site C past the point of no return. Meanwhile, the Opposition says it will refer the matter to the BC Utilities Commission for independent review, but has yet to say unequivocally whether it will allow it to proceed or kill it. Surely it is time that this unprecedented project became a defining election issue. Grand Chief Stewart Phillip is an Okanagan Indigenous leader and has been president of the Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs since 1998. Ben Parfitt is a resource policy analyst with the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.


The Dawson Creek Mirror

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A9

opinion

“They’ve studied the areas to the south, and they’ve studied the areas to the north, but they haven’t really studied us. We’re the gap in between.” TR GeopARk mAnAGeR SARAh wATeRS, on why new plAnTS & AnimAlS could be diScoveRed in The ReGion (See Page a1)

QuoTE of THE WEEk

CHEWS THE NEWS

An impolite four-letter word one might wish to withdraw wood chips. That’s correct, the plane was powered by tree limbs and waste wood from forests. It’s just a matter of time until you board a plane, the flight attendant hands you an ax and a log, and says: “Start chopping!”

Bob

SNYDER SPY GUY: The chief of Canada’s intelligence agency says China is trying to steal Canadian technology secrets. I guess we’ll know there’s a problem when China starts selling cheap inferior poutine. And yes, Canada has an intelligence agency. Currently their main job is to feed false information to Justin Bieber in the U.S. about how bad things are back home - so he never returns to Canada. JET JEST: Last week an Alaskan Airlines passenger plane flew a 3,000 mile flight powered by fuel made from

CURSE WORSE: According to a study published last week by Marist College in New York: Cursing is linked to intelligence. People who frequently use swear words are more likely to have a higher IQ, a wider vocabulary, and more skill at understanding problems. No (BEEP)! FART FIASCO: In Ottawa, a Calgary Member of Parliament made people unhappy by using the word “fart” in a House of Commons speech. She refused to apologize for using a four letter word that’s associated with an impolite noise from the rear end. By the way, another four letter word Canadians often use that’s associated with “impolite”, “noise”, and “rear end”: “Yank”. (“Trump” is FIVE letters)

SHOP TILL YOU DROP: Friday was Black Friday, the day bargain shoppers go nuts. I was pushed and shoved and kicked and flattened. And that was before I left my house. I remember one Black Friday back when I was a little kid. My dad said: “We’re going out to get you a trampoline”. We arrived at the mall. I said: “Where’s the trampoline store?” Dad replied: “Did I say a trampoline? I meant trampled. I always get those two confused”. WEATHER, WHAT WEATHER? Last week NASA launched the most advanced weather satellite ever. Here’s how it works: Attached to the outside of the satellite is a piece of seaweed. NASA uses the Hubble Space Telescope to look at the seaweed and predict the weather. POLARITY HILARITY: Meteorologists say the North Pole is an amazing 36 degrees warmer than normal for this time of year. Santa’s sweating so much - his bowlful of jelly

is now HALF a bowlful of jelly. How hot is it at the North Pole? If you receive Christmas gifts that were made in Santa’s workshop - you may notice a faint smell of elf B.O. GLOBAL GIGGLE: Meanwhile, according to an Internet survey, an increasing number of senior citizens now believe in climate change. For example: My Grandma believes Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons broke up because of global warming. (I personally believe global warming could be reduced if Santa stopped putting all that coal in kids’ stockings) CRAWL Y’ALL: According to an item on CBC, the latest fitness fad is crawling. You get down on your hands and knees and you crawl around on the floor. It was invented by a guy who lost a contact lens. BULL BULLETIN: Last Tuesday in Regina, a bull escaped from an agricultural trade show. It was seen running around downtown in the

early morning. The bull was recaptured shortly after 8 a.m. -before any china shops opened. PASSWORD PROBLEM: On CBC an expert predicted computer and Internet passwords will eventually be replaced by selfies. Instead of typing in a password you’ll hold your phone up to your face. But that’s in the future. Right now for all of my Internet passwords I use the word “incorrect”. When I forget my password I get an automatic reminder that the password is - “incorrect”. SOCCER STUFF: Last week in Montreal, an important soccer game was delayed when officials noticed the lines painted on the field were wrong. The playing area was too small. Soccer players need lots of space. When they’re on the ground - faking an injury - throwing their arms and legs around - if they don’t have enough space - somebody could get hurt. chewsthenews@fastmail. com

PoTIoNS WITH MERLIN

The never-ending water and sewer debate

Merlin

NICHOLS Forty years ago on the first day of September Mirja and I started building our house. It was supposed to last us for a lifetime. Apparently that lifetime is not over yet. That first day of September was beautiful, warm, sunshiny, and our hopes were high. Yes, we did finish the job but don’t start your house after the end of June if you want to complete it before Jack Frost takes over. Just a small word of experience. Start your house

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whenever the building spirit moves you. A lot of things happen in forty years. Shingles take a beating from sun, sleet, cold, and heat. Kids put fingerprints on the walls. Dogs pee on the carpet. Water heaters fail. There comes a time when the builderowner-maintenance one has to acknowledge that he-she and the family is living in an infrastructure deficit. That infrastructure deficit has to be addressed, fixed, controlled before the roof leaks and the cost escalates. That’s life under the relentless rule of entropy. Things wear out and if we live long enough we’ll have to fix it again. (I reroofed for the second time just last year and I hope that it will be the last time for me. Hence, the 50year guarantee. Anyone betting on if I’ll live to collect on the guarantee?)

So I reduce my liquid resources by $50,000 and increase the value of my house by an equivalent besides giving me some peace of mind knowing that the sky won’t fall through the roof. That’s good. Now transfer this tale to our home town. Sixty years ago our ancestors laid some of the first pipe in the soil of the valley. Their children connected other pipes to the originals and their offspring connected others to those. Progress. All the while that pesky second law of thermodynamics is quietly working his baleful magic on the stuff in the ground. Metal and plastic and asbestos and lead and the human body are alike in this: they share a common destiny. They wear out, fall apart, disintegrate. As Councillor Bassendowski revealed last week, time always wins. He’s right. So we, the descendants of the folks who planted the first

sewer and water pipes in the soil of Chetwynd have the honor of beginning the replacements that should last another half century – maybe longer. What about the cost? Why should you pay? There is a cost to rebuild and replant and reconnect and the cost is not small. However, it is smaller than neglecting to do it. Like education – expensive, but not as expensive as ignorance. Who should pay? There are several ways of answering this question. We could save up, scrimp, defer other needs until we accumulate enough to install, for example, the East Trunk Main. In the meantime the old main fails and disgorges its contents in areas not approved. Not nice. Or we could borrow the cost of the replacement and let future users pay down the debt. Councillor Bassendowski

expressed this point eloquently last week. Time is not on our side for the East Trunk Main and Council has opted to borrow to replace it. We trust that you, the residents, will see as we see on this very high priority. The actual process over the next ten to twenty years will see both borrowing and scrimping. Ultimately, the result will be continuing dependable service to the residents of our home town. And once again to reference Councillor Bassendowski, by the time the high-priority jobs have been completed in ten or fifteen years the lower priority jobs will have migrated up. Seems like our great-great grands will be sitting in Council debating these issues for themselves. Merlin Nichols, Mayor of Chetwynd

We welcome letters to the editor of up to 500 words. All letters must be signed and include a phone number for verification. Unsigned letters will be discarded. For more information about our letters policy please contact Rob Brown at 250-782-4888 or editor@dcdn.ca

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A10 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

NEWS

ENERGY REALTY

DAWSON CREEK

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LAKOTA CLINIC Tamara Kunzel takes part in the Tara Norman Horse Clinic last week. RON CARTIER PHOTO

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A12 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

NEWS

Mile 0 Connections

File counts down, but Dawson Creek RCMP still kept busy JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

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Dawson Creek RCMP members are dealing with fewer files than last year, but are being kept busy by staff shortages and two complicated cases. Overall, the detachment is receiving fewer calls for service than in 2015—a year that saw elevated file counts due to an uptick in crime following the economic downturn. Sgt. Mike Richard updated Dawson Creek city council on the state of the local detachment at a meeting Nov. 21. Through October 2015, the detachment dealt with 8,363 files. During the same period this year, the file count dropped to 7,119, a decline of around 15 per cent. Still, file counts have yet to return to levels seen before the last boom in oilpatch activity. The first ten months of 2013, before the latest boom, recorded just 6,889 files. While file counts give some indication of the detachment’s workload, they don’t tell the full story. According to Richard, the detachment is working to fill several staff vacancies, including a vacant sergeant position. With fewer members,

it’s likely officers aren’t noticing a significant change in workload compared to last year. Chief Administrative Officer Jim Chute added that files aren’t a perfect measure of how busy RCMP members are. For example, RCMP list both 911 calls, which might be resolved within a few hours, and years-long homicide investigations as single files. “There’s files, and there’s files,” he said. He said the detachment is working on two “extraordinarily complicated” files, including a recent homicide investigation. “They by themselves make up for many file counts just due to the nature of the files.” Two positions at the detachment are currently vacant, while three members are working to sell their homes and are expected to leave in the coming months, Richard told council. With a full complement of 25 officers, the local RCMP detachment’s staff will soon be down 20 per cent. Mayor Dale Bumstead said the decline in files is heartening, but added the city would put pressure on senior levels of government to make sure the detachment has a full staff of officers. reporter@dcdn.ca

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COLOURING FOR A CAUSE Dawson Creek Secondary’s Jayden Mayoh hopes a colourful civics project will help raise awareness around mental health issues. Mayoh, a Grade 11 Civics student, has created a colouring book featuring artwork by DCSS students focused on mental health. She’s selling the colouring books at lunch hour and at local craft fairs. Mental health and substance use issues are “something that happens a lot in our school and the community, and it’s something I want to work towards helping out with,” she said. JONNY WAKEFIELD PHOTO


The Dawson Creek Mirror

Senior citizens, old homes pressure housing market JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

Growing seniors’ populations, a rising proportion of renters and an aging supply of homes will put pressure on Dawson Creek’s housing market over the next two decades, a new study has found. The Northern B.C. Housing Study, released Nov. 19, profiled ten communities including Dawson Creek and Fort St. John, and examined the demographic and economic trends affecting housing supply and demand in the region. Of those communities, Dawson Creek’s housing market was the most volatile, said Marleen Morris, co-director of the Community Development Institute (CDI) at the University of Northern B.C., “That was one of the things that made Dawson Creek unique: just how much its housing market has shifted in the past 3-4 years,” she said. Since 2011, the city went from having B.C.’s highest vacancy rate to one of the lowest and back again. At last count, the city’s vacancy rate sat at 9.1 per cent, while rents continued to be on par with cities like Vancouver. Demographic trends examined in the study raised two big questions about housing stocks in Dawson Creek. “Do we have the housing to attract and retain people interested in moving to the north? And do we have the housing that can retain our seniors so they can age in place?” Morris said. Between 2016 and 2036, seniors are expected to grow from 13 to 20 per cent of the Dawson Creek population. At the same time, young families are expected to move to the city to fill jobs when seniors retire. That will put pressure on the housing supply, Morris said. The majority of homes in Dawson Creek were built before 1980, which create difficulties for both groups. For one, older homes tend to be geared towards large families with multiple children, which are becoming less common. They’re also energy inefficient, which makes them less attractive at a time when utility costs are rising. Many pre-1980 homes are also split-level, which create difficulties for seniors with mobility issues. Morris also expects to see a smaller proportion of homeowners in the city, as young people opt for the flexibility that comes with renting. With smaller families and more seniors, the housing supply will also need to become more flexible, Morris said. The CDI

recommends developers “expand the diversity of housing options” to focus on small, multi-family units. Those units, including secondary suites, can also house Dawson Creek’s “shadow population” of transient resource sector workers. “We realized that unless we have the (right) housing in place, we’re missing that opportunity to attract new people and retain existing people,” Morris said. “We’ve got a mismatch in most communities between the housing stock and what the demographics would suggest (we need).” While multifamily homes might make sense for emerging demographics, Dawson Creek has struggled to regulate secondary suites, which change the character of singlefamily neighbourhoods and create parking and snow removal issues. reporter@dcdn.ca

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A13

NEWS

NEW EQUIPMENT Glenda Laudon, the chief medical lab technologist at the Dawson Creek and District Hospital, with the STA Contact Max—a fully-automatic clinical analyzer at the Dawson Creek and District Hospital. It is designed to perform tests on human plasma. The results of these tests aid in the diagnosis of coagulation abnormalities or in monitoring anticoagulant therapy. Anticoagulants are used to treat and prevent blood clots. The Mr. and Mrs. P.A. Woodward’s Foundation out of Vancouver covered costs of the equipment with a donation of approximately $45,000 to the Foundation. SUBMITTED PHOTO

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A14 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

Property assessments flatline after decade of growth JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

The Dawson Creek Mirror

NEWS

The value of homes and businesses in Dawson Creek has flatlined after more than a decade of growth, creating new fiscal troubles for the city. According to a report from the city’s finance department ahead of its 2017 budget, residential and commercial assessments are trending down for the first time since the early 2000s. The city expects to see a decrease of $12 million in its overall assessment base in 2017—compared to a $43 million increase in 2016, city councillors heard at a Nov. 21 meeting.

City staff anticipate a 1.3 per cent drop in residential assessments, while growth in commercial assessments has slowed to less than one per cent. The issue is two-fold. Construction of homes and businesses in the city has slowed with the downturn in oil and gas investment. Meanwhile, increases in the market values of properties are flatlining. The average single family home in the city, for example, is expected to lose about $1,135 of its assessed value—dropping from $256,194 to $255,059. Dawson Creek’s population has hovered around 10,000 people for decades, but the value of properties has surged since oil and gas activity picked up in the early 2000s.

Between 2001 and 2016, the taxable value of residential properties in Dawson Creek climbed from $287 million to $1.24 billion dollars. In that time, nearly 800 residential folios were added to Dawson Creek’s tax roll, many of them new homes. Commercial assessments, meanwhile, climbed from $76 million to $470 million as new businesses opened in the community. The assessment gains were driven largely by new construction and corresponding increases in the assessed value of existing homes and businesses. Over the years, the city adjusted its tax rate to avoid larger bills for long-time residents. reporter@dcdn.ca

TURKEY TIME Ritchie Waller washes down some turkey Friday afternoon at a turkey supper at St. Marks congregation in Dawson Creek. ROB BROWN PHOTO

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The Dawson Creek Mirror

Rodeo weathers tough year

reporter@dcdn.ca

South Peace court docket Nov. 21 - 25 A summary of what happened in Peace Region provincial courts for the week ending Nov. 25. There were no dispositions that week in Chetwynd or Hudson’s Hope.

Dawson Creek David K. Scott (born 1965) was handed a conditional discharge of 6 months, 6 months probation and a $100 victim surcharge

after being found guilty of the less included offence of assault.

Tumbler Ridge Connor L. Hunter (born 1992) was given a $100 fine and a $30 victim surcharge on a charge of failing to appear pursuant to a court order, and a fine of $100 and a $30 victim surcharge on a second charge of failing to appear pursuant to a court order.

Man arrested on child porn charges JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

A joint investigation involving Dawson Creek RCMP and the Abbotsford Police Department has ended with the arrest of a man on child pornography charges. According to Abbotsford police, a detective in the department’s Major Crime Unit received information in August that an Abbotsford resident was uploading “images of child sexual abuse.” Police began an investigation and a 41-year-old male suspect was identified. That suspect then moved from Abbotsford to Dawson Creek. Despite the change in jurisdiction, the APD Major Crime Unit continued to work with Dawson Creek RCMP and executed a search warrant

at a residence in the city on October 25, 2016, the release states. “A subsequent search of a laptop computer and file storage devices yielded evidence needed to support charges,” police say. “On November 21, 2016, Jason Christopher Reedel was arrested and charged with possession of child pornography and making available child pornography. Reedel was earlier convicted of possession of child pornography in 2014 following a Langley RCMP investigation. It is unclear whether Reedel will be tried in Dawson Creek or Abbotsford. He has a first appearance on the charges listed for Dec. 19 at the Abbotsford law courts. reporter@dcdn.ca

WINTER WONDERLAND Frost on the trees at the Mile Zero Campground Nov. 24 made for a winter wonderland. After a warm, dry fall, a blanket of snow settled on the region last week, and appears to be here to stay. JONNY WAKEFIELD PHOTO

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Visit our Home Hardware Stores, today. Many in store specials and Christmas shopping items, decorations, toys, tools and household needs. Wishing All a Very Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.

Check the Home Hardware weekly flyer in your mailbox. Go to the Home Hardware Web site for store web pages listing store hours, weekly flyers, Beaver Homes and Cottage catalogue, Home Hardware catalogues and much, much more. Register and have an e-flyer in your computer mailbox every week.

Woodland Home Hardware Building Centre, Grande Prairie AB 780-538-1340 Grande Prairie Home Hardware Building Centre, Grande Prairie AB 780-532-2092 Peace River Home Hardware Building Centre, Peace River AB 780-624-1090 Woodland Home Building Centre, Fairview AB 780-835-5411 Eldor Truss, Sexsmith AB 780-568-3354 Beaverlodge Home Building Centre, Beaverlodge AB 780-354-2233 Timberland Home Hardware Building Centre, Slave Lake AB 780-849-3141 Chetwynd Home Hardware Building Centre, Chetwynd BC 250-788-2373

YOUR ONE STOP BUILDING CENTRE

www.homehardware.ca

• STORAGE SHEDS • DECK PACKAGES • FENCE PACKAGES • SHINGLES • SIDING • STAIRS • ROOF TRUSSES •

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Dawson Creek’s Fall Fair appears to have weathered the storm during a rough time for agricultural exhibitions in Western Canada. Despite a slight dip in attendance and a drop in sponsorship, the annual exhibition and stampede managed to finish in the black after its 2016 season, Exhibition Association President Connie Patterson said. “We had some major cuts in our budget, so no capital items, except for a few we couldn’t live without,” said Patterson. “We were afraid we might not make it, but as it turns out, we came ahead $60,000. That turned out to be a positive for us. We projected a loss in our budget.” The Dawson Creek Exhibition Association held its annual general meeting on Nov. 21. Attendance over the six-day

event was down only slightly, from 30,000 to 29,000 year to year, she said. Despite that, they were lean times. Before the fair, tarp sales for chuckwagon races were down at auction, but still better than many had expected. Sponsorships, many of them oilfield businesses, were down only slightly, from around $380,000 to $350,000. That meant, among other things, going without the services of a rodeo clown. “Every position had to give something up,” Patterson said. “We wouldn’t want to be doing that every year, let’s put it that way.” Patterson hopes the economy will rebound in time for next year’s exhibition, the 95th. Then, its into countdown mode for the 100th-annual fair. “We’re working now on the legacy of what this board is going to leave,” she said.

• NEW PRODUCTS • BUILDING EXPERTS • HARDWARE • HOUSEWARES • TOOLS • PLUMBING • HEATING • ELECTRICAL • FLOORING • HOME EXPRESSIONS • CONTRACTORS •

JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A15

NEWS


A16 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

NEWS

Pair of Peace River plots ID’d for Site C parks JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Writer

CHAMPIONSHIP PLANS Barry Reynard and Wally Ferris were instrumental in Dawson Creek and Fort St. John’s bid to bring the World Under-17 Hockey Challenge to the Peace last year. Now, they hope to repeat. Both cities are in line to host the 2017 U17 Tournament, after Hockey Canada received no bids to host. The municipal employees presented at the Peace River Regional District Nov. 24, outlining the economic and hockey mentorship benefits that came out of the 2015 tournament. Reynard said the event injected around $6 million into the Peace Region economy. JONNY WAKEFIELD PHOTO

Chetwynd has picked out two plots of land on the Peace River that could become parks as part of a benefits deal with BC Hydro over the Site C dam. District officials toured the sites this summer, which include a camping area on the south bank of the Peace River that would overlook the $8.8 billion dam and a viewpoint at the confluence of the Pine and Peace Rivers. Both sites are on Crown land. They are largely undeveloped, but are already popular recreation sites with backcountry users. BC Hydro has agreed to give the District of Chetwynd $200,000 to develop recreation areas to make up for disruptions the town will experience during construction of the controversial megaproject. Despite being far from the dam site itself, the town on the west side of the Pine Pass will see a

major increase in traffic due to dam construction, including trucks hauling the stone that will divert the Peace River. The fund to develop south bank sites is one of several BC Hydro plans to compensate boaters, hunters and campers for land lost to Site C’s 83-kilometre reservoir. Peace River Regional District (PRRD) officials have been critical of the proposals, however. This summer, the board declined a role in administering a Site C recreation fund, saying the PRRD risked being saddled with the cost of maintaining park sites in exchange for one-time funding that amounts to a “drop in the bucket.” District of Chetwynd officials toured three sites for potential parks before settling on two. One, dubbed the Lakeside Camping area, is easy to access by vehicle and would be upgraded with campsites, fire pits, picnic tables, a gazebo and pit toilets, at a cost of around $148,000.

“Future expansion capability also exists at this site, should demand warrant, and the river (future lake) views at this location are truly inspiring,” the report states. The other is being called the Peace/Pine Valley Park Reserve and offers “dramatic views of the Pine River Valley, the meandering river and nearby railway grade,” as well as access to “unique grasslands” and a road that leads to an abandoned industrial area near the Peace River. Upgrading the site with pit toilets, picnic tables and camping areas would cost around $51,000. In a PRRD report, staff noted the areas are already used by campers and hunters and “their development may not be considered a benefit to the public.” Site C still faces legal challenges from two area First Nations. reporter@dcdn.ca

SPEC AL DELIVERY Our family is now a little larger....

It’s a boy! CHASE OZELIUS CHMELYK

Parents: Coleman and Darcie Chmelyk Length: 52 cm Weight: 7 lbs 10 oz November 11, 2016

Drop or mail your FREE birth announcement to: The Dawson Creek Mirror, 901-100th Avenue, Dawson Creek, B.C. VIG 1W2 or email: compose@dcdn.ca

It’s a girl! HALLE ANNALISE BELOUR

Parents: Nicole Bassett & Jordan Belfour Length: 21.25 inches Weight: 10lbs 8 oz November 10, 2016

It’s a girl! LILY REA POHL

Parents: Jessica & Tyrel Pohl Length: 20.75 inches Weight: 7 lbs 10 oz November 11, 2016

Have a new baby? Are you expecting? Don’t forget to drop off your announcement to the Dawson Creek Mirror Newspaper

Precious Footprints These commemorative plaques, celebrate the beginning of a life, and help the foundation purchase much needed equipment in the hospital’s maternity ward, ensuring our newest community members spend their first moments in the safest, healthiest, happiest environment possible.

Footprints for our commemorative wall are $125, You may also purchase an additional keepsake footprint for $25. If you are interested in a footprint for your child, please contact us! Forms are available in the office as well as by the footprint hall, in the entry area of the Dawson Creek & District Hospital. Call 250-784-7355 for more information.

www.dawsoncreekfoundation.ca

901 - 100 Avenue Dawson Creek, B.C. V1G 1W2

“Special Delivery” (PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY)

You are hereby authorized to publish the following birth announcement in the Dawson Creek Mirror newspaper. Date of Birth: _______________ Sex: ____________________ Baby’s Name: ________________________________________ Weight: _________________ Length: ____________________ Name of Parents: _____________________________________ Address of Parents: ___________________________________ Phone No.: ____________________________(Will not be published) Date: _______________________________________________ Parent’s Signature: ____________________________________


The Dawson Creek Mirror

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A17

sports

SportS

ANOTHER OLYMPIAN IN AREA! Check it out… A18

Olympic swimmer an average guy with big dreams

Two-time Olympic medalist Ryan Cochrane speaks to under-14 swimmers at the Kenn Borek Aquatic Centre last weekend. The Dawson Creek Seals Swim Club arranged to bring Cochrane to town for several swim clinics. JONNY WAKEFIELD PHOTO

JONNY WAKEFIELD Staff Write

When Ryan Cochrane was a kid taking swimming lessons in Victoria, one of the city’s local triathletes let him try on his Olympic gold medal. Something must have worn off on the young swimmer. It could have been some magic from the medal itself, but what really stuck with Cochrane, now a two-time Olympic medalist, was more mundane. “The one thing I remember after meeting him was he was

just an average guy,” Cochrane told a room full of Dawson Creek Seals swimmers Saturday. “It’s not like he was extra tall, he was actually quite short, it’s not like he looked stronger than everyone he raced against, he was just an average guy who knew what his goal was.” The description fits Cochrane to a T. Cochrane, who medalled in London and Beijing, was in Dawson Creek over the weekend to teach local swimmers drills and techniques for improving their performance in the pool.

Get in the

But more than anything, he wanted to drive home that going to the Olympics is an achievable goal. When he was five years old, Cochrane would tell anyone who asked that he wanted to be an Olympic athlete when he grew up. The sport itself mattered less. Despite that, he was always in the shadow of his naturally athletic twin brother Devon. The rivalry drove Cochrane to swimming, where he had to work hard to excel. He had the benefit of training

in Victoria, a city with a fair number of Olympians. “So I got to see what they did everyday and see how normal it was,” he said. While kids in Dawson Creek might not have the benefit of regularly training around Olympians, Seals president Carolyn Huttema said the goal was to bring more athletes like Cochrane to town. “We like to teach our kids that if they want to do something they can do it,” she said. “Look at this regular guy, and look how much he did. He didn’t

even choose to be an Olympic swimmer. That’s not how he started out.” “You get somebody like this to come here, and now he’s like ‘you know what, there are other Olympians who would love to come here, this place is amazing.’ So hopefully we’ll be able to get him and some others back one day.” Before his talk Saturday, Cochrane passed around his Olympic medals. More than a few local kids tried them on. reporter@dcdn.ca

Dawson Creek with the

Sunday, December 4: DC Canucks vs. North Peace Navigators Game starts at 1:30pm at the Memorial Arena


A18 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

SPORTS

Paralympian Huot brings message to Parkland Elementary ROB BROWN Managing Editor

As swimmer Benoît Huot hit the doors of Parkland Elementary, he had a message for students. “Dream big.” Huot is one of Canada’s most accomplished Paralympians of all time, having won 19 medals at the last four Paralympic Games before Rio. Last year he raced at two major events. At the Toronto 2015 Parapan Am Games he earned a gold and four silver; and at the 2015 IPC World Championships in Glasgow, Scotland he won two silver and a bronze.

Huot answered questions from the students. “I started swimming when I was eight and competitively at age 10 with Hippocampe de St-Hubert,” he told Parkland and Devereaux School students. When asked if he would continue to hunt for medals at the Olympic level, he said he was only looking twelve months ahead right now. “We’re taking it one year at a time. The older I get the more challenging it is to stay in the sport. editor@dcdn.ca

apped Toys r w n U ff O p o Dr rship in le a e D r a C y at a n k: Dawson Cree Aspol Motors let Buick GMC ro Browns’ Chev Capital Ford ntre e Inland Auto C y Toyota Peace Countr ber 15th Until Decem

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AROUND THE BEND Bryn Hallam makes the turn at the Peace Wapiti interclub speedskating meet in Grande Prairie over the weekend. RON CARTIER PHOTO


The Dawson Creek Mirror

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A19

SPORTS

Hockey Standings as of November 27

Above, Connor Rose in Senior Canucks in action Thursday, while on Friday, the Junior squad took to the ice in DC. Junior Canuck Deon Leer celebrated after potting a goal against Sexsmith in NWJHL play Nov. 25. The Jr. Cs retained possession of second place in the league with the 9-5 win, putting them two points behind the first place Navigators. Dustin Bahm and league-leading scorer Wesley Shipton chipped in with three- and four-goal performances, respectively. JONNY WAKEFIELD/RON CARTIER PHOTOS

Jr. Canuck Player of the Week

W 13 12 11 9 9 7 1

L 5 6 6 6 7 10 17

T 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

OTL 0 0 0 2 2 1 0

SO 0-0 1-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-0

GF 80 106 72 82 72 80 37

GA 54 64 42 51 55 80 183

NORTH PEACE HOCKEY LEAGUE East Division PTS Grimshaw Huskies 8 Falher Pirates 6 Valleyview Jets 0

GP 6 7 6

W 4 3 0

L 2 4 6

OTL 0 0 0

SOL 0 0 0

GF 28 35 19

GA 22 37 65

+/+6 -2 - 46

West Division Fort St. John Flyers Grande Prairie Athletics D.C. Sr. Canucks Spirit River Rangers

GP 8 8 8 7

W 7 5 5 1

L 1 2 2 5

OTL 0 1 1 0

SOL 0 0 0 1

GF 51 53 46 25

GA 30 30 31 42

+/+ 21 + 23 + 15 - 17

NORTHERN ALBERTA MIDGET AA HOCKEY LEAGUE Boucher Div PTS GP W Peace River Royals 25 16 11 GPAC TEK P & H Storm 17 14 7 Whitecourt Wolverines 16 12 8 NEBC Yukon Trackers 11 12 4 Fort McMurray Barons 9 16 2

L 2 4 4 5 9

T 3 3 0 3 5

GF 73 58 45 36 41

GA 36 50 28 41 62

+/+37 +8 + 17 -5 - 21

NORTHERN HOCKEY LEAGUE PTS JPSI Bushleaguers 20 Browns Social House 18 Savannah Stingers 18 Boston Pizza 16 Leftovers 14 Moez 10 Joe Loomis Trucking 7 Gerry’s Well Service 6 Bromar 5

W 9 7 8 8 6 4 3 3 1

L 3 2 2 3 4 7 10 9 9

T 2 4 2 0 2 2 1 0 3

W 4 3 1 1 0 0 0 W 2 1 1 0

L 0 1 0 2 2 4 0 L 0 0 2 2

T 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 T 0 0 0 0

GF 30 19 5 11 7 5 0 GF 13 5 6 2

GA 3 18 4 9 12 31 0 GA 2 0 15 9

+/+ 27 +1 +1 +2 -5 - 26 0 +/+ 11 +5 -9 -7

PTS 14 11 11 3

GP 14 13 12 11 12 13 14 12 13

PEACE COUNTRY FEMALE HOCKEY LEAGUE Tier 1 PTS GP Grande Prairie Panthers 8 4 Grovedale Vipers 6 4 Sturgeon Lake Chill 3 2 Peace River Sharks 2 3 North Peace Eagles 1 3 Hythe Colts 0 4 Dawson Creek Elites 0 0 Tier 2 PTS GP Slave Lake Kodiaks 4 2 Taylor Falcons 2 1 Fairview Mad Dogs 2 3 Grimshaw Hustlers 0 2

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NORTH WEST JUNIOR HOCKEY LEAGUE Team PTS GP North Peace Navigators 26 18 D.C. Jr. Canucks 24 18 Fairview Flyers 22 17 GP JDA County Kings 20 17 Fort St. John Huskies 20 18 Sexsmith Vipers 15 18 Beaverlodge Blades 2 18


A20 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

ARTS

ARTS&CULTURE A unique take on steak Few foods have as much universal appeal as steak, and filet mignon might just be the most beloved steak of them all. When hosting a dinner party or enjoying steaks at home with the family, consider the following recipe for “Filet Mignon With Braised Oxtails and Purple Potato Puree” from Tony Mantuano’s “The Spiaggia Cookbook” (Chronicle Books).

Filet Mignon With Braised Oxtails and Purple Potato Puree Serves 4

For the Braised Oxtails: 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 pounds oxtails 1 yellow onion, chopped 3 carrots, peeled and chopped 3 stalks celery, chopped 1 tablespoon tomato paste 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme For the Oxtail Sauce: 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 small carrot, finely chopped 1/2 yellow onion, finely chopped 1 stalk celery, finely chopped 1 teaspoon tomato paste 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 4 filet mignons, 5 ounces each Sea salt and freshly ground pepper 1 tablespoon chopped fresh flat-leaf (Italian) parsley 11/2 cups dry red wine 2 cups veal stock 2 cups water 1 ounce caul fat, cut into four 5-inch squares 1 bay leaf 5 peppercorns 1/2 cup dry red wine 11/4 cups reserved braising liquid 2 cups blanched and chopped broccoli rabe Purple Potato Puree (see below), for serving 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced To make the braised oxtails: In a large roasting pan over medium-high heat, heat the 1/4 cup olive oil. When the pan and oil are hot, add the oxtails and sear, turning as needed to brown on all sides, about 4 minutes per side. Transfer to a large stockpot and set aside. Add the onion, carrots and celery to the roasting pan and return to medium-high heat. Saute until the vegetables are softened, about 5 minutes. Add the tomato paste, thyme and parsley. Stir well to combine and cook, uncovered, until the vegetables are browned, 6 to 8 minutes longer. Add the wine and scrape to loosen any browned bits from the bottom of the pan. Add the vegetables and liquid to the stockpot, along with the veal stock and water. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat to low, and gently simmer, uncovered, until the oxtail meat just starts to fall off the bones, about 3 hours. Transfer the oxtails to a platter and let cool. Pull the meat off the bones and set aside. Strain the braising liquid and reserve. Discard the solids. Line a lightly oiled 3-inch ring mold with 1 caul fat square. Pack 1/2 cup of the braised oxtail meat into the mold, pressing gently to pack the layer. Fold over the edges of the square. Carefully remove the mold. Repeat with the remaining 3 squares. Set aside. To make the sauce: In a saucepan, heat the 6 tablespoons olive oil over mediumhigh heat. Add the carrot, onion and celery and saute for 3 minutes. Stir in the tomato paste and cook 2 minutes longer. Add the bay leaf, peppercorns and wine. Bring to a simmer and reduce for 5 minutes. Add the reserved braising liquid, return to a simmer, and cook until reduced to 1 cup, 15 to 20 minutes. Strain. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Keep warm. Heat a large saute pan over medium-high heat for 1 minute. Add 2 tablespoons olive oil to the pan and heat. Add the oxtail packets, seam side down, and brown for 4 minutes each side. Remove the packets and pat dry with paper towels. Keep warm. Heat another large saute pan over medium-high heat for 1 minute. Add the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and heat. Season the filets with salt and pepper, add to the pan, and sear for 4 minutes on each side for medium-rare. Prepare the broccoli rabe. To serve, place an oxtail packet in the center of one of four warmed plates. Arrange a filet mignon on top of the oxtail, then place a large oval of purple potato puree on top of the filet. Ladle 1/4 cup of sauce on the plate. Arrange the broccoli rabe and garlic around the packet. Repeat to make the remaining 3 servings and serve immediately. PC136251

DEMMITT FUN Nearly 100 took in the Jenie Thai concert of the Borderline Culture Series at the Demmitt Community Centre on November 19. DON ALBRIGHT PHOTO

MONTNEY COOL The Montney Coulees played the Rolla Pub on November 19.

SUBMITTED PHOTO


The Dawson Creek Mirror

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A21

ARTS

Dawson Creek & District DC Ministerial Association

Contact: David Roch (250) 782-1947 E-mail: droch@pris.ca 11501 17th Street, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 4P2

Alliance Church

Contact: (250) 782-3837 Steven Roszmann, Youth Pastor Web: www. dawsoncreekalliance.ca/ 9009 10 Street, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 4T1

Bethel Pentecostal Church

Contact: Gordon Warriner 250-782-5885 Web: http://www.betheldc.ca 11501 17th Street, Dawson Creek

Dawson Creek Community Church

Contact: David Roch (250) 782-4745 Email : droch@pris.ca 1224 103 Ave, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2G9

First Baptist Church

CRASH BOOM BANG Pouce Coupe firework action after last week’s Truck Light parade. ROB BROWN PHOTO

We are a Christian Church that serves our communities through providing opportunities to worship & pastoral care through representing the faith of Christ Jesus. Mens, womens, and childrens/youths programs are available. Call the number below for more info and for service times.

Contact: Terry Coe (250) 782-4792 Web: http://dcfirstbaptist.ca/ Email: firstbaptist@shawbiz. ca 1400 113 Ave, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2Z2 Sundays 10:30am Winter hours Sundays 10:00am Summer

Family Foursquare

Contact: Trevor Birak 250-784-8530 Email: Trevor.Birak@gmail. com

Pouce Coupe Community Church

Contact: Pastor Cory Lizotte 250-786-0160 Sunday Meetings 10:00 am

Salvation Army Church 250-782-4812 1436 104th Avenue, Dawson Creek, BC Church Service: Sundays 11:00 am

South Peace United Church

Contact: Maryilyn Carroll (250) 782-2636 Web: www.neonet.bc.ca/ unitedchurchdawsoncreek/ Spuc_Home.html Email: spuc@neonet.bc.ca 1300 104 Ave, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2J6 Sunday Meetings 10:30 am

St James Presbyterian Church

Pastor Terry Hagen (250) 782-4616 Email: stjamespastorterry@ gmail.com 1501-108 Ave., Dawson Creek, BC, V1G 4H8 Sunday Service: 10:00 a.m.

St Marks Anglican Church Web: http://stmarksanglican. blogspot.ca/ Email: stmarks@pris.ca 1029 103 Ave, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2G6 250-782-2939 Sunday Service 11:00 a.m.

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church Pastor Noel Smith Sunday School: 10am Sunday Service: 11am 250-782-3085 stpaul58@telus.net 901 Cornwall Crescent, Dawson Creek, BC

Grace Lutheran Church Grace is a caring church community. We welcome all to worship and share our life in Christ’s love.

(250) 782-3624 Email : grace@pris.ca 11101 17th Street, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 4Z3 Sunday Worship 11:00 am

Grandview Chapel

Is a friendly church nestled on the hill in Dawson Creek, BC Web: www.grandviewchapel.ca

Contact: Tony Vigar 250-782-4225 900 94 Ave. Dawson Creek, Sunday Meetings 10:00 am

Notre Dame Catholic Church

Please contact the office for service times and for ministerial program information

BAKE SALE Tis the season! Rotary Manor held a bake sale over the weekend. ROB BROWN PHOTO

Contact: Fr. Louis Kwena (250) 782-3456 Email: nddc@shaw.ca 908 104 Avenue, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2H7

Apostolic Lighthouse

Contact: Pastor James Bridges (250) 782-5489 Email: anna@peacecountry. com 709-96A Ave, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 1M6 Meeting Time: Wednesday 7 p.m. Sunday - 2 p.m.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 250-782-4921 Web: http://www.mormon. org/ 10901 13th Street, Dawson Creek, BC

Church of the Nazarene

Church of the Nazarene Service times: Sunday 2pm, Friday 7pm Website: www.dcnazarene.com Pastor Megan Polowski Email: dcnazarene@gmail.com Phone: 250-719-7425

Church of the New Jerusalem

A distinctive Christian church dedicated to learning, living and sharing the spiritual understanding of the Bible as revealed in books written by Emanuel Swedenborg. We worship the Lord, Jesus Christ as God Himself in Human form. We believe his whole word is a divine allegory with a spiritual sense. We also have a unique and extensive set of teachings about the life after death. Our motto “ All religion is of life, and the life of religion is to do what is good.” All are welcome to our services and other events. Please go to www. dawsoncreeknewchurch.ca for more info and the church newsletter.

(250) 782-8035 9013 8th Street, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 3N3 Sunday Worship 11:00 am

Gideons International Canada

The Grizzly Valley Chapter is part of the national Gideons organization. Our mission is to share God’s World with effective and engaging forms of Scripture. Reaching people everywhere with the Gospel through personal witness and partnership with the local church.

Contacts: William “Bill” & Pauline Hendley, ph. 250-788-8177 (H) 250-788-6902 (C) Email: newtouch@pris.ca; Stanton & Charlotte Miller, ph: 250-782-3881 (H) Email: cemiller083@gmail.com

Baha’i Faith

Baha u allah – founder of the Baha’i faith, meaning glory of God New Independent religious belief based on progressive revelations. The belief that God sent messengers throughout various times and places, sending messages of his teachings, to different people in different times explaining the various religions around the world. Feast every 19 days open to others.

Contact : Dale Campbell 250-719-7427 Tuesday Evenings 7:30 pm Location varies.

Jehovah’s Witnesses

250-782-7487 644 105A Avenue, Dawson Creek, BC

Northgate Anabaptist Fellowship (Mennonite Church, BC)

We meet to worship God, study the Bible, encourage and support each other, and work together to further God’s purposes in the world.

Contact: Eileen Klassen (250) 219-6375 Email: northgate.a.f@gmail.com 1800 109 Ave, Dawson Creek, BC V1G 2V5 Sunday Meetings 10:00 am

Peace Mission Chapel

Contact: Pastor Lee Stevenson 250-843-7506 Sunday Meetings 11:00 am

Seventh-Day Adventist Church

Bible Study: 10:00 am Church Services: 11:00 am

Contact: Church office 250-782-1710 9201-14th Street, Dawson Creek, BC Pastor: Cavin Chwyl

New Beginnings Baptist Church 10221-18th St Dawson Creek, BC Pastor: Dr. Michael Stark www.newbeginningsbaptist. ca

Rolla Bible Baptist Church

Pastor Bob Rempel (250)759-4540 Web: rollachurch.com Email: rolla@pris.ca Location: Rolla, BC at the corner of 400 Ave. and 403 St. Services: Sundays 10:30am


A22 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

community

The Village of Pouce Coupe lit up the night with Santa, hot dogs and marshmallows over the open fire before parading through the village and raising funds and food for the local food bank. ROB BROWN PhOtO

The Dawson Creek Mirror

Paul Davey of Software Emporium accepted the business of the year award at city council earlier this month. More than 1,000 votes were cast in the revived Dawson Creek Community Awards, which acknowledged the town’s citizen, youth, business and entrepreneur of the year. JONNY WAKeField PhOtO

Sync Falls, located in the Red Deer Creek area southeast of Tumbler Ridge, is Northeast B.C.’s “newest” waterfall. A team of adventurers stumbled upon the falls on a grainy satellite image and made the trek to the previously unknown water feature this summer. See Page 1 for more on the waterfall find. tUmBleR Ridge PhOtO

Does your home light up the neighborhood with a dazzling display of holiday cheer? Nominate yourself by sending in this entry form to the Mirror office, Dawson Creek Peavey Mart; OR Upload your photos to our Deck the Home Contest page, and you Proudly could be eligible to WIN a gift certificate to Peavey Mart! Brought to Prizes: 1st: $500, 2nd: $300, 3rd: $200 you by:

Full details available at:

DAWSONCREEKMIRROR.CA

Name: _____________________________________ Address: ___________________________________ Ph/Cell:______________________

Dawson Creek


The Dawson Creek Mirror

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A23

Send in your photoS

Email us your community photos at editor@dcdn.ca

Owner Donna Jones and sales rep Azalyn Kotak pose at the George Dawson Inn Saturday with light works that can be custom made for the holidays, weddings, night lights, and special occasions. Sarah Trobacher greets those entering the DC Farmers Market on the weekend. The market will be open Fridays and Saturday through the month of December until the 17, and then closed for the month of January. roB BroWn photoS

Olde Creek Store held an open house last week.

Chris Broad with one of her many tasty creations Friday at St. Marks Turkey pot pie luncheon.


A24 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

EVENTS CALENDAR

CALENDAR

YOUR WEEKLY COMMUNITY LISTINGS Saturday, Dec. 10 – Sat., Dec. 31

SAT.,

DEC 10

HOLIDAY!

TUES. MEETING

Christmas for Kids at NAR. Head down to the Station Museum for a fun afternoon.

MILE 0 QUILTERS GUILD TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS 7PM AT KPAC

1 TO 3PM

FRI.,

DEC 16

MASQUE-RAVE!

Get ready! Sudeten Hall. DOORS AT 8PM

THURSDAYS KNIT NIGHT

KNIT NIGHT THURS. @ FAKING SANITY 6:30 8:30 PM.

WEDNESDAYS

NEW YEAR’S EVE - EVERYWHERE

COMPUTER INFORMATION

SAT., DEC. 31

Seniors Computer Club CO-OP BISTRO • 1:15PM

250-782-4668 for more information

WEDNESDAYS THIRD WEDNESDAYS!

South Peace Historical Society meetings Calvin Kruk Centre ARCHIVES ROOM 2 PM

250-782-4668 for more info.

THURSDAYS

ROB BROWN PHOTO

s i t r m h a C s y D r a ays t o R

MORNINGS!

TOPS 3907 Take Off Pounts Sensibly meet Thursday. 9:30 AM AT NEW BEGINNING BAPTISTS CHURCH. CALL 250-7826628.

Sunday Dec 4 please join us for our:

Community Dinner 5

$

/plate

Notre Dame Hall December 4th

PHOTOS WITH SANTA! DC VET CLINIC

Doors open 4:00pm Dinner at 5:00pm

SAT., DEC. 3

Tickets available at Santa will Dawson Co-Op office, visit too! Dawson Creek Mirror office,

Then Sunday Dec 11 come to: Pioneer Village December 11th 12:00 – 5:00 pm

Admission is FREE All welcome

Enjoy sleigh rides, skating on Rotary Lake, music, chestnuts roasting on an open fire, hot dogs and hot chocolate.

Sponsored by the Rotary Clubs of Dawson Creek Donations may be made to benefit local charities


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A25

The Dawson Creek Mirror

30

WEEKS TO GO

A life dedicated to serving the Canadian people

Leonard Braithwaite was the first black Canadian elected to a provincial legislature. He ran against NDP and Conservative party candidates to win a Member of Provincial (MPP) seat for the Liberal party. His maiden speech in 1964 to the Ontario Legislature addressed the Separate Schools Act, which permitted racial segregation in the Ontario school system. Several weeks later, the province’s premier amended the Act. This human rights victory was the first of many championed by Braithwaite during his political career. Leonard Braithwaite was born in Toronto in 1923 to a Bajan (Barbadian) father and Jamaican mother. He grew up in the Kensington Market district during the Depression, and in 1943—after several unsuccessful enlistment attempts stemming from racial prejudice—left to serve overseas with the LEONARD BRAITHWAITE Royal Canadian Air Force in the Second World War. He functioned as both an engine mechanic and a safety equipment (1923–2012) worker with the No. 6 Bomber Group in Yorkshire, England. WWII veteran, politician and After the war, Braithwaite returned to Ontario’s capital where he rights activist obtained a Bachelor of Commerce degree from the University of Toronto. He continued his studies at the Harvard School of Business and there acquired his MBA. The final tier of his education involved a return to Toronto where he achieved a law degree from Osgoode Hall Law School of York University. In 1958, he opened a law practice just outside Toronto, in the suburb of Etobicoke. In 1960, Braithwaite commenced his political career as school trustee for Ward 4 in Etobicoke. A couple of years later he was elected as alderman for Ward 4. He became increasingly popular in the riding and ultimately was approached by the Liberals to run as an MPP. He won in the 1963, 1967 and 1971 elections, but ultimately lost his seat in 1975. During his more than 10 years in parliament, he raised his voice for racial and women’s rights. One of the causes he championed was affording women the right to work as legislative pages in parliament—a position formerly reserved exclusively for men. After his years in the Ontario Legislature, Braithwaite returned to municipal politics. He also returned to his law practice, where he worked until his death in 2012 at the age of 88. Shortly after his passing, the City of Toronto renamed an Etobicoke park in honour of the riding’s pioneering representative. His determination and strong sense of justice sparked profound change in Ontario’s legal framework, most notably by, in his words, “getting rid of the old race law.”

Where are we from? THE 52 LARGEST GROUPS IN CANADA’S MULTICULTURAL MOSAIC

CANADA’S BELGIAN COMMUNITY

According to the Canada 2011 Census, 176,615 Canadians claim Belgian ancestry. This population has made significant positive impacts on Canadian culture, affecting numerous sectors and industries. Some Belgian-Canadians of note include: painter Henri Leopold Masson; Olympic diver Emilie-Joane Heymans; philanthropist and businessman Michael DeGroote and musician Chad VanGaalen. In the mid 19th century, Belgians were given preferred immigrant status in Canada. The Canadian governing body was actively pursuing agriculturally inclined individuals to help settle the western provinces and in many cases, suitable candidates—such as Belgians— were given safe passage and free farmland. Several Belgian communities therefore sprung up in Manitoba, with St. Boniface and St. Alphonse being among the earliest. Substantial waves of immigration also occurred close to the beginning of the 20th century— thanks to a direct steamship link from Antwerp and a need for dairy farmers—and after the First World War in response to a need from Ontario tobacco companies. A final large influx of Belgians started to arrive after the Second World War and kept coming until 1990. This final group gravitated to urban centres and were more educated than preceding migrants. About two-thirds among this group landed in Quebec.

TEST YOUR CANADIAN KNOWLEDGE QUESTION 1: Name the Canadian creator of the Scott Pilgrim series, on which the 2010 film Scott Pilgrim vs. the World starring Michael Cera, Anna Kendrick and Jason Schwartzman is based QUESTION 2: Which province celebrates the statutory holiday Louis Riel Day on the third Monday of February? QUESTION 3: What is the name of the next Canadian astronaut set to travel to the International Space Station for a six-month mission in November 2018? QUESTION 4: In which city are the Canadian Forces Snowbirds — Canada’s aerial acrobatics team—based?

ART, LITERATURE AND ENTERTAINMENT

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY

SPORTS AND LEISURE

ANSWERS

CANADA: NATURAL SOURCE OF PRIDE SINCE 1867

Quiz

1: Bryan Lee O’Malley 2: Manitoba 3: David Saint-Jacques 4: Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan

Canadian treasures

infO Canada THE STORIES BEHIND OUR SYMBOLS

NORTHWEST TERRITORIES BIRD: GYRFALCON In 1990, the gyrfalcon (Falco rusticolus) became the avian emblem of the Northwest Territories. This largest member of the falcon family winters in the north and primarily inhabits tundra and mountainous areas. Its diet consists mainly of ptarmigan but also includes squirrel, arctic hare and seabirds. The gyrfalcon is quick, strong and has few natural enemies.


A26 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

Automotive

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Residential

Commercial

Windows

Doors

Repairs

Lets Be Clear!

Automotive

Residential

A Cracked Windshield is a hazard

GET YOUR VEHICLE READY FOR THE ROAD

CUT THUMB GLASS Call (250) 782-9321 Toll Free 1-866-782-9321

webSTICKS A B C 1 2 3 7 8 9 13 14 15 19 20 21 25 26 ?

D 4 10 16 22 ?

E F 5 6 11 12 17 18 23 24 ? ?

Quality Workmanship We Can Handle All Your & Materials Glass Replacement Needs

with Terry Stickel Suppose all the counting numbers were arranged in rows and columns as shown on the left: Under what letter will the number 2000 appear? Answer: It will appear under ‘B”, in the 333rd row

TODAY’S PUZZLE

Copyright © 2008, Penny Press

11. To that place 12. Expressed pleasure 14. Fills with horror 17. Find a sum 18. Cognizant 20. Female making debut in society 23. Members of U.S. Navy 24. A group of three 25. And, Latin 26. Fall back time 29. What was that? 30. Inches per minute (abbr.) 31. American/ Canadian falls Clue 32. North Palestine region 35. Bird beak 36. Manila hemp 38. Smart 40. Three-banded armadillo 41. Short cloak 42. Scops owl genus 43. 100 = 1 afghani 44. A health resort 45. Equal, prefix 46. Microgram 47. Make imperfect

CLUES ACROSS 36. Lawyer’s organi4. Japanese apricot zation 1. Molten rocks 5. They __ 37. Maldives capital 7. More (Spanish) 6. Soviet Socialists 38. In bed Republics 10. Artists’ workrooms 39. Wedgelike metal 7. Arad river fastener 12. Radiant light 8. Lined up one around an object 40. Winglike struc-joining beside Find the correct word, theanother first tures 13. More threadbare 9. Diego, Francisco word then joining the second word 41. Mesoamerican or Anselmo 14. Moses’ elder resin brother 10. One who ana44. Glasses lyzes metals 15. Become aware of 45. Green 16. Exclamation of PREVIOUS PUZZLES ANSWERS relief 48. Large South American burrowing 17. Swiss river rodent 18. Mimics 49. Shoulder blades 19. Colored fabric 50. Noah’s boat 21. A bunch of bills 51. A female ogre 22. Despised 27. “Today’s” Roker CLUES DOWN 28. “Twilight Zone” 1. Unkind host 2. Vestments 33. Three-toed sloth 34. Actor 3. A derisive remark


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A27

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REYNARS

FUNERAL HOME & CREMATORIUM Sharing in Our Peace River Area Communities’ History for 87 Years

We understand the importance of community education. For your pre-planning information please feel free to drop in and visit with us in our family friendly atmosphere.

R0031158911

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Serving Dawson Creek, Chetwynd, Moberly Lake, Tumbler Ridge & Surrounding Area 1300-102 AVENUE, DAWSON CREEK BC • (250) 782-2424 • TOLL FREE 1-800-217-2299 • wecare@reynars.com • www.reynars.com

Clue

Find the correct word, joining the first word then joining the second word

Clue

Find the correct word, joining the first word then joining the second word

TODAYS PUZZLE

how to play: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started. Remember: you must not repeat the numbers 1 through 9 in the same line, column or 3x3 box. PREVIOUS PUZZLES ANSWERS


A28 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

Had a Dad

The Dawson Creek Mirror

coffee corner

Dear Annie: My nephew, “Bill,” married “Helen.” Helen had a 2-year-old son, “Dylan.” Helen told Bill that Dylan’s father had given up his parental rights, so Bill legally and happily adopted baby Dylan. We all came to deeply love baby Dylan. He was adorable, bright and sweet. Dylan quickly felt close to all his many cousins. Four years later, Helen abruptly left Bill for another man. When Bill attempted to get visitation with Dylan, Helen informed the court that Dylan’s father had never really given up his parental rights, so therefore the adoption became void. Tragically, none of us in the family ever saw Dylan again. How could 6-year-old Dylan begin to understand this? He loved Bill more than anyone in the world, and then one day he never saw him again! We do not know what his mother told him. How could his mother hurt him like this? I often wonder whether children are ever going to have any rights of their own in our courts. So far, the only rights kids have are not to be starved and not to be beaten. Our children are still lawfully treated as property of their parents. Our courts look out for the parents’ rights. When will our laws become in favor of what is in the best interest of the child? -- Still Crying Dear Crying: Look further into the laws in your state. I think there is a good chance your nephew has recourse here to see Dylan again, especially as he adopted him -- or at least was led to believe he did. Some states do have laws that take such factors into consideration, with the goal of doing what’s best for the child. Don’t give up hope.

skills. I will admit I settled for much less than I should have with my most recent three partners because they had many good qualities that attracted me. One decided after three years that I was “too fat” (I am a size 12), and he met a woman who is shorter than I am but not thinner. Another, after two years, told me he had a boyfriend and thought it was OK to date us both at the same time because he is bisexual. I ended the relationship, and six months later, he was married to a woman. Another one sat on my couch one day and began crying, telling me he missed his wife, whom he had divorced five years earlier. (They eventually remarried.) My friends, all married or in long-term relationships, said, “Take some time for yourself!” I don’t know what they were thinking when I’d been spending most birthdays, Christmas Eves and New Year’s Eves alone for years. I haven’t dated for two years. Now the same friends say, “You have to get yourself out there!” I go to movies, plays and other events alone. I bicycle on busy bike paths, and I work a job. But the truth is that no one has the answer as to why most single men are so out of whack. So they tell you silly things -for example, “Learn how to be happy with yourself.” “Serially Disappointed” gave no indication she is not happy with herself, and I am indeed happy with who I am. I just wish I could find a quality single guy in his 60s before he is snatched up by one of the millions of intelligent, compassionate, kind single women out there looking. -- Will Anyone Love Me When I’m 64?

Dear Annie: I feel that your reply to “Serially Disappointed” was a cop-out. I hear what this young woman is saying. I am in my early 60s and have been divorced for 15 years. The men I meet are seriously lacking in relationship and basic life

Send your questions for Annie Lane to dearannie@creators.com. To find out more about Annie Lane and read features by other Creators Syndicate columnists and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www. creators.com.

Annie’s Mailbox

© 2015 by Vicki Whiting, Editor Jeff Schinkel, Graphics Vol. 31, No. 52

Take a stroll around your neighborhood with friends or family members. On this walk, each of you take one of the cards below and cross out items as you see them. First one to black out the card wins!

PROTECT COUNT LEARN CENTURY HOLLY SKILL BIRDS STARS SCIENCE MODEL CAP CANDY GRAPH TYPE LOOK

In 2007, Tom Rusert of Sonoma Birding had the idea to include kids in this important “citizen science” effort. He launched the first Audubon Christmas Bird Count (CBC) for Kids. It was so successful that now organizations around the country are starting their own CBC for Kids programs, following Rusert’s model. To learn more about how you could start or join a CBC for Kids, visit: www.audubon.org or www.sonomabirding.com

Observation is an important scientific skill. Look carefully to count each type of bird and complete this graph by coloring in a bar for each one you count on this page.

Standards Link: Research: Use the newspaper to locate information.

Standards Link: Research: Use the newspaper to locate information.

TAURUS – ApR 21/MAy 21

Introspection leads you on a quest to find a creative outlet, Taurus. Play to your strengths and ideas will surface, or check in with friends for inspiration.

GEMINI – MAy 22/JUN 21

Gemini, stick with a course of action even if you have hit a rocky road. Your efforts thus far have been extensive, and you will soon see a light at the end of the tunnel.

CANCER – JUN 22/JUl 22

Cancer, if family is not around, surround yourself with friends. This support system will prove invaluable. Express your gratitude to friends for their unwavering support.

lEO – JUl 23/AUG 23

Leo, a different way of thinking may be just the thing you need to solve a problem that’s been more puzzling than you expected. Ask others for their point of view.

VIRGO – AUG 24/SEpT 22

Virgo, before you can be honest with others, you have to be honest with yourself. Take a look at things you might want to change and then forge ahead in that direction.

Libra, if you take a roundabout route, you will still end up at the finish line. And the new perspective this route provides may benefit you in the long run.

It’s called the Christmas Bird Count. Counting birds every year at the same time and in the same location gives scientists important information about birds and the environment.

Look through today’s newspaper and count the number of eyes you can find in photos, comics, etc. Have a parent try. Who found the most?

Aries, peace of mind may come your way after you square away all of your finances and begin developing a budget for the year to come. Enlist some professional help if necessary.

lIBRA – SEpT 23/OCT 23

very year for over a century, people around the country count birds.

The information helps scientists protect birds and their habitat—and helps identify environmental problems. For example, changes in bird populations can tell about a threat to the environment, such as groundwater poisoning from improper use of pesticides.

ARIES – MAR 21/ApR 20

SCORpIO – OCT 24/NOV 22 L P J K M N R A E L

B I R D S O P G M S

Y U Q O R T D A X C R G T B T Y Y E C I

U R N L L E S P L E

T A U L N S C Y E N

N P O I S R A T S C E H C K C A N D Y E

C W V S B K O O L W

Scorpio, you may have to work a little harder to get what you want, but the results can’t be denied. Focus your attention on making a name for yourself in your career.

SAGITTARIUS – NOV 23/DEC 21

There is no stopping you when you have a goal in mind, Sagittarius. Call it stubbornness or just dedication, but your ambition may open doors that remain closed to others.

CApRICORN – DEC 22/JAN 20

How many of these can you find?

Now make a graph of your results.

Look through the newspaper for a picture and then study it for one minute. After one minute, cover the image and write down or share with a partner every detail you can remember. Standards Link: Students observe common objects using the five senses.

Write a paragraph about a bird you like. Explain why you chose this bird. Include three facts in your report.

Capricorn, someone close to you is interested in learning more about what makes you tick. New friendships may develop this week, so approach situations with an open mind.

AQUARIUS – JAN 21/FEB 18

Aquarius, resist the temptation to bite off more than you can chew. While you might want to prove your ability to multitask, don’t do so at a detriment to your health.

pISCES – FEB 19/MAR 20

Pisces, even if you have rest and relaxation on the brain, celestial forces are pushing you in a different direction.


The Dawson Creek Mirror

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A29

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1010 Announcements 1055 Coming Events GET RESULTS! Reach almost 2 million people in 107 papers for only $395/week for a 25-word text ad, or $995/week for a formatted display ad

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MILE 0 QUILTERS GUILD: Tuesdays & Thursdays 7PM at Calvin Kruk Performing Arts Centre in Dawson Creek

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REPUTABLE PRO DJ SETUP WITH SMOKIN’ HOT DANCE TUNES PLUS KARAOKE R E D U C E D RATES! STEVE: 250-7845999

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S AT U R D AY S : LEARN YOUR ROOTS - Genealogy information NAR PARK ROOTS BUILDING 10:00am peacecountryroots.ca

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South Peace Historical Society Meetings Third Wednesday of the month. In Dawson Creek at the Calvin Kruk Centre Archives Room at 2 pm.

1010 Announcements

Dorothy Sarah Vause, 1105 Obituaries formerly from Fort St.

r0011150614

John, BC passed away on September 15, 2016 Dorothy was born January 3, 1930 in Quill Lake Saskatchewan. She is survived by her daughter Linda (Mike) Kowal, and son Ken (Loretta) Vause and son in law Lloyd Garlock and numerous grandchildren, great grandchildren and one great great grandchild. Dorothy will be remember by always willing to offer a her home as a quiet refuge for family and friends. Family was what Dot was about. She loved her siblings, and her children and their families proudly displaying pictures of her family throughout her house. Dot loved music and dancing and hosted many New Year’s parties that were enjoyed by everyone. Her favorite part was the guitar playing and singing. Knitting was something that Dot excelled at, keeping many in socks, mitts and sweater for years. She worked at the Fort St. John Providence Hospital in 1963 until 1982. Once retired Dot and Jim made full use of their motorhome, taking grandchildren on numerous camping trips. After Jim’s passing in 1992, she kept herself busy doing volunteer work. In 2013 Dot moved closer to her daughter Linda and into the Heimstead Lodge in LaCrete, AB and on July 5, 2016 to Fort Vermilion St. Theresa Long Term Care unit. R0011339404

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ARE YOU MISSING HERISHED OLD FAMILY PHOTOS? The News office has a collection of photos that we’ve published over the years to celebrate graduations, birthdays, engagements, etc. We can’t keep them forever, & they’re too valuable to throw away, so we invite you to come in & reclaim your forgotten property. Office hours are 8:30am - 4:00pm, Mon-Fri, or call 250782-4888.

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Have an Event or meeting you need to Advertise? Call: 250-7824888 to book your ad.(Ad charges may apply). Enter your events online: dawsoncreekmirror.ca

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LOCAL

10200-17th Street, Dawson Creek

Dawson Creek Seniors Hall Activities 1011 McKellar Ave Floor curling, carpet bowling, pool, line dancing, bridge, crib, darts, bingo, pickle ball, craft classes. Come and see our hall and try out our activities.

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1090 Funeral Services

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ART CLASSES UNTIL JUNE 30: Each day a different skill for after school youth D A W S O N CREEK ART GALLERY: 3:30 to 5:00PM 250782-2601 KNIT NIGHT: Thursdays at Faking Sanity Cafe in Dawson Creek6:30 to 8:30 PM.

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D A W S O N CREEK BADMINTON CLUB From Sept. 19, 2016 to April 26, 2017 Mondays & Wednesdays Time: 7:30-9:30 pm Central Campus Gym Dawson Creek Please pay before you start playing. Players under 16 years must have an adult with them. You will need clean gym shoes and a racquet. Contact Dan or Judy Pandachuck: 250782-4783

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A30 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

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NO. S167950 VANCOUVER REGISTRY IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BETWEEN: WENDY BAKER PLAINTIFF AND: JESSE DISHER, JOHN DOE, RICHARD ROE, and JANE DOE DEFENDANTS ADVERTISEMENT [Rule 22-3 of the Supreme Court Civil Rules applies to all forms.] To: The Defendant, Jesse Disher TAKE NOTICE THAT on November 16, 2016, an order was made for service on you of a Notice of Civil Claim issued from the Vancouver Registry of the Supreme Court of British Columbia in proceeding number S167950, by way of this advertisement. In the proceeding, the Plaintiff, Wendy Baker, says that as a result of a dog attack on December 25, 2015 at or near 163-9207- 82nd Street, in the City of Fort. St. John, B.C. the following relief is claimed against you: 1. General Damages, including for: a) pain and suffering; b) loss of earnings and future earning capacity; c) cost of future care; d) permanent partial disability; e) Special Damages; f) Interest; g) Costs. You must file a response to the Notice of Civil Claim within the period required under the Supreme Court Civil Rules failing which further proceedings, including judgment, may be taken against you without notice to you. You may obtain, from the Vancouver Registry, at 800 Smithe Street, Vancouver, B.C. a copy of the Notice of Civil Claim and the order providing for service by this advertisement. This advertisement is placed by the Plaintiff, Wendy Baker, whose address for service is c/o McNeneny McNeney Spieker LLP, #605-1080 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2T1, Tel: 604-687-1766, Fax: 604687-0181. NO. S167952 VANCOUVER REGISTRY IN THE SUPREME COURT OF BRITISH COLUMBIA BETWEEN: ROBIN ELGIE PLAINTIFF AND: JESSE DISHER, JOHN DOE, RICHARD ROE, and JANE DOE DEFENDANTS ADVERTISEMENT [Rule 22-3 of the Supreme Court Civil Rules applies to all forms.] To: The Defendant, Jesse Disher TAKE NOTICE THAT on November 16, 2016, an order was made for service on you of a Notice of Civil Claim issued from the Vancouver Registry of the Supreme Court of British Columbia in proceeding number S167952, by way of this advertisement. In the proceeding, the Plaintiff, Robin Elgie, says that as a result of a dog attack on December 25, 2015 at or near 163-9207- 82nd Street, in the City of Fort. St. John, B.C. the following relief is claimed against you: 2. General Damages, including for: h) pain and suffering; i) loss of earnings and future earning capacity; j) cost of future care; k) permanent partial disability; l) Special Damages; m) Interest; n) Costs. You must file a response to the Notice of Civil Claim within the period required under the Supreme Court Civil Rules failing which further proceedings, including judgment, may be taken against you without notice to you. You may obtain, from the Vancouver Registry, at 800 Smithe Street, Vancouver, B.C. a copy of the Notice of Civil Claim and the order providing for service by this advertisement. This advertisement is placed by the Plaintiff, Robin Elgie, whose address for service is c/o McNeneny McNeney Spieker LLP, #605-1080 Howe Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2T1, Tel: 604-687-1766, Fax: 604-687-0181.

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The Dawson Creek Mirror

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DEC 3- COUNTRY MUSIC DANCEMusic by Night Sounds at the Senior Citizens Hall, 1101 McKellar Ave, Dawson Creek. Dance from 8:3012:30 Admission includes lunch. 19 years and over welcome. For more information phone Fred at 250782-2192 or Linda at 250-843-7418 Saturday, December 3rd - 1:00 pm Dawson Creek Royal Canadian Legion Branch# 141 will be holding its Monthly General Meeting at its New location the branch located at 900-102nd Ave, (side entrance) across 9th Street from Lakeview Credit Union. Results will be given on results of annual poppy campaign. Save the Dates July 7, 5:00 pm to July 9, 2017 at 3:30 pm for the 23rd Annual Mile Zero Cruisers Summer Cruise weekend starts with Registration held at the Dawson Co-op. Bring down your pride and joy and register for the 2017 Summer Cruise Car Show weekend. All registrants will receive access to all weekend events as well as a chance to win prizes. Check in this paper for more details closer to the show! W E D N E S D AY S : COMPUTER INFORMATION Seniors Computer Club - Dawson CO-OP Bistro 1:15pm 250-7824668 for more information

1055 Coming Events

Seniors Game Time First Thursday of the Month until May 4 10:30 am-12 pm MDT Dawson Creek Public Library Join Literacy Now and the Dawson Creek Municipal Library for Seniors Game Time. There are board games, cards, and more. Do you have a favourite game to play? Bring it along and share with new friends! Bring a friend and be entered in a draw! Everyone is welcome. Light refreshments are provided. SOUTH PEACE HOSPICE PALLIATIVE CARE SOCIETY Candlelight Memorial Service Thursday December 1, 2016at 7:00 p.m. Calvin Kruk Art Centre for the Arts Theatre 10401- 10th Street All are welcome to attend! We invite you to attend our service to celebrate and remember the life of your loved ones and find comfort in sharing with others. There will be a candle lighting service, musical selections, and memorial cards to place on the tree and candles to light in memory of our loved one. Please join us. Refreshments will be served. S U N D AY S : FAMILY TREE HELP - Peace Country Roots Group Meeting Fourth Sunday of each Month at the CALVIN KRUK CENTRE in Dawson Creek 1:30pm

1055 Coming Events

Visually Impaired Support Group meets the first Tuesday of each month at 12 noon at First Baptist Church (south side of Tremblay School) 1400-113 Ave Dawson Creek. Come and enjoy a simple lunch (by donation) and a short program. For further information please phone Margaret, 250-7823221 or Pam, 250782-5187

1165

Volunteers

Dawson Creek’s “Better at Home” is looking for volunteers to help shovel walks and driveways for the seniors. Volunteer your time in helping seniors throughout the winter months. To get involved you can head to “Better at Home” in the Dawson Creek CO-OP Mall or call at 250-782-2341.

1215 General Employment

Are you looking for some extra income? We are currently looking for DC CARRIERS in several areas. Interested? Contact Margot at 250-782-4888

Dawson Creek Community Band is Looking For a Band & Community Coordinator. This is a Part-Time Position and The Ideal Candidate would Start Immediately. For More Information visit: kiwaniscommunityband.org

1215

TELUS National Business Delivery team members are responsible for providing industry leading data, converged, integrated solutions and voice across multiple platforms in an ever-changing and evolving technology world. We are a team of approximately 600 members across Canada; who pride ourselves on being the face of TELUS for all of 250.782.4888 250.782.6300 classifieds@dcdn.ca our business clients, both large and small. We are looking to grow our dynamic team and further invest in our communities across Western Canada; our team members are highly accountable and take responsibility to ensure that we are driving the ultimate General client experience. Employment

Local Dawson Creek pipeline Construction Company is currently looking for someone to work in the accounting/administration department. Simply Accounting experience is preferred, but may train individual with equivalent related experience. Please forward resumes to: fross@triplejpipelines.com LOOKING FOR WORK? THE DC AIRPORT IS LOOKING FOR A SEMI-RETIRED INDIVIDUAL. APPROXIMATELY 2 HOURS/DAY. 250-784-4433

5035 Financial Services

AGM

All members welcome

Are you someone who? - Takes pride in delighting your customers and delivering an amazing experience - Treats every customer interaction as an opportunity to increase customer loyalty and become a trusted advisor - Can provide solutions to our customers by promoting and selling TELUS products and services - Supports our Customer First Initiative by striving to establish rapport and trust with our customers - Is passionate about technology: enjoys learning about, working with and providing the latest and greatest technology that TELUS has to offer - Is highly skilled in communicating, planning and problem solving - Demonstrates a high level of professionalism and accountability What’s in it for you? - Rewards of starting your career with TELUS include a competitive hourly wage with added performance incentives and annual bonuses. We also offer best-in-class training to start, employee share purchase plan, service discounts and many more benefits! You will have the opportunity to build a long term career with a leading-edge team that strongly believes in giving back to the communities in which we work, live and serve - Become the technical sales and service consultant for our business customers in the work environment, understanding their needs and becoming their advocate. - Nothing is day to day about this job - with every customer install you will get to learn their business and how TELUS helps them get the job done. Whether it is data service, Optik TV, public WIFI or fibre optic services, every customer interaction will be unique and exciting! We pride ourselves on quality, but sometimes things break, when it does you get to be the hero that gets our business customers up and running in no time flat! - Similar to our Lions, Pandas, Parrots and Bunnies, just to name a few, you too can be the face of TELUS! Take this opportunity to radiate your enthusiasm about TELUS products and services to our business clients. Positions are currently available in the following locations:

$750 Loans & More NO CREDIT CHECKS Open 7 days/week 8am - 8pm 1-855-527-4368 Apply at: www.credit700.ca

With your help dignity is within reach for all. Please give generously this year. Please support your local Food Banks!

6030 forHouses Sale

BRAND NEW HOUSE FOR SALE

5520 Legal/Public Notices

December 16, 2016 7:00 pm Pomeroy Inn Dawson Creek

Now is your chance to be a part of something special. The TELUS National Business Delivery team is currently recruiting for Business Service Technicians. This is an exciting role with a wide range of duties and responsibilities; we are looking for candidates to provide exceptional customer service and solutions to our business clients. The successful candidates will be self-motivated individuals who are highly engaged, passionate and work well in a team setting thus creating a positive and collaborative working environment. We believe in being excellent corporate citizens, therefore our employees give back to our communities and create shareholder value by volunteering their time and effort on a regular basis. Are you ready to join us on our journey?

British Columbia - Dawson Creek - Fort St John - Grand Forks - Revelstoke - Williams Lake Required Skills & Abilities: - Maintain a high level of performance under the pressure of time constraints and a fast-paced changing environment using demonstrated effective decision-making skills while under limited supervision. - Demonstrated ability to identify problems and situations, take appropriate action, implement solutions or escalate as required - Ability to manage a physically demanding workload which may include climbing poles and working in a variety of indoor/outdoor environments and weather conditions. - Must have analytical and technical problem solving skills and/or related work experience - Must have technical aptitude and the ability to do fine, precise work with their hands - Must have the ability to or willingness to learn proper operation of hand and power tools, and test equipment - Normal colour vision to work with colour-coded wiring - Must follow safe work practices and abide by all safety rules and regulations. - Must be willing and able to work various shifts as assigned including evenings, weekends and statutory holidays to meet customer/business needs, including working out of town assignments that may preclude your ability to return home as required. - Fluent in English including demonstrated professional oral and written communications skills - Must possess Personal Computer navigational skills - Must meet applicable testing requirements and pass all related exams - Some limited areas may require an ability and/or willingness to: - Work in confined spaces, on bridges, towers or other fixtures at a height of 20 meters or more above the ground or water level - Travel in small aircraft, aerial tramways, helicopters, etc. Main Responsibilities: - Passionate about technology and have the dexterity to learn new products and features and recommend meaningful solutions to our customers - Skill to deliver great customer experience in any environment and to be motivated by personal interaction - Strong communication skills that allow you to interact with customers and provide them with world class service - Teamwork makes the dream work - must have ability to positively contribute in a team setting Education & Experience: - Must have completed a minimum Grade 12 Diploma with at least Grade 11 math (Transcripts and/or diplomas will be required) - Clean and valid Class 5 Driver’s License or other provincial equivalent (Driver’s license and abstract will be required) Who is TELUS? We’re a high-performing team of individuals who collectively make TELUS one of the leading telecommunications companies in Canada. Our competitive consumer offerings include wireline, wireless, internet and Optik TV. We also deliver a compelling range of products and services for small, medium and large businesses; and have carved out a leadership position in the health, energy, finance and public sector markets with innovative industry specific solutions.

Approx. 900 sq.�., 2 bdrm, 1 bath Centrally located in Pouce Coupe, one block from school. Appraised at $264,800

MUST SELL Call:780-536-8747

47509

The TELUS team is as diverse as the society we live in and the customers we serve. We’re also passionate about creating success for our customers, our shareholders, our communities and our team. And we do so by living the TELUS values and delivering on our Customers First commitments. Do you share our passion? At TELUS, you create future friendly® possibilities. At TELUS, we are committed to diversity and equitable access to employment opportunities based on ability. www.telus.com/careers Job posting#: ROL02522-16-Service Technician- National Business Delivery


The Dawson Creek Mirror

Classifieds NO RefUNds! NO CRediTs! 100 Word Limit & 1224 Skilled Help 1229 Trucking Transport Lawrence Meat Packing Meat Cutter (NOC 6331) 3 openings $17 per hour Benefits: BC Medi− cal, Dental and RRSP. Permanent, Full time, 40 hours per week. Main duties of the job: − Cut, trim, and otherwise prepare standard cuts of meat, poultry, and fish for sale at self− serve counters or according to cus− tomers’ orders. − Grind meats and slice cooked meats using powered grinders and slicing machines − Prepare special displays of meat, poultry, fish and shellfish − Shape, lace and tie roasts and other meats, poultry or fish and may wrap prepared meats, poultry, fish and shellfish − Manage inventory, keep records of sales and determine amount, product line and freshness of products accord− ing to company and customer require− ments − Ensure safe food storage conditions are maintained − May supervise other butchers, or meat cutters. − Completion of high school required − 1 to 2 years expe− rience required 250−782−5111 jobs@lawrence meat.com

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016 A31

Classifieds

Halo Ventures Ltd. Employment Opportunity Class 1 Drivers with Fluid Hauling Experi− ence, Owner Operators with Fluid Hauling Ex− perience, Dispatch/ Manager with Fluid Hauling Experience. Please email resume & drivers abstract to cara@haloventures.ca We will contact eligible applicants, please do not call. cara@haloventures.ca

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250.782.4888

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Dawson Creek Mirror

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Call (250) 782-4888 for more information. 2055 Firewood

FIREWOOD FOR SALE. PINE & SPRUCE. CUT, SPLIT & DELIVERED. PHONE 250-782-6992.

2060

For Sale - Misc

Firewood-Will Deliver to Dawson Creek and Surrounding Area. Spruce/Pine Poplar/Birch. Please Phone: 780864-8741

3560 Pets

2 Male Chihuahuas for sale. Ready to go. Great for Christmas call 250-785-6582

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Furnished or unfurnished rooms/ private bath. Pouce Coupe. From $550/ month includes utilities/Cable/ Laundry Facilities. Call 250-719-8111

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A32 THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

The Dawson Creek Mirror

And Visions of Camping Danced through their Heads… Foster’s RV is your Christmas Headquarters for the camping enthusiasts in your family

Starting at $

4,495

ALL DECK TRAILERS ON SALE

Starting at $ 89 Bi-Weekly

Receive Extended 5yr. Warranty Gift

Only $ 150 Bi-Weekly Save

10,000

ALL IN STOCK UNITS AND ACCESSORIES ON SALE NOW !!!

Tel: 250-782-2722

920 Adams Road, Dawson Creek, BC

31233

$


Mirror 2016-1201