The Mic: Issue 38 - Christmas '14

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NOTTINGHAM UNIVERSITY’S OFFICIAL MUSIC MAGAZINE

issue 38 December 2014

free

Christmas special

With

Interviews with jesse will and becky hill

Review of 2014 what to expect in 2015


Taking the guilt out of guilty pleasures. Nottingham's most outrageous pop-fuelled Friday night service. Come worship at the altar of Pop.


Inside this issue 4 - The rise of feminism in music 5 - singer-songwriters 10 - mr twin sister 11 - top 10 songs 16 - mark ronson 18 - lana del rey 19 - replacements 22 - st vincent 24 - oxjam 26 - top 5 hip hop acts 30 - pop punk’s not dead 32 - late night urn 34 - becky hill


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A self-indulgent letter from our editor... Thank you for picking up a copy of The Mic, the University of Nottingham’s only official music magazine, written by students, for students. All of us here at The Mic believe that Nottingham is an incredible city for music. Its countless venues attract some of the biggest and best acts in the UK and beyond, it has a thriving local scene, and of course its fantastic pubs and bars are the best place to sit down and relive the gig over a pint. If you have a passion for music and journalism, The Mic is for you. Not only are we the only society that focuses solely on music journalism, we can offer our writers the opportunity to see gigs in Nottingham for free. This Christmas we’ve been looking back over the year and asking our writers to review 2014! Inside these pages you will read about what we think has been good, bad and ugly (but mainly good) about the past year in music, as well as what there is to look forward to in 2015. This autumn our new team has taken up the reins and built on the amazing achievements of last year’s committee. Without them The Mic wouldn’t be what it is today, and now it’s our job to take it into the future. If you fancy writing for our next issue or our website, or want to get involved in The Mic in any way, drop me an email at themiceditors@gmail.com. Join us! Alex Orosa Editor-in-Chief


The Rise of Feminism in Music Whether feeling it being “Hard out here for a b***h”, courtesy of Lily Allen, or getting the world knowing who runs the world, feminism has been hitting music hard since the turn of the century. Women are dominating the music industry, breaking the shell of “Pop girl bands” and expanding to scratch their wise words into our souls and minds. For those who don’t know, or only have a vague idea, feminism is the idea of advocating women’s rights, in regards to gender equality. Not about man hating, equality. But the idea of feminism in music has been a controversial one. Not because it’s seen as a bad thing, but because misogyny is still a common issue in today’s industry. Recently, an article was published in The Independent about Eminem publicly attacking Iggy Azalea with lyrics like “So what’s it gon’ be? Put that s**t away Iggy. You don’t wanna blow that rape whistle on me. Scream! I love it. ‘Fore I get lost with the gettin’ off.” Why is this still allowed? Without even an ounce of subtlety, the context in which woman-hating is used is frankly disgusting. What is entertaining about talking about obscene acts, and flinging around the word “b***h” a lot? It all sort of started off with the release of the infamous Blurred Lines in early 2013; “I know you want it” being the central ticking time-bomb which blew up how we view the music industry today, from the suggestively placed foam fingers, to the sexualisation of young women. Despite the major controversy (or perhaps because of it) it was the second best-selling song of 2013 in the US and the best-selling song of 2013 in the UK. Just what does that say about our Western culture and society? I think we’re a bunch of hypocrites when it comes to anti-feminism music. On one hand we’re protesting to get it banned, yet blasting it in every club around the country.

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On the other side of the spectrum: women are finally hitting back in the music industry. With the rise of modern-feminism, you can now say goodbye to the raging bra burning, non-shaving, boy-hating feminists (who don’t really count frankly). At the VMA’s this year, when Queen Bee let go a backdrop saying “Feminist”, why was there a shock/horror reaction? Surely being a female on planet earth automatically makes you a feminist? Do women really like being treated unfairly in some social situations? Being a feminist is not just about what we all think; it’s more. It’s about self-acceptance, loving what you are and do without a care in the world- whether that is creating music or just speaking up for your rights. No matter what she sings, how she dresses, why should society care? She’s just a woman singing her mind, yet people go around criticising her because she is seemingly far from the stereotypical feminist.

“you don’t wanna blow that rape whistle on me...” The same goes for the likes of Miley Cyrus. Who are we to judge how she projects herself these days; she is just a young artist having fun - what crime is she committing? As women we have the strength and power to do as we please. This time last year Lily Allen’s full-on single ‘Hard Out Here’ took the pop music industry by storm. “The video is meant to be a light-hearted satirical video that deals with objectification of women within modern pop culture,” says Allen regarding the context. Women can be whoever they want to be; but all in all, the way the music industry has shaped itself by having the main focus on looking pretty, to say the least, is the big issue that is still problematic today. By Gabriella Ahmed


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Singer-Songwriters: the established & upcoming

2014 has continued to demonstrate the innovation of singers and their guitars and the growing demand for these (often) solo musicians. We have seen the continued success of a veteran in Ben Howard, the rise of Mercury Prize Award nominee Nick Mulvey, and someone to look out for in 2015: James Bay. Additionally, there has been a continuous growth in musicians from all walks of life taking a guitar and trying to break into the highly competitive music industry. One such musician, Jesse Will from New Zealand, I had the pleasure of talking to.

Ben Howard The 27 year old from London has gone from strength-to-strength in 2014, having achieved his first UK number one with I Forget Where We Were. Ben Howard is by no means a rookie in the industry; he had great success with his debut album Every Kingdom in 2011, which received a nomination for the Mercury Prize award the following year. 2012 was Howard’s real breakthrough year as he toured the world promoting his critically acclaimed debut, a tour that was topped off in 2013 when he played the Pyramid Stage at Glastonbury. It is therefore fair to say that the last few years have been pretty non-stop for Ben Howard, and with the continued success of his most recent release, there are few signs of this coming to an end anytime soon. I Forget Where We Were is arguably a more complete album to his debut. With songs like ‘Small Things’ and the title track ‘I Forget Where We Were’ it is easy to see why many in the music industry see such a big future for Ben Howard.


nick mulvey

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Nick Mulvey has taken a slightly different route to success than Ben Howard. Mulvey began his musical journey studying music in Havana, which was followed by his role playing the hang (a percussion instrument constructed from two half-shells of steel, think symbols) in Portico Quartet (who were nominated for the Mercury Prize themselves in 2008). His journey continued when he made the decision to go solo in 2011, but it wasn’t until 2014 when he started to make waves in mainstream music. 2014 saw the release of his debut album First Mind which, once again, was nominated for the Mercury Prize that year. It features tracks such as ‘Cucurucu’ and ‘Fever to the Form’, which could be said to be influenced by his time in Latin America. His live shows are almost indescribable, each performance creating an intimacy with the crowd. He continues to favour instruments such as the hang, which has served him so well in the past and will continue to do so. If 2014 is a sign of things to come then we should all be keeping a lookout for Nick Mulvey in 2015.

James bay James Bay is a spring chicken in comparison to Ben Howard and Nick Mulvey. At just 23 years of age, Bay is at the start of his career in the music industry, one I’m sure will be long and successful. In his few years as a musician he has held support slots for Tom Odell, John Newman and Kodaline. 2014 has seen the release of EPs and tracks such as ‘Let it Go’, but it is the anticipation around his debut album which has caused most of the attention. Recently released ‘Hold Back the River’ is an insight into his future as a musician and signals that something very special indeed could be coming from the young Brit.


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Jesse will

All the above artists, Ben Howard, Nick Mulvey, and James Bay have long been signed to record labels but there is also an untapped resource in those talented musicians who have yet to make the first breakthrough. One such artist is Jesse Will. The 23 year old from New Zealand moved to the UK 2 years ago and is releasing his second

EP in February 2015. His music is the kind to make you sit up and take note, especially when you hear songs like ‘Hold Your Cards’ and ‘Indigo’. Here is what Jesse had to say when answering a few questions about his journey so far, as well as what we can expect from him in 2015.

Q: Hi Jesse, so what you got planned here until you head back to New Zealand in 2 weeks?

explore where your blood comes from. A lot of the singer-songwriters I have a lot of respect for come from the UK or thrived in the UK”

A: “I’m filming a live session with Reload, I’m doing a cover and an original from my next EP [released in February]. I haven’t been back [to New Zealand] for two years so it has all been a bit hectic.” Q: How has it been for you in the UK? Have you got everything done you had hoped? A: “I came here with the intention to write. As I was leaving New Zealand I was releasing my first EP, I went to Dublin and played a couple of shows before heading to London. I came to the UK to meet some people and get to know this side of the world.” Q: Why did you choose to come to the UK instead of the US or closer to home in Australia? A: “In terms of label, when I first came over here, I was offered a label contract which is the reason I dropped everything and came over here so quickly, with a label called Animal Farm in London. They got me a couple of good shows but I didn’t like the attitude they had toward the music, the contract didn’t allow me much freedom to do what I wanted to do. I quite like having control over everything myself.” “America was up there but I preferred the idea of the UK because I have a bit of heritage here [grandparents] which was a big part of it. There’s always that side of you wanting to

“America is definitely somewhere I want to visit soon while I’m young. Australia I’ve done a lot, the music scene is amazing in Melbourne” Q: What music did you listen to growing up and who were your musical idols? A: “Michael Jackson obviously, massive one. Vocally I modelled myself on MJ growing up; I used to make cardboard stages for myself. I wish I could pull it off now! In terms of singer-songwriters, John Martin is amazing. And lots of soul singers who thrived in America, people like Aretha Franklin I’ve got a big love for, and Tracey Chapman” “I didn’t really discover the Beatles until quite late and I’m quite glad of that. Over here you’re surrounding yourselves by them the whole time but my parents weren’t really into them. I discovered them myself when I was 16/17 and I’m really happy that they were put aside for that age because that was a big moment. People like Jeff Buckley and people more modern like Ben Howard who manage to capture a lot of expression whilst keeping the music very real, not trying too hard to achieve what they set out for in their music. I’m a big fan of Tom Waits, he’s great, and Pearl Jam were a big thing for me when I was younger.” “I find it quite age specific [what music you listen to growing up]. I listened to a lot of mu


8 sic I wouldn’t listen to now, I’m sure everyone has been through that though. I went through a big hip-hop phase but it’s always stuff that’s really melodic. I’ve never taken a liking to something which doesn’t have some melody and a decent harmony to it, that’s why I love the soul music. But I never liked Creed which is important to know! But yeah, I did have some pretty terrible taste in my young years.” Q: Do you thrive when it is an intimate show between yourself and the crowd? A: “I really appreciate shows like that where it’s really intimate and people are there to really listen and get into the atmosphere. That’s another reason London is great, there’s a big singer-songwriter scene and there are a lot of small venues where people are just there to absorb the atmosphere.” “I ended up just playing other people’s music [when he got to the UK] because my music’s very intimate and in order for it to have the effect it has it needs to be heard and in a way the silence is just as importance as the noise in the music. I’m playing fewer shows but the shows I do play are more carefully chosen. When you play with a band you have more options to play bigger songs. Travelling has helped me grow and pick the atmosphere where I want to play.” Q: What are your goals for the rest of 2014 and 2015?

A: “Primarily the new EP and once that’s out I’ll do a tour of the UK for sure, paying special attention to the cities I’ve had the best response like Brighton, which has an amazing singer-song writing scene with people like James Bay. It would be great to explore the UK more as well because, although I’ve been here for 2 years, I haven’t had much time to travel. If a label comes along with the right opportunities that would be great.” Q: What are your thoughts on the likes of London Grammar who have achieved huge success and Nottingham as a city? A: “I was considering doing a cover of one of their tracks for the session I’m about to film. I really enjoy what they’re doing and it’s always fun to cover a song by a female vocalist.” “My grandparents are from Nottingham. It’s my number one in the UK to visit because it’s where my family is from and Robin Hood!” Q: And finally, why should the readers of The Mic keep an eye out for you and check your music out? A: “The songs on my first EP I wrote whilst I was studying myself. The music I write isn’t going to appeal to everyone and to the masses but it’s the music which might appeal to one or two people and appeal strongly, which is what I try to convey” “Give it a try and if you don’t like it, don’t tell me!”

I would encourage you to definitely keep your eyes and ears peeled for Jesse Will in 2015. As he said, his music may not appeal to everyone, but how many musicians can honestly say every listener will instantly love their music? And who knows, we may be hearing a lot more of Jesse Will in 2015!

By Aaron Brudney


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MR T WIN SIS T ER

The ensuing album, September’s self titled Mr Twin Sister, is also one of the best surprises of the year. Much like Queen had the perfect name to communicate their gloriously camp and extravagant sound, adding a ‘Mr’ to Twin Sister lends their name a subtle contradiction that is at the core of their new style. As if to make the point obvious to the rest of us, lead vocalist Andrea Estella outlines this ambiguity in lyric form:

“I am a Woman/ But inside I’m a Man and I want to be as gay as I can.”

When you’re just starting a band, it can be hard to land on the right name. Either it sounds too fey, too cool, too serious, or too fun, or maybe the essence of your band isn’t quite captured in those few basically meaningless but oh-so-important syllables that, as often as not, people will judge you by… as much as the actual music. So you change your name up a few times, and eventually you get something that sucks just a little bit less than the others and then that’s…IT! You’re stuck with a name like ‘Huggy Bear’ forever, when really your music sounds more like ‘TERRIFYING GRIZZLY MOMMA BEAR’.

Better writers than me have deconstructed the implications of that lyric, and the name change itself, but I would like to point out that despite the ambiguous and fluid nature of gender being discussed here, there is no ambiguity about Estella’s lyric. Mr Twin Sister know exactly what they are doing here, and go about walking the line between genres, genders and moods expertly. For example, this record feels incredibly lush, but it also has bass grooves that I haven’t heard the likes of since Poliça burst onto the scene back in 2012; you can dance to it or let it wash over you just as easily. At different times Mr Twin Sister sounds like funk, electronic, synth pop, even soft rock, and yet it all comes together into a lovely amalgamation of sound.

At least that’s the normal way things go. But NY’s Twin Sister weren’t all too keen on their name even after they’d released 2011’s joyously and jauntily twee In Heaven, and they decided that since Mr Twin Sister suited them so much better, they’d just switch it permanently. And as naturally as that decision apparently was to the band, so their new name is in perfect harmony with the direction of their music.

Frankly, I’ll be gobsmacked if there’s a more interesting song than ‘In the House of Yes’ released this year, and the more I think about it, the more I think this might be the strongest album from start to finish that I’ve heard in 2014. With most bands the name isn’t all that important, but for Mr Twin Sister, it’s the whole story and not even a half of it, all at once. I’m sure they wouldn’t have it any other way.

By Kieran Hallam


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2014 was a slow year for albums; off the back of a year which included comebacks from the likes of David Bowie and Daft Punk, releases from hip-hop giants such as Kanye, Drake, Pusha T and Childish Gambino and indie giants Franz Ferdinand, Vampire Weekend, Arcade Fire, Queens of the Stone Age and Arctic Monkeys... How could it not be? But whilst this year’s great albums have been sparse and more left field, 2014 has been the year of the single. Quick bursts of genius from across the genre spectrum have populated the blogosphere and rightly so. So here follows a list of the 10 best of these, all of which deserve a listen.

By Liam Inscoe-Jones


The majesty of this song then is in its arrangement; its perfectly captured atmosphere, the themes of getting ‘home’ in a spiritual sense and Jay’s killer verse, where he drops poetic bars such as ‘my grandma told me every bed a n***a make, he lay in it/the church you go to pray in it, the work is on the outside/staring out the windows is for love songs and house flies.’ I don’t quite know what it is, but it’s like no other.

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10. Eye of the Needle [Sia] Sia is a somewhat contradictory talent; her sound highly commercial. She builds songs with ultra-modern 21st century studio polish, whilst singing in the maximalist style every audition on the X Factor aspires to. It’s a technique so few of the best female artists display; PJ Harvey doesn’t, Carole King never did. But Sia also comes from behind the scenes. She isn’t just the mouthpiece for these commercial songs like many of her counterparts, as she wrote a great many of them too. Eye of The Needle is so great because it’s a commercial song, and that’s the style Sia owns and embodies. When he reaches her upper register she lets us hear her voice strain and almost crack; she’s no auto-tune offshoot. Perhaps that’s why the main hook of the song consisting of a warbling vocal improvisation is endearing, not vomit-inducing, and the thundering drums with rising choral vocals in the background work so well. It’s a backlash against musical snobbery, proving a sound isn’t so often derided just because it’s popular, but because it so rarely sounds as good as this.

9. Better In Tune With The Infinite [Jay Electronica] Jay Electronica is something of an enigma; he signed to Roc Nation in 2010 and followed that up with… nothing much. You could call this a single from his upcoming album Act II: Patents of Nobility (The Turn), but it was only really ‘upcoming’ in 2011; it was due out in 2012. The music itself reflects this uncertainty: it’s definitely not a hiphop banger but it’s not alternative hip-hop either - hardly a song but a soundscape. It begins with an Elijah Muhammad quote, followed by a Wizard of Oz snippet, followed by an actual Jay verse (which sounds, in the words of Kanye, more like spoken word) and ends with a gorgeous vocal performance by Latonya Givens, scored by Bibo No Aozora, from the ending of the 2006 film Babel.

8. Love Never Felt So Good (Demo) [Michael Jackson] The remix of this song was essentially an abomination: a cheapened track by Timberland and co, exploited for profit by adding superfluous Justin Timberlake vocals then presented to the masses as if it were some kind of tribute. The irony is that the best compliment to the talents of the tragic pop icon would have been to release the demo of this track, untouched. It was instead a gem included only of the deluxe edition of Xscape - a shame, because it’s really something special. You can tell it’s a demo as some of the lyrics are almost murmured by Jackson, and the sound is far from crisp.


However the simple heightening of passion is a sublime vocal performance, whilst the piano escalates in pitch and tempo, making it one of the best sing-a-longs of the year. It’s an insanely catchy ballad which culminates in a hand-clap finale that’s truly grin-inducing. It woos with its passion and simplicity; or at least would have done had anyone been allowed to hear it.

by living up to the worst fears of the most bigoted. ‘No family’s safe, when I sachet!’ he proclaims. It’s a song of admirable intent and striking construction.

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5. Prince Johnny [St. Vincent]

7. Queen [Perfume Genius] For anyone who’s heard the work of Perfume Genius frontman Mike Hadreas before, might be a little startled by the opening note of Queen- the first single from his marvellous third release Too Bright. His first two albums barely broke from his Modus Operandi of soft, atmospheric, piano-led soundscapes. Here we start with the strike of an electric guitar. Mike’s making a statement; ‘don’t you know your Queen?’ Heterosexual folks have a tendency to be intimidated by the more flamboyant members of the LGBTQ community, or even the entirely ‘quiet’ ones. Mike attacks that mentality, not by disproving it - but

6. Everytime The Sun Comes Up [Sharon Van Etten] Feeling like a timeless classic the second it begins, Everytime the Sun Comes Up is at once Sharon’s most accessible song, and her best. Her voice is suitably brittle and beautiful, and her enunciation of ‘Trouble’ drunk and dreary, a flourish towards the song’s end sending shivers down the spine. Based shamelessly off a machine-made drum pattern and a gently strummed guitar, the instrumentation is truly a backdrop for the effortlessly evocative chorus vocals and tale of embittered discontent. While Lana Del Rey simply submits to any man who wants her to, Sharon ‘washed your dishes, but I shit in your bathroom.’ It’s a bold statement, but one not as powerful as the marvellous musicianship itself.

Not only is this the best ballad of 2014, it also happens to be one of the most unique pop-songs in years. This is mostly down to its astounding structure; like a James Murphy track gone schizoid, it allows her chorus vocals to be laid bare at first, followed by the guitar lead then an over bearing and compressed kick drum some time before the bass melody is finally unleashed. That’s not to say the sum parts can’t carry the song for the first few minutes. The limited instrumentation allow Annie’s stylistic idiosyncrasies to shine- her vocal delivery embittered and gorgeous. A far off angelic choir coats the whole piece in a mystery the song’s title can only imply that it’s quite an achievement.


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4. Divisionary [Ages & Ages] It’s hard to believe that Ages & Ages are a secular band: such is the gospel, preaching nature of their music. Regardless of spirituality, the band’s intent is hardly subtle; most of this song is made up of a repetition of its subtitle, which is slowly building with a heightened rhythm and vocal layering imbuing it with a sense of the anthemic. At heart it’s a soppy campfire song but it’s so good at doing so that it becomes one of the best songs of the year. With sharp but cheery lines like ‘they say formality, this is what they really meant: they can be the walk and we can be the pavement’ it reads sometimes like a my-first-protest song, but its sincerity and joyfulness is utterly charming.

On Two Weeks the artist formerly known as Twigs takes control. She does so, not by walking all over her man but sexually dominating him. On just two EP’s the young singer cast herself as queen of the London Trip-Hop scene, but so often seemed beholden to any whim but her own. On this explicit track thought she’s proclaiming ‘I can fuck you better’ and crooning that ‘smoke on your skin to get those pretty eyes rolling, my thighs are apart for when you’re ready to breathe in’; except she’s not pleading, just waiting expectantly like a barracuda. Her new found maestry is sealed in the instrumental: trip-hop goes epic. With sultry synths and high-hats that soundtrack grand and sticky crescendos, not flutter in the distance as they so often to in the sub-genre, Two Weeks is lust made music.

[FKA Twigs] 3. Two Weeks


2. Carissa [Sun Kil Moon] Sun Kil Moon’s Benji: one of the best albums we’ve had in a few years, is so remarkable that this article could easily be populated with its track list. Carissa is a song deserving of such treatment though, an enchanting tune, and literal tearjerker that both weaves a simple story of an unusual family passing, while manages to wistfully encompass all of life and its losses. A simple but endearing guitar pattern sets the mood for a story of Kozelek’s second cousin’s death in a freak accident fire, while he tries to find some meaning in the death of a girl he barely knew. Furthermore he gives meaning to the death of someone who knew little about but her name; a vocal accompaniment in the chorus adding remarkable beauty and proclaiming ‘Carissa was 35, you don’t just raise two kids, and take out your trash and die, she was my second cousin, I didn’t know her well at all, but that doesn’t mean that I wasn’t, meant to find some poetry to make some sense of this, to find a deeper meaning, in this senseless tragedy, oh Carissa I’ll sing your name across every sea.’ Not that every lyric isn’t marvellous, the verse lines saying little but speaking volumes. The lyricism is so dense that Carissa could be played hundreds of times and still reveal details later down the line, which is a good job, because it most certainly will be.

Hot Dreams is the best song of 2014 because it is the most complete artistic vision of them all. It is the perfect representation of the idea of 60’s jazz balladry as written by a dark and dangerous romantic. Beside the instrumental forming a complete pallet of gentle tapping drumbeats and a majestic organ ditty, Taylor Kirk’s deep and rich vocals paint a picture of despair, just uncertain and unnerving. ‘I wanna follow through on all my promises and threats to you babe’ he coos in the verses, while the chorus ‘I want to wake from hot dreams of you babe’ could even be pretty and seductive if one were only half listening. The making of this track though is in the closing sax solo. Arranged by Colin Stetson, it appears to just be a beauteous outro to the track, but even here the instrumental plays off the dark tendencies of Kirk’s writing. It doesn’t break into deathly hammer house of horror strings.. it just feels off, it feels… wrong. It’s a song of such strength of vision that, had it been released in the 60’s era it pastiches, might well have been one of the eras best and today’s most beloved.

[Timber Timbre] 1. Hot Dreams


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MARK RONSON IS BACK!

Mark Ronson’s long overdue 4th album is coming. It’s called Uptown Special and great things are destined to come out of it. So get your grooves on because the wait is nearly over! According to his interview with the Guardian, Ronson wants Uptown Special to be something that ‘sits rightfully on the shelf with [his] favourite American R&B, soul, jazz and blues records from the 70s and 80s, when the lyrics were really striving for something.’ Anything with a Mark Ronson production tag on it is almost always guaranteed awesomeness. This album, created over the course of 18 months, does not seem to be an exception to this rule.

The first release from the forthcoming album is the lead single ‘Uptown Funk’, co-written and co-produced with Bruno Mars. The song took seven months to finish and with bass line straight from Prince’s playbook, it’s so funky it could resurrect Michael Jackson. The second track ‘Daffodils’, which had its world premiere on the same day, is even better. It features collaboration with Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker. Parker’s stoner-washed voice brings something special to this Billie


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Jean-esque track and the result of this Ronson-Tame Impala formula is an oddly groovy, soul-infused, yet slightly psychedelic sound. Mark Ronson is renowned for his collaborations and Uptown Special looks to deliver just that. Apart from Kevin Parker and Bruno Mars, contributors to this album will also include the likes of Miike Snow’s Andrew Wyatt, TNGHT’s Hudson Mohawke, Simian Mobile Disco’s James Ford and producer Emile Haynie. Lyricswise, Uptown Special will also feature a creative collaboration between music and literature. Excluding ‘Uptown Funk’, most of the lyrics are written by Pulitzer Prize winner Michael Chabon, whose book apparently moved Ronson to tears.

g with Anythin son on a Mark R on i product is tag on it ys lwa almost a ed e guarant ss ene awesom

From the sound of Daffodils, it looks like Chabon would bring a lot more to the album than just the brainless party of modern day dance music.

so funky it could resurrect Michael Jackson ‘Uptown Funk’ is set to be released as a lead single on 11th January and Uptown Special follows on 26th January 2015 on RCA. Amidst the coursework and exams crisis, it turns out that there is still the beacon of hope that is the new Mark Ronson album. The start of 2015 doesn’t seem too bad after all. By Jaisai Wongpichet


Dan Auerbach anthems, rock and roll anthems, complete abandonment of her teenie bop pop anthems, and Ultraviolence: a somewhat predictable, yet effective third studio album for a simple former ‘style over substance’ pop singer. Lizzy Grant (AKA Lana Del Rey) seems to have taken the entire music industry by storm. With her humble musical beginnings as a pop singer with an aloof aura, and having somehow crawling towards a more alternative feel, her album Born to Die allowed her to grab the attention of pop, R&B and hip-hop lovers alike. Collaborating with wellknown hip hop artists such as, A$AP Rocky and having him star in her ‘National Anthem’ video was just the beginning of a very well thought out plan to dominate the industry as a recognised, powerful female icon. Moving on from her ‘young and in love’ persona in Born to Die, Lana Del Rey teamed up with rock and roll master himself, Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, in order to absolutely demolish the image of pop princess; and her already loyal fans couldn’t help but follow. It seems as though Grant’s recent take-over is a direct result of years of plotting the easiest, and most effective ways to become accessible to… well… everyone. And it worked. Understandably, I find it best to keep Ultraviolence to myself and away from the parents, but I can surely still find my mum swaying along to the melodic perfection of ‘Video Games’ and ‘Blue Jeans’ while I enjoy the sultry grit of Ultraviolence favourites such as ‘West Coast’, ‘Guns and Roses’, ‘Fucked My Way Up To The Top’ and ‘Money Power Glory’. By releasing this dark and particularly personal album, which steers away from fixating on a beautiful fairy-tale love life, and focuses on more real, raw and believable topics, Del Rey manages to open herself up to a completely new set of fans.

The alternative-rock and edgy feel to each song, along with catchy guitar riffs and innumerable mentions of drugs and alcohol make it a truly captivating must-listen album. With the brilliant combination of Auerbach’s musical genius and Del Rey’s impeccably husky yet somewhat seductive jazz-singer tinted vocals, the production and musical technicality of Ultraviolence is faultless. But is this her prime? Is this the point at which the highly anticipated young star gives all that she is capable of giving? Doubtful.

“Lana Del Rey’s versatility allows her to be fully capable of jumping from genre to genre without a worry. I would soon expect her to be collaborating with more hip-hop, R&B and rock’n’roll artists, spreading her alternative sound and image across the music industry and even broadening the musical horizons of her loyal pop fans. This seems to be a road less travelled by female pop artists – it’s a gamble and a very risky one at that, but Lana Del Rey has done it well and will surely continue to do so in what can be predicted as a very long musical career.”

By Sobia Khan

LANA DEL REY: YEAR IN REVIEW


replacements Josh Klinghoffer and Michael Shuman - they’re already at the pinnacle of contemporary alternative music and they’re just getting started. The Red Hot Chili Peppers and Queens of the Stone Age are undoubtedly two of the largest names in alternative music. Both possess an extensive list of past members and collaborators that would make any rock enthusiast’s heart flutter; do names like Dave Navarro and Dave Grohl ring any bells? However, such illustrious histories leave some sizeable shoes to fill, and this is certainly the case for relative newcomers Josh Klinghoffer and Michael Shuman - two fresh faced upstarts who happen to be

incredibly talented. The parallel between the two is pronounced. Before making a full studio feature they both toured with their respective bands in support of their previous albums; for Shuman following the release of Era Vulgaris and Klinghoffer joined part way through the Stadium Arcadium tour. They have now both featured on the groups’ most recent releases and toured extensively while still finding time to keep developing their own projects.

josh klinghoffer

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For Klinghoffer especially there was a lot to prove when he took over the reigns on guitar. His predecessor, John Frusciante, was a fan favourite and instrumental in the development of the band’s sound during his two stints as a member. He even provided short covers of songs by greats such as Elton John and The Bee Gees during their live sets - it’s hard to top Frusciante’s bitter sweet falsetto on ‘How Deep is Your Love’. Since his return in 1999 with Californication, the band went from strength to strength, culminating in the ambitious double album Stadium Arcadium and his departure.

the newcomer’s backing vocals are impeccable being both harmonically intelligent and expressive Despite this, Josh Klinghoffer is an exceptional musician in his own right. Although his performances on I’m With You are in places understated, (partly due to a drum centric mix heralded by the addition of percussionist Mauro Refosco), his ability in terms of both raw and subtle riffs shines through on numerous occasions on the record. Moreover, despite Frusciante’s aptitude in the backing

vocals department the newcomer’s backing vocals are impeccable - being both harmonically intelligent and expressive. One of the singles the band subsequently released from the album sessions, ‘Hanalei’, features one of the most sublime examples of Klinghoffer’s ethereal vocal chops in its bridge section. He managed to replace one of the most loved guitarists in modern rock and came out of it remarkably unscathed.

his bass fills are to die for - there are certainly worse trade offs Shuman had less of a tough act to follow in regards to his immediate Queens predecessor, Alain Johannes, as he was more a frequent collaborator with the Josh Homme than a set in stone band member, (see what I did there?). Nonetheless, bassist and singer Nick Oliveri’s expulsion due to various misdemeanours including an armed standoff with a SWAT team left a rift that was still apparent. Yet where Olivieri contributed aggression and creativity Shuman adds indefatigable groove to songs such as ‘I Sat By The Ocean’, provides emphatic vocals to supplement Homme’s crooning and his bass fills are to die for - there are certainly worse trade offs. Over and above their respective offerings to their bands Shuman and


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Michael Shuman

<ůŝŶŐŚŽīĞƌ ĂƌĞ ďŽƚŚ ƉĂƌƚ ŽĨ ƐŝĚĞ ƉƌŽũĞĐƚƐ ǁŚŝĐŚ ƉƌŽĚƵĐĞ ĞīĞĐƟǀĞ ŝŵĂŐŝŶĂƟǀĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ͘ dŚŝƐ LJĞĂƌ ĂůŽŶĞ <ůŝŶŐŚŽīĞƌ͛Ɛ ďĂŶĚ Žƚ ,ĂĐŬĞƌ ŚĂǀĞ ƌĞůĞĂƐĞĚ ĂŶ ĞŶŐĂŐŝŶŐ ƚǁŽ ƉĂƌƚ ĂůďƵŵ͕ How’s Your Process (Work) ĂŶĚ (Play)͘ DĞĂŶǁŚŝůĞ ^ŚƵŵĂŶ ƚĂŬĞƐ ƵƉ ĚƌƵŵŵŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ũŽŝŶƚ ƐŝŶŐŝŶŐ ĚƵƟĞƐ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ϳϬƐ ŝŶŇƵĞŶĐĞĚ ŐƌŽƵƉ DŝŶŝ DĂŶƐŝŽŶƐ Ͳ Ă ďĂŶĚ ĐƵƌƌĞŶƚůLJ ƚŽƵƌŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ ZŽLJĂů ůŽŽĚ ǁŚŽ ŚĂǀĞ ŐĂŝŶĞĚ ĂƩĞŶƟŽŶ ĨƌŽŵ ƚŚĞŝƌ ƌĞĐĞŶƚ ĐŽůůĂďŽƌĂƟŽŶ ǁŝƚŚ ůĞdž dƵƌŶĞƌ ĂŶĚ ƐŝŶŐůĞ ͚ ĞĂƚŚ ŝƐ Ă 'ŝƌů͛͘ dŚĞŝƌ ƉƌĞǀŝŽƵƐ ƐĞůĨ ƟƚůĞĚ W ŽĨ ϮϬϭϬ ŝƐ ĂůƐŽ Ă ŐƌĞĂƚ ůŝƐƚĞŶ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƐŝĚĞ ƚŽ ƚŚĞŝƌ ƐŝŶŐůĞ ͚DŽŶŬ͛ ŝƐ Ă ŐůĞĞĨƵůůLJ ĚĂƌŬ ĐŽǀĞƌ ŽĨ ůŽŶĚŝĞ͛Ɛ ͚,ĞĂƌƚ ŽĨ 'ůĂƐƐ͛͘ Žƚ ,ĂĐŬĞƌ͛Ɛ ϰ ƚƌĂĐŬ

W ĨƌŽŵ ϮϬϭϮ ŝƐ ĞƋƵĂůůLJ ĂƐ ĂůůƵƌŝŶŐ͖ ͚KƌĚĞƌ ŝƐŽƌĚĞƌ͛ ŝƐ ĂŶ ĂůƚͲƌŽĐŬ ƌŽŵƉ ǁŚŝůƐƚ ͚ LJĞ KƉĞŶĞƌ͛ ŝŶǀŝƚĞƐ ƚŚĞ ůŝƐƚĞŶĞƌ ƚŽ ĚƌŽǁŶ ŝŶ ŐůŝƐƚĞŶŝŶŐ ƌĞǀĞƌď ĂŶĚ <ůŝŶŐŚŽīĞƌ͛Ɛ ŵŽƵƌŶĨƵů ŵŽĂŶƐ͘ /ƚ ǁŽƵůĚ ďĞ Ăůů ƚŽŽ ĞĂƐLJ ƚŽ ǁƌŝƚĞ ^ŚƵŵĂŶ ĂŶĚ <ůŝŶŐŚŽīĞƌ Žī ĂƐ ƐŝŵƉůLJ Ă ƐƚĞƉ ĚŽǁŶ ĨƌŽŵ ƉĂƐƚ ďĂŶĚ ŵĞŵďĞƌƐ Ͳ LJĞƚ ƚŚŝƐ ŝƐ ĨĂƌ ĨƌŽŵ ƚŚĞ ĐĂƐĞ͘ dŚĞLJ ŚĂǀĞ ƉƌŽǀĞĚ ƚŚĞŵƐĞůǀĞƐ ďŽƚŚ ĂƐ ƉĂƌƚ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ŵŽŶŽůŝƚŚƐ ƚŚĂƚ ĂƌĞ ƚŚĞŝƌ ƉƌŝŵĂƌLJ ďĂŶĚƐ ĂŶĚ ŝŶ ƐĞƉĂƌĂƚĞ ŐƌŽƵƉƐ ƚŚĂƚ ĂƌĞ ŶŽ ůĞƐƐ ĐŽŵƉĞůůŝŶŐ͘ dŚĞLJ ĂƌĞ ĂůƌĞĂĚLJ Ăƚ ƚŚĞ ƉŝŶŶĂĐůĞ ŽĨ ĐŽŶƚĞŵƉŽƌĂƌLJ ĂůƚĞƌŶĂƟǀĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞLJ͛ƌĞ ũƵƐƚ ŐĞƫŶŐ ƐƚĂƌƚĞĚ͘

They are already at the pinnacle of contemporary alternative music and they’re just getting started

By Gabriel Burrow


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St. Vincent’s Year in review

What a 2014 it has been for Annie Clark, better known by the name she performs under: St Vincent. She has played sell-out gigs around the world, released yet another critically acclaimed album, and played her first UK festival headline slot at End of the Road this summer. All in all, a fantastic and full on year- and she shows no signs of slowing down. With an EP set for release on Record Store Day, falling on Black Fri-

day the 28th November, things are looking up. Clark has proven difficult to fault in 2014, in the ascendancy ever since dropping undoubtedly one of the albums of the year in February. She has been delivering electrifying live shows with an ever-growing confidence about her. Her 4th solo outing has definitely made her more assured in her abilities. She has steadily gained confidence throughout her career; a confidence which must surely have been accelerated by working with


Talking Heads ůĞŐĞŶĚ ĂǀŝĚ LJƌŶĞ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŽƵƚ ƚŚĞ ƉĂƐƚ ĨĞǁ LJĞĂƌƐ ŽŶ ƚŚĞŝƌ ĂůďƵŵ Love this Giant. WůĂLJŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ ƐŽŵĞŽŶĞ ŽĨ ƚŚĂƚ ƐƚĂƚƵƌĞ ĂŶĚ ĂďŝůŝƚLJ ǁŝůů ĂůǁĂLJƐ ƌƵď Žī ŽŶ Ă ŵƵƐŝĐŝĂŶ͕ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƉƌŽŽĨ ŽĨ ƚŚŝƐ ŝƐ ŝŶ ŚĞƌ ĞůĞĐƚƌŝĨLJŝŶŐ ůŝǀĞ ƐŚŽǁƐ͘

Difficult to fault

/ ŚĂĚ ƚŚĞ ƉůĞĂƐƵƌĞ ŽĨ ǁŝƚŶĞƐƐŝŶŐ ŽŶĞ ŽĨ ƚŚĞƐĞ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ƐƵŵŵĞƌ͕ ĂŶĚ ǁŚĞŶ ^ƚ sŝŶĐĞŶƚ ŝƐŶ͛ƚ ƐŚƵŋŝŶŐ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ŝŶ ďŝnjĂƌƌĞ͕ ƚƌĂŶĐĞͲůŝŬĞ ĚĂŶĐĞ ŵŽǀĞƐ Žƌ ƚĞůůŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ ĂƵͲ ĚŝĞŶĐĞ ƚŚĞ ǁĞŝƌĚĞƐƚ ƐƚŽƌŝĞƐ ĨƌŽŵ ƚŚĞ ĚĞƉƚŚƐ ŽĨ ŚĞƌ ŝŵĂŐŝŶĂƟŽŶ͕ ƐŚĞ͛Ɛ ĚĞůŝǀĞƌŝŶŐ Ă ŚĞĂĚ ĐƌƵƐŚŝŶŐůLJ ŐŽŽĚ ƐĞƚ͘ ,Ğƌ ƚŽƚĂů ŵĂƐƚĞƌLJ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ Ăƌƚ ŽĨ ŐƵŝƚĂƌ ƉůĂLJŝŶŐ ŵĞĂŶƐ ƚŚĂƚ ƐŚĞ ŚĂƐ ďŽƚŚ ƚŚĞ ŝŶƐƚƌƵŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ ĂƵĚŝĞŶĐĞ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ƉĂůŵ ŽĨ ŚĞƌ ŚĂŶĚ͖ ŽŶĞ ŵŝŶƵƚĞ ĐĂƌͲ ƌLJŝŶŐ ƚŚĞŵ ĂůŽŶŐ ŽŶ ĚĂŝŶƚLJ ƐLJŶƚŚƐ ĂŶĚ ƐǁĞĞƚ ǀŽĐĂů ŵĞůŽĚŝĞƐ͕ ƚŚĞ ŶĞdžƚ ƚŚƵŶĚĞƌŝŶŐ ŝŶ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ŚƵŐĞ ƌŝī͘ ^ŚĞ ƉůĂLJƐ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ŬŝŶĚ ŽĨ ĚĞůŝĐĂƚĞ ĨĞƌŽĐŝƚLJ ƚŚĂƚ ŝƐ ƐŽ ƵŶŝƋƵĞ ƚŽ ŚĞƌ͕ ĐĂƌƌLJŝŶŐ ǁŚŽĞǀĞƌ ŝƐ ƉƌĞƐĞŶƚ ĂĐƌŽƐƐ Ă ŚƵŐĞ ƐƉĞĐƚƌƵŵ ŽĨ ĨĞĞůŝŶŐƐ͘ dŚŝƐ ŝƐ ŶŽƚ ƐŽŵĞŽŶĞ ǁŚŽ ŵĞƌĞůLJ ƉůĂLJƐ ŚĞƌ ƐŽŶŐƐ͕ ďƵƚ ƐŽŵĞŽŶĞ ǁŚŽ ƉĞƌͲ ĨŽƌŵƐ ƚŚĞŵ͕ ĂŶ ŝŵƉŽƌƚĂŶƚ ĚŝƐƟŶĐƟŽŶ ƚŚĂƚ ŵĞĂŶƐ ŶŽ ƉĞƌƐŽŶ ŝƐ ůĞŌ ƵŶĚĞƌǁŚĞůŵĞĚ͕ ĂŶĚ ŶŽ ƐƋƵĂƌĞ ŝŶĐŚ ŽĨ ƐŬŝŶ ŝƐ ůĞŌ ƵŶƚŽƵĐŚĞĚ ďLJ ŐŽŽƐĞ ďƵŵƉƐ͘ tŚŝůƐƚ ƚŚĞƐĞ ůŝǀĞ ƐŚŽǁƐ ĂƌĞ ƐŽŵĞƚŚŝŶŐ ƚŽ ďĞŚŽůĚ͕ ŝƚ ƚŽŽŬ ƚŚĞ ƌĞůĞĂƐĞ ŽĨ ůĂƌŬ͛Ɛ ĨĂŶƚĂƐƟĐ ŶĞǁ ĞƉŽŶLJŵŽƵƐ ĂůďƵŵ͕ ^ƚ͘ sŝŶĐĞŶƚ͕ ƚŽ ƚƌƵůLJ ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞ ƚŚĞƐĞ͘ /ƚ ǁŽƵůĚ ďĞ ĚĞďĂƚĂďůĞ ƚŽ ƐĂLJ ƚŚĂƚ ƚŚĞ ĂůďƵŵ ŝƐ ^ƚ sŝŶĐĞŶƚ͛Ɛ ďĞƐƚ ƌĞĐŽƌĚ͕ ďƵƚ ƐŚĞ ŚĂƐ ĐĞƌƚĂŝŶůLJ ƌŝƐĞŶ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ ĐŚĂůůĞŶŐĞ ŽĨ ĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐ ϮϬϭϭ͛Ɛ ĨĂŶƚĂƐƟĐ Strange Mercy. /ƚ͛Ɛ ŵŽƌĞ Ă ƉƌŽŐƌĞƐƐŝŽŶ ƚŚĂŶ ĂŶ ŝŵƉƌŽǀĞŵĞŶƚ Žƌ ĚĞĐůŝŶĞ͕ ĂŶĚ ƐĞĞŵƐ ƚŽ ďĞ Ă ƌĞĮŶĞŵĞŶƚ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ƐƚLJůĞ ƐŚĞ ŚĂƐ ďƵŝůƚ ƵƉ ƐŝŶĐĞ ƚŚĞ ƐƚĂƌƚ ŽĨ ŚĞƌ ĐĂƌĞĞƌ͘ tŝƚŚ ŵŽƌĞ ƉŽƉ ĂŶĚ ŐƵŝƚĂƌ ĚƌŝǀĞŶ ĞůĞŵĞŶƚƐ ƚŚĂŶ ƉƌĞǀŝŽƵƐ ƌĞůĞĂƐĞƐ͕ ^ƚ͘ sŝŶĐĞŶƚ ŝƐ ĂŶ ĂůďƵŵ ŵĂĚĞ ĨŽƌ ĂƌĞŶĂƐ ƉĂĐŬĞĚ ĨƵůů ŽĨ ĚĞǀŽƚĞĚ ĨĂŶƐ͕ ĂŶĚ ĐŽƵůĚ ŝŶĚĞĞĚ ďĞ ƚŚĞ ĂůďƵŵ ƚŚĂƚ ƉƌŽƉĞůƐ ŚĞƌ ƚŽ ƚŚŽƐĞ ůĞǀĞůƐ͘ dŚĞ ĂůďƵŵ ŝƐ ĨƌĂŶŬůLJ ďƌŝůůŝĂŶƚ ĂŶĚ / ǁŽƵůĚ ĚĞĨLJ ĂŶLJ ůŝƐƚĞŶĞƌ ƚŽ ĞǀĞŶ ĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌ ƉƌĞƐƐŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ ͚ƐŬŝƉ͛ ďƵƩŽŶ Ăƚ ĂŶLJ ƉŽŝŶƚ͕ ǁŝƚŚ ͚ ŝƌƚŚ ŝŶ ZĞǀĞƌƐĞ͛ ĂŶĚ ͚,ƵĞLJ EĞǁƚŽŶ͛ ƉĂƌƟĐƵůĂƌůLJ ĐĂƚĐŚŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ ĂƩĞŶƟŽŶ͘ dŚĞ ůĂƩĞƌ͕ ĨŽƌ ŝŶƐƚĂŶĐĞ͕ ŝƐ ĂŶ ŝŶŝƟĂůůLJ ĂŶ ĂŵďŝĞŶƚ ƐLJŶƚŚ ďĂƐĞĚ ƐŽŶŐ ƐŚŽǁĐĂƐŝŶŐ ůĂƌŬ͛Ɛ ǀŽĐĂů ĚĞdžƚĞƌͲ ŝƚLJ͕ ƚŚĞŶ ƚƵƌŶƐ ŝŶƚŽ ĂŶ ĂŐŐƌĞƐƐŝǀĞ ďĞĂƐƚ ǁŝƚŚ ŝƚƐ ƌŝī ƚŚĂƚ ƚĞĂƌƐ LJŽƵƌ ĨĂĐĞ Žī͘ /ƚ ŝƐ ŽŶĞ ŽĨ ĨĞǁ ƚƌĂĐŬƐ ŽŶ ƚŚĞ ĂůďƵŵ ƚŚĂƚ ĐĂŶ ďŽĂƐƚ Ă ŐŽŽƐĞ ďƵŵƉ ĂĐŚŝĞǀŝŶŐ ŵŽͲ ŵĞŶƚ ŽŶ Ă ƉĂƌ ǁŝƚŚ ƉƌĞǀŝŽƵƐůLJ ƌĞůĞĂƐĞĚ ƐŽŶŐƐ ƐƵĐŚ ĂƐ ͚^ƚƌĂŶŐĞ DĞƌĐLJ͕͛ ͚ ŚĞĞƌůĞĂĚĞƌ͛ Žƌ ͚>ĂƵŐŚŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ Ă DŽƵƚŚ ŽĨ ůŽŽĚ͛͘ dŚŝƐ ƌĞĐŽƌĚ ŝƐ ĐŽŚĞƐŝǀĞ ĂŶĚ ĐŽŶƐŝƐƚͲ ĞŶƚ ǁŝƚŚ ŚĞƌ ƉƌĞǀŝŽƵƐ ǁŽƌŬ͕ ŚŽǁĞǀĞƌ ƐƟůů ŵĂŶĂŐĞƐ

ƚŽ ŐŝǀĞ Žī ĂŶ ŝŶŶŽǀĂƟǀĞ ĂŶĚ ĞdžƉĞƌŝŵĞŶƚĂů ǀŝďĞ͕ ŵĂŬŝŶŐ ŝƚ ƚŚĞ ŵŽƐƚ ƌĞĮŶĞĚ ŽĨ ŚĞƌ ĐĂƚĂůŽŐƵĞ͘ /Ŷ ƚĞƌŵƐ ŽĨ ůŝǀĞ ƐŚŽǁƐ ĂŶĚ ŚĞƌ ŶĞǁ ƌĞĐŽƌĚ͕ ^ƚ͘ sŝŶͲ ĐĞŶƚ͛Ɛ ϮϬϭϰ ŚĂƐ ĐůĞĂƌůLJ ďĞĞŶ Ă ǀĞƌLJ ƐƵĐĐĞƐƐĨƵů ŽŶĞ͕ ĂŶĚ ŚĞƌ ƚĂůĞŶƚƐ ĂŶĚ ƉƌŽŐƌĞƐƐ ŚĂǀĞ ŶŽƚ ŐŽŶĞ ƵŶŶŽͲ ƟĐĞĚ ďLJ ŐŝĂŶƚƐ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ǁŽƌůĚ ĞŝƚŚĞƌ͘ ůƌĞĂĚLJ ŚĂǀŝŶŐ ǁŽƌŬĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ƵŶĚŝƐƉƵƚĞĚ ůĞŐĞŶĚ ĂǀŝĚ LJƌŶĞ͕ ƐŚĞ ŚĂƐ ŶŽǁ ďĞĞŶ ŬĞĚ ĂƐ The Black Keys ƐƵƉƉŽƌƚ ĂĐƚ ŽŶ ƚŚĞŝƌ ŵĂŵŵŽƚŚ ƚŽƵƌ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ hŶŝƚĞĚ ^ƚĂƚĞƐ͘ ,ŽǁĞǀĞƌ͕ ŵŽƐƚ ƐŝŐŶŝĮĐĂŶƚůLJ ŽĨ Ăůů͕ ŝŶ Ɖƌŝů ƐŚĞ ǁĂƐ ĂƐŬĞĚ ďLJ ƚŚĞ ƌĞŵĂŝŶŝŶŐ ŵĞŵďĞƌƐ ŽĨ Nirvana to ĨƌŽŶƚ ƚŚĞ ďĂŶĚ ŝŶ ƚŚĞŝƌ ƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞ ŽĨ ͚>ŝƚŚŝƵŵ͛ Ăƚ ƚŚĞŝƌ ŝŶĚƵĐƟŽŶ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. /ƚ͛Ɛ ĂůǁĂLJƐ Ă ŐƌĞĂƚ ĐŽŵƉůŝŵĞŶƚ ĂŶĚ ŚŽŶŽƵƌ ƚŽ ĞǀĞŶ ďĞ ĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌĞĚ ǁŽƌƚŚLJ ŽĨ ƐƚĞƉƉŝŶŐ ŝŶƚŽ ƚŚĞ ƐŚŽĞƐ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ůĂƚĞ ŐƌĞĂƚ <Ƶƌƚ ŽďĂŝŶ͕ ĂŶĚ ŝƚ ǁĂƐ Ăůů ƚŚĞ ŵŽƌĞ ƐŝŐŶŝĮĐĂŶƚ ĨŽƌ ^ƚ͘ sŝŶĐĞŶƚ ŚĞƌƐĞůĨ͕ ĐŽŶƐŝĚĞƌŝŶŐ EŝƌͲ ǀĂŶĂ͛Ɛ ĂůƚĞƌŶĂƟǀĞ ŽƵƚƐŝĚĞƌ ŝŵĂŐĞ ƐŚĂƉĞĚ ŚĞƌ ŵƵͲ ƐŝĐĂů ĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ ĂƐ Ă LJŽƵŶŐƐƚĞƌ͘ ,Ğƌ ƚĂůĞŶƚƐ ĂƌĞ ĐůĞĂƌůLJ ďĞŝŶŐ ƌĞĐŽŐŶŝƐĞĚ ŽŶ ĂŶ ĞǀĞƌͲŐƌŽǁŝŶŐ ƐĐĂůĞ͕ ĂŶĚ ϮϬϭϰ ŝƐ ĂŶ ĞdžĐŝƟŶŐ ƟŵĞ ĨŽƌ Ă ďƌŝůůŝĂŶƚ ŵƵƐŝĐŝĂŶ͘

I would defy any listener to even consider pressing the ‘skip’ button at any point

ϮϬϭϰ ŚĂƐ ŚĂĚ ŝƚ Ăůů ĨŽƌ ^ƚ͘ sŝŶĐĞŶƚ͕ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ĐƌŝƟĐĂůͲ ůLJ ĐůĂŝŵĞĚ ĂůďƵŵ ĂŶĚ ŶŽǁ ĂŶ W ŽŶ ƚŚĞ ǁĂLJ͕ ďƌŝůͲ ůŝĂŶƚ ůŝǀĞ ƐŚŽǁƐ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ǁŽƌůĚ ŝŶ ǁŚŝĐŚ ƐŚĞ ŚĂƐ ƐĐĂůĞĚ ŶĞǁ ŚŝŐŚƐ ďŽƚŚ ŝŶ ƚĞƌŵƐ ŽĨ ƐŝnjĞ ĂŶĚ ƉĞƌĨŽƌͲ ŵĂŶĐĞ ůĞǀĞů͕ ĂŶĚ ƌĞĐŽŐŶŝƟŽŶ ĂĐƌŽƐƐ ƚŚĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ŝŶͲ ĚƵƐƚƌLJ ƚŚĂƚ ƐŚĞ ƚƌƵůLJ ŝƐ Ă ĨŽƌĐĞ ƚŽ ďĞ ƌĞĐŬŽŶĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ͘ ,Ğƌ ĞǀĞƌ ƉƌĞƐĞŶƚ ƋƵŝƌŬŝŶĞƐƐ ŵĂŬĞƐ ŚĞƌ ĞǀĞƌ ŵŽƌĞ ŝŶƚƌŝŐƵŝŶŐ͕ ĂŶĚ ŝŶƐƉŝƌĞƐ Ă ĐƵƌŝŽƐŝƚLJ ƚŽ ŬŶŽǁ ǁŚĂƚ ŝŶͲ ƐƉŝƌĞƐ ŚĞƌ ůLJƌŝĐƐ͕ ŚĞƌ ŵƵƐŝĐ ŝŶ ŐĞŶĞƌĂů ĂŶĚ ŽĨ ĐŽƵƌƐĞ ŚĞƌ ŵĂŶĚĂƚŽƌLJ ďŝnjĂƌƌĞ ƐƉŽŬĞŶ ǁŽƌĚ ŝŶƚĞƌůƵĚĞƐ Ăƚ ŚĞƌ ŐŝŐƐ͘ ǀĞƌLJŽŶĞ ĂůƌĞĂĚLJ ŬŶĞǁ ƚŚĂƚ ŶŶŝĞ ůĂƌŬ ǁĂƐ Ă ŵƵƐŝĐĂů ƉŝŽŶĞĞƌ͕ ďƵƚ ϮϬϭϰ ŚĂƐ ƐŚŽǁŶ ƚŚĂƚ ^ƚ͘ sŝŶĐĞŶƚ ŚĂƐ ƚŚĞ ƉŽƚĞŶƟĂů ƚŽ ďĞĐŽŵĞ Ă ŐŝĂŶƚ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ǁŽƌůĚ͘ / ŚŽƉĞ / Ăŵ ŶŽƚ ƚŚĞ ŽŶůLJ ǁŚŽ ŝƐ ĚĞƐͲ ƉĞƌĂƚĞ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĂƚ ƚŽ ŚĂƉƉĞŶ͕ ĂŶĚ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ĚĂLJ ƚŚĂƚ ƐŚĞ ŝƐ ƐƚŽŽĚ ĂƚŽƉ ƚŚĞ ďŝŐŐĞƐƚ ƐƚĂŐĞƐ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ǁŽƌůĚ ƚŽ ƚƌƵͲ ůLJ ĚŽ ŚĞƌ ŵƵƐŝĐ ũƵƐƟĐĞ͘ /Ĩ ƚŚĂƚ ŝƐ ƚŽ ŚĂƉƉĞŶ͕ ϮϬϭϰ ŚĂƐ ƵŶĚŽƵďƚĞĚůLJ ďĞĞŶ Ă ƐƚĞƉ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ƌŝŐŚƚ ĚŝƌĞĐƟŽŶ͘ By Angus Macleod


23

oxjam music festival

Beeston recently played host to Oxjam, a small music festival scattered around the local pubs, clubs and bars promising to be an eclectic mix of local talent, all for the good cause of Oxfam.

‘Part-time Model’, which broke any remaining audience tension. They seemed so comfortable, performing with ease, giving the impression of a wellrefined band, a breath of fresh air composed of tight riffs, confidence and a hell of a lot of potential. They are already signed to Sound Hub Studios, an independent record label in the Midlands, with their debut single, ‘Orange Car’, soon to be released.

an eclectic mix of local talent, all for the good cause of Oxfam

Having skipped the daytime entertainment, our night was kicked off by a young band whose name no one ever discovered. All I can remember was the overworked skill of their bassist and an array of provocative t-shirts, so no lasting impressions made there.

The venues were as eclectic as the music, with a tiny end-of-the-world style pub, The Hope Pole, playing host to a band called No! Disco - a Nottingham three-piece indie band. Crammed into the corner of the pub, with a cheeky and engaging stage (…well, corner) presence, they held the full attention of a packed room. Having only formed in 2013, less than a handful of people there had ever heard of them, yet they never lacked audience support, interrupting their set list to serenade an unsuspecting crowd member with a cover of Flight Of The Concords’

D No!

isco

a breath of fresh air composed of tight riffs, confidence and a hell of a lot of potential Still new to Beeston’s varied venues, stumbling across Barton’s - a converted 1900s transport workshop - was definitely the hidden gem I had been hoping for. The venue fitted a music scene perfectly, with its grungy industrial feel serving the purpose of a haphazard festival themed night club. After flitting between the two stages, an explosion of sound (I later came to know as a band called Midnight Wire) drew me straight in. This band know exactly how to create an atmosphere that will leave you sweaty,


Mi d

n ig

h

re t Wi

danced-out and aching for more. They burst onto the stage with an attitude stronger than the neat vodka being served at the bar - that’s right, a bar that doesn’t give the option of mixers! With an original take on a popular sound, being likened to that of The Clash, The Libertines and Two Door Cinema Club, it was a combination that worked strongly in their favour. The band formed in 2011, a four-piece indierock band from Leicester. Front man, Alex Van Roose, has already had a taste of fame, making it onto the Glastonbury BBC Introducing Stage with his previous band, The Heroes, a slot prior to Two Door Cinema Club. After Roose left, he formed Midnight Wire, who released their debut album, Crossing the Rubicon, in September and have already completed a thirty five-date headline tour. With continuous support from BBC Introducing, and recent shows with the likes of Carl Barat, they seem to only be going up, set to pick up where The Heroes fell before them.

As well as Roose, the band is composed of Chris Merriman, formerly of Razmataz, and drummer Adam Horton, of Chezza and The Beat. However most interesting is the background of their bassist, Arj Johal, who prior to Midnight Wire had never picked up a guitar, let alone been in a band; initially doing so only a few days before the band started recording. Roose stated that their previous bassist lacked dedication, with Johal learning the whole set in two days, he had never seen anything like it. I must say I have to agree, Arj gives the impression of a well practiced bassist, one of those rare people who can honestly be referred to as a true natural. Both bands can be found in and around Nottingham, so I completely recommend taking some time to go and see them. No! Disco are currently gigging in Bodega, Spanky Van Dykes and The Maze, with Midnight Wire hosting an album release in Leicester, with Nottingham on the close horizon. By Meg Spoor

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Top 5 hip-hop acts to watch out for in 2015 With 2015 promising hot new releases from Kanye, Kendrick, Drake and Lil Wayne to name just a few, let’s take a look at the guys flying high below the radar. These artists are by no means underground, but all of them are looking to reach that next level of success in 2015.

Big Sean:

5

Royce da 5’9: Royce has always been regarded as one of the best MCs in the game. Since his release from prison in 2007, his true resurgence came from his collaboration with Eminem under the name Bad Meets Evil, whose 2011 release introduced him to a new wave of Eminem fans picked up by the mass appeal of Recovery in the previous year. Since then, Royce has been a major role in Shady 2.0, releasing solo projects and collaborations with his rap group Slaughterhouse in 2011 and 2012.

Since then, he appeared to lay low until a collaborative album with DJ Premier sparked interest again. As of writing, Royce is set to appear on Eminem’s Shady XV project with Slaughterhouse and Bad Meets Evil. In early November, four different new verses from Royce showed us what to expect of him next year. He arguably stands his ground against Eminem’s legendary flow on the track ‘Detroit vs. Everybody’, as well as spitting an impressive freestyle in the Shady XV cypher. The tracks ‘Y’all Ready Know’ with Slaughterhouse and PRhyme display how impressive Royce sounds over DJ Premier’s production, and what is to be expected of him in 2015.

Big Sean has always shown his lyrical ability in his mixtapes, but is yet to release a studio album that isn’t incredibly underwhelming. It’s rumoured that label-mate and mentor Kanye West wouldn’t appear on his 2013 release Hall of Fame due to it being too “commercial”. Sean’s studio albums appear to be engineered to produce radio singles, with dumbed down lyricism and simple production with pop-sensibility.

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3 However, at the start of the year he released ‘1st Quarter’ - a true display of what he can do lyrically. During the year he featured on DJ Mustard’s album, 10 Summers, dropping an energetic and comical verse that was recognised as one of the best on the album. Towards the end of the year, Sean released a further four tracks, the most popular of which being “IDFWU”, an upbeat track aimed at his ex-girlfriend, Naya Rivera, supported the iconic bouncy, poppy production style of DJ Mustard accompanied by both Kanye West and DJ Dahi. However, the tracks ‘Paradise (Ransom Intro)’ and ‘4th Quarter’ - an apparent sequel to his release earlier in the year - show his lyrical potential at its peak. With his third studio album in production, here’s to hoping Big Sean can finally deliver.

Mac Miller: Mac Miller is slowly becoming one of the best artists in hip-hop. From his original “frat-rap” style, he has evolved into a deep and introspective artist with one of the best work ethics in the game. Since the underwhelming reception to his debut studio album, Blue Slide Park, Mac changed his style and lyrical focus for his next mixtape, Macadelic, leading to his 2013 studio album Watching Movies with the Sound Off gaining a much improved critical response than his previous commercial release. Miller claimed that he had “over one thousand” songs recorded for the project.

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The lyrical style of the album delved deeper into Mac Miller’s personal life as well as him taking on more of the production under the pseudonym, Larry Fisherman. This year he released a twenty-four track mixtape, Faces, in which Miller talks about more personal struggles in his life such as insomnia and a cocaine addiction. Producing the vast majority of the tape, this has proven to be one of Mac’s most profound projects yet. This, combined with even more features and production credits, as well as managing his own label, REMember Music, shows how hungry he is to constantly improve. Since the release of Faces, Mac has kicked his coke habit and signed to his first major label, Warner Bros. The fact that it took four years from his breakout the mixtape, K.I.D.S., for him to sign to a major label shows that he is confident that this is the right direction for his music to go. With reports of him working with legendary producer Rick Rubin, 2015 should be a big year for Mac Miller.


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Kid Cudi: Scott Mescudi broke into the mainstream in 2008 with his mixtape, A Kid Named Cudi, which got him a deal with Kanye West’s G.O.O.D. Music. He then went on to release a classic album, Man on the Moon: The End of Day; a heartfelt album containing stories of depression and loneliness with singles such as ‘Day ‘n’ Nite’ and ‘Pursuit of Happiness’ causing it to reach number four on the billboard top rap albums chart. However, after his sophomore release of Man on the Moon II: The Legend of Mr Rager, a change in style caused Cudi to fall out of favour for many hip-hop heads.

His alternative rock project, WZRD, did not garner the ideal critical reception he had potentially anticipated, with their debut album achieving a metascore rating of fifty out of a possible hundred. His next solo release, Indicud was also criticised for abandoning a lot of the style of rapping that made him popular in favour of more singing and what became known as the “Kudi moan”, as well as a change from production from G.O.O.D. Music’s in-house production to Kudi’s own unique, dark style. On songs such as ‘Solo Dolo, Pt. II’, a sequel to the iconic song from his debut studio album, the guest feature, Kendrick Lamar, stole the limelight from Kudi, which happens with a lot of features on Indicud.

However, his release this year Satellite Flight: The Journey to Mother Moon - showed development in Kudi’s alternative style and is said to be a prequel to the next instalment of the Man on the Moon trilogy. With his recent departure from G.O.O.D., there is no doubt that Cudi will be in full control of his creative vision and hungry to live up to his potential.


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T-PAIN: You probably know T-Pain (Faheem Najm) as “the auto-tune guy”. After his signature gimmick made him a star, the Tallahasse artist became the object of ridicule, as critics yielded that the wave of auto-tuned songs and other artists such as Ke$ha and the Black Eyed Peas breaking into the charts was the “death of pop music”; despite artists like Kanye West using auto-tune to critical acclaim on his 2008 release 808’s & Heartbreak, on which T-Pain consulted West as to how to properly utilise the tool to create new sounds. Listeners became tired of the synthetic sound, and T-Pain was condemned for starting the trend.

As Jay Z released his 2009 track ‘D.O.A (Death of Autotune)’, a line was drawn between “real” hiphop and the pop-rap that T-Pain was boxed into. Najm fell into depression, uninspired to make new music despite a relatively successful single featuring B.o.B. entitled ‘Up Down (Do This All Day)’, with DJ Mustard on production. This year he aired out his stories about how it felt to become the butt of Hip-Hop’s jokes, recounting a story in which Kanye West ridiculed him during the creation of 808’s & Heartbreak citing that all of T-Pain’s ideas were “stupid”. However, it wasn’t until after his NPR, tiny desk concert, when people started to take notice. Racking up five million views in a week, the video showcases T-Pain’s true singing ability.

Although he claims that during live performances he likes to sing without auto-tune, to the mainstream listener this is the first time T-Pain’s talent was heard. In early November, Najm premiered the song ‘Stoicville’ on Soundcloud as the first track in his new album - a hard-hitting, confessional piece that airs out his experience of depression and struggles with fame, symbolising a new era of his career. Next year, T-Pain is going to drop his equivalent of My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy - watch out.

By Matt Smith

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In Review After releasing Resurrection, their 8th studio album, ‘New Found Glory’ embarked on their first tour of the UK in long a while. After a bad start to the year with the controversial departure of guitarist Steve Klein, New Found Glory were back stronger and more energetic than ever. However, they didn’t just bring themselves to the UK, but a bunch of newer bands such as The Story So Far, State Champs, Candy Hearts and Only Rivals, who combined to form the Pop Punk’s Not Dead Tour. New Found Glory started the Pop Punk’s Not Dead Tour just over three years ago in the States. The intention was to showcase up and coming pop punk bands and give them the same exposure that N.F.G. were given in the early stages of their career by the likes of Green Day and Less Than Jake. It became so popular…

that guitarist Chad Gilbert promised fans that they would bring it to the UK. Three years later New Found Glory finally fulfilled their promise The first act of the night are Dublin’s Only Rivals, who have toured with some pretty big names this year. They manage to get the crowd going by encouraging them to clap along and start the night’s first mosh pit. The vocals are outstanding, with enough energy to liven up the room and let the crowd know what the night had in store. The guitar parts are heavy in places, diversifying the sound by moving it away slightly from the pop punk which was to follow for the rest of the night.


EĞdžƚ ƵƉ ĂƌĞ EĞǁ :ĞƌƐĞLJ ƉŽƉ ƉƵŶŬƐ͕ Candy Hearts, ǁŚŽƐĞ ƌĞĐĞŶƚ ƌĞĐŽƌĚ All The Ways You Let Me Down ǁĂƐ ƉƌŽĚƵĐĞĚ ĂŶĚ ƌĞůĞĂƐĞĚ ďLJ EĞǁ &ŽƵŶĚ 'ůŽƌLJ͛Ɛ ǀĞƌLJ ŽǁŶ ŚĂĚ 'ŝůďĞƌƚ͘ ^ŝŶŐĞƌ DĂƌŝĞů͛Ɛ ǀŽŝĐĞ ƉƵƚƐ Ă ƵŶŝƋƵĞ ƚǁŝƐƚ ŽŶ ƚŚĞ ŐĞŶƌĞ ĂŶĚ ƐŚĞ ƵƐĞƐ ŝƚ ƉŽǁĞƌĨƵůůLJ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŽƵƚ ƚŚĞ ƐĞƚ͘ dŚĞ ƐŽŶŐƐ ĂƌĞ ƉůĂLJĨƵů ĂŶĚ ƌĞǀĞƌƚ ďĂĐŬ ƚŽ Ă ŵŽƌĞ ĐůĂƐƐŝĐ ƉŽƉ ƉƵŶŬ ƐŽƵŶĚ͕ ŵĂŬŝŶŐ ƚŚĞŵ ƐŽƵŶĚ ƐŝŵŝůĂƌ ƚŽ Ă ĨĞŵĂůĞ ĨƌŽŶƚĞĚ Blink 182͘ dŚĞ ďĂŶĚ ƉůĂLJƐ ĞŶĞƌŐĞƟĐĂůůLJ͕ ǁŝƚŚ DĂƌŝĞů ŵŽǀŝŶŐ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƐƚĂŐĞ ǁŝƚŚ ŚĞƌ ŐƵŝƚĂƌ ĂŶĚ ĞŶĐŽƵƌĂŐŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ ĐƌŽǁĚ ƚŽ ƐŝŶŐ ĂůŽŶŐ͘

his voice can give you goose bumps as it echoes gracefully around the venue ŌĞƌ Candy Hearts͕ New York’s State Champs ĐŽŵĞ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ ƐƚĂŐĞ͘ ƚ ƚŚŝƐ ƉŽŝŶƚ ƚŚĞ ĐƌŽǁĚ ƐƚĂƌƚ ƚŽ ƉƵƐŚ ĨŽƌǁĂƌĚ ƚŽ ŐĞƚ Ă ŐůŝŵƉƐĞ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ďĂŶĚ ĂŶĚ ŚĞůƉ ƐŝŶŐ ĂůŽŶŐ͘ sŽĐĂůŝƐƚ ĞƌĞŬ͛Ɛ ǀŽŝĐĞ ŝƐ ƉŽǁĞƌĨƵů ĂŶĚ ŚŝƐ ĂďŝůŝƚLJ ƚŽ ƌŝī ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ŽƌŝŐŝŶĂů ƐŽŶŐƐ ŝƐ ŵŽƌĞ ƚŚĂŶ ŝŵƉƌĞƐƐŝǀĞ͘ ,Ğ ƉƌŽǀĞƐ ƚŚĂƚ ŚĞ͛Ɛ ƚŚĞ ŬŝŶĚ ŽĨ ǀŽĐĂůŝƐƚ ƚŚĂƚ ƐŽƵŶĚƐ ďĞƩĞƌ ůŝǀĞ ƚŚĂŶ ŽŶ ƌĞĐŽƌĚŝŶŐƐ͖ ŚŝƐ ǀŽŝĐĞ ĐĂŶ ŐŝǀĞ LJŽƵ ŐŽŽƐĞ ďƵŵƉƐ ĂƐ ŝƚ ĞĐŚŽĞƐ ŐƌĂĐĞĨƵůůLJ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ǀĞŶƵĞ͘ dŚĞ ďĂŶĚ ŵŽǀĞ ĂďŽƵƚ ĂƌĚĞŶƚůLJ ĂƐ ŝĨ ƚŚĞLJ ŚĂǀĞ ƚŚĞ ďĞƐƚ ũŽď ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ǁŽƌůĚ ĂŶĚ ůŽŽŬ ŐĞŶƵŝŶĞůLJ ŚĂƉƉLJ ƚŽ ďĞ ƉůĂLJŝŶŐ͘

killer atmosphere The Story So Far ;ǁŚŽ ĂƌĞ ŶĂŵĞĚ ĂŌĞƌ Ă New Found Glory ƐŽŶŐͿ ĂƌĞ ŽŶ ŶĞdžƚ ĂŶĚ ĂůƚŚŽƵŐŚ ƚŚĞLJ͛ƌĞ ŶŽƚ ƚŚĞ ŚĂƉƉŝĞƐƚ ďĂŶĚ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ǁŽƌůĚ͕ ŝƚ ĂĚĚƐ ƚŽ ƚŚĞŝƌ ĂŶŐƐƚLJ͕ ŚĞĂƌƞĞůƚ ƉŽƉ ƉƵŶŬ͘

30 dŚĞ ĐƌŽǁĚ ƐŝŶŐƐ ďĂĐŬ ĞǀĞƌLJ ǁŽƌĚ ƚŽ ƐŽŶŐƐ ůŝŬĞ ͚ ĂƵŐŚƚĞƌƐ͛ ĂŶĚ ͚ ŵƉƚLJ ^ƉĂĐĞ͕͛ ǁŚŝĐŚ ƵŶŝĮĞƐ ƚŚĞ ĐƌŽǁĚ ĐƌĞĂƟŶŐ Ă ŬŝůůĞƌ ĂƚŵŽƐƉŚĞƌĞ͘ ůƚŚŽƵŐŚ ƐŽŵĞ ŚĂǀĞ ĂƌŐƵĞĚ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ƉĂƐƚ ƚŚĂƚ ƚŚĞ ďĂŶĚ ůĂĐŬ ƐƚĂŐĞ ƉƌĞƐĞŶĐĞ͕ ƉĂƌƟĐƵůĂƌůLJ ĂĨƚĞƌ ƚŚĞŝƌ ƐĞƚ Ăƚ ZĞĂĚŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ >ĞĞĚƐ͕ ƚŚŝƐ ŝƐ ŶŽƚ ƚŚĞ ĐĂƐĞ ƚŽŶŝŐŚƚ ĂƐ ǀŽĐĂůŝƐƚ WĂƌŬĞƌ ĂŶŶŽŶ ĚĂŶĐĞƐ ĐŽŶĮĚĞŶƚůLJ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ ƚŚĞ ƐƚĂŐĞ ƉƵŶĐŚŝŶŐ ƚŚĞ Ăŝƌ ǁŝƚŚ ŚŝƐ ĮƐƚ ĂŶĚ ƉŽŝŶƟŶŐ ŚŝƐ ŵŝĐ Ăƚ ƚŚĞ ĐƌŽǁĚ ƚŽ ƐŝŶŐ ĂůŽŶŐ͘

The crowd sings back every word &ŝŶĂůůLJ͕ New Found Glory ĞŵĞƌŐĞ ĂŶĚ ũƵŵƉ ƐƚƌĂŝŐŚƚ ŝŶƚŽ ŽŶĞ ŽĨ ƚŚĞŝƌ ĐůĂƐƐŝĐ ŚŝƚƐ͗ ͚hŶĚĞƌƐƚĂƚĞŵĞŶƚ͛͘ dŚĞ ƐĞƚ ĨŽůůŽǁƐ Ă ƐŝŵŝůĂƌ ĨŽƌŵƵůĂ Ăůů ƚŚĞ ǁĂLJ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚ͕ ƐŚŽǁĐĂƐŝŶŐ ŶĞǁ ƚƌĂĐŬƐ ĨƌŽŵ ZĞƐƵƌƌĞĐƟŽŶ ĂƐ ǁĞůů ĂƐ ĞĂƌůŝĞƌ ƐŽŶŐƐ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞŝƌ ŽůĚĞƌ ĨĂŶƐ͘ &Žƌ Ă ďĂŶĚ ǁŚŽ ŚĂǀĞ ďĞĞŶ ƚŽŐĞƚŚĞƌ ĨŽƌ ϭϳ LJĞĂƌƐ͕ ŶŽƚ ŽŶĐĞ ĚŽ ƚŚĞLJ ůŽŽŬ ďŽƌĞĚ Žƌ ƐƚŽƉ ŵŽǀŝŶŐ ĂƌŽƵŶĚ͘ ŚĂĚ ĂŶĚ ďĂƐƐŝƐƚ /ĂŶ ƐǁĂƉ ƐŝĚĞƐ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ƐƚĂŐĞ ĐŽŶƟŶƵŽƵƐůLJ͕ ƐŝŶŐŝŶŐ Ăƚ ƚŚĞ ĐƌŽǁĚ ĂŶĚ ƉůĂLJŝŶŐ ǀŝŐŽƌŽƵƐůLJ͘ dŚĞLJ ƌĞŵŝŶĚ ƚŚĞ ĐƌŽǁĚ ƚŚĂƚ ďĞŝŶŐ ŝŶ Ă ďĂŶĚ ŝƐŶ͛ƚ ũƵƐƚ ĂďŽƵƚ ďĞŝŶŐ ƐƵĐĐĞƐƐĨƵů ďƵƚ ĐƌĞĂƟŶŐ ŐŽŽĚ ŵĞŵŽƌŝĞƐ ĂůŽŶŐ ƚŚĞ ǁĂLJ͕ ƐŽŵĞƚŚŝŶŐ ƚŚĂƚ ƐŚŽǁƐ ƚŚƌŽƵŐŚŽƵƚ ƚŚĞŝƌ ƐĞƚ͘ ƚ ŶŽ ƉŽŝŶƚ ĂƌĞ ƚŚĞLJ ĂĨƌĂŝĚ ƚŽ ůĞƚ ŐŽ ĂŶĚ ůŽŽŬ ůŝŬĞ ƚŚĞLJ͛ƌĞ ŚĂǀŝŶŐ Ă ŐĞŶƵŝŶĞůLJ ĨƵŶ ƟŵĞ͕ ƚŚĞLJ ĞǀĞŶ ŵĂŬĞ ũŽŬĞƐ ĂďŽƵƚ ϱ ^ĞĐŽŶĚƐ ŽĨ ^ƵŵŵĞƌ͘ KǀĞƌĂůů͕ ƚŚĞ ƚŽƵƌ ǁĂƐ Ă ďƌŝůůŝĂŶƚ ƐŚŽǁĐĂƐĞ ŽĨ ƵƉ ĂŶĚ ĐŽŵŝŶŐ ďĂŶĚƐ ĂŶĚ ĚĞĮŶŝƚĞůLJ ǁŽƌƚŚ ƚŚĞ ƚŚƌĞĞͲLJĞĂƌ ǁĂŝƚ͘ /Ĩ ŝƚ ƉƌŽǀĞĚ ĂŶLJƚŚŝŶŐ͕ ŝƚ ǁĂƐ ĚĞĮŶŝƚĞůLJ ƚŚĂƚ ƉŽƉ ƉƵŶŬ ŝƐ ŶŽƚ ĚĞĂĚ͘ By Eleanor Parkinson


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Introducing: URn After dark Compiled by Alex Orosa

‘Metal Madness’ (Sunday night, 1-3am)

‘Rock Bottom’ (Saturday night, 9-11pm) Every Saturday night, Rock Bottom brings you a range of the best Rock music from the last six decades. With three hosts, Adam, Alex and Dan, each bringing their own musical tastes to the table, we give listeners a wide range of styles and sounds, as well as a plethora (our favourite word) of features and interactive games. All of our previous shows are up on our Mixcloud page, or find us on Facebook and Twitter at URN Rock Bottom. Join us!

The heaviest show on URN After Dark. As well as playing the best picks in the last 50 years of Metal, we also discuss bands playing shows in Nottingham, review the latest releases, discuss the goings on in the Metal world and root out some underground goodies to introduce you to. All slathered in a veneer of moronic arsing around.

‘Bassweight’ (Monday night, 7-9pm) Bassweight brings you all the best in bass music from the UK and further afield. We aim to bring you up to date with events, new releases and news from the world of bass music, with an emphasis towards events in Nottingham. Expect brand new music, DJ mixes and plenty of chances for you to get involved! You can keep up to date with our free mixes and podcasts on twitter: @Bassweight_URN.

‘Luke & Adam show’ (Monday night, 1-3am) Do you like it hard, dark and fast? Do you want a quality double-team to give it to you good? Luke & Adam play techno bangers 1am-3am Tuesday mornings. Expect tracks from labels such as Opal Tapes, Livity Sound, L.I.E.S., Token, Fifth Wall and more, as well as info on local nights and the best new releases. Listen back to the show on our Soundcloud page.

‘The Britpop Show’ (Saturday night, 11pm-1am) Ending each Saturday on a high note with a mix of Britpop and alternative rock! Each week I throw together some chart-toppers of past decades with the more obscure tracks you may not have heard. You can also expect the occasional segment of news or trivia, not to mention and competitions and other features.


‘Foreign Voices’ (Wednesday night, 7-9pm) We are Foreign Voices, a dance music show every Wednesday from 7-9pm on URN. It’s called Foreign Voices because the show began life on a year abroad. I have regular guests on every week with different features (recently we hosted an EDM-styled Ryder Cup live on air) – and we’re having live mixes on air in upcoming episodes!

‘Maddie and Nikki’ (Tuesday night, 7-9pm) Our focus is on Soul and Motown as a genre, the best from the 60s and 70s running through all the way to contemporary artists, with a few curveballs thrown in. Every week we choose a different artist or group to focus on and play a mixture of their songs in between the rest of our playlist. We also sing a live acoustic cover of a Soul or Motown classic and invite other people to come into the show and do the same.

‘Night Moves’ (Thursday night, 11pm-1am) Night Moves brings the sounds of the nocturne to the forefront. Choices from across the entire musical spectrum, and spanning the last 60 years of popular and alternative music, mean that you’ll be hearing the most promising new talents and a new side to established artists.

‘Motherfunkers’ (Sunday night, 1-3am) Sophie and Tom (AKA Señor Superfly and Monsieur Party-time, two badass Motherfunkers) are here to guide you through the mystical, groovy world of soul, funk, disco, R&B and blues! Combining the likes of Otis Redding, Ray Charles, Bootsy Collins, Chic, Aretha Franklin and so much more, let the MOTHERFUNKERS bring you to the only place to party on a Monday at 1am only on urn1350!

‘Heart and Soul’ (Sunday night, 9-11pm) URN’s premier soul and R&B show, presenting the very best of classic soul, contemporary R&B and everything in between, with regular features including the album of the week and the Symphony in Soul.

‘Rap101’ (Saturday night, 1-3am) Rap101 is hosted by Liston and Danny. If its rap, we are all over it. We play rap, talk rap, teach rap and also have rap battles. We also interview some high profile stars; on our second show we interviewed Wretch32. We are on air every Saturday from 1am until 3am.

‘DesiJam’ (Wednesday night, 11pm-1am)

DesiJam is URN’s first show dedicated to celebrating Asian music. Although a specialist show, we bring a diversity of sounds across Bollywood, Bhangra and BritAsia R&B. DesiJam unites the Asian community, igniting nostalgia of back home. With chatty banter and weekly competitions, our vibrant and upbeat show guaranteed to make you smile.

‘Afrobeats’ (Wednesday night, 9-11pm) The show is about African music and one the best upcoming genres of music: Afrobeats. We talk about the latest news in the Afrobeats music industry and keep our listeners updated on anything related to Afrobeats happening in Nottingham. During the show we read shout outs from our listeners and encourage them to tweet in using the hash tag #ADAFROBEATS, we also make them vote for the sign off song.


An Interview with Becky Hill

Just before her performance as support act for Katy B, at Nottingham’s Rock CIty, we caught up with Becky Hill for a chat about her music, her obsessions and the highlights of her career so far. The Mic (TM): First things first, you’re supporting Katy B! How did that come about? Becky (B): We met during a writing session, and Katy kindly invited me the opportunity to feature on her tour. TM: And we’re very glad to have you. Now, I’d like to trace the start of your musical journey. You started on The Voice? B: Yeah, I’d say I was a bit of a talent show

snob. I hadn’t applied for one in the past, but was desperate to get out from my surroundings. Honestly, I didn’t prepare for the audition, but things turned out pretty well. I made the semi-finals and came off the show with Jessie J’s manager as a contact, and from there, I joined a management team who put me in contact with other music artists. TM: So you’ve worked with some quite wellknown names I hear?


34 B: tŽƌŬŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ DE < ĨŽƌ ŵLJ ůĂƚĞƐƚ ƐŝŶŐůĞ͕ ͚>ŽƐŝŶŐ͕͛ ǁŚŝĐŚ ǁĂƐ ŝŶĐƌĞĚŝďůĞ͘ <ĞƐŝ ƌLJĚĞŶ ĨƌŽŵ ZƵĚŝŵĞŶƚĂů ƉƵƚ ƵƐ ŝŶ ĐŽŶƚĂĐƚ ĂŶĚ ƚŚŝŶŐƐ ũƵƐƚ ĐůŝĐŬĞĚ͘ ^Ž ŵƵĐŚ ƐŽ͕ ƚŚĂƚ ǁĞ ǁĞŶƚ ŽŶ ƚŽ ǁƌŝƚĞ ƚŚĞ ǀŽĐĂůƐ ĨŽƌ ͚KǀĞƌĚƌŝǀĞ͛ ďLJ KůŝǀĞƌ ,ĞůĚĞŶƐ͘ TM: h< EƵŵďĞƌ KŶĞ͕ ƉƌĞƩLJ ŐŽŽĚ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ƐƚĂƌƚ ŽĨ LJŽƵƌ ĐĂƌĞĞƌ B: tĞ ƚƌŝĞĚ ƚŽ ŵĂŬĞ ŝƚ Ă ĐůƵď ƚƌĂĐŬ͕ ǁŝƚŚ ĞdžƉĞƌŝŵĞŶƚĂů ĂŶĚ ĐůĂƐƐŝĞƌ ůLJƌŝĐƐ͖ / ƚŚŝŶŬ ƚŚĞ ƐŽŶŐ ŝƐ ƋƵŝƚĞ ĂĐĐĞƐƐŝďůĞ͘ / ŚĞĂƌĚ ƚŚĞ ŝŶƐƚƌƵŵĞŶƚĂů ŝŶ Ă ĨƌŝĞŶĚ͛Ɛ ĐĂƌ ĂŶĚ ǁĂŶƚĞĚ ƚŽ ǁƌŝƚĞ Ă ŵĞůŽĚLJ ƚŽ ŝƚ͊ TM: EŽǁ͕ ůĞƚ͛Ɛ ƚĂŬĞ Ă ůŽŽŬ Ăƚ ŵƵƐŝĐ ƚŚĂƚ ŝŶƐƉŝƌĞĚ LJŽƵ͘ tŚĂƚ ƐŽƌƚ ŽĨ ƐƚƵī ǁĞƌĞ LJŽƵ ŝŶƚŽ ŝŶ LJŽƵƌ LJŽƵƚŚ͍ B: / ŚĂĚ ƐƚĂŐĞƐ ŽĨ ŵƵƐŝĐĂů ƚĂƐƚĞ͕ Ăůů ͚ƵƉ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ Ăŝƌ͛ ĂŶĚ ƋƵŝƚĞ ǀĂƌŝĞĚ͘ / ůŝŬĞĚ ĞůĞĐƚƌŽŶŝĐ͕ ĚƌƵŵ ĂŶĚ ďĂƐƐ͕ ďƵƚ ŚĂǀĞ ĂůǁĂLJƐ ĞŶũŽLJĞĚ ƉŽƉ ŵƵƐŝĐ͘ / ďŽƵŐŚƚ ͚ ůĞƉŚƵŶŬ͛ ďLJ ƚŚĞ ůĂĐŬ LJĞĚ WĞĂƐ ǁŚĞŶ / ǁĂƐ LJŽƵŶŐĞƌ͕ ĂŶĚ / ůŽǀĞ DĂƌŽŽŶ ϱͲ ĞƐƉĞĐŝĂůůLJ ĚĂŵ >ĞǀŝŶĞ͛Ɛ ǀŽŝĐĞ͘ ZŽďLJŶ͛Ɛ ŵƵƐŝĐ ŵĞĂŶƐ Ă ůŽƚ ƚŽ ŵĞ ƚŽŽ͕ ĂƐ ŝƚ ƐŽƵŶĚƐ ĂƐ ŝĨ ŝƚ͛Ɛ ǁƌŝƩĞŶ ĨƌŽŵ ƚŚĞ ŚĞĂƌƚ͘ TM: dŚĞ ĐŽŶƐƵŵƉƟŽŶ ŽĨ ŵƵƐŝĐ ŚĂƐ ďĞĞŶ ŝŶ ƚŚĞ ŶĞǁƐ Ă ůŽƚ ƌĞĐĞŶƚůLJ͕ ƉĂƌƟĐƵůĂƌůLJ ǁŝƚŚ ƐƚƌĞĂŵŝŶŐ ƐĞƌǀŝĐĞƐ ƐƵĐŚ ĂƐ ^ƉŽƟĨLJ͘ tŚĂƚ ĂƌĞ LJŽƵƌ ƚŚŽƵŐŚƚƐ ŽŶ ƚŚŝƐ ĚĞǀĞůŽƉŵĞŶƚ͍ B: ,ŽŶĞƐƚůLJ / ůŽǀĞ ^ƉŽƟĨLJ͕ ĂŶĚ / ǁĂŶƚ ƚŽ ƉƵƚ ŵLJ ŵƵƐŝĐ ƚŚĞƌĞ͕ ĂŶĚ / ůŝŬĞ ŚŽǁ ^ƉŽƟĨLJ ĐŽƵŶƚƐ ƚŽǁĂƌĚƐ ƚŚĞ ĐŚĂƌƚƐ ŶŽǁ͘ dŚĞ ŝƐƐƵĞ ŝƐ ƚŚĂƚ ƚŚĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ĐŽƐƚƐ ŵŽŶĞLJ͖ ŝĨ ŵŝdžŝŶŐ͕ ŵĂƐƚĞƌŝŶŐ ĂŶĚ ƐŽƵŶĚ ĚŝĚŶ͛ƚ ĐŽƐƚ ŵŽŶĞLJ /͛Ě ŚĂƉƉŝůLJ ŐŝǀĞ ŝƚ ĂǁĂLJ ĨŽƌ ĨƌĞĞ͕ ŚŽǁĞǀĞƌ ŝŶ ƚŚĂƚ ƐĞŶƐĞ͕ ƉĂLJŝŶŐ ĨŽƌ ŵƵƐŝĐ ŝƐ ũƵƐƟĮĞĚ͘ Ƶƚ / ĚŽŶ͛ƚ ĚŽ ŵƵƐŝĐ ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ƉĂƐƐŝŽŶ ĂŶĚ ŶŽƚ ƚŚĞ ŵŽŶĞLJ ĂŶĚ ŝƚ͛Ɛ ŐƌĞĂƚ ƚŚĂƚ / ĐĂŶ ŚĂǀĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ƚŚĂƚ ŝƐ ŵŝŶĞ͘ TM: >ŽŽŬŝŶŐ ŝŶƚŽ ƚŚĞ ĨƵƚƵƌĞ͕ ǁŚĂƚ ĐĂŶ ǁĞ ĞdžƉĞĐƚ ĨƌŽŵ LJŽƵ͍ zŽƵ͛ǀĞ ƉƵƚ ŽƵƚ ƐŽŵĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ŚĂǀĞŶ͛ƚ LJŽƵ͍

B: ĞĨŽƌĞ ƚŚĞ ƐŝŶŐůĞ͕ ǁĞ ƉƵƚ ŽƵƚ ͚ ĂƵƟŽŶ ƚŽ ƚŚĞ tŝŶĚ͕͛ ǁŚŝĐŚ ǁĂƐ Ă ďƵnjnj ƚƌĂĐŬ ĨŽƌ ƚŚŝŶŐƐ ƚŽ ĐŽŵĞ͗ ƚŚĞ ƟƚůĞ ŝƚƐĞůĨ ŝƐ ĂŶ ŝĚŝŽŵ ƚŚĂƚ ƌĞƐŽŶĂƚĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ŵĞ͘ / ĨĞĞů ƚŚĞ ŝŶƐƚƌƵŵĞŶƚĂů ĂŶĚ ƉƌŽĚƵĐƟŽŶ ŝƐ ǀĞƌLJ ŝŵƉŽƌƚĂŶƚ ƚŽ ƚŚŝƐ ƐŽŶŐ͘ tŝƚŚ ƚŚŝƐ ŝŶ ŵŝŶĚ͕ / ǁĂŶƚĞĚ Ă ůĞŌͲĮĞůĚ ĂŶŐůĞ ƐŽ ůŽǀĞĚ ǁŽƌŬŝŶŐ ǁŝƚŚ dǁŽ /ŶĐŚ WƵŶĐŚ ĂƐ ŚŝƐ ƋƵŝƌŬŝĞƌ͕ ůĞŌ ƐŽƵŶĚ ŝƐŶ͛ƚ LJŽƵƌ ŵŝĚĚůĞ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ƌŽĂĚ ƉƌŽĚƵĐƟŽŶ ĞdžĂĐƚůLJ͘ dŚŝƐ ǁĂƐ ĂŶĚ ŝƐ ƚŚĞ ŵƵƐŝĐ ƚŚĂƚ / ǁĂŶƚ ƚŽ ŵĂŬĞ͗ ŝŶƚĞůůŝŐĞŶƚ ĂŶĚ ƉĞƌƐŽŶĂů͘ ͚>ŽƐŝŶŐ͛ ŝƐ ƋƵŝƚĞ ŵĞůĂŶĐŚŽůŝĐ͕ ǁŚŝůƐƚ ƚŚĞ ƌĞƐƚ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ĂůďƵŵ ŝƐ ƋƵŝƚĞ ĨĞŝƐƚLJ͘ / ĂůƐŽ ǁƌŽƚĞ ǁŝƚŚ ^ŚŝŌ <ϯz͕ ǁƌŝƟŶŐ ďĂůůĂĚƐ ĂŶĚ ŐƌŽŽǀLJ ƚƵŶĞƐ͕ ĂŶĚ /͛ǀĞ Ă ƐŽŶŐ ĐĂůůĞĚ ͚'Ğƚ ŽǁŶ͛ ǁŚŝĐŚ ŝƐ ƐŽƌƚ ŽĨ Ă ĐƌŽƐƐ ďĞƚǁĞĞŶ ŚĂƌůŝ y y͛Ɛ ͚ ŽŽŵ ůĂƉ͛ ĂŶĚ ůůĂ LJƌĞ͛Ɛ ͚ ŽŵĞďĂĐŬ͛͘ /͛ŵ ƌĞĂůůLJ ĞdžĐŝƚĞĚ ĂďŽƵƚ ƚŚĞ ŶĞdžƚ ƐƚĞƉƐ ƚŚŽƵŐŚ͖ ƚŚĞ ĂůďƵŵ ĐŽŵĞƐ ŽƵƚ ĞĂƌůLJ ŶĞdžƚ LJĞĂƌ͕ ǁŝƚŚ Ă ĨĞǁ ƐŝŶŐůĞƐ ďĞĨŽƌĞ ŝƚ͘ TM: dĂůŬŝŶŐ ĂďŽƵƚ ĐƵƌƌĞŶƚ ĂƌƟƐƚƐ͕ ǁŚĂƚ ƐŽƌƚ ŽĨ ĐƵƌƌĞŶƚ ŵƵƐŝĐ ŚĂǀĞ LJŽƵ ďĞĞŶ ůŝƐƚĞŶŝŶŐ ƚŽ͍ B: /͛ŵ ĚĞĮŶŝƚĞůLJ ŝŶƐƉŝƌĞĚ ďLJ ŽŶ /ǀĞƌ͕ ůůŝĞ 'ŽƵůĚŝŶŐ͕ WĂƐƐŝŽŶ Wŝƚ ĂŶĚ ĞŶ ,ŽǁĂƌĚ͘ / ƌĞĐĞŶƚůLJ ƉƵƚ ŽƵƚ Ă ^ƉŽƟĨLJ ƉůĂLJůŝƐƚ ŽĨ ŵƵƐŝĐ /͛ŵ ůŝƐƚĞŶŝŶŐ ƚŽ͘ WĞŽƉůĞ ůŝŬĞ ƉŚĞdž dǁŝŶ͕ <ǁĂďƐ͕ ^ŝŶĞĂĚ ,ĂƌŶĞƩ͕ ^ŚĂŶŶŽŶ ^ĂƵŶĚĞƌƐ͕ ĂŶĚ <ĂƚĞ ^ƚĞǁĂƌƚ͘ / ƌĞĂůůLJ ůŝŬĞ ŚƵ͛Ɛ ͚&ĂĚĞĚ͕͛ >ĂďƌŝŶƚŚ͛Ɛ ͚>Ğƚ /ƚ Ğ͛ ĂŶĚ ƚŚĞ EĂŽ ĂŶĚ < WĂƵů͛Ɛ ͚^Ž 'ŽŽĚ͛͘ /͛Ě ůŽǀĞ ƚŽ ǁŽƌŬ ǁŝƚŚ ŚŝƐ ďƌŽƚŚĞƌ͕ :Ăŝ WĂƵů͘ / ƌĞĂůůLJ ůŝŬĞ ĂŶŬƐ͛ ĂůďƵŵ ͚'ŽĚĚĞƐƐ͛͘ ^ŚĞ ǁŽƌŬĞĚ ǁŝƚŚ ^K,E͕ ĂŶŽƚŚĞƌ ƉƌŽĚƵĐĞƌ /͛Ě ůŝŬĞ ƚŽ ǁŽƌŬ ǁŝƚŚ͘ TM: &ŝŶĂůůLJ͕ ŚŽǁ ǁŽƵůĚ LJŽƵ ĚĞƐĐƌŝďĞ LJŽƵƌƐĞůĨ ŝŶ ƚŚƌĞĞ ǁŽƌĚƐ͍ B: zŽƵƚŚĨƵů͕ ĞdžƉůĂŶĂƚŽƌLJ ĂŶĚ ƟŵĞůĞƐƐ͊ TM: dŚĂŶŬƐ ĨŽƌ LJŽƵƌ ƟŵĞ ĞĐŬLJ͘ B: dŚĂƚ ǁĂƐ ƐŝĐŬ͊ By Preyesh Champaneri


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Our Team The committee

Designers

Preyesh Champeneri Alex Orosa Gabriella Ahmed Sobia Khan Aaron Brudney Jhan

Emma Quaedvlieg Jaisai Wongpichet Daniela Figiel Sobia Khan

Contributors Gabriella Ahmed Aaron Brudney Kieran Hallam Liam Inscoe-Jones Jaisai Wongpichet Sobia Khan Josh Klinghoffer

Angus MacLeod Meg Spoor Matt Smith Eleanor Parkinson Alex Orosa Preyesh Champeneri

Follow us on twitter @the micnotts Find us on facebook /themicnotts


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Ultimate Artists, in collaboration with Nottingham’s Renewal Trust will be bringing together the youth of Nottingham. Coming to you, from ‘the voice uk’! biggest

From one of the UK’s talent competitions, The Voice UK, the mentors are offering four talented students a full scholarship to attend the eight day Ultimate Artists music development program in August 2015, taking place in London.

Led by industry professionals Led by Joshua Alamu and Ali Tennant, contestant vocal coaches on The Voice, the mentors, along with a number of industry professionals from all areas of the music industry, will provide lectures and workshops, teaching students about not only singing, songwriting and producing, but everything you need to know about what’s required to have a career in today’s commercial music industry. Understanding what is means to see yourself as a ‘brand’ and not as just a band!

Get in touch now! Working with this team of experts that want to help you by sharing their wealth of knowledge and professional experience will be just what you need to jump start your musical career – so don’t hesitate…get in touch! www.ultimateartists.co.uk or info@ultimateartists.org https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgrwWdYSFaY



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