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Michigan Chronicle and the Detroit Public School League Football Coaches Association

PSL All-City 2011 Team Page C-1

www.michronicle.com VOLUME 75 – Number 26

March 7-13, 2012

479 Ledyard • Detroit MI 48201

313.963.5522

$1.00

Atlanta Daily World joins Real Times Media Real Times Media (RTM), a Detroit-based multimedia company, is pleased to announce that it has entered into a strategic alliance with the Atlanta Daily World (ADW) newspaper in Atlanta, Ga. Under the terms of the agreement, RTM will assume full operational responsibility for the 84year old African-American publication this month.

“Real Times Media is delighted to enter into this strategic alliance with the Atlanta Daily World,” said Hiram E. Jackson, chief executive officer, Real Times Media. “The Atlanta Daily World is one of the most storied and legendary newspaper franchises in America and Atlanta is one of the most important markets in the country.” Founded in 1928 by William A. Scott II, the Atlanta Daily World is Atlanta’s oldest Black-owned newspaper. For the full story, see page A-4.

Former CBC Chair, Congressman Payne, dies Donald Payne, the first African American elected to represent New Jersey in Congress since 1988 and former chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, died at at 77 after battling cancer. A respected and Donald Payne powerful voice for the Black community, Payne was also among the strongest supporters of Africa in Washington, chairing the House Subcommittee on Africa as well as serving on the Foreign Affairs Committee.

Daniel T. Wheatley services A memorial service for Daniel T. Wheatley, DDS, will be held on Friday, March 9, 11 a.m. at Gesu Catholic Church, 17180 Oak Drive, Daniel Wheatley in Detroit. It wil be preceded by a family hour at 10 a.m. Arrangements are being handled by Swanson Funeral Home. For additional information, call (313) 272-9000 or (313) 923-1122.

WHAT’S INSIDE Obama’s star power

(Page D-1)

DETROIT POLICE CHIEF Ralph Godbee Jr., poised to intensify fight against crime.

What is

human life worth? Some Detroit neighborhoods

of these men and women to give us a reason to have faith in them. Citizens have every right to expect quality work from fields. Something has to give. Our its police force — and to feel children cannot keep dying, our safe on the streets and in their seniors cannot continue be pris- homes. oners in their own homes, fearing to step out because of the likelihood of their becoming the next crime statistic. Our schools must not be battlefields. Our businesses should not have to operate in an atmosphere of fear.

rapidly becoming killing fields By Bankole Thompson CHRONICLE SENIOR EDITOR

Is human life worth arguing over a seat at a baby shower? Is it worth fighting over a cell phone or girlfriend?

That is where Detroit currently is as violent crime continues to steal the lives of innocent children, making COMMENTARY them victims of conflicts — some so trivial that it is impossible to fathom — they had no role in.

This is where the wisdom and the capability of the Detroit Police Department (DPD) is being put to the test. As these crimes are taking place almost every day, many are looking for The children were in answers from the police the wrong place at the before taking the law wrong time, some in a into their own hands. presumed safe place — their own homes. DPD should show us that under its leader, The rate at which Chief Ralph Godbee Jr., these atrocities are happening begs for a swift Bankole Thompson it can stem the tide of violence. and lasting resolution. It is everyone’s problem in that we We are always asked to have are all affected. faith in the men and women in blue We cannot concede our neigh- for putting their lives on the line to borhoods to those who have de- protect us. At the same time we must ask cided to make them their killing

“It should not matter what one’s background is. We have not declared in this city that protection should be based on the economic scale, and that is not what the men and women in blue are sworn to do.”

It is beyond a tragedy that children’s lives are being brought to an abrupt and violent end before they have even had a chance to really live. The

shame is ours. In the case of nine-monthold Delric Miller, we perhaps have lost a boy who could have grown up to be among this city’s leaders. I’ve been listening to some of the analyses that have been given in the wake of the shootings, and I must confess some of it is just plain twisted. Most of them conclude that poverty is the root cause, so let’s just give up.

No.

It should not matter what one’s background is. We have not declared in this city that protection should be based on the economic scale, and that is not what the men and women in blue are sworn to do. They are expected to serve residents and businesses in this city regardless of who they are or where they live. That is why the intervention of U.S. Attorney Barbara McQuade and the various federal law enforcement agencies is welcome news. Criminals, and those contemplating crimal activity, are cognizant of the fact

See NEIGHBORHOOD page A-4

Detroit Riverfront: Then and now By Jeff Alexander Faye Nelson’s office on the 17th floor of the GM Renaissance Center provides a panoramic view of the Detroit River and a daily reminder that the Motor City — despite its problems — is still capable of grand achievements. The proof lies in the Detroit RiverWalk, a sprawling walkway and bike path that transformed the city’s waterfront from an industrial wasteland into a recreational haven. Nelson, the CEO of the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy, has shepherded the $300 million, privately funded project from the outset. The Detroit native said she is filled with Faye Nelson pride when she sees people using the RiverWalk for exercise, as a place to watch passing freighters and migratory birds, or simply to relax along the river. “Growing up in Detroit, experiencing the river and all of its wonder was a part of my childhood,” Nelson said. “It was really a challenge for me to be confronted by the major decline of our community,

www.michronicle.com

Andre Smith photos

U.S. ATTORNEY BARBARA MCQUADE announced federal intervention last week to stop violent crime on Detroit’s east side.

See RIVERFRONT page A-5

DEAN ROBERT M. ACKERMAN (left), Keith Center Director Peter Hammer, Judge Damon J. Keith, Aubrey V. McCutcheon Jr. and Deacon Robert Brown.

Keith Center receives $56,000 donation from estate of John Thomas Hall Attorney Aubrey V. McCutcheon, Jr. and Deacon Robert Brown, trustees of the estate of John Thomas Hall, presented a check in the amount of $56,000 to Wayne State University Law School’s Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights at the Keith Center recently. For more than 50 years, Mr. Hall and Judge Damon

J. Keith served the congregation of the Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church when it was located at 6125 Beechwood Ave., Detroit, under the pastoral leadership of the late Rev. Dr. Frederick G. Sampson II and the late Rev. Dr. Jesse J. McNeil. Mr. Hall was general superintendent of the Sunday church school for many years; Judge Keith served as an

ordained deacon at the church. A retired U.S. postal worker, Mr. Hall died July 1, 2009, at age 90. He had no survivors. “I vividly recall the discussion between Mr. Hall and his caregiver, Deacon Emmett Grimmett, when plans for the Keith Center

See CENTER page A-6


THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE March 7-13, 2012 Page A-2 news Watching Detroit, Wayne Life after treatment for County implode: Where a gambling addiction have all the leaders gone? By Bernie Zeitler By Tom Watkins

over and kicked down the In November 2007, I road? began a journey home Where have all the from the addiction of compulsive gambling. “leaders” gone?

What happens in Detroit and Wayne County impacts us all. Watching the slow motion financial unraveling of Detroit and the ongoing scandals in Wayne County brings to mind that old saying, “When you show people death, they will accept serious injury.” Is there any accountability for out-of-control Tom Watkins No idea. Really? local government? When there is a hole We will not move conin your roof, pretending fidently into the future by to fix it does not keep the looking in the rearview rain out. Yet, the pretend- mirror. Instead, we need ing in Detroit and Wayne to drive boldly forward. County continues. Efforts by the mayor Current “changes” and county executive under way in Detroit and to address the swirling Wayne County are mini- problems are anemic at mal when juxtaposed best given the massive, against the magnitude of historical, structural and the problems faced by the cultural mess that needs mayor and county execu- to be addressed and been ignored for far too long. tive. City and county officials have known about the problems of declining tax base and rising and unsustainable health care and pension costs for years and have failed to take action to address these structural fiscal issues.

It appears these units of government continue to operate as if only minor tweaks are needed. In reality, only massive reform and a cultural transfusion will free the city and county from the past and provide a solid foundation on which to rebuild.

The “crisis” exists today because leaders in the past did not lead or act. We must not let these problems fester.

Why the refusal to say “the emperor has no clothes” or say these short-term tweaks will not address the long-term problems? Why the silence from so many quarters about what is going on that mimics the denial of the auto industry in our most recent “lost decade in Lansing” where problems were papered

How could there be no knowledge that a culture of corruption was bubbling within the inner sanctum and around the top aides to the Wayne County Executive?

To bring about real Thanks to the help of change, real change is Michigan’s Problem Gamnecessary. bling Treatment Services Recently, I laid out and Neighborhood Service bold citizen led reforms Organization (NSO), I have that could be initiated to regained my sanity even help make our major city in the face of my losses. and region competitive on the world stage. Like any Going back to my major undertaking, it re- youth, there were signs quires vision, leadership that I could become a and action. Is someone compulsive gambler. Bernie Zeitler ready to step up and reinvent Southeast Michigan? I remember in elemen- 2010, I was able to be at Gov. Snyder has made tary school the “friendly” his bedside, holding his clear we need a viable De- games of marbles that I hand because gambling troit and Wayne County to played for keeps. In high was no longer a part of my have a viable and prosper- school, I would buy the life. I am well on my way occasional scratch-off to recovery, but I have no ous state. ticket. illusions. He wants local officials Over the years, stress That is the challenge to address local problems. He has made it abundant- and responsibilities took in life after treatment for a gambling addiction. ly clear that if they don’t their toll. address the problems, he I spent hundreds of dol- If you or someone you will. lars at a time on scratch- know may be experienc But will he? Is there off tickets to avoid going ing a gambling problem, leadership in Lansing home. I would spend confidential help is availthat will step up and de- hours going through tick- able. clare, “Detroit and Wayne ets, scratching them off in Call the Michigan County are too important my car or in the store, and Problem Gambling Helpto our collective future to when they were all losing Line at 1-800-270-7117, tickets, I would spend fail?” hundreds more to try to 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. So, Detroit and Wayne win back what I lost. County, what will it be? Death or serious injury? My wife and chilThis is a local decision dren rarely saw me. I — with statewide conse- did not make it to my mother’s bedside when quences. she was dying because I Tom Watkins led two was spending time with THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE major departments of scratch-off tickets. 479 LEDYARD • DETROIT MI 48201 (313) 963-5522 • FAX (313) 963-8788 Michigan’s state govern I lost track of what I ment, was an elected OFFICE HOURS: member of the Wayne was spending, but I knew Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. County Charter Commis- the bills were not getting For general, local ............ Ext. 232 sion in the ’80s. He can be paid. I went bankrupt in Entertainment news........ Ext. 241 2005. I could not believe reached at tdwatkins88@ it had come this far. Community gmail.com. (religion, weddings, etc) .......... Ext. 231 With any addiction, Subscriptions .................. Ext. 227 loss is inevitable. That loss is not just that of the –DEADLINE – addict, but of the people around him or her. Classified: 3 p.m Friday. Copy,

HOW TO CONTACT US:

Stop wasting time in meetings

Expert offers tips for meetings that get things done By Mike Richardson Technology is constantly speeding up the pace of business: Decisions once delayed for weeks are now made in seconds thanks to internet communication. Computer analytics puts realtime market information at our fingertips. Transactions can occur anywhere, any time.

Logic holds that businesses that can’t keep up will be left behind.

 “Just to keep pace, businesses must develop organizational agility, and it’s absolutely critical if they want to do more than just survive,” said Mike Richardson, author of “Wheel$pin: The Agile Executive’s Manifesto: Accelerate Your Growth, Leverage Your Value, Beat Your Competition.” Organizational agility is being able to move quickly and decisively, and one of the biggest obstacles is unproductive, time-wasting meetings he said.

“They start late, run long, and don’t achieve much,” he says. “But meetings are the backbone of an agile business.”



He offers these tips:

• Map  your  meeting: Create a standing agenda and a master spreadsheet with tabs relevant to each agenda item with the expected inputs, throughputs and outputs. That way, the meetings are easy for the chairman to run because everything is crystal clear. • Set  the  mood:  Set the tone for the energy level by playing a video or music. You can tell a story, read a quotation, or be unpredictable and

My gambling addiction left a path of destruction that affected my two sons, my ex-wife, all of my extended family members and strangers I may never meet.

report back. (Remember Recovery has been a to allot time for each step • Spark creativity: Frame good thing for me. When of the process.) the purpose of the meetmy father passed away in ing as a question: How do • Get  fast  consensus:  we best …? Questions get Once the options are on the human brain thinking the table, facilitate the more quickly. group toward fast deci• Document  the  action  sions with statements live:  Instead of taking and questions like: “I’m notes, editing them and leaning toward this …”; distributing them after- “Does anyone have a vioward, save time by captur- lent objection to that … ing everythingelectroni- ?”; “Can everyone get cally in real time. You behind that?”; and then can project action items move them into fast for all to see during the action: “How could we meeting, and keep them best do that?” in a master spreadsheet “Agility is the ability to hosted on your server for be constantly looking for easy access by all. opportunities to move for• Time-box  everything:  ward toward goals while Meetings should last 45 planning for problems,” minutes, from 5 after the Richardson says. “It’s hour to 10 minutes to the being able to capitalize on hour. Allot time for each fleeting opportunities, reagenda item and espe- bound from problems and cially for presentations. make decisions on the Get people used to the turn of a dime.”

 create a surprise factor.

fact that you will guillotine anything which runs over.When you challenge people to figure out how to get things done in the time allotted, you will be amazed at how they can.

• Leverage  the  wallspace:  Wall space is one of the most underutilized assets in your business. Have the standing agenda on the wall, creative problem-solving frameworks, your core values, key elements of your strategic plan, inspirational quotations, etc., all in a format large enough for you to refer to during the meeting. • Generate  input:  Have everyone take a minute to write down an idea relevant to the agenda item. Go around the table and allow each person to share his or her idea, or break into pairs or triads to discuss the ideas and

Free seminar for women

That doesn’t happen in businesses where executives and workers are bogged down by burdensome systems, procedures and timewasting meetings stuck in minutiae, he says. Instead of shooting forward when they press on the gas, they go into a futile wheel$pin.

Creating agile meetings is one big step toward creating an agile organization which is in traction. Mike Richardson is president of Sherpa Alliance Inc., a management support business and a chair with Vistage International, a global collaborative of CEOs. He holds an MBA from London Business School and is an adjunct faculty member at the University of San Diego Business School.

Advertise in the Michigan Chronicle March is National 313-963Red Cross 5522 Month

Alpha Kappa Alpha, Pi Tau Omega and Pi Delta Chapters will present a free woman’s health seminar Saturday, March 17, at Lawrence Tech University, Gallery Room T-210, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

gynecology, as well as guest speakers. A Zumba session and hip-hop aerobics are included. Continental breakfast will be served at 9 a.m. Wearing comfortable clothing is suggested.

Topics of discussion include nutrition, diabetes, organ donation, kidney and heart disease,

For more information, visit www.AKA-southfield. com or call (248) 4982552.

corrections and cancellations, preceding the Wednesday publication. Display: 12 p.m. Friday preceding the Wednesday publication. For all news and calendar items: Deadline is two weeks prior to event.

Weeks that contain holidays, deadline is Thursday prior to publication date.

The Michigan Department of Community Health (MDCH) funds the Michigan Problem Gambling Treatment Program and Help-Line operated by Neighborhood Service Organization. It is a statewide program for problem gamblers and their families. Through this program, people who need assistance with problem gambling can receive a referral to a trained treatment provider. Neighborhood Service Organization is a diverse human service agency with a mission to be “Always Within Reach” for our most vulnerable neighbors. To learn more about the Michigan Problem Gambling Helpline and our Treatment Program, or to donate to NSO, please call 313-9614890 or visit www.nsomi.org.

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news

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012

Page A-3

Joking judge a disgrace to bench By Michael Cottman

ing over cases that may involve people of color, given his disdain for Obama.

So it’s come to this: Even federal judges are now joining the racists in their public contempt for President Barack Obama.

Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, (D-MO) chair of the Congressional Black Caucus, stopped short of calling for Cebull to step down.

The latest Obama hater to be exposed is the chief federal judge of Montana, who admitted Thursday to sending a despicable, racially incendiary e-mail under the subject line “A Mom’s Memory” that likened Obama to a dog.

“Chief Judge Richard Cebull’s email was deplorable, shameful and inexcusable,” Cleaver said in a statement. “There is no way to shroud hatred under the cloak of differences in ideals. The email was blatantly racist and filled with the hateful rhetoric this country has strived so desperately to leave behind. An apology alone is not acceptable. Comments like this are beyond disrespectful and ignorant.

COMMENTARY Chief U.S. District Judge Richard Cebull sent this e-mail joke to his “old buddies” about Obama: “A little boy said to his mother, ‘Mommy, how come I’m black and you’re white?’ His mother replied, ‘Don’t even go there, Barack! From what I can remember about that party, you’re lucky you don’t bark!’” Cebull, who was appointed by President George W. Bush in 2001 and has been the chief judge since 2008, added another sarcastic nugget to his e-mail that he apparently thought was witty.

RICHARD CEBULL, chief judge of the federal court in Montana, admits to sending racist e-mail comparing President Obama to a dog.

‘‘There’s no way imaginable

it. And he’s probably right: Federal judges are appointed for life and can only be removed if they are impeached by Congress. So our Capitol Hill legislators could show some courage and debate whether Cebull crossed the line. In an interview with the Great Falls Tribune, Cebull flip-flopped and admitted the e-mail was racist, but maintained that he doesn’t consider himself a racist and that the note was meant to remain private. Of course it was. Cebull got busted.

Cebull first denied the e-mail was racist. He did, however, admit that his email was “anti-Obama.” So where is the outrage? The rationalization for Cebull’s racism was absurd, and frankly, federal judges who spew racist rhetoric — even by e-mail — should not be allowed to serve on the bench.

“The only reason I can explain it to you is I am not a fan of our president, but this goes beyond not being a fan,” the judge told the newspaper. “I didn’t send it as racist, although that’s what it is. I sent it out because it’s anti-Obama.”

But here’s the truth: Cebull is an arrogant, influential conservative who believes that he can say whatever he wants about Obama and get away with

But for Cebull, being “anti-Obama” seems to be synonymous with hate, racism and disrespecting the office of the president of the United States — at least while there’s a Black man in the White House. Every now and then, the curtain gets pulled back, and we get a glimpse into the mindset of a highlevel White civil servant. And sadly, the racism that’s being uncovered is much more prevalent, more mean-spirited and strategically directed at Obama. This time the light was shined on Cebull, who offered a half-baked apology for his bigoted e-mail, saying he could “understand why people would be offended.” Offended? That’s no apology. That’s a shameless copout by a judge who should not be presid-

U.S. Rep. Gary Peters hosts public forum on consumer protection answers to their consumer protection questions.

Gary Peters nity College’s Orchard Ridge Campus, featured Congressman Peters, Zixta Martinez, Assistant Director for Community Affairs from the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and local representatives from AARP, GreenPath Debt Solutions, the Accounting Aid Society and the Legal Aid and Defender Association.

“I worked with President Obama to create the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau because all Americans deserve protection from abusive and predatory lending practices,” said Peters. “The CFPB exists to help families deal with unfair credit cards, mortgages and other banking institutions, so I strongly encourage anyone that needs help to contact this newly formed agency.”

“It’s important that we hear from you, the general public,” said CFPB Assistant Director for Community Affairs Zixta Martinez to forum attendees. “The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is here to help you.”

At this event, families of the metro Detroit region were encouraged to share their stories and learn about how the CFPB can help them.

After panel introductions, a question and answer period was moderated by Congressman Peters. This opportunity allowed local residents to share their concerns, their experiences and get

The community forum, which was held at Tirrell Hall on Oakland Commu-

“Tonight we heard the nightmares that too many families have faced with skyrocketing credit card interest rates, unfair mortgage penalties and outrageous payday lending fees,” said Peters. “This is why I worked with President Obama to create an agency to give families a way to fight back. If you have a story to share, I strongly encourage you to contact the CFPB to help us end these abuses.” The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was created as part of the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, the most sweeping Wall Street Reform legislation since the Great Depression. Congressman Peters serves on the House Financial Services Committee and played a significant role in shaping the original reform bill the House passed in 2009. Peters worked with President Obama to get the best bill possible to protect consumers and hold those on Wall Street that caused the recession accountable for their failures. To learn more or contact the CFPB, please visit www.consumerfinance. gov or call 855-411-CFPB (2372).

S

ubscribe and receive one full year of the Michigan Chronicle to hour home or office www.michronicle.com

VOLUME 74 – Number 26

March 9-15, 2011

479 Ledyard • Detroit MI 48201

edunomics: Read Less,

WHAT’S INSIDE sampson appointed (A-8) Mariners Inn recently announced the promotion of David Sampson to the position of chief executive officer. He has been with Mariners Inn since 2002 and held several positions.

Pay More

mubarak played religion card (A-2) Ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak portrayed himself as a paradigm of stability in a country he once described as a “powder keg” of sectarian unrest. Yet far from promoting stability, his regime may have actually been the source of much of the religious strife.

Home repair Program (B-1): Rebuilding Together Detroit (RTD) is seeking applications from low-income homeowners in Southwest Detroit who are in need of minor home repair assistance.

Academic excellence honored (c-1): The Final Five Elite High School Football Players were recently lauded for their Athletic and Scholastic Excellence at the 20th Annual Franklin D. Watkins Awards held at the Omni Hotel in Los Angeles.

new tax credits (c-6): A new 25 percent state Small Business Investment Tax Credit, designed to encourage investments in start-up and early-stage Michigan technology companies, is aiming to help Michigan entrepreneurs secure capital and reduce risks associated with a new business or novel technology.

The motortown Revue (d-1): The Motortown Revue, the legendary shows that toured the nation by bus for almost the entirety of the ’60s, is recalled by someone who never missed a revue and, like so many other Motown fans, cherishes the memory.

Bankole Thompson CHRONICLE SENIOR EDITOR

The current state of the Detroit Public Schools is a mockery of Brown v Board of Education and it exposes the deep inequities in education. Just because your child is not enrolled in the Detroit Public Schools does not mean you shouldn’t be concerned about the fate of the district before it heads toward implosion.

COMMENTARY

like Detroit where a national reading report card places the city at number 56 out of the 75 largest metropolitan cities in the U.S. surveyed. That means literacy is shamefully low in the city and we are doing little or nothing to change the deplorable situation. The latest study conducted by Central Connecticut State University, according to Data Driven Detroit, ranks the “culture and resources for reading” and it examines not wheth-

Your ability to get the Bankole Thompson best education for your child should not be based on geography, income or ethnicity but, rather, on the simple principle that every child regardless of their background should have an empowering education that equips them for a brighter future. Each child should have access to a meaningful education that would not leave them trailing behind in the dust children in Japan, India, China and other countries move ahead.

But that is not the case in places

er people can read, but whether they actually do read.

313.963.5522

Coming Soon White House X Change

Our readers take center stage on national issues Following his series of sit-down interviews with President Obama, and his successful 2010 interview-based book “Obama and Black Loyalty Vol. 1,” editor Bankole Thompson is upping the ante with the start of a new special report “White House XChange” March 30. The report will deal with issues tied to Detroit and Michigan that the Obama administration is tackling. It will introduce readers to issues raised in White House media conference calls. The report will invite our readers to weigh in on the debate about what the Obama administration is doing by having their opinions and views reflected in the report.

See edunomics page A-4

Jim Murray

Accelerating the speed of business growth AT&T commits $19 billion to support area business growth By C.L. Price Area businesses sloshing through Michigan’s sluggish economic recovery will soon receive much-needed infrastructure support, thanks to global communications leader AT&T’s network improvement plans announced last week. The improvements — to expand backhaul, enable 4G speeds, increase mobile broadband capacity and upgrade hundreds of cell sites — are predicted to accelerate the pace of area business growth. Why invest now?

Gov. Snyder keynotes Pancakes & Politics Gov. Rick Snyder kicked off the Michigan Chronicle’s Pancakes & Politics season at the Detroit Athletic Club on March 3 with a candid conversation built around reinventing Michigan. At left, Snyder chats with Curtis Ivery, Wayne County Community College Chancellor, Betty Brooks, community leader, and Shaun Wilson, Vice President, Director of Client and Community Relations, PNC Bank, and Ric DeVore, Regional President, PNC Bank. See page C-7 for photo highlights.

At Your Service

Dentist

Cebull said he sent the bigoted e-mail joke to six

He’s an embarrassment to the entire judicial system. Cebull may not be an official card-carrying member of Montana’s 13 White supremacist hate groups, but he’s proudly carrying their racist message.

At Your Service

AT YOUR SERVICE

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Its is also noteworthy that these cities are among the most admired places in the nation and they have, in fact, become meccas for those seeking greener pastures. When young people are making the exodus from the state, more than likely they are moving to one of the cities mentioned in this report. These cities are not only a paragon of a reading culture, they also offer other incentives that we are not offering in this city.

When the educational system does not have the public confidence

state-

“We act so as to protect individual rights and freedoms, preserve judicial independence and promote public trust in the Judiciary of the United States of America,” according to the statement on the federal court web site. Cebull certainly isn’t promoting public trust.

Business forums will be held Saturday and Sunday 11A.M. – 5P.M.

$1.00

Detroit’s 56th place in the 2010 study is the same spot it occupied in a similar report in 2005. The highest rank the city got was 50th in 2007. Washington, D.C., was rated the most well-read city in the nation and following that were Seattle, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, St. Paul, Denver, Portland, St. Louis, Cincinnati and Boston.

There is no possible way we can bank on attracting young families to the city if basic amenities like recreational centers are not available on a full scale.

the

There’s no way imaginable that Cebull can offer an “impartial forum” for anyone of color who is a defendant in his courtroom. Imagine the number of other White federal judges who were appointed by Republican presidents who perhaps also have disdain for Obama and who oversee courtroom trials through a racial prism.

of his “old buddies.” Who are these buddies? Are they judges too? Are they prosecutors? Are they trial attorneys?

that Cebull can offer an ‘impartial forum’ for anyone of color who is a defendant in his courtroom.”

“Normally I don’t send or forward a lot of these, but even by my standards, it was a bit touching,” Cebull wrote to his sidekicks. “I want all of my friends to feel what I felt when I read this. Hope it touches your heart like it did mine.”

Congressman Gary Peters recently hosted a public forum with representatives of the newly formed Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and several local agencies. The CFPB was created as part of the Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act which U.S. Rep. Peters helped write and President Obama signed into law in 2010. This agency was created to provide common sense protections for all Americans by helping them deal with abusive or unfair lending practices by credit cards, mortgages and other banking institutions.

Consider

ment that’s prominently posted on Cebull’s federal court website: “The mission of the United States District Court for the District of Montana is to support, defend and preserve the Constitution of the United States by providing an impartial forum for the just resolution of disputes.”

Mayor Dave Bing Congressman Hansen Clarke Lisa L. Howze, State Representative Small Business Administration (SBA) Representative

See AT&T page A-4

WCCCD is largest urban community college, with record enrollment numbers Daylight Saving BEGINS on

3UNDAY -ARCH¬¬¬

Set your clocks &/27!2$ one hour

www.michronicle.com

Curtis Ivery

Wayne County Community College District (WCCCD) is the largest urban community college in Michigan, with record enrollment numbers for the spring 2011 semester. Nearly 32,000 students registered for credit classes at all five of the District locations and online. Additionally, the District expects more than 40,000 non-credit students to register as well for a total of nearly 72,000 served in all programs. WCCCD, the multi-campus district serving 32 communities in Southeast Michigan, has seen exponential growth as degree and certificate programs have been expanded, infrastructure improved, and

investments in students, services and technologies increased. “In this economy, post secondary education and training is the ticket to competing in today’s changing workforce. Access to higher education-especially community colleges--is critical,” said Dr. Curtis Ivery, chancellor. “WCCCD is an integral economic and social catalyst to the health and welfare of this region and state.” A recent economic impact study reported that WCCCD’s students generate more than $122 million in taxable income annually to the region and state. Every dollar that is invested in WCCCD returns

$22.80 in benefits to all Michigan residents. Having been recognized as one of the fastest growing community colleges in the nation and the largest urban community college in Michigan, WCCCD was forced to cap enrollment during the spring 2010 semester. This year, under the direction of Dr. Ivery, WCCCD lifted the enrollment cap to make certain that no student was turned away in spite of WCCCD’s funding challenges. WCCCD gives students the opportunity to train in emerging technology and high demand fields, allowing them to become competent professionals helping to position the

state for vibrant growth and a strong economic future. Community colleges across the nation face difficult decisions in a climate of limited resources. The commitment of WCCCD in assuring that the doors to educational opportunities remain open is a direct result of the determination of faculty, staff and administrators. “Our students and all those we serve need us to work as hard as we can for them. If we can’t be the difference between success and a future of limited options, we are not living up to the mission and vision of this institution,” said Dr. Ivery.

Panel Of Private And Public Financial Lenders To Discuss Availabilty Of Financial Assistance For Business Development


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THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Neighborhoods

From page A-1

that federal sentencing is stricter than local sentencing.

When people are scared or afraid they will not give information.

If it takes federal intervention to arrest the madness of violence in our communities, it should serve as an impetus on how to collaborate on other issues that may stretch out the resources of our local government. Or put simply, when the money isn’t there given the economic mess the city of Detroit is in.

Arriving at an incident scene hours after to get information from people will yield little result if officers in a particular district have not built a relationship of trust with that community before an incident. In simple terms, people talk to who they know. They don’t talk to strangers.

But beyond what the Detroit police and the federal government can do, lies the most important partner — the community whose responsibility it is to take back their streets and neighborhoods from people who are hell-bent on transforming them into war zones.

The ball is in our court. Looking the other way only serves to make a bad situation worse, as does playing the blame game. All of us can do something to stop the killing fields. Getting involved in some way is essential.

Forget about the politics of whether you like Detroit Mayor Dave Bing or Chief Godbee. What we need is community policing and that can only happen if Detroit police and other agencies seeking to put a break on the cycle of violent crime, can find meaningful partners. The need is crucial. Finding such partners will require more than press conferences. It would mean really becoming part of the community by attending block club meetings and other community events that allow law enforcement to interact with the community in a non-threatening atmosphere.

Center

were first disclosed,” McCutcheon said. “I know John Hall would be delighted with the building as completed and honored by the knowledge that his contribution will foster the fulfillment of its announced purpose. Mr. Hall greatly admired the contributions of Judge Keith to the church and the community.” “We are very grateful for this most generous donation and delighted

Your child or you could be the next victim. Bankole Thompson is the editor of the Michigan Chronicle and the author of a six-part series on the Obama presidency, including “Obama and Black Loyalty”published last year. His latest book is”Obama and Christian Loyalty” with an epilogue written by Bob Weiner, former White House spokesman. His upcoming books in 2012 are “Obama and Jewish Loyalty”and ”Obama and Business Loyalty.” Listen to him every Thursday, 11:30 a.m., on WDET 101.9 FM Detroit and every Sunday, 9 to 10 p.m. on “The Obama Watch” program on WLIB 1190 AM-New York.  E-mail bthompson@michchronicle.com.

From page A-1 that Mr. Hall’s personal convictions and respect for Judge Keith will be translated into programs that will carry out his vision for civil rights,” said Peter Hammer, professor of law and director of the Keith Center. The Keith Center honors the life and legacy of Judge Damon J. Keith, civil rights icon, one of the country’s leading jurists and a 1956 Wayne Law alumnus.

By developing programs and opportunities that promote his vision of equality and justice under the law for all people, the Keith Center is advancing learning at Wayne Law, encouraging community engagement, and promoting civil rights in one of the most culturally rich and diverse cities in the United States. For more information, visit http://keithcenter. wayne.edu/.

Emergency Manager Law faces repeal By Brandon Jessup

and cancel public contracts.

Michigan Forward, the Stand Up for Democracy Coalition and countless volunteers and supporters representing the labor, civic, and faith based communities from around the State of Michigan submitted 226,637 signatures to repeal the “Local Government and School District Fiscal Accountability Act,” known as Public Act 4 (PA 4). The campaign to repeal PA 4 is a grassroots movement that began in June 2011. Stand Up for Democracy has reached a milestone with the submission of 50 full boxes of repeal petitions to the Office of the Great Seal of Michigan. This campaign was driven by thousands of Michigan voters who sacrificed and volunteered their time to comb their neighborhoods, knock on doors and work on holidays to protect Democracy in Michigan. The submission of the petitions is not the end of our fight. Democracy’s opposition resides in Michigan’s Emergency Manager Law. Governor Snyder continues to trample Democracy, transparency and accountability. While we prepared to deliver our petitions to the State Capitol, the radical agents against democracy were hard at work in Detroit and Inkster. The City of Detroit’s financial review team created a subcommittee to continue to circumvent our constitutional rights

Brandon Jessup guaranteed in our state’s Open Meetings Act. Additionally, Inkster’s elected leadership was asked to sign a consent agreement laced with predatory language that will secure conditions for emergency management, not resurgence. Our voices will remain vigilant against the misinformation and bad public policy continually produced by anti-Democracy agents. These agents in the Michigan House and Senate prefer their cloak of darkness designed to usurp the will of the people. No elected official should consider any legislation designed to circumvent the constitution they are sworn to defend; the constitution that protects the right to petition, representative government and vote. That is not what democracy looks like. This looks like dictatorship designed to disenfranchise voters, dissolve communities and schools

The repeal of PA 4 won’t cause chaos as some ill informed legislators have said nor will PA 72, the previous law, go back into effect. What the residents of communities facing fiscal crisis desire is reinvestment and rebuilding. These communities have sacrificed for far too long under the promise of their day coming soon. Michigan’s communities and school districts in fiscal crisis deserve immediate relief. That starts with this egregious policy being removed from our law books. Our fight has just begun. We echo the sentiments of Congressmen John Conyers, Hansen Clarke and Gary Peters in communication with the Secretary of State and Bureau of Elections for a lawful process in the counting of the petitions submitted. We are preparing for the next eight months of education, mobilization and demonstration to get Michigan voters out to the polls on November 6, 2012 and vote down Michigan’s Dictator Law. Today, we sent a message that democracy is not meant only for a select few. What Democracy looks like is the hundreds who created an assembly line to carry the petitions into the Office of the Great Seal. Brandon Jessup is chairman and CEO of Michigan Forward.

WCCCD trains next generation of engineers A new IT boot-camp aimed at producing entrylevel software engineers for the growing tech sector in metro Detroit will kick off March 12 at the Wayne County Community College District University Center, in Harper Woods. The 18-week program is the result of a unique partnership between WCCCD and global IT consultancy, Infosys, Ltd. (NASDAQ: INFY).  Ranked by Forbes Magazine as one of the most innovative companies in the world, Infosys Ltd. serves Fortune 500 clients through a global network of 64 offices and 68 development centers in the U.S., India, China and across the globe.   WCCCD is the largest urban community college district in Michigan, with more than 70,000 students enrolled at its five

Curtis Ivery campuses.   “This partnership is an opportunity to build strong career pathways in an important and growing sector of Wayne County’s economy,” said WCCCD Chancellor, Dr. Curtis L. Ivery.  “We’re excited about partnering with a global IT leader such as Infosys to help direct more people into rewarding information technology careers.” The boot camp program will use methods

developed at the Infosys Leadership Institute, Education and Training Center to train more than 14,000 entry level software engineers in Mysore, India. This will be the first time such a program has been offered in the United States. With Detroit as an emerging Information Technology hub, Infosys selected Wayne County Community College District as its educational partner to launch training in southeast Michigan. Those interested in participating in the Boot Camp must call 313-4962704 to register for one of two Infosys orientation sessions on Wednesday, March 7, 2012 or Tuesday, March 13, 2012 at WCCCD’s University Center, located at 19305 Vernier Road in Harper Woods, Michigan. For more information visit:  www.wcccd.edu.

March 7-13, 2012

Page A-4

Atlanta Daily World newspaper joins Real Times Media family of companies Real Times Media (RTM), a Detroitbased multimedia company, is pleased to announce that it has entered into a strategic alliance with the Atlanta Daily World (ADW) newspaper in Atlanta, Ga. Under the terms of the agreement, RTM will assume full operational responsibility for the 84-year old African American publication this month. “Real Times Media is delighted to enter into this strategic alliance with the Atlanta Daily World,” said Hiram E. Jackson, chief executive officer, Real Times Media. “The Atlanta Daily World is one of the most storied and legendary newspaper franchises in America and Atlanta is one of the most important markets in the country. “We believe that building a strong multi-media presence in Atlanta is key to the continued growth of our company.” Concurrent with the new strategic alliance, a partnership headed by a number of Real Times Media owners, including Jackson and William F. Pickard, acquired 100 percent of the ownership of the Atlanta Daily World. Founded in 1928 by William A. Scott II, the Atlanta Daily World is Atlanta’s oldest Black-owned newspaper. “The Scott family is very pleased with the marriage of the Atlanta Daily World and the Real Times family,” said William A. Scott IV. M. Alexis Scott will continue as publisher. “The Atlanta Daily World is excited to become a part of Real Times,” M. Alexis Scott said. “This is truly a new beginning for the paper. The resources that are now available will enable us to diversify into a multimedia platform.” In becoming part of RTM, the ADW joins five other historic African-American newspapers including the Chicago Defender, the Michigan Chronicle, the

Riverfront

Michigan FrontPage, the New Pittsburgh Courier, and the Tri-State Defender in Memphis, Tenn. In addition to its newspaper holdings, Real Times Media is parent company to Who’s Who Publishing Company, the leading provider of content celebrating professional achievement in the African American and Latino markets, and RTM Digital Studios, an archival image licensing company dedicated to artifacts from the past 100 years of the AfricanAmerican experience. “The Real Times approach is more than the printed word,our newspapers are continually evolving and remain focused on a 360 degree integration of print, digital opportunities and engagement marketing,” said Jackson. “That’s why we expect the Atlanta Daily World and our other brands to continue to buck industry trends and continue to grow.”

About Real Times Media

Real Times Media is a Detroit-based multimedia company focused on engagement marketing and niche and newspaper publishing. The leading provider of original print content for African-American related news, entertainment and lifestyle information, the Real Times Media family of companies includes the nation’s largest African-American owned and operated newspaper organization, comprised of the Chicago Defender, the Michigan Chronicle, the Michigan FrontPage, the New Pittsburgh Courier, and the TriState Defender, Who’s Who Publishing, LLC, the largest producer of content showcasing minority professionals, and RTM Digital Studios, an archival image licensing firm specializing in artifacts from the past 100 years of the AfricanAmerican experience. For more information, please visit www.realtimesmedia.com.

From page A-1

but it’s quite an honor to be part of an organization that is leading the effort to revitalize our riverfront.” The Detroit RiverWalk currently spans 3.5 miles of the riverfront. When completed, it will extend 5.5 miles, from the Ambassador Bridge to Belle Isle. With its environmentally friendly design, numerous gardens and front row views of the Detroit River, the RiverWalk has become a popular destination for local residents and tourists. More than 1 million people visited the RiverWalk last year, Nelson said. The RiverWalk project had two major purposes: Create a large public space on the riverfront that was visually appealing and safe, and create an attraction that could serve as a catalyst for economic development in downtown Detroit. New businesses have sprouted along the RiverWalk and on nearby streets. Among them: Wheelhouse Detroit, a bike shop on the RiverWalk; the Roberts Riverwalk Hotel, located in the old Omni Hotel; the Elevator Building, a small business incubator on the Dequindre Cut, which links the RiverWalk to Detroit’s popular Eastern Market; and a new Detroit Port Authority terminal that will host 13 visits this summer from Great Lakes cruise ships. “I think the RiverWalk is changing the public’s perception of Detroit,” said Kelli Kavanaugh, co-owner of Wheelhouse Detroit, which rents and sells bikes and leads bike tours around the city. “For many people, the RiverWalk has been a pleasant surprise that may lead opening them up to visiting other parts of the city where you can have pleasant experiences.” Kavanaugh, who has reported about Detroit for online publications, said the RiverWalk has not yet reached its full potential as a catalyst for economic development. “When all the segments of RiverWalk are connected, it’s going to be a lot more popular and more powerful as an economic development tool,” she said. “When that happens, its popularity will blow up.” The significance of RiverWalk transforming the riverfront cannot be overstated, explains John Hartig, a Great Lakes scientist who has researched the Detroit River and sits on the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy’s board of directors. “Detroit lost its connection to the river when industries lined the shoreline — industries made the river the back door instead of the front door,” Hartig said. “That’s why I think the Detroit RiverWalk is so important: It’s giving five miles of the Detroit River shoreline back to the community.” WALK LEADER: Faye Nelson of the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy helped guide a $300 million renovation of riverfront property, turning what was once an industrial moonscape into an attraction for residents and tourists alike. Hartig believes RiverWalk could help Detroit reverse decades of economic decline. “Detroit has not capitalized on its natural capital yet,” Hartig said. “Water is like a magnet for people and Detroit has one of the most beautiful rivers in the world.”

The RiverWalk project dates back to the late 1990s, when a group of Detroit civic leaders concluded the riverfront needed a makeover to make the city’s downtown an attractive place to live, work and play. The City of Detroit helped establish the nonprofit Detroit Riverfront Conservancy; General Motors donated land along the river for the RiverWalk; and The Kresge Foundation provided a $50 million grant to get the project off to a fast start. It has grown to a $300 million project. About $140 million of that amount will come from cash donations; the remainder will be in-kind services from government agencies and private businesses, Nelson explained. To date, the Detroit Riverfront Conservancy has raised $105 million. Major funders beyond The Kresge Foundation and GM include: The W.K. Kellogg Foundation and Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan, which contributed $5 million each; The Hudson-Webber Foundation, which donated $2.5 million; and The Ford Foundation and McGregor Fund, which donated $2 million each. Several other companies and foundations — including Compuware, Chrysler and Toyota — contributed at least $1 million each to the project, according to Detroit Riverfront Conservancy financial records. The Conservancy owns and maintains RiverWalk and has a private security force patrol it. The Conservancy has acquired miles of land along the river, razed numerous dilapidated buildings, installed an attractive walkway and welcomed Michigan’s first urban state park: William G. Milliken State Park and Harbor. The state park, which occupies 31 acres on the riverfront, has 52 boat slips and is within walking distance to downtown Detroit. Perhaps most significantly, the RiverWalk has generated positive buzz for a city plagued by years of economic decay, high crime rates and the resulting negative publicity. The project has been featured in numerous regional and national publications. Nelson said the RiverWalk, coupled with other downtown development projects, “will work to change the conversation about Detroit.” “We see the riverfront playing a major role in the revitalization of Detroit,” she said. “RiverWalk has provided a tremendous boost in quality of life for our community — it’s a place that’s clean, safe and beautiful. It’s a place we can brag about.”


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THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Small Business Development Center presents free entrepreneur workshops Union Grace Community Development Corporation, the Small Business Development Center, is sponsoring a Speaker’s Forum with seasoned business owners offering business strategies to help today’s entrepreneurs go to the next level in their business endeavors. Are you looking to start your own business or are you a current small business owner who is ready to go to the next level, but don’t quite know how to get there? Join them Saturday, March 17, from 11 a.m. to 1p.m. with Detroit’s own Social Media Guru Pam Perry as she dissects “How Social Media is Guiding Today’s Business.” Perry has been in the marketing business over 10 years and is noted throughout the Michigan business arena for her knowledge in Social Media Marketing. “Learn Common Mistakes People Make in Business,” “How To Apply for State Grants” and “How to Form a 501

(c)3” at workshops being held on Saturday, March 31, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch is included. However there are only 100 spots available, so reserve today. Hear from successful business owners on how they got started. Find out how one of the region’s largest McDonald franchisees, Errol Service, who owns 15 McDonald locations, achieved his success. Call for the date and time of his speaking engagement. These free seminars are to help business owners grow their businesses in order to become more profitable during this economic recession. All seminars will be held at the Union Grace Conference center located at 2550 W. Grand Blvd. Free secure parking is available. To learn more about each of the seminars or to reserve your spot in these workshops, please call the Small Business Development Center at 313899-1040.

Doctor shortage in Michigan will blunt health reform’s effect

By Steve Jacob

The new health reform law is expected to create 32 million more insured Americans, according to the Congressional Budget Office. The federal government plans to expand Medicaid to low-income adults and subsidize purchases on the health-insurance exchanges when it requires most Americans to carry insurance in 2014. However, an insurance card will not mean much to patients without providers to care for them. Michigan will have 750,000 more insured residents because of reform, according to an Urban Institute analysis. A primary-care physician is the first contact for people with undiagnosed illnesses. They include family physicians, pediatricians and internal-medicine doctors. Primarycare physicians’ share of the U.S. health-care dollar is only 7 cents. However, primary-care doctors control 80 cents of the health-care dollar by sending their patients to hospitals, referring them to specialists and handing out prescriptions. The U.S. has the about the same number of physicians per capita as other industrialized nations. However, the U.S. has far fewer primary-care physicians than specialists. They make up about 50 percent of the physician workforce in most other developed nations, compared with 35 percent in the U.S. The number of U.S. specialists per capita has risen dramatically since 1965, while the ratio of

primary-care physicians has remained relatively constant, because they earn as much as three times more income. The outlook is for more of the same: greater scarcity of primary care and a growing supply of specialists.

Massachusetts reformed its state healthcare system in 2006, giving the nation a glimpse of what is to come when access to health insurance is expanded without expanding the supply of primary care. The average wait for a non-urgent appointment with an internist rose from 17 days in 2005 to 48 days in 2011. Less than half of family physicians there are accepting new patients, compared with 70 percent four years ago. Massachusetts has about 108 primary-care physicians for every 100,000 residents, compared with only about 85 per 100,000 in Michigan. This ultimately suggests an even longer wait locally. The primary-care workload is expected to increase by nearly 30 percent between 2005 and 2025. A number of factors feed this demand, including a growing population, a flood of baby boomers becoming Medicare beneficiaries and acquiring medical conditions as they age, and the newly insured because of the reform law. However, the supply of primary-care physicians is expected to rise by only 2 to 7 percent. Three out of 4 physicians say they already are at or over capacity. The math screams that there will be a crisis of health-care access in

the next 15 years. Expect longer waits for appointments, shorter physician visits, greater use of non physicians for routine care, and higher prices. The U.S. trains about 16,000 doctors a year. The nation would have to increase that number by 6,000 to 8,000 annually for 20 years to meet expected demand. Adding to the sense of urgency is the fact that about 1 out of 4 Michigan physicians is age 60 or older. About 10 percent of Michigan residents currently live in federally designated primary-care shortage areas. Physicians tend to cluster in areas where supply is already high rather than where the need is greatest. About 80 percent of new physicians in the 1980s and 1990s did this. They like affluent areas with well-insured patients, high-tech hospitals and civic amenities that offer a better quality of life. These high-income enclaves are also home to the nation’s healthiest people. Most do not want to recognize that health care is rationed. It is done so by lack of insurance. Health reform is expected to rectify that, but it will exacerbate a new form of rationing: the doctor is not in. Steve Jacob is a veteran health-care journalist and author of the new book Health Care in 2020: Where Uncertain Reform, Bad Habits, Too Few Doctors and Skyrocketing Costs Are Taking Us. He can be reached at steve@ unitedstatesofhealth.

Your children and proper dental care Everest Institute, with five campuses throughout Michigan, is the nationwide leader in training dental assistants. March 4-10 is Dental Assistant Recognition Week, and to mark the occasion, dental assistant instructor Maria Diaz offers the following tips on what children and parents can do to protect and strengthen their smiles for years to come. Brush and floss daily the right way. It’s not new advice, but brushing and flossing remain the two most important ingredients for a healthy smile. Parents should model and teach their children the correct techniques to keep their teeth healthy and clean. Brushing should require only a pea-sized amount of toothpaste and incorporate circular brush strokes to reach all surfaces. Often, because of their limited dexterity, children will brush too hard, which can lead to increased tooth sensitivity and receding gum lines. Proper flossing requires wrapping the floss around the fingers and then gliding the thread between teeth in a C-shaped motion. This prevents plaque buildup between teeth and under the gum line. Make sure your child uses a new section of floss each time he or she goes between two new teeth to avoid spreading bacteria

throughout the mouth. Limit sugary snacks and drinks. The bacteria that form plaque feed on sugar and use it as a glue to stick to teeth. Be aware of the snacks you provide your children. Foods like raisins, peanut butter, taffies, toffees, soft candies and pastries stick to teeth and provide a long-term feast for bacteria. Crunchy foods like apples, carrots and other raw vegetables, as well as foods high in vitamin C, like citrus fruits and broccoli are not only healthier, but also naturally clean teeth while kids eat them. Using fluoride toothpaste helps your child’s teeth to be less soluble to the acids created by bacteria. However, using too much creates a condition known as mottled enamel, which appears as brown spots on teeth. The key to avoiding mottled enamel is using the right amount of fluoride. For infants, a small smear of fluoride toothpaste is sufficient, and for children younger than 7, use no more than a peasized amount. It is also important to know if your child is consuming fluoridated water. Check with your local water utility to find out if your water has fluoride in it as well as the amount it contains. Along with fluoride, dental sealants are an excellent way to prevent tooth decay in

children. The dental sealant procedure takes only minutes, is painless, is less than half the cost of a filling and is virtually 100 percent effective at stopping decay. Proper procedures can save teeth. Children involved in sports need proper mouth protection to prevent mouth injuries, knocked-out teeth and possible concussions. Ask your dentist about customized mouth guards. If your child knocks out a permanent tooth while playing sports, gently rinse the tooth off and place it in a cup of warm milk. If warm milk is not available, salt water or plain water will also work. Call your dentist and bring your child and the soaking tooth in immediately for re-implantation and stabilization. Make dentist visits fun. If children have a good attitude about their dental hygiene, they will be more likely to take proper care of their teeth. Appointments should be made right at the appearance of the first tooth, according to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD). Early visits make for a more pleasant experience for the child and help prevent future health problems.

March 7-13, 2012

Page A-5

Michigan Historical Center and Wild Swan Theater present ‘Shipwrecked!’ The Michigan Historical Center announces two performances of “Shipwrecked!” — an original drama about a family on the Great Lakes. Created for elementary and middle school audiences by Ann Arbor’s awardwinning Wild Swan Theater, the play offers an inspiring opportunity for students to begin exploring the role of the lakes in Michigan’s past, present and future. Performances are set for March 27 and 28 at 10:30 a.m. and will last about one hour. “Shipwrecked!” is set in 1893. It follows the travails of twelve-year-old Aaron Buchanan whose family’s schooner is caught in a fierce storm while he is at the helm. Young as he is, Aaron has sailed with his parents for years, ferrying cargo from their home port of Detroit to ports along the Great Lakes. As the family is returning from Sault Ste. Marie on Lake Huron in November with a huge load of Christmas trees, they are caught in a ferocious gale that sweeps through Thunder Bay — infamously known as Shipwreck Alley. With assistance from the lighthouse keepers on Thunder Bay Island, a crew of surfmen from the lifesaving station brave 40-knot winds and sixteen-foot waves in a daring rescue. Located in the heart of the Great Lakes, the largest supply of fresh water on the planet, Michigan has a rich maritime heritage. “Wild Swan’s artistry offers an extraordinary opportunity for Lansing-area youth to experience the drama of Great Lakes storms,” said Sandra Clark, Director of the Michigan Historical Center. “It will inspire curiosity and the desire to learn more about Michigan’s fascinat-

ing past.” Wild Swan and its partners have developed educational materials to accompany the play and are offering a traveling trunk for loan to classrooms. One class will be chosen by random drawing from reservations received by March 16 to participate in a post-performance workshop with actors and Wild Swan staff. All performances are signed/shadowinterpreted for the hearing impaired. Performance dates: Tuesday, March 27, and Wednesday, March 28 Time: 10:30 a.m. Duration: About an hour Location: Michigan Library and Historical Center, Forum Auditorium, 702 W. Kalamazoo, Lansing Tickets: • Single adult

admissions:

$6/youth,

$8/

• School groups: $4/youth, $6 adult (teacher free) • Home School groups of 10 or more pay group rates, with one adult admitted free. Call 517-373-1359 to purchase tickets now. Ticket price includes admission to the Michigan Historical Museum. Wild Swan Theater is dedicated to producing professional theater of the highest artistic quality for young people and families. Its actors have been delighting family audiences in Ann Arbor and around the state since 1980 with performances that blend storytelling, movement, and music into magical, accessible experiences. The theater is nationally known for its ingenious artistry, its innovative audience accessibility program and its projects for participants with disabilities.

S

ubscribe and receive one full year of the Michigan Chronicle to hour home or office www.michronicle.com

VOLUME 74 – Number 26

March 9-15, 2011

479 Ledyard • Detroit MI 48201

edunomics: Read Less,

WHAT’S INSIDE sampson appointed (A-8) Mariners Inn recently announced the promotion of David Sampson to the position of chief executive officer. He has been with Mariners Inn since 2002 and held several positions.

Pay More

mubarak played religion card (A-2) Ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak portrayed himself as a paradigm of stability in a country he once described as a “powder keg” of sectarian unrest. Yet far from promoting stability, his regime may have actually been the source of much of the religious strife.

Home repair Program (B-1): Rebuilding Together Detroit (RTD) is seeking applications from low-income homeowners in Southwest Detroit who are in need of minor home repair assistance.

Academic excellence honored (c-1): The Final Five Elite High School Football Players were recently lauded for their Athletic and Scholastic Excellence at the 20th Annual Franklin D. Watkins Awards held at the Omni Hotel in Los Angeles.

new tax credits (c-6): A new 25 percent state Small Business Investment Tax Credit, designed to encourage investments in start-up and early-stage Michigan technology companies, is aiming to help Michigan entrepreneurs secure capital and reduce risks associated with a new business or novel technology.

The motortown Revue (d-1): The Motortown Revue, the legendary shows that toured the nation by bus for almost the entirety of the ’60s, is recalled by someone who never missed a revue and, like so many other Motown fans, cherishes the memory.

Bankole Thompson CHRONICLE SENIOR EDITOR

The current state of the Detroit Public Schools is a mockery of Brown v Board of Education and it exposes the deep inequities in education. Just because your child is not enrolled in the Detroit Public Schools does not mean you shouldn’t be concerned about the fate of the district before it heads toward implosion.

COMMENTARY

like Detroit where a national reading report card places the city at number 56 out of the 75 largest metropolitan cities in the U.S. surveyed. That means literacy is shamefully low in the city and we are doing little or nothing to change the deplorable situation. The latest study conducted by Central Connecticut State University, according to Data Driven Detroit, ranks the “culture and resources for reading” and it examines not wheth-

Your ability to get the Bankole Thompson best education for your child should not be based on geography, income or ethnicity but, rather, on the simple principle that every child regardless of their background should have an empowering education that equips them for a brighter future. Each child should have access to a meaningful education that would not leave them trailing behind in the dust children in Japan, India, China and other countries move ahead.

But that is not the case in places

er people can read, but whether they actually do read.

313.963.5522

$1.00

Coming Soon White House X Change

Our readers take center stage on national issues Following his series of sit-down interviews with President Obama, and his successful 2010 interview-based book “Obama and Black Loyalty Vol. 1,” editor Bankole Thompson is upping the ante with the start of a new special report “White House XChange” March 30. The report will deal with issues tied to Detroit and Michigan that the Obama administration is tackling. It will introduce readers to issues raised in White House media conference calls. The report will invite our readers to weigh in on the debate about what the Obama administration is doing by having their opinions and views reflected in the report.

Detroit’s 56th place in the 2010 study is the same spot it occupied in a similar report in 2005. The highest rank the city got was 50th in 2007. Washington, D.C., was rated the most well-read city in the nation and following that were Seattle, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, St. Paul, Denver, Portland, St. Louis, Cincinnati and Boston.

Check if Renewal – Renewal Acct. #____________

Its is also noteworthy that these cities are among the most admired places in the nation and they have, in fact, become meccas for those seeking greener pastures. When young people are making the exodus from the state, more than likely they are moving to one of the cities mentioned in this report. These cities are not only a paragon of a reading culture, they also offer other incentives that we are not offering in this city. There is no possible way we can bank on attracting young families to the city if basic amenities like recreational centers are not available on a full scale. When the educational system does not have the public confidence

See edunomics page A-4

Jim Murray

Accelerating the speed of business growth AT&T commits $19 billion to support area business growth By C.L. Price Area businesses sloshing through Michigan’s sluggish economic recovery will soon receive much-needed infrastructure support, thanks to global communications leader AT&T’s network improvement plans announced last week. The improvements — to expand backhaul, enable 4G speeds, increase mobile broadband capacity and upgrade hundreds of cell sites — are predicted to accelerate the pace of area business growth. Why invest now?

Gov. Snyder keynotes Pancakes & Politics Gov. Rick Snyder kicked off the Michigan Chronicle’s Pancakes & Politics season at the Detroit Athletic Club on March 3 with a candid conversation built around reinventing Michigan. At left, Snyder chats with Curtis Ivery, Wayne County Community College Chancellor, Betty Brooks, community leader, and Shaun Wilson, Vice President, Director of Client and Community Relations, PNC Bank, and Ric DeVore, Regional President, PNC Bank. See page C-7 for photo highlights.

“We feel very confident about Detroit’s economic recovery,” stated Jim Murray, president of AT&T Michigan. “As a consequence, we’re committed to making sizeable investments in this

See AT&T page A-4

WCCCD is largest urban community college, with record enrollment numbers Daylight Saving BEGINS on

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www.michronicle.com

Curtis Ivery

Wayne County Community College District (WCCCD) is the largest urban community college in Michigan, with record enrollment numbers for the spring 2011 semester. Nearly 32,000 students registered for credit classes at all five of the District locations and online. Additionally, the District expects more than 40,000 non-credit students to register as well for a total of nearly 72,000 served in all programs. WCCCD, the multi-campus district serving 32 communities in Southeast Michigan, has seen exponential growth as degree and certificate programs have been expanded, infrastructure improved, and

investments in students, services and technologies increased. “In this economy, post secondary education and training is the ticket to competing in today’s changing workforce. Access to higher education-especially community colleges--is critical,” said Dr. Curtis Ivery, chancellor. “WCCCD is an integral economic and social catalyst to the health and welfare of this region and state.” A recent economic impact study reported that WCCCD’s students generate more than $122 million in taxable income annually to the region and state. Every dollar that is invested in WCCCD returns

$22.80 in benefits to all Michigan residents. Having been recognized as one of the fastest growing community colleges in the nation and the largest urban community college in Michigan, WCCCD was forced to cap enrollment during the spring 2010 semester. This year, under the direction of Dr. Ivery, WCCCD lifted the enrollment cap to make certain that no student was turned away in spite of WCCCD’s funding challenges. WCCCD gives students the opportunity to train in emerging technology and high demand fields, allowing them to become competent professionals helping to position the

state for vibrant growth and a strong economic future. Community colleges across the nation face difficult decisions in a climate of limited resources. The commitment of WCCCD in assuring that the doors to educational opportunities remain open is a direct result of the determination of faculty, staff and administrators. “Our students and all those we serve need us to work as hard as we can for them. If we can’t be the difference between success and a future of limited options, we are not living up to the mission and vision of this institution,” said Dr. Ivery.


Page A-6 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • March 7-13, 2012

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Section B

SHOP TALK Nissan pioneers scratch resistant iPhone case If you own a cell phone chances are you’ve gotten several scratches on the case, which after a few drops you tend to chalk up to normal everyday wear and tear. Nissan, however, is pioneering a groundbreaking self-healing case for the iPhone.

March 7-13, 2012

‘WICKED’ TM

Drive.

Live. Share.

The Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case features the brand’s pioneering self-healing paint finish, a world first in paint technology developed in 2005 and already used on a number of Nissan and Infiniti models. Developed by Nissan in collaboration with University of Tokyo and Advanced Softmaterials Inc., the unique Scratch Shield paint finish was initially designed for automotive use and is available on the Nissan Murano, 370Z and X-Trail along with the Infiniti range of products. Now the technology is being tested on a non-automotive product in Europe, with the Nissan Scratch Shield iPhone case. The case has been designed using several automotive engineering innovations to deliver a more durable and long-lasting paint coat and closely fitting, tight case. It has three key benefits: the highly flexible and elastic properties of Scratch Shield paint technology allows fine scratches to quickly mend themselves; its tactile gel-like rather than glossy surface is more scratchresistant than conventional paint and provides a better grip; and the case itself is made of ABS plastic, a high grade substance widely used in the automotive industry that is more rigid and robust than other plastics. The outer “paint” of the case is made from polyrotaxane, which means that when damage occurs to the coating in the form of a fine scratch, the chemical structure is able to react to change back to its original shape and fill the gap, thus “healing” the blemish. An initial prototype of the Scratch Shield iPhone cases has been produced by Nissan for BETA testing with selected journalists and customers, but if demand proves strong (which it likely will), the cases will go on general sale later this year.

IN THE

GREEN

Toyota Prius c

– A.J. Mueller Photography

PRACTIALLY EVERY facet of the Fiat 500 has been tweaked for the Abarth model, including the exterior.

New Fiat Abarth is a surprising jolt in the lineup

By Marcus Amick SPECIAL TO THE CHRONICLE

I know, when you think Fiat the idea of “wicked” doesn’t necessarily come to mind. A car this small hardly conjures up thoughts associated with say the thrill of a 300 or so drop on a rollercoaster, or that feeling you get in your gut when the coaster starts making those final Marcus Amick clicks up the hill before the descent. Question: Is it just me, or at that point right before that drop, do you ever wonder why you’re even up there?

THE COCKPIT of the Fiat 500 Abarth features a number of race-inspired themes and unique touches for higher performance driving.

Call me a wimp if you want, but I ask myself that just about every time I get on one of those wild amusement park rides, always amazed of the rush afterwards and a little eager to try it again.

‘To stay true to the legacy of Abarth, Fiat considered every element of the Fiat 500 to figure out what needed to be done to develop a higher performance model.’

REALLY WICKED My recent test drive of the new Fiat 500 Abarth (pronounced AHBART) on a racetrack in Nevada left me with a similar look of surprise considering that I just never expect a Fiat 500 to be able do what it does on some pretty wild twists and turns. The goal for the Abarth model, says the Fiat team, was to add a vehicle to the lineup that would appeal to more performance enthusiasts — and that it does. Of course, for those who are more familiar with the history of Abarth, the thrill of driving the car probably comes as little surprise.

Abarth and the Fiat brand have a history of collaboration going back 45 years and resulting in six international records and nearly 900 individual race victories.

Founded by Karl Abarth more than 60 RATING To stay true to the legacy of Abarth, years ago, in 1949, Fiat considered every element of the Fiat the Abarth marque is 500 to figure out what needed to be done synonymous with perto develop a higher performance model. (Based On Scale of 1 to 5) formance, raking up About the only similarity between the more than 10,000 indiAbarth, which uses the scorpion symbol as a distinvidual race victories, 10 world records and 133 international titles. See Fiat 500 Abarth page B-2

★★★★

Toyota recently announced pricing for the all-new 2012 Prius c with a starting price under $19,000 for the base model. The new five-door hatchback, which extends the carmaker’s Hybrid Synergy Drive to the subcompact segment, has an EPA-estimated city fuel economy rating of 53 mpg. Yep, that’s 53 miles to the gallon. Funny how that awkward styling synonymous with the Prius now looks a lot cooler with gas prices rising. Aimed at younger buyers looking for a fuel efficient vehicle, the Prius c will be available in four grades when it starts rolling into dealerships this month. The Prius c One base grade, which has a base price of $18,950, offers standard features such as automatic climate control, tilt-telescopic steer­ ing wheel and Bluetooth® hands-

See In the Green page B-2

Join Marcus Amick on test drives and events at Twitter (http://twitter.com/MarcusAmick).

MY WHEELS SHOW ’EM WHAT YOU GOT

Got a cool car or just love the one that you drive? E-mail us your best photo of you with your vehicle and it just might be featured in the MY WHEELS section. E-mail the photo along with your first and last name, city and state, and a telephone number where you can be reached to MYWHEELS@wheelside.com.


drivetime

MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012

MOBILE HOT SHOT Ride: Mercedes-Benz G-Class

Page B-2

The Numbers: MPG – 12 city/15 hwy Powered by – 362 hp 5.5-liter V8 Sticker - $107,975

What makes it hot? Whether it’s a matter of knowing the SUV’s off-road capabilities or just the mere presence you know it has on the road, the G-Class wagon gives you sense of royalty when behind the wheel. But with a sticker of over a hundred grand, most would say it should. The highly coveted four-wheel-drive vehicle for the very, very well to do has retained all of its classic styling cues over the years. The 2012 model is available with a 610-watt digital Harman/Kardon Logic7 audio system, which can play tracks stored on a data CD, DVD or SD memory card, and a hard-drive navigation system that provides real-time traffic info and Zagat restaurant ratings. — M. Amick

Gearin’ Up

Whether it’s a weekend getaway or an everyday city commute, no accessory is probably more important than something that makes it easy to tote all those necessities around. From a cotton and linen tote bag for women to a canvas foldover messenger bag featuring leather trim, Gap has a few classic pieces that’ll come in handy when moving about. Canvas Foldover Messenger Price: $60

Fiat 500 Abarth guishing mark, and the standard Fiat is the overall body design. Everything else has been completely modified to give the car more performance capabilities. BUILDING ON THE BRAND The Fiat Abarth features the debut of the new 1.4-liter MultiAir Turbo engine that delivers 160 horsepower and 170 lb.-ft. of torque, and a heavy-duty fivespeed manual transmission with an estimated MPG of 28 city/34 highway. The addition of a turbocharger coupled with the MultiAir technology delivers 73 percent increase in torque, 58 percent increase in power over the base 1.4-liter Fiat 500 engine. For improved handling, the frontwheel-drive Fiat 500 Abarth features a unique MacPherson suspension design with a 40 percent stiffer spring rate and 0.6-inch (15 mm) lower ride height compared to the front-suspension design of the Fiat 500 Sport model. The exterior styling of the new 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth was also designed with a specific focus on improving the car’s performance capabilities with features like the signature “Abarth” shield floats that serve as an additional air intake; the twin “nostrils” are precisely positioned on the front fascia to maximize airflow in and out of the two engine intercoolers; and a rear spoiler. Inside, the Fiat Abarth features a race-inspired interior with features like Abarth inspired steering wheel with perforated leather and a flat bottom increased roominess during “at-the-limit driving” (nice touch). Behind the steering wheel, the Fiat 500 Abarth features a large instrument

From page B-1

cluster wrapped in Nero leather with Rosso accent stitching that displays its 160-mph speedometer (I saw it at 95) and a tachometer and trip computer. The Abarth also features race inspired seats and an available Bose audio system, although you tend to be more tuned in to the car’s exhaust note when driving. IS IT ENOUGH? Considering what else you can get for the money, however, pricing seems a bit steep once you start moving up from the $22,000 base model and start adding on a lot of those extras, which I imagine most in the US would want if buying a vehicle in this segment. That is, unless you’re the type who prefers buying a vehicle bare bone and doing a lot of the customizing yourself.

Canvas Weekend Bag Price: $70

Still, convincing consumers that the Fiat Abarth is worth considering if they’re in the market for a small sporty car won’t come easy – especially for those thrill seekers who are inclined to be drawn to more familiar brands even if the Abarth does cost less than, say, a high-performance Mini Cooper. But if you’re willing to take a chance, the Fiat Abarth promises to be one surprising ride.

HIGHLIGHTS ■ Sticker: $22,000 (base) ■ Unique exterior features ■ 0 to 60 mph in 7.2 seconds ■ Race-inspired interior ■ Optional Bose Audio System Marcus Amick can be contacted at Marcus@ Wheelside.com.

Consumer Reports announces its top 2012 American cars Following annual tradition, Consumer Reports recently announced its American Top Picks list spotlighting the top-scoring domestic-branded models in Consumer Reports testing. An alternative compilation to Consumer Reports’ official 2012 Top Picks, the list is targeted at consumers who favor buying an “American” car the many strong choices that have stood out in our tests.

In the Green free phone controls, and remote keyless entry with illuminated entry. The Prius c Two grade, which offers equipment like a 6-speaker audio system, a 60/40 split folddown rear seat with adjustable headrests and cruise control, has a base MSRP of $19,900. The Prius c Three grade, which features a Toyota’s high- tech touchscreen nav and audio system (Entune) that features Sirius XM Satellite Radio capability, HD Radio with iTunes Tagging and USB port with iPod connectivity, has a starting MSRP of $21,635. The Prius c Four grade, distinguished by its 15-inch, 8-spoke alloy wheels, heated front seats, color-keyed heated power outside mirrors with turn signal indicators, has a starting MSRP of $23,230.

Colorblock Tote Price: $45

All Prius c models are equipped with a Hybrid Synergy Drive 1.5-liter DOHC, 16-valve engine that puts out 99 horsepower. Hardly a speed

From page B-1 demon, but at 53 mpg most in the market for a small compact car will get over giving up a little power if it means less trips to the pump.

IN ROTAION | Mary J. Blige GENRE: R&B/Soul/Hip Hop NOTE: These days true classics through and through are hard to come by, which from time to time prompts you pull out one of those old school CDs that you can count on to keep you entertained for the duration. Mary’s J. Blige’s “What’s the 411?” definitely fits the bill. The Bronx native’s debut album which features songs like “You Remind Me,” “Real Love” and “Reminisce” is as good now as it was in 1992 when it was released.

To qualify as a Top Pick, a car must rank at or near the top of its category in overall test score. Reliability must be average or better, based on problems reported by Consumer Reports subscribers in the latest Annual Auto Survey. And Top Picks must perform well (if tested) overall in government or industry crash and rollover tests. CONSUMER REPORTS TOP 2012 AMERICAN CAR ASSESSMENT: Small car: This is a frustrating one. The year has brought a lot of improvement in this segment for the domestics, but they each fall short of winning the prize. The Ford Focus is a nice car that is a joy to drive, but it hasn’t been reliable in its first year. Same goes for the Ford Fiesta. The Chevrolet Cruze is also unreliable. The Dodge Dart has potential, but we haven’t tested it yet. We don’t have reliability for the decent, new Chevrolet Sonic yet. So nothing qualifies here. Maybe next year. Family sedan: With 34 mpg overall in our tests, the Ford Fusion Hybrid can’t touch the 38 mpg overall from the revised Toyota Camry Hybrid, or the Camry’s roomier rear seat. But Fusion is enjoyable to drive and has a quiet cabin. Reliabil-

ity and owner satisfaction have been excellent. Affordable family sedan: It’s starting to feel a bit old, but the four-cylinder Fusion is our highest scoring domestic entry-level family sedan. This category is in flux, with a new Chevrolet Malibu due out very shortly and a new Fusion coming this fall. Both cars promise to raise the bar for refinement and fuel economy. We’ll see. Sports sedan: The Cadillac CTS might seem a bit benign given some of the choices out there. So to ward off the inevitable interweb comments: We haven’t bought and tested a Cadillac CTS-V, Chrysler 300 SRT8, Dodge Charger SRT8, or Ford Taurus SHO. Since we purchase all of our test cars, we focus on buying higher-volume models. (It would be fun to put together that group, though.) So that leaves us with the CTS-but this well-finished sedan delivers responsive steering, agile handling, and quick acceleration. The CTS claiming this category is more than a consolation prize. Small SUV: Here, we have a quandary. The dated Ford Escape is approaching its final sales month; the new Escape looks like it should be a big step up. The uncompetitive Jeep Patriot and Compass cousins fall off the radar. So that leaves us with GM. Its Chevrolet Equinox/GMC Terrain SUVs are tweeners that split the segment-they’re a bit big for a small SUV. But lacking a better alternative, they’re this year’s pick. (Yes, they were last year’s American Top Pick for Family SUV. But now there’s a better alternative for that category.) Family SUV: New to the list this year is the Jeep Grand Cherokee. Its redesign brought newly-found refinement, and the Jeep can tow a good-sized trailer or go off-road, too. Fuel economy is competitive, but we hope rumors of an eight-speed automatic mean that better efficiency is coming. (Same with plans for a diesel.) The Grand Cherokee

is a much better choice than a V6 Ford Edge, which scores too low in MyFord Touch-equipped form to be recommended--and it’s unreliable. Family hauler: This pick would normally go to a minivan. They’re simply the most practical and convenient way to move your family and its stuff. But except for Chrysler, the domestics checked out of this segment. The revised Town & Country scores OK, but it has poor reliability, so we don’t recommend it. Ford and GM want you to buy a large, car-based SUV instead. With the Ford Flex EcoBoost having below-average reliability, that makes the pick here the Chevrolet Traverse. (The similar GMC Acadia has belowaverage reliability in our survey.) Pickup truck: Given that we’ve tested the full current crop of trucks, including the wellregarded Ford F-150 EcoBoost, the so-so selling Chevrolet Avalanche might seem an odd pick. But it rides better than all other rivals and is very quiet, plus the unique unified cab and bed enhance loading flexibility. You do pay for that niceness though; it’s definitely a vehicle for families rather than a contractor’s work truck. Sporty car: A case could be made here for the Chevrolet Corvette Z06, a fabulous performance car that scores near the top of our Ratings. Reliability has improved a lot in the last few years too. But we want Top Picks to be more attainable, so the highly entertaining Ford Mustang is our choice. Green car: The official pick for this category was the Toyota Prius, which outscores the Chevrolet Volt, mainly thanks to better practicality. It is also less expensive to buy and more efficient when running on gasoline. But if your commute allows you to stay within the Volt’s electric-only range, it can be less expensive to operate than a Prius. First year Volt reliability is excellent, as is owner satisfaction.


community

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012

Page B-3

McDonald’s honors Romulus restaurant manager Detroit is home to one of the nation’s top McDonald’s restaurant managers. Greg Sumpter recently received the Ray Kroc Award, an annual performancebased award that recognizes the top performing McDonald’s restaurant managers in the country. Named after McDonald’s Corporation founder Ray Kroc, the award was established in 1999 to honor hardworking restaurant managers who make Ray Kroc’s vision of excellence come to life in restaurants and for customers each day.

A select 141 managers were

chosen this year to receive the Ray Kroc Award, an honor that comes with a cash prize, a Ray Kroc award trophy, ring and pin and a trip to Chicago for an awards gala on April 3. McDonald’s USA president, Jan Fields, will host the event. “It gives me a great sense of pride to be recognized among the many hardworking and talented McDonald’s managers nationwide,” said Sumpter. “The success of our restaurant can be attributed to great teamwork and everyone’s willingness to exceed our custom-

ers’ needs.” Ray Kroc built the McDonald’s business on the belief that greatness can only be achieved through the dedication and support of a Company’s people. The award was based on Kroc’s commitment to people and recognizes contributions to the organization he helped establish. Each year, this prestigious award is given to the top one percent of McDonald’s® U.S. restaurant managers to recognize their superior performance and achievement.

McDonald’s Owner/Opera-

tors and/or regional staff nominate restaurant managers for the Ray Kroc Award to recognize their hard work, dedication and commitment to McDonald’s. From there, a selection committee of representatives from McDonald’s Operations, Training and Human Resources select the top one percent of McDonald’s Restaurant Managers for the Ray Kroc Award. McDonald’s USA, LLC, is the leading foodservice provider in the United States serving a variety of wholesome foods made from quality ingredients to more than 26 million custom-

ers every day. Nearly 90 percent of McDonald’s 14,000 U.S. restaurants are independently owned and operated by local business men and women. Customers can log online for free at any of the nearly 12,000 participating Wi-Fi enabled McDonald’s U.S. restaurants. For more information, visit www.mcdonalds.com, or follow us on Twitter (@McDonalds) and Facebook (Facebook.com/ McDonalds) for updates on our business, promotions and products.

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(313) 963-5522 Fax 963-8788 e-mail:chronicle4@aol.com March 7-13, 2012

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Page B-4

Obama doesn’t get credit for GM bailout

By George Curry

Three years ago, President Obama came to the rescue of Detroit’s struggling auto industry. His faith in that sector of the economy was rewarded recently when General Motors announced that it earned $7.6 billion in 2011, the largest annual income in its history. But just as was the case when Osama bin Laden was killed, President Obama gets only begrudging credit, if that.

sachusetts residence and another one at their beach house in San Diego.” The cars sell from $35,485 to $54,525.Although the Cadillac SRX is designed in Detroit, it is assembled in Mexico. How many people do you know who own homes on opposite coasts with at least one luxury vehicle parked in each garage?

Like Romney, the other three Republican candidates for president – Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich Leading up to Tuesday’s and Ron Paul – opposed the Republican primary in George Curry plan to rescue Detroit. And Michigan, native son Mitt Romney continued his blistering assault neither Republican acknowledges that on Obama, including the president’s de- the auto rescue and Wall Street bailout cision to rescue the auto industry. But it were initiated by George W. Bush and is clear that it was Romney who wanted continued by President Obama. to drive us down the wrong road. Economist Paul Krugman noted how He wrote an op-ed in the New York difficult it was to obtain credit when Times on November 19, 2008 under the Obama assumed office: headline, “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt.” “If the economy as a whole were in Romney said, “If General Motors, Ford reasonably good shape and the credit and Chrysler get the bailout that their markets were functioning, Chapter 11 chief executives asked for yesterday, [structured bankruptcy] would be the you can kiss the American automobile way to go. Under current circumstances, industry goodbye. It won’t go overnight, however, a default by GM would probabut its demise will be virtually guaran- bly mean loss of ability to pay suppliers, teed.” which would mean liquidation — and Instead of saying goodbye, the auto that, in turn, would mean wiping out industry is again saying hello. According probably well over a million jobs at the to the Center for Automobile Research, worst possible moment.” the federal rescue saved 1.3 million jobs Dean Baker, co-director of the Center at the Big Three and related business- for Economic and Policy Research in es. Washington, D.C., agreed. Romney, whose father served as presHe said in 2009: “Had General Motors ident and chairman of American Motors and Chrysler been allowed to go into Corp. and later as governor of Michigan, bankruptcy last fall, it would have had a hard time justifying his support quickly led to a chain of bankruptcies for the Wall Street bailout but not one by a whole set of parts suppliers, all of that would benefit Main Street or Dr. whom are owed large amounts of money Martin Luther King Boulevard. by these two companies. It is virtuIt is part of a larger problem Romney ally certain that these companies and has trying to connect with everyday their suppliers would have been forced people. He receives more than $20 mil- to shut down, because no one would lion a year from his investments but have stepped forward to provide credit tries to portray himself as a typical to operate through bankruptcy without American. After offering to bet Texas a government guarantee. Because Ford Gov. Rick Perry $10,000 during one Re- shares many of these suppliers with publican debate and calling $374,000 he GM and Chrysler, the disruption to the earned in speaking fees “not very much” supply chain almost certainly would money, Romney on Friday demonstrated have been enough to push Ford over the line as well.” again his gift for gaffes. Speaking to an audience of 1,200 at Ford Field — nearly 64,000 fewer than usually populate the stadium for Detroit Lions football games — Romney said: “It feels good, being back in Michigan. You know, the trees are the right height. The streets are just right. I like the fact that most of the cars I see are Detroit-made automobiles.”

GM and Chrysler received about $80 million from the Troubled Assets Relief Program (TARP), about half of which has already been repaid. Ford had a line of credit that allowed it operate without emergency federal assistance.

Departing from his stump speech, Romney ran into trouble with the 99 percent of Americans who don’t share his economic status when he said, “I drive a Mustang and a Chevy pickup. Ann drives a couple of Cadillacs, actually.”

Largely because of President Obama, Detroit received a check that paved the way for the turnaround. Now, we need Romney and his Republican opponents to do a turnaround and stop misrepresenting the role President Obama played in saving the auto industry.

Romney’s wife, Ann, keeps a Cadillac SRX luxury crossover at their Mas-

In his “Let Detroit Go Bankrupt” oped, Romney said, “Detroit needs a turnaround, not a check.”

What the payroll tax means to your pocket By Meghan Miller Congress recently passed an extension to the payroll tax cut, unemployment benefits, and the “doc fix” for the rest of 2012, avoiding the March 1 expiration and a potential hit to middle-class families across the country. The final vote ensures hard-working Americans and those unemployed through no fault of their own will be able to help contribute to our economic growth as the economy picks up steam. Payroll tax cuts allow American workers to take home more money in their paychecks: $120 billion more in 2011 alone. Unemployment benefits, through which the government assists people who lost their job through no fault of their own, kept 3.2 million Americans out of poverty in 2010. And without the doc fix doctors would earn 27 percent less in Medicare reimbursements. Following is a by-the-numbers look at how the payroll tax cut, unemployment benefits, and the doc fix have helped — and will continue to help — Americans.

Payroll tax cut 160 million: The number of workers who benefit from the payroll tax cut $40:The amount that the average American family can save in each paycheck thanks to the 2 percent Social Security tax cut. $1,000: The total amount the average American family will save this year. $120 billion: The estimated total amount added to American workers’ paychecks in 2012 due to the tax cut. 400,000: The number of jobs saved by extending the cut through the end of 2012.

0.5: The percentage of gross domestic product saved by extending the cut

Unemployment benefits A little more than 7000,000The average number of jobs that unemployment benefits helped to create per quarter over the past few years. 1.6 million: The average number of Americans who have kept their jobs in every quarter of the recession thanks to unemployment benefits. $2: The amount added to the economy for every $1 spent on unemployment benefits. $315 billion: The total amount that unemployment benefits added to GDP from the start of the recession to the second quarter of 2010. $50 billion: The estimated amount that the economy would have lost if Congress had failed to pass the first extension of unemployment benefits last year, which would have led to the loss of 275,000 jobs. 49 million: The number of people on Medicare in 2011 who could have been affected if the doc fix had not been extended, driving doctors to refuse to work under Medicare. Failing to extend the doc fix, unemployment benefits, and the payroll tax cut would have been disastrous for our already-fragile economy. Both Democrats and Republicans should be commended for putting politics aside to enact legislation that will help rebuild our middle class and keep our economy growing.

Oil companies get billions while you pay more By Richard W. Caperton, Jackie Weidman and Daniel J. Weiss Oil prices, which averaged a nearrecord $103 per barrel in 2011, have risen steadily since the beginning of 2012. In tandem with oil prices, gasoline prices are also rising — from an average of $3.30 ending the week of January 2 to $3.59 last week. Higher gas prices mean that money is flowing out of Americans’ wallets and pocketbooks and straight into the coffers of Big Oil companies. This Center for American Progress analysis finds that each penny rise in the average quarterly (three months) price of a gallon of gas corresponds to a $200 million increase in quarterly profits of the big five oil companies — BP, Chevron, ConocoPhillips, ExxonMobil, and Royal

are small, particularly in relation to their profits and in light of the fact that in 2011 these companies also had a combined $58 billion in cash reserves, nearly 30 times more than they received in special tax breaks. Still the big five oppose ending their taxpayer handouts. Many of those same oil industry leaders oppose actions that would save consumers money at the pump. Former Shell Oil CEO and founder of Citizens for Affordable Energy, John Hofmeister, for example, opposes selling a small amount of reserve oil from the nearly full U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve to lower gas prices, which would provide some relief to drivers. And why wouldn’t he be against such a move? Lower gas prices mean lower profits for Shell. The company’s current CEO,

“Still the big five oppose ending their taxpayer

handouts. Many of those same oil industry leaders oppose actions that would save consumers money at the pump. Former Shell Oil CEO and founder of Citizens for Affordable Energy, John Hofmeister, for example, opposes selling a small amount of reserve oil from the nearly full U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve to lower gas prices, which would provide some relief to drivers.” Dutch Shell. Since the beginning of the year, the price for gasoline increased 29 cents per gallon. If that average increase holds true through the end of March, it will translate to $5.8 billion in additional profits for the big five. CAP analyzed the past four years of average quarterly gas prices and total profits for the five largest oil companies and, not surprisingly, oil company profits are closely linked to gas prices. While gas prices aren’t the only factors influencing profits, they are a significant indicator. What’s more, we can confidently predict how much money each penny increase in gas prices transfers from consumers to the big five oil companies. Just this past January the typical house paid about $290.76 for gasoline, up by $25 over the same one-month time span in January 2011. It looks like households will face a similar increase in gasoline expenditures in February with gas prices on the rise even though demand is the lowest it’s been since 1997. This especially affects the 82 million households that spend 6 percent or more of their annual household budgets on gasoline. High oil and gasoline prices in 2011 enabled the big five companies to rake in $137 billion in profits last year. These enormous earnings contributed to the $1 trillion in profits they earned from 2001 through 2011. Despite a profit figure with 12 zeroes — count them: $1,000,000,000,000 — these oil giants are major players in the lobbying efforts to retain $4 billion in annual tax breaks for oil and gas companies that they clearly do not need. In the scheme of all things Big Oil, these tax breaks

Peter Voser, made $13 million in executive compensation in 2010. The other four CEOs made a combined $40 million in 2010, and will likely have made more in 2011. Instead of using their outrageous profits to invest in alternative energy sources or create jobs, the big five and other oil and gas firms spent more than $146 million lobbying Congress last year. The big five oil companies alone spent more than $18 million on federal campaign contributions. Ninety percent of these contributions went to Republican candidates and 10 percent to Democrats. Many of these politicians were the loudest defenders of oil tax breaks. t makes absolutely no sense to remain susceptible to a volatile global oil market. Instead we need to reduce our dependence on oil, which is priced globally and partly set by the OPEC cartel. President Barack Obama has made a significant start by proposing to double vehicle fuel efficiency standards by the year 2025. By that year, modernizing vehicle fuel efficiency will save the average car owner $8,000 in lower gas purchases over the life of a vehicle compared to a car bought in 2010. While these improved fuel economy standards are taking effect, selling a small amount of reserve oil this year could reduce gasoline prices by 5 percent to 19 percent, which means a reduction of 18 to 72 cents per gallon. This would provide some much-needed relief for middle- and low-income families whose budgets are already strained. And so what if it shaves up to $14 billion in profits from the big five oil companies? We know they can easily afford it.

Letters to the editor

Dear Editor:

We send our brave young men and women to war in foreign countries so that those citizens will have the right to vote. But so many Americans do not exercise their right to vote here at home. Less than 40 percent of eligible voters turn out to vote in non-presidential national elections. In presidential elections it improves to slightly more than 50 percent. Why? The answer is the quality of the candidates and their parties. The career politicians from the Republican and

Democratic parties fail to live up to their promises and fail to solve the serious problems facing America. Examples: a failing educational system, ballooning debt and illegal immigration. GOOOH has the solution: select candidates who are independent of a political party and will serve a limited term. GOOOH is an acronym for “Get Out Of Our House,” a non-partisan plan to evict career politicians from the U.S. House of Represetatives. To learn more, visit www.goooh.. Serving in Congress should be an honor, not a career. — Billy D. Clifford

How To Write Us:

The Michigan Chronicle encourages letters from readers. Expressed opinions must bear the writer’s signature, address and phone number (only the names will published with the letters). Write: Reader’s Speak, Michigan Chronicle, 479 Ledyard, Detroit, MI 48201 or email the editor at chronicle4@aol.com


community ARIES

March 7-13, 2012

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

STAR CHART

Money may come to you from an unlikely source this week. Keep your eyes peeled for opportunity. Let your words this week paint the images of better ways of being in the world for yourself and for those under your care. Soul Affirmation: I invest new faith in everything I do this week. Lucky Numbers: 6, 23, 46

TAURUS You may decide to visit a friend you haven’t seen in a while, or you may hear from one while you are at work. How did they get your number? You’ll be pleased to connect again with this person. Soul Affirmation: Things are as I believe them to be.

mind this week. You’ll meet some interesting people and also get a new view of how you are perceived by others if you go. Enjoy!

Soul Affirmation: I spend the week celebrating me.

VIRGO

You are full of ideas this week, and some of them have practical application. Pick and choose which ones to test as you move through your week. Keep a very positive outlook on all relationships.

Soul Affirmation: My smile is a radiant light to those I encounter Lucky Numbers: 8, 21, 29

Your intuition is trying to tell you something. Be still for a bit and let the message come. You know when to exercise caution and when to let go and revel in pleasure. There’s much pleasure in your life this week.

Soul Affirmation: I find comfort in the familiar. Lucky Numbers: 32, 34, 37

Lucky Numbers: 5, 12, 28

Soul Affirmation: I enlarge my happiness by forgetting about myself this week. Lucky Numbers: 11, 28, 41

Put one of your new ideas into action this week and see how it feels as you work through your routine. You are in command of how you think this week, so use this beneficial energy to accomplish some of the things you’ve been wanting to do. Soul Affirmation: I paint my world in colors of the rainbow. Lucky Numbers: 10, 19, 24

LEO A humanitarian cause may get you out to a meeting with others of like

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SAGITTARIUS Every positive idea you have is

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Lucky Numbers: 18, 20, 45

Lucky Numbers: 23, 27, 54

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Soul Affirmation: I tell people I love them this week.

Soul Affirmation: I let my instincts light my way this week.

SCORPIO

Too much information is as confining as too little information for you. Try to find a balance in your conversations with others. Listen and observe and you’ll learn the thing that you are looking for this week.

likely to be challenged this week, so you may want to keep your brilliance under wraps until at least tomorrow. Your ideas are sound and good. Don’t take others’ rude behavior personally.

P I CK S

Lucky Numbers: 6, 12, 19

Soul Affirmation: I keep my eyes open for business opportunities this week.

CANCER

LOTTERY

Lucky Numbers: 19, 30, 42

Everybody’s in a full moon frenzy regarding relationship issues. Listen to what others are saying, and chart your own course through this week. If you are in a relationship, remember what brought you together with this person in the first place, and be glad for what you’ve had.

LIBRA

GEMINI

Week’s Best

Soul Affirmation: I let go and let the spirit run my life this week

Lucky Numbers: 19, 27, 44

Lucky Numbers: 9, 12, 48

1064

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LowVisionofMichigan.com


inspirations

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Ronald McDonald House of Detroit competing for $250,000 in Facebook Contest Finale The Ronald McDonald House of Detroit, winner of the May 2011 Aprons in Action contest, The Home Depot Foundation’s yearlong Facebook voting program, will compete against ten other monthly winners for $250,000 in the final round of the contest. Voting is during the month of March at www. facebook.com/homedepofoundation. The organization with the most votes at the end of the month will win the $250,000 grand prize. Organizations with the second and third most votes will receive $150,000 and $100,000 respectively, from The Home Depot Foundation. Competing finalists include: April 2011: Great Falls Children’s Receiving Home (Great Falls, Mont.) May 2011: Ronald McDonald House of Detroit (Detroit, Mich.) June 2011: Jerusalem House (Atlanta, Ga.) July 2011: New OrleansArea Habitat for Humanity (New Orleans, La.) August 2011: Northwest Hospital Fdn. (Seattle, Wash.) September 2011: Taylor VFW Post #4422 (Taylor, Mich.) October 2011: Midwest Shelter for Homeless Veterans (Wheaton, Ill.) November 2011: Utah State Veterans Home (Salt Lake City, Utah) December 2011: Lifebuilders of Detroit (De-

troit, Mich.) January 2012: Jewish Family Services (Southfield, Mich.) February 2012: Veterans Guest House (Reno, Nev.) “We are truly thrilled to have been selected as a finalist for The Home Depot Foundation’s Aprons in Action contest,” said Jennifer Litomisky, executive director of the Ronald McDonald House of Detroit. “The $250,000 grand prize would allow us to makesignificant improvements, including replacing the roof, adding new flooring in all the bedrooms, and completingrenovations in the common areas. We also could purchase new furniture, washers, dryers and refrigerators so that thethousands of families we serve every year will have a safe, comforting and secure home away from home while their critically ill child receives care, just steps away at Children’s Hospital of Michigan.” During the Aprons in Action contest, The Home Depot Foundation’s Facebook fans will have helped 11 nonprofit organizations win $25,000 each to bettertheir communities. After winning the $25,000 in May, the House completed major renovations on all of the first level shower facilities as well as several bathrooms on the second level. Across the country, The Home Depot Associates give back to their communities by volunteering their time and tal-

ents with local nonprofit organizations, like The Ronald McDonald House of Detroit. The Aprons in Action Program recognizes these successful partnerships and gives each of the featured nonprofits the opportunity to do additional work with Team Depot volunteers to better their communities. Working together, the Ronald McDonald House of Detroit and Team Depot volunteers have updated rooms for families, installed new carpet, painted the interior of the building and replaced malfunctioning windows.

The Henry Ford Community College (HFCC) Job Placement Office will host a “Back to Résumé Basics” guest panel/workshop on Wednesday, March 14, from 3 to 4:30 p.m. in the Berry Auditorium of the ASCC Building, which is located on the main campus. This event is free and open to the public. HFCC is coordinating this event with the Human

The following is my tribute to the late Whitney Elisabeth Houston: I met Whitney Houston’s music while serving in the Gulf War. She recorded “The Star Spangled Banner” and we played the recording over and over. The troops and I were so proud and pleased to experience this powerful woman of God’s voice. She helped encourage so many. Peace, sweet peace, at last for you, Whitney Elisabeth Houston.

I grew up listening to her mother, Cissy Houston, and first cousin Dionne Warwick’s music. It is reported that the last song Ms. Houston sang was “Yes, Jesus Loves Me.” After many years of drama, success and suffering, separations and

“This is a great opportunity to hear from frontline decision-makers on

what they look for in a great résumé. You can also get one-on-one help in our breakout sessions to polish your résumé,” said Chad T. Austin, Job Placement officer at HFCC. For more information about “Back to Résumé Basics,” contact Austin at (313) 845-9618 or via email at ctaustin@hfcc. edu.

Technology to restore vision through the use of a component of green algae - developed by a Wayne State University professor and scientific director of the Ligon Research Center of Vision at the Kresge Eye Institute - has attracted additional funding for therapy development.

The Foundation Fighting Blindness announced a $250,000 grant from their affiliate, National Neurovision Research Institute, to RetroSense Therapeutics, LLC, a Michigan-based company. RetroSense signed a license agreement in 2011 for the novel gene-therapy approaches developed at

Wayne State University by Zhuo-Hua Pan, Ph.D., professor of ophthalmology and anatomy & cell biology in the School of Medicine. For more information, visit: http://www.media. wayne.edu/2012/02/14/ retrosense-therapeuticsreceives-grant-from-thefoundation

Coaches in the classroom: Applying sports leadership to business

Top leadership experts from the Michigan Ross School of Business will lead the program: Kim Cameron, associate dean of Michigan Ross Executive Education and the William Russell Kelly Professor of Management and Organizations; Scott DeRue, assistant professor of management and organizations and co-director of the Ross Leadfinally divorce, on the top ership Initiative; and Bob of the charts in the eightQuinn, professor of busiies and nineties, multiple ness administration and Grammy’s, many battles management and organiwith addiction that evenzations.

 tually destroyed her vocal chords, she returned to They will teach sesher beginnings, a place sions on positive leadwhere she first met the ership, positive energy resilience, business and Lord. sports translation, the Ms. Houston is the leader as coach, fundaperfect example of the immentals of leadership, portance of introducing leaving a leadership our children to God early legacy and more.

“With on. Without that early the most successful coltraining, what principles, lege football team in U.S. wisdom, and guide do our history and a deep lineup children have to call upon of nationally acclaimed or to fall back on except varsity sports, the all-star drugs, drunkenness, coaches at the University drama and demons?

A special salute to Whitney Houston I will continue to pray for your family that, as you have peace now, may they also come to a place of rest in the awesome memories and legacy you have left for our enjoyment and encouragement.

Resources Association of Greater Detroit (HRAGD) Community Relations Committee, who will have several members in attendance. These members will participate in both the panel and breakout sessions, sharing their expertise on what jobseekers need to have on their résumé.

RetroSense Therapeutics receives grant from the Foundation Fighting Blindness for WSU-licensed technology

“Aprons in Action is our $1 million effort to support the most active and engaged nonprofit organizations across the country,” said Kelly Caffarelli, president of The Home Depot Foundation. “Through Aprons in Action, we have already distributed $440,000 to 44 deserving organizations from across the nationwide Team Depot network, allowing them From the football field to continue their great and basketball court to work.” the corporate boardroom Aprons in Action is and executive suite, a on Facebook at www. new University of Michifacebook.com/homede- gan executive education p o t o r w w w . f a c e b o o k . program will teach busicom/homedepotfounda- ness leadership through lessons learned in U-M tion. sports.

 The final percentages and Best: of votes for each non- Leaders profit will be posted on Winning the Leadership The Home Depot and The Game is an innovative sixHome Depot Foundation’s day program (June 24-29) Facebook pages. For more for senior business leadinformation and to view ers offered by Michigan the program rules, visit Ross Executive EducaThe Home Depot on Face- tion and the U-M Athletbook or go to www.ho- ics Department that will combine U-M’s rich tradimedepotfoundation.org. tions of leadership excellence in academics and athletics.
 
The program will feature U-M athletic director David Brandon, football coach Brady Hoke, basketball coach John Beilein and softball coach Carol Hutchins, who will share the thinking behind their winning strategies and explain what it takes to lead highperforming teams when the stakes are high. They will be joined by former U-M football coach Lloyd Carr, former football player Desmond Howard and Zingerman’s founder Ari Weinzweig, among others.



Helen Body celebrated her 80th birthday on Feb. 27 with family and friends who surrounded her with love on this special day. All 10 of her children, 12 grandchildren, one great-grandchild and close friends of the family were present to celebrate. Special surprise guests included Carla Washington of Friends Who Care and Adam Mundy of Detroit Councilman Kenneth Cockrel’s office. He presented Mrs. Body with a proclamation from the Detroit City Council.

D.Min., LCDR, CH, USN (Ret)

Page B-6

Henry Ford Community College to hold résumé workshop

80th birthday celebration

By PJ Banks-Anderson

March 7-13, 2012

of Michigan define leadership,” Cameron said. change.


To learn more, visit www.mgoblue.com.


inspirations

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012

Page B-7

Sherrie L. Farrell named Dykema’s Detroit office managing member

Homecoming Day for Rev. Naomi Gatlin Rev. Naomi Gatlin (second from right), joined William Love (left), Barbara White, Acie Cooper, and O’ Neil D. Swanson Sr. Pres./CEO Swanson Funeral Homes Inc. recently to celebrate the annual Homecoming Day for Rev. Gatlin and members of Universal Liberty in Christ Temple located at 7000 E. Canfield.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church celebrates 93rd anniversary Dexter Avenue Baptist Church will be celebrating its 93rd church anniversary on Sunday, March 11. The church began with a strong foundation, akey factor in the success of the church. They are now in the 21st century celebrating 93 years of success, and can sing from the top of the mountain: “Down Through the Years,” “I thank You, Jesus” and all the other spirit-filled songs of how good God has been good. They have invited a host of guest ministers and church families to join them in this special celebration. The anniversary will start with evening worship services on Wednesday, March 7, and conclude on Friday, March 9, at 7 p.m. each night, and will culminate on Sunday, March 11, with a full day of celebrations. The 7:45 a.m. guest pastor will be Rev. Dr. Allyson Abrams, pastor of Zion Progress Baptist Church. The 10:45 a.m. speaker will be Rev. Ricardo Bartlett II, senior

Sherrie L. Farrell has been named managing member of the Detroit office of Dykema, a leading Detroit-based national law firm.

Law’s chapter of American Inns of Court, whose goals are to instill excellence in advocacy and professionalism among students.

In her new role, Farrell will oversee the general management and growth of Dykema’s Detroit office.

Farrell was a member of the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership Detroit Class XVIII, a community leadership program for executives in Southeast Michigan. She is a current board member of the Legal Aid and Defender Association, Inc., the largest provider of free legal services to the indigent in Michigan and one of the largest in the United States.

“Sherrie is a tremendous leader and we’re pleased to have her in charge of our Detroit office,” said Peter M. Kellett, Dykema’s chairman and chief executive officer. “She brings a fresh perspective to the job that we believe will help Dykema to grow and continue to play a key role in the Detroit community.” Farrell, a former columnist and feature writer for the Michigan Chronicle, also serves as chair of Dykema’s Diversity Committee. Farrell said she is “honored to have been chosen for this important assignment in the firm. Dykema was founded in Detroit and while we now have 11 offices around the country, it is a special privilege for me to have been given the responsibility for administration of our home office.”

Rev. Dr. Allyson Abrams

Rev. Ricardo Bartlett II

pastor, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. The 3:30 p.m. speaker will be Rev. Kenneth J. Flowers, president of the Michigan Progressive Baptist Convention and pastor of New Greater Mt. Moriah Baptist Church.

Wanda Harper, chairperson, and Deacon Michael Bouie, co-chairperson, and the entire Dexter Avenue Baptist Church family invite the public to bless them with their presence.

The theme is “93 years strong, trusting in the Lord.” The Scripture is from Proverbs 3:5: “I will trust in the Lord with all thine heart.” The colors are red and white.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church is located at 13500 Dexter Ave. For further information, please call the church office at (313) 8694878.

Farrell, who has been at Dykema since 1997, is a member in the firm’s Litigation Department. In that role she advises clients on all aspects of business disputes, including a broad range of complex litigation matters. She has represented manufacturers, closelyheld corporations, auto suppliers and construction companies in both litigated and non-litigated matters. Her practice also includes the defense of consumer financial services matters. She served as the national discovery counsel for a Fortune 25 corporation. Farrell also has significant experience in corporate bankruptcy matters and business restructuring. She has represented troubled suppliers, staffing corporations, construction companies and other regional and national businesses in creditors’ rights matters, out-ofcourt restructurings and as debtors’ and creditors’ counsel in Chapter 7, 11 and 13 proceedings. She has a breadth of experience in leading document and information investigations and has worked extensively with corporate counsel to develop and implement discovery strategies.

LOCAL JUDGES honor and congratulate Missionary Hattie B. Humphrey on celebrating another spirit filled year of doing service in Detroit. Seated (from left) Hon. Katherine L. Hansen, Missionary H. B. Humphrey, Monique Marks. Standing: Hon. In 2011, she received Linda V. Parker, Hon. Gershwin A. Drain, Hon. David S. Robinson Jr., Hon. Kevin the Robert Millender ViF. Robbins, Hon. Lawrence S. Talon, Hon. Prentis Edwards, Jr., Hon. Edward sionary Award from Michigan State University ColEwell Jr., Hon. Donna Robinson Milhouse.

2012 Civic Birthday Celebration honoring Missionary Hattie B. Humphrey Onward Christian Soldiers! Missionary Hattie B. Humphrey has expressed her concern about aggressively confronting the onslaught of issues we are facing in this day and time. Missionary Humphrey is on the forefront to protect our community from indifference and injustice. Chairing this year’s cel-

ebration is Hon. Kevin Robinson, cochair is Hon. Prentis Edwards Jr. This year’s event will be held on Saturday, March 17, 6 p.m.. at the Hotel St. Regis 3071 W. Grand Blvd. For ticket information please call Monique Marks at (313) 363-1707 or Michael Van Tull at (313) 283-2572.

Tony Dungy keynote speaker for Tougaloo College event benefiting Detroit area students The Tougaloo College Alumni Association, Detroit Chapter, is pleased to present “An Evening with Tony Dungy” at their inaugural fundraiser, which will benefit metropolitan Detroit students currently enrolled and entering Tougaloo College.

of Christian Athletes and the American Diabetes Association. The theme for this year’s event is “Mentoring Detroit’s Youth Today.” The Tougaloo College Alumni Association, Detroit Chapter, is dedicated to ensuring that local students have access to a quality education at one of the nation’s oldest historically Black colleges.

The event will take place on April 14, 6:30 p.m., in the Renaissance Ballroom of the Detroit Marriot in the Renaissance Center. Tickets are $100. Dungy is a former NFL player and retired coach of the Tampa Buccaneers and the Indianapolis Colts. In 2007, he led the Indianapolis Colts to a Super Bowl victory, making him the first African American coach to win the prestigious Lomdardi Trophy. As an author, mentor and commentator

Tony Dungy on NBC’s “Football Night in America,” Dungy remains a driving force in sports and the media. He has authored four books and is involved in a wide variety of charitable organizations, including Big Brothers Big Sisters, Boys & Girls Clubs, Fellowship

The Princeton Review listed Tougoloo College as one of the Best Colleges in the Southeast, and the Washington Monthly selected Tougaloo College among the Top 20 liberal arts institutions in the nation. Please feel free to visit Tougaloo College, at www.tougaloo.edu to learn more about its rich history and academic accomplishments.

March is National Red Cross Month

lege of Law’s Black Law Students Association. The award is named after the renowned Detroit attorney who was a partner in the first integrated law firm in the United States and a political mentor to such legendary leaders as Coleman A. Young, John Conyers and Richard Austin. A participant in a number of professional and bar activities, Farrell is a member of the American Bar Association, Detroit Metropolitan Bar Association, Federal Bar Association, National Bar Association, Wolverine

Sherrie L. Farrell Bar Association, serving as president from 20082009, and the Women’s Lawyers Association of Michigan, which she served as president from 2000-2001. In addition, Farrell is an active member of several civic and charitable organizations. She serves on the Michigan Governing Board of Directors for Gift of Life, an organ and tissue donation program, and is an Advisory Board member of the Detroit Minority Organ Tissue Transplant Education Program (MOTTEP). She formerly served as a member of Wayne State University Law School’s Board of Visitors and as Barrister of the University of Detroit Mercy School of

Farrell earned a B.A. from Wayne State University and a J.D. from the Michigan State University College of Law.

About Dykema Dykema is a leading national law firm, serving business entities worldwide on a wide range of complex business issues. Dykema lawyers and other professionals in 11 U.S. offices work in close partnership with clients – from start-ups to Fortune 1000 companies – to deliver outstanding results, unparalleled service and exceptional value in every engagement. To learn more, visit www.dykema.com.

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SHIELD OF FAITH CHURCH Bishop James A. Jennings, Senior Pastor

BISHOP’S 22nd ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION Theme: “The Vision, the Venture, and the Victory”, Acts 16: 6-15

GUEST CHURCHES Sunday, March 11, 2012: 10:00 A.M. Minister Marcus D. Jennings, Shield of Faith Church 3:00 P.M.Pastor Curtis R. Grant & Zion Hope Baptist Church Tuesday, March 13, 2012: 7:00 P.M.Pastor Edward L. Branch & Third New Hope Baptist Church Wednesday, March 14, 2012: 7:00 P.M.Pastor Julius C. Hope & New Grace Baptist Church Sunday, March 18, 2012: 10:00 A.M. T.B.A. 3:00 P.M.Pastor Nathaniel Caldwell & Greater Burnette Baptist Church

Sunday, March 25, 2012:

OFFICIAL DAY

10:00 A.M. Pastor James Jennings, Sr. & New True Vine Baptist Church 3:00 P.M.Pastor Everett N. Jennings, Sr. & New Providence Baptist Church Chairperson: Trustee Charlene Miles Co-Chair: Alberta Curry


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Page C-1 C-1 Page

March 7-13, 7-13, 2012 2012 March

Hotel St. Regis host hosts the Hotel St. Regis the

Michigan Chronicle and the Detroit Public School League Football Coaches Association

03,!,, #)494%!Prepared by Leland Stein III • Photos by Andre Smith • Sponsored by Papa Johns

Michigan Chronicle Chronicle All-PSL All-PSL team team at at Hotel Hotel St. St. Regis Regis with with Andre Andre Harlan Harlan (middle), (middle), VP V.P.ofofDetroit Det. Coaches Michigan CoachesAssociation. Association.

FIRST TEAM TEAM FIRST OFFENSE 2011 2011 OFFENSE

FIRST TEAM TEAM FIRST DEFENSE 2011 2011 DEFENSE

Michigan Chronicle/Co-PSL Chronicle/Co-PSL Michigan Offensive Players Players of of the the Year Year Offensive

Michigan Chronicle/PSL Chronicle/PSL Michigan Defensive Player of the the Year Year Defensive Player of

Martin Luther Luther King King running running back back Martin Dennis Norfleet and Dennis Norfleet and Crockett quarterback quarterback Crockett Brian Blackburn Brian Blackburn

Cass defensive defensive lineman, lineman, Darryl Darryl Goldsmith goldsmith Cass Central defensive lineman, Micheal Jones Central defensive lineman, Micheal Jones

Cass Linebacker Linebacker Cass Royce Jenkins-Stone Royce Jenkins-Stone

Renaissance defensive defensive lineman, lineman, Jabari Jabari Dean Dean Renaissance Crockett defensive lineman, Jalen Dandridge Crockett defensive lineman, Jalen Dandridge

Crockett offensive offensive tackle tackle Antoine antoine JohnsonJohnson- Clark Clark Crockett Cass offensive offensive tackle tackle Kenton Kenton Gibbs gibbs Cass

Southwestern linebacker, linebacker, Marino Marino Water Water Southwestern Pershing linebacker, linebacker, Veyon Veyon Brentley Brentley Pershing

Martin Luther Luther King King offensive offensive guard guard Sam Sam Tate Tate Martin Mumford offensive guard Daron Brown Mumford offensive guard Daron Brown

Osborn linebacker, linebacker, Dorian Dorian Cowans Cowans Osborn Denby linebacker, Micheal Phillips Denby linebacker, Micheal Phillips

Cody center center Demetrius Demetrius Carpenter Carpenter Cody Douglas running back Demetrius Stinson Douglas running back Demetrius Stinson

Cass linebacker, linebacker, Laron Laron Taylor Taylor Cass Douglas defensive back, Delcory Williams Douglas defensive back, Delcory Williams Kettering defensive defensive back, back, Ralph Ralph Gibson gibson Kettering

Southwestern running running back back Romello Romello Ross Ross Southwestern Crockett receiver Khalid Hill Crockett receiver Khalid Hill Southeastern receiver receiver Mercedes Mercedes Williamson Williamson Southeastern Cass receiver receiver Ruben Ruben Lile Lile Cass Finney athlete athlete Kendrick Kendrick Mingo Mingo Finney Pershing punter Demetrius Newsome Pershing punter Demetrius Newsome

Michigan Chronicle/PSL to r) Thomas Wilcher from Cass Cass Michigan Chronicle/PSL Co-Coaches Co-Coaches of of the theYear Year:– (lThomas Wilcher (left) from Tech,and Linda Swanson and Douglas’ Demps. Tech Douglas’ Al Demps (right) Al with Linda Swanson.

Cass Tech Tech defensive defensive back, back, Terry Terry Richardson Richardson Cass Renaissance defensive back, Chris Norris Renaissance defensive back, Chris Norris Henry Ford Ford defensive defensive back, back, Victor Victor Edge edge Henry

Antione Johnson-Clark Johnson-Clark Antione Crockett (Undecided) (Undecided) Crockett

Royce Jenkins-Stone Jenkins-Stone Royce Cass Tech Tech Linebacker Linebacker Cass

Darryl Goldsmith Goldsmith Darryl Cass (Saginaw (Saginaw Valley Valley State) State) Cass

Delcory Williams Williams Delcory Douglas (undecided) (undecided) Douglas

Demetrius Stinson Stinson Demetrius Douglas Douglas

Dennis Norfleet Norfleet Dennis King (U-M) (U-M) King

Dorian Cowans Cowans Dorian Osborn- (Lakeland (Lakeland Univ.) Univ.) Osborn-

Jalen Dandridge Dandridge Jalen Crockett (undecided) (undecided) Crockett

Kendrick Mingo Mingo Kendrick Finney (Langston) (Langston) Finney

Kenton Gibbs Gibbs Kenton Cass (undecided) (undecided) Cass

Khalid Hill Hill Khalid Crockett (U-M) (U-M) Crockett

Laron Taylor Taylor Laron Cass (Iowa) (Iowa) Cass

Mario Waters Waters Mario Southwestern (undecided) (undecided) Southwestern

(Eastern Mich Mich or or Bowling Bowling Green) Green) (Eastern

Ralph Gibson Gibson Kettering Kettering Ralph

Romello Ross Ross Romello Southwestern (Alabama (Alabama State) State) Southwestern

Ruben Lile Lile Ruben Cass (Iowa) (Iowa) Cass

Terry Richardson Richardson Terry Cass (U-M) (U-M) Cass

(l-r) Former Northwestern Pittsburgh Steeler’s Former Northwestern HighHigh and and Pittsburgh Steelers star star, Johnson Ron Johnson and PSL PSL Offensive Offensive Player Player of of the the Year, Year, Ron (left) and Crockett quarterback quarterback,Brian BrianBlackburn. Blackburn. Crockett

Speakers: Leland (front from left) Lelandleft), SteinO’Neil III, O’Neil Swanson, Johnson and George Jr. (back Speakers: Stein III (front, Swanson, Ron Ron Johnson and George SteinStein Jr. Back from from left) Eric Smith, Keith Williams, Thomas Seabron and Alan Hughes. left: Eric Smith, Keith Williams, Thomas Seabron and Alan Hughes.

Leland Stein Stein can can be be reached reached at at lelstein3@aol.com lelstein3@aol.com or or Twitter Twitter at at LelandSteinIII LelandSteinIII Leland


Page C-2 • THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE • March 7-13, 2012


business

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012

Page C-3

MOVINGUP

AFG CEO appointed to Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice

Jack Martin reappointed as emergency manager for Highland Park Schools Gov. Rick Snyder followed the recommendation of the independent Highland Park Schools review team, confirming his determination that a financial emergency exists in the Highland Park School District and reappointing Jack Martin as emergency manager, pursuant to Public Act 4 of 2011, the Local Government and School District Fiscal Accountability Act. Martin, a certified public accountant, is founder and chairman of Martin, Arrington, Desai & Meyers, P.C., and served as chief financial officer for the U.S. Department of Education from 2002 to 2005. “Jack Martin is the right person for this post. Not only does he have a clear understanding of the crisis facing Highland Park school, he has the background, expertise and passion to address it,” Snyder said. “Despite the roadblocks along the way, we remain committed and will work tirelessly to ensure to the well-being and education of Highland Park kids.” The governor’s reappointment of Martin followed a review team’s unanimous recommendation first on Jan. 4, and again on Feb. 22 during

vances that totaled nearly $5 million over the past seven months, Highland Park Schools was unable to pay its teachers and staff for the third time on Feb. 24, 2012. • On Feb. 8, 2012, the Michigan Department of Education processed a $261,000 state aid advance under Section 17b of the State School Aid Act to ensure that the district could meet its Feb. 10, 2012 payroll for teachers and staff.

Jack Martin

an open public meeting, that the district is experiencing a financial emergency. • The HPS cumulative deficit increased by 51 percent over the past fiscal year, growing from $6.6 million to $11.3 million. Expenditures exceeded revenues by $3.8 million in FY 11. The district received $14,165 per pupil, but expended $16,508 per pupil. • For the 2011 fiscal year, HPS’ per pupil revenue ranked 40 out of 777 local districts and academies, placing the district in the top 5 percent of per pupil revenue statewide. • Despite three special hardship or cash ad-

• On Jan. 13, 2012, MDE processed a $188,000 state aid advance to again ensure that the district could meet its payroll for teachers and staff. • The district’s pupil enrollment has decreased by 58 percent since 2006, dropping from 3,179 pupils to 1,331 for FY 2011. Current estimates show a pupil count of 969. • The district has incurred an operating deficit in five of the last six fiscal years. As emergency manager, Martin will develop and maintain ongoing communications with school district officials, parents of Highland Park students, members of the community, and the media.

UPSIDE Gastroenterology division recognized for quality and safety Henry Ford Hospital’s Division of Gastroenterology has been recognized for its quality of care by the nation’s leading gastrointestinal endoscopy society. Henry Ford was one of 27 organizations nation-

ing CDC infection control standards. Upon completion of the program, hospitals receive an ASGE “Certificate of Recognition” for promoting quality in endoscopy which is valid for three years.

doscopic research, recognizes distinguished contributions to endoscopy, and is the foremost resource for endoscopic education. Henry Ford’s Division of Gastroenterology is a national leader in the

“Henry Ford was one of 27 organi-

zations nationally to be recognized by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) for quality in endoscopy.” ally to be recognized by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) for quality in endoscopy. The ASGE Endoscopy Unit Recognition Program honors gastroenterological endoscopy programs with a demonstrated track record of adhering to ASGE guidelines on privileges, quality assurance, endoscopy reprocessing and maintain-

ASGE is the profession’s leader in setting standards of excellence in endoscopy through its safety guidelines and the training of its members so that patients receive the best and safest care possible. ASGE, with nearly 12,000 members worldwide, promotes the highest standards for endoscopic training and practice, fosters en-

diagnosis and treatment of digestive disorders. It includes the Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) Center and Liver Disease Center, a first of its kind in Michigan, which treats patients with liver disease, including medical management, advanced minimally invasive surgical techniques and liver transplantation.

Amanda “Amy” L. Good, CEO of Alternatives For Girls (AFG), a 24-year-old southwest Detroit-based nonprofit organization serving homeless and at-risk girls and young women, was recently appointed by Gov. Rick Snyder to the newly formed Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice, an advisory board to be held within the Michigan Department of Human Services. As a member of the committee, Good will serve as the representative of private nonprofit organizations. Snyder issued Executive Order 2012-1, which establishes the 15-member committee to advise on juvenile justice issues and guide effective implementation of juvenile justice policies and programs. The Michigan Committee on Juvenile Justice replaces two commissions that previously worked on juvenile justice issues, the Juvenile Accountability Block Grant Advisory and the Michigan Commission on Juvenile Justice, of which Good was a member. “I am very pleased to have been appointed to this crucial statewide committee,” said Good. “As I have learned through my past service on this committee, and through Alternatives For Girls’ work with homeless and high-risk girls and young women-some aging out of the foster care or juvenile justice system, and some simply “aging out” of youth homelessness-

Amy L. Good

Michigan’s youth who are at risk for, and engaged in, the juvenile justice system need our very best efforts, energy, creativity, and all the resources we can bring to bear to provide them and their families with opportunities to heal, grow, thrive, and contribute to society. I look forward to serving with my colleagues in this important work.” Other members of the revised committee include Judge Dorene Allen, of Midland, chief probate judge for Midland County; Melissa Baldwin, of Ionia; John Broad, of Grosse Pointe Farms, president and CEO of Crime Stoppers of Michigan; Barbara Donaldson, of Traverse City, chief probation officer for the Grand Traverse County Family Division of the 13th Circuit Court; Lawrence “Larry” Emig, of Reed City, county commissioner for Osceola County and vice chairperson of the board; Jeffrey Fink, of Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County pros-

ecuting attorney; Sandra Metcalf, of Grand Haven, director of juvenile services for the 20th Circuit Court’s Family Division; Kari Kusmierz, of Orleans, captain and commander of the training division for the Michigan State Police; and Larissa Niec, of Mount Pleasant, licensed clinical child psychologist, director of the Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) Clinic and Research Lab at Central Michigan University and psychology professor at Central Michigan University. Also, Ed Roth, of Sterling Heights, head of The Center for Charter Schools at Central Michigan University; Brandon Shire, of Midland, student of criminal justice and law enforcement at Delta College; Kenyatta Stephens, of Farmington Hills, chief operating officer of Black Family Development, Inc.; and Richard Wood, of Brighton, founder and executive director of Midcourse Correction Challenge Camps, Inc. Alternatives For Girls is a Detroit-based 501(c)3 nonprofit serving homeless and high-risk girls and young women. Since 1987, AFG has provided critical services to the girls and young women it serves, including safe shelter, street outreach and educational support, vocational guidance, mentoring, prevention activities, and counseling. The goal is to empower the girls and young women it serves to make positive choices.

Obama taps Henry Ford physician for advisory role Henry Ford Health System physician Kimberlydawn Wisdom, M.D., has been appointed by President Barack Obama to serve as a member of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion, and Integrative and Public Health. Dr. Wisdom currently serves as Senior Vice President of Community Health & Equity and the Chief Wellness officer at Henry Ford Health System. As a member of the Advisory Group, Dr. Wisdom will advise the President’s Cabinet on policy and provide program recommendations. The Advisory Group also advises the National Prevention Council on lifestyle-based chronic disease prevention and management, integrative health care practices, and health promotion. The Advisory group was established in June of 2010 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and reports to the U.S. Surgeon General. “I am extremely proud that Dr. Wisdom has been chosen to share her expertise and passion for preventive health in a way that will now meaningfully impact the wellbeing of all Americans,” says Nancy Schlichting, CEO of Henry Ford Health System. Dr. Wisdom’s 30-year career in health care includes developing innovative partnerships to improve community health. As the founding director of the Institute of Multicultural Health at Henry Ford Health System she developed AIMHI (African American Initiative for Male Health Improvement), a nationally recognized initiative that recently received the Michigan Association of Health Plans Pinnacle Award for Community Collaboration.

The things we do for

On February 16, Dr.Kimberlydawn Wisdom was sworn in as a member of the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion and Integrative and Public Health by Dr. Howard K. Koh while Nancy Combs held the Bible at the Hubert H Humphrey Department of Health and Human Services Building in Washington, DC. Dr. Wisdom is the recipient of the Gail and Lois Warden Endowed Chair on Multicultural Health for Henry Ford Health System and cochairs the Henry Ford Healthcare Equity Campaign, which strives to address and eliminate health care disparities. The campaign goal is to increase awareness, cultural competency, and opportunities to ensure health care equity is practiced by Henry Ford providers, staff, researchers and the community at large – and to link health care equity as a key, measurable aspect of clinical quality. From 2003 to 2010, Dr. Wisdom served as the first surgeon general in Michigan. In response to Detroit’s infant mortality rate, among the nation’s highest, the Detroit Regional Infant Mortality Reduction Task Force, chaired by Dr. Wisdom, is developing groundbreaking strategies to “sew up the safety net” as competing health systems and public health agencies collaborate to reduce infant mortality. The approach will reate a sustainable template for

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future regional collaborations to close health disparities gaps and create a healthier community. Funding for the project is provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Local Funding Partnerships, The Kresge Foundation and other local partners. Dr. Wisdom currently serves on the Satcher Health Leadership Board: the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy Board; the Public Health Institute Board, and is the Honorary Chair of the Governor’s Council (MI) on Physical Fitness, Health and Sports. She is a board-certified Emergency Medicine physician at Henry Ford and serves as an assistant professor in the Department of Medical Education at the University of Michigan Medical School. Dr. Wisdom earned her medical degree from the University of Michigan Medical School, her master’s of science degree from the University of Michigan School of Public Health, and her bachelor’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania.


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THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Are unions really good to Blacks?

By Stacy Swimp I’m disappointed and disgusted with elected liberal officials playing the race card in their efforts to justify their assault on the basic logic and intellectual capacity of Americans across this wonderful land of opportunity. One of the lies that liberals officials use to manipulate Black Americans is that forced unionism is constitutional. In the Black community, that is further highlighted by playing the race card and claiming how “good” the unions have been to Black people.

Commentary Last month, Wisconsin State Senator Spencer Coggs, in a shameful display of pretzel logic mired in the depths of longdead racial realities, proclaimed: “As a people, we have done well with union jobs. I know the impact that union jobs have on our wages, our health care and our very ability to keep a job. If it weren’t for unions, we often wouldn’t have a hedge to protect us against being the last hired and first fired.” Liberals would have Black Americans to believe that unions are the only hope for overcoming the victimhood assigned to Black Americans and perpetuated by liberal politicians who are intent on profiting from this farce. I, for one, have grown tired of this intentional refusal to acknowledge the importance and significance of what Black America brings to the table on a daily basis. We, as do all Americans, determine our own place in our history, and certainly don’t need special treatment from unions or government in order to shine brilliantly in our individual pursuit of happiness.  Unions, furthermore, in their blatant desire to perpetuate an ugly and untrue picture to curry

Stacy Swimp favor among Black Americans, continue to discriminate against Black workers. If most Black Americans knew the facts, I am convinced that there would be a resounding renouncing and en masse opting out of unions. The Center for Union Facts (http://www.unionfacts.com/crime-corruption/discriminationby-unions) published a report obtained through the Freedom of Information Act which demonstrates, in large part, union discrimination against Blacks. The report stated that Between 2000 and 2011, labor unions faced 13,815 complaints of discrimination filed with the government’s Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. These included 4,248 complaints of race discrimination. That amounts to at least one formal complaint per day for racial discrimination. Unions also discriminate against Blacks in labor, particularly in construction, through the Davis Bacon Act of 1931. The Davis Bacon Act was created for the purpose of keeping non-union Blacks workers from competing with whiteonly unions for construction jobs that were partially or fully funded by the Federal government. It was a “Jim Crow” Law.

Most Blacks today do not know that this Jim Crow law is not only still on the books, but continues to have the same intended consequence. Another way that unions discriminate against Blacks is through what is known as Project Labor Agreements (PLAs). The National Black Chamber of Commerce recently released the following statement, regarding PLAs: “AfricanAmerican workers are significantly underrepresented in all crafts of construction union shops … this problem has been persistent during past decades and there appears to be no type of improvement coming … PLAs are anti-free-market, noncompetitive, and, most of all, discriminatory.” (See http://www.plawatch. com/discrimiate) Studies upon studies have confirmed that PLAs serve as major barriers for Black owned businesses seeking to bid on public and private projects. Nevertheless, unions continue to lobby for government to sustain public policies that have negative outcomes for Black business owners and workers, while promoting racial equality and social justice through false propaganda. Regarding forced unionism, Black Americans should be outraged. No American should be forced to join a union, against their will, and pay dues in order to work. The Black unemployment rate is almost 17 percent. That Black Americans would face being terminated from their jobs, harassment or discrimination, if they don’t want to join a union, is a form of economic slavery. Slavery, by any name, is still slavery. Are unions really good to Blacks? Not unless freedom deprived, in any way, can ever be defined as “good.”

March 7-13, 2012 Page C-4

Help ‘kitchen table’ entrepreneurs By Ralph D. Ward

What if we instead tried to offer these off-the-books entrepreneurs a few tools that could actually help them?

While Gov. Rick Snyder has pledged to make jobs a priority for 2012, we have a rich, hidden opportunity — but one trapped between the worlds of economic development and employment and training efforts for the poor. State economic development focuses on tempting new businesses to the community and helping current businesses expand.

Commentary Employment and training tends to serve those with the most strikes against them — low income, poor education, criminal records, youth, and often several generations of life on the dole. Both can be a frustrating upstream swim against our area’s economic trends. Of late, there have been tentative efforts to build synergy between the domains of economic development and education and training. The Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) and Michigan Small Business & Technology Development Center (MI-SBTDC) are outstanding here. MI-SBTDC, for example, offers a valuable 10-week “FastTrac” entrepreneurial training program. These offerings are demanding, formalized, and intentionally off-putting. Those who venture into such “venture boot camps” meet a fairly narrow profile. Perhaps they work with an area company and seek to go out on their own. Most already have some startup background, plus a few local networking connections to at least get their calls on credit, facilities, and suppliers answered. The current development/E&T paradigm assumes that a few, the achievers, the survivors, will be able to overcome and launch a business that will end up hiring lots of people. It is based on the belief that entrepreneurs must be carefully winnowed, with a good slapping up and toughening process to prove themselves worthy. It’s hard to argue with this bracing view of entrepreneurship … but I’ll start with its wastefulness. The greatest single failing of this approach is that it ignores the very people who could benefit most. Those low-income, un- or underemployed folks who our jobs programs struggle to help? Turns out many are already informal entrepreneurs. These entrepreneurs are not found at the local golf club trying to network a round of angel financing. They instead are the welfare recipients, the disability clients, the folks shopping at the dollar stores, the paroled, the wounded, the invisible. Their “business plans” are not multipage presentations, but rather are found on the bulletin boards of markets and party stores. Often misspelled, these are offers to collect scrap metal, for handyman services, to babysit, for hair weaving, to butcher deer. Usually this is a single person, doing odd jobs off the clock, off the books, for a few acquaintances. This informal entrepreneurship may bring in a few dollars a

month — or a few thousand dollars, but it’s always cash. It’s certain that the IRS, zoning boards, licensing authorities, or caseworkers don’t learn about a dime of it. Asking these folks if they are “entrepreneurs” will bring a blank stare. They’re making some cash on the side, earning this day their daily bread. You may as well demand a formal business plan from a woodchuck. Their business facilities are the backyard or a kitchen table, and they will continue their informal business whether our institutions support them, counsel them, or even acknowledge they exist. Such micro-enterprise is messy, erratic, and sometimes illegal, whether in the basic regulatory sense, or more felonious variants (what is cooking up meth in one’s trailer if not entrepreneurism?) Yet this underground economy contributes billions to the greater economy. More pertinent to this essay, it provides the few dollars that can mean the difference between getting by and utter collapse. Yet Michigan’s economic development programs flatly ignore these hidden entrepreneurs. Perhaps worse, our employment and training functions view their initiative as a violation of income rules, a problem to be ignored or halted. What if we instead tried to offer these off-the-books entrepreneurs a few tools that could actually help them? If we confidentially let them know they could make even more by following a few rules, to help them come in out of the cold? The basics on what’s needed to get their day care licensed? Advice on creating a sole proprietorship? Networking among other off-the-books business folk? Access to microcapital and microlending? Coaxing them to bring what they do into the sunlight, to ultimately join the state tax base? If we give up on the idea that entrepreneurs must be businessmen with a storefront, but can instead be poor people edging toward self sufficiency, all sort of miracles can happen. First, though, our state employment and development systems must start viewing them as a solution, not a problem. Editor’s Note: Ralph Ward of Riverdale is publisher of the Boardroom INSIDER newsletter (wwwboardroominsider.com) and a board member of the Central Area Michigan Works Consortium and of Greater Gratiot Development Inc.

The ‘Avoid the Ghetto’ app By Bill Johnson The drive-by shootings that took the lives of a 12-year-old girl and a 9-month old boy in separate incidents in recent weeks makes the controversial “Avoid the Ghetto” app an imperative. Anyone contemplating a visit to Detroit shouldn’t be caught dead without one. A recently patented Microsoft GPS software application for pedestrian Smartphone users, technically called the “route production” program, is not available for sale. And while the patent makes no reference to the word “ghetto,” its “Avoid the Ghetto” nickname has spawned high-tech criticism.

Commentary Dallas branch NAACP President Juanita Wallace, among others, voiced concerned that its use of crime stats will steer tourists away from urban areas across America. Bill Johnson Wallace told CBS: “I’m going to be up in arms about it if it happens. It’s almost like gerrymandering. It’s stereotyping for sure and without a doubt, I can’t emphasize enough, it’s discriminatory.” What’s not in dispute is that random and willful murders in cities like Detroit pose a serious and recurring threat to motorists, residents and visitors. The evening news routinely airs stories about a young child being shot inside or outside his or her home; a teen or young adult male lying dead in the street; friends, mothers and other relatives pleading and crying out for relief from the senseless, seemingly endless, bloodshed. Citizens gripped by fear are afraid to venture onto streets that overflow with marauding, rudderless youth, school dropouts, dope dealers and gang bangers. Too few opportunities and too many lures sap much of the potential of generations. So pervasive and overwhelming are the minefield of temptations that the drift of young people into the dead-end world of crime is predictable. A lucrative drug market fuels hopelessness, misery and death. There’s no mystery why Detroit has one of the highest per capita homicide and teen murder rates in the nation. Hoards of social misfits exhibit such incorrigible, immoral behavior that it begs answers to a list of perplexing questions: Is it too late for Detroiters to reverse the negative, self-perpetuating pattern of their lives? Is the erosion of institutions too damaged to repair the moral fabric of communities? Has so much ground been lost that frightened residents are fatefully assigned the terror?

One would think that every conceivable response to this

predicament — be it social, education, political, community or a law enforcement crackdown — would receive a significant public appointment. But looking in on today’s Detroit, you’ll find little evidence that a constituency that placed a high value on safety ever existed. The voice of those who once set standards and values acceptable to and conformed to by the larger group has gone silent. The law enforcement hierarchy hopelessly wrings their hands, talk tough, beg for community support, but are otherwise powerless to quell the ruthless and violent surge. Instead of urgently and passionately setting the moral tone for neighborhoods in distress, the remaining law-abiders communicate their disaffection by loading what belongings they have left into moving vans and vacating neighborhoods where the carnage occurs. Until the city gets its arms around the shootings and murders, survival is in doubt. But that assumes there are still enough well meaning Detroiters with some predilection to the “right thing.” As TV and the press chronicle the dramatic slide into oblivion, the images of the city’s undoing becomes firmly embedded in the psyche of observant and judgmental people who live outside the city. They subsequently, and to a large extent, justifiably avoid venturing into it. The moral legacy left to Detroit may ultimately be one that requires a Smartphone app to safely navigate through the quagmire. Such a device would not be fail-safe, but it will allow visitors to quickly identify and possibly avoid hot crime spots. To that end, the “Avoid the Ghetto” app could be a life saving hightech instrument in a highcrime, deadly era.


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UPlift

March 7-13, 2012

Page C-5

One brick at a time

By Arvis L. Perry

There is something happening on the east side, a resurrection if you will. While driving down Lakewood Street you take in the view of some nice homes, and you take in the view of some abandoned homes, somewhat worn from the years. There are several that have been left to the elements and occasional fires our city has become associated with. As you approach Waveney and Lakewood, something very strange appears. Not just new construction, but what seems to be very out of place or better yet, an oasis in the desert.

The homeowner and builder Pastor Charles Brooks says he is helping to build Detroit back to its former glory, starting with his home on his block, “one brick at a time.” He has lived in this home for nearly 15 years and does not plan on moving. Several years ago, Pastor Brooks was a hardworking young man with three missions on his mind: spreading the Gospel in his small church, growing his business and raising his children. One tragic day, he was riding in the car with his youngest son when he was the victim of a carjacking and suffered a near fatal shooting. Shortly afterwards, he suffered another setback when his home caught fire. Undaunted by what he calls “the devil trying to stop me,” he decided what he had to do. To the astonishment of his neighbors, family and friends he began building his home all over again, dedicating each brick to the glory of God. Each area has significant Scriptures etched into them, even street signs in the yard directing you to heavenly bliss.

Pastor Charles Brooks

The home, located at 4234

Photo credit: Ten-speed and Brown Shoe photograph: Terrell V. Hill

Lakewood, boasts two garages, one with 12-car capacity, the other an eightcar capacity, fully finished with an upstairs and lovely tiled bathrooms.

and provided each guest with a photo op while entering, upbeat appropriate music, lighted secure and guard staffed parking and a delicious meal.

The fountain in the courtyard holds 50,000 gallons of water and is decorated with night lighting and lily pads. The home has three bedrooms, two bathrooms and the grounds are fenced in with security guards on the premises.

He had a host of guests who came to celebrate not only his birthday, but also to view this monument to a God-driven man and show their love and support. When the pastor is not busy helping to beautify Detroit, he is doing what his heart loves: spreading the Gospel. He has held a prayer vigil outside the City/ County Building, organized and attended many rallies around the city and has plans on another church.

The home has been featured on several local and national television shows, and this past summer was featured in On Earth magazine. Pastor Brooks insists that he was inspired by a divine direction from God to build in this neighborhood and in this nature. I asked several of his aunts, cousins and a sister what they thought of his venture. No one seemed surprised, saying he has always been driven by his conviction to his religious beliefs. Pastor Brooks recently celebrated his birthday

Pastor Brooks may live like a king at home, but day-to-day he works in the vineyard just as any other man. He owns and operates a highly skilled and successful home improvement company, Unique Construction, and if what his home looks like and the words on one of his many trucks is true, Detroit could definitely take

Arvis L. Perry a lesson from this man. The home is not merely a home for Pastor Brooks, it is also the office headquarters for his company, which is quite evident with many trucks and construction equipment in several of the many garages and on the grounds. To reach Pastor Brooks call (313) 823.2011 or visit info@uniqueconstructionco.com. Arvis L. Perry is a retired school teacher, poet and contributor to the Michigan Chronicle.

WCCCD honors Thomas Turner with scholarship foundation:

A labor of love

Thomas Turner

About Thomas Turner

Thomas Turner, a heralded labor leader, headed the Metro-Detroit AFLCIO for two decades. He was elected president of the Wayne County AFLCIO in 1968, and the next year was elected president of the newly formed Metro-Detroit AFL-CIO. He held that post for 20 years before retiring in 1989. He also served as secretarytreasurer of the Michigan AFL-CIO. Turner served as president of the Detroit NAACP from 1968 to 1970, where he combined the power of his dual leadership roles to forge an unprecedented relationship between the NAACP and the AFL-CIO. He later went on to serve on the NAACP’s national board. Thomas Turner was an uncommon man who was loved by many and respected by all.

Recently, a cross section of civic and community leaders met at Wayne County Community College District Downtown Campus for the launching of a scholarship foundation named after the late labor leader Tom Turner. The gathering which was chaired by WCCCD Chancellor Dr. Curtis Ivery, was an outpouring of tribute to the life of Turner who was fearless in his thoughts and convictions and worked hard to highlight the plight of working families. Turner’s family members, including son Michael Turner, chief of staff to Wayne County Sheriff Benny Napoleon spoke and thanked WCCCD and the dignitaries for honoring his father’s legacy. Congressman John Conyers, Sheriff Napoleon and others spoke passionately about Turner and his impact on Detroit. Below are photos from the event.


community

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

About Detroit Circles... This week’s Detroit Circles gathering was hosted by Lauren Morris. Detroit Circles is a grassroots campaign aimed at building support for President Barack Obama for the 2012 presidential election. The Detroit Circles Initiative is a series of gatherings held in homes, businesses and establishments throughout Detroit and the surrounding area. The UAW will be kicking off the first round of gatherings, in which UAW staff members will recruit family and friends to host a Detroit Circles meeting. Then, those guests are recruited to host, donate and volunteer....and the circle continues. Detroit Circles began Nov. 26, and will run until November 2012. – Andre Smith photos

March 7-13, 2012

Page C-6


March 7-13, 2012

section D

Reflections By Steve Holsey

Another solid marriage

…with Ellen DeGeneres

The world of show business is known for many things, but marriages that last is not one of them. There is a joke that goes, “It used to be ‘till death do us part, but now it’s ‘for as long as we both think it’s a good idea.’” Enduring marriages like those of Denzel and Pauletta Washington, Bill and Camille Cosby, and Samuel L. and LaTanya Jackson are uncommon. And certainly Valerie Simpson and Nick Ashford would have been ongoing. Dondré Whitfield and Salli Richardson with daughter Parker and son Dre Terrell. One happy married couple we don’t hear much about, because they are not superstars, is actor Dondré Whitfield and actress Salli Richardson. Between them they have a lengthy list of film and TV credits. They were married in 2002 and signs point to them having a lasting union. (Plus they look good together.) In 2003 Ebony magazine named them one of the “10 Hottest Couples.” LAZ ALONSO fully deserved the NAACP Image Award that he received recently for Outstanding Actor in a Motion Picture for his work in “Jumping the Broom.” Like Denzel Washington always does, Alonso totally got into the role of Jason Taylor, opposite Paula Patton’s Laz Alonso Sabrina Watson. He made the character totally believable. Cee Lo Green, singer, rapper, producer, actor, songwriter and judge on “The Voice,” is writing his autobiography, which is slated for 2013 release. (His real name, by the way, is Thomas DeCarlo Callaway.) The legendary Fats Domino says that at the age of 84 he is done with concert tours and things of that nature. He has a comfortable income from royalties from his great hits like “Blueberry Hill,” “Walking to New Orleans” and “I’m in Love Again” from the 1950s and early 1960s.

Also, he has no intention of ever leaving his native New Orleans. He loves it there and has never been able to find food that good anyplace else!

STEFAN GORDY, the son of Berry Gordy better known as Redfoo from the wild party band LMFAO, says he hasn’t cut his Afro Redfoo since 1995. He just lets it do its thing. Redfoo, by the way, is a bit older than most people think. He’s 36. Even though LMFAO’s music is a far cry from that of Motown, Redfoo says his father “couldn’t be more proud and that makes me the happiest man alive.” It was strange to hear that Gladys Knight will be one of the celebrity dancers on this season’s “Dancing With The Stars.” She’s got to be better than Wendy Williams was! THESE ARE hotterthan-hot times for super actress Viola Davis. (I love her.) Wow, talk about someone’s ship coming in! But what’s up with the breast exposure and a Viola Davis body that appears to have oil smeared all over it? Maybe she just feels sexy and likes being shiny!

Davis was recently asked who her “style

See Reflections Page D-2

Winfrey …with Oprah

BARACK

THE STAR POWER OF

O BAMA

By Steve Holsey

T

here may have never been a president as popular in music and Hollywood circles as Barack Obama, the 44th person to be chosen to hold the most powerful position in the world.

And as any supporter will tell you, and even some nonsupporters will reluctantly admit, President Obama has done a commendable job, as well as making history as the first Black president and smoothly managing to rise above “the race factor.” When most people look at him, they see …with Jamie Foxx a man, period, which is as it should be. This is not the place to expound on President Obama’s myriad achievements, including the economy gradually getting better, (GM is again the world’s No. 1 automaker), the image of the United States around the world being drastically improved, there being a growing sense of hope in this country, and certainly terrorism is not the threat it was just a few years ago. But the likability of Barack Obama cannot be downplayed as being a factor in his popularity as chief executive. He puts the “C” in charisma, the “C” in class, the “C” in charm, the “C” in character and, yes, the “C” in cool. To top it all off, he’s fun (and a pretty good singer too!), Among his few rivals in the archives of the presidents past are Bill Clinton and John F. Kennedy, and even they come up short in comparison.

…with Spike Lee

…with Whoopi Goldberg

…with Stevie Wonder

…with Quincy Jones

The amount of suppport President Obama has received in the show business industry is nothing short of amazing. One need only peruse this alphabetized partial list of celebrity supporters, and the key word is “partial.”

Alec Baldwin Jack Black Beyoncé Bono Nick Cannon Mariah Carey Don Cheadle George Clooney Ellen DeGeneres Michael Douglas Vivica A. Fox Jamie Foxx Aretha Franklin Morgan Freeman Lady Gaga Whoopi Goldberg Berry Gordy Anthony Hamilton Herbie Hancock Tom Hanks Hill Harper Neil Patrick Harris Dennis Haysbert Jennifer Hudson Jay-Z Samuel L. Jackson Quincy Jones

Tom Joyner Alicia Keys Ashton Kutcher Ledisi Spike Lee Eva Longoria Jane Lynch Bill Maher Eddie Murphy Al Pacino Gwyneth Paltrow Sarah Jessica Parker Sean Penn Smokey Robinson Chris Rock Russell Simmons Sinbad Emmitt Smith Jada Pinkett Smith Will Smith Steven Spielberg Wanda Sykes Barbra Streisand Vera Wang Vanessa Williams Oprah Winfrey Stevie Wonder

…with Al Pacino …with Chris Rock

…with Jennifer Hudson

See Star Power Page D-2 …with George Clooney

…with Alicia Keys

…with Bono


entertainment

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012 Page D-2

MOTOR CITY ENTERTAINMENT Calendar

BOYZ II MEN, Motor City Casino Sound Board, March 22. Tickets sold at Ticketmaster locations and MotorCityCasino.com.

Harold Melvin’s Blue Notes

Jeffrey Osborne

B.B. KING, Fox Theatre, May 23. Tickets sold at Ticketmaster locations. To charge by phone call 1.800.745.3000. GLADYS KNIGHT, the Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, April 28. Tickets at Tickemaster locations and Caesarswindsor.com. “MADEA GETS A JOB,” Fox Theatre, April 26-29. Tickets sold at Ticketmaster locations. To charge by phone call 1.800.745.3000.

DR. MICHAEL L. WALKER, worship and celebration concert, Puritan Avenue Baptist Church, March 18, 4 p.m. Free admission. Reception with refreshments will follow the show. For more information, call 313.921.9577. THE WHISPERS, the Emotions, the Stylistics, the Delfonics, the Chi-Lites, Harold Melvin’s Blue Notes, Fox Theatre, May 13. Tickets on sale at the Fox Theatre box office and all Ticketmaster outlets. To charge by phone, call 1.800.745.3000.

FIFTH DIMENSION, the Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, April 12. Tickets at Tickemaster locations and Caesarswindsor.com. “HOPE FROM THE ASHES,” presented by Teen HYPE, Millennium Center, March 15-16. School reservations must be made in advance. For more information and to make reservations, call 313.831.8336.

The “Hair Wars” ex­ travaganzas are often imi­ tated but never equaled. They have made Detroit the Hair Capital of the World. The next show, “Hair Wars…With a Twist of Pink,” will be presented on Sunday, April 29, at Cobo Center, 6:05 p.m. with doors opening at 5 p.m. Over 30 hair enter­ tainers will be featured, along with more than 250 models. It is being de­ cribed as “a hair takeover of Detroit.” The show is dedicated to the sister and mother of “Hair Wars” founder David (“Hump the Grind­ er”) Humphries, both of whom lost a battle with breast cancer, and to all

Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, March 17. Tickets at Tickemaster locations and Caesarswindsor.com.

KELLY CLARKSON, the Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, Thursday, March 8. Tickets at Tickemaster locations and Caesarswindsor.com. “CLUCKED UP Saturday Night,” stage comedy, City Theatre, May 24. For more information, call 313.471.3464.

‘Hair Wars…With a Twist of Pink’ coming to Cobo Center, April 29

B.B. King

The Stylistics

BARRY MANILOW, Fox Theatre, Friday and Saturday, March 9-10. Tickets sold at Ticketmaster locations. To charge by phone call 1.800.745.3000. JOHN MAYER, Fox Theatre, April 14. Tickets sold at Ticketmaster locations. To charge by phone call 1.800.745.3000.

City Casino Sound Board, May 10. Tickets sold at Ticketmaster locations and MotorCityCasino.com. RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS, Joe Louis Arena, June 1. Tickets on sale at Ticketmaster locations. To charge by phone call 1.800.745.3000.

O’JAYS, the Colosseum at Caesars Windsor, March 31. Tickets at Tickemaster locations and Caesarswindsor.com.

KID ROCK, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Fox Theatre, May 12. Tickets sold at Ticketmaster locations. To charge by phone call 1.800.745.3000.

JEFFREY OSBORNE, Motor

KENNY ROGERS, the

CHARLIE WILSON, Kelly Price, Kindred the Family Soul, Fox Theatre, April 8. Tickets on sale at the Fox Theatre box office and all Ticketmaster outlets. To charge by phone, call 1.800.745.3000.

who have lost loved ones to the disease. For tickets and more info, visit hairwarsustour. com or call (313) 5348318.

Michael L. Walker to perform On Sunday, March 18, singer-musician-music director-educator Dr. Mi­ chael L. Walker will be presented in concert at Puritan Avenue Baptist Church, 2351 Puritan at Baylis.

YOUNG JEEZY, the Fillmore, Saturday, March 10. Tickets may be purchased at Livenation.com and Ticketmaster locations. To charge by phone, call 1.800.745.3000.

The worship and cel­ ebration event, for which

S

there is no charge, will start at 4 p.m. Organizers promise “gospel music at its finest and most mean­ ingful.” A reception with refreshments will follow. For additional infor­ mation, please call (313) 921-9577.

ubscribe and receive one full year of the Michigan Chronicle to hour home or office www.michronicle.com

VOLUME 74 – Number 26

Star power When a presidential contender has support of this magnitude, it makes it that much more likely that he will emerge victori­ ous when “V Day” (voting day) comes around. Since so many music artists on this list, it brings up the question as to what extent Mr. Obama is into music. Well, a great extent, as evidenced by

March 9-15, 2011

From page D-1

the well over 2000 songs on his iPod, with artists ranging from Earth Wind & Fire, Stevie Wonder, Lu­ dacris and Miles Davis to the Rolling Stones, Bruce Springsteen and Sheryl Crow. The president de­ scribes his taste in music as “pretty eclec­ tic.” Indeed, it seems to be as wide-ranging as his

appeal to the American populace — smart, social­ ly concerned, hope-seek­ ing people who realize the country is headed in the right direction. It has much to do with the charismatic, classy, charming, cool president. A man of character. The right person at the right time…a fact realized by a lot of celebrities.

479 Ledyard • Detroit MI 48201

edunomics: Read Less,

WHAT’S INSIDE sampson appointed (A-8) Mariners Inn recently announced the promotion of David Sampson to the position of chief executive officer. He has been with Mariners Inn since 2002 and held several positions.

Pay More

mubarak played religion card (A-2) Ousted Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak portrayed himself as a paradigm of stability in a country he once described as a “powder keg” of sectarian unrest. Yet far from promoting stability, his regime may have actually been the source of much of the religious strife.

Home repair Program (B-1): Rebuilding Together Detroit (RTD) is seeking applications from low-income homeowners in Southwest Detroit who are in need of minor home repair assistance.

Academic excellence honored (c-1): The Final Five Elite High School Football Players were recently lauded for their Athletic and Scholastic Excellence at the 20th Annual Franklin D. Watkins Awards held at the Omni Hotel in Los Angeles.

new tax credits (c-6): A new 25 percent state Small Business Investment Tax Credit, designed to encourage investments in start-up and early-stage Michigan technology companies, is aiming to help Michigan entrepreneurs secure capital and reduce risks associated with a new business or novel technology.

The motortown Revue (d-1): The Motortown Revue, the legendary shows that toured the nation by bus for almost the entirety of the ’60s, is recalled by someone who never missed a revue and, like so many other Motown fans, cherishes the memory.

Bankole Thompson CHRONICLE SENIOR EDITOR

The current state of the Detroit Public Schools is a mockery of Brown v Board of Education and it exposes the deep inequities in education. Just because your child is not enrolled in the Detroit Public Schools does not mean you shouldn’t be concerned about the fate of the district before it heads toward implosion.

COMMENTARY

like Detroit where a national reading report card places the city at number 56 out of the 75 largest metropolitan cities in the U.S. surveyed. That means literacy is shamefully low in the city and we are doing little or nothing to change the deplorable situation. The latest study conducted by Central Connecticut State University, according to Data Driven Detroit, ranks the “culture and resources for reading” and it examines not wheth-

Your ability to get the Bankole Thompson best education for your child should not be based on geography, income or ethnicity but, rather, on the simple principle that every child regardless of their background should have an empowering education that equips them for a brighter future. Each child should have access to a meaningful education that would not leave them trailing behind in the dust children in Japan, India, China and other countries move ahead.

But that is not the case in places

er people can read, but whether they actually do read.

313.963.5522

$1.00

Coming Soon White House XChange

Our readers take center stage on national issues Following his series of sit-down interviews with President Obama, and his successful 2010 interview-based book “Obama and Black Loyalty Vol. 1,” editor Bankole Thompson is upping the ante with the start of a new special report “White House XChange” March 30. The report will deal with issues tied to Detroit and Michigan that the Obama administration is tackling. It will introduce readers to issues raised in White House media conference calls. The report will invite our readers to weigh in on the debate about what the Obama administration is doing by having their opinions and views reflected in the report.

Detroit’s 56th place in the 2010 study is the same spot it occupied in a similar report in 2005. The highest rank the city got was 50th in 2007. Washington, D.C., was rated the most well-read city in the nation and following that were Seattle, Minneapolis, Atlanta, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, St. Paul, Denver, Portland, St. Louis, Cincinnati and Boston.

Check if Renewal – Renewal Acct. #____________

Its is also noteworthy that these cities are among the most admired places in the nation and they have, in fact, become meccas for those seeking greener pastures. When young people are making the exodus from the state, more than likely they are moving to one of the cities mentioned in this report. These cities are not only a paragon of a reading culture, they also offer other incentives that we are not offering in this city. There is no possible way we can bank on attracting young families to the city if basic amenities like recreational centers are not available on a full scale. When the educational system does not have the public confidence

See edunomics page A-4

Jim Murray

Accelerating the speed of business growth AT&T commits $19 billion to support area business growth By C.L. Price Area businesses sloshing through Michigan’s sluggish economic recovery will soon receive much-needed infrastructure support, thanks to global communications leader AT&T’s network improvement plans announced last week. The improvements — to expand backhaul, enable 4G speeds, increase mobile broadband capacity and upgrade hundreds of cell sites — are predicted to accelerate the pace of area business growth. Why invest now?

Gov. Snyder keynotes Pancakes & Politics Gov. Rick Snyder kicked off the Michigan Chronicle’s Pancakes & Politics season at the Detroit Athletic Club on March 3 with a candid conversation built around reinventing Michigan. At left, Snyder chats with Curtis Ivery, Wayne County Community College Chancellor, Betty Brooks, community leader, and Shaun Wilson, Vice President, Director of Client and Community Relations, PNC Bank, and Ric DeVore, Regional President, PNC Bank. See page C-7 for photo highlights.

“We feel very confident about Detroit’s economic recovery,” stated Jim Murray, president of AT&T Michigan. “As a consequence, we’re committed to making sizeable investments in this

See AT&T page A-4

WCCCD is largest urban community college, with record enrollment numbers Daylight Saving BEGINS on

3UNDAY -ARCH¬¬¬

Set your clocks &/27!2$ one hour

www.michronicle.com

Curtis Ivery

Wayne County Community College District (WCCCD) is the largest urban community college in Michigan, with record enrollment numbers for the spring 2011 semester. Nearly 32,000 students registered for credit classes at all five of the District locations and online. Additionally, the District expects more than 40,000 non-credit students to register as well for a total of nearly 72,000 served in all programs. WCCCD, the multi-campus district serving 32 communities in Southeast Michigan, has seen exponential growth as degree and certificate programs have been expanded, infrastructure improved, and

investments in students, services and technologies increased. “In this economy, post secondary education and training is the ticket to competing in today’s changing workforce. Access to higher education-especially community colleges--is critical,” said Dr. Curtis Ivery, chancellor. “WCCCD is an integral economic and social catalyst to the health and welfare of this region and state.” A recent economic impact study reported that WCCCD’s students generate more than $122 million in taxable income annually to the region and state. Every dollar that is invested in WCCCD returns

$22.80 in benefits to all Michigan residents. Having been recognized as one of the fastest growing community colleges in the nation and the largest urban community college in Michigan, WCCCD was forced to cap enrollment during the spring 2010 semester. This year, under the direction of Dr. Ivery, WCCCD lifted the enrollment cap to make certain that no student was turned away in spite of WCCCD’s funding challenges. WCCCD gives students the opportunity to train in emerging technology and high demand fields, allowing them to become competent professionals helping to position the

state for vibrant growth and a strong economic future. Community colleges across the nation face difficult decisions in a climate of limited resources. The commitment of WCCCD in assuring that the doors to educational opportunities remain open is a direct result of the determination of faculty, staff and administrators. “Our students and all those we serve need us to work as hard as we can for them. If we can’t be the difference between success and a future of limited options, we are not living up to the mission and vision of this institution,” said Dr. Ivery.

FLASHBACK When this picture was taken in the early ’70s, the Jackson 5 were setting the music world on fire and had become a phenomenon. The group’s hits up to that point included “I’ll Be There,” “ABC,” “The Love You Save,” “I Found That Girl,” “I Want You Back” and “Who’s Loving You.” Michael gets a lift from brothers Marlon (left), Tito, Jackie and Jermaine. Interestingly, the Jackson 5 were the the last act to emerge from the “Motown factory” in Detroit.

Reflections icon” is. She said Diana Ross, explain­ ing, “Everything she did was so flam­ boyant, yet so simple. It just accentu­ ated who she was.” (But Ross was never one for daring cleavage.) That was in extremely poor taste for Martha Reeves to say publicly that often Whitney Houston’s singing was “forced,” and that she could hit those incredible notes only because she was high. No such thing could ever be proven. True, in the later days drugs badly damaged her voice, but prior to that her singing was amazing, and pure. If you want to hear an extraordinary blues instrumental, check out “Purple” by Shuggie Otis, featured on his “Free­ dom Flight” album. You can hear it on YouTube. I think it is the best blues instrumental of all time. The real deal. BETCHA DIDN’T KNOW…that Jesse Jackson’s brother, Chuck (not be confused with Chuck Jackson of “Any Day Now” fame), was a member of the Independents, a group that had several hits in the ’70s, the biggest of which

From page D-1 was “Leaving Me.” MEMORIES: “Show and Tell” (Al Wilson), “I Want Your Love” (Chic), “Rub You the Right Way” (Johnny Gill), “Caravan of Love” (Isley, Jasper, Isley), “Ecstasy” (the Ohio Players), “Optimis­ tic” (Sounds of Blackness), “Court of Love” (the Unifics), “Get on the Good Foot” (James Brown), “The Phone’s Been Jumping All Day” (Jeannie Rey­ nolds), “Dream Merchant” (New Birth). BLESSINGS to Clarence Rome (Foody), Robin Terry, Linda Burgess, Sandra Woodall, Jay Butler, Georgette Jones, Eddie Allen, Donald Phillips, Millie Scott and Kelvyn Ventour. WORDS OF THE WEEK, from Mitch Ryder: “Try for perfection, but when mistakes occur, work through them and try to do better next time. But no matter what happens, keep going.”

Let the music play!

(Steve Holsey can be reached at Svh517@aol.com and PO Box 02843, Detroit, MI 48202.)

NOW PLAYING

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes – Text LORAX with your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)! No charge from 43KIX, std. rates may apply. Text HELP for info.


obituaries

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

Azalean Cook

Obituaries Almeda White

Services were held for Azalean Cook Feb. 25 at Swanson Funeral Home, with Rev. Kenneth Brock officiating. Mrs. Cook, 75, died Feb. 19.

Services were held for Almeda White Feb. 25 at Swanson Funeral Home, with Pastor Thomas Page officiating. Mrs. White, 64, died Feb. 18.

She was born July 4, 1936 in Verdinbough, Ala., and educated in Clarke County, Ala. She moved to Detroit in 1969.

She was born Oct. 19, 1947 in Eloise, Mich., and attended Eastern High School.

She enjoyed sewing, fishing, traveling with her family and decorating her house and yard. Her yard and garden were the talk of the neighborhood. She is survived by her children, Howard Dickinson, Jr. and Linda Gail Dickinson; Larry, Betty, Earnest, Mary, Collie, Jr.,

Bobby and Barbara Cook; 25 grandchildren; 47 great-grandchildren; and many others. Interment was at Gethsemane Cemetery.

Lelia Brown

Services were held for Lelia Brown Feb. 15 at Williams Chapel Life Church, with Rev. James C. Jones officiating. Mrs. Brown, 97, died Feb. 27.

dolyn Wilkins and Marvella Knox; and many others. Arrangements were handled by Swanson Funeral Home. Interment was at Trinity Cemetery.

Betty Thomas Pastor Betty Thomas, who died recently, was born the second of 12 children and educated in the Detroit Public Schools. In 1947, she married the love of her life, the late Bishop Morris Thomas, Sr. Rev. Thomas, known as “Pastor Betty,” was a trailblazer. She began her working career as a telephone operator in the Paradise Valley district at the historical Gotham Hotel. In 1952 she was employed by Michigan Bell as an information operator and was promoted to the position of service observer (a representative who traveled to various companies in the Southeast Michigan area to train clients and switchboard operators). In addition, she was one of the first Black women to drive a company car. Because of her proficiency in this capacity at Michigan Bell, she was asked to join the Burroughs Corporation to become an operator in their telephone room. Shortly thereafter, she was promoted to head receptionist of Burroughs worldwide headquarters. She retired at age 51. After her retirement, she acquired her GED and enrolled in Highland Park Community College becoming a LPN, fulfilling her lifelong dream of becoming a nurse. She worked at Detroit Osteopathic Hospital until it closed and was blessed with the opportunity to help care for her husband when he was hospitalized. She had many hobbies, including swimming, sewing, reading, roller skating and ice skating, doing crossword puzzles, shopping, listening to the Gaithers and socializing with her many friends. She joined St. Luke AME Church in Highland Park in 1953. She was active on the Usher Board and sang in the gospel choir. Eventually, she and her husband

were called into the ministry. In 1958, after completing seminary, Morris Thomas began pastoring other AME churches. His wife assisted him as he carried out his pastoral duties. She taught Sunday school, performed secretarial duties and played the piano, all while caring for their four children. In October 1966 they founded Faith Tabernacle Church. Mrs. Thomas knew that God had a call on her life. Although it was shunned by many and unpopular for women to be accepted into the ministry, Bishop recognized “the call” on Betty’s life; she honored the call humbly and with pride knowing that she had the full support of her pastor/ husband and the congregation. In 1968, she was ordained, licensed and appointed co-pastor of Faith Tabernacle Church under the leadership of her husband. Their ministry had a special anointing. Together they were used mightily in the areas of healing, deliverance and prophesy. During the Bishop’s illness and after his death, Pastor Betty was called and ordained by God to assume the leadership of Faith Tabernacle Church. On August 19, 1990, she was officially installed as pastor of Faith Tabernacle Church. Along with feeding the flock, she loved one-onone counseling. Pastor Betty traveled throughout the United States and various parts of Africa. She shared the Word of God with congregations and taught in conference and seminar settings. In February of 2001, Pastor Betty Thomas passed the leadership of Faith Tabernacle Church over to her son, V. Ricardo Thomas, Sr. She remained diligent in the ministry. Pastor Thomas is survived by her children, Morris Jr., Victor Ricardo, Anthony Paul and Lisa Michele.

Albert Dorty Services were held for Albert Dorty Feb. 23 at Swanson Funeral Home. Mr. Dorty, 75, died Feb. 16. He was born Aug. 11, 1936 in Jefferson, Tex., and educated in Lansing. After high school, he enlisted in the Army. He established a career for more than three years where he traveled to sev-

After a stint in the U.S. Air Force, he was employed at Chrysler Corp. grandchildren, three great-grandchildren, several siblings and many others.

Eddie McGowan

Services were held for Eddie McGowan Feb 18 at Swanson Funeral Home. Mr. McGowan, 74, died Feb. 10.

eral states. He was a talented card player and loved playing basketball. He also enjoyed reading and talking about his young adult years. He is survived by his brothers Robert and Raymond; several nieces and nephews, and many others.

He enjoyed baseball, football, basketball, classical antiquity and world history. He is survived by wife, Shirley; sons, Eddie, Jr. and Stephon Boggs; daughter, Sina Boggs;

Mr. Rhodes began his career as an educator teaching school in the Laurel, Mississippi Public school system where he later became a principal. He was later a principal at Jones County Training School in Summerland, Mississippi. In 1943, the couple moved to Detroit. Mr. Rhodes found racism in Detroit, too; so he entered the job market by passing as White. He was quickly promoted to management positions. He also enrolled at Wayne State University, where he graduated with a Master’s degree in Education Administration. He subsequently began teaching in the Detroit Public Schools System. He joined Second Baptist Church on February 22, 1948 and was an active member— including a 10year stint as chairman of the Deacon Board— until his death. Mr. Rhodes was an active man, who exer-

five grandchildren; sisters, Beatrice Williams, Vivian McGowan, Maxine McGraw, Irene Arrington, Ann McGowan and Silvia McGowan; brothers, Robert and Benny McGowan; and many others.

Interment was at Great Lakes National Cemetery.

Mr. Bentley, known as “Skip”, was born Dec. 20, 1949 and educated in the Detroit Public Schools System. He married Janice F. Bentley, and the couple had three children. Mr. Bentley was employed at General Motors. He lived life to the fullest. He spent his days with his friends and caring for his grandchildren. He was also an avid chess player. He is survived by his wife, Janice; children, Adrian Bentley, Henrietta Shaw and Tia Christian;

grandchildren, Makyael, Kaelann, D’Shayne, Daemoni, Cameron, Damone, Jr., Dakota, Eric, Breanna, and Aiden; brothers, Randolph, Elliott, Ellis, and Michael Bentley; and many others. Interment was at Meadowcrest Crematory.

Lewis Lyle Redmond The Rev. Lewis Lyle Redmond, M.Div., went home to the Lord on Dec. 17, 2011. He succumbed surrounded by his loving family in Chula Vista, California. He was 90 years old. cised three or four times a week until he was 100. He also modeled for a Detroit Medical Center an advertising campaign at the age of 90. He continuously read periodicals, watched all sports, and too was a political activist who enjoyed frequent outings with his daughter. He was also active in numerous organizations, including life member (several times) of the NAACP, and past president and member of the Detroit Chapter of Alcorn State University. He was bestowed several honors: Jackson State Alumni Club member, 1974, Alcornite of the Year, 1974, Outstanding Service award, Barbour Middle School, 1978, Service Award and Founding Chapter member for Alcorn State University, Personalities of the South Award, 1975-1976, The Yeoman’s Service Award, 1977, Second Baptist Church Leadership award, 1985, and the Alumni Legend award 2011. Mr. Rhodes is survived by his daughter, Sheila Anita Rhodes; great-niece, Deloris Cleaves-Beckley, great-nephew: Calvin D. Cleaves II, Charles Beckley and Sylvester Cleaves.

Curtis Howell

Services were held for Curtis Howell Feb. 28 at Swanson Funeral Home. Mr. Howell, 66, died Feb. 22. He was born Nov. 29, 1944 in Oxford, Miss., and educated in that community. Mr. Howell was employed at Ford Motor Company for 34 years. He is survived by his wife, Annie; children, Brenda Howell and Robbie Olds; granddaughter, Cierra Howell; great- grandsons, Jalen and Jamari Page; and many others.

He is survived by his daughters, Melinda and Kimberly; granddaughter,

Taneisha; great-grandsons, Emmanuel, Jr. and Emare’; brother, Tyrone; and many others.

Services were held for Henry Bentley, Jr. March 2 at Peace Chapel Funeral Home, with Rev. Damon Pierson, officiating. Mr. Bentley, 62, died Feb. 22.

Calvin Rhodes, 103, died Jan. 20.

He eloped with his late wife, Leonia, on January 25, 1933, and kept their marriage a secret for the next year. The two had met at a dinner dance on the campus of Alcorn University in 1928.

Mr. Jones was an active member of Original New Grace Missionary Baptist Church.

Henry Bentley, Jr.

Calvin Roosevelt Rhodes He was born April 15, 1908, in Edwards, Mississippi, and educated Alcorn prep school, and Alcorn Agricultural and Mechanical College, a historic Black University in Lorman, Mississippi that is now called Alcorn State University. In 1935 Calvin graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in science and mathematics. He also excelled in both basketball and tennis, and was inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame in 1980.

Charles Jones, Jr. He was born Sept. 18, 1955 and attended Henry Ford High School. He subsequently received his GED. At the time of his passing, he was a student at Wayne County Community College.

Mr. McGowan was employed at Ford Motor Company for more than 30 years. He retired in 2001.

She was a professional southern cook who owned Aunt Katie’s restaurant for many years.

She is survived by her daughter, Marie Welch Anderson; sisters, Gwen-

She is survived by her seven children, 18

Page D-3

Services were held for Charles Jones, Jr. Feb. 14 at Swanson Funeral Home. Mr. Jones, 56, died Feb. 4.

He was born May 7, 1937 in Birmingham, Ala., and educated in that community.

She was born May 12, 1914 in Whatley, Ala. and moved to Detroit in 1947.

Mrs. Brown was an active member of Williams Chapel Missionary Baptist Church, where she served on the Mother’s Board.

She regularly had family gatherings at her home. She loved to cook, and barbeque ribs, fried chicken, potato salad and dressing were her specialties.

March 7-13, 2012

Interment was at Gethsemane Cemetery.

Rev. Redmond was born in Curtisville, Michigan, on Sept. 20, 1921 to Wesley and Bessie Redmond. He grew up on a farm in Curtisville, learning to work hard and journey with Jesus. He surrendered his life to Jesus during an altar call at Curtisville Baptist Church at the age of 9 and faithfully served the Lord for the rest of his life. He served in the U.S. Army Air Force in the Pacific Theater during World War II. After the war he studied for the Methodist ministry, graduating from Albion College in 1950 and receiving his master of divinity degree from the Garrett Evangelical Theological Seminary of Northwestern University, in Evanston, Illinois in 1953. Mr. Redmond married Norma Waters on March 8, 1946 at Preston Methodist Episcopal Church in Detroit. Norma survives the marriage of 65 years. Also surviving are their seven children: James, Rose City, Mich.; Paul, Rocky Ripple, Ind.; Sidney Boyce, Big Stone Gap, Va.; John Thompson, Detroit; Diane (fiancé), Arlington, Va.; Marcia Sedgeman, St. Clair Shores, Mich.; Margaret Squires, Detroit; Joseph Barela, Flat Rock, Mich.; Richard, Chula Vista, Calif.; 15 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. His oldest son, Robert died in 1976. He is remembered as a man who always did his duty — to his country, to his family, but primarily to his Lord and Savior. He was a Christian ser-

vant who ministered to the poor, the fatherless, the weak, the disabled and the homeless in Detroit’s Cass Corridor for many years. He retired from the active ministry in 1981 and spent his retirement years with friends and family in Curtisville, Mich., Michigan Heights, Fla., and Chula Vista, Calif. One of Rev. Redmond’s favorite hymns was “Amazing Grace.” He thanked God for saving him by His grace and calling him to a road less traveled — one leading to the Cass Corridor. He thanked God for calling him to the straight and narrow way that leads to eternal life as a disciple of the living Lord. He felt his Master should lead him always. Lew knew that Jesus was our strength and our rest. He was not ashamed of the Gospel. He may have lost his mortal battle, but knew he had already been given the victory and was safe and secure in God’s hands. Lewis Lyle Redmond will always be remembered example of walking by faith, not by sight. He was convicted that Jesus is Lord, and like the Apostle Paul, he counted all else as loss that he might gain Christ. The memory of the Rev. Lewis L. Redmond burns brightly in many hearts and minds. Funeral were held on Dec. 23, 2011 at Glennie United Methodist Church. Interment was at Curtisville Cemetery. Memorial contributions suggested to Glennie United Methodist Church or Curtisville Baptist Church. Those wishing to express words of sympathy may do so at www.bureshfuneralhomes.com.

It is in God that we place our lives and loved ones. May He grant us the peace from day to day and mercy to share with His free gift of grace.


religious directory

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012 Page D-4

Directory of Religious Services To Be Listed Contact Linda Moragne, 963-5522, Ext. 242

AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL

BAPTIST

Allen Temple AME

9:30AM & 11AM

4101 Helen Street

(313) 922-7492

Rev. Darren K. Penson

Greater Mt. View Missionary Baptist

11AM

4211 Mt. Elliott

(313) 924-2500

Pastor Edward Smith

Baber Memorial AME

11AM

15045 Burt Rd.

(313) 255-9895

Rev. Larry L. Simmons

Greater Mt. Zion Baptist

10:45AM

15600 Evanston

(313) 839-9842

Pastor R. A. Hill

Bethel AME

10:30AM

5050 St. Antoine

(313) 831-8810

Rev. David R. Jarrett

Greater New Light Baptist

11AM

8641 Linwood

(313) 894-2390

Dr. David W. Roquemore

Bethel AME (Ann Arbor)

7:45AM & 10:45AM

900 John A Woods Dr.

(734) 663-3800

Rev. Joseph Cousin

Greater New Mt. Moriah Baptist

7:45AM & 10:30AM

586 Owen

(313) 871-8025

Rev. Kenneth J. Flowers

Brown Chapel AME (Ypsilanti)

8AM & 11AM

1043 W. Michigan Ave

(734) 482-7050

Pastor Jerry Hatter

Greater Olivet Missionary Baptist Church

10AM & 11:30AM

20201 Southfield

(313) 592-4114

Rev. Clifford L. Jackson, III

Community AME (Ecorse)

9:30AM &11AM

4010 17th Street

(313) 386-4340

Rev. Gilbert Morgan

Greater Shiloh Missionary Baptist

11AM

557 Benton St.

(313) 831-6466

Rev. Mark Gray

Ebenezer AME

7:30AM & 10:30AM

5151 W. Chicago

(313) 933-6943

Rev. Byron Moore

Greater Ship of Zion Missionary Baptist

11AM

8440 Joy Rd.

(313) 933-7367

Rev. McKinley Graddick, Jr.

Emmanuel Grace AME (formely Grace Chapel AME)

11AM

490 Conner Ave.

(313) 821-0181

Pastor Karen Jones Goodson

Greater St. John Baptist

10:45AM

7433 Northfield

(313) 895-7555

Pastor William Mebane II

Greater Quinn AME

11AM

13501 Rosa Parks Blvd.

(313) 867-8380

Rev. Daniel J. Reid

Greater Tree of Life Missionary Baptist

11AM

1761 Sheridan

(313) 925-1450

Rev. Latham Donald Sr.

Gregg Memorial AME

9AM

10120 Plymouth Rd.

(313) 491-1704

Dr. Charles Fontaine Macon

Hartford Memorial Baptist

7:30AM & 11AM

18700 James Couzens

(313) 861-1285

Dr. Charles G. Adams

Mitcham Chapel AME (Royal Oak)

10:45AM

4207 W. 14 Mile Rd.

(248) 356-5292

Rev. Barbara J. Anthony

Historic St. James M.B.C.

10AM

19400 Evergreen

(313) 534-3000

Rev. Argustus C. Williams

Mt. Calvary AME

11AM

1800 E. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 892-0042

Rev. Ernest L. Evans

Holy Cross Missionary Baptist

8AM & 11AM

6220 Linwood Ave.

(313) 894-1350

Rev. Lorenzo Edwards, Sr.

New St. James AME

11AM

9321 Rosa Parks Blvd

(313) 867-2851

Rev. Minnie Autry

Holy Hope Heritage Church Baptist

8AM & 10:45 AM

18641 Wyoming

(313) 861-5005

Dr. William Revely, Jr

Newman AME (Pontiac)

11AM

233 Bagley St.

(248) 332-2800

Rev. Alfred E. Johnson

House of Mercy

10AM

5203 St. Aubin

(313) 923-6395

Rev. Robert W. Wright, Jr.

Oak Grove AME

8AM & 11AM

19801 Cherrylawn

(313) 341-8877

Rev. Dr. Robert Brumfield

Imani Missionary Baptist

11AM

13641 W. Eight Mile

(313) 341-9556

Rev. J.K. Jackson

Pleasant Valley AME (Belleville)

11AM

45620 Victoria Ave.

(313) 461-1303

Rev. Paul Mugala

Israel Baptist

10:45 AM

3748 E. Forest Ave.

(313) 922-2633

Rev. Edward L McCree Jr.

Ruth Chapel AME

11AM

5353 Baldwin

(313) 267-9002

Rev. Diane Chappelle

Jamison Temple Missionary Baptist

11 AM

12530 Mack Ave.

(313) 821-5958

Rev. Homer & Evang. Royal Jamison

Saunders Memorial AME

11AM

3542 Pennsylvania

(313) 921-8111

Rev. Dwayne A. Gary

Jude Missionary Baptist

11AM

9036 Van Dyke

(313) 925-9330

Rev. Sylvester F. Harris, Sr.

Smith Chapel AME (Inkster)

11AM

3505 Walnut

(313) 561-2837

Rev. Dr. Cecilia Green-Bar

Kadesh Missionary Baptist

8AM & 11AM

20361 Plymouth Rd.

(313) 534-5382

Rev. Dr. Gregory L. Foster, Sr.

St. Andrew AME

9:30AM & 11AM

12517 Linwood

(313) 868-3156

Rev. Kenneth Boyd

King David M.B.C. of Detroit

11AM

18001 Sunset

(313) 891-4160

Pastor Sterling H. Brewer

St. Luke AME

11AM

363 LaBelle

(313) 868-7707

Rev. Robert Addison Blake

Leland Missionary Baptist

8AM & 11AM

22420 Fenkell Ave.

(313) 538-7077

Rev. C.A. Poe, Ph.D

St. Luke AME (Roseville)

11AM

17805 Oakdale Street

(586) 445-8350

Rev. Betty Middlebrook

Liberty Temple Baptist Church

7:45AM & 10:45AM

17188 Greenfield

(313) 837-6331

Rev. Dr. Steve Bland, Jr.

St. John AME (River Rouge)

10:45 AM

505 Beechwood

(313) 386-2288

Rev. Gerald D. Cardwell

Macedonia Missionary Baptist (Pontiac)

7:30 AM & 10AM

512 Pearsall St.

(248) 335-2298

Rev. Terrance J. Gowdy

St. Matthew AME

11 AM

9746 Petoskey

(313) 894-3633

Rev. Gloria Clark

Mark’s Tabernacle Missionary Baptist

11AM

15757 Wyoming

(313) 863-8090

Pastor J. Leonard Jones

St. Paul AME (Detroit)

10 AM

2260 Hunt St.

(313) 567-9643

Rev. Andre L. Spivey

Martin Evans Baptist Church

11:15AM

11025 Gratiot

(313) 526-0328

Rev. Thermon Bradfield, Pastor

St. Paul AME (Southwest)

9:30AM & 11AM

579 S. Rademacher

(313) 843-8090

Rev. Jeffrey Baker

Messiah Baptist

10:45AM

8100 W. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 864-3337

Pastor Orville K. Littlejohn

St. Peter AME

10:45AM

948 Watling Blvd.

Rev. Kim Howard

Metropolitan Baptist

10:45AM

13110 14th Street

(313) 869-6676

Rev. Dr. Charles Clark, Jr.

St Stephen AME

10AM

6000 John E. Hunter Drive

(313) 895-4800

Dr. Michael A. Cousin

Mt. Calvary Missionary Baptist

11AM

4741-43 Iroquois

(313) 924-6090

Trinty AME

10:45AM

6516 16TH St.

(313) 897-4320

Rev. Dr. Alice Patterson

Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist

11AM

7432 Oakland Ave.

(313) 872-4630

Vernon Chapel AME

11AM

18500 Norwood St.

(313) 893-5275

Rev. Larry James Bell

Mt. Nebo Missionary Baptist

10:45AM

8944 Mack Ave

(313) 571-0041

Pastor Henry Crenshaw

Vinson Chapel AME (Clinton Twp.)

11AM

22435 Quinn Rd

(586) 792-2130

Rev. Arnita Traylor

Mt. Olive Baptist

10:45AM

9760 Woodward Ave.

(313) 871-5854

Rev. Harold H. Cadwell, Jr.

Visitor’s Chapel AME

10:45AM

4519 Magnolia Street

(313) 898-2510

Rev. Anita McCants

Mt. Pleasant Missionary Baptist

8AM & 10AM

21150 Moross Rd.

(313) 884-6648

Pastor James Minnick

Mt. Valley Missionary Baptist

9:30AM & 11AM

14718 Fenkell

(313) 272-0428

Dr. E. C. Garrison

Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist (Ecorse)

7:30AM & 10:50AM

3936 12th St.

(313) 383-1069

Rev. Damon Pierson

Nazarene Missionary Baptist Church

11AM

901 Melbourne

(313) 871-6509

Rev. Oscar A. E. Hayes

(313) 894-5788

Rev. Robert Smith Jr.

AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION

Rev. Marvin Youmans

Clinton Chapel AME Zion

11AM

3401 23rd Street

(313) 897-5866

Pastor Ronald L. Bailey

New Bethel Baptist

7:30AM & 10:45AM

8430 C. L. Franklin Blvd.

Greater St. Peters AME Zion

11AM

4400 Mt. Elliott

(313) 923-3161

Rev. Anthony Johnson

New Bethlehem Baptist

9:15AM & 10:45AM

19018 Hawthorne

(313) 366-1872

Lomax Temple AME Zion

8AM & 11AM

17441 Dequindre

(313) 893-1463

Rev. Brian Relford

New Bethlehem Missionary Baptist

11AM

3061 Ewald Circle

(313) 931-0559

Metropolitan AME Zion

11AM

17816 Woodward

(313) 869-5150

Rev. George A. Stewart

New Birth Baptist Church

8AM & 11AM

27628 Avondale

(313) 563-1705

Rev. Joseph A. Stephens

St. Paul AME Zion

10:30AM

11359 Dexter

(313) 933-1822

Rev. Eleazar Merriweather

New Calvary Baptist

10:30AM

3975 Concord St.

(313) 923-1600

Dr. Michael C.R. Nabors

St. Peter AME Zion

11AM

3056 Yemans

(313) 875-3877

Rev. Michael Nelson

New Faith Baptist Church

11:15AM

19961McIntyre

(313) 533-0679

Rev. McKinley A. Williams

John Wesley AME Zion (Southfield)

7:30AM & 10:45AM

28001 Evergreen

(248) 358-9307

Rev. Al Hamilton

New Greater Christ Baptist

11AM

13031 Charlevoix

(313) 331-2386

Rev. Dr. William O. Thompson

New Greater Oregon St. John

10.40AM

8010 Manor

(313) 931-1850

Rev. Robert L. Sykes

New Heritage Baptist

10:45AM

11226 E. Jefferson Ave.

(313) 837-4912

Rev. Jobe C. Hughley

New Jerusalem Temple Baptist

11AM

17330 Fenkell

(313) 836-8970

Rev. Lawrence J. London

New Liberty Baptist Church

8AM & 11AM

2965 Meldrum

(313) 921-0118

Rev. Dr. Maurice Strimage, Jr., Pastor Rev. Billy J. Hales

APOSTOLIC

Rev. Arthur L. Turner

Abundant Life A.O.H. Church of God

11:30AM

437 S. Livernois

(313) 843-4339

Rev. Charles A. Bailey

New Life Community Church (Romulus)

11AM

35761 Van Born Rd

(734) 968-0105

Aimwell Apostolic Church

11:30AM

5632 Montclair

(313) 922-3591

Elder H. Seals

New Life MBC of Detroit

11AM

8300 Van Dyke

(313) 923-3111

Pastor Edison Ester, Jr.

Apostolic Church of God In Christ

11:15AM

5296 Tireman

(313) 894-2522

Rev. Gilbert Allen

New Light Baptist

10:45 AM

5240 W. Chicago

(313) 931-1111

Rev. Frederick L. Brown, Sr., Pastor

Apostolic Faith Temple

11AM

4735 W. Fort Street

(313) 843-3660

Bishop Lambert Gates

New Mt. Moriah Missionary Baptist

11AM

13100 Woodward Ave.

(313) 869-0190

Rev. Dr. Jerome Kirby

Apostolic Temple

11:45AM

5201 French Rd.

(313) 826-6487

Bishop Derrick C. McKinney

New Mt. Pleasant Baptist

11AM

2127 East Canfield

(313) 831-4669

Rev. Willie Smith

Bethel Christian Ministries (Oak Park)

12:30PM

13500 Oak Park Blvd.

(248) 424-5584

Bishop Donald E. Burwell

New Mt. Vernon Baptist

11AM

521 Meadowbrook

(313) 331-6146

Rev. Dr. Edward R. Knox

Bethel Church of the Apostolic Faith

11AM

3381 Mack Ave.

(313) 579-2765

Elder John M. Lucas

New Mt. Zion Missionary Baptist

10:45 AM

2201 Elmhurst

(313) 868-7240

Rev. Jimmie T. Wafer

Bethlehem Temple

11AM

16238 Joy Road

(313) 273-5699

Elder Samuel Hemmingway

New Prospect Missionary Baptist

7:30AM & 11AM

6330 Pembroke

(313) 341-4883

Rev. Dr. Wilma R. Johnson

Bethlehem Temple Church of Detroit

12 Noon

5594 Pennsylvania St.

(313) 923-4860

Pastor Brenda Waller

New Providence Baptist

8AM & 11AM

18211 Plymouth

(313) 837-0818

Rev. Everett N. Jennings

Calvary Apostolic Ministries (Southfield)

11:30AM

18347 W. McNichols

(313) 541-8728

Elder William E. Watson II

New Resurrection Missionary Baptist

11AM

7718 W. McNichols

(313) 862-3466

Rev. Arthur Caldwell III

Christ Temple Apostolic Church (Westland)

11:15AM

29124 Eton St.

(734) 326-3833

District Elder Luke A. McClendon

New Salem Baptist

11AM

2222 Illinois St.

(313) 833-0640

Rev. Kevin H. Johnson, Pastor

Christ Temple Apostolic Faith Inc.

11:30AM

3907 30th Street

(313) 897-6132

Bishop James Garrett

New St. Mark Baptist

7:30AM & 10AM

24331 W. 8 Mile Rd.

(313) 541-3846

Rev. Larry Smith

Christ Temple, City of Refuge (Inkster)

12 Noon

27741 Carlysle

(313) 278-8282

Elder L. C. Barnes, Jr.

New St. Paul Baptist

10:45AM

2101 Lakewood

(313) 824-2060

Rev. Tolan J. Morgan

Clinton Street Greater Bethlehem Temple

12 Noon

2900 W. Chicago Blvd.

(313) 361-1110

Bishop Shedrick L. Clark, Sr.

New St. Peter’s Missionary Baptist

11AM

1600 Pingree

(313) 871-6969

Rev. Walter K. Cheeks

Corinthian Apostolic Faith

11AM

19638 Plymouth Rd.

(313) 836-0380

Elder Benjamin S. Hoke, Sr.

Northwest Unity Missionary

11AM

8345 Ellsworth

(313) 863-8820

Rev. Dr. Oscar W. King III

Deliverance Temple of Faith Ministries

11AM

9600 Woodlawn

(313) 923-3545

Elder Gary R. Gay, Sr.

Oasis of Hope

10AM

933 W. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 891-2645

Pastor Claude Allen May

Faith Reconciliation Tabernacle Center Inc.

11AM

16599 Meyers

(313) 345-3849

Pastor Ray Johnson

Overcomers Evangel Missionary Baptist

11AM

20045 James Couzens Hwy. (313) 861-9144

Rev. C. Kenneth Dexter

Family Worship Center (Ecorse)

9:30AM & 11AM

4411 Fifth Street

(313) 381-9860

Pastor Tommy L. Lyons

Peace Missionary Baptist

10:30AM

13450 Goddard

(313) 368-2304

Rev. David L. Jefferson, Sr.

First United Church of Jesus Christ

11:30AM

8061 Joy Rd.

(313) 834-8811

Bishop Cleven L. Jones, Sr.

Pilgrim Star Missionary Baptist Church

12 Noon

5619 14th Street

(313) 361-2542

Pastor Billy Hall

Grace Christian Church

11AM & 7PM

16001 W. 7 Mile Rd.

(313) 272-6111

Elder Billy Owens

Pine Grove Baptist

10:45AM

1833 S. Electric

(313) 381-7882

Rev. Debirley Porter

Greater Christ Temple (Ferndale)

11:30AM

210 Hilton Rd.

(248) 414-3700

Presiding Bishop Carl E. Holland

Pleasant Grove MBC

8AM & 10:45AM

13651 Dequindre

(313) 868-8144

Pastor Louis Forsythe II

Greater Grace Temple

7:30AM & 11AM

23500 W. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 543-6000

Bishop Charles Haywood Ellis III

Greater Grace Temple O.G.H.M. (Taylor)

11AM

24111 Koths

(313) 295-4472

Suff. Bishop Gary Harper

Renaissance Baptist 10:30AM 1045 East Grand Blvd. (313) 922-7287

Rev. Edwin H. Holmes, Pastor Rev. Dale Weathers, Assoc. Pastor

Greater Second Ebenezer Apostolic Faith

11:45 AM

14118 Rosa Parks Blvd.

(313) 869-7783

Pastor O.B. Mahone, Jr.

Rosedale Park Baptist

10AM

14179 Evergreen

(313) 538-1180

Rev. Haman Cross, Jr.

Holy Temple

11:30 AM

8590 Esper Blvd

(313) 416-2166

Pastor Pamela Dixon

Russell Street Baptist

11AM

8700 Chrysler Fwy. Dr.

(313) 875-1615

Rev. Dee M. Coleman

Immanuel House of Prayer

11AM

147 E. Grand Blvd.

(313) 567-1871

Bishop Thomas L. Johnson, Sr.

Samaritan Missionary Baptist

10AM

8806 Mack Ave.

(313) 571-9797

Rev. Robert E. Starghill, Sr.

Independent Apostolic Assembly

10:30AM & 6:30PM

16111 W. Eight Mile

(313) 838-0456

Bishop Charles C. McRae III

Second Baptist Church of Detroit

8AM & 10:30AM

441 Monroe Street

(313) 961-0920

Rev. Kevin M. Turman

Jesus Christ Apostolic

11:30AM

13341 Gratiot

(313) 371-8611

Pastor M. L. Jennings

Shady Grove Baptist

11 AM

2741 McDougall

(313) 923-1393

Pastor Roger Carson, Jr.

Mt. Sinai House of Prayer

11:30AM & 7PM

6462 Van Dyke

(313) 925-7050

Bishop Samuel Moore

Smyrna Missionary Baptist Church

11:30AM

12728 Grand River

(313) 491-3190

Dr. Charles E. Marshall Sr.

New Greater Bethlehem Temple Community

11:30AM

3763 16th Street

(313) 386-3055

Elder Anthony V. Price

Springhill Missionary Baptist

7:45AM & 11AM

21900 Middlebelt Rd.

(248) 306-5450

Rev. Ronald Garfield Arthur

New Liberty Apostolic Faith

11:30AM

8425 Fenkell Ave.

(313) 342-2423

Bishop G.M. Boone D.D.

St. Bartholomew - St Rita

Sat. 4PM | Sun. 9AM &11AM

2291 E. Outer Drive

(313) 892-1446

Rev. Ronald A. Borg

New Life Assembly (Southfield)

12:30PM

27800 Southfield Rd.

(248) 851-3189

Elder Ronald B. Dalton

St. James Missionary Baptist

10AM

9912 Kercheval

(313) 822-9322

Pastor Karl Reid

New Mt. Olives Apostolic Faith

11:30AM

2676 Hendrie

(313) 337-2027

Dr. Jeffrey I. Harris

St. Matthew Missionary Baptist

8AM & 11AM

13500 Wyoming

(313) 933-3722

Rev. David L. Lewis

Pentecostal Church of Jesus Christ (Eastpointe)

11:15AM

16226 E. Nine Mile

(586) 772-2336

Pastor Keith L. Spiller, Sr.

St Missionary Baptist Church

10AM

9212 Kercheval

(313) 372-5426

Rev David L. Brown

Pentecostal Temple

11:30AM

750 Alter Rd.

(313) 824-8437

Bishop Dr. Charles M. Laster

St. Phillip’s Baptist MBC

9:30AM & 11:30AM

7307 Livernois

(313) 894-8123

Rev. Alvin D. Hodges, Sr.

Solomon’s Cathedral C.O.O.L.J. of the Apostolic Faith Inc.

11AM

19538 Schoolcraft

(313) 273-2992

Bishop Anthony David Crawford

Tabernacle Missionary Baptist

8AM & 11AM

2080 W. Grand Blvd.

(313) 898-3325

Rev Nathan Johnson

St. Paul Apostolic Temple

11AM

17400 Manderson

(313) 861-2784

Bishop Benjamin S. Hoke

Temple of Faith Baptist

10:45AM

14834 Coram Ave.

(313) 526-1400

Rev. Alan J. Jones

True Light Temple

11AM

8730 Harper

(313) 922-4500

Elder Michael Mitchell

Tennessee Missianary Baptist

11AM

2100 Fischer

(313) 823-4850

Rev. Milbrun L. Pearson, II

True Worship Church

11AM

803 Cottrell

(313) 834-1697

Pastor Lovell Cannon Jr.

Thankful Missionary Baptist Church

11AM

2449 Carpenter St.

(313) 365-5519

Rev. Charles Hubbert

Unity Temple of the Apostolic Faith

11AM

17376 Wyoming Ave.

(313) 862-3700

Pastor Steven Staten

The Calvary Baptist Church

7:45AM & 10:45AM

1000 Robert Bradby Drive

(313) 567-4575

Rev. Lawrence T. Foster

Word of Life Temple of Jesus Christ

11AM

19391 Conant

(313) 368-8630

Bishop Carl Noble, Sr., Pastor

Third Baptist Church

11AM

582 East Ferry

(313) 874-4133

Rev. Fred L. Gilbert

Zion Hill Church (Berkley)

12:15AM

3688 Twelve Mile Rd.

(248) 548-9466

Pastor Clarence Hawkins III

Third New Hope Baptist Church

8AM/10AM & 12Noon

12850 Plymouth Rd.

(313) 491-7890

E. L. Branch, Senior Pastor

Triumph Missionary Baptist Church

8AM/9:30AM/11AM

2550 S. Liddesdale

(313) 386-8044

Rev. Solomon Kinloch, Jr.

True Light Missionary Baptist

11AM

2504 Beniteau

(313) 822-3170

Rev. Alton M. Reid

True Love Missionary Baptist Church

7AM & 11:15AM

8200 Tireman

(313) 931-1177

Rev. Herbert B. Robinson, Jr.

Twelfth Street Missionary Baptist

10:45AM

1840 Midland

(313) 868-2659

Rev. Floyd A. Davis

Rev. Dr. Curtis C. Williams

Union Baptist

11:30AM

1754 E. Grand Blvd.

(313) 922-2557

Rev. Patrick L. Franklin

BAPTIST Aijalon Baptist

10:45AM

6419 Beechwood

(313) 895-7283

Bethany Baptist Church

11AM

15122 W. Chicago Blvd.

(313) 836-7667

Rev. Dr. Samuel H. Bullock, Jr.

Union Grace Missionary Baptist

10:30AM

2550 W. Grand Blvd.

(313) 894-2500

Rev. Reginald E. Smith

Bethel Baptist Church East

7:30AM & 10:45AM

5715-33 Holcomb

(313) 923-3060

Dr. Michael Andrew Owens

Union Second Baptist (River Rouge)

10:45AM

459 Beechwood St.

(313) 383-5559

Rev. Kenneth L. Brown

Bethesda Missionary

10:15AM

8801 David St.

(313) 571-0095

Pastor Edward Holly

United Missionary Baptist (Pontiac)

11AM

471 S. Boulevard

(248) 332-8917

Pastor Wardell Milton

Beulah Missionary Baptist (Westland)

10AM

5651 Middlebelt

(734) 595-6146

Rev. Kenneth C. Pierce

United Prayer Temple Baptist Church

11AM

15003 Fairfield

(313) 342-4011

Rev. Anthony L. Caudle, Sr.

Central Institutional M.B.C

10:45AM

15170 Archdale

(313) 836-2933

Rev. Dr. Clayton Smith

Victory Fellowship Baptist Church

10:15AM

17401 East Warren Ave.

(313) 886-3541

Rev. Darryl S. Gaddy Sr.

Chapel Hill Baptist

7:45AM & 10:45AM

5000 Joy Road

(313) 931-6805

Rev. Dr. R. LaMont Smith II

Warren Ave. Missionary Baptist

7:30AM & 10:30AM

1042-44 East Warren Ave.

(313) 831-5990

Rev. Bernard Smith

Christ Cathedral Baptist

11AM

6115 Hartford

(313) 895-1999

Rev. George R. Williams, Jr.

Williams Chapel Missionary Baptist

10:45AM

3100 Elmwood

(313) 579-0875

Rev. James C. Jones

Christ Reformed Baptist

11 AM

13576 Lesure

(313) 836-8507

Rev. Willie Williams

Wings of Love Baptist

10:45AM

17133 John R.

(313) 867-7411

Rev. Alvin E. Jackson

Christian Chapel Community Baptist

11:30AM

22930 Chippewa

(248) 624-7675

Rev. George B. Glass, Jr.

Zion Hope Missionary Baptist

7:30AM & 10:45AM

4800 Van Dyke

(313) 921-3967

Rev. Curtis R. Grant Jr.

Christ’s Mission Missionary Baptist

10:45AM

3712 Preston

(313) 579-9590

Rev. Howard R. Ramsey

Zion Hill Baptist Church

11AM

12017 Dickerson

Christland Missionary Baptist

10:45AM

12833 Puritan

(313) 341-0366

Rev. Allen O. Langford

Zion Progress Baptist

11:00 AM

Church of God Baptist

11 AM

12000 Grand River

(313) 834-1265

Rev. Clifford D. Burrell, M. DIV.

Church of the New Covenant Baptist

10:45AM

3426 Puritan Ave.

(313) 864-6480

Rev. Brian Martin Ellison

Church of Our Faith

10:45AM

2561 Beniteau

(313) 821-3627

Rev. William Anderson

Church of Our Father MBC

8AM & 10:45AM

5333 E. 7 Mile

(313) 891-7626

Rev. Bernard Byles

Christ the King

10AM

20800 Grand River

(313) 532-1211

Rev. Victor Clore

Conventional Missionary Baptist

11AM

2255 Seminole

(313) 922-4010

Pastor Roderick L. Richardson

Church of the Madonna

9AM

1125 Oakman Blvd.

(313) 868-4308

Msgr. Michael Le Fevre

Corinthian BC (Hamtramck)

8AM & 10:45AM

1725 Caniff Street

(313) 868-7664

Rev. Dr. Joseph R. Jordan

Corpus Christi

9 AM

16000 Pembroke

(313) 272-0990

Rev. Donald Archambault

Cosmopolitan Baptist

10:30AM

17131 St. Aubin

(313) 893-6163

Pastor Senoise Clemons, Jr.

GESU Catholic Church

5PM Sat & 8 & 10:30AM Sun.

17180 Oak Drive

(313) 862-4400

Rev. R. Scullin, S.J.

Dexter Avenue Baptist MBC

7:45AM & 10:45AM

13500 Dexter

(313) 869-4878

Rev. Ricardo Bartlett II

Good Shepherd Catholic

10AM

1265 Parkview

(313) 822-1262

Fr. Michael NKachukwu

El Bethel Missionary MBC

8AM, 10AM & 12NOON

25295 Grand River

(313) 532-7897

Lawrence C. Glass, Jr., Pastor

Martyrs of Uganda

11AM-Sat. 9AM

7601 Rosa Parks Blvd.

(313) 896-2335

Fr. Tyrone Robinson

Elim Baptist

11 AM

19333 Lahser Rd.

(313) 533-7285

Rev. Charles D. Oliver

Our Lady of Good Counsel

Sun. 9:30AM - Sat. 4PM

17142 Rowe St.

(313) 372-1698

Rev. Robert J. Kotlarz

El-Shaddai Missionary Baptist (Ferndale)

8AM & 11AM

928 E. 10 Mile

(248) 548-5683

Rev. Benny Holmes

Presentation/Our Lady of Victory

10:30AM

19760 Meyers Rd.

(313) 342-1333

Rev. Hubert Sanders

Elyton Missionary Baptist

8AM & 10:45AM

8903 St. Cyril

(313) 921-4072

Rev. John D. Kelly

Sacred Heart of Jesus

8AM /10AM

3451 Rivard St.

(313) 831-1356

Rev. Norman P. Thomas

Emmanuel MBC

11AM

13230 W. McNichols

(313) 927-2627

Rev. Frederick Lee Brown, Sr.

St. Aloysius Church

11:30AM - Sat. 4PM

1234 Washington Blvd.

(313) 237-5810

Fr. Mark Soehner, O.F.M.

First Baptist Institutional

10AM

17101 W. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 838-0166

St. Augustine and St. Monica

10AM

4151 Seminole Street

(313) 921-4107

Rev. Daniel Trapp

First Baptist S.W.

8AM & 11AM

7642 Gould @ Crossley

(313) 841-4866

Rev. Garrund Woolridge

St. Cecilia

8:30AM & 10AM

10400 Stoepel

(313) 933-6788

Fr. Theodore Parker

First Baptist World Changers Int’l. Min.

11AM

22575 W. Eight Mile Rd.

(313) 255-0212

Pastor Lennell D. Caldwell

St. Gerard

8AM /11AM/4PM Sat.

19800 Pembroke

(313) 537-5770

Rev. Donald Archambault

First Greater St. Paul Baptist

8AM & 10:45AM

15325 Gratiot Avenue

(313) 839-4000

Dr. Ricardo Bartlett, Sr.

St. Gregory The Great

11AM

15031 Dexter

(313) 861-0363

Msgr. Michael Le Fevre

First Missionary Baptist (Ecorse)

7:30AM &10:45AM

3837 15th Street

(313) 381-2700

Rev. Alfred L. Davis Jr.

St. Luke

11:30 AM - Sat. 4PM

8017 Ohio Ave.

(313) 935-6161

Fr. Tyrone Robinson

First Progressive Missionary Baptist

9:20AM & 11AM

10103 Gratiot

(313) 925-9377

Dr. R. W. McClendon

St. Matthew

10 AM - Sat. 4:30PM

6021 Whittier

(313) 884-4470

Rev. Duane R. Novelly

First Union Missionary Baptist

10:45AM

5510 St. Aubin

(313) 571-3043

Rev. Frank J. Knolton

St. Patrick

9:30AM

58 Parsons St.

(313) 833-0857

Fr. Mark Soehner, OFM

Flowery Mount Baptist

11:15AM

13603 Linwood

(313) 869-2567

Rev. Daniel Moore

St. Raymond Church

Sun. 11AM - Sat. 4:30PM

20103 Joann St.

(313) 577-0525

Fr. Robert Kotlavz

Gethsemane Missionary Baptist (Westland)

8AM & 10AM

29066 Eton St.

(734) 721-2557

Rev. Dr. John E. Duckworth

St. Rita

9AM & 11:30AM

1000 E. State Fair

(313) 366-2340

Fr. Tim Kane

God’s House of Prayer Baptist

11AM & 4PM

3606 25th St.

(313) 894-6739

Rev. Michael L. Townsell

St. Peter Claver Catholic Community

10AM Sun.

13305 Grove Ave.

(313) 342-5292

Rev. James O’Reilly, S.J.

Good Shepherd Missionary Baptist

10:45AM

20915 Evergreen Rd.

(248) 353-4368

Sts. Peter & Paul (Jesuit)

11AM & 7:35 PM

438 St. Antoine

(313) 961-8077

Fr. Carl A. Bonk

Great Commission Baptist

11AM

19250 Riverview

(313) 255-7995

Rev. Al Bufkin

St. Suzanne/Our Lady Gate of Heaven

Sat. 5:30PM - Sun. 9AM

19321 W. Chicago

(313) 838-6780

Fr. Robert McCabe

Greater Burnette Baptist

8AM & 10:30AM & 6PM 16801 Schoolcraft

(313) 837-0032

Rev. Dr. Nathaniel Caldwell

Greater Christ Baptist

8AM & 10:45AM

3544 Iroquois

(313) 924-6900

Rev. James C. Perkins

Greater Concord Missionary Baptist

9:30AM & 11AM

4500 East Davison Rd.

(313) 891-6800

Dr. Cullian W. Hill, Pastor

Greater Ephesian Baptist

10:45AM

9403 Oakland

(313) 867-3889

Rev. Jerry Lee James

Renaissance Christian Church

10:30AM

18101 James Couzens

(313) 341-7025

Rev. Antonio Harlan

Greater Macedonia Baptist

10:45AM

8200 Mack Ave.

(313) 923-5588

Rev. Wallace Bell

Serenity Christian Church

11AM

5801 E. 7 Mile

(313) 892-3550

Rev. John C. Harvey

7835 E. Layfayette

(313) 372-3987 (313) 331-8244

Rev. Dan Flowers Rev. Dr. Allyson Abrams

CATHOLIC

CHRISTIAN CHURCH (DISCIPLES OF CHRIST)


religious directory

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

March 7-13, 2012

Page D-5

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

CHRISTIAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL Bunton Metropolitan CME

11AM

15001 Quincy

(313) 341-0524

Rev. Diane Beverly

Action Outreach Church

10AM & 11:30AM

12908 W. 7 Mile Rd.

(313) 345-3016

A.C. Goodman, Pastor

Carter Metropolitan CME

10:45AM

1510-12 W. Grand Blvd.

(313) 895-6744

Rev. Dr. Faith A. Allen

Almighty God Missionary Tabernacle

10:30AM

2708 Joseph Campau

(313) 921-0848

Rev. Dr. Minnie L. Lacy

Central CME

11AM

7600 Tireman

(313) 931-0592

Rev. Eduardo Spragg

Bible Standard Church of God

11AM

9600 Woodlawn

(313) 921-9741

Rev. Samuel Oree

Coggins Memorial CME

11AM

4900 Hurlbut

(313) 921-1565

Rev. Alexander Miner

Body of Christ International

11AM

11780 Ohio

(313) 491-2102

Bishop Kenneth L. Tate

Grace CME

10:45AM

642 W. McNichols

(313) 862-4774

Rev. John C. Clemons

Body of Christ Community of Faith

10:30AM

18100 Meyers Rd.

(313) 345-9106

Rev. Benjamin Prince

Greater New Bethany CME (Romulus)

11AM

35757 Vinewood

(313) 326-0210

Rev. Zachary E. Easterly

Bride Of Christ

11AM

12400 Kelly

(313) 371-3236

Rev. Bill McCullum

Hamlett Temple CME

11AM

13600 Wyoming

(313) 834-6598

Rev. Dr. Barbara Delaney

Calvary Church of Jesus Christ

11:15AM

6318 Varney

(313) 922-3877

Pastor L.C. Gray

Isom Memorial CME (Belleville)

11:15AM

23612 Sumpter Rd.

(734) 461-2200

Rev. Alena E. Zachery

Canton Christian Fellowship

8AM & 10:30AM

8775 Ronda Drive

(734) 404-2408

David Washington, Jr.

Missionary Temple CME

11AM

18134 Lumpkin

(313) 893-2685

Rev. Tyson Kelley

Cathedral of Faith

10:30AM

13925 Burt Rd.

(313) 533-9673

Rev. Lee A. Jackson

Peace CME

11AM

4613 Chene

(313) 832-5929

Rev. Odis Hunt

Cathedral of Hope

11AM

17561 Jos. Campau

(313) 366-4234

Rev. Robert Thomas, Sr.

Rosebrough Chapel CME

18618 Wyoming

(313) 861-8667

Rev. Donte’ Townsend

Christ Covenant Church

9:30AM & 11:30AM

10213 Hamilton Ave.

(313) 883-2203

Rev. Authur L. Gooden

St. John’s CME

10:30AM

8715 Woodward Ave.

(313) 872-5663

Rev. Joseph Gordon

Church of Universal Truth

11:30AM

13038 E. McNichols

(313) 371-4839

Rev. Adrian Harris

Womack Temple CME (Inkster)

11AM

28445 Cherry St.

(734) 326-4822

Rev. Robert L. Holt

Community Church of Christ

11AM

11811 Gratiot Ave.

(313) 839-7268

Pastor R. A. Cranford

Craig Memorial Tabernacle

10:45AM

14201 Puritan

(313) 838-4882

Bishop James L. Craig, Sr.

Deeper Life Gospel Center (Redford)

11AM

20601 Beech Daly

(313) 794-0975

Rev. Wade A. Bell, Sr.

CHURCH OF CHRIST Church of Christ of Conant Gardens

11AM

18460 Conant

(313) 893-2438

John H. Mayberry, Jr.

Deliverance Center

10AM

340 West Grand Blvd.

(313) 297-7773

Bishop Gregg A. Booker

Holy Redeemer Church of Christ

12NOON & 3PM

7145 Harper

(313) 342-7628

Bishop J. Hatcher

Dove Christian Center Church

11AM

4660 Military

(313) 361-Dove

Pastors Lucell & Marcella Trammer

New Cameron Ave. Church of Christ

11AM & 6PM

7825 Cameron

(313) 875-8132

Lucky Dawson, Minister

Eastside Church of God (Sanctified)

11:30AM

2900 Gratiot Ave.

(313) 567-7822

Bishop William K. Lane D.D.

Northwest Church of Christ

11AM

5151 Oakman Blvd.

(313) 834-0562

Patrick Medlock/Stanley Daniel

Family Victory Fellowship Church (Southfield)

8AM & 11AM

19421 W. 10 Mile Rd

(248) 354-1990

Pastor Larry T. Jordan

Westside Church of Christ

11AM & 5PM

6025 Woodrow

(313) 898-6121

Jerrold D. Mcullough, Minister

Fellowship Chapel, U.C.C.

7:30AM&11AM

7707 W. Outer Drive

(313) 347-2820

Rev. Wendell Anthony

Wyoming Church of Christ

9:15AM/10:30AM & 6PM 20131 Wyoming

(313) 345-6780

Dallas A. Walker Jr., Minster

Full Truth Fellowship Church

11:30AM

4458 Joy Rd.

(313) 896-0233

Rev. Darlene C.A. Franklin

God’s Inspirational Kingdom

12NOON

2627 Blaine

(313) 898-2500

Queen Prophetess Lessie R. Brown

Grace Out-Reach Ministry

10:30AM

15251 Harper

(313) 885-1927

Bishop J. Ward, Jr.

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST All God’s People Ministries

1PM

15932 E. Warren

(313) 753-3732

Apostle W. J. Rideout III - Sr., Pastor

Greater Heritage of Christ Church

11:30 AM

19471 James Couzen

Rev. Tracy Lamont Bell

Anderson Memorial C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

17860 Jos. Campau

(313) 366-1407

Supt. Charles J. Johnson III

Greater Life Christian (Pontiac)

10AM

65 E. Huron

(313) 334-1166

Eld. Ellington L. Ellis, Senior Pastor

Bailey Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11:15AM

5370 McKinley Ave.

(313) 898-7996

Supt. James M. Johnson

Hill’s Chapel

11:30AM

6100 Linwood

(313) 896-9460

Rev. V. Broadnax

Calvary C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

15025 Fenkell

(313) 836-6939

Elder David L. Wells

Interfaith Church

11AM

1923 23rd Street

(810) 985-5555

Rev. Link Howard III

Christian Gospel Center

11:30AM

19901 Kentucky

(313) 345-9160

Rev. Marcus R. Ways

Lighthouse Cathedral

10:30AM & 12Noon

15940 Puritan Ave

(313) 273-1110

Bishop Charlie H. Green

Conquerors of Faith Ministries COGIC

11AM

13100 Puritan

(313) 862-5467

Pastor S.A. Moore

Metropolitan Temple

11AM

20099 Fenkell

(313) 533-8063

Rev. Byron Ammons

Covenant Missionary Temple (Roseville)

9:30AM & Sun. 11AM

28491 Utica Rd.

(810) 776-9235

Elder Jay L. Burns

New Birth Church of Christ

11AM

8021 Linwood

(313) 897-1531

Rev. Keith Cooper

East Grand Blvd. C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

1432 East Grand Blvd.

(313) 922-1464

Bishop Elton A. Lawrence

New Foundation Christian Ctr.

11AM

7759 Fenkell

(313) 862-0657

Pastor Marshall Hall

East Side Unity C.O.G.I.C.

11:45AM

5357 Mt. Elliott

(313) 579-2353

Supt. Robert Butts Jr.

New Galilee Spiritual Church

11AM

8025 Harper St.

(313) 571-2108

Bishop M. J. Moore Sr.

Encouragement Corner Ministries

9AM & 10:30AM

10330 Whittier

(313) 417-9430

Elder Howard L. Parker, Jr.

New Life! Christian Ministries, Inc.

10:30AM

2415 W. Forest Ave.

(313) 894-9394

Pastor Jacquelyn L. Rhodes

Evangel Church of God in Christ

11:45AM

13318 Kercheval

(313) 824-4887

Supt. James Smith, Jr.

New Testament Worship Center

11:15AM

14451 Burt Rd.

(313) 592-8134

Pastors Samuel & Sarah Davis

Faith Clinic C.O.G.I.C.

11:15AM

12260 Camden

(313) 372-3429

Elder Zachary Hicks

Perfecting the Saints of God Church

11:30AM

13803 Newbern

(313) 368-8973

Bishop W.E. Hollowell

Faith Tabernacle C.O.G.I.C.

10:45AM & 6PM

23800 Lahser

(248) 357-3110

Elder Edward W. Lucas, D.D.

Puritan Street Church of Christ

11:15AM

19451 Conant

(313) 893-2197

Pastor Mary R. Ealy

Fellowship C.O.G.I.C. (Ecorse)

11AM

3828 12th St.

(313) 381-6644

Rev. William Elum

Restoration Christian Fellowship

10AM

22575 W. 8 Mile Rd.

(313) 255-0212

Pastor Paul Bersche

Fenkell Gospel Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

2600 Fenkell

(313) 862-4771

Elder Lavell Whitaker

Restoration International Christian Ministries

4PM

18140 Cornell Rd.

(248) 352-9256

Rev. Dr. Ronald F. Turner

First Tabernacle of Detroit

8:30AM & 11AM

4801 Oakman Blvd.

(313) 935-PRAY

Supt. Alfred Knight Jr.

Right Spirit Christian Church

10AM

16250 Northland Dr.

(313) 837-7510

Rev. Jacquelyn Willis

Healing Springs C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

10331 Dexter Ave.

(313) 813-8952

Rev. Joey Henderson

Shekinah Tabernacle Gospel Church

10AM

16900 W. Chicago

(313) 835-0283

Elder Risarg “Reggie” Huff

Glad Tidings C.O.G.I.C.

11:15 AM

625 E. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 366-4378

Elder Robert D. Taylor, Sr.

Glory and Praise Tabernacle C.O.G.I.C

10AM & 11AM

16573 Meyers Rd.

(313) 862-7073

Pastor Krafus Walker

Shrine of the Black Madonna/ Pan African Orthodox Christian Church

11:15AM

7625 Linwood

(313) 875-9700

Cardinal Mbiyu Chui

Glory to Glory Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

19309 Greenfield Rd.

(313) 477-0479

Pastor Tommy C. Vanover

Spirit Filled Ministries

11AM

15100 Plymouth

(313) 272-3104

Pastor Thomasyne Petty Faulkner

Greater Bethesda (Ecorse) C.O.G.I.C.

11:30AM

4670 9th Street

(313) 381-3810

Elder Sam Knolton, Sr.

St. Michael Church Guardian Angel

10AM & 11:30AM

12320 Woodrow Wilson

(313) 868-7166

Bishop James Williams

Greater Dequindre C.O.G.I.C.

11:45AM

1847 Sycamore

(313) 961-4842

Rev. Robert Bullard, Jr.

Temple of St. Jude Spiritual

8AM & 11AM

8747 Fenkell

(313) 834-1650

Rev. Larry H. Williams

Greater Emmanuel Institutional C.O.G.I.C.

8:30AM & 11AM

19190 Schafer

(313) 864-7170

Supt. J. Drew Sheard

Greater Haven of Rest C.O.G.I.C.

10:30AM

16130 Woodbine

(313) Jesus-29

Supt. R. K. Benson

Greater Love Tabernacle C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

17617 Plymouth Rd.

(313) 835-8016

Bishop Clifford C. Dunlap

Greater Miller Memorial C.O.G.I.C. (Warren)

11AM & 6:30PM

4439 E. Nine Mile Rd.

(586) 757-6767

Bishop Earl J. Wright

Greater Mitchell Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

13737 Curtis

(313) 345-9900

Bishop John H. Sheard

Greater Mt. Everett (Ferndale)

11AM & 7PM

631 E. 8 Mile Rd.

(248) 541-7200

Elder Jesse G. Bell

Greater Northwest C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

15811 Rosa Parks Blvd.

(313) 345-4676

Pastor Supt. Cleotis Wells

Greater Rock of Ages C.O.G.I.C.

12 NOON

9804 Conner Ave.

(313) 526-0482

Supt. Fred L. Mitchell Sr.

Hammond C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

8740 Puritan

(313) 861-9095

Victor G. Thompson, Pastor

Hill Memorial C.O.G.I.C.

11:30AM

5501 Chase Rd.

(313) 846-4674

Elder Michael Hill

Jones Memorial C.O.G.I.C.

11 AM

19200 Evergreen Rd.

(313) 534-2860

Elder Leon R. McPherson Sr.

(Kendall) The New Gospel Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

16601 Tireman St.

(313) 581-4377

Pastor Gerald A. Echols Jr.

New Christ Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

10001 Hayes

(313) 521-5426

Rev. Lorris Upshaw, Sr.

New Jerusalem C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

7361 Linwood Ave.

(313) 894-8816

Elder Darryl Clark

New Maclin Temple C.O.G.I.C.

10AM & 12 NOON

2255 E. Forest

(313) 831-7372

Elder James M. Maclin

New St. Paul Tabernacle C.O.G.I.C.

8AM & 10AM

15340 Southfield Dr.

(313) 835-5329

Bishop P.A. Brooks

Church of God of Baldwin

11:30AM

5540 Talbot

(313) 366-3190

Elder Gerald Williams

Redemptive Love Christian Center

10AM

12190 Conant Ave.

(313) 893-6275

Elder Kenneth J. Jenkins

El-Beth-El Temple

11AM

15801 Schaefer

(313) 835-3326

Elder Henry G. Sims Sr.

Rewarding Faith C.O.G.I.C.

8AM & 11AM

12935 Buena Vista Ave.

(313) 933-3000

Supt. Joseph W. Harris

God’s Way Cathedral (formely C.O.G.I.C.)

11:30AM

14820 Puritan St.

(313) 580-9103

Bishop Herbert A. Ross D.D.

Saints Liberty Life Steps Ministries (Pontiac)

11AM

340 East Pike St.

(248) 736-3207

Elder Andrew L. Jenkins Sr.

God’s Vineyard C.O.G.I.C. (Centerline)

11:30AM

8090 Theisen

(586) 755-8910

Bishop Carey Jackson Jr.

Seth Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11:30AM

9841 Dundee

(313) 931-1315

Elder Philip R. Jackson

Great Faith Ministries Int’l

11AM

10735 Grand River

(313) 491-1330

Bishop Wayne & Pastor Beverly Jackson

Shiloh Chapel C.O.G.I.C.

9AM & 11:30AM

14841 Eastburn Ave.

(313) 527-5400

Bishop Alfred M. Smith

Greater Faith Assembly

11:30AM

1330 Crane St.

(313) 821-5761

Bishop Raphael Williams Sr.

The Open Door C.O.G.I.C.

11:30AM

14900 E. 7 Mile Rd.

(313) 526-3460

Elder Alan R. Evans

Mt. Zion Church of Deliverance

11:30AM

2263 S. Fort St.

(313) 388-9867

Rev. Jewett B. Jackson

The Way of True Holiness C.O.G.I.C.

10:30AM

1901 Electric Ave.

(313) 383-3373

Elder Curtis Charles McDonald

New Jerusalem C.O.G.I.C.

11AM

7361 Linwood

(313) 894-8816

Elder Darryl Clark

The Word of Truth C.O.G.I.C. (Warren)

9AM &10:30 AM

7107 Rivard Ave.

(586) 754-9673

Dr. Robert E. Garner, Pastor

New Resurrection Faith Ministries Inc.

11AM

18614 Schoolcraft

(313) 836-8099

Bishop Merdith R. Bussell

Unity Fellowship C.O.G.I.C.

11AM & 6PM

17050 Joy Rd.

(313) 270-2000

Elder George W. Hutchinson, Sr.

St. Luke of Detroit

11:30AM

11832 Petoskey

(313) 912-6270

Bishop Chris C. Gardner III

Walk In The Spirit C.O.G.I.C.

11:30AM

11648 Whittier Ave.

(313) 371-4007

Elder Leon K. Shipman Sr.

Thomas Temple C.O.G.I.C.

11am & 5:30PM

14500 Grand River

(313) 835-3570

Bishop Frank Richard

True Testimonial of Jesus (Roseville)

11:30 AM

19200 Frazho

(810) 443-4999

Rev. Willie Moorer Jr.

Universal Church of the Living God

10AM & 11:15AM

3401 Grandy Ave.

(313) 259-0707

Bishop Earl Field, Sr.

World Deliverance Temple

8AM & 11AM

27355 Ann Arbor Trail

(313) 730-8900

Bishop Roy Ferguson

CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE New Hope Church of the Nazarene

11AM

7630 Southfield Rd.

(313) 633-0852

Pastor John O. Wright, Jr.

Transforming Love Community 10AM

Northwest Activities Center (313) 270-2325 Ballroom

Rev. Shaheerah Stephens

True Light Worship Center

11AM

8714 W. McNichols

(313) 864-1046

Rev. William H. Sanders

Unique Non-Complaining Church (Redford)

8AM & 12 Noon

26547 Grand River Ave.

(313) 794-5440

Pastor Charles E. Brooks Jr.

Universal Hagar’s Spiritual Temple #7

11AM & Fri. 6PM

13327 W. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 862-0363

Rev. Mother Cynthia Nelson

Universal Liberty In Christ Temple, Inc

11AM

7000 E. Canfield

(313) 923-5360

Rev. Ralph J. Boyd

Universal Life of Hope

12PM

15065 Grand River

(313) 836-2100

Rev. Dr. R. Hill

Universal Triumph the Dominion of God, Inc.

10:30AM

1651 Ferry Park

(313) 873-6591 Rev. Lord & Princess James Maggie Shaffer

Waterfall Bible Institute

6PM - 10PM

12040 Visger Rd.

(313) 382-0900

Rev. Dr. Emanuel Cain

St. Raphael of Brooklyn Orthordox

10AM

(313) 533-3437

V. Rev. Fr. Leo Copacia

ORTHODOX-CHRISTIAN 23300 W. Davison St.

PENTECOSTAL

PRESBYTERIAN

CONGREGATIONAL

19125 Greenview

(313) 537-2590

Bushnell Congregational Church

10:30 AM

15000 Southfield Rd.

(313) 272-3550

Rev. Roy Isaac

Christ Presbyterian

11AM

23795 Civic Center Dr.

(248) 356-2635

First Congregational Church of Detroit

11AM

33 E. Forest

(313) 831-4080

Rev. Dr. Lottie Jones Hood

First Presbyterian Church of Birmingham

8:30AM & 10AM

1669 W. Maple

(248) 644-2040

Hope Presbyterian

11AM

15340 Meyers Rd.

(313) 861-2865

Rev. Raphael B. Francis

St. John’s Presbyterian, U.S.A.

11AM

1961 E. Lafayette Blvd.

(313) 567-0213

Rev. Johnie Bennett

Trinity Community Presbyterian U.S.A.

8:30AM & 11AM

4849 W. Outer Drive

(313) 342-2288

Rev. Edwin Fabré

Westminster Church for All People

8:30AM & 11AM

17567 Hubbell Ave.

(313) 341-2697

Rev. Neeta R. Nichols

Episcopal All Saints Episcopal

10AM

Cathedral Church of St. Paul Christ Church - Detroit

3837 W. Seven Mile

(313) 341-5320

Rev. C. Alfred Loua

7:30AM, 8:15AM & 10:30AM 4800 Woodward Ave

(313) 831-5000

Rev. Dr. S. Scott Hunter

8:15AM & 10:30AM

960 E. Jefferson

(313) 259-6688

Rev. John Talk

Grace Episcopal

8:30 & 11AM

1926 Virginia Park

(313) 895-6442

Supply Clergy

St. Christopher St. Paul’s Episcopal Church

11AM

20750 W. McNichols

(313) 538-2320

Rev. Deborah Semon Scott

St. Clement’s Episcopal (Inkster)

8AM & 10:30AM

4300 Harrison St.

(734) 728-0790

Rev. Ellis Clifton. Jr., Rector

St. Cyprian’s Episcopal

10:30AM

6114 28th St.

(313) 896-7515

Rev. Dr. Donald M. Lutas

St. Matthew’s & St. Joseph’s Episcopal

8AM & 11AM

8850 Woodward Ave.

(313) 871-4750

Rev. Shannon Brown -MacVean

St. Phillip & St. Stephen Episcopal

10AM

14225 Frankfort

(313) 822-7730

St. Timothy’s Episcopal

10:45AM

15820 Wyoming

(313) 341-1244

Calvary Presbyterian

10:30AM

(CUMBERLAND) PRESBYTERIAN St. Paul Cumberland Presbyterian

11AM

St. Peter’s Primitive

11:30AM

Church of the Living God /#37

11:30AM

2780 Packard Rd.

Supply Clergy

Abundant Life Full Gospel Worship Center

11:30AM

5619 Charles

(313) 366-0874

Pastors Roger & Mary Lewis

Crossroads Victory Full Gospel Cathedral

10:30AM & 11:30AM

9355 Greenfield

(313) 836-7260

Rev. Dr. Eileen V. Martin, Ph.D., Ed.D.

Heavenly Dimensions F.G.B.C.

10AM & 11AM

11731 Mt. Elliot

(313) 368-2925

Pastor Robert D. Lodge Jr.

Resurrection Ministries

11AM

4959 Martin

(313) 896-1708

Rev. William Goodman

INTER-DENOMINATIONAL

17251 Jos Campau

(313) 893-9094

Rev. Walter L. Harris

3556 Dubois

(313) 831-2770

Elder Leroy Williams

REFORMED CHURCH IN AMERICA 11AM

5027 W. Boston

(313) 834-4770

Rev. Robert Morris

SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST

(734) 971-8317 Rev. Jeffery D. Harrold

FULL GOSPEL BAPTIST

(313) 834-2463

PROTESTANT

FREE METHODIST 8:30AM

3841 Humphrey

PRIMITIVE BAPTIST

Nardin Park Community New Beginnings Free Methodist (Ann Arbor)

Rev. Kevin R. Johnson

Burns Church of Seventh-Day Adventist

Sat. 11:00AM

10125 East Warren Ave

(313) 924-5535

Rev. Cory Jackson, Sr., Pastor

City Temple Seventh-Day Adventist

9:15AM & 11AM

8816 Grand River

(313) 897-0506

Leon J. Bryant, Pastor

Detroit Northwest Seventh-day Adventist Church

Sat. 9:45 & 11:15 AM

14301 Burt Rd

(313) 538-8190

Cory Jackson, Pastor

Ecorse Church of Seventh-Day Adventists

Sat. 9:15AM &10:45AM

3834 10th St.

(313) 928-9212

William Hughes, Pastor

Sharon Seventh-Day (Inkster)

Sat. 9:15AM & 11AM

28537 Cherry Street

(313) 722-2313

Philip Jones, Pastor

UNITARIAN-UNIVERSALIST First Unitarian Universalist Church

11AM

4605 Cass Ave.

(313) 833-9107

Rev. Bill Neely

Northwest Unitarian Universalist Church

10AM

23925 Northwestern Hwy.

(248) 354-4488

Rev. Kimi Riegel

Community Christian Fellowship

11AM

8131 E. Outer Drive

(313) 245-2925

Bishop Samuel A Wilson, Sr.

First Church of the Redeemed

11:15AM

9360 Van Dyke

(313) 923-6455

Min. Katherine M. Fitzgerald

For Such A Time As This Ministry

11AM

10630 Grand River

(313) 935-9992

Pastor Joyce Driver

Grace Community Church of Detroit

8AM & 11AM

20021 W. Chicago Rd.

(313) 273-0410

William A Harris, Minister

Mayflower Congregational Church

11AM

7301 Curtis

(313) 861-6450

Rev. J. Michael Curenton

People’s Community

7:30AM & 10:30AM

8601 Woodward Ave.

(313) 871-4676

Rev. Martin E. Bolton

St. John’s – St. Luke

10:30AM

2120 Russell

(313) 393-8168

Rev. J. Womack – Rev. L. Hawkins

Calvary United Methodist

11AM

UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

UNITED METHODIST

ISLAMIC FAITH

15050 Hubbell

(313) 835-1317

Rev. Dr. Theodore L. Whitely, Sr.

Masjid Wali Muhammed (Jum’ah 1PM)

Ta’aleem Sunday 1PM

11529 Linwood

(313) 868-2131

Imam Salim MuMin

Cass Community United Methodist

11AM

3901 Cass Ave.

(313) 833-7730

Rev. Faith Fowler

Moorish Science Temple of America, Temple #25

2-4 Sun./7:30PM-10PM FRI.

5601 Grand River

(313) 894-8340

Minister Bro Craig P. Fuqua-Bey

Central United Methodist

10AM

23 E. Adams

(313) 965-5422

Rev. Edwin A. Rowe

Muhammad Mosque No. One

11AM Sun./ 8PM W&F

14880 Wyoming

(313) 931-4873

Minister Rasul Muhammad

Conant Avenue United Methodist

11AM

18600 Conant Ave.

(313) 891-7237

Rev. Dr. Darryl E. Totty

(The) Muslim Center (Jum’ah Prayer 1PM)

Ta’aleem 12NOON

1605 W. Davison Ave.

(313) 883-3330

Derrick Ali, Imam

Faith United Methodist (Oak Park)

9:30AM & 10AM

23880 Scotia

(248) 542-8861

Rev. Jonathan Combs

Henderson Memorial United Methodist

9:30AM

7520 Puritan

(313) 342-4020

Rev. Thomas Taylor

Hope United Methodist (Southfield)

7:30AM & 10:30AM

26275 Northwestern Hwy.

(248) 356-1020

Dr. Carlyle Fielding Stewart IIIs

Metropolitan United Methodist Church

11AM

8000 Woodward

(313) 875-7407

Rev. Tonya M. Amesen

LUTHERAN Cross of Glory Lutheran (ELCA)

9:30AM

16661 E. State Fair

(313) 839-5787

Pr. Michael Rothgery

Mt. Hope United Methodist

11AM

15400 E. Seven Mile Rd.

(313) 371-8540

Rev. Henry Williams

Genesis Lutheran

10AM

7200 Mack

(313) 571-7371

no pastor at present time

People’s United Methodist

11AM

19370 Greenfield

(313) 342-7868

Rev. Carter A. Grimmett

Good Shepherd Lutheran (ELCA)

10:30AM

16100 Lawton St.

(313) 341-3978

no pastor at present time

Redford Aldergate United Methodist Church

9AM & 11:15AM

22400 Grand River

(313) 531-2210

Rev. Jeffrey S. Nelson

Gracious Saviour Lutheran (ELCA)

11AM

19484 James Couzens Hwy.

(313) 342-4950

no pastor at present time

Second Grace United Methodist

8AM & 11AM

18700 Joy Rd.

(313) 838-6475

Rev. Dr. Charles S. G. Boayue

Immanuel Lutheran (ELCA)

8AM & 11AM

13031 Chandler Park Dr.

(313) 821-2380

Pr. Patrick P. Gahagen

Scott Memorial United Methodist

11AM

15361 Plymouth

(313) 836-6301

Rev. Anthony Hood

Iroquois Ave Christ Lutheran (ELCA)

10AM

2411 Iroquois

(313) 921-2667

Pr. Maxcy Christmas

St. James United Methodist (Westland)

10:30AM

30055 Annapolis Rd.

(313) 729-1737

Rev. Willie F. Smith

Revelation Lutheran (ELCA)

10AM

6661 Oakman Blvd.

(313) 846-9910

Pr. Doris Harris Mars

St. Paul United Methodist

11AM

8701 W. Eight Mile Rd.

(313) 342-4656

Rev. Henry Williams

Salem Memorial Lutheran (ELCA)

10:45AM

21230 Moross

(313) 881-9201

Pr. Michael Johnson

St. Timothy United Methodist

8:30 AM & 11AM

15888 Archdale

(313) 837-4070

Dr. Lester Mangum

St. Andrew-Redeemer Lutheran (ELCA)

10AM

2261 Marquette St.

(313) 262-6143

Frank Jackson

Trinity Faith United Methodist

11AM

19750 W. McNichols

(313) 533-0101

Rev. Jan J. Brown

St. James Lutheran (ELCA)

10:30AM

14450 Ashton Road

(313) 838-3600

Pr. Michael Konow

John Wesley United Methodist (River Rouge)

11AM

555 Beechwood Street

(313) 928-0043

Rev. Rahim Shabazz

Spirit of Hope Lutheran (ELCA)

11AM

1519 Martin Luther King Blvd. (313) 964-3113

Pr. Matthew Bode Unity of Farmington Hills

10AM

32500 W. Thirteen Mile Rd.

(248) 737-9191

Rev. Barbara Clevenger

Detroit Unity Temple

10AM

17505 Second Blvd.

(313) 345-4848

Rev. John Considine

God Land Unity

11AM

22450 Schoolcraft

(313) 794-2800

Rev. Ron D. Coleman, Sr.

NEW THOUGHT - HOLY SPIRIT

UNITY

Divine Awareness Spiritual Temple of Truth

Sun. 4PM/Thur. 9PM

4088 Pasadena

(313) 491-1062

Rev. Jewell Stringer

Unity of Redford (Livonia)

5-6 PM

28660 Five Mile Rd.

(313) 272-7193

Rev. Josephine Furlow

Faith Universal Study Group

11:30AM

8033 Kercheval

(313) 393-5212

Rev. Gloria J. Fitchpritch

West Side Unity

9:30AM & 11AM

4727 Joy Rd.

(313) 895-1520

Rev. Charles G. Williams

St. Catherine Temple of Prophecy

11AM

12833 Linwood Ave.

(313) 868-5612

Rev. Vallerie Gray

The Order of the Fishermen Ministry

10:30AM

10025 Grand River Ave.

(313) 933-0770

Fisherman Earl “DOC” Savage

Vulcan Christian Ministries (Warren)

11AM

7447 Convention Blvd.

(810) 771-3257

Dr. Marjorie A. Lyda

UNIVERSAL FOUNDATION FOR BETTER LIVING Faith Universal Truth Center

11:30AM

8033 Kercheval

(313) 921-2950

Rev. Gloria J. Fitchpritch


Classified

THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE In memoriam

U-M to lead statewide Tech Transfer Talent Network to bring more inventions to market

IN LOVING MEMORY OF

To turn an invention into a marketable product that can benefit society, you need, above all else, the right people involved. That’s the premise behind a new $2.4 million statewide program called the Tech Transfer Talent Network. It is led by the University of Michigan and funded through a grant from the Michigan Economic Development Corporation.



53 Chandler, Highland Park, MI 48203 (313) 868-2916 (O) (313) 868-0443 (F)

mildred Thelma Lee Browder Sanders Chambers

March 10, 1932 – February 22, 2002 23 Psalms TEN years gone from our Sight Never from our Memories or Hearts We miss your Prayers, Smile Tears and everything about YOU GOD’s love lights the Way Turns our darkness into Day We Miss You Dearly Mother, Grand/Great-Grandmother, Sister

personal services BORN GIFTED READER The 7th Daughter without asking you a single word. I will tell you what you want to know. Tell your present, past and future. Tell you who your friends and enemies are. Why you’re so unlucky. If your loved one is true or false.I will advise you all problems of life, such as love, marriage, business and health, etc. Why suffer, you can be free from all troubles. I guarantee Sucess where others failed. I am superior to any other reader you have seen. Don’t let distance keep you away from Health and Happiness. Hrs. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Daily and Sunday.

No Mail Answered 2742 Monroe St., Toledo, Ohio 1-419-248-2145

To enhance its capabilities, U-M has put in place several talent-related initiatives during the past few years. Through the network, U-M will help other universities implement some of these strategies, including:

--The Catalyst database, which identifies and tracks experienced entrepreneurs who are willing to serve as experts, mentors, consultants or even co-founders.

--Mentors-in-Residence, experienced entrepreneurs who work within Tech Transfer for 12- to 18-month rotations, helping to assess new opportunities and mentor new start-up ventures.

--Tech Transfer Fellows, a program that employs graduate students or other qualified personnel to help assess technology and analyze markets for tech transfer opportunities.

--A postdoctoral fellowship program to support graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to encourage them to continue within a newly licensed business or a new startup venture.



ADOPTION ADOPT: WE CAN GIVE YOUR BABY LOVE AND SECURITY, you can help make us a family. Expenses paid. Please call Denise and Howard at 877-676-1660. ADOPTION: DEVOTED FAMILY PROMISES TO CHERISH YOUR CHILD UNCONDITIONALLY. Financially secure; expenses paid. Your child is already loved in our hearts! Susan/ Patrick 1-877-266-9087. www.susanandpatrickadopt.com

Seeking

Associate Director of Financial Aid

The Wayne County Airport Authority is seeking one or more attorneys with 6+ years of full-time paid experience and expertise in one or more of the following practice areas: negotiating and preparing complex legal contracts, construction law, real estate, environmental (including public utilities), municipal or governmental law (including public safety), public procurements (including knowledge of competitive solicitation practices for governmental or public sector entities), technology/ intellectual property, airport federal regulatory compliance and/or litigation. Experience representing municipal or governmental entities and/or airports, or general familiarity with federal aviation laws are preferred but not required. Must have strong analytical and writing skills, and be, or eligible to become, a member in good standing with the State Bar of Michigan.

at Oakland University Financial Aid Department

Will plan, develop, implement and evaluate financial aid production and operational systems. Responsible for coordination of technical applications and insuring compliance. Participate in budget preparation process, prepare detailed statistical analysis and reports outlining fiscal and operational activities. Administer student loan, student employment, R2T4, SAP and scholarship programs. Minimum Qualifications: Master’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and/or experience. Minimum seven years of progressively responsible experience in financial aid administration. This is a full time position with a salary up to the low $60’s annually. Refer to online posting for additional requirements. First consideration will be given to those who apply by March 9, 2012. Must apply on line for this position to: https://jobs. oakland.edu.

Send resume to: jobs@wcaa.us or fax to: 734-955-5737 B: 4.625 in T: 4.625 in S: 4.625 in

Seeking S: 10 in

T: 10 in

B: 10 in

Project Advisor

at Oakland University Upward Bound Department Foreclosure af fec ts more than just you. It af fec ts your whole f amily. A million f amilies will f ace losing their homes this year.

before the City Council of Detroit. Advertisements for bids and contracts for purchases by the City of Detroit appear daily in the Detroit Legal News. Copies are available at the City County Bldg. and at 2001 W. Lafayette, Detroit.

Call today for help. Because nothing is worse than doing nothing.

1- 888 -995-HOPE

HELP WANTED social workers/casemanager Licensed BSW/MSW and Counselors

covenant house ACADEMY SOUTHWEST 5668 Baker, Detroit, MI 48209* Phone: (313) 297-8720 Fax: (313) 297-8730

Document Name: AD-COR-Z4341-P.indd Client: AD

Product: COR

Job #: AD-COR-Z4341-P Title: FORECLOSURE (MAG)

Positions available in the following programs: Clincal Services, Full Time, Exp. Mental Health, Excellent benefits. Send resume: Detroit Central City CMH, Human Resources, 10 Peterboro - Detroit, MI 48201; (Fax) 313-831-2604/ e-mail: tconte@dcccmh.org. Bleed: 4.625 in x 10 in

Current Date: 6/20/07 12:23 PM

Trim: 4.625 in x 10 in

Studio Artist: SARGENT

Safety: 4.625 in x 10 in

Proof #: 4-Release

Gutter: None

Print Scale: 100%

Document Path: Mechanicals:Volumes:Mechanical...R:AD-COR-Z4341:AD-COR-Z4341-P.indd Links: ADCOR-0001-L.tif (Library:AdCouncil:Artwork:AD-COR:ADCOR-0001-L.tif), ADCOR-NBW-1K.eps (Library:AdCouncil:Logos:AD-COR: ADCOR-NBW-1K.eps), ADCOR-ACL-1K.eps (Library:AdCouncil:Logos:AD-COR:ADCOR-ACL-1K.eps)

Applications for the 2012-2013 academic year will be available at the school for re-enrollment from March 8 through April 20, 2012; for open enrollment from April 2 through April 13, 2012. An answering machine is available for messages. Applications will be accepted for grades 9-12, serving students ages 16-22. Should applications exceed available space, a random selection drawing will be held on May 2, 2012 at the school. • New school location effective July 1, 2012 will be 1450 25th Street, Detroit, MI 48216. covenant house ACADEMY CENTRAL

CALL THE HOPE HOTLINE FIRST AT 888-995-HOPE.

2959 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.

Detroit, MI 48208 Phone: (313) 899-6900 Fax: (313) 899-6910 T:10”

Applications for the 2012-2013 academic year will be available at the school for re-enrollment from March 8 through April 20, 2012; for open enrollment from April 2 through April 13, 2012. An answering machine is available for messages. Applications will be accepted for grades 9-12, serving students ages 16-22. Should applications exceed available space, a random selection drawing will be held on May 2, 2012 at the school.

CAREER TRAINING ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE FROM DRIVER-$0 HOME. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal TUITION CDL Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement as(A) TRAINING sistance. Computer available. Financial & A JOB! Top Aid if quialified. SCHEV certified. Call Industry Pay, 877-895-1828 www.CenturaOnline. Quality Training, com. Stability & Miles! *Short employment commitALLIED HEALTH CAREER TRAINING Attend ment required. college 100% online. Job placement asMake sure you’re talking to the right people. Speak with HUD-approved 800-326-2778 Computer available. Financial housing counselors, free of charge, at the sistance. Homeowner’s HOPE Hotline. www.JoinAid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call CRST.com. 1-800-481-9409 www.CenturaOnline. com

Ok to Release

Wayne County Airport Authority Detroit Metro Airport Assistant General Counsel

NOTICE OF HEARINGS REGARDING MATTERS TO COME

IF YOU’RE FACING FORECLOSURE, TALK TO YOUR CO-WORKER SECOND.

PUB DATE: None DUE AT PUB: 6/30/10

MSUE District 11 28115 Meadowbrook Rd. Novi, MI, 48377-3128 (248) 380-9103.

ANNOUNCEMENT(S)

U-M Tech Transfer: www.techtransfer.umich. edu

covenant house ACADEMY east 7600 Goethe, Detroit, MI 48214 Phone: (313) 267-4315 Fax: (313) 267-4320

Applications for the 2012-2013 academic year will be available at the school for reenrollment from March 8 through April 20, 2012; for open enrollment from April 2 through April 13, 2012. An answering machine is available for messages. Applications will be accepted for grades 9-12, At 100% AIRLINES ARE HIRINGPrinted - Train for high Approvals Approvals Fonts &Fonts Images & Images serving students ages 16-22. Should applipaying Aviation Career. FAA IMAGES approved Oberlander CD FONTS cations exceed available space, a random Art Director Jillian Akkurat (Bold) 04_CoWorker_116.tif (CMYK; 548 ppi) program. Financial aid if qualified Job Copywriter M Bottkol Account Mgr J Dupuis selection drawing will be held on May 2, placement assistance. Call Aviation InS Gordon Studio Artist Biggs Proofreaderof stitute Maintenance 877-891-2281. 2012 at the school. Client Magenta,

MSU is an affirmative-action, equal opportunity employer.

Northpointe Academy, being an equal opportunity educational institution, shall be committed to good-faith affirmative action efforts to seek out, create and serve a diverse student body.

313 963-5522

“Having more access to experienced entrepreneurs and advisers has proven to be an effective strategy for U-M Tech Transfer,” Nisbet said. “Although the results will take years to fully develop, we are confident that the Talent Network will give a boost to our collective efforts among our sister universities to transfer technology and create new startups. This demonstrates another way that our universities are playing a key role in revitalizing our T:7” regions and transforming the Michigan economy.”



Cyan,

Apply online, job details at: www.jobs.msu.edu Closes 3/13/12

CALL NOW FOR RATE INFO

The 2011 U-M startup Life Magnetics took advantage of the mentor-in-residence program as well, going as far as hiring mentor Bill Wood after his term at Tech Transfer was finished. Wood served as interim CEO for the biotech firm and worked with its founder to raise $1 million in venture funding. Now, the company has retained the talents of a co-founder and a former CEO of HandyLab, a U-M startup that sold in 2009 for $275 million.



PUBS: None

Posting: #5893 to manage and oversee of a comprehensive education program – 4-H Youth in Governance project tri-county areas. More details see job information online.

MICHIGAN CHRONICLE

In the case of medical device firm and 2010 U-M startup HistoSonics, the Catalyst system engaged a Florida entrepreneur with specific experience in the company’s field, therapeutic ultrasound technology. Along with a mentor-in-residence, the team worked with the company to raise more than $11 million in venture funding.



T: 7” x 10” B: None L: None

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These pilot efforts at U-M have pushed tech transfer projects forward in big ways.



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U-M, which had 101 licensing agreements and spun out 11 startups in 2011, consistently ranks in the top 10 U.S. universities in tech transfer performance. In the past decade, the Tech Transfer office has helped launch 92 startups from research that originated in faculty labs, and three-quarters of those are located in Michigan.



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“Most people agree that the core problem holding back economic vitality is having available talent, especially in the Midwest. We aim to change that,” said Ken Nisbet, executive director of U-M Tech Transfer. “You may get early stage internal development funding, but if you cannot find the talent to assess commercialization issues, formulate development plans and execute on these plans, you’re not deploying that money well.”



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All proposals are due by Friday, March 30, 2012 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time. RFQ specifications are available at SEMCOG offices during normal business hours, on SEMCOG’s Web site at www.semcog.org/Vendors.aspx, or by calling Information Services at (313) 961-4266. SEMCOG adheres to all DBE guidelines.

The primary goal of the Tech Transfer Talent Network is to increase the supply of seasoned entrepreneurs and innovators who can lend their expertise to university tech transfer offices. These connections will serve as important bridges to launch technology-based startups or license university inventions to established companies. The program will allow other state universities in the network to share and benefit from the tech transfer resources developed at U-M.



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d regions with strong research-based technology opportunities or clusters of talent, and in some cases, both. In addition to U-M, members are: Wayne State University, Michigan State University, Michigan Technological University, Western Michigan University, Grand Valley State University and Oakland University. Each university is also collaborating with its regional economic development organization to promote increased access to mentors and partnering businesses.



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THE MICHIGAN CHRONICLE March 7-13, 2012 Page D-7 health Recognizing Kidney Diabetes in Michigan: Month, World Kidney Day The epidemic The National Kidney Foundation of Michigan (NKFM) is recognizing Kidney Month this March and World Kidney Day on March 8 by educating Michigan residents about preventing kidney disease and its leading causes: diabetes, hypertension, and obesity.

Although chronic kidney disease (CKD) is underdiagnosed and often undertreated, it is often treatable and preventable. Nonetheless, early kidney disease has no symptoms and can become kidney failure with little or no warning, which is why it has been called the “silent killer.� Due to the increasing prevalence of health conditions such as diabetes, hypertension, and obesity, CKD has become a major health concern for Michigan residents. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CKD was the 8th leading cause of death in the U.S.

and diabetes (the leading cause of CKD) was the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2010.

More than 26 million American adults have CKD and millions more are at risk and don’t know it. In Michigan alone, more than 900,000 adults have CKD. Diabetes alone causes over 40% of kidney failure cases in Michigan. By controlling your diabetes or prediabetes, the chances of developing CKD can be reduced. For people with diabetes and at risk for it alike, it is important to start by creating a realistic set of goals for yourself to improve your health. Some small steps include: setting weight loss goals, making healthy food choices every day, and striving to become more physically active. People with uncontrolled high blood pressure, diabetes, or a relative with CKD are at risk

for kidney disease and should make an appointment to have their kidneys evaluated. Others should follow health precautions to prevent the possibility of kidney failure. For a kidney friendly lifestyle that will help you reduce the risk of developing CKD, you should eat healthy, well-balanced meals; exercise regularly; quit smoking; and monitor your blood pressure.

For more information about preventing and controlling CKD or about local kidney screenings for Kidney Month, contact the NKFM at 800-482-1455 or visit nkfm.org. You can get information about diabetes from the National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) by visiting ndep.nih.gov. All events, kidney screenings, health fairs, and more that are hosted by the NKFM for Kidney Month are listed at http://www.kidney.org/ news/wkd/localEvents. cfm.

Black preemies more likely to die after leaving NICU Wayne State University School of Medicine researchers on staff at the Detroit Medical Center’s Hutzel Women’s Hospital have discovered that babies who die after discharge from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are more often from an African-American background, have had longer stays in the NICU than other preterm babies and have unknown

or no health insurance. For more information, visit: http:// www.media.wayne.edu/2012/02/22/researchers-find-that-africanamericanpreemies. Additional information can also be acquired by way of YouTube.

As the sixth leading cause of death among Michigan residents, diabetes is serious, common, and costly. Michigan’s diabetes rate is consistently higher than the nation as a whole, increasing 15 percent in five years. “Nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes, and we estimate that as many as one in three could develop the disease by 2050 if current trends continue,� said Ann Albright, Ph.D., R.D., director of CDC’s Division of Diabetes Translation. “With so many people impacted and millions who are unaware they are at risk, it is critical to educate early and often because we know that a structured lifestyle program that includes losing modest weight and increasing physical activity can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.� Type 2 is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for about 90-95 percent of all diagnosed diabetes cases in the United States and can lead to heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, blindness, kidney and nervous system disease, and amputation. According to the Michigan Department of Community Health, an estimated 700,000 Michigan adults have been diagnosed with diabetes, and another 365,000 have un-

diagnosed diabetes. This means more than 1 million adults in Michigan are directly affected by this growing epidemic. As the prevalence of diabetes continues to rise, so do the health care costs associated with the disease. Diabetes costs the United States $174 billion annually and over $9 billion per year in Michigan. Investments in community-based disease prevention programs that address lifestyle changes and empower individuals to take an active role in their health could yield significant economic savings. In an effort to advance these programs The Southeast Michigan Beacon Community has introduced txt4health, a mobile health information service designed to help people understand their risk for type 2 diabetes and become more informed about the steps they can take to lead healthy lives. Robin Nwankow, R.D, MPH, CDE, an American Diabetes Association volunteer who serves on the leadership board for the Michigan and Northern Ohio market said, “Community-based disease prevention programs would be particularly useful in the Detroit area, where 12 percent of the population of Wayne County has been diagnosed with diabetes, compared to 10

percent for the state as a whole. This is probably in large part due to a high prevalence of obesity and a high population of African Americans.� Certain races and ethnicities, primarily nonwhite populations, are at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes, with the mortality rates in Michigan being even greater in African Americans. Poverty, lack of access to health care, differences in disease education and cultural attitudes present barriers to diabetes prevention and management. The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to stop diabetes and its deadly consequences and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. For more information please call the American Diabetes Association at 1-800-DIABETES (1-800342-2383) or visit www. diabetes.org.

Public interest in pandemic flu vaccine faded over time By Wendy Wendland-Bowyer When a new strain of influenza began to sicken even healthy younger adults three years ago, public interest in getting the newly developed H1N1 vaccine started strong but declined over time even as more people were getting sick, a new study shows. Researchers at RAND Corp. and the University of Michigan found that the more the public learned about this new type of influenza and the longer they had to wait for the vaccine, the less interested they were in getting it. “Our results provide further evidence of how important it is to develop technology to speed vaccine production,� said the study’s co-author, Brian ZikmundFisher, an assistant professor in the U-M School of Public Health. “Many more people would have been interested in vaccination had the vaccine been available even three months earlier.� The study, a collaboration between Zikmund-Fisher and Courtney Gidengil and Andrew Parker of the RAND Corp, is being released today (Feb. 16) for advance online viewing by the American Journal of Public Health. Each year the strains of influenza circling the world change slightly. Occasion-

ally a new strain emerges, as happened in March 2009 with the H1N1 virus. Later that spring the World Health Organization declared a level 6 pandemic, the highest level possible, which meant that the disease had spread worldwide. In the United States, the peak rate of infections and hospitalizations from H1N1 occurred between September and December 2009. While other research has looked at people’s beliefs about the H1N1 influenza at one point at time, this study used the RAND American Life Panel, a large national sample, to track both the public’s perceived risk of catching H1N1 and their intention of receiving the new vaccine over time. The authors gathered data 10 different times from May 2009 (when HIN1 illnesses were still very rare) until January 2010 (when the worst of the pandemic had passed in the United States). The vaccine came out in October 2009, was widely available by November. The U-M and RAND study found that intention to get vaccinated dropped from 50 percent in May 2009 when news of H1N1 first surfaced but the vaccine was not available to just 16 percent of unvaccinated people by January, when the last survey was given. The authors’ findings are consistent with the fact that by December 2009, only 24 percent of the entire U.S. population received the H1N1 vaccine. Fortunately the 2009 H1N1 strain was not particularly deadly.

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