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Contributors Jamess Allen|Greg Baker|Rob Baker| Brezsny|Sam Eifling |Matt Matt Lane|Austin Rhodes|Josh Ruffin|Matt Ruffin Matt Stone|Jenny Wright Ruff

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CONTENTS

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14 o r t e m IRIT 8 SP 11 12 13

N.Q. ATTITUDE: Former Lynx Trevor Gillies takes his Never Quit attitude to Russia

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WHINELINE

Me: Romney sucks! My Brother: Since when is it a crime to be rich.. you’re a classist. Me: Solution for First Friday, Move it When your money doesn’t come from raiding pensions, sending to Columbia County.. Brilliant!! jobs overseas, and hiding your money in tropical tax free there are several things I love about America. (1) I was able to islands, I won’t hold it against serve my country in tyhe u.s.air you. force. (2) that I am able to vote legally to put a crooked person If a police car is traveling faster in office. (3) As a taxpayer I get than the posted speed limit, and does not have lights or siren penalized. only iN ANERICA.

going, can I speed right behind it without getting a ticket?

Hey, the Redneck Olympics are in Augusta next month! How ‘bout a bunch of you khaki Who died an made Coco Rubio wearin yuppie snobs come check Congrats to the GOP for once the king of downtown? So now it out so you’ll have something again having a candidate born he wants a an after hours First with a silver foot in his mouth! As to whine about.(You know who Friday for adults. Just who is for Josh Ruffin’s recent Romney you are.) And bring your skinny going to pay for all of the added bashing column, if you don’t like ol’ lady’s so we can whistle at security to police the throngs what he has to say then keep on them. of drunks marauding through moving...it’s what I do when I get downtown at 1am? Isn’t the to Austin’s column. (continued on page 50) whole problem now this whole after hours crowd? Now Coco wants to make it even bigger? Bad idea.

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COULD BE FIVE: Looking ahead to qualifying, the commission could have five new members CRIME HAPPENS: Your Weird Week in Crime GOODALE GETS GRANT: Restoration of historic property inches closer SHARED DEVELOPMENT: Lakeside park partnership moves forward

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Independence

Recovery


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INSIDER@THEMETROSPIRIT.COM Insider is an anonymous, opinion-based examination of the hidden details of Augusta politics and personalities.

up

THUMBS

SIDER

My Precious

That the Baptist church that wouldn’t allow a black couple to marry under its roof is in Mississippi and not Georgia.

down

This is still an issue? Well that doesn’t bode well for gay people. By now, you’ve probably heard the saga of the missing class ring. If you’re Facebook friends with Columbia County EMA Director Pam Tucker, and over 4,000 of us are, you’ve probably seen the posts, and if you’re on her email list, and only about 4,000 of us aren’t, you’ve probably read the details of the 1976 Evans High School class ring that was found last week by a Water Utility worker at the Little River Waste Water Treatment Plant. The woman’s ring, size five or six, was found in a screen intended to trap such heavy objects. It was dirty, though, meaning it could have been in the system for a long time before it reached the screen. Potentially, a very long time. When they cleaned the ring up — it was brought to Tucker because of her ability to reach out to the community — they found some initials, checked them against the 1976 senior class in the Evans High yearbook and came to the tentative conclusion that it must belong to a Jeanette Larsen. The problem is, no one seems to remember a Jeanette Larsen at Evans High, so as of now, the search for the ring’s owner continues. Given the ferocity with which candidates and their supporters have been fighting each other and the serious issues that are at stake in spite of their juvenile behavior, the ring saga is a meaningless story, a whimsical diversion that has done nothing but allow us to step out of our own problems and worries and contemplate the odd, delicious randomness of life. Which makes this ring story a pretty rare thing these days. Of course, not everyone feels such contemplation is appropriate, at least when it’s instigated by a government employee. Tucker is a highly paid director, after all. Her time should be spent doing important things, like coordinating the Damage Assessment Training at the Emergency Operations Center. Oh, wait… she did. And in spite of the ring. Seems like she might be doing a better job of resisting the power of the ring than those who suspect her of giving in to it.

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And the “I’s” Have it

As the election results came in, Columbia County voters seemed pleased to take care of their incumbents, sending the Commissioners Allen back to the Government Center. The senior Allen won by a slightly bigger margin, mopping up District 3 with businessman Butch Holley by getting 70.28 percent of the vote. But considering the venom directed at Trey Allen in the wake of what some worked hard to characterize as major scandals, the younger Allen did all right with 68.72 percent. Though not exactly an incumbent, former majority leader Barry Fleming rode that Clay Whittle radio endorsement (not to mention that really big elephant) back to Atlanta, beating Mike Popplewell by earning 61.52 percent of the vote.

Spoiled

Much will be made of the 2012 Democratic primary for sheriff in the wake of Robbie Silas’ dismal showing. Scott Peebles ended election night with 46.63 percent of the vote to Richard Roundtree’s 39.34 percent. Throw Silas’ 8.57 percent over to Peebles, and you have yourself an outright winner. There’s a little more to it than that, obviously, but the fact of the matter is, the race played out the way it was predicted — Silas proved to be nothing but a spoiler, spoiling Peebles’ chance of winning in one, spoiling his brother-in-law’s relationship with members of the community and spoiling his own reputation as a nice guy, since a nice guy generally doesn’t have an ego that would allow his own desire to “give ‘er a shot” impact so many lives so negatively. With Strength’s endorsement undoubtedly forthcoming, Peebles will likely overcome the setback and win the runoff, and Strength’s charm will undoubtedly smooth out any wrinkles he might have with the people around him. What won’t be so easily overcome, however, is the damage the race has done within the Sheriff’s Department. Those wounds will take much longer to heal, and those could have been easily avoided by a graceful step to the side. Is saying you ran for sheriff really worth all that?

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Elections and Olympiads Defeat Through Complacence

So far, this year’s Olympic Games have been comparatively devoid of anything resembling our traditional notion of drama. Don’t misunderstand me; I’ll allow that some crazy stuff has gone down — the American men’s gymnastic team completely eating it during group competition, dressage still somehow being a sport, etc. — but it’s all been mainly in the service of making this noble tradition seem more akin to a cross between an episode of “The Thick of It” and an old vaudeville routine. I know that Danny Boyle wanted Paul McCartney’s latest warbling of “Hey Jude” to properly encompass the gravity of the event, but every time I see a swimmer false start, or a Brazilian volleyball player take an inordinate amount of spikes to the throat, all I hear is the sort of mangled version of “Yackety Sax” that Merzbow and Tom Waits might cover together. I admit, though, that Michelle and I are currently devoting all of our television time and most of our DVR space to the Olympics. Most of the sports I’m truly interested in aren’t routinely televised; boxing is on almost every morning, granted, but judo, tae kwon do and Greco-Roman wrestling might as well be a black kidnapping victim as far as NBC is concerned. Still, like my self-destructive obsession with curling during the last winter games demonstrates, I’ll watch anything involving the Olympiad. Just the other morning, I was slow setting up the bar at work because women’s skeet shooting was on two separate televisions. I was riveted. You can’t actually see the clay pigeons as they’re released, so the good folks at the network follow it with a little pink glo-disc that evaporates as the pigeon itself shatters. So now we know what the doofiest alien invasion ever might look like. The inherent dichotomies and ensuing drama of women’s gymnastics, though, cannot be marginalized. Barring Russian Roulette, it seems the cruelest of all sports. These girls and women train their bodies and minds for years on end with the kind of discipline that would send marines and monks alike running madly into the hills. Relative to the rest of us, they achieve peak physical condition, the nearest to athletic perfection we can envision. And the potential payoff is immeasurable; when a competitor sticks a vault landing with nary a hop, or flings herself through the air at an impossible height and trajectory on the uneven bars, we forget to breathe. The air inside our living room seems to hum. For that reason, however, the falls (both literal and figurative) are magnified a thousandfold. We watched the Olympic trials religiously, mainly for two reasons: 1) to see if Gabby Douglas is all she’s cracked up to be — turns out she is — and 2) to see if Nastia Liukin could successfully come out of retirement and repeat her multiple medal-winning performance from the Beijing Games. She’d qualified for the trials, but was ranked at only 20th out of all American competitors. Viewers assumed, or were hoping, it was just a case of finding her footing again, and that the rust would be knocked off by the time the trials rolled around. It wasn’t: she repeatedly tottered, faltered and lost her balance during routines, and by the time she missed a release on the uneven bars and fell flat from eight feet in the air, the outcome was already inevitable. She showed resolve in finishing the routine, but a formerly untouchable athlete’s Olympic, and competitive, career was finished, while we watched the whole thing play out. More recently, as in Sunday, it happened again. Jordyn Wieber, reigning world gymnastics champion (which I only figured out a couple of years ago is an entirely different thing from being an Olympics champion), failed to qualify for the all-around competition, though through no real fault of her own. You see, Olympic gymnastics scoring and ranking is maddeningly dysfunctional, sort of like — preemptive segue alert — our national voting system. Based purely on routine scores, Wieber finished an outstanding fourth place overall, just behind teammates Gabby Douglas and Aly Raisman. According to the official

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rules, however, only two representatives from each nation can move on, and so Wieber will be forced to sit by while a dozen other gymnasts she earlier surpassed will get the opportunity that, mathematically and cosmically, should be hers. The day after, former head coach and perpetual “Fiddler on the Roof” extra Bela Karolyi took to NBC to voice his outrage over the current scoring system. Every time the interviewer tried to redirect the conversation, Karolyi would ignore him and keep on talking about the one thing that mattered. It was like the bizarro-world version of a Mitt Romney interview. Whether originally conceived in the interest of simplicity or fairness, our voting system exhibits similar shortcomings, shortcomings that are rendered more and more prevalent with each passing election cycle. I don’t have enough room or patience to get into the nitty-gritty math of it all, but the election is essentially decided by electorates in a handful of swing states. Why is this? Because the popular vote really doesn’t matter, and most states are either deeply blue (Vermont, Massachusetts) or deeply red (Alabama, Georgia and Alabama again, just for good measure). Thusly, the impact of their electoral votes is essentially the same from cycle to cycle. Swing states, then, carry the day. Obviously, it doesn’t stop there. Our system favors, and has for a long time now, a rigidly two-party system and, by proxy, a two-candidate race. Yes, you can write in any candidate you want, but you might as well be throwing away your vote. Primaries are partially to blame, where typically most candidates willing to go to bat for their principles is weeded out in short order. Say what you want about Rick Santorum — I certainly have; check the archives — but the man at least stood by his convictions, skewed and psychotic though they may be. Would he have been crushed by President Obama in the election? Yeah, and probably even worse than Romney will. But it would be a hell of a lot more entertaining than just watching Romney’s campaign self-implode in a frenzy of ineptitude. Are there solutions? There always are. In particular, the single-transferrable vote system (in use at the national level in Northern Ireland, Scotland, Australia, Iceland, India and Pakistan, and at the local level in Massachusetts and Minnesota), seems a viable alternative, allowing each citizen to initially vote for their preferred candidate, then attributing their votes to other candidates according to the voter’s stated policy preferences as more and more candidates are eliminated. Americans, though, are notoriously averse to change. We elected Obama, sure, and we will again, but the nation has reacted with a wave of firearms purchases, anti-woman legislation and more thinly veiled racism than a minstrel show. Changing the voting system, even to something that makes infinitely more sense in terms of fairness, would probably be leveled with sensationalist accusations of Marxism. And you can forget about trying to explain the new system. Our national attention span is so short in terms of politics that Rick Perry can still be mentioned as a viable 2016 candidate after herp-derping his way to national embarrassment. Above all, we care about pageantry and our own petty opinions more than anything else. Will the Olympic rules be changed? Possibly, but in service of what? Sports? As important as that is to our geopolitical and cultural identity, it pales in comparison to the impact of national leaders. Some will crow about it, but ultimately do nothing. Others will try, and be crushed. Most of us, though, will sit still, not even giving our convictions the chance to go up in flames.

JOSHRUFFIN, a Metro Spirit alum, is a published journalist and poet who just

received his MFA from Georgia College & State University. He was once the most un-intimidating bouncer at Soul Bar.

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AUSTIN RHODES About Like I Figured

As this deadline-flirting column gets tucked away, I can see I am going to be flat out of luck when it comes to having a definitive runoff field set for the honor of meeting Democrat Congressman John Barrow for the Georgia 12th district title in November. Republican Lee Anderson is of course in, with an impressive lead, and at last glance not 500 votes separated Rick Allen from Wright McLeod for the honor of meeting Anderson in a runoff. If Lee Anderson emerges as the victor, and he somehow pulls out a victory against Barrow in November, I hope the guy who ends up playing him in skits on “Saturday Night Live” makes us laugh enough to forget our embarrassment. Then again, since Anderson was happy to support T-SPLOST, with Columbia County voting solidly to reject it, as soon as the realization sinks in that we are tied to Richmond County in such a long lasting exercise in taxation, Anderson may find his local support drying up anyway. Some have hinted at this; I will say it flat out: Anderson has been a decent local politician, but his lack of aggressiveness and hillbilly demeanor would put him at a severe disadvantage in Washington. As much as I want to see the 12th go to a Republican, it might be a flat out impossibility if Anderson ends up being the man to face Barrow. In the Richmond County Sheriff’s primary I went out on a limb, the only one of the season I might add, and predicted on the air Tuesday at 5:59 p.m. that Robbie Silas would be lucky to see double digits at the end of the night. He did not crack 9 percent. Pretty sorry for such a loud campaign, but even sorrier when you realize it was the incumbent sheriff’s brother-in-law who likely cost his chosen successor, Scott Peebles, the votes it would have taken to put him over the top without a runoff. The delusional Richard Roundtree finished second with 39 percent of the vote, compared to Peebles at 47 percent. I call him delusional, because he actually believed beforehand that he would win this primary without a runoff. Peebles finished three points shy of outright victory without the vocal support of the man who groomed him to run for the last five years, Sheriff Ronnie Strength. Had Strength been a vocal supporter of Peebles, and particularly had he been able to convince his (also delusional) brother in law Silas sit out the race, Peebles would now be the Dem nominee, and very likely, Republican nominee Freddie Sanders would have never gotten into the race. Thanks a pantload, all you Silas folks. Smooth move. After his defeat, Silas told a Channel 12 reporter he was going to go home and rethink his campaign strategy. I kid you not. Lt. Silas’s strategy was flawed only in the belief that he had a snowball’s chance in Hell to win. And a special shout out to former Sheriff Charles Webster who proved once and for all that the political legacy of the Southside Mafia is as dead as the corpse of Don Corleone. And it stinks twice as bad. My old friend Willie Saunders gave it a brave run, but he was beaten by his own financial problems more than by Judge Carlisle Overstreet. When the final judgment is passed on that Superior Court judge and all the minions who worked behind the scenes making life miserable for good men like Mike Eubanks and Duncan Wheale through the years, there will be more misery than a landslide loss can bring, that is for sure. Overstreet won the election big; then again, Sue Burmeister and Charles Walker most always did the same, didn’t they? Stay tuned folks, the news on the old Fleming Cabal ain’t over by a longshot. I have seen the evidence, and I have heard the tapes, and boy are we going to have some fun!

AUSTINRHODES

The views expressed are the opinions of Austin Rhodes and do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher. 2AUGUST2012

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ERICJOHNSON

Could be Five

Looking ahead to qualifying, the commission could have five new members

Election season can seem almost exactly like the Olympic hurdles — every time you clear one, there’s another one in front of you. Just because the 2012 General Primary is behind us doesn’t mean we’re getting any relief from campaigning. Those who made it to a runoff will get to do everything they’ve already been doing between now and the August 21 runoff election, only in double time. But they’re not the only ones ready to hit the campaign trail. Qualifying for Richmond County Board of Education and the Augusta-Richmond County Commission begins at 9 a.m. Monday, August 6, which means that by noon on Wednesday, August 8, we’ll know who else will be filling our mailboxes with flyers and our lawns with signs. Earlier in the year it was unclear whether the candidates were looking at an election in July or November, causing several candidates to officially announce their intentions so long ago that many voters have long forgotten their names and faces. While qualifying will solidify the list, don’t expect them all to blast out of the gates. District 7 candidate Kenneth Echols says he plans to give people at least a couple of weeks off from campaigning before he starts in. “Right now, the focus is on the primary and people are hounded with calls and mail and all that,” he said. “We’re planning a big push after the Labor Day weekend.” Echols, a retired administrator with experience on the Richmond County Board of Education, says he enjoys campaigning and looks forward to the possibility of bringing change to the commission. “I think the potential is there to make Augusta a lot better with a good commission,” he said. “And we’ve got a chance to get five new ones.” Echols will be running against State Patrol Lieutenant Donnie Smith for the seat 8

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currently occupied by Jerry Brigham, who is being term limited out of office. Smith, too, plans to give the voters a breather before hitting the trail. “We’re sitting on go, ready to get started,” he said. “We’re just waiting for the Sheriff’s election and the Congressional race to get out of the way so we can have the focus on the county commissioners.” Waiting not only lets voters focus on the unfinished business of a runoff, it gives them a chance to give the commission and school board races their full attention. “The amount of money both the school board and the county commission are responsible for is a lot,” he said. “So the public should have the ability not to be bothered by the other races, so to speak. To be able to focus on local issues with local candidates and local monies — I think it’s a great thing.” Like Echols, Smith sees this election as a chance to shake up Augusta’s governing sensibilities. “Our commission has got five seats up and at least three of those are going to have new people in there,” he said. “This is a golden opportunity to change the leadership that we have, and I encourage everybody to participate in that process.” Of all the races, District 1 is shaping up to be the most contested, with at least Harrisburg activist Lori Davis, Laney Walker Neighborhood Association President Stanley Hawes and Harrisburg resident Denice Traina going up against incumbent Matt Aitken. With that many candidates chipping away at the vote, it’s unlikely any one candidate will win the seat outright, which means voters will have to trudge back to the polls on December 4 to vote in the runoff, which is a trip voters are traditionally loath to make. The battle to claim Joe Bowels’ term-limited seat in District 3 looks to be between business attorney Ed Enoch, who has a long association with the ins and outs of Augusta government as the Coliseum Authority’s attorney, and Mary Fair Davis, who 2AUGUST2012


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A.A. MEETINGS

By Brendan Emmett Quigley / Edited by Will Shortz 99 “___ like a Maelstrom, with a notch” (Emily Dickinson poem) 101 Old Polly Holliday sitcom 102 Company with the slogan “At the heart of the image” 103 Is mannerly 105 Funding for a Spanish seafood dish? 108 Lucidness 110 “Babette’s Feast” author 111 Gas pump abbr. 112 North by northwest, e.g. 115 For years on end 120 Game whose lowest card is the 7 123 Far Easterners signed to a St. Louis ball team? 127 Bleach 128 Top to bottom, say 129 Lick but good 130 Philosopher forced by Nero to commit suicide 131 Kids’ summer activity center 132 Like mushroom heads

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Estate-planning pro Place for a band Gridiron stat. Hyundai model Style See 71-Across World ___ Pork-on-a-stick? Came close to Line in the 1950s Scent coming from a Netflix envelope? 56 Answer to “Did you see which Greek goddess walked by?”? 59 Doughnuts, mathematically 61 Kind of pie 62 Foray 63 Filthy kid’s laconic question? 64 Calvary initials 66 Actress ___ Marie Saint 68 Like some Facebook friend requests 73 Visa charge 78 1% group Down 81 Moving 1 Wee rooms, for short? 83 Baby food preparation device 2 Onetime teen idol Corey 85 Ravens’ cries 3 Their empire was the Land of the 87 Store keepers? Four Quarters 90 Soda with a Blue Cream flavor 4 “The Avengers” villain 93 Sun, on the Riviera 5 Furniture piece 95 Jamaican music 6 Tomoyuki ___, creator of Godzilla 96 Jamaican fellow 7 Mel who was portrayed in “Field of 97 Adenoidectomy specialist, for Dreams” short 8 N.L. East team, on scoreboards 100 P.R. pro 9 Venice’s La Fenice, for one 104 Eustacia ___, “The Return of 10 Fringed carriages the Native” woman 11 Easily injured 106 Chest pain 12 Double curve 107 Historical records 13 Some M&M’s 108 Rappers’ posses 14 Steam bath enjoyed just before 109 Café additive bedtime? 110 Like some tricks 15 Nabokov novel 113 Many a prep sch. 16 ___ ejemplo 114 Funny Carvey 17 Dos Equis-filled item at a birthday 116 “This is a priority!” party? 117 Copter’s forerunner 18 Poet Sitwell 118 Make 19 Is grandmotherly, in a way 119 Tight 24 Pump choice 121 A U.P.S. driver may have one: 28 Wine: Prefix Abbr. 31 McDonald’s offering since 1985 122 Private eye 32 Dashiell Hammett’s last novel, with 124 N.L. East team, on scoreboards “The” 125 Stage item 34 “Rhoda” co-star David 126 Dangerous job 35 “___ where it hurts”

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Across 1 During which 7 Chooses 14 Unlike terra incognita, say 20 Olive oil alternative 21 Sexual drive 22 “Me! Me!” 23 Like the winner of the Miss Influenza pageant? 25 “Blast!” 26 Tiki bar order 27 Dons for the first time 29 Indulged in some capers? 30 Hovering falcon 33 Some cake slices 36 “I can see Mexico’s southernmost state from this ship!”? 41 Tapas bar order 43 Quixote’s pal 44 Art philanthropist Broad 45 Lend for a short while 47 Day during the dog days 50 When some coffee breaks begin 51 Bring in, as a big client 53 Like one who has gone green? 54 Rate setter, informally 55 Scoundrel 57 Place to get a learner’s permit, for short 58 Fall guys 60 Some Kellogg grads 61 Literally, “fire bowl” 65 Stand sales 67 ___ dish 69 Before, to a poet 70 Article in Hoy 71 With 41-Down, Ford part 72 Like the Battle of Trafalgar 74 Kick oneself over 75 Kabayaki base 76 Entertainer with a Mandinka warrior haircut 77 French verb with a circumflex 79 Pro accompanier? 80 Guts 82 Danish Nobelist 84 Cousin to “Roger that” 86 Target of thieves who do card skimming 88 Some trailers 89 Vanidades magazine reader 91 Words before and after “what” 92 They vote first 94 “Look who’s back!” 98 Brings out

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REMEMBER THE GOOD TIMES. Elliott Sons Funeral Homes ELLIOTTFUNERALHOME.COM

10 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

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TERRENCEBARBER

Crime Happens Your Weird Week in Crime

Is Augusta-Richmond County really as crime ridden as you think it is? Sure, some unfortunate incidents have occurred downtown, but don’t let that stop you from enjoying and supporting your city. Your copper wires and lawn appliances are in more danger than you are. Mostly. Bringing a Taser to a truck fight or a truck to a Taser fight? On Monday, July 23, a dispute between two Augusta women occurred over child custody. Subject No. 1 honked her horn at Subject No. 2’s home to have the child’s father come outside. Subject No. 2 said that the father would bring the child back to Subject No. 1’s residence and the two fought hand-to-hand. Between the two stories, Subject No. 1 attempted to hit Subject No. 2 with her vehicle, but missed and hit Subject No. 2’s vehicle. It was then Subject No. 2 went to the driver’s side window and Tased the driver. Both women are pressing charges on the other. When kindness gets betrayed (right?) On Thursday, July 26, at 4:40 a.m., an Augusta man picked up a woman on 9th Street and gave her a ride to a Circle K. The woman then asked if he wanted a sexual favor, to which he said no. There was $40 on the center console, which the woman took, but the victim said to give it back. The woman then asked if he would buy her a beer, to which he said yes. The woman gave back a $20 but ran out of the truck with the other $20. Suspicious circumstances are suspicious On Friday, July 27, the U.S. Security Associates Inc. reported that an employee had not shown up to work, and that they had been unable to make contact since April 1. The complaint was made to RCSO because the employee has not turned in three sets of uniforms and a 9mm Glock pistol.

2AUGUST2012

Taking all to a new level On Saturday, July 28, it was reported to RCSO that an unoccupied family home was broken into sometime between Tuesday, July 24, and that Saturday. The burglar(s) took furniture and appliances such as couches, a love seat, a refrigerator, freezers, the hot water heater, a microwave, a washer and dryer. According the incident report, the burglar(s) entered the residence by removing the burglar bars on the windows, which were also stolen for good measure. Crime totals for the week 66 counts of larceny (both felony and misdemeanor) 33 counts of invasion of privacy 17 counts of assault 11 counts of burglary with forced entry (time unknown) Eight counts of financial fraud Seven counts of identification fraud Seven counts of vehicle theft (both attempted and committed) Seven counts of burglary with no forced entry (time unknown) Seven counts of public peace disturbance Six counts of forgery Six counts of recovered property Five counts of burglary with forced entry (daytime) Five counts of property damage Three counts of armed robbery Two counts of theft/mislaid property Two counts of burglary with no forced entry (daytime) One counts of aggravated cruelty to animals One count of terroristic threats One count of burglary with no forced entry (night time) Once count of obstruction of a law enforcement officer

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RASHADO’CONNER ;/,  Goodale Gets Grant 46:; Restoration of historic property inches closer *64465 The Goodale house, which has been admired by historians, haunted by ghosts and vandalized by thieves, has received a vital restoration grant that could bring it one big step closer to its former glory. .667,673, 4(2, >/,5 9,73(*05. ;/,09(* Trust Us, You Really Don’t Want The Lowest-Bidding Air Contioning Company To Install The Most Technically Advanced And Important Appliance In Your Home.

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The Metro Spirit reported on the plight of the historic house in May. In July, Historic Augusta’s Executive Director Erick Montgomery and the property’s owner, Alabama investor Wes Sims, announced the award of a $5,000 National Trust intervention grant to draft a stabilization plan for the Goodale’s restoration. Robyn Anderson, Historic Augusta’s preservation services director, stated that the organization has been encouraging Sims to pursue the building’s preservation since it suffered a wall collapse last year. “We started to look into ways to help him move this process forward and make it a priority,” she said. “So, we identified the intervention grant. This particular grant is actually available year-round, but the money they [the National Trust] distribute is extremely limited.” Since the purpose behind the intervention grant is to resolve preservation problems immediately, Anderson said that the group applied for the grant back in May. By the time Historic Augusta went through a committee review, the preservation organization was told it would be receiving the grant money this month. Sims, who was in the Goodale house two days before its west wall collapsed, said that his course of action will be to use the grant money to first assess the damages and then follow through with full restoration. “When I was in the house before the collapse I had noticed a small separation in the wall, and I remember saying then that this separation would be the first thing we needed to secure,” he said. “I think that previous attempts at repairs [to the house] were what caused the wall’s collapse. A lot of it was also caused by deterioration and weather-related damages.” With the intervention grant, Anderson is hoping that those damages will be professionally evaluated and then repaired. As far as the budget is concerned, Anderson said that in addition to basic structural reinforcements, other immediate needs — from drywall damage to various acts of vandalism — will also be taken into consideration. “Once we know how much those needs will cost to repair, we’ll have Sims come up with a preservation timeline so that those areas will be secured and that any deterioration will be halted,” she said. “Hopefully, once we have finished a professional evaluation of things, we’ll be able to kick the actual restoration into high gear.” While looting has been an issue in the past — Sims says that bandits have not only stolen copper out of Goodale’s basement, but also petty items, such as ravioli from the house’s refrigerator — the investor has isolated a much bigger problem. “During my last trip up there, I discovered that someone had kicked in the door and cut out the electrical wires from my power box,” Sims said. “I actually had power and water running prior to that break-in, so I was pretty much devastated there.” Sims hopes to have the 1799-era inn reach tip-top shape after transferring ownership of the building over to his newest nonprofit, the Historic Home Preservation Society. Since grants are rarely doled out to private individuals, Anderson considers Sims’ choice to switch ownership a wise one. “Once he gets his nonprofit status secured and approved, it will definitely be a little easier for him to acquire grants for either interpretation or bricks and border-type of situations,” Anderson said. “But we [Historic Augusta] plan to continue aiding and advising Sims in any capacity he sees fit.” Sims, who is now in the process of putting a capital campaign together to assist in raising funds for additional rebuilding, said that although both he and the engineers are “sort of in the dark” budget-wise as far as structural analysis goes, he is determined to see the project through hand-in-hand with Historic Augusta. “Without their [Historic Augusta’s] help, we wouldn’t be at the point we’re at now and we wouldn’t be getting things underway,” Sims said. “Erick and I have discussed different plans of action over the phone, so I’m continuing to work with closely them.” While it remains hard to say when reconstruction will officially get underway or what will become of Goodale — a bed and breakfast is on the investor’s shortlist of ideas — Sims said that the road to restoration will be a painstaking one. “If it were up to me, I’d go over with brooms, bricks and lime and bring the place back up myself, but it’s just not that simple in this day and age.” 2AUGUST2012


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Commissioners recently approved a $3.1 million bid for site preparation, which Construction and Maintenance Director Matt Schlachter said was $1.7 million less than budgeted. “It’s all the rough grading for all future buildings, stadiums and whatnot,” Schlachter said. “It’s going to provide the infrastructure, which is the waterlines and sewer lines and storm drainage. It’s also going to include a parking lot and the main road through the park.” Basically, the site will be fully prepped and ready to be built on, and while it won’t have the nice manicured grass of the area’s more developed parks, nor for the time being will it have irrigation, Schlachter said it will be a grassy space useable for a variety of different activities. “So basically, you’ll have a road and 50 acres of greenspace where people can go out and throw a Frisbee, hit a baseball or a golf ball — that kind of thing,” he said. “You’ll be able to see where the soccer fields will go — they’ll be graded, they just won’t have the nice turf and they won’t have the goals and lights.” In other words, it will soon be a park without the final touches like Kroger Field, the park across from the Judicial Center in Evans that became the very developed Evans Towne Center Park. The final touches will come later and they will be significant — five soccer fields, a playground, tennis courts and a walking trail for the county’s portion, a new football stadium, a baseball field, a softball field and a practice field for the Board of Education portion. “The total parcel of land is about 70 acres,” Schlachter said. “We’re only going to be impacting a little under 50.” Commissioners plan to donate the additional 20 acres owned by the county to the greenspace program, and because it abuts an additional 20 acres already in the program, the county will end up having 40 contiguous acres dedicated to greenspace. “I was back there one day last week,” Schlachter said. “There are some beautiful views back in there. It ought to be a nice place fore people to go and enjoy nature.” Schlachter said that unless commissioners decide to move it elsewhere, the money saved by the low bid will stay attached to the park project, which at one time had the possibility of a BMX track being attached to it. Regardless of the extra money, Schlachter said that idea is no longer still being considered for that location. What will be part of the park complex, however, are improvements to the traffic flow, which was already congested. “We have an ongoing design right now,” Schlachter said. “We’re probably 90 percent done with our design to improve King Taylor Road just to get it widened out so it can take the traffic.” To alleviate congestion around the school, Schlachter said the new road being built within the park will be tied to the Board of Education’s campus, which will allow a through connection. Currently, the road goes through the existing baseball field, and they won’t move it until they have a new place to put the field. Schlachter expected the first phase to take approximately six months to complete, but said he couldn’t put a timetable on anything coming after. “We’re coming up with cost estimates for what it would take to finish the park out,” he said. “We’ll present that to the commissioners and they’ll decide if they want to move forward with it.”

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ERICJOHNSON

ATTITUDE

Former Lynx Trevor Gillies takes his Never Quit attitude to Russia At 6’3”, 240 pounds, Trevor Gillies seems like a mountain of a man as he moves about our world, the real world, eating a chicken breast lunch special at one of the picnic tables inside the Washington Road Rhinehart’s. But in his world, the pugilistic world of heavyweight hockey enforcers, he’s really not all that big, which is why he (he’ss 33) prides himself on being a fight technician. What he lacks in size and youth (he he makes up for in technique. Where he once might have been content to duke it out, he h now strategizes, breaking down fights by learning different blocks and angles with w th his fight coach, Chris Elms. wi

14 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

As he eats, the little white plastic fork looks ridiculously small in his hand, which is scuffed and bruised from fight training at Greubels Mixed Martial Arts, where he works out nearly every morning. Later in the day he’ll continue his workout at Quantum Fitness, and then he’ll make dinner at home with his wife and kids, maybe capping off the day by watching a movie with the family on their big, L-shaped couch. He’s making the most of these last few days because, by the end of the week, he’ll be halfway around the world, once more pursuing his dream. That dream has changed since the Spirit profiled him last year. Then, he was up to his mouth guard in the dream. After 12 years bouncing around hockey’s minor leagues, including two stints with the Augusta Lynx, he had just finished his first full year with the National Hockey League’s New York Islanders and was looking forward to another season. Thanks to a groin injury and a changing game, however, that was not to be. After only three games, the Islanders sent him back down to the minors. Though the move caught him a little by surprise, Gillies says it wasn’t hard to see it coming. “The writing was kind of on the wall,” he says. “All the other heavyweights were getting sent down around me and then my name got called. It wasn’t really that much of a shocker — once you get rid of all the nuclear weapons, you don’t really need to have a nuclear weapon.” The nukes, he says, are being replaced by more tactical weapons. “With the NHL, I think that you need to be a guy who can play 10 or 11 2AUGUST2012


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The Soul City Sirens roller derby team takes on Burn City Rollergirls of Auburn, Ala., on Sunday, August 5, at Red Wing Rollerway, with doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout beginning at 6 p.m. Tickets to this family friendly event that features halftime enter tainment and a PBR minifridge auction, are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. The Sirens are also looking for new skaters and invite women of the CSRA to Redwing Rollerway Monday, August 13, at 7 p.m. to their midseason recruitment meeting. Email training@soulcitysirens.com or visit soulcitysirens.com. Photo cour tesy Steven Hewitt.

ENTERTAIN

ME

Arts

Watercolor class with Paul Bowers, part of the Arts Academy in the Woods series, is Thursday, August 9, from 4-6:30p.m. at Gravatt Camp and Conference Center in Aiken. $45 fee includes materials and a light supper. Pre-registration required. Call 803-648-1817 or visit bishopgravatt.org. Call for Entries for the Augusta Photo Festival, which is October 27-November 4, is going on now through August 15. For contest rules and more information, visit augustaphotofestival.org/competition.html. Call 706-834-9742 or email info@augustaphotofestival.org. Active-duty military personnel and their families will receive free admission to the Morris Museum of Art through Sunday, September 2, as part of the museum’s participation in the Blue Star Museum program. Call 706-7247501 or visit themorris.org. Day of Art, hosted by the North Augusta Artists Guild, is each Tuesday from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Arts and Heritage Center and includes a group of artists painting in the center who will answer questions or allow visitors to join in. Call 803-441-4380 or visit artsandheritagecenter.com.

Exhibitions

Double Take, a Clay Artists of the Southeast exhibition, shows at Gallery on the Row throughout the month of August. An opening reception is Friday, August 3, from 4-9 p.m. Call 706-724-4989 or visit galleryontherow.com. Surrealism at Gaartdensity: Works by Brian Stewart and Blaine Prescott shows in August at Gaartdensity Gallery downtown. An opening reception is Friday, August 3, at 6 p.m. Call 706-466-5166 or email gaartdensitygallery@rocketmail.com. Social ARTifacts: A World Vision Through Art, shows August 4-September 29 at the Lucy Craft Laney Museum of Black History. An opening reception will be held Saturday, August 4, from 6-9 p.m. and will include performances. $5, adults; $3, seniors and military; $2, children. Call 706724-3576 or visit lucycraftlaneymuseum.com. 2AUGUST2012

The Art of Alfred Hutty: Woodstock to Charleston, including 60 oil and watercolor paintings, pastel drawings, etchings, drypoints and lithographs, shows August 4-October 28 at the Morris Museum of Art. The exhibit opening, featuring a discussion from curator Sara Arnold of the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston and reception, is Thursday, August 9, from 6-8:30 p.m. Free, members; $5, non-members. Call 706-724-7501 or visit themorris.org. Ongoing Exhibition of fine paintings from the collection of Randy S. Jones shows in his gallery at 2331 Washington Road on the first weekend of each month. Strange Fruit: Lithographs by Joseph Norman is on display at the Morris Museum of Art through September 16. Call 706-724-7501 or visit themorris.org. Painters Freddie Flynt and Tricia Mayers exhibit their work at Sacred Heart Cultural Center through August 31. Call 706-826-4700 or visit sacredheartaugusta.org. Hamburg: The Forgotten Town, an historical exhibit on the town which flourished on the South Carolina banks near the modern Fifth Street Bridge, shows through August 24 at the Arts & Heritage Center of North Augusta. Call 803-441-4380 or visit artsandheritagecenter.com. Tying the Knot, a display of wedding dresses and accessories from the late 1800s to the 1960s, now shows at the Augusta Museum of History. Call 706-722-8454 or visit augustamuseum.org. ACA Summer Camp Exhibition, featuring the works of participants in the center’s summer art camps, shows June-August at the Aiken Center for the Arts. Call 803-641-9094 or visit aikencenterforthearts.org.

Music

Get Down Downtown Family Friendly Event is Friday, August 3, from 5-10 p.m. at the Augusta Common and features live entertainment from Tara

Scheyer and the Mud Puppy Band, Folly and the JAMP (James Brown Academy of Musik Pupils) Masters, as well as activities and more. First Friday concert, featuring Joel Cruz and the Young Lions, is Friday, August 3, at 6 p.m. at Casa Blanca Cafe. Call 706-504-3431 or visit casablancatime.com. The Columbia County Amateur Series, featuring Xaq Matthews, Shelby Paige and She-N-She, is Friday, August 3, at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County Amphitheater. Call 706-868-3349 or visit columbiacountyga.gov. Get Down Downtown Concert, featuring Bloodkin, Stewart & Winfield and Funk You, is Friday, August 3, at 8 p.m. at the Jessye Norman Amphitheatre. $12. Visit eventbrite.com. Twilight Music Series is Saturday, August 4, from 6:30-8:30 p.m., beginning at Patriot Boat Tours behind the Marriott on the Riverwalk. Music by Doug and Henry. Participants are invited to bring drinks and dinner. $25, with pre-registration required. Call 803-730-9739 or visit patriottourboat.com. Modern Jazz Movement performs as part of Garden City Jazz’s Candlelight Jazz Series on Sunday, August 5, at the 8th Street River Stage downtown at 8 p.m. $6; free, those 12 and under. Visit gardencityjazz.com. 2012 Hopelands Summer Concert Series, featuring Veronika Jackson, is Monday, August 6, at 7 p.m. at Hopelands Gardens in Aiken. Participants should bring lawn chairs and blankets. Free. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov. The Augusta Choral Society has openings for all voice parts for their new season and rehearsals begin Tuesday, August 7, from 7:30-9:30 p.m. in the choir room of First Baptist Church of Augusta. Singers high school age and older are welcome to attend. Call 706-826-4713 or visit augustachoralsociety.org.

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The Salvation Army School of the Performing Arts holds classes each Tuesday. Included is instruction in piano, drums, guitar, voice and brass. Call 706-3644069 or visit krocaugusta.org.

Literary

Marsha Maurer, author of “Whatever Is Lovely: Design for an Elegant Spirit,” signs copies of her book on Friday, August 3, from 4-7 p.m. at Barnes and Noble. Call 706-737-0012 or visit bn.com. Edna Davis, author of “It’s All About Me! Conscious Eater, visits the Headquarters Branch Library on Thursday, August 9, from 7-8:30 p.m. Call 706-8212600 or visit ecgrl.org. Nook tutorials at Barnes and Noble in the Augusta Mall are each Saturday beginning at noon, followed by a Nookcolor tutorial at 12:30 p.m. Free. Call 706-7370012 or visit bn.com.

Dance

Tango Night is every Thursday, 7-9:30 p.m., at Casa Blanca Cafe, 936 Broad Street. Call 706-504-3431 or visit casablancatime.com. Belly Dance Class is every Tuesday at 6 p.m. at Euchee Creek Branch Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-556-0594 or visit ecgrl.org.

Augusta Area Newcomers Club Welcome Coffee is Thursday, August 2, at 10 a.m. at Jones Creek Golf Course. Call 706-495-9064, 706-868-3668 or visit augustanewcomers.net. First Thursday at Midtown Market on Kings Way is Thursday, August 2, from 5-8 p.m. Featured artists are members of the Augusta Photo Festival Steering Committee and the cup charity is the Augusta Photo Festival 2012. Call 706-364-8479. First Friday in downtown Augusta is Friday, August 3, from 5-9 p.m. on Broad Street between 7th-12th. It includes art shows, vendors, music and more. Call 706-826-4702 or visit augustaarts.com. First Friday Inshop Tasting is Friday, August 3, from 5-8 p.m. at Wine World in North Augusta. $5, with $3 rebate upon the purchase on a bottle of the night’s featured wine. Call 803-279-9522 or visit wineworldsc.com. Weekly Wine Tastings at Vineyard Wine Market in Evans are each Friday from 4:30-6:30 p.m. and each Saturday from 1-6 p.m. Call 706-922-9463 or visit vine11.com.

Augusta International Folk Dance Club meets Tuesday nights from 7:30-9:30 p.m. at the Augusta Ballet Studio on 2941 Walton Way. No partners needed. First visit free. Call 706-399-2477.

The Augusta Market at the River is every Saturday through October 27 from 8 a.m.-2 p.m. at the 8th Street Bulkhead and features produce, arts and crafts and more for sale, as well as live music and entertainment. Call 706-627-0128 or visit theaugustamarket.com.

Theater

Health

“Almost, Maine,” a Fort Gordon Dinner Theatre production, shows August 2-4, with dinner at 7 p.m. and the show at 8 p.m. $40, civilians; $38, seniors, retirees, DA civilians, active-duty E7 and above; $30, active-duty E6 and below; $25, show only. Call 706793-8552 or visit fortgordon.com. “The Prince Is Giving a Ball,” a production of the Enopion Theatre Company, shows August 9-11, 16-18 and 25 at the Kroc Center. Thursday and Friday shows are at 7 p.m. and Saturday matinees are at 3 p.m. $15, adults; $10, seniors, children 12 and under and groups of 10 or more. Call 706-771-7777 or visit enopion.com.

Flix

“Porgy and Bess” shows Friday, August 3, at noon at the Morris Museum of Art as part of the Films on Friday series. After the movie, museum Director Kevin Grogan will lead a discussion. Participants are invited to bring lunch. Free. Call 706-724-7501 or visit themorris.org. “Snow Dogs” shows at 1 p.m. and “Because of Winn Dixie” shows at 3 p.m. as part of the Dog Days of Summer Movie Fest at the Aiken Public Library on Friday, August 3. Call 803-642-2023 or visit abbe-lib.org. Family Movie Night on the Big Screen, featuring “Where the Wild Things Are,” is Friday, August 3, at 8:30 p.m. in the parking lot of the Headquarters Branch Library. Participants should bring lawn chairs and every child will receive a copy of the book. Call 706-821-2600 or visit ecgrl.org. “The Secret World of Arrietty” shows Saturday, August 4, at the Headquarters Branch Library. Call 706-8212600 or visit ecgrl.org. “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen” shows Tuesday, August 7, at 6:30 p.m. at the Headquarters Branch Library. Free. Call 706-821-2600 or visit ecgrl.org. Monday Movie Matinees show at 2 p.m. at the Diamond Lakes Branch Library. Participants are invited to bring their own snacks. Call 706-772-2432 or visit ecgrl.org.

20 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Special Events

Cribs for Kids, a seminar on safe sleep environments for infants sponsored by Safe Kids East Central, is Thursday, August 2, at 5:45 p.m. at GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center. Families who can demonstrate a financial need will receive a portable crib, fitted sheet, sleep sac and pacifier for $10. Pre-registration required. Call 706-721-7606 or visit georgiahealth. org/safekids. Center for Women Tour is Thursday, August 2, at 7 p.m. at Doctors Hospital. Free, but pre-registration required. Call 706-651-2229 or visit doctorshospital.net. Mobile Mammography Screenings, offered by appointment, are available August 3 at Target in Aiken, August 6 at Dillard’s in the Augusta Mall, August 7 at Belk in North Augusta, August 8 at Hillcrest Baptist Church and August 9 at Lincoln County Health Department. Appointments can be made from 8 a.m.-3 p.m. each day. Call 706-774-4145 or visit universityhealth.org. Baby Care Basics and Breastfeeding is Friday, August 3, from 9 a.m.-noon at Trinity Hospital of Augusta. Pre-registration required. Call 706-481-7727 or visit trinityofaugusta.com. Weekend Childbirth Education Class is Friday, August 3, from 6:30-9:30 p.m. and Saturday, August 4, from 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Free, but pre-registration required. Call 706-774-2825 or visit universityhealth.org. Family Focused Childbirth Tours are Monday, August 6, from 2-3 p.m. at Trinity Hospital of Augusta. Pre-registration required. Call 706-481-7727 or visit trinityofaugusta.com. Look Good, Feel Better, a workshop for female cancer patients who want to maintain their appearance and self-esteem during chemo and radiation, is Monday, August 6, from 3-5 p.m. at Doctors Hospital. Preregistration required. Call 706-651-4343 or visit doctors-hospital.net. Total Joint Replacement Class is Tuesday, August 7, from 1-3 p.m. at University Hospital. Visit universityhealth.org. 2AUGUST2012


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2AUGUST2012

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 21


V23|NO31

Fresh Start Smoking Cessation Class meets Tuesdays, August 7-28, at 6 p.m. at University Hospital’s cafeteria. Pre-registration required. Call 706774-8094 or visit universityhealth.org. Infant CPR Class is Tuesday, August 7, from 6-8 p.m. at Trinity Hospital of Augusta. Pre-registration required. Call 706-481-7727 or visit trinityofaugusta.com. Weight Loss Surgery and You is Tuesday, August 7, at 6 p.m. at University Hospital’s Heart & Vascular Institute. Pre-registration required. Call 706774-8931 or visit universityhealth.org.

721-2609 or visit georgiahealth.org/weightloss. Women’s Center Tour is Thursday, August 9, from 7-9:30 p.m. at University Hospital. Free, but pre-registration required. Call 706-774-2825 or visit universityhealth.org. Child Safety Seat Inspections and Car Seat Classes, sponsored by Safe Kids East Central, are offered by appointment at either the Safe Kids Office or Martinez-Columbia Fire Rescue. Call 706-721-7606 or visit georgiahealth. org/safekids.

group, meets Monday, August 6, at 6 p.m. at Walton Options for Independent Living in North Augusta. Call 803-279-9611 or visit csradreamcatchers.com. Parents Healing Together, a support group for those who have lost infants, meets Monday, August 6, at 7 p.m. at University Hospital. Call 706-7742751, 706-774-5802 or visit universityhealth.org. A-Team: Autism Spectrum Disorder Support and Resource Group meets Tuesday, August 7, from 6-7 p.m. at GHSU’s Children’s Medical Center. Call 706-721-5160 or email ddrakele@georgiahealth.edu.

Childbirth Education Class meets Tuesdays, August 7-28 from 7-9:30 p.m. at University Hospital. Free, but pre-registration required. Call 706-7742825 or visit universityhealth.org.

Joint Efforts, presented by Trinity Hospital of Augusta, meets every Thursday from 11-11:45 a.m. at Augusta Bone and Joint, and features a free seminar about knee and hip pain, treatments, medication, food and exercise. Call 706-481-7604 or visit trinityofaugusta.com.

The Daddy Class, a baby care class just for men, is Tuesday, August 7, from 7-9 p.m. at Doctors Hospital. Pre-registration required. Call 706651-2229 or visit doctors-hospital.net.

Infant CPR Anytime Learning Program will be held Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. at the first floor information desk (west entrance) of Georgia Health Sciences University. Visit georgiahealth.edu.

Bariatric Support Group meets Wednesday, August 8, at 6 p.m. at Aiken Regional Medical Centers. Pre-registration required. Call 803-641-5751 or visit aikenregional.com.

Breastfeeding Class is Tuesday, August 7, from 7-9 p.m. at GHSU’s Medical Center. Pre-registration required. Call 706-721-9351 or visit georgiahealth.org.

Multiple Sclerosis and Parkinson Disease Aquatics Class meets every Monday and Friday at noon at the Wilson Family Y. Free for members; $3 for non-members. Pre-registration required. Call Claudia Collins at 706922-9664 or visit thefamilyy.org.

ALS Support Lunch and Learn meets Thursday, August 9, from 11 a.m.-2 p.m. at GHSU’s Medical Office Building. Pre-registration required. Call 706721-2681 or visit georgiahealth.org.

Pickles and Ice Cream, a class for women in their first trimesters of pregnancy, is Tuesday, August 7, from 7-9:30 p.m. at Doctors Hospital. Pre-registration required. Call 706-651-2229 or visit doctors-hospital.net. Car Sea Class is Thursday, August 9, from 5:45-8 p.m. at MCGHealth Building 1010C. $10. Pre-registration required. Call 706-721-7606 or visit georgiahealth.org/kids. Bariatric Seminar is Thursday, August 9, from 6-7 p.m. at Doctors Hospital. Free, but pre-registration required. Call 706-651-4343 or visit doctorshospital.net. Breastfeeding Class is Thursday, August 9, from 6:30-9:30 p.m. at Doctors Hospital. Pre-registration required. Call 706-651-2229 or visit doctorshospital.net. Weight Loss Surgery Seminar is Thursday, August 9, at 7 p.m. at the Columbia County Library. Free, but pre-registration required. Call 706-

22 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Heart Attack and Stroke Prevention Orientation is every Monday at 6 p.m. and Tuesday at 2 p.m. at University Hospital’s Heart & Vascular Institute (Classroom 3). Call 706-774-5548 or visit universityhealth.org. Adapted Wii Special Populations available by appointment at the Wilson Family Y, and feature individual ½-hour classes for physically and developmentally challenged individuals of all ages. $10, members; $20, non-members. Call Claudia Collins at 706-922-9662 or visit thefamilyy.org.

Support

CSRA Huntington’s Disease Support Group meets Tuesday, August 7, at 6:30 p.m. at the MCG Movement Disorders Clinic conference room. Call 706-721-2798, 706-231-2775 or visit universityhealth.org.

Breast Cancer Support Group meets Thursday, August 9, from 5:30-7:30 p.m. at GHSU’s Cancer Center. Call 706-721-4109 or visit georgiahealth.org. Cancer Survivor Support Group meets Thursday, Augusta 9, from 6-7 p.m. at Augusta Oncology Associates. Call 706-651-2283 or visit doctorshospital.net. Brain Injury Support Group meets Thursday, August 9, from 6-7:30 p.m. at NeuroRestorative Georgia. Call 706-829-0370 or visit wrh.org.

Amputee Support Group meets Thursday, August 2, from noon-1 p.m. at Walton Rehab. A clinic is held immediately afterwards. Call 706-823-8504 or visit wrh.org.

PFLAG, a support group for LGBT people and their parents, family, friends and allies, meets Thursday, August 9, at 7 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Augusta. Visit pflag.org.

CSRA Dream Catchers, a traumatic brain injury and disability support

Diabetes Youth Support Group meets quarterly. For more information, call 706-868-3241 or visit universityhealth.org.

2AUGUST2012


10 Slimming Kitchen Tools

Win $1,000

Most of us know which foods to avoid if weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on a diet. But what kitchen gadgets should we have? Health.com highlights 10 genius gizmos. Stocking your home with the right prep and cook tools is a key step in keeping those extra pounds away. You probably already own a food processor and blender, but here are some kitchen aids that make it easy to slash calories and fat, picked by Joy Bauer, Today show nutrition expert and author of the new cookbook â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slim and Scrumptiousâ&#x20AC;?; Lauren Deen, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cook Yourself Thin Fasterâ&#x20AC;?; and celebrity trainer Kathie â&#x20AC;&#x153;High Voltageâ&#x20AC;? Dolgin. IMMERSION BLENDER This handheld tool lets you whip up smoothies in the glass and purĂŠe soups right in the pot â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a get-thin trick since research shows that having low-cal soup before a meal helps you eat less. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I use asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower and squash,â&#x20AC;? Bauer says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re high in volume, low in calories and you get that luxurious texture. Beans work well, too.â&#x20AC;? STEAMER Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s great for cooking vegetables without adding oil â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and for keeping most of the nutrients. This inexpensive item â&#x20AC;&#x153;can also steam fish,â&#x20AC;? Deen says. OIL MISTER Fill it with canola or olive oil, and it will save you â&#x20AC;&#x153;significant calories,â&#x20AC;? Bauer notes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even healthy oils can add weight. For example, every tablespoon of olive oil has 120 calories and 14 grams of fat. With a mister, you can cover the whole bottom of a pan with just a teaspoon of oil.â&#x20AC;? APPLE DIVIDER This ingenious (and inexpensive!) invention removes the core and cuts apples into convenient wedges in a single stroke, so you can bag them up and take them with you. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It makes you much more likely to snack on fruit,â&#x20AC;? Dolgin says.

Lose Weight

Fit to Be Gold Phase 5 Starts in September

Goldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gym is looking for a few good men and women to compete in Phase 5 of the Fit to Be Gold Challenge, a 12-week weight loss competition that begins September 4. But if you want to participate, be prepared to work hard. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fit to Be Gold is for the individual who is seeking to lose weight and change their life who LVKLJKO\PRWLYDWHGWRUHDFKWKHLUJRDOLQZHHNVÂľVDLG*ROG¡V*\P0DUNHWLQJ'LUHFWRU$OOHQ Childs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a contest.â&#x20AC;? It is a contest anyone 14 and up can enter. Childs admits that those in their 20s and 30s do well in the contest, but adds that older contestants are also competitive. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a gentleman who was in the Phase 3 contest who was 67 years old and he came in second SODFHVRDJHGRHVQ¡WPDWWHUDWDOOÂľKHVDLG´$JDLQLWDOOMXVWFRPHVEDFNWRGHVLUHÂľ Childs said applications are being accepted now for the contestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 20 positions. Those interested need only email their name, phone number and the reason why they want to be in the contest to fittobegold@hotmail.com. 7KHGHDGOLQHLV7XHVGD\$XJXVWDQGHYHU\RQHZKRHPDLOVZLOOEHFRQWDFWHG â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we will do is call everybody and have them come in for an interview so we can explain the program,â&#x20AC;? he said. ,QWKHIUHHFRQWHVWVSRQVRUHGE\WKH0HWUR6SLULW)R[3UHPLHU)LWQHVV3HUVRQDO7UDLQLQJDQG Goldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gym, participants will receive free access to Goldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gym for 12 weeks and once a week meetings with a personal trainer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nutrition is a major part of the program,â&#x20AC;? Childs said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their personal trainer will be their exercise coach as well as their nutrition coach.â&#x20AC;? $QGZKLOHWKHZLQQHUZLOOUHFHLYHDSUL]HHYHU\RQHZKRVWLFNVZLWKWKHFRQWHVWZLOOJHW something out of it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about sta starting and finishing the program; the contest is really just icing on the cake,â&#x20AC;? Childs explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look at Rob Forbes. He cam came in second place but he lost 47 pounds. Did he lose? Look at Bobby Burch. He didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get a thousand dollars but he lost 55 pounds. Did he lose? No.â&#x20AC;? Winner of Phase 4

Chelsie Lee

GRATER/ZESTER â&#x20AC;&#x153;I like it for grating cheese â&#x20AC;&#x201D; you end up using less,â&#x20AC;? Deen says. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also handy for grating small amounts of chocolate. Bauer makes citrus zest with hers: â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can use the zest in banana bread, in sauces for fish, even burgers. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s calorie-free but gives food a lot of punch.â&#x20AC;?

To enter th the Fit to Be Gold Phase 5 Challenge, email your phon number and the reason why you want to enter to name, phone fittobegold fittobegold@hotmail.com by Tuesday, August 28.

before

HANDHELD CHOPPER This makes it easy to chop veggies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; no more excuses for not getting your five-plus slimming fruits and veggies a day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I use it to chop carrots, water chestnuts, red bell pepper and celery,â&#x20AC;? Bauer says. Unlike a food processor, it will also chop nuts without turning them into paste. KITCHEN SCISSORS Invest in a good pair and keep them sharp: â&#x20AC;&#x153;They make it easy to cut the fat off chicken, trim vegetables, cut pizza and snip herbs,â&#x20AC;? or Deen says. The flavor of herbs, Bauer says, â&#x20AC;&#x153;more than makes up for whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not going in your food â&#x20AC;&#x201D; like butter and salt.â&#x20AC;? NINE-INCH PLATES In the last few decades, the average dinner plate has grown from 8 RXW ÂźLQFKHVWRLQFKHV0DNHVXUH\RXUVDUHFORVHUWRLQFKHVÂłDERXW the size of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salad plate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s my dinner plate,â&#x20AC;? Dolgin says.. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fit on a salad plate, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not eating it.â&#x20AC;? SMALL GLASS-ESPRESSO CUPS Deen uses them to serve puddings and chocolate mousse: â&#x20AC;&#x153;They look pretty and satisfy your sugar craving â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but you control the calories.â&#x20AC;? MUFFIN TINS â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can make small quiches and portion out side dishes, too,â&#x20AC;? Deen says.

after


GOLD’S GYM: JUNE 2012 |p.3

Eating Healthy for the Whole School Year

With back to school just around the corner, the normal daily schedule is about to change. But don’t let this stop your healthy eating habits. Remember to make time for breakfast for you and your kids. Breakfast is the single most important meal of your day. By eating a breakfast, you are fueling your body and jump-starting your day for school or work. Not only does breakfast fuel your body but fuels your mind. Studies have shown that children who eat breakfast perform better at school. And it would go without saying that the same is true of adults and their performance at work. Eating healthy by starting with a healthy breakfast aids in weight loss. Studies show those who eat breakfast maintain a 35 pound or more weight loss over those who do not eat breakfast. The most common breakfast of those who lost this weight was whole grain cereal and skim milk. This is a quick and easy meal for breakfast. Here are some quick tips to ensure you keep eating healthy during the school year.

TIPS

back to school

Tip #1 Keep easy to eat breakfast foods on hand like bananas, apples, whole-grain cereal, cereal bars and skim milk. If you don’t have time for a nice warm breakfast grab a quick bowl of cereal or a fruit and cereal bar to go. Tip #2 Plan for lunch before the week starts. Over the weekend plan for and shop for the next week’s lunch menu. Pack your child’s lunch the night before so you are not pressed for time in the morning. Do the same with your healthy lunch as well. Tip #3 Have healthy after-school snacks on hand for when the kids get home. After a long day at school they will want something to fuel up. Cut up some cucumbers, carrots and celery and keep it in a closed container with water to keep fresh. Make two containers and take one to work with you to keep on hand for your break. Instead of potato chips try keeping popcorn on hand or whole-wheat crackers. Tip #4 Set a schedule for dinnertime to make sure you are eating healthy for all your meals. Along with back to school also come all the school events like sports, choir practice and a dozen other activities. Plan your meals to accommodate these extra activities when you can. And when you can’t and eating out is the only choice, select wisely from the menu and watch portion sizes. Tip #5 Don’t skip meals on the weekend. Make sure to continue eating healthy by starting your weekend with breakfast and follow up with healthy snacks and meals. This will help you keep you good habits and rev up your metabolism.

per month

$10

no commitment | month - to - month

no kidding

*amenities vary by location | $10 per month good at Bobby Jones location only


5 Surprising Reasons You’re Not Losing Weight The answer to your frustration may be hiding out amid the random things you do over the course of an average day — those little habits that have seemingly no connection to weight loss, but may in fact be sabotaging your best get-fit efforts Ask yourself these questions, and if you answer yes to any of them, you may have found your personal diet defeaters. Outwit them and you’ll soon be back on track to a leaner, fitter you. DO YOU ALWAYS EAT “HEALTHY”? A funny thing happens when you focus on making careful diet decisions. If you just “think” of your meal as a light choice, it can cause your brain to make more of the hormone ghrelin, reports a study from Yale University. “More ghrelin makes you feel less full and signals your metabolism to slow down,” says study author and Ph.D. candidate Alia Crum. To keep your ghrelin balanced, focus on the more indulgent parts of your meal — say, the nuts and cheese on your salad, rather than the lettuce. It also helps to pick foods that are both healthy and seem like a treat, like a warm bowl of soup with crusty whole-grain bread. DO YOU PAY WITH PLASTIC? Carrying cash may feel a little last century, but people who use a credit card when grocery shopping buy significantly more unhealthy, calorie-dense food than people who pay cash, according to a study in the Journal of Consumer Research. Junk-food buyers were perfectly aware of the extra calories and cost of those treats, but since they didn’t feel the immediate hit in the wallet, they gave in more easily to impulse buys, explains study co-author Kalpesh Desai, Ph.D., associate professor of marketing at Binghamton University. DO YOU USE EXERCISE AS A REASON TO SNACK? There’s a downside to that, says a new French study: Simply thinking about exercise can cause you to eat 50 percent more. Why? People assume that the upcoming workout gives them license to snack. Avoid excessive munching with a pre-gym snack of no more than 150 calories, advises Keri Glassman, R.D., author of “The Snack Factor Diet.” Try two slices of turkey with whole-grain crackers. ARE YOU DESK-BOUND AT WORK? Sit for just a few hours and your body stops making a fat-inhibiting enzyme called lipase, researchers at the University of Missouri-Columbia found. Stand and stretch every hour, and you’ll boost your metabolism by about 13 percent, says research published in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Or, fidget all day (tap your feet or bounce in your chair) and increase calorie burn by 54 percent. DO YOU SLEEP TOO LITTLE? “Not enough shut-eye puts your body into a carb- and fat-craving survival mode,” says Michael Breus, Ph.D., author of “The Sleep Doctor’s Diet Plan.” A study in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that women who slept fewer than four hours ate 300 more calories and 21 more grams of fat the next day. Try this to gauge your sleep needs: For a week, go to bed seven and a half hours before you need to get up. If you awaken before the alarm, you can get by with less sleep. But if you hit snooze, you may need eight, even nine, hours a night to wake up refreshed, recharged and ready to burn some fat.a

If your body has been in park — or idling on the couch — Gold’s Gym Fitness Institute trainer Robert Reames has a few words of advice before you hit the gas

Whether they want to lose a few pounds before the high school reunion or are trying to get in bikini shape for an upcoming beach trip, people resolve every day to stop being sedentary and get back inside the gym. But too many go into overdrive, trying to lose weight too fast and pushing themselves too hard. It’s a phenomenon called crash fitness, and it can leave anyone sidelined with an easily preventable injury. “It occurs when people jump into fitness programs to make up for missed time,” explains Reames, trainer and author of “Make Over Your Metabolism.” “It’s the weekend warrior mentality: They believe they can just start back at the same level, lift the same weights — and they end up pulling a muscle or hurting themselves.” Here are the top five crash-induced injury zones and how to make sure you steer clear.

Shoulders and neck. “Because of today’s volume of work in a seated position and just overall poor posture, many people are naturally predisposed to shoulder and neck strain injuries,” Reames observes. “Poor posture combined with improper form at the gym can cause a quick injury.” How to avoid a problem: “Practice good posture,” Reames says. “Sit up tall, feet firmly planted on the ground, your abdominals drawn in and your shoulders pulled back and down.” Lower back. “Gym-goers these days are often hitting the gym too hard and too fast with little to no core training or strength trainingg beforehand,” Reames says. “Lifting too much too fast or using improper liliftingg technique can


GOLD’S GYM: JUNE 2012 |p.5

easily throw your back out.” How to avoid a problem: Make sure your knees are bent when you’re lifting weights, and talk to a Gold’s Gym personal trainer if you have any questions about technique. Increase your core strength with basic bridges and half Superman lifts. Basic bridge: Lie on your back, knees bent with arms comfortably at your sides. Press into heels and raise your hips, taking the pressure in the upper shoulder. No pressure should be felt in the neck or back. For advanced positions, try touching your fingertips to the back of your shoes or clasping your hands behind your back and drawing your shoulder blades together. Half Superman: Lie facedown with your arms stretched above your head and your feet about hipwidth apart. Keeping your neck straight and your eyes on the floor, lift your arms and torso as far off the ground as you can. Knees. “Many people who are looking to ‘bulk up for summer’ are lifting too much weight,” Reames says. “Begin slowly, and focus on proper range of motion.” How to avoid a problem: “Start out doing exercises like squats and lunges just using your body weight,” Reames advises. “Concentrate on achieving proper form. Then, once you can do the move easily, think about adding some form of resistance or weight.”

Shins. “Stretching plays a key role in avoiding shin splints,” Reames says. “Proper stretching before a workout will help you elongate muscles, provide flexibility and promote healing after workouts are complete.” How to avoid a problem: “Your calves are much stronger than your shins — and that imbalance can really beat up your shins, especially if you have improper form when you run or walk,” Reames warns. If you get shin splints frequently, think about asking a trainer to check your form. In addition, work on strengthening your shins, which you can do while sitting: Simply draw your toe toward your knee while keeping your heel on the ground. Wrists. “Your wrist can be the weakest link of the chain and can compromise the way your large major muscle groups work when working out,” Reames says. “Improper stretching and ‘overloading’ weight can cause a wrist injury in a matter of moments.” How to avoid a problem: Make sure you aren’t overdoing resistance, and keep your wrists straight and properly aligned when doing arm workouts. “If you are curling, pulling or pushing anything, make sure your wrists are straight,” Reames advises.

KEEP THINGS GOOD BELOW THE HOOD

Make sure to take proper care of your body, especially your muscles. You can give yourself a minimassage almost every day using a foam roller (the type you find at most gyms) and a myofascial release approach; it’s like therapy for your muscles.

“These moves roll out trigger points — or knots, as we normally call them — and help cure tight muscles and relieve sore ones,” Reames says. “Do them postworkout, and the recovery process for your body starts faster because you’re relieving tension and increasing circulation.” Make sure to take your time and roll as slowly as possible. Start with your quads. Lie on top of the foam roller, facing down with the foam roll under your mid-thigh. Beginning at mid-thigh, roll down to just above the top of your knee, then up to the top of your hip area. Move on to the glutes. Sit down on the foam roller. Focus on one side of your bottom by crossing one leg over the other. Slowly roll from the bottom of your glutes through to the top. Really try to use your weight to push down into your muscle. Repeat on the other side. Take care of your iliotibial band. This muscle that runs down the outside of your leg is responsible for hip rotation and knee stabilization. Lie with the foam roller under the side of your right leg near the top of your hip; roll down to the side of the knee, then back to your upper hip. Repeat on the left leg. Focus on your middle to upper back. Lie face up with the foam roller below your shoulders. Bring your elbows together in front of your chest to really push out your back muscles. Roll down so that the foam roller reaches the middle of your back, then roll back up to your shoulders. “Consistency is the key here,” Reames says. “These stretching exercises might hurt the first time you try them, but the more you do them, the more revived and relaxed your muscles will feel.”

crashFITNESS STEER CLEAR OF


The Best Time Of The Year Here’s what to expect from our favorite football teams It won’t be long now. Soon, Dabo will lead his Tigers down Death Valley’s big hill. “2001: A Space Odyssey” will pipe through William Brice Stadium. Larry Munson will bring Bulldog nation to its feet with “Glory, Glory to Ole’ Georgia.” The Ramblin’ Wreck will lead the Yellow Jackets onto Grant Field. And Georgia Southern’s famous bald eagle, Freedom, will take flight from Paulson Stadium’s press box. August is here and so is college football. This is truly the best time of the year for sports fans, especially here in the South, where football reigns supreme. GEORGIA In the SEC, Georgia and South Carolina have been jawing at each other all summer. Steve Spurrier loves to take jabs at Georgia’s schedule. For the second year in a row, the Bulldogs avoid both LSU and Alabama. However, Georgia does have to play at SEC newcomer Missouri in week two and it will head to Columbia shorthanded. A couple of key defensive players are suspended for this game, including former Westside star Sanders Commings. However, Missouri also has some issues. Star quarterback James Franklin is coming off shoulder surgery. All indications are that Franklin will be ready for the Georgia game. If he’s 100 percent, the Bulldogs secondary is going to have its hands full. One headache that Mark Richt won’t have to deal with is Isaiah Crowell. A felony weapons charge was the last straw for Richt. The Bulldogs coach gave Crowell the boot and now the once highly touted running back will try to resurrect his career at Alabama State. Most Georgia fans aren’t shedding a tear over Crowell’s dismissal and I don’t blame them. During his freshman year, you never knew which Crowell would show up. Watching him limp off the field with nagging injuries was a common theme. Richt did prepare nicely for life without Crowell by signing Keith Marshall and Todd Gurley. Both incoming freshmen were heavily recruited and look for them to get a ton of carries this season. Why is this game on the schedule? Buffalo (Week 1 in Athens). Upset Alert: Tennessee 34 Georgia 30 (Week 5 in Athens). SOUTH CAROLINA No Stephen Garcia means no QB drama in Columbia. In fact, Steve Spurrier is so confident in Connor Shaw that he took him to SEC football media days. He’s the first Gamecocks QB to ever make that trip with Coach Spurrier. This should tell you just how much Spurrier thinks of Shaw. In 10 games last season, Shaw accounted for 22 touchdowns (14 passing, eight rushing). With a healthy Marcus Lattimore lined up behind him in the backfield, Shaw becomes even more dangerous. Exit Alshon Jeffery, enter Shaq Roland. The electrifying WR from Lexington, S.C., is the crown jewel of coach Spurrier’s ‘12 recruiting class. I saw this guy play against North Augusta last fall and he’s the real deal. Roland can fly and go up high to catch the ball over defensive backs. On defense, everything points to DE Jadeveon Clowney having an All-American season. He certainly lived up to the hype his freshman season. Why is this game on the schedule? Wofford (Week 12 in Columbia). Upset alert: Vanderbilt 24, South Carolina 20 (Week 1 in Nashville, Tenn.).

YOUR

children’s SCHOOL TIME YOUR

is

You’ve spent all summer at cookouts by the pool, visiting restaurants on vacation and having a great time with family and friends. It’s been a blast, with one exception: that swimsuit you worked so hard to fit into last spring is now more than a little snug.

CLEMSON Clemson won the ACC championship in 2011, but Tigers fans are still steaming over what happened in the Orange Bowl: West Virginia 70, Clemson 33. The Tigers were exposed badly and new Defensive Coordinator Brent Venables was quickly brought in from Oklahoma. Beating Virginia Tech in the ACC title game did take some heat off Dabo Swinney, who watched his team lose four of its last six games. How does Clemson get back to the ACC championship game? Defensive improvement is a must, but in this conference, the Tigers can certainly win many high-scoring games. QB Tajh Boyd and WR Sammy Watkins have developed into one of the most feared passing combos in the country. It won’t take long to see how far Clemson has come since the Orange Bowl debacle. The Tigers open the season in the Georgia Dome against Auburn. Why is this game on the schedule? Furman (Week 3 in Clemson). Upset Alert: Maryland 35, Clemson 31 (Week 10 in Clemson).

No problem, especially if you’re a member of Gold’s Gym. That little thing called school that your kids have to go back to in a week or two? That means you’ll have more time to spend pedaling in RPM, lifting in BodyPump, dancing in Zumba and punching in BodyCombat.

GEORGIA TECH In his last two seasons at Georgia Tech, Yellow Jackets Head Coach Paul Johnson has posted a 14-12 record. Johnson is not on the hot seat, but he expects better results in 2012. He also needs to figure out a way to win bowl games. Under Johnson, Georgia Tech is 0-4 in bowl contests. For the Yellow Jackets to return to double-digit wins, they’ll need RB Orwin Smith to bounce back nicely from a toe injury that limited him to only 61 carries in 2011. Smith is one of the most dangerous players in the ACC. Even when he wasn’t 100 percent last season, Smith still managed to rush for more than 600 yards and 11 touchdowns. Johnson does have solid depth at running back and he’s counting on former News Channel 6 Football Friday Night Player of the Year B.J. Bostic (Jefferson County High School) to make an impact in the backfield. Vad Lee is pushing Tevin Washington at QB, but Johnson is quick to point out that Washington is the leader of the team. Washington knows he needs to improve his accuracy. Last season, he completed less than 50 percent of his passes.

per month

$10

time

HEALTH & FITNESS

Don’t remember your favorite class is? Here’s a little reminder.

no commitment | month - to - month

no kidding

*amenities vary by location | $10 per month good at Bobby Jones location only


AUGUSTA AUGUSTA AIKEN

NORTH

TIME 6:00AM 9:00AM 10:00AM 11:00AM 12:00PM 4:30PM 4:45PM 5:30PM 6:30PM 7:30PM

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ZUMBA CXWORX YOGAFIT

CXWORX CXWORX ZUMBA

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FUNK AEROBICS CXWORX

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YOGA

ZUMBA - 3PM ZUMBA

BELLY GROOVE

ZUMBA KRUNCH

TIME 5:30AM 9:00AM 12:00PM 5:30PM 6:30PM 6:45PM

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SUNDAY

ZUMBA CXWORX (30) ZUMBA ZUMBA

cxworx (10am)

ZUMBA ZUMBA

cxworx (10am)

CXWORX ZUMBA ZUMBA

ZUMBA CXWORX

CXworX

TIME 6:00AM 8:30AM 9:00AM 6:00PM

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

TIME 5:30AM 8:30AM

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

aqua fit ZUMBA

pilates

aqua fit zumba

pilates

FRIDAY CXWORX (6AM) zumba gold aqua fit

CXWORX (45)

AQUAFIT/AQUAZUMBA

ZUMBA

9:30pm

CXWORX (45) 10:00AM 10:30am

yoga stretch zumba

11:00am 5:30PM 5:45pm 6:00PM 6:30PM 7:00PM

line dancing

TIME 5:30AM 8:30AM 5:30PM

MONDAY

zumba

CXWORX

yoga stretch zumba

ZUMBA

line dancing

aqua ZUMBA yoga zumba TUESDAY power ride

zumba WEDNESDAY

aqua ZUMBA CXWORX zumba THURSDAY power ride

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY


V23|NO31

Cardiac Support Group meets three times a year. For more information on meetings, as well as for pre-registration, call 706-774-5864 or visit universityhealth.org.

Computing for Beginners is a three-session class at the Diamond Lakes Branch Library that meets Thursdays, August 9, 16 and 23, at 10 a.m. Pre-registration required. Call 706-772-2432 or visit ecgrl.org.

Beginner’s Spanish Language Class is each Monday from 4-5 p.m. at Friedman Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-736-6758 or visit ecgrl.org.

Adult Sexual Assault and Rape Support meets for group counseling. For more information, call 706-724-5200 or visit universityhealth.org.

Creating an Email Account Class is Thursday, August 9, from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Wallace Branch Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-722-6275 or visit ecgrl.org.

Benefits

Narcotics Anonymous, sponsored by Trinity Hospital of Augusta, meets Fridays and Sundays at 7:30 p.m. Call 706-855-2419 or visit trinityofaugusta.com. AA meets every Sunday and Wednesday at 7:15 p.m. at Aiken Regional Medical Center (Aurora Pavilion), and features an open discussion. Call 800-322-8322 or visit aikenregional.com. Burn Support Group meets every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at Doctors Hospital (Lori Rogers Nursing Library, JMS Building). All burn survivors, and their families and friends are welcome. Call Tim Dorn at 706-6516660 or visit doctors-hospital.net. Moms Connection, a free support group for new mothers and their babies, meets Tuesdays from 1-2 p.m. at Georgia Health Sciences Building 1010C. Call 706-721-9351 or visit georgiahealth.org.

Education

Coupon Class is Friday, August 3, at 10 a.m. and Thursday, August 9, at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Library. Call 706-863-1946 or visit ecgrl.org. Social Networking for Adults Class is Friday, August 3, at 10 a.m. at the Diamond Lakes Branch Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-7722432 or visit ecgrl.org. Annual Student Employment Fair is Monday, August 6, from 1-3 p.m. at ASU’s Jaguar Student Activities Center ballroom. Call 706-737-1432 or visit aug.edu. Beginners Internet Searching Class is Tuesday, August 7, from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Wallace Branch Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-7226275 or visit ecgrl.org.

The Dollar Dog Days of Summer goes on throughout the month of August at the Augusta Museum of History. During the month, admission is $1. Call 706-722-8454 or visit augustamuseum.org. 27th Annual SEED, The Ruth Patrick Science Education Center’s Science Education Enrichment Day, is now accepting exhibit proposals from CSRA organizations who want to present the fun and excitement of science through hands-on, interactive exhibits, performances, demonstrations and entertainment. This year’s theme is Ignite Your Mind. Call 803-641-3474 or visit http://rpsec.usca.edu/SEED/. Free Tutoring for all ages, offered by ASU’s Literacy Center, is available by appointment Mondays-Thursday, from 4-8 p.m., at the center at 1401 Magnolia Drive. Appointments required. Call 706-737-1625 or visit aug.edu. GED classes meet weekly at the Kroc Center. Pre-registration required. Call 706-364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org. Work Networking Group is held each Monday from 8:30-10 a.m. at Grace United Methodist Church in North Augusta. A networking and informational meeting for anyone looking for a job, the group meets in room 206 of the Asbury Building and is facilitated by career and business professionals. Call 803-279-7525 or email doctor@pritchardgroup.com. Computer classes are offered every Thursday at 6 p.m. at the Wallace Branch Library. Call 706-722-6275 or visit ecgrl.org. ESL classes are offered every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at Headquarters Branch Library (Third Floor Writing Lab). Pre-registration required. Call Charles Garrick at 803-279-3363 or visit ecgrl.org. Intermediate Spanish Language Class is each Monday from 2:30-4 p.m. at Friedman Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-736-6758 or visit ecgrl.org.

2AUGUST2012

Storks & Corks, an annual fundraiser for the Silver Bluff Audubon Center, is Saturday, August 4, at 6 p.m. at the center and includes food, wine, a chance to see endangered wood storks and a silent auction. $40. Preregistration required. Call 803-471-0291 or visit audubon.org. Karma Yoga is offered at Just Breathe Studio, downtown Aiken, each Friday at 10 a.m. and is free if participants bring a donation of a personal item, which will be given to the Cumbee Center to Assist Abused Persons. Call 803-648-8048 or visit justbreathestudio.com.

Sports-Outdoors

The Augusta GreenJackets play the Charleston RiverDogs Friday-Saturday, August 3-4, at 7:05 p.m.; Sunday, August 5, at 5:35 p.m.; and Monday, August 6, at 7:05 p.m. at Lake Olmstead Stadium. $7-$11. Call 706-7367889 or visit greenjacketsbaseball.com. Swamp Saturday is a free 2.5 mile, 1.5 hour hike at Phinizy Swamp on Saturday, August 4, at 9:30 a.m. Call 706-828-2109 or visit naturalsciencesacademy.org. The Soul City Sirens roller derby team takes on Burn City Rollergirls of Auburn, Ala., on Sunday, August 5, at Red Wing Rollerway, with doors open at 5:30 p.m. and the bout beginning at 6 p.m. Tickets to this family friendly event that features halftime entertainment is $10 in advance and $15 at the door. Visit soulcitysirens.com. The Soul City Sirens are currently looking for new skaters and invite women of the CSRA to Redwing Rollerway Monday, August 13, at 7 p.m. to their mid-season recruitment meeting. There is no cost or obligation and men are also encouraged to attend because the group is also looking for referees and volunteers. Email training@soulcitysirens.com. Free Canal Boat Tours are available to teachers throughout the month of July, Teacher Appreciation Month. The daily tours last about an hour and depart at 9, 10:15 and 11:30 a.m., as well as 1:30 p.m. and include free admission to the Canal Interpretive Center Reservations suggested. Call 706-823-0440, ext. 4, or visit augustacanal.com.

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 31


V23|NO31

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Wii Bowling for Adults is every Monday in July at 6 p.m. at the Columbia County Library. Call 706-863-1946 or visit ecgrl.org.

Kroc Trotters Running Group meets Tuesdays at 6:30 p.m. at the Kroc Center. Free for members. Call 706364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org.

BlazeSports Swim Team, for all ages of physically challenged swimmers who want to train for competition, meets at the Wilson Family Y. $35 a month, members; $50 a month, non-members. Preregistration required. Visit thefamilyy.org.

Hott Shott Disc Golf is each Wednesday at 7 p.m. at Killer B Disc Golf, 863 Broad Street, and features games and prizes for all ages and skill levels. $2. Call 706-814-7514 or visit killerbdiscgolf.blogspot.com/p/ hott-shott.

Wheelchair Tennis is each Monday at 6 p.m., weather permitting, at the Club at Raeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creek. Free and open to the public. Call 706-826-5809 or visit alsalley@ wrh.org.

Kids

Augusta Canal Boat Tours lasting one hour are offered Monday-Saturday at 10 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m., and Sunday at 1:30, 3 and 4:30 p.m. All tours include admission to the Augusta Canal Interpretive Center. Call 706-823-0440 or visit augustacanal.com. The Augusta Fencers Club is open five nights a week from 5:30-9 p.m. and most Saturday mornings from 10 a.m.-noon. Visitors always welcome. Call 706-722-8878. Thursday Night Chain Reaction Ride begins at 6 p.m. each Thursday at Patriots Park in Grovetown. For intermediate to fast-paced cyclists, who average 25-32 miles. Participants should bring their own water and helmet. Call 706-855-2024 or visit chainreactionbicycles.net. Riverview Disc Golf League meets each Thursday at 6 p.m. at Riverview Park in North Augusta. $5 entry fee and $1 ace pool. Call 803-215-8181 or visit augustadiscgolf.com.

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Road Bike Ride meets each Thursday at 6:30 p.m. at Andy Jordanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bicycle Warehouse downtown for an approximately 25-mile ride at a moderate to fast pace. Front and rear lights, as well as a helmet, are required. Call 706-724-6777 or visit andyjordans.com. Guided Trail Rides at Hilltop Riding Stables at Fort Gordon are available Saturdays at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., noon, 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m.; Sundays at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and noon; and Wednesday-Friday at 11 a.m. with reservations 24 hours in advance. All trail rides are on a first-come, first-served basis, and participants should arrive 30 minutes prior to the trail ride starting for sign in procedures. $23-$30. Call 706-791-4864 or visit fortgordon.com. Zumba with Sohailla is every Saturday from 10-11 a.m. at the Ballroom Dance Center in Evans. Call 706-4216168 or visit zumbawithsohailla.blogspot.com. Saturday Historic Trolley Tours are Saturdays from 1:30-3:15 p.m. at the Augusta Museum of History. Reservations required 24 hours in advance. $12. Call 706-724-4067 or visit augustamuseum.org. Lakeside Rideouts at Hilltop Riding Stables at Fort Gordon are each Sunday beginning at 1:30 p.m. on a first-come, first-served basis. The ride, which begins at 2 p.m., is a two-hour guided ride to Wilkerson Lake. $45-$50. Call 706-791-4864 or visit fortgordon.com. Yoga Class at Euchee Creek Branch Library meets every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. Pre-registration required. Call 706-556-0594 or visit ecgrl.org. Weekly Group Runs include the Monday Metro Run meeting at Metro Coffeehouse at 6 p.m.; Monday Intervals meeting at the Family Y track on Wheeler Road at 7 p.m.; the Tuesday Nacho Mamaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Group Run at 6 p.m.; Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Blanchard Woods Group Run at 6 p.m.; Wednesday Stay in Shape Group Run at 6 p.m.; Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Post Office Hill Training Run at 7 p.m.; Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Homer Hustle at 6 p.m.; and Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Stay in Shape Run at 8 a.m. For more information, visit augustastriders.com.

32 METROSPIRITAUGUSTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

American Red Cross Babysitterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Training, for students ages 11-15, is Thursday, August 2, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. at Aiken Regional Medical Center. $30; pre-registration required. Call 800-322-8322 or visit aikenregional.com. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in the Box? Summer Fun at the Beach is a kids program on Thursday, August 2, at 10 a.m. at the Morris Museum of Art. Participants will view painting and create a sculpture. Free, museum members and parents; $4, non-members. Pre-registration required. Call 706-724-7501 or visit themorris.org. Zombie Teen Lock in, part of the summer reading program events, is Friday, August 3, from 6-11 p.m. at North Augustaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nancy Carson Library. Call 803-2795767 or visit abbe-lib.org. Tara Scheyer and the Mudpuppy Band perform Sunday, August 5, at 2 p.m. at the Morris Museum of Art as part of the Artrageous! Family Sunday series. Participants will also make a watercolor painting inspired by their favorite songs. Free. Call 706-7247501 or visit themorris.org. Summer Crafts Class for kids ages 5-8 years is Wednesday, August 8, at 10 a.m. at the Wallace Branch Library. Call 706-722-6275 or visit ecgrl.org. Back to School Clinic, which includes immunization administration, as well as hearing, vision and dental screenings, is continues Monday-Friday through August 10 at the Frank M. Rumph Richmond County Health Department on Laney-Walker Boulevard. Call 706-721-5800 or visit augustaga.gov. Kroc Tots Activity Hour, featuring story time, crafts and more, is every Friday at 9 a.m. at the Kroc Center. Free, members; $1, non-members. Call 706-364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org. Free Junior Fitness Class, for those ages 7-12, meets Sundays at 3 p.m., Mondays and Wednesdays at 5:30 p.m. and Saturdays at 9 a.m. at the Kroc Center. Call 706-364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org. Follow the Drinking Gourd shows Saturdays in August at 8 p.m. and Digistar Virtual Journey shows Saturdays in August at 9 p.m. at the DuPont Planetarium in Aiken. Digistar shows are $5.50, adults; $4.50, seniors; $3.50, 4K-12the grade students; $1, USC-A students, faculty and staff. General shows are $4.50, adults; $3.50, seniors; $2.50, 4K-12th grade students; and $1, USC-A students, faculty and staff. Call 803-6413654 or visit http://rpsec.usca.edu/planetarium. Zumbatonic, a Zumba class for kids, meets Wednesdays at 4:30 p.m. at the Kroc Center. Call 706364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org. Preschool Story Time is every Tuesday at Headquarters Branch Library at 10 a.m. Toddler Story Time is every Wednesday at 10 a.m. Group registration required. Call 706-821-2600 or visit ecgrl.org. Story Time is every Tuesday at 10 a.m. at Diamond Lakes Branch Library. Groups of six or more must preregister. Call 706-772-2432 or visit ecgrl.org. Story Time is every Tuesday at 10 a.m. at Friedman Branch Library. Groups of six or more must preregister. Call 706-736-6758 or visit ecgrl.org. Story Time is every Wednesday from 10-11:15 a.m. at 2AUGUST2012


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Wallace Branch Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-722-6275 or visit ecgrl.org. Story Time at the Columbia County Library is each Tuesday at 11 a.m. for those under 2; Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 10:15 a.m. for 2-yearolds; and Monday, Wednesday and Thursday at 11 a.m. for preschoolers. Call 706-863-1946 or visit ecgrl.org.

Hobbies

Story Time is every Tuesday at 10:30 a.m. at Harlem Branch Library. Call 706-556-9795 or visit ecgrl.org.

Introduction to Crochet Class meets every Monday in August from 4:30-6:30 p.m. at the Appleby Branch Library. Pre-registration required. Call 706-736-6244 or visit ecgrl.org.

Toddler Time, free play for children ages 5 and under, is each Monday and Wednesday from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at the H.O. Weeks Center in Aiken. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov. Wacky Wednesday Story Time is each Wednesday at 10 a.m. in the children’s department of Barnes and Noble in the Augusta Mall. Call 706-737-0012 or visit bn.com. Story Time is every Wednesday at Appleby Branch Library from 10:05-10:20 a.m. for toddlers 18 months-35 months, and from 10:30-11:15 a.m. for preschoolers ages 3 and up. Parent must stay with child. Call 706-736-6244 or visit ecgrl.org. Story Time is every Wednesday at 10:15 a.m. for Pre-K, and either 11 or 11:30 a.m. for preschoolers at Aiken County Public Library. Call 803-642-2023 or visit abbe-lib.org.

Monday -Thursday nights One pound of shrimp (fried, grilled or boiled) $9.99

Seniors

Senior Computer Classes meet weekly at the Kroc Center. Pre-registration required. Call 706-364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org.

Crab Legs served with redskin potatoes and mixed green salad $7.99 a pound

Medicare and You is a program that meets every Thursday from 9 a.m.-noon at the Kroc Center. Call 706-364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org.

Wednesday night

Games for Seniors at the Weeks Center in Aiken include Rummikub each Thursday from 9 a.m.-noon, Mahjong each Thursday from 1-4 p.m., Bridge each Friday from 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., Bingo each Tuesday at 9 a.m., Pinochle each Tuesday from 10:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., and Canasta on Tuesdays and Fridays from 11:30 a.m.3:30 p.m. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov.

Bone in fried catfish over blue cheese grits and salad $6.99 *din *d ine in only

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French Market Grille West 34 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

Story Time is every Wednesday from 10:30-11 a.m. for toddlers and 11:15-11:45 a.m. for preschoolers at North Augusta Branch Library. Call 803-279-5767 or abbe-lib.org. Golden Agers meets Mondays from 9 a.m.-noon at the Kroc Center. Call 706-364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org.

Tuesday night

Yoga I and II are offered at the Weeks Center in Aiken on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 8:45-9:45 a.m. and on Mondays and Wednesdays from 5:30-6:30 p.m. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov.

Story Time at the Euchee Creek Branch Library, for all ages, is each Wednesday at 10:30 a.m. and each Thursday at 4 p.m. Call 706-556-0594 or visit ecgrl.org.

Ceramics Class, for ages 14 and up, meets Mondays at 9 a.m. or 6 p.m., Tuesdays at 6 p.m., and Wednesdays at 9 a.m. in the Weeks Ceramics Center. Call 803-6427631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov.

HOT POT.

Line Dancing is each Tuesday at the Weeks Center in Aiken at 10 a.m. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov.

Silversneakers I is offered Mondays and Wednesdays at 9 a.m. and Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays at 11:15 a.m., while Silversneakers Yogastretch is offered Mondays and Wednesdays at 11:15 a.m. at the Weeks Center in Aiken. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov.

Genealogy Class meets every Thursday at 1 p.m. at the Euchee Creek Branch Library. Limited to the first 15 students. Call 706-556-0594 or visit ecgrl.org.

Learn How to Crochet, a Lunch & Learn Series, meets every Tuesday in August from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Headquarters Branch Library and participants will learn how to make a winter scarf. Pre-registration required. Call 706-821-2604 or visit ecgrl.org.

Spiritual

Praise in the Park is Friday, August 3, from 6-9 p.m. at Springfield Baptist Church downtown and, as part of the church’s 225th anniversary celebration, will have food, beverages, choirs, praise teams, dancers, spoken word and hip hop performances. Call 706-7241056 or visit historicspringfieldbaptistchurch.org. The Sanctuary Church’s Sixth Anniversary Celebration is Sunday, August 5. The public is invited. Call 706364-8284 or visit mysanctuary.org. Food, Faith and Fitness, a women’s group, meets each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at the Kroc Center. Call 706-3645762 or visit krocaugusta.org. Morning Manna, a community devotion time, meets Wednesdays at 11 a.m. at the Kroc Center. Free. Call 706-364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org. Sunday activities at the Kroc Center include an adult Bible class at 9:30 a.m., youth Sunday school at 9:45 a.m., and a worship service at 11 a.m. Free. Call 706364-5762 or visit krocaugusta.org.

Volunteers

The Morris Museum of Art is currently accepting applications for the 2012 new docent class for the 12-session training program that begins in September. Candidates must commit to one year of service following the training and no prior experience is required. Call 706-828-3865 for more information and an application. Visit themorris.org. Hospice Care of America’s Augusta office needs administrative and patient care volunteers. No experience necessary; training will be provided. Call Rich Boland at 706-447-2626 or email rboland@ msa-corp.com.

Elsewhere

Thursday Nights at the High, a special event at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, offers half price tickets from 4-8 p.m. each Thursday. A guided tour is offered at 6:30 p.m. Call 404-733-4200 or visit high.org. If you would like to see your organization’s events listed in our calendar, please email Amy Christian at amy@themetrospirit.com. The deadline for each Thursday’s issue is the previous Friday at noon.

Ceramics Class is offered at 9 a.m. on Mondays or Wednesdays and 6 p.m. on Mondays or Tuesdays at the Weeks Center. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov. Fit 4 Ever is offered at the Weeks Center in Aiken on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays from 10-11 a.m. Call 803-642-7631 or visit cityofaikensc.gov. 2AUGUST2012


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V23|NO31

Fountain of Youth

Should I be worried about getting older? The Girl says yes.

This morning, while watching the Olympics, we saw a commercial for wrinkle repair cream. “Mama, you should get that!” The Girl exclaimed with a smile. I asked her why, and she looked a little embarrassed but said, “Because you need it, that’s all!” Ouch. Don’t get me wrong. I own such products. I use such products. I don’t want anyone telling me I need them. I’m sure that most women my age think about wrinkles, and all have started thinking about aging (right?). I admittedly color my hair. I’m not ready to be gray. Covering it has become more of a challenge; I have to go visit Mary’s chair more often to keep it at bay. That’s pretty much where I draw the line for me, though. For now. I wear a little makeup, and I like shopping just fine. I like watches and perfume, and I don’t mind having extra money to spend on clothes. I’m not overly concerned with it all. Well, I wasn’t, and maybe I’m still not. I used to always get the “you look so young for your age!” or “you look great! I can’t believe you’ve had two kids!” Of course I need to exercise more and could add a few more vegetables to my diet, but does that help wrinkles? The man hasn’t gotten any wrinkles yet. I now hear, “Gosh, your husband is such a baby! He looks so young!” He got carded by the girl at the liquor store at the beach, and the girl was surprised to find out his real age. He’s 34. I’m older by four months. (Does that make me a cougar?) Facials, creams and electrode promises have been around forever, but the newest thing is Botox. Oh, I know it’s not a recent development. I watch The Real Housewives shows. At 35, it’s rather new to me. Or newly interesting, rather. I’m not saying I’d do it, and I’m also not sure I wouldn’t. There are so many whose faces are completely paralyzed, seemingly caught in a state of serious surprise. Sure they don’t have any wrinkles, but I don’t think they look younger. They look old gone wrong. If done right, Botox actually does make a noticeable-but-not-in-a-plasticky-way difference. I’ve seen it. There are so many things that we can improve with the help of pills, surgeries, simple injections and bottles of hair dye. There’s a foggy area between normal upkeep and going overboard.

36 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

JENNYWRIGHT lives in Summerville with her husband, who she calls The Man, and two kids, who she affectionately calls The Boy and The Girl. She enjoys taking photos, cooking and playing tennis.

You’d be surprised at how many people have had their boobs done and who do Botox on a regular basis. I’d never rat them out, because half the time I don’t know for sure, and rarely do I even care. It’s their business. I do find it humorous and a little sad when someone does too much. Back in the olden days (you know what I mean, right?), were women content with aging, or did they long for an invention that made them look younger? There are early accounts of plastic surgery, but the procedures were usually performed because of a deformity or injury. Still today, that is a large part of what cosmetic surgery is all about. No one will argue with those cases. But are saggy boobs a deformity? What about wrinkles? To some, I’m sure it feels as if they are. To others, they lift, separate and fill because they can afford to. To the rest, a certain confidence is restored. Do those with money have an unfair advantage? They’re able to look younger than their poorer counterparts. If a new wrinkle pops up, just buy a few more units of Botox, right? I’m not sure where I stand on all of this. For the friends who’ve had work done and do Botox regularly, not a single judgment is being passed. I’m just trying to figure it all out. As of today, I’m mostly happy with the way I look. I don’t like sitting in the salon chair for too long or returning clothes that don’t fit. How on earth would I sit still for extracurricular beauty treatments? I had a keratin straightening treatment done on my hair. It’s absolutely not my style to do such things, but the convenience it offers is great. For about two hours in the salon chair, I haven’t blow-dried my hair but about five times in over two months. It may seem shallow, but my time is worth something. What, besides perky boobs, do breast implants have to offer me? Oh, I know they’ll look better, but will I save time in any way? I’m invited to a Botox party tomorrow night. I’m not planning on being injected, but the host is serving wine. I’m thinking of it as a learning experience — with wine. Wine makes learning fun. As for The Girl and her product suggestions, I appreciate the help from my little angel. I’m happy to give her advice as well. If she keeps this up, the only suggestion I’ll give will be, “Get a job.”

2AUGUST2012


V23|NO31

GREGORY A. BAKER, PH.D

What Were They Thinking? Anonymous gets ripped off and the Olympics start

By now, all of our readers should be familiar with the hacktivist group Anonymous. Anonymous is a loosely knit organization that strongly opposes internet censorship and surveillance and has been credited with taking down secure and high profile websites, including those of government organizations. As a group that has routinely shown a high level of seriousness and capability, Anonymous has earned a great deal of respect. Therefore, one has to wonder what e-commerce company Early Flicker was thinking when they filed to trademark the Anonymous logo and slogan. The application was filed with the French Institut National De La Propriete Industrielle (INPI) in February. The filing became known earlier this week, and Anonymous responded in a YouTube video promising to “take down any business they have going on the internet, and the 99 percent will not stop until the registration has been revoked and a public apology has been made.” Best of luck to you guys! U – S – A! U – S – A! In a welcome distraction from the political season, the Olympic games started this past week in London. Over the next couple of weeks, the world will be watching athletes compete in 30 different sports. For most of us, the Olympics provide the opportunity to catch up with the lesser-known sports, some of which are only televised during the games. Every once and a while, the coverage switches over to an event that makes one wonder, “Is that really a sport?” For me, beach volleyball falls in this category. I am convinced that the reason it receives so much coverage is because of the lack of coverage on the participants. (Not that there’s anything wrong with that...) At my daughters’ gymnastics practice earlier today, we had a discussion about all the sports. Even with all the different events, we all came to the conclusion that there are only six uniquely different competitions. There are racing events such as swimming and cycling that that demonstrate that I’m-Faster-Than-You. We have combat events such as boxing, wrestling and fencing that show that I’m-Tougher-Than-You. Strength and skill events such as weightlifting, archery and field events allow competitors to boast I-Can-Do-That-Better-Than-You. Goal scoring events such as soccer, handball and water polo are based on I-Can-StickIt-Better-Than-You, and volleying events such as tennis, badminton and beach (sic) volleyball fall into the I-Can-Thwack-It-Better-Than-You category. Finally, there are the judged events such as gymnastics and synchronized swimming that let the world know I’m-Prettier-Than-You. So, are you interested in keeping up with all the Olympic athletes? One of the better spots I’ve found is hub.olympic.org. It’s an aggregation site that brings together the Twitter and Facebook feeds of all the Olympians. Check out the latest from Jordan, Missy, Michael and all the other athletes. And of course, stay up to date with all the Olympic news at london2012.com. Until next week, I’m off the grid. @gregory_a_baker GREGORY A. BAKER, PH.D, is vice president and chief rocket scientist for CMA, which provides information technology services to CSRA businesses and nonprofits.

2AUGUST2012

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 39


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40 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

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706-863-0080

201 Shartom Drive Augusta

(behind Applebee’s on Washington Rd.)

Hoagie | Steak Sandwiches | Chicken Steak Sandwiches | Italian Beef | Italian Sausages | Chicken Kabobs 2AUGUST2012

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 41


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AMYCHRISTIAN

Party Down

Surrey Tavern is the place to go for a good timeâ&#x20AC;Ś and has been for quite a while Matthew Widener has worked at Surrey Tavern for more than a decade, which seems like ages in bar years. Not when it comes to this one, though. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From what the owner before me said, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been Surrey Tavern since 1973,â&#x20AC;? Widener, who bought the bar nearly two years ago, said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if that means the building, but I do know that, before Surrey Tavern, at some point it was some sort of oyster bar. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an oyster pit in the back bar that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t use anymore.â&#x20AC;? Stories abound when it comes to Surrey Tavernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history, probably because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been around so long that it is intertwined with a lot of local residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; personal history. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I know my mother and father used to go here,â&#x20AC;? Widener says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And we have a lot of people who met here and now theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re married with kids, all because of Surrey Tavern. And we love seeing that.â&#x20AC;? Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recollections of the barâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history may differ slightly, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one part of Surrey Tavern that all can easily identify, no matter how many years have passed since the last time they visited: the backdrop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do know it came from Surrey, England, in pieces and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of the focal point of the whole bar,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s real Tiffany glass and someone came in and appraised the mirror several years ago and said that it was worth thousands of dollars. Just the mirror.â&#x20AC;? Little has changed in Surrey Tavern since Widener took over ownership and the little that did were cosmetic upgrades that had been needed for quite some time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I put a big facelift on it, made it look like a tavern,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It needed some love, as far as the look of it goes.â&#x20AC;? He did, however, institute a no smoking policy on the weekends. The most important aspect of Surrey hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t changed, however: the music and the party atmosphere that the live music generates. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve stuck with the rhythm and blues era ever since Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been here and I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t plan on changing it,â&#x20AC;? Widener said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We break out from time to time, but our main focus is jazz and rhythm and blues. To me, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s party and dance music and how can you go wrong? I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why people love

Surrey Tavern during Masters Week.â&#x20AC;? Playback The Band Featuring Tutu Dyvine, Soul Dimensions and Tony Williams and the Blues Express all play the tavern regularly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We used to have Playback a lot more,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been playing at Surreyâ&#x20AC;Ś I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember when it was, but I remember them saying that they needed to have a 20-year reunion and that was years ago. I can easily say thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been 25 years. And Soul Dimensions has been there almost as long.â&#x20AC;? Upcoming are bands like Whiskey Gentry on August 10, who Widener is excited about featuring, as well as Old You and the Mike Frost Jazz Band. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in addition to the Beer Olympics on Tuesdays, in which beer for drinking games is free; trivia on Wednesdays and, now, karaoke on Thursdays. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really hate karaoke but this is going to be a little different,â&#x20AC;? Widener said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have Tony Williams and David Heath and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to be up on stage with you, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re calling it Rock Out Karaoke. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kind of like karaoke with a band. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve seen it done in bigger cities but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think anybody in Augusta has done it, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to give it a go.â&#x20AC;? Also up next is a new venture for Widener and the guys who own Bar West: a more upscale place in the spot formerly occupied by the Vue and the Library. It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet have a name â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Widener said the three are currently going through a long list of suggestions they got from Facebook â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but plans are for it to open sometime between mid-September and the first of October. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to turn it back into an upscale nightclub for the most part, but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to intertwine live music along with DJ music,â&#x20AC;? he explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be something Augustaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never seen before. If we can get these ideas going, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be killer.â&#x20AC;? For now, though, Widener is focused on doing what he does best at Surrey Tavern: Making his customers happy with great live music in a party atmosphere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You know, the live music scene isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t what it used to be,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I see a lot of bars that open and play music on the radio and have drink specials and do well. I could do that too, I guess, but this something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m passionate about. And as long as people keep supporting Surrey, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to keep doing what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing.â&#x20AC;? Surrey Tavern | 471 Highland Avenue Monday-Saturday, 4 p.m.-3 a.m. | 706-736-1221

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706-868-6111 42 METROSPIRITAUGUSTAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

2AUGUST2012


V23|NO31

Michael Johnson

mejphoto.photoreflect.com

Katie Dowder, Ethan Dowder and Jessica Hokrein at “Almost Maine” at the Fort Gordon Dinner Theatre.

SIGHTINGS

Cristina Jackson, Priscilla King and Kathleen Cantey Lilly at the dinner auctioned off on EBay at Casa Blanca for Aimee Copeland.

Jodi Yu, Kayle Griffin and Laura Phelan at Stillwater Tap Room.

SIGHTINGS

Erik Hensley, Heather Cooper and Rich Jones at LimeLite Cafe.

(Sitting) Courtney Barber, Mandy Flanders and Lauren, (Standing) Jaclyn Frazier with Bachelorette contestant Ryan Bowers and Kay Lilly at the dinner auctioned off on EBay at Casa Blanca for Aimee Copeland.

SIGHTINGS

Kevin Hackett, Mika Patterson, Matthew Mason and Summer Krouse at the Soul Bar.

2AUGUST2012

Ashley Hilderbrand with singer/songwriter Thomas Tillman, Maranda Hilderbrand and Dillon Smith at the County Club.

Joe and Angel Legare and Amanda Roquet at the Pizza Joint downtown.

Michael Johnson

mejphoto.photoreflect.com

Jane Afshar, Sarah Leger, Jamieson Troise and Brandy Stefonik at the Bee’s Knees.

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 45


V23|NO31

Shazam!

Don’t leave downtown after First Friday, especially if you want to catch a good show

A couple gunshots are not putting an end to First Friday and, for this writer, that’s awesome to hear. Thanks to support from city officials and community leaders, we’re still going to be able to get hammered with thousands of people every First Friday. Oh yeah, and we’ll be able to enjoy the art scene in Augusta. It’s time to Get Down Downtown. Westobou Festival and Friends with Benefits Fund have put together two great events to show off downtown Augusta. For only $12 you can see Bloodkin, Stewart & Winfield and Funk You at the Jessye Norman Amphitheatre with the Savannah River as your backdrop. Good music, food and craft beers. Some of my favorite shows have been at the amphitheater. If you are looking for a free event, come out early to the Augusta Common and see JAMP Masters (James Brown Academy of Musik Pupils) at 5:30 p.m., then music from Folly and Tara Scheyer and The Mud Puppy Band. Some people are questioning the attendance already, but if we want this city to flourish you cannot let the trash of Augusta bring it down. To everyone from Evans and Martinez, quit being a bunch of wussies (I really wanted to use the other word). These are great events and you will definitely be entertained. The entertainment continues downtown this weekend with a show that is guaranteed to be one of the most fun shows of the summer. Sky City welcomes Foxy Shazam and Baby Baby, Saturday, August 4. “That’s the biggest black ass I’ve ever seen, and I like it,” screams Eric Nally, lead singer of Foxy, in their first radio single, “I Like It.” Nally has been compared to Queen frontman Freddie Mercury; flamboyant is a good word. You will not be disappointed, and if you caught it early, this is only a $5 show. If you’re late, $10 at the door while they last. Doors open up at 8 p.m., with music at 9:30. I’ll be the guy double fisting $2 PBRs. This past week has been crazy for me. Along with the girlfriend and the dog, we headed out on a road trip to Michigan. That’s a 15-hour drive, if you were wondering. I was thinking that this is a great way to hear what music people like in different parts of the country. Let’s just turn on the radio and see what we can find. Well let me tell you, radio is bad in other parts of the country. There’s an abundance of country music and classic rock, both of which make my stomach turn. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again; Lynyrd Skynyrd’s music should have died in the plane crash with them. For Michigan, they love Kid Rock. I get that he’s from there, but can’t we all agree that “Cowboy” is a bad song? There are actually only two kinds of radio stations that were tolerable around this great nation of ours: oldies and NPR. The coolest pit stop along the way was Jack White’s record store in Nashville. Back in 2001, Jack started Third Man Records and in 2009 he opened up his own record store in Nashville, appropriately titled Third Man Records. The store only sells music that was recorded by White. Great vinyl records (Google vinyl if needed, youngsters) from the likes of Loretta Lynn, Beck, Conan O’Brien and all of White’s bands. I managed to come out only spending $100, and that was with a lot of restraint. For a music lover, this store is pretty awesome. Fair warning: It’s not on the best side of town. I’m sure Jack planned it that way. What shows are coming to Augusta? What did you think of Foxy Shazam? Email me, matt@themetrospirit.com.

MATTSTONE can be heard weekdays from 2-6 p.m. on 95 Rock. 46 METROSPIRITAUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

2AUGUST2012


V23|NO31

Family Tradition

AMYCHRISTIAN

On the eve of their 30th year in business, French Market Grille remains an Augusta favorite

Diners love consistency and continuity, so it’s really no surprise that French Market Grille is one of the most popular restaurants in town. For the past 29 years, those who walk in, whether they were born and reared in Augusta or are repeat Masters visitors, know that two of the first people they’re going to see are owners Chuck and Gail Baldwin. “They do know that they’re going to see Grandpa and Grandma,” Chuck Baldwin jokes during a recent lunch service that, even at 2 p.m., is still going strong. “If I go out of town, I’ll come back and the guys will tell me that 200 people said, ‘Where’s Chuck?’ I learned the business from guys who are very front of the house oriented.” Baldwin learned the business formally at Michigan State, where he earned at degree in hotel and restaurant management. But it was is very first food service job where he discovered he was a people person. “In 1969 I was a delivery guy for the second Domino’s Pizza ever,” he said. “It was my first job in the food business and I just realized that I kind of liked the interaction with people.” After college, Baldwin worked at Augusta’s the Green Jacket for a while and then moved to Michigan. Baldwin said it was at the Green Jacket that he met Craig Calvert, a person who would become instrumental in getting French Market Grille off the ground. “We had worked at the Green Jacket together and stayed in touch,” he remembers. “He came back to Augusta before me and opened Calvert’s.” The Baldwins wanted to return to Augusta, but it wasn’t until a bequest from Gail’s grandmother’s estate that the couple had enough money to do so. “We came back in 1983, and I didn’t have a plan, really, so I just worked at Calvert’s,” Baldwin said. A short time later the ice cream parlor that had occupied to corner spot on the upper level of Surrey Center closed. “So Craig said, ‘Well, look at that. It looks like New Orleans. And, by the way, I met this lady who cooks Cajun and Creole food,’” he says. “So we all sat down together and she said that we ought to go to New Orleans, so we did. And we fell in love with it. I’ve been to Louisiana many, many times. I have an affinity 2AUGUST2012

for it. Maybe I was there in another life or something.” The woman in question was Mary Mauldin, who also ended up being instrumental in French Market Grille’s success despite only being with the restaurant for a year. “I don’t know how you put it, but she just had a feel for what people like,” Baldwin says. “The shrimp po boy? That’s her recipe. The peanut butter pie? That’s her recipe too. Roughly half of today’s menu, maybe a little less, is made up of her recipes. She was one of those people who was just really gifted.” Just like that, everything seemed to fall in place: The Baldwins opened French Market Grille in 1984 with Calvert’s financial help and Mauldin’s magic in the kitchen. And while Baldwin admits that their first Masters Week (the restaurant opened just eight days beforehand) was a little slow, the restaurant gained name recognition and positive word of mouth throughout the years because of a combination of delicious food and inviting atmosphere. It is an atmosphere in which all are welcome, from those who have been coming to the restaurant for nearly three decades to their children and grandchildren. Baldwin says he pays special attention to his youngest customers, probably because he himself is a grandfather and says that, in the long run, it’s those great memories of family meals that keep French Market so close to so many people’s hearts. “We’re on our third generation of customers and we’ve been voted best restaurant in Augusta for years, but I don’t pretend to be the best restaurant

in Augusta. There are a lot of outstanding restaurants in Augusta, especially on the high end,” he said. “But that kid, who now brings his kids here, has memories of being here when he was little. And those are the people who vote for us.” The family atmosphere extends to the staff, he said. The kitchen staff averages 10 years of service, and Baldwin can name three people off the top of his head who have worked at French Market for 20 years. Heck, his daughter in law even works in the restaurant. And it’s an atmosphere that out of towners notice and appreciate as well. “I guess next year will be our 30th Masters Week and there are people who’ve been coming here every year,” he said. “We know every one and they’ll eat here two or three times that week.” Masters Week, which Baldwin calls a story until itself and the restaurant’s 13th month, has become a science at French Market Grille, a time when a month’s worth of business is crammed into six days (the restaurant is never open on Sunday). How do they do it? “Gail is very meticulous and organized,” Baldwin says. “She’s got all these detailed files on Masters do’s and don’ts, so all we do is refine it every year.” Faithful Masters customers will encounter something new at French Market Grille the next time they visit. For the first time since opening, Baldwin revealed that the restaurant is changing it’s menu. “Mostly what it is is a different format,” he said. “It will be relatively the same menu but it will look different. And we may drop a few things from the menu.” That last sentence may cause regular French Market customers to panic, but Baldwin says that the most popular menu items will stay and that those taken off the permanent menu will reappear as specials. But, people person that he is, he says he knows that some will be unhappy and he is glad to talk to those people. “I’m here to weather that,” he laughs. “They can vent on me. I can take it.” French Market Grille 425 Highland Avenue, Surrey Center Monday-Thursday, 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. | 706-737-4865 thefrenchmarketgrille.com

AUGUSTA’S INDEPENDENT VOICE SINCE 1989

METROSPIRIT 47


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Primetime Pigskin

Thursday night football returns to CSRA

America’s most innocent form of our national pastime gets underway in about three weeks and, man, can it not get here soon enough. After an entire off-season muddled with bounty gate, Peyton Manning, Tim Tebow and unprecedented future lawsuits looming, it’s refreshing to get back to where the pigskin dreams begin taking their mold. And once again, it’s time for Game Night Live. I, alongside my esteemed colleague Ashley Brown of WGAC, will provide play-by-play and color commentary for the broadcast. Ryan Bowers of Bachelorette fame will be patrolling the sidelines with stories and insight from the contest. The goal for all involved is to get exposure to the abundance of talent we have in the CSRA, and WJBF (Channel 6) is raising that bar to heights unseen. I think I speak for everyone involved in being overwhelmingly grateful again for this opportunity. The games will be broadcast live on Thursday nights, with the broadcast beginning at 7 p.m. on their digital channel 6.2 (Knology/Atlantic Broadband 248 or Comcast 380).

Here is our 2012 Schedule Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday, Thursday,

August 23 Midland Valley @ North Augusta August 30 Evans @ ARC September 6 Silver Bluff @ South Aiken September 13 Fox Creek @ Augusta Christian September 20 North Augusta @ Grovetown September 27 Burke County @ Cross Creek October 4 Ridge Spring-Monetta @ Blackville-Hilda October 11 Lincoln County @ Aquinas October 18 T.W. Josey @ Harlem October 25 Midland Valley @ Strom Thurmond November 1 Glenn Hills @ Hephzibah

MATTLANE is host of The Weekend Rundown which airs from 10 a.m.-noon Saturdays on News-TalkSports 1630 AM. He can be reached at mattlane28@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter @Mattlane28.

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Jennifer White is a local photographer, specializing in fine art pet photography. Animals have always had a special place in my heart. Growing up, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve never been without a pet (or a few), and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always had a strong passion for photography. As an adult, I am around animals on a daily basis at work and then I make may way home to my seven awesome doggies, two frogs and a lizard. A day doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pass that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not taking photographs of my own critters, even if they are just fun pictures with my cell phone, so it was only natural for my love for photography to collide with my love for animals. Earlier in the year when I took in one of my own, Dixie, for her routine check up, we found that this year Special Events would be different; we Augusta Humane Society offers obedience classes twice learned that she had mast cell cancer. She underwent HDFK\HDUÂŹ)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO about four months of chemotherapy and did great. She is currently having her Ongoing Adoption Events: follow-ups done, and is PETCO doing fine so far. 4209 Washington Road, Evans Once she was diagnosed, I Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 1-4 p.m. was on the internet every night, reading all I could PetSmart about this cancer and the 225 Robert C. Daniel Parkway, Augusta many other types of cancers Saturdays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. that affect dogs more often than you would think. In doing so, I came across the Tractor Supply National Canine Cancer 596 Bobby Jones Expressway, next to Samâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club Foundation, which led me to Saturdays and Sundays from 1-4 p.m. Smile for a Cure, a national program in which photographers raise awareness and funds in the fight against canine cancer. Throughout the months of August and September, Smile for a Cure pet photographers from across the country will donate 100 percent of their session fees to The National Canine Cancer Foundation, a nonprofit, 501(C) 3 dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health issue in dogs (wearethecure.org/). One in four dogs will be diagnosed with cancer, and 50 percent of them will die from this terrible disease. My company, Jennifer W Photography of Augusta, is partnering with Smile for a Cure to help raise money to donate to the National Canine Cancer Foundation. By booking a session, you can make a tremendous difference in the lives of dogs as well as humans, making this that much more important. The National Institute of Health has gone on record to declare that much of the research on canine cancer applies to human cancer as well. Founded in 2009 by North Carolina pet photographer Nunthany Johnson, Smile for a Cure is composed of a caring group of pet photographers all across the country dedicated to making a difference in the lives of dogs with cancer and the people who love them. Smile for a Cure is a direct result of cancer hitting home, when Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bichon Frise Max was diagnosed with hemangiosarcoma, a fatal cancer of the blood vessels. When someone you love has cancer, whether animal or human, it can be devastating. Sessions will be scheduled from August 1 through September 30 and a session fee is $125, with 100 percent of the proceeds from the program going to The National Canine Cancer Foundation to fund grants directly to cancer researchers who are working to save lives, find better treatments and early detection methods and, ultimately, a cure. If you are interested in scheduling your pet's custom photo shoot, please contact Jennifer W Photography (Jennifer White) by calling 706-414-6231, emailing jenniferbweaver@yahoo.com. You can also find me on facebook at jennifer w photography or on my website at onemoreglance.com.

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WHINE

WHINELINE@THEMETROSPIRIT.COM

Have something you want to get off your chest? Send your whines to whineline@themetrospirit. com. If you do so by noon on Friday, you might just see it in the next Thursday’s issue. Oh, and whines may be edited for content but will pretty much be printed exactly as you type them.

LINE If I wanted to live on the southside of Augusta where there are clothing vendors on every corner, I would have moved there. So please, dont turn Washington Rd and I20 into the scummy southside. Please hurry up and get through with this Republican 12th election crap and get to the Richmond County Crazy! Why is it okay for the Yes Magazine to litter all over neighborhoods and how to make it stop? We have repeately asked it to stop. Stop littering our neighborhoods!!! Chief James you need to forget about everything else that you keep going on the news about. Forget that one our own

shouldn’t even be allowed to drive because he destroyed 9. Instead fight to get us our sick time back. We worked for that. I could have came in and worked 8 the other day, but until you make a REAL effort to fight for the ones you claim to lead I wouldn’t come in for anything on a day off. Guess that is why 8 and 9 were both shut down. None of us care to work for you. You aren’t Chris Don Corleone James, so quit laying your faith with those who are screwing us. We can’t even speak out unless it is anonymous because we know we will be suspended for some erroneous reason. Oh wait...that just happened to one of my fellow brothers. Hey, I just plowed through that Josh Ruffin piece, “Stupid, stupid week” three times and I still ain’t figured out what the hell he’s trying to say. I just don’t think this boy is hittin’ on all his firing pins or else he’s smoking something strange. Maybe y’all can send him to one of them writin’ schools where they teach

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you how to write so’s ordinary people can understand what you’re trying to say? If that don’t work, maybe you can just let him deliver the papers and you can get somebody who ain’t warped to write that column. You can’t make a coherent rebuttal to Ruffin, so you resort to commentary straight out of Middle School. I cringe every time I read country-bumpkin metaphors like how his brain could “fit in a mosquito’s butt.” You vote? You actually enter a voting booth and help decide on the fate of this great nation? I can debate you on nothing but your own intellect as that’s all you’ve given me to work with. Instead of your unintentionally-hilarious missives about how dumb he is, try and form a counter-argument and submit that. Or is it too much of a challenge for you? If there is a God, he(she) doesn’t care about your prayers. If he(she) did the world wouldn’t be in the mess it is. Instead of sitting on your behind in church, why not go out and do some volunteer work in a community where it might make a difference. Volume 23 No. 29 is the first Metro Spirit I’ve picked up in a long time. I have always liked the paper, and enjoyed this one as well. Except for the whine line ad. “What’s on your mind chief?” with a child wearing a ridiculous headdress meant to be representative of Native American clothing. As a Cherokee/Iroquois I find this insulting. Please remove this ad. Most of us are dead, this is true, but don’t mock us. Most Augusta residents share the same blood, but never recognize when they are ridiculed in ads like these. I ask that you politely refrain from using obviously demeaning stereotypes in the future. Thank you very much. Hey Austin , if you google 50 most influential radio talk host streaming on the Internet Alex jones is #17... I put in your name ....nada....you should educate yourself about the industry that you work in.

that time. The problems start after 10pm and a lot of it has to do with certain bar owners who encourage this drunk party atmosphere on the streets. They have used First Friday to drive business to them and have helped create the monster of the after 10pm chaos. Why city leaders would be going to these same bar owners for solutions for First Friday is ridiculous. Hey what’s happened with the whine line? Where’s all the whines about fat chicks in South Augusta, farting in grocery store check out lines, talk show hosts who look like lesbians, how bad the paper mill stinks, and how lame Augusta’s nightlife is? I want the old whine line back. Enough with all the boring political whine. Give me the Jerry Springer whines. WOW - employees wearing name tags so the company knows where you are every minute of the day. Employees with GPS apps in their cell phones so that company knows where you are every minute of the day. BIG BROTHER is not only watching you, BIG BROTHER is now controlling you... and the “powers to be” just love it. You people wanted the “tech-age” and you’ve got it...are you happy now, well, are you? time for one person to be in charge and responsible for first Friday. I’d rather get a root canal than go downtown. business’s need to get a clue.. cleanup and paint your stores!! let’s do away with a few civil liberties!! harass.. check backpacks etc make it uncomfortable for the lowlifes!!! Thank you to the person that paid for my lunch today at the Wendy’s drive-thru in North Augusta! I promise to pay it forward! i cannot believe what mr. rhodes wrote in his column last week. and I cannot believe the metro spirit chose to print it. you should be more responsible in the future metro.

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Metro Spirit 07.12.2012