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The Merciad F R E E

VOL. 86 No. 18 4 / 10 / 2013

Men’s lacrosse undefeated

More Inside & Online

Health school announced

Administration has authorized the opening of a school that integrates all health related academic programs into one. The School of Health Professions and Public Health, will begin functioning next fall.

Read more on Page 3

‘Eurydice’ set to stun

The arts at Mercyhurst seem to be continually "one-upping" themselves. "Eurydice" will not only continue the trend, bump it up to a level that hasn't been seen on campus in years.

Read more on Page 11

ONLINE POLL RESULTS How do you feel about the new Mercyhurst Twitter account? I just hope I don’t end up on there. 23% I can’t stand them. Some tweets push it too far. 32% Total votes: 69

Read more on Page 7

Off-campus housing issues

Residents surrounding Mercyhurst University addressed Erie City Council on Thursday night regarding students living off Campus. This has been brought to council multiple times over the past 10 years.

I’m addicted.I mean I can stop any time 26% I wanna know who has a crush on me. 19%

Photo Credit: Zach Dorsch

Read more on Page 4


NEWS

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April 10, 2013

Penn State Behrend hosts fracking panel By Zach Dorsch Photo editor

Environmental and industry experts on fracking will be at Penn State Behrend for a roundtable discussion Thursday, April 11, at 7 p.m. in Jack Burke Research and Educational Development Center (REDC) 180. This event was planned by students in a public relations class taught by Ursula Davis, Ph.D., to fulfill a course requirement. The event will begin with a student presentation covering the fracking process and facts about the process. They will also cover some of the bigger contrives such as the political, legal, and environmental issues caused by the fracking industry. An open panel discussion will follow. The six members that comprise the panel will be representing two organizations, The Sierra Club and Adler Tank Rentals. The Sierra Club will include Allegheny Defense Project Forest Watch

Coordinator Cathy Pedler and Behrend History Professor John Rossi, Ph.D. Adler Tank Rentals, a fracking solution storage rental service, will be represented by Industrial & Environmental Sales Account Manager Ryan Hess. After the panel, they will open the floor to key questions on the subject. Some of the key questions students will be asking include: Is deep well injection a suitable solution for the disposal of fracking water? In 10 years, where do you see this industry? Will it be the new economic engine of Pennsylvania, or will the gas companies have more on the next region after extracting as much as possible? “It is the fastest growing industry in Pennsylvania and the entire process is becoming extremely politicized,” said Behrend senior Alec Italiano. “We took it upon ourselves as a public higher learning facility to cut through this web of spin in order to present the public with the honest truth about this industry.”

The panel will include guests from the Sierra Club and Behrend faculty members.

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April 10, 2013

News Brief

Bob Woodward lecturing at Mercyhurst Investigative journalist and author Bob Woodward, famous for breaking the stories on the Watergate scandal during President Richard Nixon’s term, will be lecturing tonight at 8 p.m. at the Mary D’Angelo Performing Arts Center. His talk, titled “Inside the White House: From Nixon to Obama with Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein,” is open to the public. The remaining tickets can be acquired at the box office or reserved online. One of his most notable publications, “All the President’s Men,” co-authored with Carl Bernstein, was adapted into a major motion picture starring Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman as Woodward and Bernstein. The film depicts the events surrounding the Watergate scandal that led to the eventual resignation of President Nixon. The film received excellent reviews and garnered some major accolades, including two Academy Awards. Other books published by Woodward include “The Final Days,” “Bush at War” and “The Price of Politics.” For more information, please contact the box office at (814) 8243000.

Mercyhurst University Police & Safety

Police Log

Tuesday, April 2 Possession of Drug Paraphernalia McAuley Hall Referred for discipline Tuesday, April 2 Theft Briggs Ave. Referred for discipline

Sunday, April 7 Liquor Law Violation, Disorderly conduct, Criminal Mischief Lewis Ave. Referred for discipline Sunday, April 7 Liquor Law Violation Warde Hall Referred for discipline

NEWS

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Mercyhurst set to open School of Public Health By Juan Mendez Staff writer

In continuing with the theme of the year of the university, the administration has authorized the opening of a school that integrates all health-related academic programs into one. The School of Health Professions and Public Health, which will begin functioning next fall, will house all pre-health, sports medicine and public health programs at Mercyhurst Main and North East campuses, as well as a physician assistant’s program. Public Health Department Chair David Dausey, Ph.D., will be appointed dean of the new school, with David Hyland, Ph.D., and Marion Monahan joining him as assistant deans for Main and North East campuses respectively. Dausey believes that the timing was right for this announcement. “I think we reached a tipping point with the number of students interested in public health programs where it was necessary to combine all of our

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David Dausey, Ph.D., will become the dean of the new school. health-related majors into one school so the programs could have more visibility,” he said. The importance of giving the students a significant amount of interaction with people in related programs also brought forth the necessity for a new school. “We wanted to create a health-applied discipline for people that want applied careers. On top of that, cross-disciplinary collaboration is a major benefit to the students,” Dausey said. Student response to the announce-

ment is mostly positive. Sophomore public health major Matt Vendeville thinks the school will benefit from the School of Health Professions and Public Health. “I feel Dr. Dausey is the perfect person to lead this school in the right direction. His enthusiasm toward this school and it being successful is tremendously high,” said Vendeville. “He works countless hours to make sure students and the school become competitive with other undergraduate Public Health schools.”

Education majors find success post graduation By Katie Felong Staff writer

As the 2012-13 school year comes to a close, Mercyhurst seniors anxiously contemplate what will happen after graduation. They wonder if they will find employment, if they will go to grad school and where they will be living. Each November, six months after graduation, the Mercyhurst Career Development Center (CDC), reaches out to these new graduates. The CDC emails links to questionnaires, while Ambassadors help with this process through phone calls. The study usually runs until February. There is no standard for what should be in a post-graduation questionnaire, but the CDC found that the word “positive placement” is comprehensive. It means that graduates are either employed, attending graduate school or both. This year, Kyle Foust, Ph.D.,

director of the Career Development Center, found that all of the Education graduates who responded had positive placements six months after graduation. Twenty-seven out of 30 graduates and 93 percent of the previous students had found positive placement. Upon hearing that, associate dean of the Hafenmaier School of Education and Behavioral Sciences, Leanne Roberts, Ph.D., reached out to her department graduates and conducted a similar study. Foust, who has two education certificates himself, connected with the education department. Roberts contacted 30 early childhood and special education graduates, and heard back from 27 of them. She found that 25 of them were employed or enrolled in a master’s program, bringing the positive placement rate to 93 percent. But why is the status of Mercyhurst alumni important? Senior education major, Lindsey Artman had her own input.

“You will hear the phrase ‘early and often’ in reference to spending time in the classroom with actual students and they mean it,” said Artman. “I have been going into classrooms, observing as well as working with the children since my freshman year. All of these experiences have helped me be much more prepared and equipped for student teaching as well.” These numbers are even despite more than 200 teacher layoffs in the Erie area. Foust understands the reason for these results. “The reason these numbers are increasing is partially because we have reached the bottom or the very bottom of budgetary problems and schools are learning how to react to the decreasing dollar, plus teachers on the higher end of the scale are looking at the changing of the pension rules and are finding that it’s more worthwhile to retire.”


NEWS

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April 10, 2013

Erie residents complain about off-campus students By Alicia Cagle Editor-in-Chief

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Students find ways to communicate with themselves and practice meditation in a new communication class.

New class puts students at ease By Aaron Loncki Contributing writer

As a senior communication major, Tim Eibl knows how to communicate with others, but it wasn’t until he took the “Mindful Communication” course at Mercyhurst that he learned to communicate with himself. It is not in every class that students begin with 10 minutes of silent meditation. “Mindful communication” is not an average college course. Instead of the stress and anxiety many students associate with college classes, “Mindful Communication” offers students an outlet to relax and be present. “Mindfulness is being aware, centered and concentrated,” said Eibl, who plans to either enter the workforce or join the military after graduation. “It allows me to be aware of what’s making me stressed and come to terms with it. It slows things down and makes everything manageable.” Eibl uses breath breaks to re-center himself in stressful situations. In an increasingly distracted world, simple mindful techniques can help students slow down and consciously manage their lives. “If they can do something as simple as focus on their breath, they can start to make a change in their reaction to any situation,” said instructor Brian Sheridan. “You don’t need a fancy uniform or a special building– you always

have your breath— it’s that simple.” Sheridan, a communication instructor with an interest in martial arts and Buddhism, designed the course to help students from all majors learn about and improve themselves. And unlike many college courses, failure is an option. “That’s why we call it practice. ‘I didn’t get it right today, but maybe tomorrow I can get it right,’” said Sheridan. “With mindfulness, we know that it’s okay.” According to Sheridan, mindfulness practices have been adopted by medical schools, veterans’ hospitals and Fortune 500 companies. No matter the industry, research shows mindfulness has its advantages. “Benefits can be better stress management, better interpersonal relationships, more creative thinking and leading a less distracted life,” Sheridan said. For Eibl, learning mindfulness is worth a shot and it starts with listening. “When you take the time to slow down and be mindful, you actually get a sense of what your body and mind are telling you,” said Eibl. “Sometimes our bodies and our minds tell us things but we don’t take the time to listen.” In today’s world, Eibl said, “we never really think about communicating with ourselves.” Sheridan hopes the class will be available next year if student interest is high.

Residents surrounding Mercyhurst University addressed Erie City Council Thursday night regarding students living off campus. Problems concerning students living off campus have been brought to the Council multiple times over the past 10 years. Complaints included underage drinking, loud music, flashing, public urination, increased traffic, zoning, parking, littering and condition of houses. Many Erie residents, including Erie City Controller Cas Kwitowski, said they have been living near the university long before off-campus housing was a problem or safety was an issue. While some problems stem from a lack of respect for neighbors, others are caused by a disregard for the law. That includes landlords who are ignoring zoning laws which only allow three unrelated people per rental and students who are ignoring laws such as underage drinking and public indecency. “I think we just need to enforce the laws that are out there,” City Councilman Dave Brennan said. Chief of Police & Safety Robert Kuhn agrees with Brennan, stating, “If they crack down on code violations, they could probably cut down on some of this.” Kwitowski added that students also need to take responsibility for their actions. “This is a residential area and they need to act like adults,” said Kwitowski. “All we ask is that they take the parties inside and be respectful.” An additional problem residents brought before the Council was the number of complaints that never make it through the system. “I will testify to the fact that [there

Zach Dorsch photo

An Erie City Council meeting was held to discuss complaints about off-campus students living in the community. are] very little complaints,” said Councilman Robert Merski, who lives in the neighborhood near campus. “Somewhere in the system, it is breaking down.” Merski is a Mercyhurst alumnus. Residents placed some blame on Mercyhurst for accepting more students than can be housed on campus and that Police & Safety need to monitor off-campus housing as well. Associate Director of Public Relations Debbie Morton and Associate Vice President for Student Life Laura Zirkle were at the City Council session with Kuhn. “I think that we’ve made huge improvements in the relationship with our students and off-campus neighbors,” said Zirkle. “I think our (students) are much more aware of living in the community and being in the neighborhood.” Zirkle explained, however, that many students living off campus have a good relationship with their neighbors, but there are some who ruin it for the rest. Kuhn explained that Police & Safety

remains unarmed, per the college’s orders, and that Mercyhurst officers do not have jurisdiction with matters off campus. Erie Police are hired, however, during weekends that large parties are expected. “We’re doing the best that we can,” Kuhn said. Merski acknowledged the work the university has done so far. “Mercyhurst has gone above and beyond . . . I know you try to make every effort,” said Merski. “I want the community aware that we do have a good working relationship.” Merski has already begun looking at solutions in other municipalities across Pennsylvania. Finding solutions to the problems concerning Mercyhurst’s off-campus students will continue to be examined by City Council. It’s a problem that never really ends,” said Zirkle. “We have new students every year. It will always be an ongoing issue that we just need to be diligent about.”

Social Work hosts spaghetti dinner Social Work seniors will host a spaghetti dinner Saturday, April 13, at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church on Old French Road from 5-7 p.m. The dinner will benefit Cribs for Kids, which advocate safe sleep habits and donate cribs to reduce infant deaths. Guests will be able to participate in a 50/50 and a Chinese auction to win an assortment of prizes including $200 to Ink Assassins and gift certificates to Claytopia, the movies and tickets to the Erie Zoo, among others. Pre-purchased tickets are $5 and tickets at the door are $7.


FEATURES

April 10, 2013

Page 5

Trashion Show explores students’ inner creativity By Kayla Kelly Features editor

Clubs on campus are collaborating to create an event that involves a creative approach to recycling. The Art Education Club, along with help from the Fashion Merchandising Club and Art Therapy Club, is hosting a “Trashion Show” on Wednesday, April 24, from 7 to 10 p.m. in the Carolyn Herrmann Student Union. The event is a spin-off of a typical fashion show with a focus on “trash.” The garments and accessories that will be worn by the models will all be made out of recycled objects. Materials can range from newspaper and food or drink boxes to broken household items. Participants are encouraged to refrain from using large amounts of duct tape or creating entire duct tape outfits. The event is also challenging people to refrain from purchasing anything for their creations.

If you want to get involved in the Trashion Show, you can make an outfit as an individual, group or club. You can either nominate your own model, or models may be provided to strut your outfit down the runway. A panel of judges will then evaluate the garments and prizes will be given out for first, second and third places. “The event is not as structured as a typical fashion show,” said Art Eduaction Club Co-president Megan O’Polka. “We want our participants to have fun. Make up a dance for walking down the runway, choose a really fun song or walk down with your best friends in trash outfits. Anyone can do this. It will also help bring awareness to recycling and reusing.” The Art Education Club is also currently looking for an individual or a pair of students who would be interested in being emcee. If you are interested in this role, contact O’Polka at mopolk63@lakers. mercyhurst.edu or Art Education

Club Secretary Rosemary Moore at rmoore62@lakers.mercyhurst.edu. If you want to become involved in the event by designing an outfit for the runway, you can sign up as an individual, group or club on the Facebook page “1st Annual Trashion Show.” There is a sign-up link available on the page. Deadline for entries is Wednesday, April 16, at midnight. It is $2 to enter an outfit and free to attend the event. There will also be a raffle during the show so the audience can participate in the evening. To learn more, feel free to attend club meetings on Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. in Zurn 221. Also check out the Facebook page for more information or email O’Polka. “I think this is going to be a really fun and unique event for Mercyhurst,” said O’Polka. “I hope everyone takes a chance to showcase their creativity.”

Zach Dorsch photo

Wheaton designs new card game, “Widget,” that challenges partcipants to come up with the silliest gadget.

Wheaton creates game By Daniel Tarr Staff writer

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Freshmen Sabrina VanTine and Ashley Favata pose in their recycled outfits to encourage students to attend Trashion Show.

We all love party games, especially ones that deal with cards. Thanks to Intelligence Studies Professor Kristan Wheaton, Ph.D., you can add another card-based game to your collection. The game is called “Widget.” Wheaton described the game as a card game played with words. The players, roughly three to six, take the cards and try to create a gadget or gizmo that does something silly. The point of the game is to make the weirdest gadget. After creating the gadgets, the players then vote on who has the silliest gadget out of them all. The player with the gadget that has the most votes wins. Wheaton, who has been designing games for 30 years, first thought of this game back around October 2012. One day, Wheaton woke up from a dream and the idea for the game was in his head. He proceeded to rush to his office and wrote the whole thing down. All of the cards from the game are illustrated by various artists from around the world. A total of 47 different artists contributed to designing cards for the game. Some of these artists come from places such as Australia, Sri Lanka, Nigeria and Argentina.

Wheaton funded the development of this game through a page on Kickstarter. On Kickstarter, one has a maximum of 30 days to reach the goal amount of money needed to fund a project that he or she has established on the website. Wheaton needed a total of $4,000 in order for his Kickstarter to be successful. He got to 40 percent of his goal after four days. He had received $1,638 from 58 people who decided to fund the game. The Kickstarter for “Widget” ended Saturday, April 6. No more contributions can be made at this time. Wheaton now hopes to begin producing the game. Wheaton is using the production of this game as an experiment to see how entrepreneurs can use intelligence analysis as a way of making their projects successful. “Entrepreneurs need intelligence support just as much as governments and big businesses but, until now, no one has explored the topic,” said Wheaton. “I figured the best way to learn about what entrepreneurs need from intelligence is to become an entrepreneur myself.” If you would like to know more about the game “Widget,” contact Wheaton at (814) 824-2023 or kwheaton@mercyhurst.edu.


FEATURES

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April 10, 2013

Pantone releases Literary Festival features student spring color trends creative work every skin tone from the pale skinned redhead to the dark skinned goddess. Another great quality about emerald is that it catches everyone’s attention. The color is a showstopper, just like you will be, if you choose to wear this color. Its subtle glamour refrains from it being too over the top. If you want to incorporate emerald into your wardrobe, but in small quantities, try a piece of emerald jewelry to ease into the color trend. A jewel-encrusted bracelet is a great option, because you can wear it with a pair of jeans and sweater or dress it up with a little black dress. A little pop of color will go a long way.

By Abigail Robinson Staff writer

The Pantone Fashion Color Spring 2013 Report has been released and the top spring colors include Dusk Blue, Nectarine, Emerald, Grayed Jade, African Violet, Monaco Blue, Lemon Zest, Linen, Tender Shoots and Poppy Red. The Pantone Color Report defines the fashion world. The Pantone Color Institute is comprised of numerous top designers, including Tommy Hilfiger and Tracy Reese, alongside the industry’s leading stylists, fashion consultants and buyers. So when Pantone chose emerald as the 2013 color of the year, I was ecstatic. While Emerald will be seen everywhere from apparel, cars and home décor, it will be very popular for the spring season. Ever since Angelina Jolie wore a black dress with a high slit and classic emerald earrings to the 2009 Academy Awards, the color has been seen everywhere. Here in Erie we barely see sun during the winter months, so it is extremely exciting when spring rolls in. I’m definitely guilty of spending the winter months in varying shades

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Jolie wears emerald earrings on the red carpet. of neutrals because I can’t always bring myself to be cheerful due to Erie’s snowstorms, wind and freezing cold. But spring is here and it is time for us to incorporate more color in our life, specifically emerald. The good thing about emerald is that its deep, rich color complements

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This $78 J.Crew bracelet can be paired with any outfit this spring season.

So whether or not you decide to wear emerald this spring, try one of the other upcoming top spring colors that Pantone has provided. For more information on color trends go to www.pantone.com.

By Garrett Erwin Staff writer

2013 marks the 11th Annual Mercyhurst Literary Festival that features accomplished writers as well as student-produced works. For 10 years, the English department has made an annual effort to promote creative literary talents on campus for students to enhance their perspectives. The Literary Festival began in 2002 with the collaboration of English Professor Jeff Roessner, Ph.D., and Associate Professor of English Ken Schiff, Ph.D. They had a common goal of bringing acclaimed writers to campus to interact with students. Over the past years, students have been involved in meeting various accomplished writers from all over the world. They also had the opportunity to submit written and visual works expressing their literary talents for campus publication. “The Festival is a great opportunity for students to hear and meet with award-winning poets and fiction writers and to experience the creative works of their classmates,” Schiff said.

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Marjorie Agosin will speak to students about her poetry. The festival begins Thursday, April 11, with a reading by Chilean poet, Marjorie Agosin, at 8:15 p.m. in the Taylor Little Theater (TLT). William Kowalski, author of several best-selling books, as well as an Erie native, will give a presentation at 8:15 p.m. on Thursday, April 18, in the TLT. The final festival spot is held for the unveiling of the student-produced literary magazine, “Lumen,” on Thursday, April 25, at 8:15 p.m. in the TLT.

This event also features presentations of awards for the three best examples of student creative writings and best critical essay on literature. “Lumen” is the Mercyhurst arts magazine that is student produced and features written and visual works from students on campus.

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William Kowalski will present on Thursday, April 18. The magazine is a collaborative effort between the editorial staff and the graphic design department before it goes to print. “Each year, students send in submissions of poetry and fiction to be judged by the editorial staff, comprised of students who are typically, though not always, part of the English/creative writing discipline,” Lumen Editor-In-Chief Chelsea Schermerhorn said. After the editorial staff chooses the works to be published, they meet with the graphic design department to create the overall design of the magazine. Following the announcement of the winners, students will be sharing their works during an open microphone session to conclude the events. The campus community is encouraged to attend to experience the talent beyond the classroom. The 11th annual Mercyhurst Literary Festival will begin Thursday, April 22, at 8:15 p.m., in the Taylor Little Theater. All festival events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Ken Schiff at (814)-824-2461 or kschiff@mercyhurst.edu


ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

March 10, 2013

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Local Events Wednesday, April 10:

8 p.m. & 10 p.m. Bob Woodward Performing Arts Center Thursday, April 11: 8:15 p.m. Literary Festival Opening Marjorie Agosin Taylor Little Theater Contributed photo

Students prepare to stun audiences on campus this weekend with their production of “Eurydice.” Complete with the use of running water, fire and a set that is a masterpiece in itself, “Eurydice” will have audiences begging for more from the new theatre program.

‘Eurydice’ set to amaze By Mathew Anderson A&E editor

Online

The arts at Mercyhurst seem to be continually “one-upping” themselves in terms of performance and content quality, along with sheer talent from the students. “Eurydice” will not only continue this trend, but also bump it up to a level that this campus has not seen in years, if ever. The cast will perform five times with a special guest performance on Wednesday, April 10, a presentation to local grade school students on the morning of Thursday, April 11, and with three performances, which are open to the public, April 12 – 14. “Eurydice,” by Sarah Ruhl, is an updated version of the age-old Greek myth of Orpheus and Eurydice. Traditionally, the tale is told through the eyes of Orpheus as he descends into the underworld to rescue his beloved. With the creative vision of the

director, Brett Johnson, Ph.D., “Eurydice” comes alive with running water, real fire and a set that is entirely made up of slanted surfaces and sand. Sarah Ruhl’s “Eurydice” is told through the eyes of the heroine as she discovers a whole new world and meets a menagerie of interesting characters. Sophomore Jordan Strange plays Orpheus, the musician who has had the love of his life ripped away from him on his wedding day. “I would have to say my favorite part of this production is the story itself. It literally draws you in and it draws you deeper, you can’t help but feel attracted to it because it’s so relative and real. The honesty, sincerity of it all is just so gripping,” Strange said. The storyline follows the love of Eurydice, played by freshman Sarah Creighton, and Orpheus, played by Strange. The plot is twisted when Eurydice dies on her wedding day. After discovering that an interesting man, junior Chris Gaertner, has a letter written by her deceased father, Eurydice follows the nasty interesting man

Full list of events can be found on the PAC website

to her death. The plot then follows Eurydice into the Underworld where she meets Ruhl’s vision of a Greek chorus, a group of stones who represent the long-dead residents of the Underworld. Eurydice also meets her father, although, after being dipped in the river Styx, she does not recognize him. Gradually, the two become reacquainted, as her father parents her as a young girl, helping her to acquire language and telling her stories about their family. Meanwhile, Orpheus struggles to make his way to the Underworld to find his beloved. The father warns Eurydice that if Orpheus should turn around and see her before they have reached the end of their journey, she will die a second death. If the realistic portrayal of this mythical story is not interesting enough, the set of the show itself is unique and should be showcased all on its own as a work of art. Incorporating the use of fire, water and sand, along with intricate sound

and lighting, pushes this production to a level that the City of Erie has not seen in years. During the four-week rehearsal process, actors were encouraged not to ‘act,’ but rather listen and respond – to become invested in the show on a deeper level. Freshman Tonya Lenhart describes her experience of working with the theatre program in its inaugural production. “My experience so far in the rehearsal process has been an interesting one to say the least. But it has also been a rewarding one.” “I was given the chance to discover my character in a way I never had the opportunity to do so before,” said Lenhart. Sarah Ruhl’s “Eurydice” will be performed in the Taylor Little Theatre on Friday, April 12, and Saturday, April 13, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, April 14, at 2 p.m. Ticket information can be found at pac.mercyhurst.edu or by contacting the D’Angelo Performing Arts Center at 814-824-3000.

View upcoming performances: www.pac.mercyhurst.edu

Friday, April 12: 8 p.m. Pines of Rome Symphonic Series Warner Theatre Saturday, April 13: 12 p.m. & 3:30 p.m. Met Opera - Francesca da Rimini Performing Arts Center Sunday, April 14: 2 p.m. Erie Explosion vs. Detroit Thunder Erie Insurance Arena Monday, April 15: 7:30 p.m. Rock of Ages Broadway Show Warner Theatre

www.merciad.mercyhurst. edu/arts_entertainment


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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

April 10, 2013

Forever Endeavor illustrates creativity By Garrett Erwin Staff writer

Forever Endeavor art exhibition marks what has taken graduating seniors four years of creativity and hard work to complete, and allows these artists to display their talents for the public and the campus community to enjoy. The gallery held a public opening on Saturday, April 6, in which a large crowd gathered to view the unique works of art. The annual gallery showcases the talents of nine seniors, and the use of various mediums in various sizes. As senior art majors, students took a senior thesis course during the winter term. These students include Katelyn Cecchetti, Carli Hatfield, Kathryn LeVan, Durim Loshaj, Hilda Navarro, Karma Smith, Kaylyn Stack, Jeffrey Thiede and Paulina Weilandt. The class met once a week with their professors to discuss what they had been working on, as well as to bounce ideas off of each other and critique each other’s works. The show expresses a use of various media such as oils, pastels, oil pastels, acrylics, charcoals, photography, graphics and gelatin prints. Art education major Katelyn Cecchetti used oil paints on canvas to

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Forever Endeavor artwork will be on display until April 28 in the Cummings Art Gallery. create four correlating pieces of art to exemplify the common toys that help to enhance creativity in the minds of children. “It was mandatory that every class we had made some sort of progress, so we were able to talk about what worked and what did not work to ensure it was the best it could be,” Cecchetti said. Sophomore James Conley attended in support of fellow art majors. He was not the only person amazed by the gallery as a whole. “The best thing about the gallery

show is the wide variety of talent that the students have displayed,” said Conley. “It shows well for the talent that Mercyhurst has on campus.” The showcase comes together with the collaboration of the senior artists and the Director of the Cummings Art Gallery, Heather Dana. The students met with Dana prior to the show and worked together to find the best location in the gallery to display their works. “I am very pleased with this show because the students have expressed a lot of color within their works,” said Dana. “It is a really strong show and it was a pleasure working with the students.” Other visitors included friends and family of the artists. Art therapy major Paulina Wielandt used a medium of United States maps and old dress patterns, with the use of acrylics to find different whimsical animals within the lines. Artists always try to find a way to include their personality within their works to make it especially unique. Wielandt’s aunts, Molly Prahler and Tricia Barney, both agreed that their niece has a way of showing her personality. “Paulina is extremely passionate about what she does, and her lovable personality really shows in her artwork,” said Prahler. The entire show was a success, and students are encouraged to stop in to view the gallery. The exhibition is open in the Cummings Art Gallery through April 28, with daily hours of Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays, 2-5 p.m. For more information, contact Heather Dana at (814) 824-2092 or hdana@mercyhurst.edu.

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The Smiths’ album “The World Won’t Listen” features collections of singles and B-Sides.

The Smiths: The World Won’t Listen By Zach Dorsch Photo editor

Author Stephen Chbosky once wrote, “Youth commands that all must endure a Smiths phase. If it was not you yourself who, at one point, attended the church of Morrissey, then at least a family member or someone close to you did.” I myself joined the “Church of Morrissey” with the band’s second compilation album “The World Won’t Listen.” Hailing from Manchester, The Smiths formed in 1982 when singer Steven Morrissey met guitarist Johnny Marr and the two began working on demos. After adding bassist Andy Rourke and Mike Joyce on drums, The Smiths were fully formed. They would soon become one of the most important indie rock bands of all time. “The World Won’t Listen” features a collection of singles and B-sides from 1985 to 1986 and is viewed as an essential to most fans. Narrowing down the tracks to discuss on this album was a challenge, but I will talk about my personal top three tracks off of the album. “There Is A Light That Never Goes Out” really demonstrates

how Morrissey can use his lyrics to relate to generation after generation of youth. This song is about being madly in love with a significant other but feeling the pressure of alienation at home. Morrissey sings the passionate chorus “And if a double-decker bus crashes into us/to die by your side is such a heavenly way to die.” The next track, “The Boy with the Thorn in His Side,” is about the band’s struggle with getting its music played on the radio. Morrissey attacks with lyrics “Behind the hatred there lies a murderous desire for love.” Every aspect of this song really connects Johnny Marr’s subtle yet powerful guitar part with the synthesized strings wonderfully. The last song is probably one of The Smiths most recognized songs. “Asleep” is a song I could listen to on repeat and never get tired of it. That is because of the pure art of the lyrics, that can be interpreted so many ways, mixed with the simplicity of just a simple piano part. Most people would say this song is about suicide, but I feel like it is about knowing you are going to die very soon and not going to wake up again. So as your last wish you want your significant other to “sing me to sleep.”


Page 9

OPINION

April 10, 2013

The views expressed in the opinion section of The Merciad do not necessarily reflect the views of Mercyhurst University, the staff of The Merciad or the Catholic Church. Responses on any subject are always welcomed and can be emailed to opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.

Gay marriage should be between two people Government, religion should stay separate By Zach Yost Staff writer

Recently there has been some hubbub in the United States about the possibility of the Supreme Court legalizing gay marriage. As anyone with a Facebook account knows, this issue has been quite divisive with many different thoughts and perspectives on the whole issue. Unfortunately, all sides seem to take a side that is completely unacceptable to the other. As someone who personally holds a great many controversial positions, I am no stranger to having usually

friendly disagreements with friends and acquaintances. I find it very sad, however, to see friends become angry and upset with one another over this issue. This is especially disconcerting as there is a simple solution to the whole issue that should be agreeable to all sides. The solution is simply to remove the government from the business of marriage all together. Why does someone need a license from the government to get married? Why is the status of someone’s personal relationships the government’s business? If I wanted to get married why would I need to pay Erie County $45 to get married?

In the legal sense, which is the only sense in which same sex marriage has any relevance, marriage is a contract. What more does the government and law need other than that? If I have a contract between myself and a girl or between myself and a guy, what difference does it make to the government for the purposes of taxation? What concern is it of anyone else’s if I have a contract between myself and five other people? I, of course, have my own personal opinion on whether I believe same sex marriage is moral or not. Yet there is no need to bring that into the debate. Why can we not simply leave every-

one alone to pursue their own happiness? As a follower of Christ, I am deeply saddened by many of my brothers and sisters in Christ who seem to forget that in Matthew 7 Jesus instructs us to worry about the plank in our own eyes before concerning with the speck in our brother’s eye. Whether or not homosexuality is moral does not excuse Christians from loving everyone and treating them with respect. If you believe that homosexuality is a sin, you cannot deny that if one is not free to sin, then one is not free to be righteous. Using the force of government to enforce what you believe to be moral does not make anyone act in a moral way.

The whole point of free will is that we have a choice between right and wrong. If that choice is eliminated, the whole system is destroyed. Regardless of whether they believe homosexuality is right or wrong, I believe that the only position that Christians can take while still sticking to their beliefs is to remove government from marriage altogether and leave everyone alone. After all, in the end, everything is between an individual and God. I know that I have a whole forest of planks in my own eye and am in no position to cast condemnation upon other for the speck in their eyes and I suspect that many of my fellow Christians are in the same situation.

The Person & The Parakeet by Brady Greenawalt

An original comic about struggles in a modern world.

If you don’t want it printed . . . don’t let it happen. @mercyhurst.edu Editors Positions editormerciad Alicia Cagle Editor-in-Chief newsmerciad Stacy Skiavo News Editor featuremerciad Kayla Kelly Features Editor sportsmerciad Joe Chiodo Sports Editor entertainmentmerciad Mat Anderson A&E Editor copymerciad Chelsea Schermerhorn Copy Editor photomerciad Samantha Link Graphics photomerciad Zach Dorsch Photo Editor ejohns89 Ethan Johns Web Editor admerciad Will DeFeo Ad Manager wwelch Bill Welch Adviser

The Merciad is the official student-produced newspaper of Mercyhurst University. It is published throughout the school year, with the exception of finals weeks. Our office is in Hirt, Room 120B. Our telephone number is (814) 824-2376. The Merciad welcomes letters to the editor. All letters must be signed and names will be included with the letters. Although we will not edit the letters for content, we reserve the right to trim letters to fit. Letters are due Mondays by noon and may not be more than 300 words. Submit letters to box PH 485 or via email at opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.


April 10, 2013

OPINION

Page 10

The views expressed in the opinion section of The Merciad do not necessarily reflect the views of Mercyhurst University, the staff of The Merciad or the Catholic Church. Responses on any subject are always welcomed and can be emailed to opinionmerciad@mercyhurst.edu.

Twitter accounts Beyoncé’s Cuba trip potentially hurtful receives too much Assistant Professor of Communications Meghan Corbin has brought pride to the Mercyhurst community after tweeting a response to the Google question: “What would you do with Google Glass?” Corbin has been chosen as one of the 8,000 individuals who will get to pioneer the new technology.

This year’s Kids N Sibs Weekend advertisements sport the mockingjay symbol from “The Hunger Games,” but does not explain further events involving the trilogy. Let’s hope students and their guests will not be randomly selected as tribute and then fight to the death. May the odds be ever in your favor, Mercyhurst.

By Alejandra Zeron Staff writer

Over the past couple of weeks, a series of Twitter accounts have created buzz on campus. The mania began with HurstMakeouts and was soon followed by other accounts including HurstMistakes, MercyhurstRumors, MercyhurstCrushes, MU_Bucketlist and MUConfessions. One of the most popular accounts, MercyhurstCrushes allows students to anonymously share their crushes by sending a direct message to the account and the mystery account owner tweets their comment. There have been mixed feelings about the accounts. Many students find the comments entertaining and even claim they have become addicted to them, constantly checking their Twitter for new mentions and confessions. Nevertheless, others find the tweets rude, inappropriate and overly descriptive. The initial tweets posted by the multiple accounts were lighthearted and amusing. However, recent tweets have been the subject of concern for taking it a bit too far. Some of these comments cross the line between being amusing and offensive. In a mid-size school where most students know one another, there is great potential for the respective

accounts and their content to hurt and embarrass individuals. Many students do love the Twitter accounts because they create both excitement and anxiety as to whose name will pop up next. On the downside, the different accounts can become tools for individuals to promote themselves or their friends, which many students claim is what is really going on. As for the involvement of Mercyhurst University, the accounts don’t seem to be alarming to the Public Relations department. After all, the accounts are merely on a student-to-student basis and should have no impact on incoming or prospective students. Furthermore, it would be difficult for Mercyhurst University to control the accounts because social media is a platform to create, share and exchange information and ideas. Regardless of the different reactions the accounts have being receiving, they have certainly sparked the attention of the student population. The real question seems to be whether the Twitter accounts are just another fad or are they here to stay for the long run. So far, it seems like MercyhurstConfessions and MercyhurstRumors have been shut down and MercyhurstCrushes has been tweeting fewer comments.

negative publicity By Caitlin Handerhan Staff writer

On February 3, 2013, televisions across America were tuned into arguably the biggest sporting event of the year: the Beyoncé Bowl. The top two NFL teams played a game of football, but the Internet was not abuzz with the rough and tumble ball game, but rather the 12-minute half time show that garnered Beyoncé more than another 15 minutes of fame. While the celebrity was not in question before her star-studded half time performance, Beyoncé certainly held headlines captive for days after her performance, which is an improvement from her headlines only weeks before when it was revealed that she did not sing live at the Presidential Inauguration to the disdain of many. It seems Beyoncé has once again made headlines in a political context, with many lawmakers releasing harsh statements today condemning Beyoncé and hip hop mogul husband, Jay-Z, for vacationing in Cuba this week. It seems the political volatility between the United States and Cuba is of no relevance to Beyoncé and family, as the poverty and political suppression of the Cuban people was far from

mind as America’s musical darling took her tropical vacation. Not to underplay the insensitivity of this vacation choice, but who really cares? It is almost unbelievable that elected members of the United States government are using time and resources releasing statements about Beyoncé’s vacation choice. Was it a less-than stellar choice? Absolutely. Was it headline worthy? Absolutely not. On a day when the United States doesn’t have troops in the Middle East, a budget crisis constantly looming, broken Congressional leadership or human rights on trial in the Supreme Court to name a few, maybe tabloid stories could be remotely of salience to elected officials. But not today; too much needs done in Washington for elected officials to be concerned with a pop-darling’s vacation choice. Beyoncé making headlines this week for going to Cuba is about as geopolitically relevant as Dennis Rodman’s diplomacy in North Korea. And clearly, we can see how impactful that was. Politicians need no help in lowering the public’s opinion of them. Just because Beyoncé scored big at the Superbowl, doesn’t mean Congress can have a repeat performance.

Have an opinion? Some students who live off campus took time to attend City Council’s study session last week regarding problems with Mercyhurst’s off-campus residents. One student spoke up for those off-campus, stating that carting off underage drinkers, particularly his criminal justice and intelligence studies friends, would completely ruin their future careers. He insisted that students who drink underage should not be held accountable for these actions. Sorry, kids, but underage drinking is no fault but your own.

Wanna get paid? Write for The Merciad Email editormerciad@mercyhurst.edu


SPORTS

April 10, 2013

Page 11 September 3, 2008

Men’s lacrosse dominates competition By Lindsey Burke Staff writer

There is only one word to describe the Mercyhurst men’s lacrosse season thus far — perfect. The Lakers have soared to an untouchable perfect 10-0 to start the 2013 season. Rightfully so, the ‘Hurst has been residing at No. 1 in the national rankings. Recently, the team faced No. 9 Dowling College in a rematch from last year’s national semifinal. This year, the Lakers came out on top. The final score was 12-11 after senior James Chayka scored with 12.9 seconds left. The Lakers trailed 4-0 during the game and 9-6 before fighting back and defending their undefeated season. Chayka also scored a goal with 5:11 remaining to tie the score at 10. Mercyhurst outshot Dowling 46 to 34, and also picked up 12 more ground balls than the visitors. Chayka finished with a career-high five goals, four that came in the fourth quarter. Junior Jake McAndrew added three goals and an assist. Senior Brian Scheetz also had three assists. The Lakers turned around and played Alderson-Broaddus the following day and won convincingly, 19-5, on a celebratory senior day. The team honored nine seniors: James Chayka, Dan Cuddy, Kyle Lind-

Dave Leisering photo

Senior James Chyaka scored the final goal with 12.9 seconds left in the game on Saturday against rival Dowling College. say, Peter Plaskey, Zac Reid, Walter Rodenhouse, Brent Rotz, Mark Saltrelli and Brian Scheetz. They also won their 50th career game at Mercyhurst.

The win bumped Mercyhurst to 10-0 overall and 5-0 in the league. The team has three games left before its postseason playoff run begins. Scheetz attributed hard work in

the offseason as a direct result of the team’s success now. “This year we worked harder than ever in the offseason, we lifted and ran four days a week,” said Scheetz. “This

offseason was definitely my most rigorous training in four years at Mercyhurst.” One of their most interesting off-season workouts came around Halloween when their coach decided to get in the spirit and incorporate a pumpkin into the team’s run. “We completed a run to the lake and back in four different groups, each group had to carry a hefty pumpkin and return back to campus in an hour.” Scheetz also noted the team’s toughest competition was against Dowling; however, the rest of the season their competition will be tough each game. The 2013 senior class is poised and ready to settle for nothing less than another national championship. “This class has been very successful at Mercyhurst, and we want to leave a lasting legacy,” said Scheetz. “We hope that we have elevated the program to have a national championship caliber each year from here on out, and it starts in 2013.” The Lakers are on track to win the East Coast Athletics Conference. They could be the first title-holders for this newly formed conference. The Lakers next face Long Island University-Post away on April 13. The team has wrapped up its regular season home play.

Baseball stays on track at 21-13 overall By R.J. Niedzwiecki Staff writer

The Mercyhurst Lakers baseball team finished off its second PSAC series games against Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP) at Mercyhurst on Saturday, March 30. The series was set for two games at Mercyhurst then two at IUP; however, the rain and snow forced the teams to play four games at Mercyhurst because IUP’s field was not playable. IUP claimed a victory in game one, but the Lakers came back and took the next three against the Crimson Hawks. In game one, the Lakers were shut out by a score of 3-0. Runners were in scoring position but they could not be driven in, leaving players stranded and shut out. The next three games had different

outcomes. The Lakers won game two, 3-2, game three, 4-0, and game four, 5-4. In game three, the number two pitcher in the rotation, senior Ben Rawding, recorded his 19th consecutive win. With this win Rawding had improved his season record to 7-0 and has a 1.71 ERA. “It’s an awesome accomplishment that I hope to continue on with,” said Rawding. “I want to thank my teammates for making it possible to win this many games and wouldn’t be possible without them.” The key to his success starts with his determination. Before each game, Rawding does the same routine and mind preparations. “The key for me is continuing to do the same things that made me successful in the past. Even though I have been successful, it does not mean that

there is nothing for me to work on.” Rawding said. Rawding then went on to lose

I want to thank my teammates for making it possible to win this many games Senior Ben Rawding

his winning streak during game two against the Lock Haven University Bald Eagles on Friday, April 5. Mercyhurst will challenge the sixthranked Slippery Rock University this Friday and Saturday, April 12 and 13. The teams will play on the Mercyhurst baseball field on Friday, starting at 1:00 p.m.

Dave Leisering photo

Freshman Hank Morrison scored the first homerun of the Laker’s season on Friday, April 5, against Lock Haven University.


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SPORTS

10, 2013 September 3,April 2008

Women’s lacrosse looks for redemption

By Joe Chiodo Sports editor

Despite suffering a loss against West Chester on Saturday, April 6, the Lakers hold a sturdy record of 9-2 overall. Managing such an impressive record does not come easy, and senior Alisha Cantalino knows her team has fought hard to get where they are. “We have an extremely young, but extremely talented team. Coming together has taken a little while, but we are finally getting into a flow on the field,” Cantalino said. Having a strong connection to one another on and off the field has led to the Lakers keeping the season alive and thriving. “I think one of the greatest strengths we have is being able to read each other as players,” Cantalino After losing to West Chester, 19-5 over the weekend, there is plenty of pressure on the Lakers to come back and secure a win in their next game. “Clearly, we had a breakdown

Dave Leisering photo

Senior Kayla Minner dodges Lake Erie College defenders on her way towards the goal on Wednesday, March 13.

against West Chest, and the loss is certainly not an easy one to swallow,” said Cantalino. “The great thing about this team is that we are humble and will be taking this loss with a grain of salt, learn and move on.” Coming back from a loss, although always difficult, presents an opportunity to learn and improve. “The challenge is that we must look at not only individually what we did that was ineffective, but also together as a team,” said Cantalino. “It is not the easiest thing to pick out your own weaknesses, but in the end it will only make you a better player.” Going into their game against Stroudsburg on Wednesday, April 10, the Lakers are ready to pounce on the chance for a win. “Although the loss was tough, it has brought us the opportunity to address some issues that have just been swept under the rug during our eight-game win streak,” said Cantalino. “I have great faith in this group of girls, and that we will come out on Wednesday passionate and ready to redeem ourselves.”

Women’s tennis unstoppable at 13-3 By Joe Chiodo Sports editor

After crushing the Daemen Wildcats, 9-0, on Sunday, Mercyhurst University women’s tennis boosts their record up to an extraordinary 13-3. The Lakers fell one match short of a complete sweep against Daemen on Sunday and are carrying their ferocious momentum onto post-season play. “Everyone’s hard work and training has led us into having such an impressive season,” said junior Caroline Bristol. “The dedication the team has had, even throughout the winter, has really enabled us to play our best at each of the matches.” Bristol has been having a spectacular season, having suffered her first singles loss in just shy of an entire year on Monday, April 1. Despite the record-snapping loss, Bristol remains steadfast in her determination to keep helping the Lakers win. “Suffering my first loss in a while wasn’t too hard because I have lost to the girl before in a tournament,” said Bristol. “She is the number one girl in the region so it was a very tough match for me.” Bristol credits the hard work she puts in during the off-season to her incredible season. “I dedicated myself throughout the offseason,

in the summer and winter, which was a major benefit to remain on the top of my game,” said Bristol. “Also, it is important for me to focus at each and every match and have my head in the game, no matter whom I was playing.” Coach Jerome Simons knows that the team has been and will continue to put in the necessary work to keep their season alive as they enter post-season play. “A lot of the girls have put in a lot of time on their own and came into the season ready to play and have improved in each and every match,” said Simons. “All I ask of my players is to come prepared to play each match as it comes, both physically and mentally.” With the Lakers’ last regular season match quickly approaching, post-season play is right around the corner. “Our biggest challenges lie ahead in the post season. Here, we get to see how much we have progressed,” said Simons. “It takes a lot of work to be a good tennis player; both mental and physical toughness as well as execution of a game plan. The Lakers will begin post-season play after their final regular season match against Edinboro University on Tuesday, April 9. “Our last matches are the most important because we want to finish off the season strong and positive,” said Bristol. “This way we will be ready for postseason play.”


The Merciad, April 10, 2013