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The Mental Health Gym By Dr. Ron Kaiser Welcome to the Mental Health Gym: The Home of Goal Achieving Psychotherapy! Optimum mental health is achieved through attitude and effort. Just as going to a gym can improve your physical health, joining The Mental Health Gym can help you build and maintain healthy emotional functioning using the principles of POSITIVE PSYCHOLOGY and GOAL-ACHIEVING PSYCHOTHERAPY (GAP). Whether you are an individual working on improving your mental health or a professional seeking resource for yourself and others, The Mental Health Gym is YOUR website. Take a look around and then join us.

About Us Ronald S. Kaiser, Ph.D., ABPP, is a Licensed Psychologist in Philadelphia, where he is in private practice and also serves as consulting psychologist to the Jefferson Headache Center at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. In addition to serving on staff at both Jefferson and Methodist Hospitals, Dr. Kaiser is Clinical Associate Professor in the Department of Neurology at Jefferson Medical College. He is listed in the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology and Board Certified in Forensic Psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology. He has a special interest in behavioral medicine and in working with medical patients to improve their emotional functioning. He also started a psychology practicum and internship training site at Jefferson, and he continues to be heavily involved in the training of doctoral level psychologists of the future .

Blog One of the concepts that I have difficulty relating to is boredom I’m seldom bored, but I frequently hear others complain that they are. It’s not a subject that I’ve studied a whole lot, but I think that I’ve had enough experience in avoiding boredom to enable me to help others by sharing my thoughts on the matter. Let’s start with the most obvious bit of advice. It’s hard to be busy and bored at the same time – so one of the keys to avoiding boredom is to have enough activities on your plate to not leave time for boredom to creep in. Next, there is a difference between being bored and having nothing to do. Boredom is a negative and unenjoyable experience but, if you are the type of person who seeks enjoyment as an ongoing part of


the experience of living, you can embrace those times when you have nothing to do. The practice of mindfulness teaches us to live in the now – even if that “now” involves not being particularly productive at the moment. On a more encompassing level, staying stuck is boring. If you feel that you are not moving forward, and you are not making plans to change direction, that is a particularly concerning type of boredom. It means that there is nothing to look forward to and no strategies to get you out of your funk. It is a small step from that type of boredom to depression. Although I’m not exactly unbiased, I think that one of the real contributions of Goal-Achieving Psychotherapy is that it creates a structure that enables individuals to avoid boredom. Setting positive goals leads to the recognition that any periods of “down time” are temporary stops along the way to achieving goals. Those stops can be recognized as being temporary, and they can be embraced with the recognition that goals will prevent boredom from becoming a way of life. What do you think?

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Read more at http://www.thementalhealthgym.com/ Contact: Mail to: ron.kaiser@thementalhealthgym.com Call now 215-955-2743


THE MENTAL HEALTH GYM