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your independent student newspaper

For the week of Thursday, March 15 • Volume 45, Issue 24


Campus beat

meliorist the

March 15, 2012 • 2

Janet Barriage Campus Reporter For more information on contributing to Campus Beat, please contact Janet Barriage, campus.beat@themeliorist.ca

What’s happening If you want to see your event posted in the “Beat,” please contact campus.beat@themeliorist.ca for more information. Events must be submitted by Friday evening to appear in the following issue of the Meliorist.

Five Days for the Homeless

March 11 – 16 In front of the Students’ Union Building, across from the bus loop This national campaign brings attention to and raises money for homelessness and local youth at risk. Donate and help out this local cause!

“Why Women and Gender Studies?: A Multi-generational Roundtable and Conversation”

March 16 2 to 6 p.m. in the University Student’s Union building Ballroom A This workshop and roundtable highlights the ways in which critical gender awareness may advance young people’s careers, and the event will provide an arena for sharing of ideas and networking. For more information, please contact Women and Gender Studies Chair Carol Williams at carol. williams@uleth.ca.

Dirty Bingo St. Patrick’s Day Edition March 16 5:30 to 9:30 p.m. in The Zoo Bingo, sexy prizes, the best holiday ever? How could it get better? See you there! U of L Library presents NFB Film Club: The Future is Now!

March 21 at 7 p.m. in L950 In an effort to re-connect a pessimistic “everyman” with humanity, a journalist takes him on a voyage of possibilities, encountering leading thinkers in the arts and sciences. Will the journalist succeed in turning the cynic into an optimist? Will it matter? What can one person do? Documentary (91 min)

OUTspoken 2012

March 21 – 24 Around Lethbridge This is the largest annual event of its kind in Southern Alberta. The goal is to address a wide variety of LGBTTQA (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans, two-spirit, queer and allies) topics. If you didn’t understand any of those words or if you identify with or just support this cause, then this is the event for you! This four-day workshop and lecture series includes an evening of entertainment and a dance party. It is free to attend!

6th Annual U of L Film Festival

March 24 8 p.m. in PE 250 This is a great chance to check out the amazing talent we have around the university. Tickets are $5 in advance and $7 at the door

5

Days for the Homeless

Janet Barriage Campus Beat

I’m sure that by now you have noticed the dirty students hanging out in front of the SU building asking for money. This week marked the start of Five Days for the Homeless, which runs from March 11 – 16. Five Days for the Homeless wants to create a society where all homeless individuals are given access to opportunities free from barriers and public judgment. The University of Lethbridge is proud to bring attention to local youth homelessness and Woods Homes, a local organization that supports youth at risk in the community. During the five day campaign,

students from across the country will be making personal sacrifices to make their community a better place. Students will forgo their comforts and live outside on campus for five full days. The students for our campus are Eric Stemberger, Emma Ladoucer, Jesse Zimmer, Michael Willems and Rita St. Gelais. They aren’t just camping outside. They have some rules to follow and here they are: -Remain on campus for five days. The campaign begins 5 p.m. on Sunday, March 11, 2012 and ends 5 p.m. on Friday, March 16, 2012. -Have no income. 100 per cent of the funds donated to participants are passed on to charity. -Have no food or drinks. Food

can only be received through direct donations and all non-perishable food must be donated. -Have only a pillow and a sleeping bag. These items can be exchanged for an emergency meal. -Have no access to showers or facilities to which their student status would usually grant them access. Washrooms can only be accessed when campus buildings are open. -Sleep outside. The only exception is if inclement weather becomes a health risk. -Attend all classes. Participants will complete all academic responsibilities, including student organizations and teaching positions. -Avoid personal communication media. Participants will be expected

to not use cell phone or online social networking websites during the Five Days campaign except for the purposes of promoting the campaign. They are required to have at least one cell phone for safety purposes though. The participants will write about their experiences and post them on an online blog available on www.5days.ca. The fundraising goal is $15,000. Donations can be accepted in person, or online at the Lethbridge regional page of the official website. So be generous and help them raise some money for a great cause that will help people right here in Lethbridge!

Club Hub

Lethbridge Students For Liberty James Forbes

Campus Beat Contributor

“A Free Academy. A Free Society.” That is the slogan adopted by Lethbridge Students For Liberty (LSFL), a campus club that was ratified for the first time this past September. What exactly does it mean to live in a free society, and how can that be achieved? That’s the central question that drives the members of LSFL, and the reason for the club’s existence. Founded as The Libertarian Club in 2009, LSFL is a club for libertarian-minded students who see a need for limited government and maximized individual freedoms. We see that so many of the problems in the world today are caused by too much government interference in people’s lives, the economy, and in the world abroad. Some issues that libertarian students care about include the following: free markets, ending the drug war, bringing the troops home and practicing a non-interventionist foreign policy, strong property rights, and free speech. Essentially, we want the government to play a limited role so that people can be

free to pursue their own path without coercion or suppression. What can we, as students, do to promote a freer world and fight big government? The most important battles that we can fight are in the realm of ideas; we need to bring these issues into the forefront and get people talking about the appropriate role for government and what makes a free society. That is LSFL’s main goal, and we accomplish it by holding discussion meetings, movie nights, and bringing in speakers to address the big issues! In previous years we have brought in cannabis activists to talk about the dangers of prohibition, former military police to talk about the negative consequences of an interventionist foreign policy, economists to talk about the problems with government control of production and trade, and policy analysts to talk about what happens when a government doesn’t respect property rights. Interested in joining LSFL or finding out more? Contact James by e-mail at j.forbes@uleth.ca. If you’re reading this on Thursday, March 15, then you may still

be able to attend our movie night TONIGHT @ 7:30 p.m. in Galileo’s Lounge! Bring a friend, and be prepared to enjoy an entertaining and

informative evening among fellow lovers of freedom! Free snacks will be provided.


news

the

meliorist

March 15, 2012 • 3

Bill C-10

Bill C-10, the Conservative Government’s Omnibus Crime bill passed 154-129 without amendments last night. The provinces of Newfoundland, Quebec, and Ontario have all spoken out against the bill, and even provinces who support it say they cannot bear the financial cost of the new measures.

The Meliorist is asking for your opinion! What are your thoughts on Bill C-10 and what it means for Canadian citizens? Email einc@ themeliorist.ca to weigh in on the subject next week in the News section.

Double feature: Uganda in the spotlight Invisible Children’s campaign and criticism Kelti Boissonneault Editor-in-Chief

The not-for-profit social advocacy group Invisible Children (IC) has come under fire recently for their Kony 2012 campaign video that went viral worldwide last week through social media like Youtube, Facebook, and Twitter. The campaign video, which lasts just over 29 minutes in length, features filmmaker and co-founder of Invisible Children Jason Russell explaining an emotional journey in connection with close friends and his own son Gavin Danger Russell in regards to the unrest that has plagued Uganda and other African nations for the past 25 years. The video focuses on the Kony 2012 campaign which calls for united world action against the warlord Joseph Kony, leader of the LRA (Lord’s Resistance Army), who kidnaps and recruits child soldiers for guerrilla warfare in eastern and central Africa. The campaign itself effectually utilizes social media outlets to spread their message in such a way that experts have referred to the phenomenon as unprecedented and explosive. While the campaign has thus far garnered the attention of many nations and many millions of viewers worldwide, the practices of Invisible Children have also come under scrutiny as a non-profit organiza-

tion. Criticism of the organization include their budgetary expense allocation with a mere 32 per cent of their annual budget going towards actual programs in Africa, with the majority of expenses centered around salaries of staff and the cost of producing films. Additionally, direct criticism of the video has pointed out that while Uganda was militarily unstable six years ago, there have been no recent major upheavals to warrant the kind of military action the video advocates. In response, IC has issued statements that while the video for the Kony 2012 campaign does simplify many of the issues surrounding the situation in Africa and the cap-

ture of an international war criminal, the purpose of the film was to spread the word and increase public awareness of an important issue. It is obvious that in this objective the video has most certainly succeeded, garnering over 55 million views in its first two days. Invisible Children began when three filmmakers, Jason Russell, Laren Poole and Bobby Bailey went to Africa in 2003 and discovered the plight of what they have termed the “invisible children” soldiers of Uganda. Creating a documentary Invisible Children: Rough Cut, which was first screened at the University of San Diego in 2004, Russell hoped to garner support for the

plight of child soldiers in Africa, specifically those affected by Joseph Kony and the LRA. Since 2004 it is estimated over five million people have seen the film, which is approximately 55 minutes in length. A further criticism of the Kony 2012 campaign is the apparent direct support of the Ugandan military and direct military action against Kony. Critics of the endorsement for direct military action point out Kony’s traditional response to military action has been increased raids and attacks, resulting in an increased number of civilian and child casualties. Allegations against the Ugandan military are similar to the disparaging war crimes Kony is known for, including rape and looting in villages that the military is deployed to protect. The US government has been providing aid to the Ugandan military to track and arrest Kony since October of last year, but IC and other organizations interested in the capture or death of Kony are worried that without fast results the US will pull its support by the end of December this year. IC has therefore developed the Kony campaign to keep the warlord’s identity a household name in order to maintain pressure on the government to expend resources in tracking and apprehending him. Finally, critics point out that the

Kony’s Uganda and the current atmosphere Kelti Boissonneault Editor-in-Chief

Even with the efforts of Invisible Children’s Kony 2012 campaign to increase awareness on the plight of child soldiers under Joseph Kony and the LRA in central Africa, many of the details of the history of the war in Uganda and central Africa are unknown. While public outcry for action against Kony has reached its height, the conflict has been raging under the West’s radar for the better part of 25 years. Joseph Kony was born in 1961 in Odek, a village near Gulu in northern Uganda, and is the leader of an Ugandan guerrilla military group known as the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA). The LRA’s aim is to purify the Acholi people of Uganda and turn the nation into a theocracy based around Kony’s personal interpretation of the Ten Commandments. Active not only in Uganda, Kony is wanted for war crimes in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, South Sudan, and Sudan. His war crimes, which include rape, murder, dismemberment, disfigurement, torture, possible counts

of cannibalism, and abduction of children for soldiering and sex slavery earned Kony indictment in 2005 for war crimes by the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague (Netherlands) but he has never been apprehended. Since his rebellion began in 1986, Kony and the LRA have abducted an estimated 66,000 children and have displaced over two million people. During the beginning of his campaign, Kony enjoyed the support of many Ugandan people, already embroiled in an internal conflict between the state government and the National Resistance Army (NRA) under Yoweri Museveni. Kony would later turn on the Ugandan public by resorting to military raids starting in Gulu, northen Uganda for the purposes of abducting children to swell his ranks. Children abducted by the LRA were often beaten, tortured, and on some occasions forced to kill their own parents to solidify their position within the army. Dissenting children, or those caught trying to escape, were brutally tortured and killed. Girls captured by the LRA were used as sex slaves. In 2008 the Garamba offensive

(Operation Lightning Thunder) was launched against the LRA in the Garamba region of the Congo. Joint forces from Uganda, DR Congo, and South Sudan launched a military attack against known encampments of the LRA. The initiative, launched on Dec. 14, announced on Dec. 21 that 70 per cent of the LRA’s camps had been destroyed. The United States provided planning support and financial and technical support during the operation, but was not militarily involved. In response to the Garamba Offensive, the LRA launched several attacks killing more than 100 villagers in a single occasion. While Uganda has since pulled out of the Garamba offensive, DR Congo continues to wage war against Kony and the LRA. Despite global interest in Uganda arising from the Kony 2012 campaign launched by Invisible Children, Uganda has not experienced any major episodes of raids or civil unrest in the past six years. Reports are beginning to filter in to news networks worldwide that concern in Uganda has been raised against the Kony 2012 film and campaign as locals begin to fear LRA reaction and military action.

philosophical basis for the videos produced by the IC intimate a degree of the “great white saviour” complex extant in western history since colonization began. Invisible Children refutes this by pointing out they are working with Ugandan and African organizations to build schools and educate children in an effort to keep them from Kony’s ranks, as well as empowering local governments to make this issue a top priority. Despite this, there is no mention within the film of Ugandan efforts to stop Kony for the past 25 years, which has led many critics to claim that the film is self-aggrandizing, patronizing, and far too oversimplified. In response, the IC points out that over 95 per cent of their leadership and staff in Uganda are locals and that the top-down implementation strategies popular in the West do not work well in Ugandan society. They add that they work with local governments and other organizations in Africa to find and employ qualified local individuals at all levels of their organization. Despite the criticism, the Kony 2012 campaign has grabbed the interest of many people around the world, and advocacy and support groups, initiatives, and events are being held worldwide to keep the pressure on the US government for involvement, and the world media for attention.


meliorist 4 •March 15, 2012 the

news

Students’ Union election results are in

The votes are tallied Kelti Boissonneault Editor-in-Chief

The election results for the 2012/2013 year have been tabulated and the results were announced last Friday at 5 p.m. in a packed Zoo. With 17 per cent of the student population turned out

to vote, the elections were deemed a success given the number of uncontested candidates running for key positions. The highly contested VP Internal Affairs was eventually awarded to Shuna Talbot, who won by a mere 20 votes over the next runner-up Erin Luchia. In conjunction with the Executive Council and General Assem-

bly Elections, ORS positions and LPIRG positions were also elected with Jesse Mullett gaining the ORS President seat and Leanne McCuaig taking the VP Aperture position over Kendra Wilson. For the Arts and Science Reps, six of whom ran for the six available seats, Chris Hollingsworth received the most number of votes.

No current nominee for position was beat by the no-vote, despite the many uncontested positions. Several positions received no nominations and therefore a byelection will be held in September 2012 to fill the empty assembly seats.

By the numbers President Armin Escher Yes: 1,023 No: 184

VP Academic Julia Adolf Yes: 1,017 No: 172

Correction:

VP Operations & Finance Brady Schnell

“Orr takes first semi-final”

Kelti Boissonneault Editor-in-Chief

I would like to extend my personal apologies to Mr. Orr, whose speech for the Student Speaker Challenge was misrepresented by last week’s Campus Beat article “Orr takes first semi-final.” Due to a lack of understanding on my part, Mr. Orr’s premise was inaccurately represented in the article and I

would like to take the opportunity to correct it. Last week’s article inadvertently attributed Mr. Orr’s stance on the systemic world crisis to a need for a homogenous world culture and included references to points that Mr. Orr did not address during his speech. These were erroneously attributed to him whilst I was reviewing my notes of the speech and subsequent question period. As

Yes: 1,010 No: 189 such, due to my poor understanding of Mr. Orr’s presentation and my own hastily-taken notes, the speech was misrepresented. According to Mr. Orr, his speech is about “…addressing structural systemic bias towards creating adversarial situations in which they do not exist. It is about the tragedy of individuals and institutions internalizing conflict as a necessary component of conducting their af-

fairs. It is about denouncing the objective evaluation of subjective means and reinstating the importance of morality as a means through which we as individuals make decisions...” I would like to extend my personal apologies to Mr. Orr for these factual inaccuracies and congratulate him on his successes in the 2012 University of Lethbridge Student Speaker Challenge.

VP Internal Affairs Shuna Talbot – 413 votes Erin Luchia: 393 votes Emma Ladouceur: 332 votes

General Assembly Arts and Science: (six positions) Chris Hollingsworth: 504 James Forbes: 474 Katie Kalmar: 470 Victoria Wells: 457 Maxine Saretsky: 444 Sean Glydon: 419

Management Rep: Michael Kawchuck 154

Calgary Campus: Danielle Bernier 88 Allan Tam 29

Board of Governors Rep: Zack Moline: 1,072

International Students Rep: Felipe Ferriera: 34

First Nations, Inuit, Metis Rep: Abby Morningbull: 33

ORS President: Jesse Mullett: 262

VP Uhall: Jesse Baker: 263

VP Aperture: Leanne McCuaig: 199 Kendra Wilson: 72

LPIRG: (seven positions) Emma Ladouceur: 768 Leyland Bradley: 695 Leslie Mahoney: 619 Kailey Little: 617 Madison Webber: 611 Dave McCaffery: 593 Brandon Wallis: 584


features

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March 15, 2012 • 5

Matt Baird Features Editor For more information on contributing to Features, please contact Matt Baird, f.editor@themeliorist.ca

Sex toys: ladies

Vocabulary:

Picking your perfect non-person playmate

Clitoris:

(clit) a small, bulbous

penetrates either the anus or

pleasure centre located externally

the vaginal canal for stimulation

from the vagina.

within those orifices.

Dildo:

toy intended for internal

use usually resembling a penis or phallic object typically made of

inner and the outer, to protect

silicone, rubber, or glass.

from dirt and bacteria.

any toy that is

Vagina: (vaginal canal) also

not intended for internal use and is

known as the birth canal; where

specifically intended for external,

the g-spot is located, it is the

usually clitoral, stimulation.

passage to the uterus.

Internal toy:

Features Writer

I am not an aficionado of sex toys, but I have been to a few passion parties and sex stores in my day, checking out their wares and comparing price, utility, function, discretion, design, and effectiveness. I can honestly tell you that with the myriad of options out there, most women will not be bored for an extremely long time. With several sex stores here in town, and some pretty knowledgeable people willing to, literally, bring the party to you, there are many ways a girl can get the goods on the good-time selection, but I figured I’d throw in my two cents. So whether you’ve got a handy collection sitting in your drawer at home, or whether you’re brand new to the world of sex toys and pleasure exploration, this article will review basic toy buying tricks for those ladies on the market. Men, don’t worry, there are a few tips and tricks in here too in case you want to surprise your belle with a great gift (for the both of you!). There are many different types of sex toys on the market. Everything from foreplay board games right up to fetish gear and restraints can be considered objects for sexualized play. If you’re in a committed relationship, these can be great ways to spice up your sex life. If you’re just looking for some self-pleasing playmates without the necessity of a second person, there are oodles

of options for you too. The biggest hurdle you’re going to have is finding the toy type and make that fits both your budget and your needs. Let’s break this down a little:

External toys and vibrators: If you haven’t discovered penetration yet, or are holding off cashing in your V-card for that perfect someone, chances are you will be interested in external-only toys and vibrators. These are products not intended for internal use, and are primarily focused on clitoral stimulation and erotic fantasy. Depending on your sensitivity (and it varies greatly between women) and just what you’re looking for, there are a lot of options for vibrators out there. There are even vibrators you can hook into your MP3 player to “vibe with the beat.” Corded external stimulators are not for internal use, so do not insert and use the cord to pull it out. There have been horror stories about electrical shocks from loose wiring. Also, do not insert small “bullet” vibes as they can sometimes move up the vaginal canal and get lodged in the cervix. Non-vibrating external toys include things like the smitten, literally a silicone mitten great for massage (especially in the shower) either solo or by a partner.

Internal toys and dildos: Dildos are specifically used for

insertion and many can be used both vaginally and anally (though not without cleaning between!). There are specifically designed toys for anal insertion like thunder beads, anal beads, and anal plugs. These are used on both men and women to stimulate the prostate in men and the g-spot (from a different angle) in women. Dildos can be either vibrating or not, and are usually made of rubber, silicone, or glass. They can have a variety of different functions including spinning internal beads for g-spot stimulation, a vibrating clitoral stimulator

“lips” of the vagina;

every woman has two sets, the

External toy:

Kelti Boissonneault

Labia:

any toy that

attached, a life-like thrusting action and variable speed/direction options as well. The more bells and whistles, the more the price goes up. For any internal usage, make sure you use lots of lube! When engaging in sexualized play it’s important to maintain your toys and put them away properly. All toys should be cleaned after every use to decrease the risk of infection and help maintain the life of your toys (they will eventually degrade or break!). Cleansers can be bought from any shop that sells

them, and the sales staff should be able to talk about which cleaner works best on which toy (material being the biggest consideration). Before each use, any wires should be checked and battery casings secured to make sure there are no exposed wires anywhere. If using with a partner, be sure to discuss integration of a toy into your usual activities before surprising them. Keep out of reach of pets and children, and make sure they are hidden when company is coming to avoid embarrassing conversations.


the

Features

meliorist

6 • March 15, 2012

Bibliophile

We Need to Talk About Kevin, by Lionel Shriver Kari Tanaka

Features Contributor

This book had been sitting on my bedside table for a number of months , and somehow managed to always find its way to the bottom of my “things to read next” pile. I’m not sure why I kept ignoring it in favour of one of the other titles that also found their way into this perpetually revolving stack, although the fact that this book came into my possession in the first place because my dad “just couldn’t get into it” and handed it to me in much the same way that he would offer up some questionable food (“This ice cream tastes funny, do you want some?”) might have had something to do with it. Ironically, it was the preview for the movie version of We Need to Talk About Kevin that inspired me to pick up the book, a process that usually happens in reverse. Indeed I was in the theatre to begin with checking out the movie adaptation of Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, because the book by Jonathan Safran Foer was so damned good. So, a seriously intense 90-second preview led me to begin a journey through 400 pages of seriously intense fiction. We Need to Talk About Kevin is written as a series of letters by Eva Khatchadourian to her absent husband, Franklin, about Thursday. We soon find out that Thursday refers to the day that their 15-year-old son Kevin decided to go on a murderous rampage at Gladstone High School, brutally killing seven classmates, a cafeteria worker and a teacher. The letters are Eva’s way of trying to make sense of her son and what led him to commit such a horrible act. They are intense and excruciatingly candid. Eva sugar coats nothing, including the distaste that she felt for her son from the moment he was conceived. The pregnancy, although planned, was seen as an intrusion on her body, her marriage, and her career. When she did not feel the immediate attachment with Kevin that she expected the moment he was born, her dislike for him grew even stronger. The reader is pulled through 15 years of tension between a mother and son who are unable, or unwilling, to bond, a father who is so desperate for a Happy Days relationship with his son that he is blind to the truths that surround him, and an innocent little daughter/sister that is caught in the middle of it all. Whether Kevin’s “evilness” is an issue of nature or nurture remains up for readers to debate. I can honestly say that Eva, Kevin, and Franklin are three of the most despicable characters that I have come across in a long time. In fact, all three made my skin crawl like nails were being scraped across the chalkboard of my brain as I lifted each word from the page. Eva is exceptionally selfish, cold, and downright cruel to Kevin at times and unabashedly favours his little sister, Celia, when she comes into the picture. Kevin, who you would think should earn empathy, especially in his baby and toddler years, also displays a horribly evil personality that cannot be blamed on Eva’s indifference alone. Franklin is such a pathetically weak excuse for a man and husband and is so plastic that he garners as much empathy as a Ken doll. Yet, despite all of this, I could not help but read on to find out how this train wreck would end. That, to me, is the mark of a great writer and a great novel. To be able to propel readers through a story that is rife with such unlikeable characters takes a great amount of talent. We Need to Talk About Kevin is a difficult, but worthwhile, read that sheds light on a variety of contemporary social issues. In addition to struggling with whether or not evil is inherent or learned, the novel also touches on our need to become eager audience members as details of horrible events unfold before our eyes. At one point, while being interviewed by a reporter, Kevin waves his hand in front of the camera saying that there are so many audience members and not enough stars.

The subplot of Mary Wolford suing Eva for negligent parenting resulting in the killing of Mary’s daughter, speaks to the need of placing blame and receiving financial gain as the result of the tragedy. There is also an interesting section describing a theory that children who grow up in affluent families are apt to become depressed because they know their lives are never going to get better than they already are. All of these issues, of course, circle the larger nature versus nurture theme that permeates the novel. So, fellow readers, I will leave it up to you to decide the answer to the big “why” at the end of this book which is available at all fine bookstores, including your University Bookstore, and I would be truly interested to hear what you think. If you have read the book, are reading the book, or have seen the movie, please track me down in the bookstore in person, by e-mail, on Facebook, or on Twitter. I’d love to hear about which side of the debate you fall on.

We Need to Talk About Kevin is a difficult, but worthwhile, read that sheds light on a variety of contemporary social issues


meliorist

Features

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March 15, 2012 • 7

Introducing: Julia Adolf Incoming VP Academic Kelti Boissonneault Editor-in-Chief

Where are you from, and why did you choose the University of Lethbridge? I am from a tiny little town called Trochu; it’s pretty much in the middle of nowhere, and for anyone who knows the geography of Alberta, it’s in between Calgary and Edmonton. It’s a farming community, and basically that’s one of the biggest reasons I came to the U of L, because it’s small as well. I’d originally started looking at the U of A, really looked at the U of A, but fell in love with everything here. It’s very much like home down here; it’s all prairie and that small-community feeling — it’s the fact that you get to know your professors oneon-one. I was down here and didn’t know anybody; that was my biggest draw too, because I could just come here and be somebody new. What are you studying? I am studying, technically I’m just doing a general degree, but I was originally doing bio. Then I kind of switched to a general just because I wanted to do more psychology. But I still wanted to be able to teach so I had to stay with a general instead of switching right into psych. Bio, chem, and psych are my three disciplinary streams, but right now I’m pretty much done. I’m so stoked about being around for another year — very excited, it will be a lot of fun. I’m a science geek. What made you decide to get involved in student governance? My first year I was pretty involved living down in U Hall. I lived in residence, and I’ve lived in residence ever since, so I really got involved with ORS. I actually got hired on in my second year to be an RA in D/E 1. I really got involved with that and learning how to work within an organization, running events, and just doing things that way. I was actually on our academic committee when I was involved with ORS, so I was involved in academics that way and getting in speakers so I have that little aspect in it. I wanted to take a bigger step, go to a bigger part in the community and I just loved it

this year, being one of the Arts and Science representatives. My good friend, Andrew Williams, who is obviously the current VP Academic, he asked me at the very start of last year during elections if he got the position would I be his commissioner; so, eventually, once we got to September we elected commissioners and I got to be his commissioner. He asked me later on if I wanted to do his job later, so I kind of wanted to do it for a whole year. Yeah, I’m just really excited to continue on, and it’s just the fact that working with people is probably the reason I got into it in the first place, because I just love being involved. I love going and attending the events, but being able to help, and to volunteer, and have that little bit of more input into an event — it’s just gratifying to know that something went well and “I got to help with that.” So, you said you were Andrew’s commissioner this year; is that why you decided to run for VP Academic over other positions? Yes, I knew the position very well; I got to work through a lot of it this year. I got to do grade appeals just last week with some students, so I got to do some of my job even before I got elected into it. I have my new initiatives, the note bank, so I knew a lot of how everything worked. I was getting really excited to do more of the government portion of it, working with our lobby groups. That’s the one portion I’m really looking forward to this year. The whole year I’ve been looking forward to it. I’m just stoked to be here, and contributing towards everything. It just feels so good in the end because you get that big hand in everything, and even though some people don’t know you’re there, and don’t know you’re the one responsible for it; it’s just gratifying to see people happy and smiling even if they don’t know you were the cause of it. Before you were involved in the SU, and you’ve been involved for a while, what were your impressions of it as just a student? I didn’t know all too much in my first year. In my second year, work-

ing for ORS, we got very introduced because our president at the time was really involved with the Students’ Union. He really informed us about what was going on in the SU, and that’s how I started to know what was actually happening. That’s where I kind of got interested in it; then I left for a year, then came back and dove right back into it. I feel like we aren’t very well known around campus, which is hard to deal with because there always is that student apathy, which we will always talk about. The biggest thing with [apathy] is that students are going to do what they’re going to do. If you just keep pushing them to do something, they just aren’t going to. I think it’s just getting ourselves out there and known, and being prominent at NSO when first years are arriving and just getting away from home. At first I didn’t know much, but then once I started looking around and noticing that we do all this stuff and contribute all this money back to our students – I mean yes, you pay a certain amount in tuition — but with all the services: scholarships, food bank, note bank, travel and conference grants. It’s amazing all the services we provide but so many people don’t know about. That’s just one of the biggest things both the rest of the execs and I want to push next year: getting the word out to the first years, pushing the mobile app, getting that onto all their phones, and just go with it so everyone is informed. My impression was that I didn’t know what it was; then when I discovered it, I was surprised at how much they did. Now that you are elected into office, what are your goals as VP Academic? My goal is to basically further what we’ve done this year. We’ve basically introduced so much, or at least Andrew has with his position; he’s done the mobile app, the note bank, we’ve had a really strong relationship with CAUS, and those are the three main areas I want to keep advocating and pushing for. They are just brand new things, and I don’t want them to just get lost and pushed to the wayside because

they’re already done. I don’t want a bunch of huge new initiatives coming in and I don’t want to have lots of little things that don’t have their legs and aren’t grounded yet. I just want to continue those so that they are solidly built. For instance, the mobile app allows people to know what we are doing all the time, if they have the app and they utilize it. And then the note bank; it’s so easy for students to miss class, be sick, or be away at a conference, so it’s nice to be able to utilize something like that and have that there for the students. The last [goal] is just working with our lobby group, CAUS; I’m really excited. Things like mandatory non-instructional fees, that big looming cloud over our head that the university can just increase our tuition in any way that they want to in some respects — working with the government to make sure that can’t happen and that those fees are kept low is a big thing we are pushing these next months and years. If the university raises those fees, or implements them like the U of C has done, our tuition can just skyrocket. It’s making sure the government is aware, and giving us money, and being aware that our students are voting: pay attention to us. We want you to help, not just leave us in the dust. I said in my election speeches that I do want to see those little whiteboards around campus with little questions so everyone can answer them: politics or science, something to do with pro-choice, pro-life, just little questions around. It’d be nice to see one [white board] up in the library, one in the First Choice Savings Centre, and one down in U Hall. Just building up the programs and getting that firm basis is what I want to focus on this year. I really want the note bank to prosper because the test bank is becoming unuseable. It’s just a way for students to help each other out, and this year is to make sure that [these initiatives] are going to stay, going to work, and going to last. You’ve mentioned a few initiatives, but what is it that the VP Academic does within the SU? What is

your exact role? My exact role: anything academic, I get to deal with. I delegate all the committees that the SU is on, so anytime I need a student to sit on a committee, whether it’s a student already on our GA, or just a regular undergrad, I get to delegate where to put them. I get to sit on the senate, and others get to sit on the Board of Governors, so the students are well-represented and other areas of the university can hear the student voice. Then I get to deal with grade appeals, and deal with students who are not necessarily able to deal with their academics by themselves. I will point them in the right direction, whether to an advisor, or directly to the Dean, or whomever they need to talk to. If there is, eventually, a grade appeal, I get to help them with that. I also get to be on our lobby group: CAUS, so student advocacy is a big part of my role. I get to go to Edmonton and be the voice for students. There’s also a lot of phone calls and a lot of meetings. What would you say to students to encourage them to utilize the SU services a bit more? I would just inform them about what exactly there is. Just getting the knowledge out there to the first years, and going up to the third, fourth, and fifth years to remind them. Utilizing the mobile app, and continuing to utilize The Zoo to engage the students is also important. If we have our students on campus more, then the community will thrive much more. I basically want to tell them to just be involved. It’s pretty easy to figure out what’s going on, you just have to ask. We don’t want to be those big, intimidating people. We are all students, just like everyone, so people can come up to me in the hallway and come say “Hi.” I’m not a big scary person; I’m just like everyone else. I’d definitely tell everyone just get out there and be involved! Is there anything you want to add? Don’t forget about by-elections coming up in the Fall. We have [several] positions available that are left open, so there’s that.


opinions

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March 15, 2012 • 8

Kelti Boissonneault Editor-in-Chief For more information on contributing to The Meliorist, please contact Kelti Boissonneault, einc@themeliorist.ca

Our truth and effort: This is bigger than you Janet Barriage Op-Ed

I bet by this time we have almost forgotten about what the Kony 2012 video is really about. Our minds have been filled up with memes and people saying negative things about the legitimacy of the company and cause. I would like you to remember what you felt when you first saw the video: the initial shock, the awakening of the activist in you, and the feeling that you can do something. I am going to assume that by now everyone knows what the Kony 2012 video is all about. I’m also going to assume that everyone has picked a side; you are either all for it or you hate everything about it. Now, I’m going to completely disregard that your opinion or feelings mean anything because, like it or not, this is bigger than you. It’s also bigger than one country, one man, one company, and one cause. I think it goes without saying that one video isn’t going to change the world, but it’s a start. Companies and humanitarian groups have not figured out how to use the internet and social media yet. Imagine if every human rights violation, government failure of its

people, or humanitarian cause was broadcast by the internet in the same way the Kony campaign has. If they garnered this much interest, emotion, and conversation things would very likely change. The first step to critical analysis and change is awareness, interest, and education. We are an educated generation and we have been taught to think critically in everything we do, but this criticism can blind us to the goodness that we desire and can create. We have the most powerful global tools that the world has ever seen, yet we are wasting them. I think this is because we don’t know how to use them; we’re still learning and this has denied the issues in the world the attention they deserve. Some movements have successfully used Facebook and other social media to connect and organize. But why can’t everyone use it? Fostering an activist mentality is not a bad thing; it’s what will change the world and get the attention of our government. If you don’t like decisions that are made in parliament, then do something about it. And tell other people who feel the same way how to change it too. This is the beginning of our knowledge of how to use social

One more person that’s aware is hopefully one more person backing positive social change media in our favour. It is a powerful tool and I hope the Kony video is the start of us using it properly. I’m not saying I agree with the company; however, I am wondering how you can argue that it’s a bad thing for social media to utilize its power for something other than posting pictures and talking about #firstworldproblems. Regardless of the particular issue it is looking at, if anything can make one person learn about something they didn’t know about 24 hours ago and feel even the slightest tingle of activism, I’m going to support it. Yes critical analysis of the issue, information, and campaign are necessary and important with any topic. But I think people are too quick to take that critical stance instead of embracing and appreciating how powerful it is that

Elizabeth Porter

someone who had no interest or education in any social issues one day can feel inspired and capable of change the next. It’s about using what power we have and if a video going viral makes people feel they have the power to change things, that’s where the beginning needs to be. I’m hopeful that the level of

enthusiasm felt last week will extend to create a higher level of social consciousness about all issues. Only time will tell. Ideally people will keep looking out for all issues and use social media to share them, regardless of if they’re currently popular. One more person that’s aware is hopefully one more person backing positive social change.

The Meliorist is still accepting applications! Deadline for application extended to March 20, 2012 Editor-In-Chief

The E-in-C is responsible for supervising the staff and working with the managerial team to produce the weekly paper. They are responsible for the content, focus, theme, images, and podcast material for that week. It is the task of the E-in-C to make sure editorial staff are making deadlines, assist with article research, and to deal effectively with complaints from the readership. They are also responsible for the opinion article each week, though this may be delegated to other editors who are interested in writing the opinion that week. The ideal candidate will have superb time management skills and an ability to deal quickly and effectively with extreme-stress situations. They must also be a team leader, and be able to accept and adapt to criticism both personally and on behalf of the organization.

Business Manager

The BM is responsible for tracking and monitoring the spending of the Meliorist, paying bills, collecting A/R from advertisers and producing the budget. They are also responsible for administering payroll to the staff, and for reimbursement of funds for approved expenditures. They must be highly organized and efficient with Openbook and other accounting soft-

ware. Team-focused individuals with excellent communication skills are important for this job.

Advertising Manager

The AM is responsible for obtaining and maintaining relationships with advertising clients and must be a self-driven individual focused on sales. They may supervise a team of Account Representatives, but the majority of advertising contracts will come from the AM’s personal efforts. They must strive to meet weekly and monthly goals in advertisement sales and foster a professional relationship with clients in the community. This individual will be highly motivated, personable, and extremely well organized.

Production Manager

The PM is responsible for overseeing the production team and will work with the Creative Designer on the overall aesthetic of the newspaper. They are responsible for getting the paper built on time and supervising the Production Assistant. This individual must have experience in Photoshop and InDesign software and must be proficient at time management with an attention to detail.

Creative Designer

The Creative Designer works

closely with the E-in-C and the Production Manager to produce a cohesive and exciting aesthetic for the newspaper. Extensive knowledge of Photoshop and InDesign are assets for this job. This individual must be able to work in a team and have a basic knowledge of newspaper design and layout.

Distribution Manager

The DM is responsible for the distribution of the paper on Wednesday evenings/Thursday mornings. They must have their own vehicle and valid drivers’ license. They are responsible for picking up the newspaper from the printer and distributing it both on-campus and at drop points around the city. They are also responsible for archiving back-issues of the newspaper and may be asked to perform other tasks around the office.

Editors

Section editors include News/ Campus Beat, Entertainment, Features, and Sports/Lifestyle. The Editors are responsible for the content of the paper under the direction of the E-in-C. Individuals applying for this job must have excellent written communication skills, and be willing to work as a team. They will manage contributing writers for their sections and maintain healthy relationships with

contributors in addition to editing and revising submitted articles. These individuals must be highly self-motivated and have excellent time management skills.

Copy Editor

The CE is responsible for editing all written content of the paper for CP style and grammatical/spelling errors. They are also responsible for fact-checking articles and editing potentially libellous content. This person must have excellent editing skills and good time management. They must also be flexible to allow for missed deadlines or extensions.

Photo/Podcast Editor

The Photo Editor is responsible for the image content of the paper including the cover, centrespread, and article images. Personal equipment and knowledge of different photographic techniques is an asset as well as basic photo editing in Photoshop and InDesign. For podcast editing, this person must have an excellent working knowledge of sound-recording software and equipment and the proven ability to edit sound content.

Art Dept Assistant/ Communications Coordinator

The ADA will work closely with

the Production Manager and the Creative Designer to create images/ illustrations for the paper and assist with the overall aesthetic. They will also generate fund-raising ideas and promotions for the paper and be responsible for the social media aspect of communication with the public through the maintenance of Twitter and Facebook accounts.

Production Assistant

Will work with the PM and the editorial staff to build the pages of the paper. Individuals should be familiar with InDesign and Photoshop and have excellent attention to detail and design/layout. The ability to work efficiently in a team environment is essential to this position. All positions are paid! Please send all resumes to Kelti Boissonneault at einc@themeliorist.ca. If you are applying for the Editorin-Chief position, please send resumes to leyland.bradley@uleth.ca Applications are due March 20. Only those selected for interviews will be contacted. We thank everyone for their application.


meliorist

Procrastination Unicorn Hunt!

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Try to find this unicorn hidden somewhere in this week’s Meliorist. Email the page number and a brief discription of where you found it to einc@ themeliorist.ca. You’ll be entered to win our monthly Unicorn Draw. You can enter as many times in the month as we publish.

SU-166, 4401 University Drive West, Lethbridge, AB T1K 3M4 Phone: 329-2334 www.themeliorist.ca

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mel•io•rism (meel’e riz’m, me’le e-), n. the doctrine that the world tends to become better or may be made better by human effort

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Good hunting!

The Meliorist is the student newspaper of the University of Lethbridge, published most Thursdays throughout the academic year by The Meliorist Publishing Society, an autonomous incorporated body. Please address all correspondence to The Meliorist, 4401 University Drive, Lethbridge, Alberta, T1K 3M4, or drop it off at room SU-166. Deadline for submissions is Sunday 4pm. The Meliorist appreciates and encourages the writing of thoughtful, concise, timely letters. However, The Meliorist will only consider for publication those letters which are signed by the author. Special arrangements may be made for those wishing anonymity, but absolutely no pseudonyms. Letters should contain the authors legible name, address, telephone number and student identification number. The address, I.D. and phone number will not be published. The Meliorist reserves the right to edit submissions and will not print libelous material. Letters may be edited for brevity, clarity and legality.

Editor-in-Chief Kelti Boissonneault einc@themeliorist.ca Business Manager Nelson Chin b.manager@themeliorist.ca Advertising Manager Brandon Wallis

ad.manager@themeliorist.ca Production Manager Calvin Shiu p.manager@themeliorist.ca Creative Director Jeff Henry c.director@themeliorist.ca

Crossword

(CUP) — Puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com

Account Rep Jillian King

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1- Bit; 5- Not fem.; 9- Exclamation to express sorrow; 13- Diamonds, e.g.; 14- Coniferous tree; 15- Having wealth; 16- Air; 18- Choir member; 19- Places of contest; 20- Remedial; 22- Gives up; 23Capital of Afghanistan; 24- Queue after Q; 26- Advantage; 31- Black gold; 34- Jazz singer Anita; 37Baseball manager Joe; 38- Make urban; 42- Fire; 43- Killed; 44Deity; 45- Perform major surgery; 47- Rich soil; 50- Equipped; 53Basil-based sauce; 57- Abroad; 61- SAT giver; 62- Verne captain; 63- Business of a publisher; 65Some Ivy Leaguers; 66- Advantage; 67- Designer Schiaparelli; 68- Doing nothing; 69- Devices for fishing; 70- Observed;

1- Designer Mizrahi; 2- Bizarre; 3- Measured with a watch; 4- Yom Kippur observer; 5- _ -jongg; 6- Betel palm; 7- Rub vigorously; 8- Winged child; 9- I smell _ !; 10- Taylor of “Mystic Pizza”; 11- When Hamlet dies; 12- Foot covering; 14- CD forerunners; 17- Back talk; 21- Prince Valiant’s wife; 23- Acclaim; 25Best; 27- Darlin’; 28- Not a dup.; 29- Rice-shaped pasta; 30- Give eats; 31- Actor Epps; 32- Able was _ ...; 33- Former Fords; 35100%; 36- Give up; 39- Fish eggs; 40- Killer whales; 41- Snake eyes; 46- Boring tool; 48- Galoots; 49Interlocks; 51- Pale bluish purple; 52- Convocation of witches; 54Subway turner; 55- Keyed up; 56- Church instrument; 57- Dedicated to the _ Love; 58- South African grassland; 59- Pianist Gilels; 60- Ascended, flower; 61“... _ the cows come home”; 64Fleur-de- _ ;

account.rep@themeliorist.ca News Editor n.editor@themelisorist.ca Features Editor Matt Baird f.editor@themeliorist.ca Entertainment Editor Billy Davey e.editor@themeliorist.ca Sports and Lifestyle Editor Nicole Meech s.editor@themeliorist.ca Campus Beat Reporter Janet Barriage campus.beat@themeliorist.ca Photo Editor Jon Martin p.editor@themeliorist.ca Illustrator Elizabeth Porter Copy Editor James Forbes Distribution Manager Tracy Fairs Production Assistants Emma Ferguson Myles Havinga Creative Designer Brandon Wallis Webmaster Chris Morris Printing Southern Alberta Newspaper Group Contributors Kari Tanaka James Forbes R.J Balog Craig Boehmer Kelti Boissonneault Cover Brandon Wallis


Leyland Bradley When you were elected in the Spring of 2011, what were your goals stepping into office? I had worked as the VP internal commissioner the year before when I was an Arts and Science Rep. so I knew what I was getting into, kind of. I ran on not re-inventing the wheel for the events side of the job, but just continuing what was already working on campus and then to try a few new things. I didn’t come on with a ton of huge parties and promises; it was more to keep the successful events going such as open mic night, humans vs. zombies, LCB and Ender Bender – just to make sure those are always up to par. Fresh Fest as well. On the clubs side of things, I just wanted to up the attendance for clubs council because that was a big problem last year. On the accountability side of things I just wanted to know the bylaws very well and make sure they were being observed.

Farewell 2011-2012 SU Executive Lisa Rodych Andrew Williams

Do you feel you have accomplished those goals over the past year? On the most part, I think on the policies and bylaws side of things, I think I’ve done really well with that. I can quote some of them – it’s terrible. Clubs: I’ve been really happy with the progress there. We’ve had 10 new clubs, bringing us up to 82 currently. One club did de-ratify, but over 80, so that’s really exciting. I think the clubs side of things has gone really great. Events: I have been very pleased with the success of some of them, but Meltdown didn’t go as planned. In terms of Oktoberfest, it got rained out, but I did have really positive feedback from those who attended up in The Zoo. Overall I think I’ve come very close to achieving what I wanted to achieve. Looking back there is still so much more that can be done, just with bylaw and policy reviews, but it’s hard to do and tackle a good number of them.

So you were elected in the Spring of 2011; what were some of your goals heading into office? The whole idea was that we offer quality services, or improve upon services, or add new services, obviously being under my portfolio: operations. So a tutoring program was necessary, and I know that Andrew made some really great headway on that. That was really fantastic. Anything I could do with the food bank, I was all about that. Another was survey stuff; I’m in sociology and stats is a really big part of that, so doing a survey was another thing that was really important – getting people’s thoughts and opinions on a number of things: what we could improve. I know that Allan [Hall] put out a survey for Fresh Fest, for students who were attending that: what did you like, what didn’t you like, what can we improve on, that kind of stuff. So that was really good. I think, just overall, quality of services was what I intended to improve. I knew it wasn’t until I got my feet wet, and I got comfortable and immersed in the SU that I would know how to work things out.

What are some of the things you would have done differently? I would have tried to make those [events] better. For Meltdown, I don’t know what happened there. The numbers weren’t what I wanted; I’m not sure what failed there, but I would have done something differently. I would have been more organized, figured out my organization system way in advance, because it took me a few months to figure out how to be the most efficient I could be.

Do you feel that you have accomplished all the goals that you set out to do? Within reason, yes. I think that if there is one thing that this job taught me, and the interesting thing about working in the SU is that you’ve only got this job for a year. It takes so long to understand your boundaries, your limits, and what you are capable of. I know a lot of SU execs step into office with the attitude that they are going to change the world, and do this and that, but it really is a process, and it’s hard. It’s completely doable, and everything is possible, but it is hard.

Do you view your term as VP Internal as successful? Yes. Definitely. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? I think it’s definitely a good model but it could definitely be improved. It took a while for myself and some of the other execs to learn just what the staff there can do for us. So I wish we would have known specific job descriptions of all the staff at the beginning. It could have been a bit more efficient. Communication is obviously always an issue, because people feel like they don’t know what’s going on. It takes longer to do things, so that could be something that could be more efficient overall. It’s good but it could be worked on. What advice do you have for the incoming SU councillors? Definitely take things one step at a time and take a break when you need it. Obviously we’re also busy with classes, and meetings all the time. It’s hard to do, and take you-time as well. So just to keep the balance: don’t use your office for homework and don’t use your home time for office stuff. Keep those separate so they don’t clash together. Do you feel the SU has good rapport with the student body? Sometimes, some students. There’s always going to be all the different types of students: the ones that don’t know what’s going on but don’t care, the ones that just want to complain because they complain, the ones that are active and love the SU, and the ones that know a little bit and are content—not super happy but not super upset. It’d be great if we could reach everyone and leave everything open for feedback, but you can’t please everyone. What is some advice you have for the general student population? Definitely to get involved in any way, whether it’s with the SU or in any other way. The students that are engaged with their campus seem to have such a better time. Living on rez is great but not everyone can do that. Get involved with a club, work at the paper, work at the student bar, one of the food court places, work as a tutor: just something. Just get involved with at least one thing; it will make things so much better. How do you think students should be encouraged to get more involved in their student governance? I was disappointed by all the uncontested [positions], because in elections people won’t work as hard if they know they are just fighting a novote. Essentially I think: the advertising – if we could get it more out there for people to know these are going on. It’s that easy. Just get that information out there, and I don’t think enough people who aren’t connected with the SU know that you only have to be a student with good financial and academic standing to run: it’s that easy. The benefits of being involved: it’s so great to know the different sides of things and to know what’s going on. Is there anything else you would like to add? Just get involved; and before you complain, learn what you are complaining about. Those are two big things.

What were some things that you would have done differently? The t-shirt contest I know only had 11 submissions from students, and it was supposed to be campus-wide. That was supposed to be an effort on our part to engage students in our SU swag. It surprised me that a lot of our submissions were not “University of Lethbridge Students’ Union” associated. They were very U of L associated… so it really said that these students don’t know who we are. There are a lot of students who don’t know what the SU is or what we do, they couldn’t differentiate between what the Students’ Union was and what the university was. That really spoke to me, and it was really telling. I think there is far more that the SU needs to do in future years to really engage students. Do you view your term as VP Operations/Finance as successful? Yes. I’m really proud of what I am currently doing, and will look back on this with nothing but complete satisfaction. I’m really glad that I did what I did. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? Yes, I do. I think that it’s not an easy job, and I think that a lot of students who come into it have a lot of catch-up. You get into this position and it’s like: here’s 40 years of knowledge and you plug it into yourself. This is how we work, this is how we operate, and these are the different departments on campus; this is who you talk to for this, that, and the other thing. I think, knowing that we haven’t had a single executive get impeached, at least within the past couple of years, I think everyone is doing okay. We are all just trying to do our job and get by. What advice do you have for any incoming SU councillors? The best advice I got: two things. First, respect the staff, as some of them have been there for many years. They are a wealth of knowledge, and they really run the show. Respect them, make friends with them. Second: be the executive you want to be. I don’t need to do the job that my predecessors did it, and I can do it the way I want to. It was the best piece of advice I ever got. Do you feel the SU has a good rapport with the student body? I think the SU does what it can. I really think that the SU does everything it can do to get the students engaged. However, I think there’s a lot of students who still don’t know how to reciprocate that. I think we help enough students, and help enough clubs, that people understand where our services are and that our intentions are really good. I think most people can understand that. There’s always room for improvement, but I don’t think our situation is different from any other campus. What is some advice you have for the general student population? Get informed and get involved and get excited. Engagement can be a really exciting thing. It can be really fun. It’s not a challenge, it’s not a job, it’s not a chore, and some of the coolest people are the people who are most involved. From my experience being on campus, being involved in everything from Fresh Fest, to clubs, to LPIRG, to whatever, the coolest people are the ones who are engaged and the most open, the most accepting.

You were elected in the Spring of 2011; what were your goals stepping into office? I had a lot of individual goals, but my overarching goal was to basically leave the students at the University of Lethbridge with something I didn’t have when I came here. I think I tried to do that in a number of ways. I was able to work along with the recruitment and retention project at the U of L and what I really pushed for was the introduction of a peer tutoring program. That was introduced in a pilot phase for this semester just in a couple of departments, and hopefully will expand over the coming years. I feel like giving students access to the academic assistance that they need, through peer tutoring, so allowing them to both teach and learn benefits both sides: both the strong students and the weaker students. I am very happy to see that moving forward. You had a lot of goals going into office; do you feel that you’ve accomplished most of those? I feel like I have accomplished most of them. I think there are a few that I haven’t been able to get to. Some because of feasibility issues, there were a couple initiatives that I had that ran into legal barriers, but I feel that the majority of what I set out to do I’ve done, so I’m pretty happy. What were the issues that you couldn’t get done? I wanted to introduce something along the lines of a rate-my-landlord site for students in the area. A lot of us rent, and a lot of us have had experiences with less-than-great landlords. I wanted to introduce some sort of system through which we could share our experiences at different properties. There were some legal issues with that in that it would have to be very heavily moderated to ensure there were no slanderous or inappropriate comments. Since it would be run by the Students’ Union, all of those comments could come back to us and we’d be held accountable for those. It was something that we could do, but it was something that would be difficult, and potentially very costly. So we decided to kibosh that and focus on some other issues. So what are some things you would have done differently while you were in office? I would have liked to have focussed a little bit more on the advocacy side of things. I worked with CAUS a little bit this year, but I don’t feel as though I gave it 100 per cent of my focus. Well, obviously not 100 per cent of my focus, but I feel like I could have given it a little bit more of myself, and I kind of regret that a little bit. I wish I had pushed a little more on that and put more effort into the advocacy side of things. So do you view your term as VP Academic as successful? I think I do, but I will leave that up to the students to decide. I have had a couple complaints over the year, but I think with any public office position you are going to have a few people who are unhappy. I’m pretty happy with the way I’ve done it. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? I think there are certainly areas that the SU could improve on. One of those is a spot where every different council tries to improve and that is basically communication with the students. In this year’s debate, Julia Adolf, who will be succeeding me, actually brought up a really good point: you can waste all of your energy trying to get to those students who just want to come to school, get their degree, and get out. But it’s not going to really do much. Focus instead on the students who are engaged, who want to come out to events, who want to take advantage of the services you do have, and that’s really all you can do. Definitely: communication with students is always an area the SU can improve on and I hope to see next year’s council improve even more. What advice do you have for incoming SU councillors? Be very, very organized from day one. I worked pretty hard over the summer, put in lots of 70-hour weeks over the summer when the weather was nice, but if you put in enough work over the summer and have all your ducks in a row come September, it will be so worth it. You’ll have way less on your plate and be able to focus on getting your initiatives done, focus on communicating with students, focus on executing whatever plans that you had made up over the summer. So, as tempting as it may be to go out and play in the sun and go out and enjoy your summer vacation, put in a little more effort over the summer and it will pay off. What is some advice you have for the general student population? The general student population: that’s a tough question. For those of you who are interested, take advantage of the services that we have. There are a lot of services that students aren’t aware of, like our food bank, travel and conference grants, emergency assistance; come talk to us and we might be able to help you out. My advice would be to take a few minutes to check out the SU website, take a look at the services we have, and just take the time. There are a lot of instances where students could benefit from the SU but don’t because they simply aren’t aware. You pay the fees, so make sure you know what you can get out of it; don’t just throw your money at us. Come in, and try and to get something back from us.

Zack Moline When you were elected in the Spring of 2011, what were your goals stepping into the office of SU president? I wanted to do a lot of things; the four pillars of my platform were advocacy, service, sustainability, and student engagement. Advocacy-wise I served as chair of CAUS this year so I spent a lot of time up in Edmonton lobbying on students’ behalf, and we did see some good successes out of that this year. On the service side we’ve done a lot up in The Zoo this year. We’ve put in the new taps, the new furniture. We’ve brought a lot of neat events into there as well: the karaoke/open mic night, etc. I’ve talked a lot about northern campus service expansion. There is also a referendum right now for a five dollar gym pass up at Calgary, so if that goes through I think it will be huge as well. Food bank this year has been the fullest it has ever been. We usually hold two fundraisers, but now we have to ask just for monetary donations because the shelves are literally full right now. A big part of that was Bill Nye too; we got in about $6-7,000 in ticket sales to go towards the food bank so that really helps. On the student engagement side, obviously we wish to do more; there aren’t enough candidates running in our elections, so there’s clear room for improvement. There’s still a lot of apathy on campus but it’s not something you are ever going to kill. I think we’ve done well with the mobile app; the volunteer core so far has had mixed success at getting students engaged. Fresh Fest – always good there. Sustainability: we got compost bins up in one of the residences. We have those around campus too. The biggest thing I’m happy about is that there’s a committee that has student representation on it, [and] over the year they commissioned a scoping report from a sessional faculty member in environmental science who had five students working with him. They did an entire audit of sustainability initiatives on campus. And then now this committee has created a sustainability map and it’s going to provide the foundation to make the campus…strategic plan which will provide the room for these initiatives to grow into the future. What are some of the things you would have done differently over the past year? In my platform I talked about really encouraging school spirit for athletics, and I don’t think I did enough for that. I held some meetings at the start of the year and we had a lot of really good ideas with athletics: we were going to host these tailgates at the start of the games and get the Herd really involved, really prominent on campus but they just never really came to fruition. Other priorities came into place and the workload was a little bit too heavy. We did donate to “adopt the horns” program as well but we definitely didn’t do enough for athletics this year. Do you view your term as president as successful? I’d say so, yeah, but I don’t think I can be the judge of it: students should be the judge of whether or not I was successful. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? I do think so, yeah. We do a lot of really good things and make an enormous impact on the lives of a lot of the students. I think communication [to the students] is a thing we can really improve upon. I think it’s mediocre to good right now but it’s not an excuse; we need to bump it up a bit. Some things we’ve talked about are a branding strategy so we have similar sort of design for our posters so that they are easily recognizable. What advice do you have for any incoming SU councillors? I’d say don’t take yourself too seriously. Be ready to learn and never be over-confident. Rely on the staff a lot. You need to come in with that open mind: that you are just a student and you are not an expert on this. Just take the time and be very willing to learn. Rely on the staff since they’ve been there for so long; they really know what’s going on and you need to be willing to take advantage of that resource. Do you feel that the SU, as a council and as an organization, has a good rapport with the student body? I think it’s good; last year’s interview survey had over 50 per cent say “very well” or “good” – I think it was 60-70 per cent, and 20 per cent said they can’t judge. Only a few said they were dissatisfied. Certainly the students who know what we do see the value in what the SU provides and they appreciate it. Then there is the group who are dissatisfied for whatever reason, and they perhaps don’t know, and those are the ones we need to work on. What is some advice you have for the general student population at the University of Lethbridge? I’d say get involved; do something. We are in the prime of our lives right now and there’s so much potential, so much public investment in us right now: we are the future. A lot of people I see are just wasting this opportunity. Classes just don’t do it. Is there anything else you’d like to add or anything else you’d like to talk about? Just to stress again to get involved. It’s really not as hard as many students might think and there are so many roads to it: both personal and societal as well.


Leyland Bradley When you were elected in the Spring of 2011, what were your goals stepping into office? I had worked as the VP internal commissioner the year before when I was an Arts and Science Rep. so I knew what I was getting into, kind of. I ran on not re-inventing the wheel for the events side of the job, but just continuing what was already working on campus and then to try a few new things. I didn’t come on with a ton of huge parties and promises; it was more to keep the successful events going such as open mic night, humans vs. zombies, LCB and Ender Bender – just to make sure those are always up to par. Fresh Fest as well. On the clubs side of things, I just wanted to up the attendance for clubs council because that was a big problem last year. On the accountability side of things I just wanted to know the bylaws very well and make sure they were being observed.

Farewell 2011-2012 SU Executive Lisa Rodych Andrew Williams

Do you feel you have accomplished those goals over the past year? On the most part, I think on the policies and bylaws side of things, I think I’ve done really well with that. I can quote some of them – it’s terrible. Clubs: I’ve been really happy with the progress there. We’ve had 10 new clubs, bringing us up to 82 currently. One club did de-ratify, but over 80, so that’s really exciting. I think the clubs side of things has gone really great. Events: I have been very pleased with the success of some of them, but Meltdown didn’t go as planned. In terms of Oktoberfest, it got rained out, but I did have really positive feedback from those who attended up in The Zoo. Overall I think I’ve come very close to achieving what I wanted to achieve. Looking back there is still so much more that can be done, just with bylaw and policy reviews, but it’s hard to do and tackle a good number of them.

So you were elected in the Spring of 2011; what were some of your goals heading into office? The whole idea was that we offer quality services, or improve upon services, or add new services, obviously being under my portfolio: operations. So a tutoring program was necessary, and I know that Andrew made some really great headway on that. That was really fantastic. Anything I could do with the food bank, I was all about that. Another was survey stuff; I’m in sociology and stats is a really big part of that, so doing a survey was another thing that was really important – getting people’s thoughts and opinions on a number of things: what we could improve. I know that Allan [Hall] put out a survey for Fresh Fest, for students who were attending that: what did you like, what didn’t you like, what can we improve on, that kind of stuff. So that was really good. I think, just overall, quality of services was what I intended to improve. I knew it wasn’t until I got my feet wet, and I got comfortable and immersed in the SU that I would know how to work things out.

What are some of the things you would have done differently? I would have tried to make those [events] better. For Meltdown, I don’t know what happened there. The numbers weren’t what I wanted; I’m not sure what failed there, but I would have done something differently. I would have been more organized, figured out my organization system way in advance, because it took me a few months to figure out how to be the most efficient I could be.

Do you feel that you have accomplished all the goals that you set out to do? Within reason, yes. I think that if there is one thing that this job taught me, and the interesting thing about working in the SU is that you’ve only got this job for a year. It takes so long to understand your boundaries, your limits, and what you are capable of. I know a lot of SU execs step into office with the attitude that they are going to change the world, and do this and that, but it really is a process, and it’s hard. It’s completely doable, and everything is possible, but it is hard.

Do you view your term as VP Internal as successful? Yes. Definitely. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? I think it’s definitely a good model but it could definitely be improved. It took a while for myself and some of the other execs to learn just what the staff there can do for us. So I wish we would have known specific job descriptions of all the staff at the beginning. It could have been a bit more efficient. Communication is obviously always an issue, because people feel like they don’t know what’s going on. It takes longer to do things, so that could be something that could be more efficient overall. It’s good but it could be worked on. What advice do you have for the incoming SU councillors? Definitely take things one step at a time and take a break when you need it. Obviously we’re also busy with classes, and meetings all the time. It’s hard to do, and take you-time as well. So just to keep the balance: don’t use your office for homework and don’t use your home time for office stuff. Keep those separate so they don’t clash together. Do you feel the SU has good rapport with the student body? Sometimes, some students. There’s always going to be all the different types of students: the ones that don’t know what’s going on but don’t care, the ones that just want to complain because they complain, the ones that are active and love the SU, and the ones that know a little bit and are content—not super happy but not super upset. It’d be great if we could reach everyone and leave everything open for feedback, but you can’t please everyone. What is some advice you have for the general student population? Definitely to get involved in any way, whether it’s with the SU or in any other way. The students that are engaged with their campus seem to have such a better time. Living on rez is great but not everyone can do that. Get involved with a club, work at the paper, work at the student bar, one of the food court places, work as a tutor: just something. Just get involved with at least one thing; it will make things so much better. How do you think students should be encouraged to get more involved in their student governance? I was disappointed by all the uncontested [positions], because in elections people won’t work as hard if they know they are just fighting a novote. Essentially I think: the advertising – if we could get it more out there for people to know these are going on. It’s that easy. Just get that information out there, and I don’t think enough people who aren’t connected with the SU know that you only have to be a student with good financial and academic standing to run: it’s that easy. The benefits of being involved: it’s so great to know the different sides of things and to know what’s going on. Is there anything else you would like to add? Just get involved; and before you complain, learn what you are complaining about. Those are two big things.

What were some things that you would have done differently? The t-shirt contest I know only had 11 submissions from students, and it was supposed to be campus-wide. That was supposed to be an effort on our part to engage students in our SU swag. It surprised me that a lot of our submissions were not “University of Lethbridge Students’ Union” associated. They were very U of L associated… so it really said that these students don’t know who we are. There are a lot of students who don’t know what the SU is or what we do, they couldn’t differentiate between what the Students’ Union was and what the university was. That really spoke to me, and it was really telling. I think there is far more that the SU needs to do in future years to really engage students. Do you view your term as VP Operations/Finance as successful? Yes. I’m really proud of what I am currently doing, and will look back on this with nothing but complete satisfaction. I’m really glad that I did what I did. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? Yes, I do. I think that it’s not an easy job, and I think that a lot of students who come into it have a lot of catch-up. You get into this position and it’s like: here’s 40 years of knowledge and you plug it into yourself. This is how we work, this is how we operate, and these are the different departments on campus; this is who you talk to for this, that, and the other thing. I think, knowing that we haven’t had a single executive get impeached, at least within the past couple of years, I think everyone is doing okay. We are all just trying to do our job and get by. What advice do you have for any incoming SU councillors? The best advice I got: two things. First, respect the staff, as some of them have been there for many years. They are a wealth of knowledge, and they really run the show. Respect them, make friends with them. Second: be the executive you want to be. I don’t need to do the job that my predecessors did it, and I can do it the way I want to. It was the best piece of advice I ever got. Do you feel the SU has a good rapport with the student body? I think the SU does what it can. I really think that the SU does everything it can do to get the students engaged. However, I think there’s a lot of students who still don’t know how to reciprocate that. I think we help enough students, and help enough clubs, that people understand where our services are and that our intentions are really good. I think most people can understand that. There’s always room for improvement, but I don’t think our situation is different from any other campus. What is some advice you have for the general student population? Get informed and get involved and get excited. Engagement can be a really exciting thing. It can be really fun. It’s not a challenge, it’s not a job, it’s not a chore, and some of the coolest people are the people who are most involved. From my experience being on campus, being involved in everything from Fresh Fest, to clubs, to LPIRG, to whatever, the coolest people are the ones who are engaged and the most open, the most accepting.

You were elected in the Spring of 2011; what were your goals stepping into office? I had a lot of individual goals, but my overarching goal was to basically leave the students at the University of Lethbridge with something I didn’t have when I came here. I think I tried to do that in a number of ways. I was able to work along with the recruitment and retention project at the U of L and what I really pushed for was the introduction of a peer tutoring program. That was introduced in a pilot phase for this semester just in a couple of departments, and hopefully will expand over the coming years. I feel like giving students access to the academic assistance that they need, through peer tutoring, so allowing them to both teach and learn benefits both sides: both the strong students and the weaker students. I am very happy to see that moving forward. You had a lot of goals going into office; do you feel that you’ve accomplished most of those? I feel like I have accomplished most of them. I think there are a few that I haven’t been able to get to. Some because of feasibility issues, there were a couple initiatives that I had that ran into legal barriers, but I feel that the majority of what I set out to do I’ve done, so I’m pretty happy. What were the issues that you couldn’t get done? I wanted to introduce something along the lines of a rate-my-landlord site for students in the area. A lot of us rent, and a lot of us have had experiences with less-than-great landlords. I wanted to introduce some sort of system through which we could share our experiences at different properties. There were some legal issues with that in that it would have to be very heavily moderated to ensure there were no slanderous or inappropriate comments. Since it would be run by the Students’ Union, all of those comments could come back to us and we’d be held accountable for those. It was something that we could do, but it was something that would be difficult, and potentially very costly. So we decided to kibosh that and focus on some other issues. So what are some things you would have done differently while you were in office? I would have liked to have focussed a little bit more on the advocacy side of things. I worked with CAUS a little bit this year, but I don’t feel as though I gave it 100 per cent of my focus. Well, obviously not 100 per cent of my focus, but I feel like I could have given it a little bit more of myself, and I kind of regret that a little bit. I wish I had pushed a little more on that and put more effort into the advocacy side of things. So do you view your term as VP Academic as successful? I think I do, but I will leave that up to the students to decide. I have had a couple complaints over the year, but I think with any public office position you are going to have a few people who are unhappy. I’m pretty happy with the way I’ve done it. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? I think there are certainly areas that the SU could improve on. One of those is a spot where every different council tries to improve and that is basically communication with the students. In this year’s debate, Julia Adolf, who will be succeeding me, actually brought up a really good point: you can waste all of your energy trying to get to those students who just want to come to school, get their degree, and get out. But it’s not going to really do much. Focus instead on the students who are engaged, who want to come out to events, who want to take advantage of the services you do have, and that’s really all you can do. Definitely: communication with students is always an area the SU can improve on and I hope to see next year’s council improve even more. What advice do you have for incoming SU councillors? Be very, very organized from day one. I worked pretty hard over the summer, put in lots of 70-hour weeks over the summer when the weather was nice, but if you put in enough work over the summer and have all your ducks in a row come September, it will be so worth it. You’ll have way less on your plate and be able to focus on getting your initiatives done, focus on communicating with students, focus on executing whatever plans that you had made up over the summer. So, as tempting as it may be to go out and play in the sun and go out and enjoy your summer vacation, put in a little more effort over the summer and it will pay off. What is some advice you have for the general student population? The general student population: that’s a tough question. For those of you who are interested, take advantage of the services that we have. There are a lot of services that students aren’t aware of, like our food bank, travel and conference grants, emergency assistance; come talk to us and we might be able to help you out. My advice would be to take a few minutes to check out the SU website, take a look at the services we have, and just take the time. There are a lot of instances where students could benefit from the SU but don’t because they simply aren’t aware. You pay the fees, so make sure you know what you can get out of it; don’t just throw your money at us. Come in, and try and to get something back from us.

Zack Moline When you were elected in the Spring of 2011, what were your goals stepping into the office of SU president? I wanted to do a lot of things; the four pillars of my platform were advocacy, service, sustainability, and student engagement. Advocacy-wise I served as chair of CAUS this year so I spent a lot of time up in Edmonton lobbying on students’ behalf, and we did see some good successes out of that this year. On the service side we’ve done a lot up in The Zoo this year. We’ve put in the new taps, the new furniture. We’ve brought a lot of neat events into there as well: the karaoke/open mic night, etc. I’ve talked a lot about northern campus service expansion. There is also a referendum right now for a five dollar gym pass up at Calgary, so if that goes through I think it will be huge as well. Food bank this year has been the fullest it has ever been. We usually hold two fundraisers, but now we have to ask just for monetary donations because the shelves are literally full right now. A big part of that was Bill Nye too; we got in about $6-7,000 in ticket sales to go towards the food bank so that really helps. On the student engagement side, obviously we wish to do more; there aren’t enough candidates running in our elections, so there’s clear room for improvement. There’s still a lot of apathy on campus but it’s not something you are ever going to kill. I think we’ve done well with the mobile app; the volunteer core so far has had mixed success at getting students engaged. Fresh Fest – always good there. Sustainability: we got compost bins up in one of the residences. We have those around campus too. The biggest thing I’m happy about is that there’s a committee that has student representation on it, [and] over the year they commissioned a scoping report from a sessional faculty member in environmental science who had five students working with him. They did an entire audit of sustainability initiatives on campus. And then now this committee has created a sustainability map and it’s going to provide the foundation to make the campus…strategic plan which will provide the room for these initiatives to grow into the future. What are some of the things you would have done differently over the past year? In my platform I talked about really encouraging school spirit for athletics, and I don’t think I did enough for that. I held some meetings at the start of the year and we had a lot of really good ideas with athletics: we were going to host these tailgates at the start of the games and get the Herd really involved, really prominent on campus but they just never really came to fruition. Other priorities came into place and the workload was a little bit too heavy. We did donate to “adopt the horns” program as well but we definitely didn’t do enough for athletics this year. Do you view your term as president as successful? I’d say so, yeah, but I don’t think I can be the judge of it: students should be the judge of whether or not I was successful. Do you think the SU is effective in its current model? I do think so, yeah. We do a lot of really good things and make an enormous impact on the lives of a lot of the students. I think communication [to the students] is a thing we can really improve upon. I think it’s mediocre to good right now but it’s not an excuse; we need to bump it up a bit. Some things we’ve talked about are a branding strategy so we have similar sort of design for our posters so that they are easily recognizable. What advice do you have for any incoming SU councillors? I’d say don’t take yourself too seriously. Be ready to learn and never be over-confident. Rely on the staff a lot. You need to come in with that open mind: that you are just a student and you are not an expert on this. Just take the time and be very willing to learn. Rely on the staff since they’ve been there for so long; they really know what’s going on and you need to be willing to take advantage of that resource. Do you feel that the SU, as a council and as an organization, has a good rapport with the student body? I think it’s good; last year’s interview survey had over 50 per cent say “very well” or “good” – I think it was 60-70 per cent, and 20 per cent said they can’t judge. Only a few said they were dissatisfied. Certainly the students who know what we do see the value in what the SU provides and they appreciate it. Then there is the group who are dissatisfied for whatever reason, and they perhaps don’t know, and those are the ones we need to work on. What is some advice you have for the general student population at the University of Lethbridge? I’d say get involved; do something. We are in the prime of our lives right now and there’s so much potential, so much public investment in us right now: we are the future. A lot of people I see are just wasting this opportunity. Classes just don’t do it. Is there anything else you’d like to add or anything else you’d like to talk about? Just to stress again to get involved. It’s really not as hard as many students might think and there are so many roads to it: both personal and societal as well.


students’ union

March 15, 2012 • 12 March 15, 2012

REPRESENTATION.ADVOCACY.SERVICE Year in Review: Student Advocacy Zack Moline

ULSU President As I sat down to write this Meliorist article from Halifax at the Canadian Alliance of Student Associations’ (CAUS) Annual General Meeting (AGM) I thought it would be pertinent to write about some of the successes and failures of the ULSU’s advocacy efforts this year. It’s been a long and productive year, and after seeing my successor voted in last Friday I’m feeling nostalgic, so I’m going to write about what we’ve accomplished and what we must leave to our successors to finish. Successes: Participation Rates – At the beginning of our year last May CAUS developed the high level idea of improving our post-secondary participation rate. Currently Alberta is dead last in the country on this metric, and we felt that it provided a powerful message to Government leaders as to why we need to invest in post-secondary. It worked. Premier Redford (candidate at the time), picked up on this idea and made it a center piece of her Post-Secondary Education (PSE) leadership platform which she relased during the summer in our building. It has since remained in Government rhetoric on post-secondary. Now that that idea is in place, we have been using it as the theme for the majority of the other issues we advocate on. If the Government truly wants to increase PSE participation in Alberta, hopefully they’ll act soon on some of our other suggestions. Operating Grant Increase –During October and November of this year CAUS lobbied the Government to increase the base operating

grants provided to our institutions. For the first time in four years it happened. In the Budget announced last February, our Universities received an increase of a little over 2% to their operating funding. This will take the pressure off schools, such as the University of Lethbridge, to resort to raising student fees to collect much needed revenue and should allow them to maintain existing levels of quality. Get Out The Vote (GOTV) Campaign – I’m just going to assume that you’ve heard at least something about the preliminary phase of our GOTV Campaign right now. To date, we’ve collected somewhere around 2,000 signatures from students who are planning on voting in the upcoming election and have yet another month to go. If the end of the campaign continues as well as it has started, I’m confident that we can have a significant effect on the voter turnout in Lethbridge West. Mixed Success: Alberta Student Financial Aid Reforms – In February the Government streamlined a few aspects of student finance and made it easier for students to receive loans. Essentially, expected parental contributions, income from certain savings accounts, and part time earnings have been removed from the resource assessment and been replaced with a flat rate of a $1,500 contribution. This means that any student who would have previously been calculated to have received more than $1,500 from those three sources I listed will now be able to receive a larger loan. Along with these changes, the Government also eliminated the remission system and replaced it with a completion grant to the tune

of $2,000 for graduates with a degree who stay to work in Alberta. CAUS has long been advocating for the removal of parental contributions, increasing allowable part time earnings, and simplifying the remission system. From this perspective, this policy change was a definite win. However, we also expended a considerable effort this year advocating for increasing non-repayable assistance (89 million was cut the last three years) and combatting student debt. These changes don’t affect levels of non-repayable aid, and will likely only increase levels of student debt. CSLP Vehicle Exemption – At the federal level we advocated for the removal of a personal vehicle in the asset calculation of federal student loans. Right now, if a student owns a vehicle which is worth over $5,000 it counts against the loan they’re eligible to receive. We’ve been informed that this potential exemption has made it into the next level of federal budget discussions. We don’t know yet if it will be included in the upcoming budget, but it looks promising. If this happens, it will be a win for students, especially on a commuter campus such as ours. Failures: Non-instructional fees – The regulation of non-instructional fees has arguably been our biggest priority provincially this year and it has been an absolute frustration dealing with the Government on the file. For the past two years we have been dragged around by the Government of Alberta who first told us to solicit the support of the other student groups, and then to discuss our proposals with our institutions on two occasions. After we successfully jumped through these delaying tactics they have repeatedly told us

a solution is on its way. Unfortunately none have come, and I’m becoming less and less hopeful that a permanent fix will happen before the upcoming election. I see this to be the direct results of a lack of political will on behalf of the Government and the strongly entrenched influence of our institutions within the Ministry. I certainly do not believe that if CAUS had employed different tactics or ran with different messaging our results would be any different. While I haven’t completely given up hope yet, I think this will be an issue for our successors to secure closure on.

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Blackberry

Check www.ulsu.ca for more details!

Student & Club of the Year Awards- Nominations Open Andrew Williams VP Academic

Do you know an outstanding student who has made the university and community a better place? Have you seen a club do amazing things this year? Then here is your chance to give them the recognition that they deserve! The Student of the Year, the Club of the Year and the Bill Chapman Students’ Union Certif-

icate of Distinction awards are open for ALL STUDENTS to submit nominations. The Student of the Year Award is an annual award presented to the student(s) who embody leadership, commitment, and contribute to the betterment of U of L students; this may be exemplified by involvement in clubs, non-profit organizations, student organizations, community, and volunteerism. The Students` Union Club of the Year Award is an annual award presented to the Students’

Union ratified club which has demonstrated the most outstanding effort and dedication in their endeavours over the past year. The Students` Union Club of the Year Award is an annual award presented to the University of Lethbridge student, or students, who has (have) shown the most innovation in the area(s) of student affairs, wellness, or another notable field, over the past year. All you have to do to show how much you value what these people have done this year

is send a quick email to Lisa Rodych, at su.internal@uleth.ca. Include your name, their name, and a paragraph or two detailing what they have done this year, and why they deserve the recognition by March 19th at 4pm. It’s that easy! Nominee recipients will be honored at the annual Recognition Dinner.

Upcoming Events:

- Karaoke in the Zoo - Mar. 13 at 8pm - Flames Game in the Zoo Mar. 15 at 7pm - St. Patty’s Day Dirty Bingo Mar. 16 at 5:30pm in the Zoo - Flames Game in thje Zoo Mar. 16 at 7:30pm - Flames Game in the Zoo Mar. 20 at 7pm - Karaoke in the Zoo - Mar. 20 at 8pm - ULSU General Assembly Meeting - Mar. 21 at 6pm - Flames Game in the Zoo Mar. 22 at 6pm - Flames Game in the Zoo Mar. 26 at 7pm - Karaoke in the Zoo - Mar. 27 at 8pm - Flames Game in the Zoo Mar. 28 at 7:30pm - Open Mic Night in the Zoo 5pm

The studying, the assignments, the papers, the exams... everything has been leading up to this single defining moment of your semester.

Are You Ready? LCB

2012

WED. APRIL 18


entertainment

meliorist the

March 15, 2012 • 13

Billy Davey Entertainment Editor For more information on contributing to Entertainment, please contact Billy Davey at e.editor@themeliorist.ca

Brock Zeman, always a songwriter Billy Davey

Entertainment Editor

“To be honest, I’ve probably let go of everything to do this… I can’t remember what I did before that… I can’t really picture myself doing anything else… once you get into it and decide this is what you’re going to do, it pretty much consumes everything,” said songwriter, performer, producer, and owner of Mud Records, Brock Zeman. With an unrelenting work ethic and love of music, Zeman has released nine of his own records, played hundreds of gigs, and searches for new talent to record for his label. Brock and Tim Hus will be playing at the Geomatic Attic on April 5. Doors open at 7:00 p.m. and the show starts an hour after. Ticket prices are $27.50. Zeman started out by working weekdays as a bartender and booking shows for the weekends. “And eventually it just kind of flipped… I was booking shifts at the bar in between gigs to keep money comin’ in, and then I just got too busy to keep both of them, so I had to quit — good problem to have, I guess,” laughed Zeman. However, the singer revealed his real passion

is song writing, not performing: “I had no idea, or desire to perform really. My main interest is song writing and recording, but I figured out you could make a hundred bucks playing at the bar and probably get some drinks out of it too. So that’s kind of where it started.” But Zeman still remains fond of his performance side and uses it to test and try out new songs he’s written because it keeps things from getting stale. But when asked what types of venues and shows he like to play, Zeman did not say small pubs, like many others would say if they were trying new songs each show; “Definitely festivals, they’re just way more – it’s so satisfying to be on a main stage and to know there’s a couple thousand people out there who are all really into music and a good time. Those are definitely the moments that stick with ya.” Starting out as an independent musician and doing all your own publicity, managing, song writing, and performing means taking all the shows you can get and forgetting about “hitting it big,” he says. “You’ve got to play so much to make it all work. So one night, I remember this like two years ago, I was opening up for Steve Earle on

the Ottawa Blues Fest stage and the next night I was playing a charity pig roast,” laughs Zeman. “The idea of ‘making it’ is, I really don’t know what ‘it’ is —making money, being a star, I don’t really know.” “It was a definite gradual thing,” said Zeman, recalling the days of lots of hard work and trying to make a name for himself. Now that he is an established artist, however, he has created a new workload to occupy himself with: Mud Records. “Well, I’ve got a group of really talented buddies and friends that are from this area that never play gigs. They all write songs and no one ever hears their songs because they don’t play, and they work their asses off all day ‘cause they’re in construction or something like that, so I just started taking these guys and recording them,” beamed Zeman as his voice began to light up while talking about other artists he has recorded. But, a song writer at heart, Zeman always prefers putting pen to paper over recording or performing. “I’d like to cut down the amount of gigs I’d have to do,” said Zeman who then paused to let out a laugh, “and just sit around all day and write songs — I’d love to do that.”

“I was just always obsessed with music and couldn’t put it down, couldn’t stop trying really.”

Plants and Animals The End of That (Secret City)

Justin Moore Outlaws Like Me (The Valory Music Co.)

The Montréal band has released an album filled with the spirit of rock with The End of That. Recorded near Paris, the album is much more choreographed than previous ones, using less jamming to create tracks. The album starts with a calm yet intriguing acoustic guitar and continues in a simple fashion with a basic drum beat, tame vocals, and a sedated lead guitar in “Before.” The second track, “The End of That,” is probably the closest the group comes to their self-definition – “post-classic rock.” The first single, “Lightshow,” is a dichotomy of a simple rock tune and a full sound that seems to drown itself out, which sets the tone for the rest of the album. The End of That, in entirety, has few shortcomings and it signals that the band is doing anything but slowing down.

Justin Moore’s second album, Outlaws Like Me, has been much more successful than his first and has helped the country singer establish himself as more of an artist. The album features songs about rednecks, heaven, tractors, honky tonks, beer, fishing, backroading, guns, Chevys, and outlaws; now I like a good cliché from time to time – but goddamnit Justin. Besides my absolute contempt towards modern/mainstream country’s lyrical pursuits, the album is pretty average. Songs like “Beer Time,” “Bait a Hook,” and “Guns” are all fairly good soundtracks for the activities they describe. So if you are into pickup trucks, shooting things, and vague expressions of pedophilia in “Sunshine Babies” (listening to the states he sings about and having seen the Toddlers & Tiaras show, I have no idea what demographic he is interested in), this is for you.

Paul McCartney Kisses On The Bottom (Hear Music)

Going for a jazz-pop sound, the legendary Paul McCartney summons on some classic, and fairly unknown, American jazz tunes. Only “My Valentine” and “Only Our Hearts” are written by McCartney himself. The entire album is smooth and easy listening, starting with a song written in 1935 by Fats Waller, “I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter.” Many songs, especially “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” have excellent rhythm sections composed of various strings like guitars, violin, and a piano that have an audible dance every time the vocals stop. The album, however, leaves the listener wishing for McCartney to change the general theme up, such as in “Bye Bye Blackbird” and “Only Our Hearts,” which both feature orchestral arrangements. Kissing On The Bottom is good for the easy listening fan but could use more things like the harmonica solo in the last track.


the

entertainment

meliorist

14 • March 15, 2012

Comic Corner RJ Balog Entertainment Writer

Here’s something new that I thought we could try: how about a little blurb about some of the new comics up on shelves this month? First let me clarify that no, these aren’t the newest releases, seeing as new issues come out on Wednesday, and this paper comes out Thursday. So it wouldn’t be possible to get a review in when the paper is printing. But anyway, if you’re interested in comics regardless, I don’t think you’ll mind. For now let’s just run down a couple of the better series for the week one schedule. DC: Swamp Thing #7 Those unfamiliar with Swamp Thing should stop what they’re doing and go pick up some of what’s definitely one of DC’s best titles. I’ll admit that I wasn’t the biggest Swamp Thing fan until just recently, but times are a changing, and DC’s reboot changed a lot of things. Scott Snyder has masterfully crafted a bigger-than-life tale only fitting for Swamp Thing. Up until now we’ve seen Alec Holland refuting his place as the greens champion and what he calls “the monster,” all while on the run from the creatures of the rot. We left off with Alec being taken over by the rot and being judged by the Parliament of Trees. Try to stick with me here. With issue 7, Snyder brilliantly contrasts life and death, and hate and love. Yanick Paquette lays out beautiful panels that bring to life the juxtaposition in Snyder’s story, the beauty and life of the green mirrored by the grotesque decay and death of the rot. Every panel has a unique element distinguishing it

from the rest. Paquette has managed to bring a nostalgic funk feel to a perfectly fitted title. Issue 7 has Alec Holland finally accepting his fate with the green, as front man for the battle with the rot. An extremely satisfying issue to an already impressive title, with one of the grooviest covers ever, get into Swamp Thing and feel the funk. Marvel: The Amazing Spider-Man #681 With this issue we have the conclusion to the two-part mini story of Spider-Man in space. Last issue we had Spider-Man and Human Torch headed to the Apogee 1 Space Station where communications have failed between its crew and mainly the honourable Colonel John Jameson. Once inside, the quick-witted duo met up with Jameson and quickly discovered that the ship has been overrun with octobots and compromised crew members courtesy of the good Doc Ock. 681 has our heroes frantically trying to make it out in one piece, with the crew no less. All in all this was a solid issue for Spidey with clever writing and some classic quips between two of the Marvel universe’s best jokesters. The story was backed up with good art, typical for a Spidey series. This Spidey in space tale is just a prologue for Spider-Man’s next big arc, “Ends of The Earth” which will have everyone’s favourite hero face off against a new Sinister Six led by the newly costumed Doctor Octopus. The new arc looks promising, and the set-up has been entertaining so far, so this might be a good one to step on board for. So that’s it for now; if this seems like a column readers would be interested in, don’t hesitate to let us know. But for now, when trouble comes, look to the skies.

B20180

The Pipe: the most prescient film you’ll see this year Victoria Film Festival flick will appeal to those who have followed Keystone, Northern Gateway pipeline projects Vanessa Annand The Martlet

VICTORIA (CUP) — If you saw a horseman decked out in his finest apocalyptic duds in your hometown, what would you do? Give the Book of Revelations a close reading, perhaps. If you’ve paid any attention to the proposed pipeline projects that have divided this country for months (Keystone, Northern Gateway) and you’re wondering what lies ahead, what should you do? Watch The Pipe at the Victoria Film Festival (VFF). No film at the VFF will resonate so soundly with the collective coastal consciousness as this documentary about Shell’s controversial Corrib Gas Pipeline in Ireland. In 2004, Shell started building a pipeline from a subsea natural gas reserve through Broadhaven Bay. The pipe was meant to cross over land and through the village of Rossport to an onshore processing facility, but local resistance stalled its development. “Resistance” isn’t quite the word though — it could easily apply to a child who wraps his legs around his chair, refusing to leave the dinner table when asked. These people aren’t petulant. They’re willing to go on hunger strike, to prison, to court and out to the fields and the shore with their Border Collies to remind themselves why they’re fighting an energy monolith. The film opens with sweeping helicopter shots of the landscape around Broadhaven Bay. These are juxtaposed with jolting, handheld camera shots of protesting Rossport villagers being roughed up by police. We’ve seen these images before — hundreds of times in

sundry documentaries. What we haven’t seen is old, toothless farmers digging for crabs in their gumboots, telling us what it will get to you in the end is sadness. We’ve seen images of fishermen on their boats with peeling paint before, too. But we haven’t seen their crates full of crabs used as a metaphor for humans’ ruthlessness towards one another. The fishermen clip the muscles in the crabs’ claws so that the crustaceans won’t kill each other when in close quarters. Who will clip the far-reaching pincers of Shell that are choking the community? Certainly not the government, which allows the company onto farmers’ land and permits the pipeline to proceed apace without consultation. Certainly not the police, the reflective vestclad Garda who beat protesters and board fishermen’s vessels. It’s the age of the protesting villagers that is most affecting. These aren’t dissatisfied youths (though there are a few young faces in the sign-bearing crowds). These are men gone soft round the middle and women with drawn faces and cable-knit sweaters. These are people who, during the winter, stand with their signs but still take a moment to straighten their husbands’ collars or cup their wives’ faces. These small, warm gestures, more than the shrieking at town hall meetings or at protests, are the moments you will realize that everything — from the smallest hand-squeeze to the largest farm in the county — is at stake. The only question that remains is how long it will take us to rouse ourselves to a similar state of ire and action. It’s called The Pipe, singular, but you will leave thinking of The Pipes, plural.


meliorist

Entertainment

the

March 15, 2012 • 15

Glee: Jonathan Petrychyn The Carillion

I fucking hate Glee. “But Jon,” I hear you say, “You can’t hate Glee. You’re gay. Don’t you just think Kurt and Blaine make the cutest couple and are the best role models for young gay kids?” No, no I do not, fictional straw person. I think Glee, just like Modern Family, just like Degrassi, makes a spectacle out of their gay characters, sanitizing them into easily digestible, safe, harmless and often delightful characters that any straight man or woman can love. “But Jon,” I hear you say again, “Isn’t that a good thing? Don’t you want gays to be accepted?” Yes, you’re right. I do want gays to be accepted. But you aren’t doing queer kids any favours by showing them that they only way they can exist is to exist like everyone else. I hate to break it to you, but everyone else (that means you if you’re straight, probably you if you’re gay and want to get married) has been participating in a system that has,

since the Victorian era, been oppressing and marginalizing queer folk. Telling me that I’m allowed into this oppressive group doesn’t make me feel better, because I’m only allowed into the group if I conform to what you, the heterosexual community, deem acceptable as “queer.” What does this have to do with Glee? Let’s look at Kurt and Blaine. Now, I’ll confess I gave up on Glee about three or four episodes into Season 3. The only thing that kept me going was Kurt’s story arc, which was the most compelling of the entire series. I bawled when Kurt’s dad married Finn’s mom. I was emotionally invested in the show, just like everyone else was. And then I realized: I shouldn’t be invested in the show just like everyone else. I’m not just like everyone else. I’m a queer man. I am different. And Kurt, like me, shouldn’t want what everyone else wants. He’s different. And we need to recognize this difference and not cheer him on when he enters into a relationship that is basically just Rachel and

not as queer-friendly as it pretends to be

Popular TV show pushes conservative values

Finn’s, but with two guys. It’s everything our mothers wanted from us, and this is exactly the problem. Kurt’s relationship with Blaine mirrors the relationship of every heterosexual couple in the series. This is perhaps shown no better than in the episode where Kurt loses his virginity at the same time Rachel does. Kurt gets a relationship just like Rachel does, and we all cheer for acceptance. But is this really acceptance, or are we just oppressing Kurt in a more subtle, more harmful way? What we’re telling Kurt, and other queer males (don’t even get me started on the queer girls; Santana is a complex phenomenon in Glee that would warrant a whole other column) is that if you want acceptance, you have to be just like every other heterosexual couple out there. You have to want a monogamous relationship, with a well-paying job, a couple kids, a dog and a white picket fence. Sounds awfully conservative, doesn’t it?

That’s because it is. Glee may be the most conservative show I’ve seen in the last six months, and I’ve watched the pilot of Work It. Glee isn’t nearly as progressive as we want to think it is, because its idea of “acceptance” is telling Kurt and Blaine and other gay males that you’ll be accepted if you want the same things your straight counterparts wants. Instead, I think it

needs to work something like this: we need to recognize the difference that is queerness. Queer folk are not like heterosexual folk. We need to recognize this. Denying us the ability to define ourselves, by telling us that we’re just like you, denies us the opportunity to truly define who we are. Unfortunately, the queer community has bought into this line. We push the “we’re just like everyone else” line so often, when, in fact, we’re not like everyone else at all. We shouldn’t want to be part of the system that has single-handedly oppressed us. How do we do that? How do we get out of that system? The first step would be to speak out against Glee, and stop deifying it as this bastion of acceptance and progressive values. Let’s be queer. Let’s take the opportunity to look at these heterosexual institutions and rework them so they work for everyone, and not just those who fit the mold. You never know; it just might create the post-sexuality world we want.

March 15 Prairie Folk Tournament @ The Slice & Owl Acoustic Lounge 9 p.m. Play and Prose competition winners @ David Spinks Theatre 7 p.m. Real McKenzies with Scallywags @ Bo Diddly’s 9 p.m. Renee Werenka and Friends @ Good Earth Coffee House 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.

March 16 Prairie Folk Tournament @ The Slice & Owl Acoustic Lounge 9 p.m. Lori Kole @ Lethbridge Casino 9 p.m.

March 17 Prairie Folk Tournament @ The Slice 9 p.m. Steve Gates and B.A. Johnston @ Owl Acoustic Lounge 9 p.m.

Deuce Coustics with Suite 33 @ Bo Diddly’s 9 p.m. Lori Kole @ Lethbridge Casino 9 p.m. Tom and Curt @ Lethbridge Legion 7 p.m.

Open Mic with Cory Oryniak and Dave Tilsley U of L Headbangers @ Jimmy’s Pub Society present 9 p.m. Escape the Asylum, Killing Redemption, Reborn Extinction @ U of L Ballroom 7 p.m.

March 18

Bluegrass Jam @ Wolf’s Den 7 p.m.

2012 Women’s World Curling Championship @ Enmax Centre 7 p.m.

March 19

March 21

Open Mic @ Owl Acoustic Lounge 9 p.m.

Chris Craig and Dano @ Black Tomato Lounge 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Lethbridge Symphony Orchestra Masters Series IV @ Southminster United Church 7:30 p.m.

March 20

L.A. Beat open jam @ Owl Acoustic Lounge 9 p.m. Most Vocal Poets @ Crossings Branch Library 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

Hey! Wanna post your band’s concert? Your phallacious Level 8 gallery opening? Email your events to e.editor@ themeliorist.ca!

••• Got nothing on

Open Mic @ The Slice 9:30 p.m. Open Mic @ Bo Diddly’s 7 p.m. to 10 p.m.

the go? Go to an event. Write an article. Contribute it to The Meliorist.


TLFs

16 • March 15, 2012

Interested in Kung Fu? Join our two day workshop of Wing Chun and Choy Lee fut Kung Fu on March 24th & 25. Email mail@lethbridgekungfu.com for more detail for this very rare opportunity to learn from one of the most respected kung fu masters in Canada. Dear strangers: I’m sorry I keep waving at you. You all look like people I know. Sensory Exploitation: the female species wearing fluorescent clothing … that’s not science, it’s neuroscience. First world problem: complaining about midterms. Third world problem: not being able to go to school. If ur sick, be a hermit and stay in ur room as long as u can. No one else wants to get sick >.<

This is a reminder that the library’s “Quiet Area” does not mean group work area, laughing at online comedy area, or pump your 90s techno at max volume area. Thanks :) Excuse I normally use to avoid giving money to beggars/homeless people “I forgot my wallet”…I used that today to not donate to the 5 days thing…I’m so going to hell…oh well. 5 days of being homeless has started again… I can barely feed myself, what makes you think I have any spare change? Get off university campus and live on the real streets. I found an iPad in a leather case in the cafe and gave it to the corner convenience. Hope the rightful owner finds it. Also, redhead on row machine today = <3 (03/12)

Elect Kony 2012. Stop at nothing! Bill C-10 2012 Canada, wtf happened? I wear my sunglasses at night, so I can so I can actually be inside a lit building without getting a massive migraine from my light sensitivity. Stop hatin’, people. To the guy playing the accordion outside of Kainai last week: you totally made my day man, you rock! If you are the only person sitting at a library table please move to a cubby desk! It’ll give groups room to work and will be much quieter for you to do yours. Anyone who can do vertical push-ups is hot

Eggs: by-product of a hen’s reproductive cycle. Egg salad: hen-period salad. Who wants an omelette? Sinatra: “And that laugh, that wrinkles your nose/ It touches my foolish heart!” Beiber: “Oh, Baby, baby, baby yeah!/Oh Baby, baby, baby yeah!” Music: wtf happened? Congratulations to the Dance Team for getting 3rd Place at the WEM Total Spirit Competition this weekend. Good Job Girls!! Supratentorial pansynaptopenia is on the rise. Do your homework to ensure you are not at risk. to the homeless people: get a job

You all have beautiful voices, but the sound system makes it seem like you’re screaming and seriously… right by the study centre?! So much for studying. You’re right, dildos do rarely have men attached, but I bet girls like you would pay extra if there was one.

meliorist the

we need a twitter feed on the status of the Tim Hortons line MAKE KONY FAMOUS 2012 #INVISIBLE CHILDREN Girls at the gym, how may a beta such as myself ever hope to approach your heavenly blessed beauty?

Season Olympics Summer: 1 Winter: uncountable summer: wow you really dropped the ball this year winter Winter: I want that guy tested for global warming!!! >_<

Joseph Kony, 2012. Look him up, and then help us raise awareness on April 20th! We will cover the night, and we need all the help and support we can get.

To my gal pals, just as a heads-up, when you spend all of your time making out with your boyfriend, your friends won’t wanna be around. No one’s calling? Take a hint.

Free movie night hosted by Lethbridge Students For Liberty to take place on Thursday, March 15th @7:30 in Galileo’s Lounge. Come explore what makes for a truly free society!

Self-esteem: feeling more confident in my Iron Maiden shirt and ratty jeans than she does in her lulus and Aritzia sweater. Girls, the clothes aren’t the beautiful thing – YOU are.

Everyone who has ever built anywhere a “new heaven” first found the power thereto in his own hell.

International Women’s Day does nothing more than tell women that we should celebrate our personhood 1 day in 365. Thanks, but I’m a person EVERY day. The testing centre is so cold, how are you supposed to think while writing exams when all you’re doing is shivering?! C’mon UofL don’t be so cheap and do something about the heat! guy at the gym wednesday. commented on how sweaty you were :p , your cute, hope to see you again next wednesday To the awesome girl who offered to help carry all my “camping bags” to my car! Thanks so much!

The visible problem with invisible children: http://ilto.wordpress.com/2006/11/02/ the-visible-problem-with-invisiblechildren/ I found the campus women’s center… but wheres the mancave? Pretty girl who works out with her friend around 7PM, looks new. Are you single? When one wishes to be left alone, use sarcasm to confuse people. Dear woman from Amnesty International, I am not apathetic towards human rights. I just wanted to get rid of you. You interrupted our conversation about Kony. visiblechildren.tumblr.com

Submit your TLFs at WWW.THEMELIORIST.CA or to THEMELIORIST@GMAIL.COM. All TLFs must be submitted via a valid uleth account. Keep in mind that slanderous or offensive TLFs my be edited or omitted. The TLFs do not reflect the views or opinions of The Meliorist Publishing Society.

Band/Album/Label

* indicates Canadian artist


lifestyle

meliorist the

March 15, 2012 • 17

Nicole Meech Sports and Lifestyle Editor For more information on contributing to Sports and Lifestyle, please contact Nicole Meech, s.editor@themeliorist.ca

Yoga... undressed? Nicole Meech Lifestyle Op-Ed

When you first think of yoga, what is the first thing that comes to mind? Probably extreme flexibility, Indian names you can barely pronounce, spandex outfits, and nudity. Wait, what?! Yes, you heard right, the latest trend in the yoga world is practicing in the nude. You won’t be lucky enough to find studios baring it all in Southern Alberta, however. Currently the only active businesses are in Toronto, and even then there are only a handful. So, you are probably aware that fully clothed yoga is all about finding inner peace with yourself, and pushing yourself beyond your boundaries. According to Yoga Undressed, the idea behind nude yoga is relatively the same thing ex-

cept you are able to celebrate your body in an “unguarded” way. Nude yoga seeks to celebrate the natural, and create your fullest potential in every area of your life. By shedding those (I thought comfortable) yoga threads, the idea is to become “one” with the universe and “embrace your sacred sexuality and true nature.” Being naked allows you to experience a greater freedom and more mindfulness – mindfulness is key in any yoga practice – and ultimately just have a greater practice. Among the above-mentioned descriptors, I also found a lot of positive testimonials regarding this somewhat new practice. So before making any drastic judgments, and doing what any good researcher should do, I decided to try this out for myself. I have practiced yoga for many years and I definitely agree

that it is essential for overall health and well-being, so I decided to have an open mind about the nude experience. While I wasn’t about to jump on a plane to Toronto, I had to make do in the comforts of my own living room. Blinds shut, lights off, yoga music on, I was ready to go. While I can’t say that this practice provided some kind of magical insight into my true being, it wasn’t half bad. I did feel more aware of my body and more mindful going into each pose; but let’s not forget that was in the comfort of my own home. Put that same scenario in a room full of other nakies and that’s a whole other story. While nude yoga practitioners claim that being with other naked people actually enhances the experience (classes are gender specific so it’s not that kind of enhancement!), it seems

unrealistic to shed the cultural implications around being nude, especially in public. We are socialized to view the human body (in its naked form) as something sexual, as something that should be covered up in public. Being able to shed that view when you walk through a nude yoga studio’s doors seems unrealistic, but maybe not. Maybe being in an environment that is so open and accepting of each individual body allows you to forget about the fact that you’re naked. Maybe you’re so aware of yourself that you don’t even notice the rest of the nakedness filling the room. Either way, I’m sure you’d be so preoccupied cleaning your mat after each class to even give it a second thought!

Keepin’ it fresh: Exercise of the week Nicole Meech Lifestyle Editor

Bosu Squat Jumps This exercise is an advanced one – you should definitely be a squat master before attempting it. Bosu balls are a great way to challenge your body by providing an unstable surface. Remember, the more unstable your exercise is, the more muscles will be engaged, thus better results will be achieved (of course you should always keep proper form in mind – performing any exercise stable or unstable without proper form will compromise your results and increase your chance for injury). Not only does this exercise add an element of instability, it also challenges your body through jumping, a completely power-based move.

How-to:

2. Jump in the air (it helps if you pump your arms up at the same time), and make sure to brace yourself for your landing. Repeat as fast as possible for as many reps as possible.

1. Make sure the bosu ball is facing round part up, then step on the ball. Squat down as deep as you can, arms in front of you.

Demonstration by Brady Flesch


sports

meliorist the

March 15, 2012 • 18

Three Horns named to Canada’s roster for Hong Kong Sevens Rugby Canada Victoria – Canada, the defending champions of the Hong Kong Sevens and reigning IRB Sevens Challenge Cup holders, have named their roster for the upcoming IRB event in China, which kicks off on March 23. Head Coach John Tait, having recently guided the Canadian women to a second consecutive victory at the USA Sevens in Las Vegas, has named a strong side full of speed, power and experience. Leading the Canadians in pursuit of their sixth consecutive major tournament win will be experienced veterans like Kelly Russell, who played every minute of every game for Canada at their previous IRB Challenge Cup win in Dubai. Russell makes up one twelfth of a squad which features a dynamic and exciting core of talent. Powerful runners like Alberta’s Jen Kish and Manitoba’s Mandy Marchak will look to punch holes in opposition defences and make room for the raw speed and creativity embodied in the likes Ghislaine Landry and former Pronghorn Ashley Steacy. Steacy, one of the most decorated players CIS women’s rugby history, was a part of the Horns three CIS Championship teams and was a two-time CIS Player of the Year. Joining Steacy from the Horns program are Kelsey Willoughby and Kayla Moleschi, who both helped the Horns win a sixth consecutive Canada West title last fall. Willoughby was the Canada West MVP and AllCanadian, while Moleschi stormed onto the CIS scene last year, winning the Canada West Rookie of the Year award and being named both a CIS All-Canadian and CIS Championship All-Star. Selection for the Hong Kong tournament has been a process unrivalled in the history of Canadian women’s rugby. Having assembled

talent from Europe, the national club scene, as well as the Canadian university game, 20 committed athletes have spent months working on their speed, fitness and skill at Rugby Canada’s Centre of Excellence in Langford, British Columbia. The Canadian coaching staff has been able to gather an unprecedented amount of data on their players and have had the opportunity to witness athletes in head-to-head competition for extended periods of time. Funding from the Canadian government’s “Own the Podium” program has meant that Canada’s sevens stars are benefitting from the tools necessary to maintain their status as the world’s number one team. Such funding enabled opportunities like the recent clinic

put on at the C.O.E. in Langford by legendary New Zealand kicking coach Mick “The Kick” Byrne. Advancing to the Hong Kong roster are a number of athletes who have recently impressed for the Canadian Maple Leafs, this country’s women’s sevens development side. Vancouver’s Andrea Burk will look to add her big tackles and impressive breakdown work to an already imposing Canadian defence, while Willoughby, who captained the Canadian development team in Dubai, returns from injury to help Canada in their quest to defend the most prestigious trophy in the women’s sevens game. Coach Tait had the following words about readying his side for battle in Hong Kong:

“We are looking forward to the challenge of repeating as Cup Champions at the Hong Kong Sevens. The opposition has been increasingly more prepared to play us and being favourites brings a pressure of its own. We have a lot of depth in this side with players who are able to play in multiple spots with real effectiveness, and we will likely try some different combinations and show some different looks in attack. Without wanting to look beyond our pool, we are excited to have another opportunity to test ourselves against the likes of England and Australia for the first time since Dubai.” Canada has been placed in Pool A in Hong Kong, drawn against Brazil, host of the 2016 Summer Olympics,

and Russia, host of the 2013 Rugby Sevens World Cup, which will also feature a women’s tournament. Canada will also expect stiff competition from the likes of Australia and England, both of whom showed very well in Dubai, as well as the United States whom the Canadians defeated in the Grand Final of the Las Vegas Sevens in February. Fans should stay connected to Rugby Canada’s social networks on Facebook and Twitter for updates over the course of the tournament, and check back regularly at www. rugbycanada.ca to read daily recaps, complete with interviews from the tour party.

When will the Sedins get the elite player respect they deserve? A fan’s rant Craig Boehmer Sports Contributor

Call them sisters, little girls, soft, or any other taunt usually reserved for a grade three playground, Daniel and Henrik will just look at you and keep scoring. The “twins” are the most ridiculed duo in the league on what has been labelled the most hated team in the league. Fans and other teams can hate the Sedins all they want, but when the Sedins are on the ice you had better respect what they can do! Unlike many stars today like Toews, Stamkos and Crosby, the Sedins did not enter the league as elite players. Drafted 2nd and 3rd overall in the 1999 NHL Entry Draft by then Canucks GM Brian Burke, the Sedins waited a year before making the move to North America. During that time the Vancouver Canucks were led by Markus Naslund, a fellow Swede, and the West Coast expressed an amazingly effective line consisting of Naslund, Todd Bertuzzi, and Brendan Morrison. This allowed the Vancouver Canucks organization to slowly develop the Sedins over the span of many years, similar to what they are currently doing for Cody Hodgson. In their early years the Sedins played minimal minutes,

The Canucks’ Sedin Twins | Iwona Erskine-Kellie

allowing them to learn the game and develop maturity. All of this waiting has begun to bear fruit in recent seasons, most noticeably last season when the Sedins led Vancouver to that debacle that we call the 2011 Stanley Cup finals. Now I don’t want to harp on last year’s Stanley Cup finals, other than

by saying it was a sad pathetic series in which a team that was infinitely more skilled lost because the NHL allows thug tactic hockey to be prevalent during the most important series of the season. I mean come on, Boston will never be as skilled a team as Vancouver, so they resorted to cheap goon tactics that

degrade hockey as a whole, and the NHL is so starved for American approval that they have allowed hockey to be cheapened by these goons and cheap shot artists. Let the skill and speed of the game attract fans; that’s what was so exciting about the first few seasons in post-lockout hockey – it was fast and skilled.

This last Stanley Cup final was just an embarrassment to the game, not that I am bitter or anything. Back to the Sedins – the Sedin twins have been two of the most consistent and prolific regular season scorers since the lockout. Since 2005/06, Henrik has scored 438 points while Daniel has scored 500. That places both of them ahead of Pavel Datsyuk and both of them just behind Jarome Iginla in scoring since the lockout. But unlike both Datsyuk and Iginla, the Sedins’ “better days” aren’t behind them. When they set up a cycle it is amazing to watch the complete control they have of the puck and of the game. The mere fact that people hate them means that they are doing something right – you don’t hate mediocre players. In a league that boasts younger and younger superstars, the Sedins continue to excel and compete at an elite level. They will win a Stanley Cup because they are elite players on an elite team, and that is what elite teams do. Last year was just their first kick at the bucket, but they will be back! Teams and fans can continue to hate them, but anyone who says they are not elite, or that they are overrated, is ignorant of hockey and of the Sedins.


classifieds Career and Employment Services JOBS JOBS JOBS!!! Let us introduce you to CES (Career & Employment Services). CES is a student service office dedicated to assisting you with your Career and Job Search needs. We’re within the Career Resources Centre in AH154, along with Applied Studies and the Management and Arts & Science Cooperative Education programs. CRC office hours are 9am - 12pm and 1pm - 4pm Monday-Friday. Go to our website for more detailed information on our services: www.uleth.ca/ross/ces.

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WIN AN iPad 2! Visit: http://www.fromlearningtowork.ca/ and fill out the survey for your chance to win!

WORKSHOPS to March 30:

Please SIGN UP for workshops at CES (AH154) or email ces.students@uleth.ca CES Resume/Cover Letter Workshops:

* Tues, Mar 20, 3-5:30pm * Thurs, Mar 22, 9:30am-12pm * Mon, Mar 26, 2-4:30pm * Thurs, Mar 29, 1:40-4:15pm

CES Networking & Job Search Workshops: * Fri, Mar 16, 10am-12pm * Wed, Mar 21, 12-2pm * Fri, Mar 30, 10am-12pm

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CES Interview Techniques Workshops: * Fri, Mar 23, 11am-1:30pm * Tues, Mar 27, 3-5:30pm

CES Career Portfolios Workshops:

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* Mon, Mar 19, 10-11:30am * Wed, Mar 28, 10-11:30am

Visit our website www.uleth.ca/ross/ces and click on the student section to find the CES online job board!

Summer Postings • •

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Camp Councilors and Camp Specialist, Various Locations ~ Canadian Camp Staff (May 31) Christian Summer Camp Staff for Underprivileged Kids Camp, Evansburg ~ Brightwood Ranch (May 31) Invasive Weed Management Technician, Prince George/Peach Region BC ~ Spectrum Resource Group Inc (March 31) Ecosystem Ecology Summer Field Research Assistant, Leth ~ UofL (Mar 31) JFR Crew Leader/Sub Leader ~ Sustainable Resource Development (Mar 30) Program Leader/Camp Counselor; Program Coodinator; Assistant Program Coordinator; Camp Cook; Dining Hall Steward; Program Coordinator/Camp Ranger ~ The Bert Sheppard Scout Reserve (Apr 2) Art/Drama Camp Instructors, Leth ~ University of Lethbridge (Mar 16) Curatorial & Program Assistant, Claresholm ~ Town of Claresholm (Apr 13)

Crop Scout Assistant, Carseland ~ Crop Production Services (Mar 17) Archaeological Assistant, Cgy ~ TERA Environmental Consultants (Mar 17) Canadian Angus Summer Internships, Various Locations ~ Canadian Angus Association (Mar 18) Seasonal Problem Wildlife Control Worker, Cgy ~ Eagle Creek Wildlife Control (Mar 23) Summer Resource Technician, Camrose ~ Ducks Unlimited (Mar 20) OSI Project Assistant, Edm ~ Alberta Office of Statistics & Information (Mar 23) Watershed Education & Stewardship Outreach Assistant, Red Deer ~ RDRWA (Mar 16) Clubhouse Staff, Leth ~ Henderson Lake Golf Club (Mar 17) Summer Camp Counsellor, Cgy ~ Leighton Art Centre (Apr 27) Product Development Technician, AB/SK/MB ~ Syngenta (Mar 31) Admin Support, Leth ~ Lethbridge College (Mar 16) Desktop Upgrade Tech, Leth ~ Lethbridge College (Mar 23) Summer Head Housekeeper; Summer Lead Cleaners; Residence Cleaners, Leth ~ Lethbridge College (Mar 20) Horticulture/Landscaping; Tourist Information, Pincher Creek ~ Pincher Creek & District Historical Society (Apr 23) Summer Youth Coordinator; Community Program Coordinator, Fort MacLeod ~ FM FCSS (Mar 31) Summer Student/Assistant, Cgy ~ Time Is Money Executive Concierge Inc (Apr 2) Reservation & Campground Attendant, Kananaskis ~ Sundance Lodges (May 1) Visitor Services Attendant, Waterton Park ~ Park Canada (Mar 23) Summer Storm Student – Claims, Leth ~ The Co-operators (Mar 25) Archaeological Field Technician, Cranbrook ~ Tipi Mountain EcoCultural Services (Mar 31) Alberta Student Ministerial Interns, Cgy/Edm ~ Government of Alberta (Mar 26) HR Summer Student, Cgy ~ Savanna Energy (Mar 19)

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PART-TIME • • • • • • •

Nanny/Babysitter, Various Locations ~ SOS Sitter (Jun 8) Gas Price Surveyor, Leth ~ Market Planning Solutions Inc (Mar 16) Sales/Productions Associate, Leth ~ CertaPro Painters (Mar 17) Tutors Required – all subjects, all levels, Leth ~ First Tutors (Mar 18) Relief Staff, Leth ~ Lethbridge Family Services (Mar 31) Brand Ambassadors, Leth ~ Signature Group Marketing (Mar 23) Registered Nurse (Mar 15); Registered Nurse AcuteCare/ ER (Mar 23); Registered Nurse AcuteCare (Mar 30), Provost ~ Alberta Health Services Office Manager, Leth ~ Lethbridge Lifelong Learning Association (Mar 21)

FULL TIME • • • • •

Crop Scout, Leth ~ Parrish and Heimbecker (Apr 20) Flash Content Creator, Cgy ~ eCompliance (Apr 1) MS Project Expert/Administrator ~ RFT (Mar 16) Addiction/Mental Health Counsellor, Cgy ~ Primary Care Network (Mar 26) Forage Marketer, Leth ~ Willbur-Ellis

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Company (Mar 23) Sales Trainee, Melbourne/Tilbury/ Rosetown/Vegreville ~ Cargill (Mar 2) Cereals Research Associate, AB/SK ~ Syngenta (Mar 31) Psychologist & Assistant Psychologist, Various Locations ~ Correctional Service of Canada (Apr 30) Executive Team Leader, Various Locations ~ Target (Mar 27) Project Manager; Surveyor; Estimator, Cgy ~ Kidco Construction (May 31) Operations Lead, Lloydminster ~ C2 Farms (Mar 31) Agronomist ~ Sanderson & Associates (Apr 19) Structural Drafting Technologist, Leth ~ Read Jones Christofferson LTD (Mar 16) Crop Production Advisor, Shaunavon/North Battleford ~ Crop Production Services (Mar 17) F.E.I.A. Cultural Technician Assistant ~ Piikani Nation (Mar 16) Leadership Development Program, Cgy/Edm ~ Crane Supply (Mar 23) Entry Level Manager, Edm/Cgy ~ WIS International (Mar 30) Inventory Coordinator, Edm/ London; Maintenance, Edm/ Halifax;Quality Control Tech, Creston; Site Logistics Manager, Creston ~ Labatt (Mar 24) Business Development Manager, Leth ~ BlackBridge Networks (Mar 25) Registered Nurse/Registered Psychiatric Nurse, Camrose ~ Bethany Group (Mar 28) Programmer Analyst, Cgy ~ Telvent (Mar 29) Peace Officer, Nisku ~ Leduc County (Mar 19) Buyer, Cgy ~ Bell Helicopter Textron Canada (Mar 30) Forage & Livestock Agronomist, Westlock ~ Gateway Research Organization (Mar 23) Support Center Technician, Cgy ~ DataDrill Communications (May 31) Instructional Technology Manager, Leth ~ Lethbridge College (Apr 4) Java C++ Junior Developer; CATIA V5 Junior Consultant, Seattle ~ PCO Innovation (Apr 4) Web & Graphic Designer, Cgy ~ HireGround Software Solutions (Apr 4) Independent Contract-Agency Operator, Leth ~ Avis Budget Group (Mar 31) Women’s Basketball Coach, Leth ~ University of Lethbridge (Mar 21) Field Sales Representative, Edm/ Red Deer ~ Kraft Canada (Apr 5) Transportation Coordinator, Hanna ~ Prairie Land Regional Division No

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25 (Mar 30) Educational Technologies Liaison, Edm ~ NorQuest College (Apr 6) GIS Technician, Cgy ~ H2Safety Services (Apr 7) Business Development Consultant ~ Western Union Business Solutions (Apr 7) Social Development Director ~ Piikani Nation (Mar 30) Field Sales Rep, Cgy ~ Kraft Canada (Apr 8) Daycare Jobs, Halifax ~ Scotia Personnel (Apr 9)

Temporary • • • • • • • •

Customer Service Representative, Shaunavon ~ Crop Production Services (Mar 17) Revenue Accountant, Leth ~ Holy Spirit Catholic Schools (Mar 23) Education Program Assistant, Pincher Creek ~ Pincher Creek & District Historical Society (Apr 23) Junior Recruitment Consultant, Edm ~ City of Edmonton (Mar 17) Technical Specialist III, Leth ~ University of Lethbridge (Mar 23) Technical Specialist IV, Leth ~ University of Lethbridge (Mar 16) HR Associate, Cgy ~ The City of Calgary (Mar 19) Field Sales Representative, Edm/ Cgy ~ Kraft Canada (Apr 9)

INTERNATIONAL • • • • • • • • •

China Internship ~ CCRC Asia (Apr 4) International & Intercultural Internship Program ~ CACHA (Mar 16) ESL Teacher, Taiwan ~ KNS Language Institute (May 1) Youth Ambassador, Tanzania ~ Youth Challenge International (Mar 16) Teach English in South Korea, South Korea ~ Eagle Consulting (May 31) English (ESL) Teacher, South Korea ~ Neo Education (May 31) ESL Teacher, South Korea ~ Dreamworks Recruiting (May 1) Youth Ambassador, Guyana ~ Youth Challenge International (Mar 30) Au Pair in US; Childrens Camps 2012 ~ Scotia Personnel (Apr 9)

For details of the postings and information on the application processes go to www.uleth.ca/ross/ces and click on the student section to see the job board.



The Meliorist Volume 45, Issue 24