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Page 1

Autumn 2019 / Spring 2020

On your

bike Best stays

D I S C OV E R J E R S E Y ’ S BEST CYCLE ROUTES

ON THE SOUTH COAST

HOT SHOTS D I S C OV E R A N E W VIEW OF THE CHANNEL ISLANDS

PLUS

GIN GIN

E N J OY A TA S T E OF GUERNSEY

Road trips St Malo

Monkey business

Alison Cronin MBE serious about saving apes

C O F F E E C U LT U R E • N U D E F O O D • I T ’ S A D O G ’ S L I F E • S A R K ’ S C H O C O L AT E D E L I G H T • C H A N N E L I S L A N D P H OTO S P OT S & M O R E


USE YOUR PHONE LIKE YOU DO AT HOME

Don’t let expensive roaming charges spoil your holiday. With JT, you can relax and use your phone just like you would at home, and only pay local rates. Dune - Iridescent mother of pearl with a classic silhouette. Collection from £35.

ST HELIER | ST OUEN | GOREY

Start saving when you switch to the Island’s FASTEST mobile network.* www.jtglobal.com/roaming *Based on Ookla’s analysis of Speedtest Intelligence data for Q2-Q3 2018. www.speedtest.net/awards/mobile. Charges still apply to receive calls. T&Cs apply.


USE YOUR PHONE LIKE YOU DO AT HOME

Don’t let expensive roaming charges spoil your holiday. With JT, you can relax and use your phone just like you would at home, and only pay local rates. Dune - Iridescent mother of pearl with a classic silhouette. Collection from £35.

ST HELIER | ST OUEN | GOREY

Start saving when you switch to the Island’s FASTEST mobile network.* www.jtglobal.com/roaming *Based on Ookla’s analysis of Speedtest Intelligence data for Q2-Q3 2018. www.speedtest.net/awards/mobile. Charges still apply to receive calls. T&Cs apply.


contents

Welcome aboard

Thank you for choosing to travel with Condor Ferries and I hope you enjoy your crossing with us today. This summer has seen us carry hundreds of thousands of passengers and vehicles as we link the Channel Islands with St Malo in Brittany and Poole and Portsmouth in the UK. Our freight teams are also ever present, 365 days per year, keeping the islands supplied with our everyday consumption needs. As we enter the quieter seasons of the year, Condor is still very busy behind the scenes. All four ships are spending time in dry dock over the next few months to undergo routine maintenance. This is all part of an overall programme of investing more than £7 million annually to ensure the fleet is ready for the peak times of the year.

Condor is focused on listening to our customers and working very hard to improve services.

As a regular traveller myself I would welcome the opportunity to talk to you and hear your comments on how we are performing. Passengers also receive a survey by email after they travel and if you complete this, it allows us to assess how we are doing and to make further improvements. Your feedback really does make a difference. I hope you will find features that interest you in this, our latest on-board magazine and would thank you again for choosing Condor Ferries.

18

Jersey highlights

20

Two wheeling

Explore Jersey’s best cycle routes

24

Jersey cow girl

Becky Houzé on her cows and Instagram

32

Full of beans

Jersey’s growing coffee culture

36

Nude food

Food with a conscience

42 Paul Luxon CEO

Jersey photo spots

Photographer, Cameron Aird tells us where

48

68

52

70

Guernsey’s own homegrown gin

Easy road trips from the city

Guernsey highlights Gin, glorious gin

St Malo highlights Beyond St Malo

54

72

Dog-friendly Guernsey

Discover this revered region

The pawfect holiday

56

‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society’

Champagne

74

Discover St Malo What’s on inside the walls

78

Dorset highlights

80

Alex Thomson

His Vendee Globe challenge

82

Boutique stays

Choice boltholes on the south coast

86

Alison Cronin MBE Monkey World founder talks about her work

Walk through the film

62

Meet Caragh

Sark’s amazing chocolatier

88-89

Safety onboard

64

Guernsey photo spots Photographer, Marc Le Cornu tells us where

Good Times Onboard Magazine 2019 Edition. Published in co-operation with Condor Ferries by Walker Agency Ltd, Wootton Mount, Bournemouth BH1 1PJ Tel: +44 (0)1202 414200 Email: annalea@walkeragency.co.uk Advertising and Sales The Marketing Bureau Tel: +44 (0)1534 504800 Copyright Walker Agency. Original material published in this magazine may not be reproduced without written permission from the publishers. The publishers accept no responsibility for claims made in any advertisement appearing in this publication and reserve the right to accept or refuse advertisements at their discretion. While every attempt is made for accuracy of information, the publishers accept no responsibility for errors, inaccuracies or omissions. 4 | Welcome aboard

Contents | 5


contents

Welcome aboard

Thank you for choosing to travel with Condor Ferries and I hope you enjoy your crossing with us today. This summer has seen us carry hundreds of thousands of passengers and vehicles as we link the Channel Islands with St Malo in Brittany and Poole and Portsmouth in the UK. Our freight teams are also ever present, 365 days per year, keeping the islands supplied with our everyday consumption needs. As we enter the quieter seasons of the year, Condor is still very busy behind the scenes. All four ships are spending time in dry dock over the next few months to undergo routine maintenance. This is all part of an overall programme of investing more than £7 million annually to ensure the fleet is ready for the peak times of the year.

Condor is focused on listening to our customers and working very hard to improve services.

As a regular traveller myself I would welcome the opportunity to talk to you and hear your comments on how we are performing. Passengers also receive a survey by email after they travel and if you complete this, it allows us to assess how we are doing and to make further improvements. Your feedback really does make a difference. I hope you will find features that interest you in this, our latest on-board magazine and would thank you again for choosing Condor Ferries.

18

Jersey highlights

20

Two wheeling

Explore Jersey’s best cycle routes

24

Jersey cow girl

Becky Houzé on her cows and Instagram

32

Full of beans

Jersey’s growing coffee culture

36

Nude food

Food with a conscience

42 Paul Luxon CEO

Jersey photo spots

Photographer, Cameron Aird tells us where

48

68

52

70

Guernsey’s own homegrown gin

Easy road trips from the city

Guernsey highlights Gin, glorious gin

St Malo highlights Beyond St Malo

54

72

Dog-friendly Guernsey

Discover this revered region

The pawfect holiday

56

‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society’

Champagne

74

Discover St Malo What’s on inside the walls

78

Dorset highlights

80

Alex Thomson

His Vendee Globe challenge

82

Boutique stays

Choice boltholes on the south coast

86

Alison Cronin MBE Monkey World founder talks about her work

Walk through the film

62

Meet Caragh

Sark’s amazing chocolatier

88-89

Safety onboard

64

Guernsey photo spots Photographer, Marc Le Cornu tells us where

Good Times Onboard Magazine 2019 Edition. Published in co-operation with Condor Ferries by Walker Agency Ltd, Wootton Mount, Bournemouth BH1 1PJ Tel: +44 (0)1202 414200 Email: annalea@walkeragency.co.uk Advertising and Sales The Marketing Bureau Tel: +44 (0)1534 504800 Copyright Walker Agency. Original material published in this magazine may not be reproduced without written permission from the publishers. The publishers accept no responsibility for claims made in any advertisement appearing in this publication and reserve the right to accept or refuse advertisements at their discretion. While every attempt is made for accuracy of information, the publishers accept no responsibility for errors, inaccuracies or omissions. 4 | Welcome aboard

Contents | 5


onboard

WIFI

good times startonboard Refresh yourself There’s no better way to start your getaway than with that first ‘phew! We’re on holiday’ drink, but whatever you fancy when you get onboard we’re sure to have it covered, from hot and cold drinks at our bars and coffee shops to traditional breakfasts, hot meals and delicious snacks served at the Bistro and Brasserie.

Free 30 mins or 100mb No activation code required

or upgrade to high-speed high-speed

high-speed

high-speed

100MB

200MB

500MB

BROWSE (up to 50 web pages)

BROWSE (up to 100 web pages)

BROWSE (up to 250 web pages)

STREAMING VIDEO (10 mins)

STREAMING VIDEO (20 mins)

STREAMING VIDEO (40 mins)

STREAMING MUSIC (1hr)

STREAMING MUSIC (2hrs)

STREAMING MUSIC (5hrs)

£4.99

£9.99

£19.99

We’re committed to making your journey a memorable part of your time away. With a great range of food and drinks, a fantastic duty free shop with the biggest deals and high speed Wi-Fi, you’ll have no trouble easing straight into your holiday.

Retail therapy Browse our onboard duty free shop, packed with big savings on the latest fragrances, big brand wines and spirits, top tech, accessories, tobacco and much more. It’s genuine duty free so you’ll save up to 40% off UK high street prices plus there’s many other seasonal offers and multi-buy deals. Something for the kids We’ve catered for the kids, literally, with a special kid’s menu but there’s more; a chill out zone where they can watch the latest films, onboard Wi-Fi to keep them connected to their games and apps or a visit to the observation deck to spot some marine life. Plus, our onboard shop has lots of pocket money toys like colouring books, Lego and beanie toys. Upgrade your space You might fancy treating yourself to a seat upgrade once you step onboard and into that carefree holiday mood. Check out availability with the cabin manager. Read on to find out more

The above data usage has been based on average estimations and is for guidance only.

Purchase from Ocean Bar on Condor Rapide, and from the Information Desk on Condor Clipper and Condor Liberation. Subject to availability. Vouchers expire 24 hours after activation and any remaining data allowance is forfeited. Usage estimates are dependent on the quality and limit of the data package. Good times start onboard | 7


onboard

WIFI

good times startonboard Refresh yourself There’s no better way to start your getaway than with that first ‘phew! We’re on holiday’ drink, but whatever you fancy when you get onboard we’re sure to have it covered, from hot and cold drinks at our bars and coffee shops to traditional breakfasts, hot meals and delicious snacks served at the Bistro and Brasserie.

Free 30 mins or 100mb No activation code required

or upgrade to high-speed high-speed

high-speed

high-speed

100MB

200MB

500MB

BROWSE (up to 50 web pages)

BROWSE (up to 100 web pages)

BROWSE (up to 250 web pages)

STREAMING VIDEO (10 mins)

STREAMING VIDEO (20 mins)

STREAMING VIDEO (40 mins)

STREAMING MUSIC (1hr)

STREAMING MUSIC (2hrs)

STREAMING MUSIC (5hrs)

£4.99

£9.99

£19.99

We’re committed to making your journey a memorable part of your time away. With a great range of food and drinks, a fantastic duty free shop with the biggest deals and high speed Wi-Fi, you’ll have no trouble easing straight into your holiday.

Retail therapy Browse our onboard duty free shop, packed with big savings on the latest fragrances, big brand wines and spirits, top tech, accessories, tobacco and much more. It’s genuine duty free so you’ll save up to 40% off UK high street prices plus there’s many other seasonal offers and multi-buy deals. Something for the kids We’ve catered for the kids, literally, with a special kid’s menu but there’s more; a chill out zone where they can watch the latest films, onboard Wi-Fi to keep them connected to their games and apps or a visit to the observation deck to spot some marine life. Plus, our onboard shop has lots of pocket money toys like colouring books, Lego and beanie toys. Upgrade your space You might fancy treating yourself to a seat upgrade once you step onboard and into that carefree holiday mood. Check out availability with the cabin manager. Read on to find out more

The above data usage has been based on average estimations and is for guidance only.

Purchase from Ocean Bar on Condor Rapide, and from the Information Desk on Condor Clipper and Condor Liberation. Subject to availability. Vouchers expire 24 hours after activation and any remaining data allowance is forfeited. Usage estimates are dependent on the quality and limit of the data package. Good times start onboard | 7


AIRLINE STYLE L SEATS

O

U

N

PRE-ASSIGNED G E SEATING

FAMILY FRIENDLY

Condor Liberation Enjoy panoramic sea views as you relax in your recliner or table seat. In the Horizon Lounge, you can purchase light refreshments from the exclusive Horizon bar. Plus, make use of the high-speed Wi-Fi which is available to purchase on the day. RECLINING SEATS AVAILABLE

AIRLINE STYLE SEATS

AIRLINE STYLE SEATS

RECLINING SEATS RECLINING SEATS AVAILABLE AVAILABLE

PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING

PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

FAMILY FRIENDLY

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

SECURE KEYPAD FAMILY FRIENDLY ENTRY

EASY ACCESS

AIRLINE STYLE LEATHER RECLINING PANORAMIC VIEW PANORAMIC VIEW SEATS SEATS

PANORAMIC VIEW

200MB WIFI ALLOWANCE

WELCOME EASY ACCESS DRINK

EXCLUSIVE POWER SUPPLY BAR POWERPRE-ASSIGNED SUPPLY SEATING

FAMILY FRIENDLY STEWARD SERVICE

EA

Inter-Island Channel Islands/UK SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

LEATHER RECLININGLEATHER RECLINING SEATS SEATS

SECURE ENTRY

SECURE ENTRY

AIRLINE STYLE SEATS

£7.95

RECLINING SEATS SECURE 200MBAVAILABLE WIFI 200MB WIFI ENTRY ALLOWANCE ALLOWANCE

WELCOME DRINK WELCOME DRINK

EXCLUSIVE BAR

EXCLUSIVE BAR

COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS SNACKS

upgrade ? today why not

Ask about availability on today’s sailing.

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

200MB WIFI ALLOWANCE

COM N

LEATHER RECLINING COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY SEATS TEA & COFFEE TEA & COFFEE

EXCLUSIVE BAR LUXURY AMENITY KIT LUXURY AMENITY KIT

STEWARD SERVICE

EXC

EASY PRE-ASSIGNED ACCESS SEATING

C

There’s a choice of seating when you travel high speed with us, and whichever you choose you’re guaranteed a comfortable pre-assigned seat. SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

On our conventional service there’s also a range of options including reclining seats and comfortable cabins.

L

FAMILY FRIENDLY

A

COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS

S

S

COMPLIMENTARY TEA & COFFEE

Condor Liberation & Condor Rapide

RECLINING SEATS PANORAMIC VIEW PRE-ASSIGNED AVAILABLE PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING SEATING

AIRLINEAIRLINE STYLE STYLE SEATS SEATS

RECLINING RECLINING SEATS SEATS AIRLINE STYLE WELCOME DRINK AVAILABLE AVAILABLE SEATS

SEATS POWERTABLE SUPPLY FRIENDLY FAMILYFAMILY FRIENDLY AVAILABLE

PANORAMIC VIEW EASY ACCESS EASY ACCESS

Dedicated Club Class hosts will offer you a welcome drink and show you to your luxury table seat. Relax in exclusive surroundings with the help of our amenity kits. And, you’ll stay connected throughout your journey with the complimentary 200MB Wi-Fi.

TABLE SEATS SECURE TABLE SEATS PRE-ASSIGNED 200MB WIFIKEYPAD AVAILABLE ENTRY AVAILABLE SEATING ALLOWANCE

WELCOME PANORAMIC DRINK VIEW VIEW FAMILYPANORAMIC FRIENDLY COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS

POWER 200MB WIFIPOWER SUPPLYSUPPLY EASY ACCESS ALLOWANCE

EA

LUXUR

PO

COM NE

LEATHER RECLINING AIRLINE STYLE SEATS SEATS

SEATS TABLE SEATS VIEW LEATHER RECLINING EXCLUSIVE BAR FAMILY STEWARD SERVICE MENUPANORAMIC EXCLUSIVE BARRECLINING AIRLINE STYLE PRE-ASSIGNED PRE-ASSIGNED FAMILY FRIENDLY EASY ACCESS WIFI SECURE WELCOME 200MB200MB WIFI FRIENDLY SECURE KEYPADKEYPAD DRINK DRINK EXCLUSIVE AVAILABLE AVAILABLE SEATS WELCOME SEATS SEATING SEATING ALLOWANCE ALLOWANCE ENTRY ENTRY

POWER SUPPLY STEWARD SERVICE EASY ACCESS COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS NEWSPAPERS

EXC

RECLINING SEATS SECURE ENTRY AVAILABLE

RECLINING SEATS PANORAMIC TABLE PANORAMIC VIEW SECURE ENTRY COMPLIMENTARY POWER SUPPLYKIT TABLE SEATS LEATHER VIEW LEATHER RECLINING STEWARD EXCLUSIVE BAR LUXURY AMENITY COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY 200MB WIFI SERVICE WELCOME DRINK SECURE KEYPAD RECLINING STEWARD SERVICE EXCLUSIVE BARSEATS AIRLINE STYLE PRE-ASSIGNED FAMILY FRIENDLY AVAILABLE AVAILABLE SNACKS AVAILABLE SEATS SNACKS TEA & COFFEE ALLOWANCE ENTRY SEATS SEATS SEATING

POWER SUPPLY COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY EXCLUSIVE MENU EXCLUSIVE MENU EASY TEA &ACCESS COFFEENEWSPAPERS

LUXUR

Upgrade to the Horizon Lounge on Condor Liberation and you’ll set sail in style with panoramic views at the front of the ship, and a private bar serving snacks and drinks. You can choose seats arranged around a table or recliners with tray tables. SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

LEATHER RECLINING SECURE ENTRY SECURE WELCOME DRINK SECURE ENTRYKEYPAD RECLINING SEATS SEATS ENTRY AVAILABLE

For the ultimate experience in luxury and comfort why not upgrade to Club Class. Available on Condor Liberation and Condor Rapide, this private lounge features roomy leather reclining seats, arranged around spacious tables. You’ll also enjoy steward service, a welcome drink and complimentary tea and coffee throughout your journey. LEATHER RECLINING SEATS

SECURE ENTRY

SERVICE EXCLUSIVE BAR DRINK COMPLIMENTARYSTEWARD COMPLIMENTARY 200MB WIFI WELCOME 200MB WIFI SEATS COMPLIMENTARY TABLE PANORAMICCOMPLIMENTARY VIEW COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS SNACKS TEA & COFFEE ALLOWANCE ALLOWANCE SNACKS TEA & COFFEE AVAILABLE

COMPLIMENTARY LEATHER RECLINING SNACKS SEATS

All upgrade seats feature their own power supply for recharging your devices.

Channel Islands/France

per person each way

per person each way

Commodore Clipper is our year round conventional service connecting the UK and the Channel Islands. There’s Club Class reclining seat lounge, and a choice of comfortable cabins. When travelling overnight you’ll need to include a reclining seat or cabin in your plans, but book early as they are very popular!

£37.95

SECURE ENTRY

EXCLUSIVE MENU COMPLIMENTARY LUXURY AMENITY KIT LUXURY AMENITY KIT POWER SUPPLY NEWSPAPERS

Channel Islands/UK

LEATHER RECLINING STEWARD SERVICE COMPLIMENTARY STEWARD SERVICE EXCLUSIVE BAR EXCLUSIVE MENUCOMPLIMENTARY ENTRY EXCLUSIVE BAR SECURE 200MB WIFITEA & COFFEE SECURE KEYPAD WELCOME DRINK SNACKS SEATS ALLOWANCE ENTRY

SECURE ENTRY

COMPLIMENTARY EXCLUSIVE BAR TEA & COFFEE

£21.95

COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS

£24.95

COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY LUXURY AMENITYSERVICE KIT STEWARD SNACKS TEA & COFFEE

Liberation Inter-Island

per personCOMPLIMENTARY TEA & COFFEE each way

EXCLUSIVE LUXURY AMENITY KITMENU COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS

EXCLUSIVE MENU LUXURY AMENITY KIT

Rapide Inter-Island

£21.95

LUXURY AMENITY KIT per person each way

Upgrade prices are subject to change. Please check with a Cabin Manager for the latest prices and availability. 8 | Article Why not upgrade today?

PO

WELCOME EXCLUSIVE MENU DRINK EXCLUSIVE MENU

STYLE FAMILYAIRLINE FRIENDLY SEATS

PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING

PANORAMIC VIEW COMPLIMENTARY TEA & COFFEE

per person each way

SECURE KEYPAD STEWARD SERVICE STEWARD SERVICE ENTRY

SECURE ENTRY

RECLINING SEATS AVAILABLE

£12.95

TABLE SEATS COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY AVAILABLE SNACKS NEWSPAPERS NEWSPAPERS

per person each way

Article | 9


AIRLINE STYLE L SEATS

O

U

N

PRE-ASSIGNED G E SEATING

FAMILY FRIENDLY

Condor Liberation Enjoy panoramic sea views as you relax in your recliner or table seat. In the Horizon Lounge, you can purchase light refreshments from the exclusive Horizon bar. Plus, make use of the high-speed Wi-Fi which is available to purchase on the day. RECLINING SEATS AVAILABLE

AIRLINE STYLE SEATS

AIRLINE STYLE SEATS

RECLINING SEATS RECLINING SEATS AVAILABLE AVAILABLE

PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING

PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

FAMILY FRIENDLY

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

SECURE KEYPAD FAMILY FRIENDLY ENTRY

EASY ACCESS

AIRLINE STYLE LEATHER RECLINING PANORAMIC VIEW PANORAMIC VIEW SEATS SEATS

PANORAMIC VIEW

200MB WIFI ALLOWANCE

WELCOME EASY ACCESS DRINK

EXCLUSIVE POWER SUPPLY BAR POWERPRE-ASSIGNED SUPPLY SEATING

FAMILY FRIENDLY STEWARD SERVICE

EA

Inter-Island Channel Islands/UK SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

LEATHER RECLININGLEATHER RECLINING SEATS SEATS

SECURE ENTRY

SECURE ENTRY

AIRLINE STYLE SEATS

£7.95

RECLINING SEATS SECURE 200MBAVAILABLE WIFI 200MB WIFI ENTRY ALLOWANCE ALLOWANCE

WELCOME DRINK WELCOME DRINK

EXCLUSIVE BAR

EXCLUSIVE BAR

COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS SNACKS

upgrade ? today why not

Ask about availability on today’s sailing.

TABLE SEATS AVAILABLE

200MB WIFI ALLOWANCE

COM N

LEATHER RECLINING COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY SEATS TEA & COFFEE TEA & COFFEE

EXCLUSIVE BAR LUXURY AMENITY KIT LUXURY AMENITY KIT

STEWARD SERVICE

EXC

EASY PRE-ASSIGNED ACCESS SEATING

C

There’s a choice of seating when you travel high speed with us, and whichever you choose you’re guaranteed a comfortable pre-assigned seat. SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

On our conventional service there’s also a range of options including reclining seats and comfortable cabins.

L

FAMILY FRIENDLY

A

COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS

S

S

COMPLIMENTARY TEA & COFFEE

Condor Liberation & Condor Rapide

RECLINING SEATS PANORAMIC VIEW PRE-ASSIGNED AVAILABLE PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING SEATING

AIRLINEAIRLINE STYLE STYLE SEATS SEATS

RECLINING RECLINING SEATS SEATS AIRLINE STYLE WELCOME DRINK AVAILABLE AVAILABLE SEATS

SEATS POWERTABLE SUPPLY FRIENDLY FAMILYFAMILY FRIENDLY AVAILABLE

PANORAMIC VIEW EASY ACCESS EASY ACCESS

Dedicated Club Class hosts will offer you a welcome drink and show you to your luxury table seat. Relax in exclusive surroundings with the help of our amenity kits. And, you’ll stay connected throughout your journey with the complimentary 200MB Wi-Fi.

TABLE SEATS SECURE TABLE SEATS PRE-ASSIGNED 200MB WIFIKEYPAD AVAILABLE ENTRY AVAILABLE SEATING ALLOWANCE

WELCOME PANORAMIC DRINK VIEW VIEW FAMILYPANORAMIC FRIENDLY COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS

POWER 200MB WIFIPOWER SUPPLYSUPPLY EASY ACCESS ALLOWANCE

EA

LUXUR

PO

COM NE

LEATHER RECLINING AIRLINE STYLE SEATS SEATS

SEATS TABLE SEATS VIEW LEATHER RECLINING EXCLUSIVE BAR FAMILY STEWARD SERVICE MENUPANORAMIC EXCLUSIVE BARRECLINING AIRLINE STYLE PRE-ASSIGNED PRE-ASSIGNED FAMILY FRIENDLY EASY ACCESS WIFI SECURE WELCOME 200MB200MB WIFI FRIENDLY SECURE KEYPADKEYPAD DRINK DRINK EXCLUSIVE AVAILABLE AVAILABLE SEATS WELCOME SEATS SEATING SEATING ALLOWANCE ALLOWANCE ENTRY ENTRY

POWER SUPPLY STEWARD SERVICE EASY ACCESS COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS NEWSPAPERS

EXC

RECLINING SEATS SECURE ENTRY AVAILABLE

RECLINING SEATS PANORAMIC TABLE PANORAMIC VIEW SECURE ENTRY COMPLIMENTARY POWER SUPPLYKIT TABLE SEATS LEATHER VIEW LEATHER RECLINING STEWARD EXCLUSIVE BAR LUXURY AMENITY COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY 200MB WIFI SERVICE WELCOME DRINK SECURE KEYPAD RECLINING STEWARD SERVICE EXCLUSIVE BARSEATS AIRLINE STYLE PRE-ASSIGNED FAMILY FRIENDLY AVAILABLE AVAILABLE SNACKS AVAILABLE SEATS SNACKS TEA & COFFEE ALLOWANCE ENTRY SEATS SEATS SEATING

POWER SUPPLY COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY EXCLUSIVE MENU EXCLUSIVE MENU EASY TEA &ACCESS COFFEENEWSPAPERS

LUXUR

Upgrade to the Horizon Lounge on Condor Liberation and you’ll set sail in style with panoramic views at the front of the ship, and a private bar serving snacks and drinks. You can choose seats arranged around a table or recliners with tray tables. SECURE KEYPAD ENTRY

LEATHER RECLINING SECURE ENTRY SECURE WELCOME DRINK SECURE ENTRYKEYPAD RECLINING SEATS SEATS ENTRY AVAILABLE

For the ultimate experience in luxury and comfort why not upgrade to Club Class. Available on Condor Liberation and Condor Rapide, this private lounge features roomy leather reclining seats, arranged around spacious tables. You’ll also enjoy steward service, a welcome drink and complimentary tea and coffee throughout your journey. LEATHER RECLINING SEATS

SECURE ENTRY

SERVICE EXCLUSIVE BAR DRINK COMPLIMENTARYSTEWARD COMPLIMENTARY 200MB WIFI WELCOME 200MB WIFI SEATS COMPLIMENTARY TABLE PANORAMICCOMPLIMENTARY VIEW COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS SNACKS TEA & COFFEE ALLOWANCE ALLOWANCE SNACKS TEA & COFFEE AVAILABLE

COMPLIMENTARY LEATHER RECLINING SNACKS SEATS

All upgrade seats feature their own power supply for recharging your devices.

Channel Islands/France

per person each way

per person each way

Commodore Clipper is our year round conventional service connecting the UK and the Channel Islands. There’s Club Class reclining seat lounge, and a choice of comfortable cabins. When travelling overnight you’ll need to include a reclining seat or cabin in your plans, but book early as they are very popular!

£37.95

SECURE ENTRY

EXCLUSIVE MENU COMPLIMENTARY LUXURY AMENITY KIT LUXURY AMENITY KIT POWER SUPPLY NEWSPAPERS

Channel Islands/UK

LEATHER RECLINING STEWARD SERVICE COMPLIMENTARY STEWARD SERVICE EXCLUSIVE BAR EXCLUSIVE MENUCOMPLIMENTARY ENTRY EXCLUSIVE BAR SECURE 200MB WIFITEA & COFFEE SECURE KEYPAD WELCOME DRINK SNACKS SEATS ALLOWANCE ENTRY

SECURE ENTRY

COMPLIMENTARY EXCLUSIVE BAR TEA & COFFEE

£21.95

COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS

£24.95

COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY LUXURY AMENITYSERVICE KIT STEWARD SNACKS TEA & COFFEE

Liberation Inter-Island

per personCOMPLIMENTARY TEA & COFFEE each way

EXCLUSIVE LUXURY AMENITY KITMENU COMPLIMENTARY NEWSPAPERS

EXCLUSIVE MENU LUXURY AMENITY KIT

Rapide Inter-Island

£21.95

LUXURY AMENITY KIT per person each way

Upgrade prices are subject to change. Please check with a Cabin Manager for the latest prices and availability. 8 | Article Why not upgrade today?

PO

WELCOME EXCLUSIVE MENU DRINK EXCLUSIVE MENU

STYLE FAMILYAIRLINE FRIENDLY SEATS

PRE-ASSIGNED SEATING

PANORAMIC VIEW COMPLIMENTARY TEA & COFFEE

per person each way

SECURE KEYPAD STEWARD SERVICE STEWARD SERVICE ENTRY

SECURE ENTRY

RECLINING SEATS AVAILABLE

£12.95

TABLE SEATS COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY COMPLIMENTARY AVAILABLE SNACKS NEWSPAPERS NEWSPAPERS

per person each way

Article | 9


Feeling

or peckish fancy adrink?

Horizon Lounge on Condor Liberation has its own exclusive bar serving a selection of wines, draught beers, spirits and soft drinks, plus sandwiches, snacks and cakes. Why not upgrade now to enjoy this extra benefit? Casquets Bistro offers a wide selection of refreshments and meals to keep you satisfied. Traditional breakfast Start your day with a tasty full English cooked breakfast or selection of toast and pastries. Main meals From crispy battered cod and chips, delicious handmade Tom’s Pies to gourmet burgers and hot dogs, we promise there’ll be something to whet your appetite. There’s also a choice of lighter bites such as jacket potatoes, panini and sandwiches. Kids meals We know how fussy kids can be, so we created our special ‘Olly’s Kids Menu’ featuring favourite meals we all know our children like, including spaghetti bolognese and fish fingers and chips, and every meal comes with a piece of fresh fruit. There’s also a kid’s packed lunch box option complete with fun colouring activities. Made from plants When you eat or drink with us today, you’ll see we have introduced vegetable-based cutlery and coffee cups made from ‘Vegware’ as part of our aim to reduce the use of plastics onboard.

Onboard today you’ll find a great selection of hot meals, snacks, wines, draught beers, spirits and soft drinks.

Sit back and relax with a refreshing drink. Choose from hot and cold soft drinks or from a selection of wines and spirits. Onboard Condor Liberation, we serve the nation’s favourite Costa Coffee so you can unwind with a freshly brewed latte, cappuccino, Americano, hot chocolate or speciality tea. On Condor Rapide and Condor Clipper our newly refurbished coffee shop, Coast is ready to serve you with a range of teas, freshly brewed coffee, cold drinks and sweet and savoury snacks.

We are aiming to reduce plastic in circulation by 75% over the next three years. Look out for recycling points coming onboard soon. *Menus may vary between ships.

VEGETARIAN & GLUTEN-FREE OPTIONS AVAILABLE. 10 | Feeling peckish

Feeling peckish | 11


Feeling

or peckish fancy adrink?

Horizon Lounge on Condor Liberation has its own exclusive bar serving a selection of wines, draught beers, spirits and soft drinks, plus sandwiches, snacks and cakes. Why not upgrade now to enjoy this extra benefit? Casquets Bistro offers a wide selection of refreshments and meals to keep you satisfied. Traditional breakfast Start your day with a tasty full English cooked breakfast or selection of toast and pastries. Main meals From crispy battered cod and chips, delicious handmade Tom’s Pies to gourmet burgers and hot dogs, we promise there’ll be something to whet your appetite. There’s also a choice of lighter bites such as jacket potatoes, panini and sandwiches. Kids meals We know how fussy kids can be, so we created our special ‘Olly’s Kids Menu’ featuring favourite meals we all know our children like, including spaghetti bolognese and fish fingers and chips, and every meal comes with a piece of fresh fruit. There’s also a kid’s packed lunch box option complete with fun colouring activities. Made from plants When you eat or drink with us today, you’ll see we have introduced vegetable-based cutlery and coffee cups made from ‘Vegware’ as part of our aim to reduce the use of plastics onboard.

Onboard today you’ll find a great selection of hot meals, snacks, wines, draught beers, spirits and soft drinks.

Sit back and relax with a refreshing drink. Choose from hot and cold soft drinks or from a selection of wines and spirits. Onboard Condor Liberation, we serve the nation’s favourite Costa Coffee so you can unwind with a freshly brewed latte, cappuccino, Americano, hot chocolate or speciality tea. On Condor Rapide and Condor Clipper our newly refurbished coffee shop, Coast is ready to serve you with a range of teas, freshly brewed coffee, cold drinks and sweet and savoury snacks.

We are aiming to reduce plastic in circulation by 75% over the next three years. Look out for recycling points coming onboard soon. *Menus may vary between ships.

VEGETARIAN & GLUTEN-FREE OPTIONS AVAILABLE. 10 | Feeling peckish

Feeling peckish | 11


onboard

In our onboard shop you’ll find some exclusive products that you won’t find on the high street - perfect for a unique gift.

Onboard beauty consultants

Our aim is to offer big brands at unbeatable tax free or duty free prices. We promise that if you find any of our range on sale at a lower standard price in any UK high street store or supermarket, we will refund the difference.*

At the Adore duty free shop, our beauty consultants are expertly trained in fragrance and beauty, so they can be on hand to assist you in choosing the right skincare or make-up product, keep you up-to-date with the latest fragrance trends, or advise you when choosing a gift for a friend or loved one.

You’ll find a selection of products in ADORE magazine which is located in your seat pocket, but 1000s more in-store!

Making the most of your allowance

Save

40% OFF

up to

shop & gifts Duty free

Our price promise

Not available on the high street

UK prices in our onboard duty free shop Off UK high street prices online September 2019.

Condor Ferries reserves the right to amend or withdraw an offer or product at anytime. Offers subject to availability for a limited period only on selected vessels and while stocks last. Prices and information are correct at the time of going to press. Products shown are not to scale and may vary. *Excludes confectionery. Excludes online only retailers. Claims must be made within 28 days of purchase. Please see our website for full terms and conditions. Just send the details and your proof of purchase to: Condor Ferries Price Promise, Onboard Services, Condor House, New Harbour Road South, Hamworthy, Poole, Dorset BH15 4AJ.

It’s good to know how much duty free each person is permitted to take home, especially with such great savings to be made.

Allowance per person 1 litre

Spirits and Liqueurs

2 litres

or Champagne/port/sherry Wine

6 bottles

Cigarettes

200

or Cigarillos

100 50

or Cigars

250g

or Tobacco Tax free fragrance/skincare/ accessories/gadgets etc

£390 worth

For more details see page 98 in Adore Magazine


onboard

In our onboard shop you’ll find some exclusive products that you won’t find on the high street - perfect for a unique gift.

Onboard beauty consultants

Our aim is to offer big brands at unbeatable tax free or duty free prices. We promise that if you find any of our range on sale at a lower standard price in any UK high street store or supermarket, we will refund the difference.*

At the Adore duty free shop, our beauty consultants are expertly trained in fragrance and beauty, so they can be on hand to assist you in choosing the right skincare or make-up product, keep you up-to-date with the latest fragrance trends, or advise you when choosing a gift for a friend or loved one.

You’ll find a selection of products in ADORE magazine which is located in your seat pocket, but 1000s more in-store!

Making the most of your allowance

Save

40% OFF

up to

shop & gifts Duty free

Our price promise

Not available on the high street

UK prices in our onboard duty free shop Off UK high street prices online September 2019.

Condor Ferries reserves the right to amend or withdraw an offer or product at anytime. Offers subject to availability for a limited period only on selected vessels and while stocks last. Prices and information are correct at the time of going to press. Products shown are not to scale and may vary. *Excludes confectionery. Excludes online only retailers. Claims must be made within 28 days of purchase. Please see our website for full terms and conditions. Just send the details and your proof of purchase to: Condor Ferries Price Promise, Onboard Services, Condor House, New Harbour Road South, Hamworthy, Poole, Dorset BH15 4AJ.

It’s good to know how much duty free each person is permitted to take home, especially with such great savings to be made.

Allowance per person 1 litre

Spirits and Liqueurs

2 litres

or Champagne/port/sherry Wine

6 bottles

Cigarettes

200

or Cigarillos

100 50

or Cigars

250g

or Tobacco Tax free fragrance/skincare/ accessories/gadgets etc

£390 worth

For more details see page 98 in Adore Magazine


C

MMUN

IT

O

Y F U N D

This year so far:

15

Community Fund initiatives supported

island life supporting

It may not be on everyone’s radar, but Condor plays an important role each year helping Channel Islands’ events, charities and other worthy causes. The support we offer includes donating raffle prizes to school PTAs and charity auctions, transporting animals for Jersey Zoo, sailing over the Normandy markets, a fleet of dragon boats, two fun fairs and many acts that entertain the crowds at the various summer shows. As we near the end of 2019, we thought we would give you a flavour. So this year, we set up our first ever Community Fund, providing grants up to £1,500 to social enterprises and individuals across the islands who give up their time to develop community activities.

The funds have been used in a variety of ways. These include providing Jersey Aquatic Rescue with state-ofthe-art manikins for teaching survival and lifesaving skills, equipment for Wellbeing Animals Guernsey for its therapy dogs so the charity can continue supporting vulnerable people locally and waterproof sailing jackets for youngsters who learn to sail with the Guernsey Sailing Trust.

Over

40

Events supported Chelsea Pensioners onboard Condor Liberation

83

Community Fund applications received

Channel Islands league

£5k

Worth of travel vouchers given out as raffle prizes Dragon boat racing

14 | Supporting island life

Sandace


C

MMUN

IT

O

Y F U N D

This year so far:

15

Community Fund initiatives supported

island life supporting

It may not be on everyone’s radar, but Condor plays an important role each year helping Channel Islands’ events, charities and other worthy causes. The support we offer includes donating raffle prizes to school PTAs and charity auctions, transporting animals for Jersey Zoo, sailing over the Normandy markets, a fleet of dragon boats, two fun fairs and many acts that entertain the crowds at the various summer shows. As we near the end of 2019, we thought we would give you a flavour. So this year, we set up our first ever Community Fund, providing grants up to £1,500 to social enterprises and individuals across the islands who give up their time to develop community activities.

The funds have been used in a variety of ways. These include providing Jersey Aquatic Rescue with state-ofthe-art manikins for teaching survival and lifesaving skills, equipment for Wellbeing Animals Guernsey for its therapy dogs so the charity can continue supporting vulnerable people locally and waterproof sailing jackets for youngsters who learn to sail with the Guernsey Sailing Trust.

Over

40

Events supported Chelsea Pensioners onboard Condor Liberation

83

Community Fund applications received

Channel Islands league

£5k

Worth of travel vouchers given out as raffle prizes Dragon boat racing

14 | Supporting island life

Sandace


day’work s all in a

Name: Tatianne Blin Position: Cabin Crew Location: Condor Rapide

Q: Talk us through a day onboard? A: No two days are ever the same. It is a really varied role which involves fulfilling my safety and security duties, marshalling cars on the car deck, showing passengers to their seats and assisting with any of their needs. I love working with our passengers which is why I love my role onboard.

Condor Ferries’ 550-strong work force across four Q: What do you like most ships and five different about your job with Condor? locations is behind A: I love the ambience onboard, it is making your journey also a very exciting role. The structured training means that I have all the tools the best it can be. and techniques I need to do my job. They are instrumental in helping to give our passengers the smoothest and safest journey possible, from initial booking right through to the final crossing home. Cabin crew member, Tatianne gives us an insight.

We work 7 days on, 7 days off, for 12 hours each day, this fits in really well with my lifestyle. We have breathing space in the middle of the day which means I get some time to recharge.

Q: What is your biggest achievement, personal or professional? A: Before I started at Condor I worked as a flight attendant across the three Americas, from Europe. I moved to France and had a baby, and so I quit my job as a flight attendant. Condor

16 | All in a day’s work

Do you fancy being part of something different happening every day? We’re always looking for enthusiastic and dedicated people to join our big friendly team – so get in touch. www.condorferries.com/careers

We’re turning

the tide on plastic

has given me the chance to relive my career while still maintaining my family life. I love my job here and work with some lovely colleagues. Cabin Managers and the Captains are fantastic. My role at Condor allows me to do what I love, which means I am happy professionally and personally, and in turn the passengers are happy.

Q: What is the most important part of your role? A: Safety is the most important part when working onboard a ferry. Being a steward means you are someone who has to know how to ensure your passengers are safe at all times and what to do in an emergency. We do lots of training for the safety aspect of the job, it is the most important part for myself and the crew.

Q: If you could switch jobs with anyone in the company, who would you switch with? A: I would love to be a Captain for just one day - to be responsible for over 750 passengers and crew on a good day with beautiful sunshine!

Condor Ferries is reducing the use of plastic across its fleet of 4 ships which will see one million single use items replaced by compostable and re-usable products from this year. We have already introduced vegetable-based cutlery and coffee cups made from ‘Vegware’ on Condor Liberation, Condor Rapide and Commodore Clipper and are investigating further ways to reduce our plastic footprint. We fully recognise we have a role to play and like most businesses accept there is a way to go to achieve this. Our aim is to reduce the use of plastics by 75% over the next three years and the next step will be to install recycling points onboard along with seaweed packaging and biodegradable water bottles.

We’re turning the tide on plastic | 17


day’work s all in a

Name: Tatianne Blin Position: Cabin Crew Location: Condor Rapide

Q: Talk us through a day onboard? A: No two days are ever the same. It is a really varied role which involves fulfilling my safety and security duties, marshalling cars on the car deck, showing passengers to their seats and assisting with any of their needs. I love working with our passengers which is why I love my role onboard.

Condor Ferries’ 550-strong work force across four Q: What do you like most ships and five different about your job with Condor? locations is behind A: I love the ambience onboard, it is making your journey also a very exciting role. The structured training means that I have all the tools the best it can be. and techniques I need to do my job. They are instrumental in helping to give our passengers the smoothest and safest journey possible, from initial booking right through to the final crossing home. Cabin crew member, Tatianne gives us an insight.

We work 7 days on, 7 days off, for 12 hours each day, this fits in really well with my lifestyle. We have breathing space in the middle of the day which means I get some time to recharge.

Q: What is your biggest achievement, personal or professional? A: Before I started at Condor I worked as a flight attendant across the three Americas, from Europe. I moved to France and had a baby, and so I quit my job as a flight attendant. Condor

16 | All in a day’s work

Do you fancy being part of something different happening every day? We’re always looking for enthusiastic and dedicated people to join our big friendly team – so get in touch. www.condorferries.com/careers

We’re turning

the tide on plastic

has given me the chance to relive my career while still maintaining my family life. I love my job here and work with some lovely colleagues. Cabin Managers and the Captains are fantastic. My role at Condor allows me to do what I love, which means I am happy professionally and personally, and in turn the passengers are happy.

Q: What is the most important part of your role? A: Safety is the most important part when working onboard a ferry. Being a steward means you are someone who has to know how to ensure your passengers are safe at all times and what to do in an emergency. We do lots of training for the safety aspect of the job, it is the most important part for myself and the crew.

Q: If you could switch jobs with anyone in the company, who would you switch with? A: I would love to be a Captain for just one day - to be responsible for over 750 passengers and crew on a good day with beautiful sunshine!

Condor Ferries is reducing the use of plastic across its fleet of 4 ships which will see one million single use items replaced by compostable and re-usable products from this year. We have already introduced vegetable-based cutlery and coffee cups made from ‘Vegware’ on Condor Liberation, Condor Rapide and Commodore Clipper and are investigating further ways to reduce our plastic footprint. We fully recognise we have a role to play and like most businesses accept there is a way to go to achieve this. Our aim is to reduce the use of plastics by 75% over the next three years and the next step will be to install recycling points onboard along with seaweed packaging and biodegradable water bottles.

We’re turning the tide on plastic | 17


J

Jersey highlights

Jersey Zoo Jersey Zoo is ready to welcome the whole family! Get up close with over 132 species of animals from the tiniest fruit bat to the huge gorillas.

Jersey War Tunnels The German occupation of Jersey during WWII is the context for this weaving warren of subterranean rooms and walkways, that tells the story of island resistance and liberation. Mont Orgueil Castle Experience history coming to life at the site which, for 600 years, protected Jersey against French invasion. Pick-a-Pearl in St Ouen It’s not everyday you get to see an oyster shell being opened to reveal your very own Akoya pearl. Enjoy the experience at Jersey Pearl – there’s a showroom, workshop and café too. La Mare Wine Estate In the grounds of an 18th-century granite farmhouse, this 25-acre working estate produces wines, spirits, preserves and confectionery. Tours, tasting and cream teas available. St Catherine’s Bay Lots of small coves to discover and at the northern end is the breakwater, where a walk to the end is breathtaking before popping into the popular Breakwater Café.

Pictures left to right: Jersey Zoo, Jersey War Tunnels, Mont Orgueil Castle, Pick-a-Pearl in St Ouen, La Mare Wine Estate, St Catherine’s Bay. 18 | Jersey highlights


J

Jersey highlights

Jersey Zoo Jersey Zoo is ready to welcome the whole family! Get up close with over 132 species of animals from the tiniest fruit bat to the huge gorillas.

Jersey War Tunnels The German occupation of Jersey during WWII is the context for this weaving warren of subterranean rooms and walkways, that tells the story of island resistance and liberation. Mont Orgueil Castle Experience history coming to life at the site which, for 600 years, protected Jersey against French invasion. Pick-a-Pearl in St Ouen It’s not everyday you get to see an oyster shell being opened to reveal your very own Akoya pearl. Enjoy the experience at Jersey Pearl – there’s a showroom, workshop and café too. La Mare Wine Estate In the grounds of an 18th-century granite farmhouse, this 25-acre working estate produces wines, spirits, preserves and confectionery. Tours, tasting and cream teas available. St Catherine’s Bay Lots of small coves to discover and at the northern end is the breakwater, where a walk to the end is breathtaking before popping into the popular Breakwater Café.

Pictures left to right: Jersey Zoo, Jersey War Tunnels, Mont Orgueil Castle, Pick-a-Pearl in St Ouen, La Mare Wine Estate, St Catherine’s Bay. 18 | Jersey highlights


wheeling

two

As Ernest Hemingway put it, ‘It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best’. Sarah Woods takes a look how Jersey’s 350 miles of cyclable lanes, roads, tracks and byways take you through to its heart. With its capillary network of quiet lanes and country backroads, Jersey is a cyclist’s idyll and offers visitors-in-thesaddle an unequalled sightseeing experience. Walking will always have its place, but cycling allows us to cover a surprising amount of distance in comfort and ease. A car just isn’t the same: boxing us off from such sensory pleasures as human interaction, the wind in our hair, the sounds of birdsong and the salty taste of sea in the air. But a bicycle brings a joyous sense of freedom, a unique kind of carefree exhilaration. With each turn of the pedal, it’s as if the vivid peripheral scenery, together with the miles, passes effortlessly by.

>

20 | Two wheeling

Two wheeling | 21


wheeling

two

As Ernest Hemingway put it, ‘It is by riding a bicycle that you learn the contours of a country best’. Sarah Woods takes a look how Jersey’s 350 miles of cyclable lanes, roads, tracks and byways take you through to its heart. With its capillary network of quiet lanes and country backroads, Jersey is a cyclist’s idyll and offers visitors-in-thesaddle an unequalled sightseeing experience. Walking will always have its place, but cycling allows us to cover a surprising amount of distance in comfort and ease. A car just isn’t the same: boxing us off from such sensory pleasures as human interaction, the wind in our hair, the sounds of birdsong and the salty taste of sea in the air. But a bicycle brings a joyous sense of freedom, a unique kind of carefree exhilaration. With each turn of the pedal, it’s as if the vivid peripheral scenery, together with the miles, passes effortlessly by.

>

20 | Two wheeling

Two wheeling | 21


Plémont

Bonne Nuit h e lier

Greve de Lecq

D1

La Grève dè Lecq

e Ru

Ro La

Ru e

de L’E t

D1 ac

Ro ute d

q

eT

Ro ute

M1

St Mary r ode z

La Ru

St John

Jean aint eS ed ut

de

e d e s Pl

Egypt a nton

s

sI ss ue s

Bouley Bay Rozel

St John’s Manor

e rte Ru La Ve

Trinity

Mo nt Pin el

Rozel Bay

No u Cotes du rd ute d Ro La

A9

es

de

La nd

al Bac

Six of Jersey’s best cycle routes

St John’s Bay

Sorel Rue de V

Rue Es Pico ts

nt

d an e

St Lawrence

in

Mar t

A8

u

a

L

La

B2 6

Route

Rd

Gorey

Ba

ga te

St Helier

A3

St Aubin

Grouville

p Es

3 A1

de

na

la

R La

Rd

Ouaisne Bay

Royal Bay of Grouville

n Do

D1

Rd

Beauport

à

A4

St Brelade’s Bay

re

t on

rb iè e

ue

Lo n g ueville

m Noi r

Rue de la C o

Corbière

A3

A8

A3

St Saviour lle

Av en ue

A1

Qu e nnev ais La Ro ute d e

ent e

Rd n’s ee

St Aubin’s Bay

First Tower Vic tor ia

Qu

Pul

Rd

A1

te d e la

A1

A1

Ro u

B28

o nt

A1

A1 3

A13

B

A13

de

St Brelade

ea um

bin’s St Au

D1

Archirondel

Gra n

E1

A9

Gorey

et

Ro de

i nt Sa de te Maufant

ou

Airport

ute d

al d

A

12

M2

Ro

eF

du Ju b i lié

St Catherine’s Bay

A9

La Grand

A8

D2 Victoria Village Gr

Mo nt

A 12

Milles

St Peter

M2

St Martin

e Rou te de

6A

2 A1

des Route nde Gra

St Ouen’s Bay

La Sait

u re

A

12

Les Mielles Nature Reserve

D2

Fliquet Bay

E2

A9

D2

D1

Durrell Wildlife Park

A8

St Ouen

St Clement

A4

A

4

Portelet

A4

Greve d’Azette A4

Portelet Bay

4

A

A4

D1

D2

In the bright Jersey sunshine, accompanied by the rhythmic soft hum of rubber licking the asphalt, cycling is an exhilarating and joyous way of sightseeing the island. Silence is a cycling zenith and nothing compares to sliding through the lanes just you, a bike, Jersey and the sun-cast shadows of an empty road. No cars, no tooting horns, no choking exhaust fumes: just the scent of blossom and wildflowers and the thrill of self-propulsion of your own legs spin the wheels. Beneath the thin veneer of tarmac, Jersey’s lanes tell the story of its storied past: a drovers’ road for cattle, an ancient path of pilgrimage, or the route of hurried fleeing from German occupation. You’ll pass fruit orchards, fields of flowers, blackberryfilled bramble bushes, pretty timber-beamed cottages, wild, remote woodlands and skinny

roughshod tracks that reach right down to the beach. There will also be plenty of opportunity to snap up fresh produce from roadside stalls, from punnets of freshly picked strawberries, seasonal vegetable crops, local meat, pork and sausages, jams, fruit wines and freshly-dug Jersey Royals. Whether you’re looking to reconnect with nature, get some exercise or simply rediscover the cycling habit, the child-like glee that freewheeling downhill brings is a sure-fire way to give energy levels a boost. Pack a picnic lunch to enjoy under a spreading oak tree, or cool down with a quick dip in a river or the sea: cycling allows an ease of movement that lets you stop, and start, at whim. Jersey is a great island for bicycle exploration with compact

towns, an abundance of cyclable routes, and plenty of sights and attractions that are located a short distance apart. Choose from relaxing, flat cycle routes; challenging off-road cycling; the wild, rugged heights of the northern coast; the wide open spaces of the Jersey National Park and the island’s moon-like tidal landscape - Jersey’s unspoiled island terrain makes it an ideal destination for exploring cyclists. A network of cycle routes is clearly marked and easy to follow with the island’s Green Lanes prioritising pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders over cars and motorists. Byways and bridleways multiply the possibilities, though wider tyres – and mudguards – are sensible choices when venturing off-road.

Cycle routes, maps and guides are available from Tourist Information sites, or can be downloaded from the website, and offer rides of varying distances and degrees of difficulties that include toilet stops and places to buy refreshments. A number of cycle hire shops stock a wide range of size and models, including Big Maggy’s Bike Shop (www.bigmaggys.com), Zebra Cycles (www.zebrahire.com), Jersey Bike Hire at Aaron’s Bikes (www.aaronsbikes.com), Jersey Cyclehire (www.littletrain.co.uk) and Puffin Bike Hire (www.jerseybikehire.com).

M1

M2

E1

E2

St Clement’s Bay

A4

Green Island

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Difficult

Around Island coastal route. Clockwise 40 miles (64km)

6.5 hours

Old Station Café, pubs/cafes at St Aubin’s, Le Braye Café, pubs/ cafés at Greve de Lecq, La Mare Wine Estate, pubs/shops near St John’s Church, pubs/cafés at Rozel Harbour, St Catherine’s Breakwater and pubs/cafés/shops at Gorey Harbour

St Aubin’s Harbour, Corbiére, Le Braye, Geve de Lecq, Rozel Bay and Gorey Harbour

7

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Difficult

Gorey to St Ouen 14.5 miles (23km)

2.25 hours

Pubs/shops at Gorey, La Hougue Bie and Oaklands Lodge

Gorey Harbour, La Hougue Bie and Oaklands Lodge

5

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Medium

St Aubin’s Bay to St John 5 miles (8km)

1.25 hours

The Jersey War Tunnels and pubs/shops near to St John’s Church

The Jersey War Tunnels and pub near St John’s Church

1

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Medium

St Ouen’s Bay to St Aubin’s Bay 4 miles (6.5km)

45 minutes

Pubs/shops near St Peter’s Church

Pubs/shops near St Peter’s Church

1

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Easy

Victoria Village to St Helier 2 miles (3.5km)

15 minutes

Shops en route

-

-

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Easy

Durrell Wildlife Park to St Martin 2 miles (3.5km)

15 minutes

Durrell Wildlife Park and pub/shop near St Martin’s Church

Durrell Wildlife Park and pub near St Martin’s Church

-

Two wheeling | 23


Plémont

Bonne Nuit h e lier

Greve de Lecq

D1

La Grève dè Lecq

e Ru

Ro La

Ru e

de L’E t

D1 ac

Ro ute d

q

eT

Ro ute

M1

St Mary r ode z

La Ru

St John

Jean aint eS ed ut

de

e d e s Pl

Egypt a nton

s

sI ss ue s

Bouley Bay Rozel

St John’s Manor

e rte Ru La Ve

Trinity

Mo nt Pin el

Rozel Bay

No u Cotes du rd ute d Ro La

A9

es

de

La nd

al Bac

Six of Jersey’s best cycle routes

St John’s Bay

Sorel Rue de V

Rue Es Pico ts

nt

d an e

St Lawrence

in

Mar t

A8

u

a

L

La

B2 6

Route

Rd

Gorey

Ba

ga te

St Helier

A3

St Aubin

Grouville

p Es

3 A1

de

na

la

R La

Rd

Ouaisne Bay

Royal Bay of Grouville

n Do

D1

Rd

Beauport

à

A4

St Brelade’s Bay

re

t on

rb iè e

ue

Lo n g ueville

m Noi r

Rue de la C o

Corbière

A3

A8

A3

St Saviour lle

Av en ue

A1

Qu e nnev ais La Ro ute d e

ent e

Rd n’s ee

St Aubin’s Bay

First Tower Vic tor ia

Qu

Pul

Rd

A1

te d e la

A1

A1

Ro u

B28

o nt

A1

A1 3

A13

B

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St Brelade

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Archirondel

Gra n

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M2

Ro

eF

du Ju b i lié

St Catherine’s Bay

A9

La Grand

A8

D2 Victoria Village Gr

Mo nt

A 12

Milles

St Peter

M2

St Martin

e Rou te de

6A

2 A1

des Route nde Gra

St Ouen’s Bay

La Sait

u re

A

12

Les Mielles Nature Reserve

D2

Fliquet Bay

E2

A9

D2

D1

Durrell Wildlife Park

A8

St Ouen

St Clement

A4

A

4

Portelet

A4

Greve d’Azette A4

Portelet Bay

4

A

A4

D1

D2

In the bright Jersey sunshine, accompanied by the rhythmic soft hum of rubber licking the asphalt, cycling is an exhilarating and joyous way of sightseeing the island. Silence is a cycling zenith and nothing compares to sliding through the lanes just you, a bike, Jersey and the sun-cast shadows of an empty road. No cars, no tooting horns, no choking exhaust fumes: just the scent of blossom and wildflowers and the thrill of self-propulsion of your own legs spin the wheels. Beneath the thin veneer of tarmac, Jersey’s lanes tell the story of its storied past: a drovers’ road for cattle, an ancient path of pilgrimage, or the route of hurried fleeing from German occupation. You’ll pass fruit orchards, fields of flowers, blackberryfilled bramble bushes, pretty timber-beamed cottages, wild, remote woodlands and skinny

roughshod tracks that reach right down to the beach. There will also be plenty of opportunity to snap up fresh produce from roadside stalls, from punnets of freshly picked strawberries, seasonal vegetable crops, local meat, pork and sausages, jams, fruit wines and freshly-dug Jersey Royals. Whether you’re looking to reconnect with nature, get some exercise or simply rediscover the cycling habit, the child-like glee that freewheeling downhill brings is a sure-fire way to give energy levels a boost. Pack a picnic lunch to enjoy under a spreading oak tree, or cool down with a quick dip in a river or the sea: cycling allows an ease of movement that lets you stop, and start, at whim. Jersey is a great island for bicycle exploration with compact

towns, an abundance of cyclable routes, and plenty of sights and attractions that are located a short distance apart. Choose from relaxing, flat cycle routes; challenging off-road cycling; the wild, rugged heights of the northern coast; the wide open spaces of the Jersey National Park and the island’s moon-like tidal landscape - Jersey’s unspoiled island terrain makes it an ideal destination for exploring cyclists. A network of cycle routes is clearly marked and easy to follow with the island’s Green Lanes prioritising pedestrians, cyclists and horse riders over cars and motorists. Byways and bridleways multiply the possibilities, though wider tyres – and mudguards – are sensible choices when venturing off-road.

Cycle routes, maps and guides are available from Tourist Information sites, or can be downloaded from the website, and offer rides of varying distances and degrees of difficulties that include toilet stops and places to buy refreshments. A number of cycle hire shops stock a wide range of size and models, including Big Maggy’s Bike Shop (www.bigmaggys.com), Zebra Cycles (www.zebrahire.com), Jersey Bike Hire at Aaron’s Bikes (www.aaronsbikes.com), Jersey Cyclehire (www.littletrain.co.uk) and Puffin Bike Hire (www.jerseybikehire.com).

M1

M2

E1

E2

St Clement’s Bay

A4

Green Island

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Difficult

Around Island coastal route. Clockwise 40 miles (64km)

6.5 hours

Old Station Café, pubs/cafes at St Aubin’s, Le Braye Café, pubs/ cafés at Greve de Lecq, La Mare Wine Estate, pubs/shops near St John’s Church, pubs/cafés at Rozel Harbour, St Catherine’s Breakwater and pubs/cafés/shops at Gorey Harbour

St Aubin’s Harbour, Corbiére, Le Braye, Geve de Lecq, Rozel Bay and Gorey Harbour

7

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Difficult

Gorey to St Ouen 14.5 miles (23km)

2.25 hours

Pubs/shops at Gorey, La Hougue Bie and Oaklands Lodge

Gorey Harbour, La Hougue Bie and Oaklands Lodge

5

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Medium

St Aubin’s Bay to St John 5 miles (8km)

1.25 hours

The Jersey War Tunnels and pubs/shops near to St John’s Church

The Jersey War Tunnels and pub near St John’s Church

1

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Medium

St Ouen’s Bay to St Aubin’s Bay 4 miles (6.5km)

45 minutes

Pubs/shops near St Peter’s Church

Pubs/shops near St Peter’s Church

1

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Easy

Victoria Village to St Helier 2 miles (3.5km)

15 minutes

Shops en route

-

-

Difficulty

Route/Length

Time (approx)

Refreshment stops

Toilet stops

No. of hills

Easy

Durrell Wildlife Park to St Martin 2 miles (3.5km)

15 minutes

Durrell Wildlife Park and pub/shop near St Martin’s Church

Durrell Wildlife Park and pub near St Martin’s Church

-

Two wheeling | 23


@

It’s our Instagram account that, potentially, connects us with the hearts and minds of Jersey islanders.

ersey cow

girl

Today’s Jersey cows get a helping hand from robots, Instagram, Facebook, hi-tech sensors and computerised tracking, says Becky Houzé, a 4th generation farmer (aka @Jerseycowgirl). When people think of farmers, they think of gum boots, muck and early mornings - and they are definitely right. However, we are proud of our Smart Farm status and embrace new and exciting technology to constantly innovate. Our methods are progressive and we are proud of the advancements we have made, and the benefits they have brought to us, our girls (our precious cows), our customers and the people of Jersey. We blog, we film, we Instagram, and you’ll also find us active on Facebook. We run school competitions, offer tours and Open Days, give talks and presentations. Public engagement is an important part of what we do: the future of profitable farming depends on it staying relevant to its consumers and ensuring local people care about, and value, what we do.

24 | Becky Houzé interview

Becky Houzé interview | 25


@

It’s our Instagram account that, potentially, connects us with the hearts and minds of Jersey islanders.

ersey cow

girl

Today’s Jersey cows get a helping hand from robots, Instagram, Facebook, hi-tech sensors and computerised tracking, says Becky Houzé, a 4th generation farmer (aka @Jerseycowgirl). When people think of farmers, they think of gum boots, muck and early mornings - and they are definitely right. However, we are proud of our Smart Farm status and embrace new and exciting technology to constantly innovate. Our methods are progressive and we are proud of the advancements we have made, and the benefits they have brought to us, our girls (our precious cows), our customers and the people of Jersey. We blog, we film, we Instagram, and you’ll also find us active on Facebook. We run school competitions, offer tours and Open Days, give talks and presentations. Public engagement is an important part of what we do: the future of profitable farming depends on it staying relevant to its consumers and ensuring local people care about, and value, what we do.

24 | Becky Houzé interview

Becky Houzé interview | 25


Seafood Restaurant COME AND EXPERIENCE OUR EXTENSIVE SEAFOOD MENU

We milk 220 pedigree Jerseys and raise over 100 head of young-stock, with a recently set up enterprise, rearing Aberdeen Angus cross Jersey beef. Our 230 acre farm has historically one of the highest butterfat averages, which currently stand at 5.9%. Jersey cows are friendly, warm, inquisitive and have adorable big brown eyes and a good-natured, docile temperament. They are a relatively small breed and superior grazers - hence their high-quality, high butterfat creamy milk. They are also incredibly cute! Little wonder the Jersey breed is the second most popular in the world (there are at least 2 million across the globe) and are undoubtedly Jersey’s most iconic animal. Our family has a 75-year association with Lodge Farm. Louis and Yvonne Houzé bought it in 1944. Then son Marcel and wife Anne Houzé took over in 1968. In 1987 son Paul Houzé became part of the farm. Now, I’m involved as part of the fourth generation of farmers. There have obviously been a lot of changes in how things are farmed since 1944, and our investment in farming infrastructure and the latest tech is extremely forwardthinking. One of our investments has been to implement ground-breaking CowMaster technology, which has replaced the need for dairy farmers like us to solely rely on their own observations and gut instincts to manage their herd. It is a huge help as it reduces the instances

when illness goes undetected until it’s too late. Of course, there’s no denying dairymen do their best but CowManager eliminates the guesswork by providing invaluable and extremely accurate information to make the decisions of farmers around the globe a whole lot easier. Amazing when you think that it’s just a non-invasive ear sensor that monitors the cows, temperature, movement and eating patterns then relays the information to the farmer’s smartphone or laptop! We also have a relationship with Jersey Electric, who operate in a sustainable way and provides green power to Jersey in a way that supports our farming methods and legacy - and ultimately helps us keep the island rich in Jersey milk. We also use robotic cleaners to clear slurry from the milking shed - an invaluable way of freeing up manpower that could be more useful elsewhere. It’s more hygienic, drastically improves our carbon footprint (the robots use a 12v battery whereas we would need a diesel generator for a human to do the same work). Again, it its like having a pair of extra hands on the farm to help care for the cows 24/7 365 days a year. We have also installed a FeedStar System, which enables us to ensure our girls have access to fresh food all day while housed indoors. The system has freed up space, decreased noise and achieved significant rises in nutritional input and milk output (at around 1.1 million litres a year).

But, it is our Instagram account that, potentially, connects us with the hearts and minds of Jersey islanders. The images and video content are amazing and capture the heart of what we do. Visit @jerseycowgirl to see for yourself - there’s love in every photo! We also regularly appear on local, and national TV, and radio to discuss farming in Jersey, and of course, our favourite subject, Jersey cows. We are also active on the conference scene and are also asked to judge at cattle shows and contribute to business forums and trade groups. But most of all we love caring for the cows, managing the land and walking around our fields and seeing happy, healthy cows. We post on Instagram regularly (we are thrilled to have more than 20k followers!) and we share other updates on Facebook. It’s great to instantly communicate globally: the interaction with thousands of people from all over the world who love Jersey cows gives us such a buzz. And who knew there’d be so many people on Insta across the globe who’d follow the life of a Jersey cowgirl?

Lodge Farm, La Grande Route de St Martin, St Saviour, Jersey JE2 7JA Telephone: 01534 853416 Email: beckyhouze@gmail.com Instagram: jerseycowgirl Facebook: www.facebook.com/lodgefarmjersey 26 |Becky Houzé interview

s Fresh Scall o p

Del icious C rab

Succulent Steak

Fresh fr om the sea

Amazing O ysters

Tast y Mussels

Quayside offers the largest selection of local crab, lobster, scallops and fish dishes in Jersey, complimented with a selection of steaks and culinary delights. Overlooking St Helier Marina with two beautiful outdoor terraces, Quayside is the perfect restaurant for lunch or a sunset dinner.

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK • SUNDAY CARVERY & SEAFOOD BUFFET Libertys, Liberty Wharf, St Helier JE2 3NY • Tel 01534 877004 • www.libertysjersey.co.uk


Seafood Restaurant COME AND EXPERIENCE OUR EXTENSIVE SEAFOOD MENU

We milk 220 pedigree Jerseys and raise over 100 head of young-stock, with a recently set up enterprise, rearing Aberdeen Angus cross Jersey beef. Our 230 acre farm has historically one of the highest butterfat averages, which currently stand at 5.9%. Jersey cows are friendly, warm, inquisitive and have adorable big brown eyes and a good-natured, docile temperament. They are a relatively small breed and superior grazers - hence their high-quality, high butterfat creamy milk. They are also incredibly cute! Little wonder the Jersey breed is the second most popular in the world (there are at least 2 million across the globe) and are undoubtedly Jersey’s most iconic animal. Our family has a 75-year association with Lodge Farm. Louis and Yvonne Houzé bought it in 1944. Then son Marcel and wife Anne Houzé took over in 1968. In 1987 son Paul Houzé became part of the farm. Now, I’m involved as part of the fourth generation of farmers. There have obviously been a lot of changes in how things are farmed since 1944, and our investment in farming infrastructure and the latest tech is extremely forwardthinking. One of our investments has been to implement ground-breaking CowMaster technology, which has replaced the need for dairy farmers like us to solely rely on their own observations and gut instincts to manage their herd. It is a huge help as it reduces the instances

when illness goes undetected until it’s too late. Of course, there’s no denying dairymen do their best but CowManager eliminates the guesswork by providing invaluable and extremely accurate information to make the decisions of farmers around the globe a whole lot easier. Amazing when you think that it’s just a non-invasive ear sensor that monitors the cows, temperature, movement and eating patterns then relays the information to the farmer’s smartphone or laptop! We also have a relationship with Jersey Electric, who operate in a sustainable way and provides green power to Jersey in a way that supports our farming methods and legacy - and ultimately helps us keep the island rich in Jersey milk. We also use robotic cleaners to clear slurry from the milking shed - an invaluable way of freeing up manpower that could be more useful elsewhere. It’s more hygienic, drastically improves our carbon footprint (the robots use a 12v battery whereas we would need a diesel generator for a human to do the same work). Again, it its like having a pair of extra hands on the farm to help care for the cows 24/7 365 days a year. We have also installed a FeedStar System, which enables us to ensure our girls have access to fresh food all day while housed indoors. The system has freed up space, decreased noise and achieved significant rises in nutritional input and milk output (at around 1.1 million litres a year).

But, it is our Instagram account that, potentially, connects us with the hearts and minds of Jersey islanders. The images and video content are amazing and capture the heart of what we do. Visit @jerseycowgirl to see for yourself - there’s love in every photo! We also regularly appear on local, and national TV, and radio to discuss farming in Jersey, and of course, our favourite subject, Jersey cows. We are also active on the conference scene and are also asked to judge at cattle shows and contribute to business forums and trade groups. But most of all we love caring for the cows, managing the land and walking around our fields and seeing happy, healthy cows. We post on Instagram regularly (we are thrilled to have more than 20k followers!) and we share other updates on Facebook. It’s great to instantly communicate globally: the interaction with thousands of people from all over the world who love Jersey cows gives us such a buzz. And who knew there’d be so many people on Insta across the globe who’d follow the life of a Jersey cowgirl?

Lodge Farm, La Grande Route de St Martin, St Saviour, Jersey JE2 7JA Telephone: 01534 853416 Email: beckyhouze@gmail.com Instagram: jerseycowgirl Facebook: www.facebook.com/lodgefarmjersey 26 |Becky Houzé interview

s Fresh Scall o p

Del icious C rab

Succulent Steak

Fresh fr om the sea

Amazing O ysters

Tast y Mussels

Quayside offers the largest selection of local crab, lobster, scallops and fish dishes in Jersey, complimented with a selection of steaks and culinary delights. Overlooking St Helier Marina with two beautiful outdoor terraces, Quayside is the perfect restaurant for lunch or a sunset dinner.

OPEN SEVEN DAYS A WEEK • SUNDAY CARVERY & SEAFOOD BUFFET Libertys, Liberty Wharf, St Helier JE2 3NY • Tel 01534 877004 • www.libertysjersey.co.uk


g Gourmet Jersey

STRIKING THE PERFECT BALANCE OF TRAdITIONAL SEAFOOd dISHES ANd mOdERN JAPANESE CUISINE. WILDFIRE

14 Mulcaster Street, St Helier, JE2 3NJ

For a sizzling night out or a casual lunchtime bite, Wildfire is a great choice with three bars and two restaurants offering a tempting range of grilled steaks and tapas.

+44 (0)1534 625 555 www.wildfirejersey.com

Located in the vibrant and popular Weighbridge area opposite The Royal Yacht Hotel and close to Jersey’s waterfront, Wildfire is a popular haunt of both locals and visitors, and well known for its extensive steak menu, which includes 20oz ribeye, angus beef fillet, New York strip, T-bone and chateaubriand. It models itself on the casual style of New York’s grill restaurants and cocktail bars. Upstairs, the Wild Grill Restaurant offers a superb range of different breeds and cuts of beef cooked over coal, along with a range of starters, salads, plates to share and a selection of other meats and local fish. On the ground floor, the bars offer classy cocktails, premium vodkas, wines and beers with professional mixologists on hand to mix you the perfect drink. They make an expert mojito or the ‘speciality’ porn star cocktail! In the Tapas Restaurant, you can also enjoy small plates, tapas and deli lunches, and dinner options include ‘steak boards’ served at cowhide booths.

Offering a fusion of locally sourced ingredients and Japanese creativity. Whether your desire is Sushi, Ramen, steak, duck or simply a bowl of steamed mussels, SOY is the perfect place to dine and enjoy. Opening Times: Monday - Saturday 12pm - 4pm & 6pm - late Closed Sundays Summer: Open all day

LA BASTILLE BRASSERIE

SUMAS RESTAURANT

BENTO SUSHI

SOY Seafood & Sushi Bar

A French styled brasserie serving fine wines and French inspired dishes, local shellfish, grill, grazing plates and pizzas. The new Biere Atelier serves real ales, craft beers and lager from around the world. Live music at weekends. French speaking. Accepts Euros.

Located in the picturesque harbour of Gorey on the East coast of the island, Sumas offers quality food and service with a focus on seasonal produce and local seafood such as hand dived scallops, crab and oysters.

Do you like sushi? Only 1 minute walk from Jersey’s bus station! Enjoy healthy sushi using fresh ingredients without waiting to be served. Our ‘sushi belt’ puts your food right in front of you, to grab and eat immediately! - Irasshaimase! (Come on in!)

8-10 West Centre, St Helier, Jersey T: +44 (0) 1534 720052 E: info@soyjersey.com

& Bière Atelier, 35 Queen Street, St Helier

+44 (0)1534 874 059 www.labastille.bar

Gorey Hill, St Martin

+44 (0)1534 853 291 www.sumasrestaurant.com

1 Commercial Street, St Helier

+44 (0)1534 887 577 www.bento.je

www.soyjersey.com


g Gourmet Jersey

STRIKING THE PERFECT BALANCE OF TRAdITIONAL SEAFOOd dISHES ANd mOdERN JAPANESE CUISINE. WILDFIRE

14 Mulcaster Street, St Helier, JE2 3NJ

For a sizzling night out or a casual lunchtime bite, Wildfire is a great choice with three bars and two restaurants offering a tempting range of grilled steaks and tapas.

+44 (0)1534 625 555 www.wildfirejersey.com

Located in the vibrant and popular Weighbridge area opposite The Royal Yacht Hotel and close to Jersey’s waterfront, Wildfire is a popular haunt of both locals and visitors, and well known for its extensive steak menu, which includes 20oz ribeye, angus beef fillet, New York strip, T-bone and chateaubriand. It models itself on the casual style of New York’s grill restaurants and cocktail bars. Upstairs, the Wild Grill Restaurant offers a superb range of different breeds and cuts of beef cooked over coal, along with a range of starters, salads, plates to share and a selection of other meats and local fish. On the ground floor, the bars offer classy cocktails, premium vodkas, wines and beers with professional mixologists on hand to mix you the perfect drink. They make an expert mojito or the ‘speciality’ porn star cocktail! In the Tapas Restaurant, you can also enjoy small plates, tapas and deli lunches, and dinner options include ‘steak boards’ served at cowhide booths.

Offering a fusion of locally sourced ingredients and Japanese creativity. Whether your desire is Sushi, Ramen, steak, duck or simply a bowl of steamed mussels, SOY is the perfect place to dine and enjoy. Opening Times: Monday - Saturday 12pm - 4pm & 6pm - late Closed Sundays Summer: Open all day

LA BASTILLE BRASSERIE

SUMAS RESTAURANT

BENTO SUSHI

SOY Seafood & Sushi Bar

A French styled brasserie serving fine wines and French inspired dishes, local shellfish, grill, grazing plates and pizzas. The new Biere Atelier serves real ales, craft beers and lager from around the world. Live music at weekends. French speaking. Accepts Euros.

Located in the picturesque harbour of Gorey on the East coast of the island, Sumas offers quality food and service with a focus on seasonal produce and local seafood such as hand dived scallops, crab and oysters.

Do you like sushi? Only 1 minute walk from Jersey’s bus station! Enjoy healthy sushi using fresh ingredients without waiting to be served. Our ‘sushi belt’ puts your food right in front of you, to grab and eat immediately! - Irasshaimase! (Come on in!)

8-10 West Centre, St Helier, Jersey T: +44 (0) 1534 720052 E: info@soyjersey.com

& Bière Atelier, 35 Queen Street, St Helier

+44 (0)1534 874 059 www.labastille.bar

Gorey Hill, St Martin

+44 (0)1534 853 291 www.sumasrestaurant.com

1 Commercial Street, St Helier

+44 (0)1534 887 577 www.bento.je

www.soyjersey.com


g Gourmet Jersey

UNAWATUNA

8 Caledonia Place, The Weighbridge, St Helier

Jersey’s only Sri Lankan restaurant, specialising in vegan and vegetarian dishes. Offering a relaxed and informal dining experience, Chef Sudu has brought a slice of Sri Lanka to the island. He learned the majority of his cooking skills at his mother’s side when he helped her to prepare family meals. Sri Lankan cuisine is a very healthy diet with the staples being rice and pulses, and with the majority of Sri Lankan’s being Buddhist, many are vegetarians so there are plenty of vegetable based dishes.

+44 (0)1534 888 430 www.unawatuna.je sudu@unawatuna.je

All day dining | Open Monday – Saturday Breakfast: 8.30 – 11.00 (excluding Sat) Brunch: 10.30 – 14.15 (Sat only) Lunch: 12.00 – 14.15 Afternoon: 14.15 – 18.30 Dinner: 18.30 – 21.00

www.samphire.je

|

01534 725100

|

book@samphire.je

|

7-11 Don Street, St Helier, Jersey JE2 4TQ

Drinks: 9.00 – Late

Open Mon – Thurs: 5pm – 9:30pm; Fri & Sat: 5pm – 10pm

SEAFISH CAFE

YOGOLICIOUS

Authentic French crêperie and café full of enticing smells, sensational flavours and charming ambience. Owner Sebastien’s philosophy is to serve good quality home cooked food using locally sourced ingredients. Open: Mon – Sat 7:30am - 4pm (Closed Sun)

Seafish Cafe serve Jersey’s finest fish and chips. Whether you are sitting in their 65 seater restaurant or choose to takeaway, the Seafish Cafe promises you great fish and chips alongside many other dishes.

We are Jersey’s only Frozen Yoghurt Bar, serving all flavours Jersey Ice-Cream all year & much more; delicious coffees, homemade cakes, hot food, fresh juices. Come in for a treat ...

+44 (0)1534 510 015 www.seafishcafe.com

Et on parle Français.

+44 (0)1534 866 607 www.cocoricojersey.com

In the heart of St Helier, Samphire welcomes you to a relaxed atmosphere with all day dining choices. The Michelin starred restaurant boasts a series of contemporary menus using fresh local produce, from casual dishes to gastronomic plates, and a killer cocktail list. Unwind at Samphire in the main dining room, bar or choice of two terraces any time of the day.

Choose from delicious starters such as fish cakes, coconut tempura king prawns, crab sambal and sticky ribs or go for their sharing plate. The mains include a good selection of meat, fish and vegetarian dishes. Sudu recommends guests choose a selection of vegetarian dishes, an optional meat/fish dish and rice.

COCORICO

33 Broad street, St Helier

SIMPLE PERFECTION

Liberty Wharf, St Helier

For the best in Italian hospitality - warmth, character and a passion for good food and mouth-watering flavours, visit La Capannina, Jersey’s most delicious destination for fine dining and Italian cuisine.

10 Hilgrove Street, St Helier

+44 (0)1534 873 280 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

Open Monday-Saturday Lunch 12 - 2pm Dinner 7 - 10pm www.lacapanninajersey.com / 01534 734602 info@lacapanninajersey.com / 65/67 Halkett Place, St Helier, Jersey JE2 4WG


g Gourmet Jersey

UNAWATUNA

8 Caledonia Place, The Weighbridge, St Helier

Jersey’s only Sri Lankan restaurant, specialising in vegan and vegetarian dishes. Offering a relaxed and informal dining experience, Chef Sudu has brought a slice of Sri Lanka to the island. He learned the majority of his cooking skills at his mother’s side when he helped her to prepare family meals. Sri Lankan cuisine is a very healthy diet with the staples being rice and pulses, and with the majority of Sri Lankan’s being Buddhist, many are vegetarians so there are plenty of vegetable based dishes.

+44 (0)1534 888 430 www.unawatuna.je sudu@unawatuna.je

All day dining | Open Monday – Saturday Breakfast: 8.30 – 11.00 (excluding Sat) Brunch: 10.30 – 14.15 (Sat only) Lunch: 12.00 – 14.15 Afternoon: 14.15 – 18.30 Dinner: 18.30 – 21.00

www.samphire.je

|

01534 725100

|

book@samphire.je

|

7-11 Don Street, St Helier, Jersey JE2 4TQ

Drinks: 9.00 – Late

Open Mon – Thurs: 5pm – 9:30pm; Fri & Sat: 5pm – 10pm

SEAFISH CAFE

YOGOLICIOUS

Authentic French crêperie and café full of enticing smells, sensational flavours and charming ambience. Owner Sebastien’s philosophy is to serve good quality home cooked food using locally sourced ingredients. Open: Mon – Sat 7:30am - 4pm (Closed Sun)

Seafish Cafe serve Jersey’s finest fish and chips. Whether you are sitting in their 65 seater restaurant or choose to takeaway, the Seafish Cafe promises you great fish and chips alongside many other dishes.

We are Jersey’s only Frozen Yoghurt Bar, serving all flavours Jersey Ice-Cream all year & much more; delicious coffees, homemade cakes, hot food, fresh juices. Come in for a treat ...

+44 (0)1534 510 015 www.seafishcafe.com

Et on parle Français.

+44 (0)1534 866 607 www.cocoricojersey.com

In the heart of St Helier, Samphire welcomes you to a relaxed atmosphere with all day dining choices. The Michelin starred restaurant boasts a series of contemporary menus using fresh local produce, from casual dishes to gastronomic plates, and a killer cocktail list. Unwind at Samphire in the main dining room, bar or choice of two terraces any time of the day.

Choose from delicious starters such as fish cakes, coconut tempura king prawns, crab sambal and sticky ribs or go for their sharing plate. The mains include a good selection of meat, fish and vegetarian dishes. Sudu recommends guests choose a selection of vegetarian dishes, an optional meat/fish dish and rice.

COCORICO

33 Broad street, St Helier

SIMPLE PERFECTION

Liberty Wharf, St Helier

For the best in Italian hospitality - warmth, character and a passion for good food and mouth-watering flavours, visit La Capannina, Jersey’s most delicious destination for fine dining and Italian cuisine.

10 Hilgrove Street, St Helier

+44 (0)1534 873 280 Find us on Facebook and Instagram

Open Monday-Saturday Lunch 12 - 2pm Dinner 7 - 10pm www.lacapanninajersey.com / 01534 734602 info@lacapanninajersey.com / 65/67 Halkett Place, St Helier, Jersey JE2 4WG


Dandy Coffee Shop Sarah Woods takes a look at Jersey’s buzzing coffee shop culture and discovers an exciting array of flat whites, cappuccino, latte, frappe, Americano and spiced chai served in chi-chi haunts across cosmopolitan St Helier and beyond. The worldwide trend of coffee shop culture has seen coffee in the UK alone enjoy its biggest period of growth in the last few years, rising by 37%, up from £2.4 billion in 2011 to exceed £3.4 billion in 2018. Be it frothy cappuccino, a short shock of espresso or an oh-so-cream latte, coffee consumption in the UK has soared to 95 million cups a day in 2018 - an increase of 25 million cups in just a decade. The Channel Islands are no exception, especially in Jersey’s cosmopolitan capital, St Helier where hip millennials, business execs, the yachting crowd and tourists enjoy the buzz and hubbub of the barista. Amidst the chatter and clatter of curb-side cafes, the senses are treated

7-9 Conway Street, St Helier JE2 3NT www.dandycoffeeshop.com

Locke’s Coffee & Grub In 1675, King Charles II banned coffee shops after growing suspicious that meetings to share a cuppa were conspiring opponents plotting ill deeds. Before that, in 1511, leaders in Mecca outlawed coffee on the belief it stimulated radical thinking. Some 16th-century Italian clergymen also tried to ban coffee because they believed it to be “satanic.” However, Pope Clement VII loved coffee so much that he lifted the ban and gave coffee a baptism in 1600. Locke’s Coffee & Grub in Conway Street shares the Papal love of the bean-fuelled beverage, offering an ambient spot just off St Helier’s main drag where a blissful brew can be truly enjoyed. Owners Drew and Ella use ethically sourced roasts that ensure coffee farmers get a fair price for the crops they harvest. They also use Vegware packaging, which is made of plants, not plastic – ensuring that it can be composted and recycled along with normal food waste. 5 Pitt Street, Charing Cross, St. Helier JE2 3RP www.facebook.com/lockes.stories/

to the delectable aromas of Arabica and Robusta beans from a brew-pot of coffee-producing nations such as Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Indonesia and Honduras. The ideal growing conditions for coffee plants may well be in the “bean belt” either side of the equator - between the Tropics of Capricorn and Cancer (23 degrees North to 23 degrees South) to be exact - but few places to drink it are as perfect as St Helier. Whether you’re sipping from thimble-sized gourmet espresso cups in warm sunshine, or gazing across foam-topped creamy macchiatos soaking up harbour views, the ground coffee in Jersey is far from the daily grind.

Full beans of

32 | Coffee culture

Dandy Coffee Shop, quirkily named after the first bull to be registered in the Jersey Herd Book (in 1866), uses the island’s top-quality milk in its delicious coffee. Jersey’s iconic breed of cattle is synonymous with luxuriant, creamy milk with high butterfat content. The Dandy team prides itself on good customer service, which has earned it considerable praise and plenty of glowing TripAdvisor reviews. Choose from two chi-chi locations for an intimate caffeine-rich tête-á-tête.

Cargo Coffee After 10 years in Costa Rica running two different bars and busy restaurants, Jersey islander Liam Montgomery and his partner Selda Kumcur have settled right into Jersey coffee culture after opening a speciality coffee shop on St Helier’s Esplanade. Today, the Cargo Café offers customers an enticing combination of exciting influences that fuses Selda’s exotic French and Turkish roots with irrepressible Costa Rican sassiness and the very best island produce. Besides a gourmet roll-call of coffees and teas, Cargo also serves great food from a menu created by Emerson, who worked at Ormer for two years. Cargo’s stylish rustic décor is also a showcase for Jersey’s thriving art scene. 20 Esplanade, St. Helier JE2 3QA www.facebook.com/cargocoffeebar

Shuga Using only the very finest beans lies at the heart of everything Shuga stands for. Each cup is prepared to enhance the inherent flavours and characteristics of the beans they choose and they are so selective about what goes into every drink they serve, they can practically give you its life story from sapling, to berries, to bean to brew. Each takeaway cup and lid is biodegradable with cups also fully compostable – simply bring your empty takeaway cup back to the shop and Shuga will ensure it is ethically disposed of. Every bread, pastry, salad and vegetable used is from a local supplier and Shuga takes special efforts to minimise waste (anything that is left over at the end of the day is composted or shared with a local charity). Shuga also supports its baristas through a two year Baristas Diploma through the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe (SCAE). Seaton Place, St Helier JE2 3QL www.shuga.je

Coffee culture | 33


Dandy Coffee Shop Sarah Woods takes a look at Jersey’s buzzing coffee shop culture and discovers an exciting array of flat whites, cappuccino, latte, frappe, Americano and spiced chai served in chi-chi haunts across cosmopolitan St Helier and beyond. The worldwide trend of coffee shop culture has seen coffee in the UK alone enjoy its biggest period of growth in the last few years, rising by 37%, up from £2.4 billion in 2011 to exceed £3.4 billion in 2018. Be it frothy cappuccino, a short shock of espresso or an oh-so-cream latte, coffee consumption in the UK has soared to 95 million cups a day in 2018 - an increase of 25 million cups in just a decade. The Channel Islands are no exception, especially in Jersey’s cosmopolitan capital, St Helier where hip millennials, business execs, the yachting crowd and tourists enjoy the buzz and hubbub of the barista. Amidst the chatter and clatter of curb-side cafes, the senses are treated

7-9 Conway Street, St Helier JE2 3NT www.dandycoffeeshop.com

Locke’s Coffee & Grub In 1675, King Charles II banned coffee shops after growing suspicious that meetings to share a cuppa were conspiring opponents plotting ill deeds. Before that, in 1511, leaders in Mecca outlawed coffee on the belief it stimulated radical thinking. Some 16th-century Italian clergymen also tried to ban coffee because they believed it to be “satanic.” However, Pope Clement VII loved coffee so much that he lifted the ban and gave coffee a baptism in 1600. Locke’s Coffee & Grub in Conway Street shares the Papal love of the bean-fuelled beverage, offering an ambient spot just off St Helier’s main drag where a blissful brew can be truly enjoyed. Owners Drew and Ella use ethically sourced roasts that ensure coffee farmers get a fair price for the crops they harvest. They also use Vegware packaging, which is made of plants, not plastic – ensuring that it can be composted and recycled along with normal food waste. 5 Pitt Street, Charing Cross, St. Helier JE2 3RP www.facebook.com/lockes.stories/

to the delectable aromas of Arabica and Robusta beans from a brew-pot of coffee-producing nations such as Brazil, Vietnam, Colombia, Indonesia and Honduras. The ideal growing conditions for coffee plants may well be in the “bean belt” either side of the equator - between the Tropics of Capricorn and Cancer (23 degrees North to 23 degrees South) to be exact - but few places to drink it are as perfect as St Helier. Whether you’re sipping from thimble-sized gourmet espresso cups in warm sunshine, or gazing across foam-topped creamy macchiatos soaking up harbour views, the ground coffee in Jersey is far from the daily grind.

Full beans of

32 | Coffee culture

Dandy Coffee Shop, quirkily named after the first bull to be registered in the Jersey Herd Book (in 1866), uses the island’s top-quality milk in its delicious coffee. Jersey’s iconic breed of cattle is synonymous with luxuriant, creamy milk with high butterfat content. The Dandy team prides itself on good customer service, which has earned it considerable praise and plenty of glowing TripAdvisor reviews. Choose from two chi-chi locations for an intimate caffeine-rich tête-á-tête.

Cargo Coffee After 10 years in Costa Rica running two different bars and busy restaurants, Jersey islander Liam Montgomery and his partner Selda Kumcur have settled right into Jersey coffee culture after opening a speciality coffee shop on St Helier’s Esplanade. Today, the Cargo Café offers customers an enticing combination of exciting influences that fuses Selda’s exotic French and Turkish roots with irrepressible Costa Rican sassiness and the very best island produce. Besides a gourmet roll-call of coffees and teas, Cargo also serves great food from a menu created by Emerson, who worked at Ormer for two years. Cargo’s stylish rustic décor is also a showcase for Jersey’s thriving art scene. 20 Esplanade, St. Helier JE2 3QA www.facebook.com/cargocoffeebar

Shuga Using only the very finest beans lies at the heart of everything Shuga stands for. Each cup is prepared to enhance the inherent flavours and characteristics of the beans they choose and they are so selective about what goes into every drink they serve, they can practically give you its life story from sapling, to berries, to bean to brew. Each takeaway cup and lid is biodegradable with cups also fully compostable – simply bring your empty takeaway cup back to the shop and Shuga will ensure it is ethically disposed of. Every bread, pastry, salad and vegetable used is from a local supplier and Shuga takes special efforts to minimise waste (anything that is left over at the end of the day is composted or shared with a local charity). Shuga also supports its baristas through a two year Baristas Diploma through the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe (SCAE). Seaton Place, St Helier JE2 3QL www.shuga.je

Coffee culture | 33


Common Ground With its stylish, casual white painted walls, wooden bench seats and oversized cushions, Common Ground is what islanders have been dreaming for years – a friendly coffee joint on the west of the island that sits right at the heart of the community. Sure, it is a cool and inviting space that serves up truly exquisite latte – but that isn’t all. This coffee joint isn’t all about roasted beans, caffeine and milk froth, it hosts a year-round calendar of events that set it apart from the rest. Michelle and her team have pitched this super little café just perfectly for everyone in and around St Brelades: they use the very finest beans so the out-and-out coffee purists are ecstatic, offer plenty of gluten-free and lactosefree alternatives to the standard menu, source as much fresh, fine produce it can from local suppliers open up for yoga, children’s movie nights and a whole range of artsy events. In fact, it is this passion for local arts that stokes the fires at Common Ground who show support by providing community groups with creative back-up so that they can teach, display, share, sell or create from a local base. As result, many of the prints, water colours and sketches on the walls can be bought – as can the brightly-painted little pots that top each table and a fine range of jewellery made by a local craftsman. Red Houses, St Brelades, Jersey Find on Facebook: Common Ground Jersey Email: commongroundjersey@gmail.com

All recycled cans at Common Ground go to Durrell for the “Cans for Corridors” project. With 50 cans = 1 tree planted – the aim is to play a positive role in making a corridor to link areas of mass deforestation in Brazil.

What’s in a name? ·AFFOGATO Ice cream (traditionally vanilla) “drowned” with a shot of espresso. · AMERICANO An espresso that is cut with very hot water to fill an American-size cup. · CAFÉ AU LAIT Coffee drink combining one-third drip-brewed coffee with twothirds hot, frothed milk. · CAPPUCCINO An espresso drink created with one serving of espresso topped with steamed milk and froth.

· LATTE A serving of espresso combined with nearly three times as much steamed milk topped with froth.  ACCHIATO A serving of espresso ·M “stained” or topped off with a small quantity of hot, frothed milk.  OCHA Espresso combined with ·M chocolate syrup and steamed milk.

a

·R  ISTRETTO Espresso pulled short, containing less water, for a more concentrated drink.

P O m o SH .c E y N e LI rs N je O de W n E so i

34 | Coffee culture

·F  LAT WHITE Espresso topped with flat, steamed milk.

m

· DECAFFEINATED Coffee that has had at least 97% of its caffeine removed is classified as decaffeinated.

 SPRESSO A brewing method in which ·E hot water is forced under pressure through a compressed bed of finely ground coffee; typically less than 2 ounces of espresso is produced.

N

· CORTADO Spanish term for an espresso topped with a small amount of flat steamed milk.

 OPPIO A double espresso. ·D


Common Ground With its stylish, casual white painted walls, wooden bench seats and oversized cushions, Common Ground is what islanders have been dreaming for years – a friendly coffee joint on the west of the island that sits right at the heart of the community. Sure, it is a cool and inviting space that serves up truly exquisite latte – but that isn’t all. This coffee joint isn’t all about roasted beans, caffeine and milk froth, it hosts a year-round calendar of events that set it apart from the rest. Michelle and her team have pitched this super little café just perfectly for everyone in and around St Brelades: they use the very finest beans so the out-and-out coffee purists are ecstatic, offer plenty of gluten-free and lactosefree alternatives to the standard menu, source as much fresh, fine produce it can from local suppliers open up for yoga, children’s movie nights and a whole range of artsy events. In fact, it is this passion for local arts that stokes the fires at Common Ground who show support by providing community groups with creative back-up so that they can teach, display, share, sell or create from a local base. As result, many of the prints, water colours and sketches on the walls can be bought – as can the brightly-painted little pots that top each table and a fine range of jewellery made by a local craftsman. Red Houses, St Brelades, Jersey Find on Facebook: Common Ground Jersey Email: commongroundjersey@gmail.com

All recycled cans at Common Ground go to Durrell for the “Cans for Corridors” project. With 50 cans = 1 tree planted – the aim is to play a positive role in making a corridor to link areas of mass deforestation in Brazil.

What’s in a name? ·AFFOGATO Ice cream (traditionally vanilla) “drowned” with a shot of espresso. · AMERICANO An espresso that is cut with very hot water to fill an American-size cup. · CAFÉ AU LAIT Coffee drink combining one-third drip-brewed coffee with twothirds hot, frothed milk. · CAPPUCCINO An espresso drink created with one serving of espresso topped with steamed milk and froth.

· LATTE A serving of espresso combined with nearly three times as much steamed milk topped with froth.  ACCHIATO A serving of espresso ·M “stained” or topped off with a small quantity of hot, frothed milk.  OCHA Espresso combined with ·M chocolate syrup and steamed milk.

a

·R  ISTRETTO Espresso pulled short, containing less water, for a more concentrated drink.

P O m o SH .c E y N e LI rs N je O de W n E so i

34 | Coffee culture

·F  LAT WHITE Espresso topped with flat, steamed milk.

m

· DECAFFEINATED Coffee that has had at least 97% of its caffeine removed is classified as decaffeinated.

 SPRESSO A brewing method in which ·E hot water is forced under pressure through a compressed bed of finely ground coffee; typically less than 2 ounces of espresso is produced.

N

· CORTADO Spanish term for an espresso topped with a small amount of flat steamed milk.

 OPPIO A double espresso. ·D


nude town

body & beach

The food forward thinking restaurant outlets that founder Lucy Morris is working hard to provide clean, healthy and entirely sustainable food.

Nude Food is a culinary revolution in Jersey. Although the hospitality industry is forward thinking in many ways, it’s been slow to recognise that today’s society and the island community has developed an accountable conscience when it comes to consuming food. More and more, we question where ingredients have been sourced, whether restaurants are supporting local growers, how will our takeaway meals be packaged and how much is being done to control waste management and recycling. Lucy Morris, founder of Nude Food, is the first person in the industry in Jersey to make a conscious move toward sustainability, developing her business model to be a circular economy, which is an alternative to a traditional linear economy (make, use, dispose), and where resources made useful for the maximum time possible and then regenerated. Lucy achieves this by offsetting her carbon emissions through composting all food waste and promoting rich, plant-based diets using food from traceable, sustainable and local suppliers. Since opening in 2016, Nude Food has expanded to three restaurants – Nude Town, Nude Body and Nude on the Beach. They have become the place to be seen if you pride yourself on eating clean, healthy fantastic tasting food that is also sustainable.

>

36 | Lucy Morris interview

Lucy Morris interview | 37


nude town

body & beach

The food forward thinking restaurant outlets that founder Lucy Morris is working hard to provide clean, healthy and entirely sustainable food.

Nude Food is a culinary revolution in Jersey. Although the hospitality industry is forward thinking in many ways, it’s been slow to recognise that today’s society and the island community has developed an accountable conscience when it comes to consuming food. More and more, we question where ingredients have been sourced, whether restaurants are supporting local growers, how will our takeaway meals be packaged and how much is being done to control waste management and recycling. Lucy Morris, founder of Nude Food, is the first person in the industry in Jersey to make a conscious move toward sustainability, developing her business model to be a circular economy, which is an alternative to a traditional linear economy (make, use, dispose), and where resources made useful for the maximum time possible and then regenerated. Lucy achieves this by offsetting her carbon emissions through composting all food waste and promoting rich, plant-based diets using food from traceable, sustainable and local suppliers. Since opening in 2016, Nude Food has expanded to three restaurants – Nude Town, Nude Body and Nude on the Beach. They have become the place to be seen if you pride yourself on eating clean, healthy fantastic tasting food that is also sustainable.

>

36 | Lucy Morris interview

Lucy Morris interview | 37


Q. So, how did you come to creating the mission and concept of Nude? I have always been into eating ‘healthy’ food with no additives or preservatives and as close to its natural form as possible. Whilst in a career in finance, I decided to go back to college and train as a chef. Once I had completed the course, I then decided to change my path and set up Nude Food with the brand ethos ‘clean, nude, uncomplicated food.’ As part of embarking on this new mission, I was taken aback at the lack of eco-friendly, compostable packaging available and the amount of waste that was produced through preparing food. I contacted a few places to see if I could give them my food waste but, unfortunately, due to licensing, I was told they couldn’t accept it. One day a gentleman called Glyn Mitchell approached me from the Credible food project and said that he had obtained a licence to accept my food waste, and was able to compost it in a machine we have named The Guzzler. Q. What would you say is the key to good health? I think the key to good health starts with happiness, and then it comes down to a what you put into your body. The better the food, air and water you consume, the better you will feel… Like anything, the better quality you put in, the better output you get, which we have recently seen with our amazing compost! Q. Can you tell us about Nude’s sustainability initiatives? The ‘Nude’ brand has now grown to not just being about the food, but also about being Nude in its entirety. All our produce is sourced locally where possible - and if not local, we

Nude Town

5 New Street, St Helier 38 | Lucy Morris interview

know exactly where it has come from. All our packaging is eco-friendly and we encourage our customers to bring their own containers by offering them a 5% discount. Q. What excites you about becoming Europe’s first circular economy restaurant? We are taking it to the next level by composting all food waste, which can then be used on local hemp and tea plantations. This will not only ensure amazing plant growth, but also the farming methods being used are drawing down carbon from the atmosphere, leaving a ‘Nude’ impact on the planet. One of the cheapest and easiest ways to solve climate change is to eat a plant-rich diet. Furthermore, by composting food waste which draws down carbon from the atmosphere, by eating ‘Nude,’ you can offset your carbon footprint. Q. What about living in Jersey inspires you the most? The access to innovative people and ideas, the beautiful setting and the healthy lifestyle. Q. What are the current challenges you face in order to become a circular business? The main challenges are education, forwardthinking and funding. It costs money to buy and run The Guzzler, and there is only so much a customer is willing to pay. In the future, we are hoping as part of the Nude Regenerative strategy, to not only offset our own and our customers’ carbon responsibilities through gaining funding, but also aim to set our own carbon price/credits. We are interested to find out, what our customers are really willing to contribute towards reducing their carbon footprint.

Nude Body

Union Street, St Helier

Q. What role does innovation play in your process of creation? We have had to be pretty innovative with this concept, as it’s something new for everyone. I think the word ‘innovation’ is perfect to describe what we all need to be doing. As a community, we need to start adapting to the changes in our environment, being conscious of our impact on this world and how we can start working towards reducing our carbon emissions to help reduce climate change. Q. How do you envision the future of Nude? The future of Nude is endless, as long as we stick to our core beliefs of being Nude in every way we can – obviously clothes would be a difficult adjustment! We can make a huge impact in educating others on all the benefits of eating and living a healthy lifestyle. Q. Do you have any tips for home cooks or home kitchens to be more sustainable? 35% of food is thrown away, which is just ridiculous! We need to be more conscious of what we need and what we don’t; there is a great service in Jersey called Olio, which redistributes food that is edible but going to be wasted, to people who are in need. We can also, as individuals, be more organised by having simple things like shopping lists, so that we don’t purchase unnecessary items and also by using up the excess food in our households before heading to the supermarket. Q. What would you say to those in the hospitality industry who want to reduce their carbon footprint? Please come on this journey with us, as we need to make changes. We might have started with a small business on a small island, but change has to start somewhere, and together we can make a much bigger impact.

Nude Beach

La Haule Slip, St Aubin

Enjoy more for less on your next break to Jersey Ample free parking is not the only benefit of staying at the Hotel de France. Visit www.defrance.co.uk or check out #hoteldefrancejersey to be inspired. Terms: 10% discount available on bookings made up to 31st October 2019. Subject to availability. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer or promotion.

B&B WHEN YOU BOOK ONLINE USING PROMO CODE: CONDOR10

FREE ON-SITE PARKING

FREE TOWN SHUTTLE SERVICE

LANDSCAPED GARDENS

FREE WIRELESS INTERNET

17,000 SQ FT WELLNESS SPA

EASY ONLINE BOOKING

St Saviour’s Road, St Helier, Jersey • Tel: +44 (0) 1534 614000 • general@defrance.co.uk www.defrance.co.uk


Q. So, how did you come to creating the mission and concept of Nude? I have always been into eating ‘healthy’ food with no additives or preservatives and as close to its natural form as possible. Whilst in a career in finance, I decided to go back to college and train as a chef. Once I had completed the course, I then decided to change my path and set up Nude Food with the brand ethos ‘clean, nude, uncomplicated food.’ As part of embarking on this new mission, I was taken aback at the lack of eco-friendly, compostable packaging available and the amount of waste that was produced through preparing food. I contacted a few places to see if I could give them my food waste but, unfortunately, due to licensing, I was told they couldn’t accept it. One day a gentleman called Glyn Mitchell approached me from the Credible food project and said that he had obtained a licence to accept my food waste, and was able to compost it in a machine we have named The Guzzler. Q. What would you say is the key to good health? I think the key to good health starts with happiness, and then it comes down to a what you put into your body. The better the food, air and water you consume, the better you will feel… Like anything, the better quality you put in, the better output you get, which we have recently seen with our amazing compost! Q. Can you tell us about Nude’s sustainability initiatives? The ‘Nude’ brand has now grown to not just being about the food, but also about being Nude in its entirety. All our produce is sourced locally where possible - and if not local, we

Nude Town

5 New Street, St Helier 38 | Lucy Morris interview

know exactly where it has come from. All our packaging is eco-friendly and we encourage our customers to bring their own containers by offering them a 5% discount. Q. What excites you about becoming Europe’s first circular economy restaurant? We are taking it to the next level by composting all food waste, which can then be used on local hemp and tea plantations. This will not only ensure amazing plant growth, but also the farming methods being used are drawing down carbon from the atmosphere, leaving a ‘Nude’ impact on the planet. One of the cheapest and easiest ways to solve climate change is to eat a plant-rich diet. Furthermore, by composting food waste which draws down carbon from the atmosphere, by eating ‘Nude,’ you can offset your carbon footprint. Q. What about living in Jersey inspires you the most? The access to innovative people and ideas, the beautiful setting and the healthy lifestyle. Q. What are the current challenges you face in order to become a circular business? The main challenges are education, forwardthinking and funding. It costs money to buy and run The Guzzler, and there is only so much a customer is willing to pay. In the future, we are hoping as part of the Nude Regenerative strategy, to not only offset our own and our customers’ carbon responsibilities through gaining funding, but also aim to set our own carbon price/credits. We are interested to find out, what our customers are really willing to contribute towards reducing their carbon footprint.

Nude Body

Union Street, St Helier

Q. What role does innovation play in your process of creation? We have had to be pretty innovative with this concept, as it’s something new for everyone. I think the word ‘innovation’ is perfect to describe what we all need to be doing. As a community, we need to start adapting to the changes in our environment, being conscious of our impact on this world and how we can start working towards reducing our carbon emissions to help reduce climate change. Q. How do you envision the future of Nude? The future of Nude is endless, as long as we stick to our core beliefs of being Nude in every way we can – obviously clothes would be a difficult adjustment! We can make a huge impact in educating others on all the benefits of eating and living a healthy lifestyle. Q. Do you have any tips for home cooks or home kitchens to be more sustainable? 35% of food is thrown away, which is just ridiculous! We need to be more conscious of what we need and what we don’t; there is a great service in Jersey called Olio, which redistributes food that is edible but going to be wasted, to people who are in need. We can also, as individuals, be more organised by having simple things like shopping lists, so that we don’t purchase unnecessary items and also by using up the excess food in our households before heading to the supermarket. Q. What would you say to those in the hospitality industry who want to reduce their carbon footprint? Please come on this journey with us, as we need to make changes. We might have started with a small business on a small island, but change has to start somewhere, and together we can make a much bigger impact.

Nude Beach

La Haule Slip, St Aubin

Enjoy more for less on your next break to Jersey Ample free parking is not the only benefit of staying at the Hotel de France. Visit www.defrance.co.uk or check out #hoteldefrancejersey to be inspired. Terms: 10% discount available on bookings made up to 31st October 2019. Subject to availability. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other offer or promotion.

B&B WHEN YOU BOOK ONLINE USING PROMO CODE: CONDOR10

FREE ON-SITE PARKING

FREE TOWN SHUTTLE SERVICE

LANDSCAPED GARDENS

FREE WIRELESS INTERNET

17,000 SQ FT WELLNESS SPA

EASY ONLINE BOOKING

St Saviour’s Road, St Helier, Jersey • Tel: +44 (0) 1534 614000 • general@defrance.co.uk www.defrance.co.uk


With its exceptional light clarity, striking natural beauty and ever-changing tides, Jersey is blessed with photogenic qualities. Read on for my top 5 recommendations for photo hot spots, should you find yourself in Jersey with a lens.

Jersey throughmy Lens Cameron Aird is a 19 year old Jersey-based photographer who works with drone technology as well as conventional cameras. He continues to represent the Channel Islands in gymnastics and is currently training hard for a place in the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

I grew up on Jersey and have always been fascinated by the ever-changing light and tides. Jersey is a photographer’s dream, with its intense colours and magical coastal scenery. Mainly low-lying in the south, the landscape is covered by rolling green fields, flowerfilled meadows and arable crops. Photo opportunities are endless, especially if you are a fan of rough seascape, high cliffs, dramatic rocks and beautiful bays. I live in the south of the island with my family, who have been in Jersey for around twenty years. The beach is just a five-minute stroll from my house, which is a blessing during the sunny summer months. What surprises most visitors is that winter creates some pretty special moments in Jersey too: the huge tidal ranges are jaw-dropping with amazing light that casts moody shadows - a photographer’s dream.

>

42 | Jersey through my lens

Jersey through my lens | 43


With its exceptional light clarity, striking natural beauty and ever-changing tides, Jersey is blessed with photogenic qualities. Read on for my top 5 recommendations for photo hot spots, should you find yourself in Jersey with a lens.

Jersey throughmy Lens Cameron Aird is a 19 year old Jersey-based photographer who works with drone technology as well as conventional cameras. He continues to represent the Channel Islands in gymnastics and is currently training hard for a place in the 2022 Commonwealth Games.

I grew up on Jersey and have always been fascinated by the ever-changing light and tides. Jersey is a photographer’s dream, with its intense colours and magical coastal scenery. Mainly low-lying in the south, the landscape is covered by rolling green fields, flowerfilled meadows and arable crops. Photo opportunities are endless, especially if you are a fan of rough seascape, high cliffs, dramatic rocks and beautiful bays. I live in the south of the island with my family, who have been in Jersey for around twenty years. The beach is just a five-minute stroll from my house, which is a blessing during the sunny summer months. What surprises most visitors is that winter creates some pretty special moments in Jersey too: the huge tidal ranges are jaw-dropping with amazing light that casts moody shadows - a photographer’s dream.

>

42 | Jersey through my lens

Jersey through my lens | 43


My top 5 Photography Spots in Jersey

Gorey Castle

Greve De Lecq

Corbiére Lighthouse

The Corbiére Lighthouse Everything ultimately buffers the sea in Jersey and there are few photographic moments more rewarding than capturing a striking sunset shot with long exposure or a night shot of Jersey’s illuminated villages and pretty harbours. The sea absolutely batters the Corbiére Lighthouse. It towers over Jersey’s south western corner, flanked by rocks and reached by a causeway and this location is really striking. I’d suggest walking, or cycling from St. Aubin to follow the track along a long-disused granite railway, climbing through tree-lined valleys to reach its peak, and the first glimpse of St. Ouen’s Bay. At low tide, you can walk the causeway out to the lighthouse, past rock pools and sandy beaches, but stay alert – a siren sounds when the tide is returning and within 10 minutes the causeway is covered – this adds an extra frisson of excitement to any photography shoot! At sunset, the southwestern headland is at its most magnificent silhouetted by the vibrant colours - absolutely magical! Gorey Castle (Mont Orgueil Castle) The famous Jersey light comes into play at Gorey Castle (Mont Orgueil Castle). Shadows that cast over the medieval architecture can be used to create a dramatic shot. The castle sits on a nub of land that juts out into the sea, with the pretty fishing village of Gorey quite literally in its shadows now for 800 years. I’ve learnt to observe the ‘golden hour rule’ when photographing in Jersey, so that I’m in position an hour after sunrise or an hour before sunset to maximise the best possible light – it is totally worth it here. The effects are stunning. St Ouen Coast The golden sands of St Ouen Coast are perfect for that dream shot of an idyllic beach. I often find it helps with composition to an interesting focal point in my frame to draw the eye. St Ouen’s golden sands are sweeping, wide and empty and work well contrasted with other physical aspects of the landscape

like a rock in the sea, or a movement in the waves or texture or pattern like ripples. It can be windy, which is a boon for the windsurfers, surfers and kite enthusiasts but not great for a tripod! Elizabeth Castle and the tidal island Set on a strategic rocky islet in St Aubin’s Bay, Elizabeth Castle is a 300-year-old fortified castle with battlements dating back to the 1590’s, when Sir Walter Raleigh was Governor of Jersey from 1600 until 1603. Lots of quirky, historical, raw and ancient history here, including the place of refuge for King Charles II during the English Civil War and bunkers refortified to command the sea approaches to Jersey during the German Occupation in World War II. Hidden rooms, passageways and bunkers, craggy rocks and a 1.5 breakwater offer lots of loads of opportunities for experimental shots. Great for drone and conventional camera. The beautiful Greve De Lecq Coast My interest in photography started when I was about 13, when I first became aware of visual content in social media. Seeing others create interesting shots inspired me to buy a camera and create imagery. After studying Media at Highlands College I started experimenting and photographing different things I came across in Jersey. This took on a whole new level when drone technology came around – it’s incredible to discover new insights and perspectives. On the Greve De Lecq coast, the bordering cliffs means the sun is lost in late afternoon – hit it right and the light-and-shade effects can be incredible. Timing is crucial when photographing Jersey: torrid high seas in the morning can be a rock-hemmed sleepy sandy beach a few hours later. I have also realised the value in walking everywhere – there is no better way to discover new things than on foot. Photography is an adventure, and I’m enjoying finding out who I am as a creative. On Jersey I am reminded every day by something spectacular, why I fell in love with photography in the first place.

Elizabeth Castle

My top tips • Make the best of Jersey’s amazing natural light • Be brave when it comes to composition • Experiment to create different moods • Check on the tide times 44 | Jersey through my lens

• Watch the weather • Never rush from one location to the next,

take your time • Learn tips and tricks from other photographers

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

• A tripod can come in handy • Remember - your imagination is your limit! • Wear comfy footwear for long walks or climbs

reated in C Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become the perfect reminder of your time in Jersey. Available from studios and outlets across the Island.

Fait a la main a Jersey.

Genuine Jersey est la garantie de la provenance des produits fabriqués localement. Les objets sélectionnés sont d’abord exploités sous leur forme brute puis transformés grâce à la créativité et le savoir-faire des artisans locaux. Ils deviennent ensuite de parfaits souvenirs de votre séjour à Jersey. Disponibles dans tous les ateliers et magasins de l’île.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

Jersey.


My top 5 Photography Spots in Jersey

Gorey Castle

Greve De Lecq

Corbiére Lighthouse

The Corbiére Lighthouse Everything ultimately buffers the sea in Jersey and there are few photographic moments more rewarding than capturing a striking sunset shot with long exposure or a night shot of Jersey’s illuminated villages and pretty harbours. The sea absolutely batters the Corbiére Lighthouse. It towers over Jersey’s south western corner, flanked by rocks and reached by a causeway and this location is really striking. I’d suggest walking, or cycling from St. Aubin to follow the track along a long-disused granite railway, climbing through tree-lined valleys to reach its peak, and the first glimpse of St. Ouen’s Bay. At low tide, you can walk the causeway out to the lighthouse, past rock pools and sandy beaches, but stay alert – a siren sounds when the tide is returning and within 10 minutes the causeway is covered – this adds an extra frisson of excitement to any photography shoot! At sunset, the southwestern headland is at its most magnificent silhouetted by the vibrant colours - absolutely magical! Gorey Castle (Mont Orgueil Castle) The famous Jersey light comes into play at Gorey Castle (Mont Orgueil Castle). Shadows that cast over the medieval architecture can be used to create a dramatic shot. The castle sits on a nub of land that juts out into the sea, with the pretty fishing village of Gorey quite literally in its shadows now for 800 years. I’ve learnt to observe the ‘golden hour rule’ when photographing in Jersey, so that I’m in position an hour after sunrise or an hour before sunset to maximise the best possible light – it is totally worth it here. The effects are stunning. St Ouen Coast The golden sands of St Ouen Coast are perfect for that dream shot of an idyllic beach. I often find it helps with composition to an interesting focal point in my frame to draw the eye. St Ouen’s golden sands are sweeping, wide and empty and work well contrasted with other physical aspects of the landscape

like a rock in the sea, or a movement in the waves or texture or pattern like ripples. It can be windy, which is a boon for the windsurfers, surfers and kite enthusiasts but not great for a tripod! Elizabeth Castle and the tidal island Set on a strategic rocky islet in St Aubin’s Bay, Elizabeth Castle is a 300-year-old fortified castle with battlements dating back to the 1590’s, when Sir Walter Raleigh was Governor of Jersey from 1600 until 1603. Lots of quirky, historical, raw and ancient history here, including the place of refuge for King Charles II during the English Civil War and bunkers refortified to command the sea approaches to Jersey during the German Occupation in World War II. Hidden rooms, passageways and bunkers, craggy rocks and a 1.5 breakwater offer lots of loads of opportunities for experimental shots. Great for drone and conventional camera. The beautiful Greve De Lecq Coast My interest in photography started when I was about 13, when I first became aware of visual content in social media. Seeing others create interesting shots inspired me to buy a camera and create imagery. After studying Media at Highlands College I started experimenting and photographing different things I came across in Jersey. This took on a whole new level when drone technology came around – it’s incredible to discover new insights and perspectives. On the Greve De Lecq coast, the bordering cliffs means the sun is lost in late afternoon – hit it right and the light-and-shade effects can be incredible. Timing is crucial when photographing Jersey: torrid high seas in the morning can be a rock-hemmed sleepy sandy beach a few hours later. I have also realised the value in walking everywhere – there is no better way to discover new things than on foot. Photography is an adventure, and I’m enjoying finding out who I am as a creative. On Jersey I am reminded every day by something spectacular, why I fell in love with photography in the first place.

Elizabeth Castle

My top tips • Make the best of Jersey’s amazing natural light • Be brave when it comes to composition • Experiment to create different moods • Check on the tide times 44 | Jersey through my lens

• Watch the weather • Never rush from one location to the next,

take your time • Learn tips and tricks from other photographers

STUDIOS | GIFTS SHOPS | GALLERIES | CAFES

• A tripod can come in handy • Remember - your imagination is your limit! • Wear comfy footwear for long walks or climbs

reated in C Genuine Jersey is the guarantee of true local provenance. Accredited products begin life in raw form and through the creativity and craftsmanship of Islanders become the perfect reminder of your time in Jersey. Available from studios and outlets across the Island.

Fait a la main a Jersey.

Genuine Jersey est la garantie de la provenance des produits fabriqués localement. Les objets sélectionnés sont d’abord exploités sous leur forme brute puis transformés grâce à la créativité et le savoir-faire des artisans locaux. Ils deviennent ensuite de parfaits souvenirs de votre séjour à Jersey. Disponibles dans tous les ateliers et magasins de l’île.

@GenuineJsy | genuinejersey.je

Look for the Mark before you buy

Jersey.


HANG OUT AT J E R S E Y Z O O

Great places to eat in the Channel Islands St Peter Port

Deerhound Country Inn

19 Commercial Arcade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1JX T: 01481 723455

South Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1HA T: 01481 720450

North Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 2NB T: 01481 728994

"Located in the heart of St Peter Port, a great, modern place to enjoy traditional cuisine and modern fusion dishes."

"A traditional town centre community pub overlooking the harbour, marinas and Castle Cornet."

"Relaxed modern seafood dishes at affordable prices served in stylish surroundings with fantastic views of the harbour."

Don ,t forget yo Inndulgen ur ce Card Co

llect y spend in our points to any of o ur pubs bars an , d eateri es acros the Cha s nnel Isla nds

Le Bourg, Forest, Guernsey, GY8 0AN T: 01481 238585

North Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 2NB T: 01481 721368

The Pollet, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1WG T: 01481 714990

South Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1AH T: 01481 720644

"A varied imaginative menu; with great pub grub classics to modern gastro dishes."

"An iconic “proper pub” occupying an enviable location overlooking the St Peter Port marinas."

"Traditional town pub serving wholesome classic bar meals with an excellent selection of beers and ale’s."

"With its Mediterranean and Far East inspired menu, this contemporary bar and restaurant takes its inspiration from European café culture."

Royal Square, St Helier, JE2 4WA T: 01534 722184

Halkett Place, St Helier, JE2 4WG T: 01534 732769

La Rue des Buttes, St Mary, JE3 3DS T: 01534 482897

La Rue des Picots, Trinity, JE3 5JX T: 01534 864691

"Traditional Jersey pub boasting a large alfresco dining area."

"Traditional pub dishes right in the heart of St Helier."

"Cosy up and relax whilst appreciating a range of traditional favourites in the picturesque parish of St Mary."

"Recently transformed, this stylish country pub serves up traditional flavours perfect for locals and visitors alike."

St Mary’s Country Inn

La Rue a la Dame, St Saviour, JE2 7NH T: 01534 726278 "This modern and bright eatery is a great place to enjoy home comforts and fantastic food."

Trinity Arms

Five Oaks

14-16 Weighbridge Place, St Helier, JE2 3NF T: 01534 858220

Seaton Place, St Helier, JE2 3QI T: 01534 730510

Halkett Street, St Helier, JE2 4WJ T: 01534 724065

"Relaxed urban industrial interior serving seafood, steak and barbeque dishes."

"Ideal for brunch, fresh stone baked pizzas and cocktails in the evening."

"Modern, fun hangout for a quick alfresco lunch or dinner."

Hue Street, St Helier, JE2 3RE T: 01534 872853

The Waterfront, St Helier, JE2 3WF T: 01534 789431

Le Boulevard, St Aubin, JE3 8AB T: 01534 746433

The Dicq, St Saviour, JE2 7PD T: 01534 730423

"Nostalgic furnishings and a roaring fire. The perfect place to enjoy your tipple and pub grub."

"Located on the popular Waterfront, a stylish place to chat with friends and savour the sunshine."

"Enjoy St Aubins’ charm. Dining, drinking and the option to stay over in the boutique hotel."

"Great food served in front of one of Jersey’s best beaches."

Old Court House Inn

St Helier White Horse

Le Hocq Inn

Make your day at Jersey Zoo extra memorable and wild. Book one of our Animal Experiences: • Encounters with bats, reptiles and amphibians, birds or meerkats and otters • Meet the apes, bears or lemurs • Keeper for a day

www.jerseyzoo.org

Visit liberationgroup.com for more information and to book a table

La Grande Route de la Cote, StClement, JE2 6EP T: 01534 854924 "Situated in a beautiful coastal setting, serving delicious food perfect for the whole family."


HANG OUT AT J E R S E Y Z O O

Great places to eat in the Channel Islands St Peter Port

Deerhound Country Inn

19 Commercial Arcade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1JX T: 01481 723455

South Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1HA T: 01481 720450

North Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 2NB T: 01481 728994

"Located in the heart of St Peter Port, a great, modern place to enjoy traditional cuisine and modern fusion dishes."

"A traditional town centre community pub overlooking the harbour, marinas and Castle Cornet."

"Relaxed modern seafood dishes at affordable prices served in stylish surroundings with fantastic views of the harbour."

Don ,t forget yo Inndulgen ur ce Card Co

llect y spend in our points to any of o ur pubs bars an , d eateri es acros the Cha s nnel Isla nds

Le Bourg, Forest, Guernsey, GY8 0AN T: 01481 238585

North Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 2NB T: 01481 721368

The Pollet, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1WG T: 01481 714990

South Esplanade, St Peter Port, Guernsey, GY1 1AH T: 01481 720644

"A varied imaginative menu; with great pub grub classics to modern gastro dishes."

"An iconic “proper pub” occupying an enviable location overlooking the St Peter Port marinas."

"Traditional town pub serving wholesome classic bar meals with an excellent selection of beers and ale’s."

"With its Mediterranean and Far East inspired menu, this contemporary bar and restaurant takes its inspiration from European café culture."

Royal Square, St Helier, JE2 4WA T: 01534 722184

Halkett Place, St Helier, JE2 4WG T: 01534 732769

La Rue des Buttes, St Mary, JE3 3DS T: 01534 482897

La Rue des Picots, Trinity, JE3 5JX T: 01534 864691

"Traditional Jersey pub boasting a large alfresco dining area."

"Traditional pub dishes right in the heart of St Helier."

"Cosy up and relax whilst appreciating a range of traditional favourites in the picturesque parish of St Mary."

"Recently transformed, this stylish country pub serves up traditional flavours perfect for locals and visitors alike."

St Mary’s Country Inn

La Rue a la Dame, St Saviour, JE2 7NH T: 01534 726278 "This modern and bright eatery is a great place to enjoy home comforts and fantastic food."

Trinity Arms

Five Oaks

14-16 Weighbridge Place, St Helier, JE2 3NF T: 01534 858220

Seaton Place, St Helier, JE2 3QI T: 01534 730510

Halkett Street, St Helier, JE2 4WJ T: 01534 724065

"Relaxed urban industrial interior serving seafood, steak and barbeque dishes."

"Ideal for brunch, fresh stone baked pizzas and cocktails in the evening."

"Modern, fun hangout for a quick alfresco lunch or dinner."

Hue Street, St Helier, JE2 3RE T: 01534 872853

The Waterfront, St Helier, JE2 3WF T: 01534 789431

Le Boulevard, St Aubin, JE3 8AB T: 01534 746433

The Dicq, St Saviour, JE2 7PD T: 01534 730423

"Nostalgic furnishings and a roaring fire. The perfect place to enjoy your tipple and pub grub."

"Located on the popular Waterfront, a stylish place to chat with friends and savour the sunshine."

"Enjoy St Aubins’ charm. Dining, drinking and the option to stay over in the boutique hotel."

"Great food served in front of one of Jersey’s best beaches."

Old Court House Inn

St Helier White Horse

Le Hocq Inn

Make your day at Jersey Zoo extra memorable and wild. Book one of our Animal Experiences: • Encounters with bats, reptiles and amphibians, birds or meerkats and otters • Meet the apes, bears or lemurs • Keeper for a day

www.jerseyzoo.org

Visit liberationgroup.com for more information and to book a table

La Grande Route de la Cote, StClement, JE2 6EP T: 01534 854924 "Situated in a beautiful coastal setting, serving delicious food perfect for the whole family."


G Guernsey highlights

Sark Island Take the short ferry ride from St Peter Port to experience the tranquillity and beauty of Sark, a car free zone and home to only 600 inhabitants. St Peter Port With cobbled streets backing up a steep hillside, spires and towers, a picturesque marina and historic gardens, this is one of Europe’s most charming harbour towns.

Hauteville House Literary lovers can step in to the magical home and world of famous author, Victor Hugo who spent 15 years here in exile. St Pierre Park Spa Complex And relax … a stunning swimming pool, marble steam room, volcanic stone sauna, experience showers, 5 treatment rooms, relaxation room and wonderful views over the lake. Fermain Bay One of Guernsey’s most beautiful beaches, this pebbly bay is hidden on the rugged east coast and is a delightful walk from St Peter Port along the cliff path.

Little Chapel Step inside Europe’s smallest chapel, decorated with pebbles and broken china. Don’t miss out on a great photo opportunity!

Pictures left to right. Sark Island, St Peter Port, Hauteville House, St Pierre Park spa complex, Fermain Bay, Little Chapel.

48 | Guernsey highlights


G Guernsey highlights

Sark Island Take the short ferry ride from St Peter Port to experience the tranquillity and beauty of Sark, a car free zone and home to only 600 inhabitants. St Peter Port With cobbled streets backing up a steep hillside, spires and towers, a picturesque marina and historic gardens, this is one of Europe’s most charming harbour towns.

Hauteville House Literary lovers can step in to the magical home and world of famous author, Victor Hugo who spent 15 years here in exile. St Pierre Park Spa Complex And relax … a stunning swimming pool, marble steam room, volcanic stone sauna, experience showers, 5 treatment rooms, relaxation room and wonderful views over the lake. Fermain Bay One of Guernsey’s most beautiful beaches, this pebbly bay is hidden on the rugged east coast and is a delightful walk from St Peter Port along the cliff path.

Little Chapel Step inside Europe’s smallest chapel, decorated with pebbles and broken china. Don’t miss out on a great photo opportunity!

Pictures left to right. Sark Island, St Peter Port, Hauteville House, St Pierre Park spa complex, Fermain Bay, Little Chapel.

48 | Guernsey highlights


g

Gourmet Guernsey

SAHARA CITY RESTAURANT AT LA TRELADE HOTEL

SLAUGHTERHOUSE BAR & EATERY

Set your taste buds alive with the taste of the Sahara!

Opening its doors in 2017, the Slaughterhouse has been reincarnated as a stunning bar and eatery where great food and drink come together in a spectacular historical building. It’s certainly well worth a visit.

Forest Road, St Martin, GY4 6UB

Castle Pier, St Peter Port, GY1 1AN

This noteworthy restaurant at Le Trelade Hotel, is situated in stunning St Martin, a parish set on the coast and surrounded by steep cliffs and beautiful bays. A trip to St Martin wouldn’t be complete without a visit to Sahara City for a relaxed dining affair where you can experience authentic North African style food. It specialises in Mediterranean, Moroccan, Lebanese and Egyptian cuisine for a true taste of the Sahara, as well as offering traditional dishes and a Sunday Carvery. An extremely tempting and varied menu includes hot and cold starters, beautifully flavoured tagines, hot delicacies from the charcoal grill, Mediterranean specialties, fresh fish, sandwiches, salads, sharing dishes, desserts and traditional English dishes. Everything is lovingly made with fresh, authentic ingredients. During the summer months, their beautiful front garden beckons for a spot of alfresco dining.

+44 (0)1481 235 454 Sahara City Guernsey on Facebook

Open for just over a year, the Sahara is gaining an enviable reputation and is often busy, so it’s worth calling in advance for a reservation. Take away is available on request.

This landmark building, beautifully positioned on the edge of St Peter Port harbour, scooped the 2017 Guernsey Design Awards for its innovative redesign and change of use.

+44 (0)1481 712 123 info@slaughterhouse.gg www.slaughterhouse.gg

Experience the many different areas of the restaurant, such as its sundrenched, sheltered courtyard, which is a great place to unwind with a snack or drink from the prosecco bar. If you want stunning views southwards over Havelet Bay, a raised private terrace also serves food and drink. Inside, the bar boasts one of the largest ranges of wines, beers and spirits in Guernsey, and a mezzanine level, where each window offers a picture postcard view of St Peter Port, is another locale that serves food prepared to perfection by their impeccable team of chefs.

MORA RESTAURANT & BAR

LA REUNION

PIER 17

THE PAVILION RESTAURANT

HOUGUE DU POMMIER HOTEL

THE LOBSTER & GRILL

Mora is a dining experience not to miss. Set on the Quay, the views of the harbour and islands are sensational. There’s a choice of à la carte dining on the first floor and a brasserie and bar below. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Bar open all day.

From our beach-side location, La Reunion produces delicious food in relaxed surroundings with a breathtaking view. Our menus include local ingredients and our two-course lunch starts from just £17 per head. Alternatively, enjoy a refreshing cocktail on the terrace or at the stylish bar.

Seamus Duggan’s seafood restaurant, in the thick of St Peter Port’s harbour action, is the place to go for the freshest turbot, brill, bass and shellfish... eaten inside or out. The menu is eclectic so there’s something for everyone - plus stunning views.

Set on the garden level within St Pierre Park Hotel, this 1 AA Rosette restaurant serves the finest dishes. The team use local and seasonal produce, as well as fuss-free techniques so the food can speak for itself. Lunch 12pm-2pm, afternoon tea 2pm-5pm, dinner 6pm-8.45pm

This is a beautifully refurbished boutique style hotel, with an enviable reputation for fine cuisine. We have extensive gardens, an outdoor swimming pool and car park. We’ve always got great offers and deals on our delicious food open for non-resident lunch and dinner.

Set in the heart of Guernsey, The Lobster & Grill is a spacious modern restaurant with a great friendly atmosphere. Known for their use of fresh local produce.

The Quay, St Peter Port

+44 (0)1481 715 053 www.mora.gg

Cobo Coast Rd, Castel

+44 (0)1481 255 600 www.lareunion.gg

Albert Pier, St Peter Port

+44 (0)1481 720 823 www.pier17restaurant.com

St Pierre Park Hotel, Rohais

+44 (0)1481 728 282 www.handpickedhotels.co.uk

Hougue du Pommier Road, Castel

+44 (0)1481 256 531 www.facebook.com/pommier.ch.je

Le Friquet Hotel, Castel

+44 (0)1481 259 974 www.thelobsterandgrill.co.uk


g

Gourmet Guernsey

SAHARA CITY RESTAURANT AT LA TRELADE HOTEL

SLAUGHTERHOUSE BAR & EATERY

Set your taste buds alive with the taste of the Sahara!

Opening its doors in 2017, the Slaughterhouse has been reincarnated as a stunning bar and eatery where great food and drink come together in a spectacular historical building. It’s certainly well worth a visit.

Forest Road, St Martin, GY4 6UB

Castle Pier, St Peter Port, GY1 1AN

This noteworthy restaurant at Le Trelade Hotel, is situated in stunning St Martin, a parish set on the coast and surrounded by steep cliffs and beautiful bays. A trip to St Martin wouldn’t be complete without a visit to Sahara City for a relaxed dining affair where you can experience authentic North African style food. It specialises in Mediterranean, Moroccan, Lebanese and Egyptian cuisine for a true taste of the Sahara, as well as offering traditional dishes and a Sunday Carvery. An extremely tempting and varied menu includes hot and cold starters, beautifully flavoured tagines, hot delicacies from the charcoal grill, Mediterranean specialties, fresh fish, sandwiches, salads, sharing dishes, desserts and traditional English dishes. Everything is lovingly made with fresh, authentic ingredients. During the summer months, their beautiful front garden beckons for a spot of alfresco dining.

+44 (0)1481 235 454 Sahara City Guernsey on Facebook

Open for just over a year, the Sahara is gaining an enviable reputation and is often busy, so it’s worth calling in advance for a reservation. Take away is available on request.

This landmark building, beautifully positioned on the edge of St Peter Port harbour, scooped the 2017 Guernsey Design Awards for its innovative redesign and change of use.

+44 (0)1481 712 123 info@slaughterhouse.gg www.slaughterhouse.gg

Experience the many different areas of the restaurant, such as its sundrenched, sheltered courtyard, which is a great place to unwind with a snack or drink from the prosecco bar. If you want stunning views southwards over Havelet Bay, a raised private terrace also serves food and drink. Inside, the bar boasts one of the largest ranges of wines, beers and spirits in Guernsey, and a mezzanine level, where each window offers a picture postcard view of St Peter Port, is another locale that serves food prepared to perfection by their impeccable team of chefs.

MORA RESTAURANT & BAR

LA REUNION

PIER 17

THE PAVILION RESTAURANT

HOUGUE DU POMMIER HOTEL

THE LOBSTER & GRILL

Mora is a dining experience not to miss. Set on the Quay, the views of the harbour and islands are sensational. There’s a choice of à la carte dining on the first floor and a brasserie and bar below. Open daily for lunch and dinner. Bar open all day.

From our beach-side location, La Reunion produces delicious food in relaxed surroundings with a breathtaking view. Our menus include local ingredients and our two-course lunch starts from just £17 per head. Alternatively, enjoy a refreshing cocktail on the terrace or at the stylish bar.

Seamus Duggan’s seafood restaurant, in the thick of St Peter Port’s harbour action, is the place to go for the freshest turbot, brill, bass and shellfish... eaten inside or out. The menu is eclectic so there’s something for everyone - plus stunning views.

Set on the garden level within St Pierre Park Hotel, this 1 AA Rosette restaurant serves the finest dishes. The team use local and seasonal produce, as well as fuss-free techniques so the food can speak for itself. Lunch 12pm-2pm, afternoon tea 2pm-5pm, dinner 6pm-8.45pm

This is a beautifully refurbished boutique style hotel, with an enviable reputation for fine cuisine. We have extensive gardens, an outdoor swimming pool and car park. We’ve always got great offers and deals on our delicious food open for non-resident lunch and dinner.

Set in the heart of Guernsey, The Lobster & Grill is a spacious modern restaurant with a great friendly atmosphere. Known for their use of fresh local produce.

The Quay, St Peter Port

+44 (0)1481 715 053 www.mora.gg

Cobo Coast Rd, Castel

+44 (0)1481 255 600 www.lareunion.gg

Albert Pier, St Peter Port

+44 (0)1481 720 823 www.pier17restaurant.com

St Pierre Park Hotel, Rohais

+44 (0)1481 728 282 www.handpickedhotels.co.uk

Hougue du Pommier Road, Castel

+44 (0)1481 256 531 www.facebook.com/pommier.ch.je

Le Friquet Hotel, Castel

+44 (0)1481 259 974 www.thelobsterandgrill.co.uk


Gin Gin Discerning gin lovers will soon find that Guernsey is just the tonic they need, says Sarah Woods.

Glorious

Gin may originally derive from a Dutch medicinal tipple, but the drink we know as gin today is unmistakably British. The last decade has seen gin claim a whole new level of fandom. Sales are up a massive 120% since 2009 in the UK with gin festivals popping up all over the country. Brits bought more than 73 million bottles of gin in 2019, breaking all previous records (worth £2.1 billion). From rhubarb gin and traditional sloe to many more unusual varieties, the purists might sniff, but gin has never been so popular: a “ginaissance” that is fueled by a seductive array of exotic infusions, flavours and aromas. In Guernsey, a small but highly skilled number of artisan gin-makers have put their own tipples on the map. Balancing the botanicals and ensuring each batch is hand-crafted to fine-tune flavours, keeping the quality exceptionally high. Each boasts a clear sense of ‘place’ that draws on the authentic character of the island: geologically, botanically and culturally. Sip gin on the rocks, or paired with tonic, or as the basis for a delectable gin-based cocktail to discover Guernsey in a glass.

52 | Glorious gin

Wheadon’s Gin

There is a great deal of Guernsey in Wheadon’s Gin as the family has been involved in alcohol on the island for more than a hundred years. Today, a talented team of gin gurus produce their treasured elixir in traditional copper stills using carefullysourced ingredients such as samphire foraged from the cliffs on Guernsey’s south coast or picked from a local horticulturalist’s incredible range of rare citrus plants. Blending delicate, slightly mineral, flavours of the sea air with bold and bright notes, Wheadon’s Rock Samphire and Pink Grapefruit is a complex and rounded gin that, like a sorbet, truly freshens the palate. For a deeper more robust flavour, try the Yuzu, Lemongrass & Green Tea Gin with its pleasing herbaceous twist. Wheadon’s Mandarin Lime & Hibiscus Gin has a delightful fragrance of citrus and hibiscus florals - perfect for an excellent negroni. Join regular tours as well as tastings and talks in the atmospheric cellar lounge of Guernsey’s Bella Luce, The Gin Hotel. As part of the Journey Through Gin experience, visitors are offered a range of options, from regular twice-weekly introductory sessions (£20 p.p.) at the distillery, through to the more involved tasting, distilling and dining options (£45 p.p). Booking essential.

Ten Degrees Equally as impressive is the ultra-premium Ten Degrees, a gin that is engineered with precision to perfection and distilled using a unique process of vacuum distillation and fractionation. What does this mean? Well, by lowering the boiling point to just 10 degrees celsius, the gin-makers at White Rock Brewery who magic up Ten Degrees can extract even the most delicate flavours from each of their six carefully selected botanicals. The result is a spirit with a clean profile exhibiting fresh bergamot, delicate floral bursts mingled with pervasive sweet-pine. Gin at Ten Degrees uses Juniper, Pink Pepper, Coriander, Bergamot, Kaffir Lime Leaves and delicate Freesia perfect for a contemporary palate.

Pink Granite Gin A spirited homage to Guernsey stonemasons, and the blush-coloured granite from which the Channel Islands was formed millions of years ago, Pink Granite Gin is inspired by Guernsey’s hand-carved rocks and monuments of timeless beauty. Launched in July 2019, Pink Granite is already seducing gin lovers to the so-called Island of Gin. Londondry and smooth in style, Pink Granite has 14 specially chosen botanicals at its heart. Locally grown raspberries, pink grapefruit, hibiscus and pink peppercorns are also a part of its authentic Guernsey taste, described as “pure sophistication”. Another Guernsey boutique gin is the award-winning Blue Bottle Gin: a fine artisan product with tantalising flavours that echo the island’s coastal character. Gin at its simplest, is a spirit flavoured with a variety of different botanicals (such as coriander seeds, cardamom, cassia bark and cinnamon) but with the predominant flavour being that of juniper. The folk that make Blue Bottle ensure that alongside the traditional juniper scent, you can also savour the tropical (almost coconut) aroma of local gorse flowers, which annually turn the Guernsey cliff tops into fields of bright gold. These flavours are complimented alongside the sweetness of nutmeg and hint of cubeb pepper. Blue Bottle is distilled in the best quality equipment, using a fine-looking copper Arnold Holstein 500L steam heated still. Glorious gin | 53


Gin Gin Discerning gin lovers will soon find that Guernsey is just the tonic they need, says Sarah Woods.

Glorious

Gin may originally derive from a Dutch medicinal tipple, but the drink we know as gin today is unmistakably British. The last decade has seen gin claim a whole new level of fandom. Sales are up a massive 120% since 2009 in the UK with gin festivals popping up all over the country. Brits bought more than 73 million bottles of gin in 2019, breaking all previous records (worth £2.1 billion). From rhubarb gin and traditional sloe to many more unusual varieties, the purists might sniff, but gin has never been so popular: a “ginaissance” that is fueled by a seductive array of exotic infusions, flavours and aromas. In Guernsey, a small but highly skilled number of artisan gin-makers have put their own tipples on the map. Balancing the botanicals and ensuring each batch is hand-crafted to fine-tune flavours, keeping the quality exceptionally high. Each boasts a clear sense of ‘place’ that draws on the authentic character of the island: geologically, botanically and culturally. Sip gin on the rocks, or paired with tonic, or as the basis for a delectable gin-based cocktail to discover Guernsey in a glass.

52 | Glorious gin

Wheadon’s Gin

There is a great deal of Guernsey in Wheadon’s Gin as the family has been involved in alcohol on the island for more than a hundred years. Today, a talented team of gin gurus produce their treasured elixir in traditional copper stills using carefullysourced ingredients such as samphire foraged from the cliffs on Guernsey’s south coast or picked from a local horticulturalist’s incredible range of rare citrus plants. Blending delicate, slightly mineral, flavours of the sea air with bold and bright notes, Wheadon’s Rock Samphire and Pink Grapefruit is a complex and rounded gin that, like a sorbet, truly freshens the palate. For a deeper more robust flavour, try the Yuzu, Lemongrass & Green Tea Gin with its pleasing herbaceous twist. Wheadon’s Mandarin Lime & Hibiscus Gin has a delightful fragrance of citrus and hibiscus florals - perfect for an excellent negroni. Join regular tours as well as tastings and talks in the atmospheric cellar lounge of Guernsey’s Bella Luce, The Gin Hotel. As part of the Journey Through Gin experience, visitors are offered a range of options, from regular twice-weekly introductory sessions (£20 p.p.) at the distillery, through to the more involved tasting, distilling and dining options (£45 p.p). Booking essential.

Ten Degrees Equally as impressive is the ultra-premium Ten Degrees, a gin that is engineered with precision to perfection and distilled using a unique process of vacuum distillation and fractionation. What does this mean? Well, by lowering the boiling point to just 10 degrees celsius, the gin-makers at White Rock Brewery who magic up Ten Degrees can extract even the most delicate flavours from each of their six carefully selected botanicals. The result is a spirit with a clean profile exhibiting fresh bergamot, delicate floral bursts mingled with pervasive sweet-pine. Gin at Ten Degrees uses Juniper, Pink Pepper, Coriander, Bergamot, Kaffir Lime Leaves and delicate Freesia perfect for a contemporary palate.

Pink Granite Gin A spirited homage to Guernsey stonemasons, and the blush-coloured granite from which the Channel Islands was formed millions of years ago, Pink Granite Gin is inspired by Guernsey’s hand-carved rocks and monuments of timeless beauty. Launched in July 2019, Pink Granite is already seducing gin lovers to the so-called Island of Gin. Londondry and smooth in style, Pink Granite has 14 specially chosen botanicals at its heart. Locally grown raspberries, pink grapefruit, hibiscus and pink peppercorns are also a part of its authentic Guernsey taste, described as “pure sophistication”. Another Guernsey boutique gin is the award-winning Blue Bottle Gin: a fine artisan product with tantalising flavours that echo the island’s coastal character. Gin at its simplest, is a spirit flavoured with a variety of different botanicals (such as coriander seeds, cardamom, cassia bark and cinnamon) but with the predominant flavour being that of juniper. The folk that make Blue Bottle ensure that alongside the traditional juniper scent, you can also savour the tropical (almost coconut) aroma of local gorse flowers, which annually turn the Guernsey cliff tops into fields of bright gold. These flavours are complimented alongside the sweetness of nutmeg and hint of cubeb pepper. Blue Bottle is distilled in the best quality equipment, using a fine-looking copper Arnold Holstein 500L steam heated still. Glorious gin | 53


If you share your life with a much-loved pet, it feels natural to share your holidays with them too. Some of Guernsey’s local pooches show us their favourite pastimes and the many ways the island welcomes four-legged friends.

Pawfect the

holiday

There are 27 beautiful beaches in Guernsey and between 30th September and 1st May, dogs are permitted to run free on any of them. Only a handful of the island’s beaches (Cobo Bay, Port Soif, Vazon (northern end), Petit Bot, Fermain Bay, Pembroke & L’Ancresse and L’Eree) do not allow dogs during the summer season from beginning of May. The good news is there are plenty of others to choose from. Check out (in panel opposite) what local pooches Tess, Gracie and Jessie have to say about their favourite walking spots. Hop to Herm Herm Island is just 20 minutes away from Guernsey and can be reached using the frequent Travel Trident ferry from St Peter Port. There is no extra charge to bring your dog onboard* – just be sure to keep them on a lead. The White House Hotel on this picturesque island has six dog-friendly rooms and there are also nine selfcatering cottages which accept dogs. For a bite to eat, four-legged friends are welcome in The Mermaid Tavern and at The Ship Inn Courtyard. Bear’s, Moissonniere and Harbour beaches allow dogs during the summer and all other island beaches allow dogs from 1st October – 30th April. Owners are kindly asked to keep dogs on a lead in public areas like the harbour and village, otherwise they may enjoy the freedom of Herm unleashed. Dog-friendly accommodation A number of hotels permit dogs to stay in allocated rooms including the Old Government House Hotel & Spa and the Duke of Richmond in St Peter Port, the Fleur du Jardin and the Imperial Hotel along the west coast. You can also stay at the Hougue du Pommier Hotel, Le Chene, Abbey Court Hotel and small dogs are welcome at Saints Bay Hotel which is close to scenic strolls. If you prefer the flexibility of self-catering then Rocquaine Bay Apartments, Vazon Bay Apartments/Bungalows, La Grande Mare Hotel’s Self-Catering Apartments and Adair Bungalows are all pet friendly and conveniently located near suitable beaches. Banjour Self-Catering even has an on-site dog parlour, and doggie day care is available if you need to go somewhere that does not happen to be dog friendly. Eating & drinking In St Peter Port – Guernsey’s capital - Le Petit Bistro Café, Octopus Restaurant, The Golden Lion and the

54 | The pawfect holiday

Terrace are just a few of the places that will happily welcome dogs. Along Cobo Bay, dogs can sit outside with you at The Rockmount Restaurant & Bar while watching the sun go down. Les Douvres Hotel in Saint Martin, a popular choice for bar meals, has sheltered gardens for dining with your furry friend, or head inside on cooler days. The island is also well-known for its coastal kiosks which are handy for refreshment breaks, and most offer water bowls and dog treats. For more information about Pet Passports and bringing pets to Guernsey go to visitguernsey.com and search ‘dog’.

Our top tips Book pet-friendly transport, such as Condor Ferries. Check out www.condorferries.com for details of pet-friendly hotels, B&B and tips on travelling with canine companions.

Meet our local pooches Tess Breed: German Shorthaired Pointer Loves: Stand-Up Paddleboarding. Stopping off at the cosy Fleur Du Jardin Hotel in the parish of Castel for dinner. Favourite winter beach: L’Eree Beach on the west coast. Favourite walking route: Along the paths of Pleinmont Headland in the parish of Torteval – a great location for exploring off the lead!

Gracie Breed: Chocolate Labrador

Trial run. Never travelled with your dog before? Take a short trip close to home first to see how he responds to transport - i.e. does he get anxious, or car sick? Water breaks. Travel with a water bowl that you can refill for breaks. Dogs can get very dehydrated when they travel. Health matters. Just as humans can fall ill on holiday, so can pets. Check your pet insurance to establish what cover you will have at your destination. Best vet. Visiting Guernsey for the first time? Locate the nearest vet for peace of mind. Search at findavet.rcvs.org.uk Travel ID your pet. Attach a tag to your pet’s collar that includes the address and phone number of where you’ll be staying during your visit to Guernsey. Exercise. Break up the journey with regular walks. Relax. Pack a familiar blanket or toy to help your dog stay calm and reassured during the trip. Walkies. Check out Visit Guernsey’s 20 selfguided walks on the rugged south coast cliff paths, the sweeping bays of the west and leafy nature trails, wildlife reserves and swathes of common land. See www.visitguernsey.com

Loves: Chasing seagulls and running into the sea, enjoying the fresh breeze. Favourite winter beach: L’Ancresse Beach situated in the most northern part of Guernsey, which has plenty of open space. Favourite walking route: The quiet lanes of Saint Martin – a country parish with lots of character.

Jessie Breed: Yellow Labrador Loves: Tennis balls and swimming. Watching ball sports on TV when it’s time to head inside. Favourite winter beach: Jessie is new to Guernsey so has yet to discover her favourite winter beach. Favourite walking route: Heading along the white sandy bay at Chouet Beach in Vale, walking next to the nearby golf course and looping back round. The pawfect holiday | 55


If you share your life with a much-loved pet, it feels natural to share your holidays with them too. Some of Guernsey’s local pooches show us their favourite pastimes and the many ways the island welcomes four-legged friends.

Pawfect the

holiday

There are 27 beautiful beaches in Guernsey and between 30th September and 1st May, dogs are permitted to run free on any of them. Only a handful of the island’s beaches (Cobo Bay, Port Soif, Vazon (northern end), Petit Bot, Fermain Bay, Pembroke & L’Ancresse and L’Eree) do not allow dogs during the summer season from beginning of May. The good news is there are plenty of others to choose from. Check out (in panel opposite) what local pooches Tess, Gracie and Jessie have to say about their favourite walking spots. Hop to Herm Herm Island is just 20 minutes away from Guernsey and can be reached using the frequent Travel Trident ferry from St Peter Port. There is no extra charge to bring your dog onboard* – just be sure to keep them on a lead. The White House Hotel on this picturesque island has six dog-friendly rooms and there are also nine selfcatering cottages which accept dogs. For a bite to eat, four-legged friends are welcome in The Mermaid Tavern and at The Ship Inn Courtyard. Bear’s, Moissonniere and Harbour beaches allow dogs during the summer and all other island beaches allow dogs from 1st October – 30th April. Owners are kindly asked to keep dogs on a lead in public areas like the harbour and village, otherwise they may enjoy the freedom of Herm unleashed. Dog-friendly accommodation A number of hotels permit dogs to stay in allocated rooms including the Old Government House Hotel & Spa and the Duke of Richmond in St Peter Port, the Fleur du Jardin and the Imperial Hotel along the west coast. You can also stay at the Hougue du Pommier Hotel, Le Chene, Abbey Court Hotel and small dogs are welcome at Saints Bay Hotel which is close to scenic strolls. If you prefer the flexibility of self-catering then Rocquaine Bay Apartments, Vazon Bay Apartments/Bungalows, La Grande Mare Hotel’s Self-Catering Apartments and Adair Bungalows are all pet friendly and conveniently located near suitable beaches. Banjour Self-Catering even has an on-site dog parlour, and doggie day care is available if you need to go somewhere that does not happen to be dog friendly. Eating & drinking In St Peter Port – Guernsey’s capital - Le Petit Bistro Café, Octopus Restaurant, The Golden Lion and the

54 | The pawfect holiday

Terrace are just a few of the places that will happily welcome dogs. Along Cobo Bay, dogs can sit outside with you at The Rockmount Restaurant & Bar while watching the sun go down. Les Douvres Hotel in Saint Martin, a popular choice for bar meals, has sheltered gardens for dining with your furry friend, or head inside on cooler days. The island is also well-known for its coastal kiosks which are handy for refreshment breaks, and most offer water bowls and dog treats. For more information about Pet Passports and bringing pets to Guernsey go to visitguernsey.com and search ‘dog’.

Our top tips Book pet-friendly transport, such as Condor Ferries. Check out www.condorferries.com for details of pet-friendly hotels, B&B and tips on travelling with canine companions.

Meet our local pooches Tess Breed: German Shorthaired Pointer Loves: Stand-Up Paddleboarding. Stopping off at the cosy Fleur Du Jardin Hotel in the parish of Castel for dinner. Favourite winter beach: L’Eree Beach on the west coast. Favourite walking route: Along the paths of Pleinmont Headland in the parish of Torteval – a great location for exploring off the lead!

Gracie Breed: Chocolate Labrador

Trial run. Never travelled with your dog before? Take a short trip close to home first to see how he responds to transport - i.e. does he get anxious, or car sick? Water breaks. Travel with a water bowl that you can refill for breaks. Dogs can get very dehydrated when they travel. Health matters. Just as humans can fall ill on holiday, so can pets. Check your pet insurance to establish what cover you will have at your destination. Best vet. Visiting Guernsey for the first time? Locate the nearest vet for peace of mind. Search at findavet.rcvs.org.uk Travel ID your pet. Attach a tag to your pet’s collar that includes the address and phone number of where you’ll be staying during your visit to Guernsey. Exercise. Break up the journey with regular walks. Relax. Pack a familiar blanket or toy to help your dog stay calm and reassured during the trip. Walkies. Check out Visit Guernsey’s 20 selfguided walks on the rugged south coast cliff paths, the sweeping bays of the west and leafy nature trails, wildlife reserves and swathes of common land. See www.visitguernsey.com

Loves: Chasing seagulls and running into the sea, enjoying the fresh breeze. Favourite winter beach: L’Ancresse Beach situated in the most northern part of Guernsey, which has plenty of open space. Favourite walking route: The quiet lanes of Saint Martin – a country parish with lots of character.

Jessie Breed: Yellow Labrador Loves: Tennis balls and swimming. Watching ball sports on TV when it’s time to head inside. Favourite winter beach: Jessie is new to Guernsey so has yet to discover her favourite winter beach. Favourite walking route: Heading along the white sandy bay at Chouet Beach in Vale, walking next to the nearby golf course and looping back round. The pawfect holiday | 55


Real peel potato

the

56 | Potato Pie Peel Society

The best-selling novel, ‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society’ stirred up a recipe of excitement in 2018 when it hit the big screen as a feature film. The book, written by American writer Mary Ann Shaffer and finished by her niece Annie Barrows, is set in Guernsey in 1946, after the German Occupation of the Channel Islands.

Potato Peel Pie Society | 57


Real peel potato

the

56 | Potato Pie Peel Society

The best-selling novel, ‘The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society’ stirred up a recipe of excitement in 2018 when it hit the big screen as a feature film. The book, written by American writer Mary Ann Shaffer and finished by her niece Annie Barrows, is set in Guernsey in 1946, after the German Occupation of the Channel Islands.

Potato Peel Pie Society | 57


It’s a gripping combination of romance and drama, about Londoner and writer Juliet Ashton, who is inspired to visit Guernsey by a series of letters she receives from the members of a Guernsey book club, who each share their experiences of living under German rule during the Second World War. Juliet forms a bond with her newfound friends as she learns more about their traumatic past. Although a work of fiction, Guernsey’s unforgettable story during WWII and Shaffer’s ‘spur of the moment’ visit to the island in 1980 inspired her to begin writing. The rest, as they say, is history!

La Valette Underground Military Museum showcases Guernsey’s military history and is set in a complex of air-conditioned tunnels that were built and used by German forces as a fuel storage facility for their U-Boats.

Why not take in the history of that period by walking in the footsteps of the characters through all the Guernsey landmarks.

See the charm of St Peter Port The harbour of St Peter Port is where character, Juliet, first arrives in Guernsey and unknowingly meets Dawsey while he is repairing the roof of the Crown Hotel. The hotel played an important part in Guernsey’s Liberation history, being a harbour office for Nazi authorities before the island was surrendered to British forces on 9 May 1945, known as Liberation Day - an annually celebrated public holiday. Today, the hotel is a traditional pub, renamed the Ship & Crown, which offers hearty meals and locally brewed beer and cider. Walk the cobbled streets of the town centre and wander down Fountain Street; you can only imagine the apprehension of the Guernsey people as German troops marched through in formation.

Explore the lanes of St Martin’s Walk in the footsteps of the characters themselves, by taking a peaceful countryside stroll through the lanes of St Martin’s parish in the southeast of the island. Start at Sausmarez Manor, a historical house which is mentioned in the novel and dates all the way back to the early 13th century. Go on a special tour of the house during the Guernsey Heritage Festival (Mid April – Mid May) and hear original readings from the diary of the Seigneur’s great aunt, which recounts the daily lives of islanders during an unimaginably difficult time. Head to Calais Lane, where the fictional ‘Potato Peel Pie Society’ came up with the name of their literary club - as a ruse to explain their reasons for breaking curfew. Then, go down Gypsy Lane which will lead you towards La Bouvée, the address of male lead character, Dawsey Adams’ farm. A self-guided ‘Tasty Walks’ tour or a guided tour with an expert is the perfect way to discover these hidden gems. Go to a museum or two These should be at the top of your list if you want an insight into what life was like for islanders throughout the hardships of the Occupation. The Occupation Museum has an extensive collection of unique items, documents and extremely rare pieces, including an original Enigma machine. It acts as an impressive time capsule with several dioramas and a recreation of a local street during German rule.

Visit the German Naval Signals HQ, the last operational Signals HQ that was running up until 9 May 1945. It was responsible for all radio traffic to and from Germany and the other islands. Or, experience the eeriness of the German Underground Hospital, the largest tunnel complex in the Channel Islands, constructed by slave workers captured by German forces during the war.

Visit one of the world’s smallest chapels Character Dawsey takes Juliet to, ‘a tiny church – every inch of which is a mosaic of broken china and smashed pottery.’ This is the Little Chapel in the parish of St Andrew, believed to be the smallest Chapel in the world. Guernsey resident, Brother Déodat, started work on it in 1914, with the aim of creating a miniature version of the famous grotto and basilica at Lourdes in France. Entry is free, and the intricate detail is sure to leave you amazed! Take the Occupation Trail Look out for of a series of information boards displayed at key locations across Guernsey. Follow the trail and learn about the significance of each site during the Occupation and within both the novel and film. Go to visitguernsey.com to find out more.

58 | Potato Peel Pie Society

IDEAS

IT’S A STANCE YOU MIGHT NOT EXPECT FROM AN ACCOUNTANT But bending over backwards to champion the entrepreneurially minded is what we do.

IDEAS | PEOPLE | TRUST bdo.gg | bdo.je


It’s a gripping combination of romance and drama, about Londoner and writer Juliet Ashton, who is inspired to visit Guernsey by a series of letters she receives from the members of a Guernsey book club, who each share their experiences of living under German rule during the Second World War. Juliet forms a bond with her newfound friends as she learns more about their traumatic past. Although a work of fiction, Guernsey’s unforgettable story during WWII and Shaffer’s ‘spur of the moment’ visit to the island in 1980 inspired her to begin writing. The rest, as they say, is history!

La Valette Underground Military Museum showcases Guernsey’s military history and is set in a complex of air-conditioned tunnels that were built and used by German forces as a fuel storage facility for their U-Boats.

Why not take in the history of that period by walking in the footsteps of the characters through all the Guernsey landmarks.

See the charm of St Peter Port The harbour of St Peter Port is where character, Juliet, first arrives in Guernsey and unknowingly meets Dawsey while he is repairing the roof of the Crown Hotel. The hotel played an important part in Guernsey’s Liberation history, being a harbour office for Nazi authorities before the island was surrendered to British forces on 9 May 1945, known as Liberation Day - an annually celebrated public holiday. Today, the hotel is a traditional pub, renamed the Ship & Crown, which offers hearty meals and locally brewed beer and cider. Walk the cobbled streets of the town centre and wander down Fountain Street; you can only imagine the apprehension of the Guernsey people as German troops marched through in formation.

Explore the lanes of St Martin’s Walk in the footsteps of the characters themselves, by taking a peaceful countryside stroll through the lanes of St Martin’s parish in the southeast of the island. Start at Sausmarez Manor, a historical house which is mentioned in the novel and dates all the way back to the early 13th century. Go on a special tour of the house during the Guernsey Heritage Festival (Mid April – Mid May) and hear original readings from the diary of the Seigneur’s great aunt, which recounts the daily lives of islanders during an unimaginably difficult time. Head to Calais Lane, where the fictional ‘Potato Peel Pie Society’ came up with the name of their literary club - as a ruse to explain their reasons for breaking curfew. Then, go down Gypsy Lane which will lead you towards La Bouvée, the address of male lead character, Dawsey Adams’ farm. A self-guided ‘Tasty Walks’ tour or a guided tour with an expert is the perfect way to discover these hidden gems. Go to a museum or two These should be at the top of your list if you want an insight into what life was like for islanders throughout the hardships of the Occupation. The Occupation Museum has an extensive collection of unique items, documents and extremely rare pieces, including an original Enigma machine. It acts as an impressive time capsule with several dioramas and a recreation of a local street during German rule.

Visit the German Naval Signals HQ, the last operational Signals HQ that was running up until 9 May 1945. It was responsible for all radio traffic to and from Germany and the other islands. Or, experience the eeriness of the German Underground Hospital, the largest tunnel complex in the Channel Islands, constructed by slave workers captured by German forces during the war.

Visit one of the world’s smallest chapels Character Dawsey takes Juliet to, ‘a tiny church – every inch of which is a mosaic of broken china and smashed pottery.’ This is the Little Chapel in the parish of St Andrew, believed to be the smallest Chapel in the world. Guernsey resident, Brother Déodat, started work on it in 1914, with the aim of creating a miniature version of the famous grotto and basilica at Lourdes in France. Entry is free, and the intricate detail is sure to leave you amazed! Take the Occupation Trail Look out for of a series of information boards displayed at key locations across Guernsey. Follow the trail and learn about the significance of each site during the Occupation and within both the novel and film. Go to visitguernsey.com to find out more.

58 | Potato Peel Pie Society

IDEAS

IT’S A STANCE YOU MIGHT NOT EXPECT FROM AN ACCOUNTANT But bending over backwards to champion the entrepreneurially minded is what we do.

IDEAS | PEOPLE | TRUST bdo.gg | bdo.je


on

EVENTS AT THE GOLF CLUB

for a great round

The Golf Club is the perfect venue for a private party or corporate event. Whatever the size of your group, we have a range of entertainment options to suit.

Time to make fantastic memories with family and friends of all ages on Guernsey’s golf courses: a hotbed of collaboration, competition and camaraderie.

Hire your own exclusive driving range bays and private dining area in our all-new Premium Bays, play nine or 18 holes on the golf course, or putt your way through Pirate Bay and have a meal in Nineteen Bar & Grill.

PREMIUM BAYS

DRIVING RANGE

GOLF COURSE

PIRATE BAY

Premium Bays are the ideal location for an exclusive, private event. With ‘sit down’ dining for up to 14 people, or drinks and buffet for up to 25, these private bays are the perfect venue. Two bays, table bar service and unlimited balls; dining options can be arranged through Nineteen Bar & Grill.

Our state-of-the-art Driving Range has 14 floodlit and heated bays, which can be hired out individually or as a ‘range takeover’ on the top level. Ball tracking and Toptracer games add a bit of friendly competition and a full bar service including range menu is available from Nineteen Bar & Grill.

Maybe take your work event onto the golf course. Whether you are entertaining clients or having a staff day out, there is an option for you. Play nine or 18 holes, followed by a meal in Nineteen. Your branding can be placed on the course for your event.

Pirate Bay is one of Guernsey’s premier attractions. Our course features 12 exciting, interactive and challenging holes suitable for players of all ages. Pirate Bay can be hired exclusively – perfect for an afternoon or early evening event, followed by food and drinks in Nineteen Bar & Grill.

Golf in Guernsey epitomises all there is to love about the game: the enthralling rugged green landscape, the balmy weather and the accessible nature of the island’s courses ensures every age of golfer can play there - making it a great activity to also try as family group while on holiday.

two-tier, floodlit driving range with Toptracer ball tracking for those trying to maintain form. The health benefits of golf are wide ranging; first and foremost, playing golf is great fun but it also boosts mental and physical well-being, reducing stress and anxiety and helping with balance and muscle endurance.

The Golf Club at St Pierre Park with its 9-hole course, designed by former Jersey resident and Ryder Cup Captain Tony Jacklin CBE perfectly encapsulates ‘golf for everyone’. With no requirement to be a member, this club has rejuvenated the golfing community in Guernsey with its ‘open to all’ policy challenging the sometimes stuffy and elitist perceptions of the game.

Cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic health is improved in golfers. It also sharpens reflexes, teaches patience and favours skillful precision over strength. It’s a great game to introduce to young children, Junior golf is booming in Guernsey, thanks to The Golf Club. Its junior Academy regularly sees 50 young players sign up for competitions.

From experienced players and complete beginners to families with mixed abilities and competitive juniors, there’ll be something to suit everyone. Even for those short on time, you can play a round in about an hour and a half.

Yet arguably golf ’s greatest USP is that you play a game that is easy to learn, but impossible to master, with the wind in your hair, the sun on your face and plenty of fresh air in your lungs. In Guernsey, golf offers the opportunity for family and friends to make fantastic memories together, revelling in the joy of collaboration, competition and camaraderie during yearned-for quality time. And it’s a game you can play forever as, unlike many sports, you’re never the wrong age for golf.

Golf swing need perfecting? No problem: there is a range of academy facilities, driving ranges and practice holes across Guernsey - not to mention sport massages for golfers to loosen limbs. The Golf Club at St Pierre Park boasts a state-of-the-art

Family-friendly Nineteen Bar & Grill is perfect for drinks or a bite to eat during your visit to The Golf Club site. Catering for all tastes, Nineteen serves steaks, burgers, pizzas, seafood and sharing platters, as well as vegan and vegetarian dishes.

email info@golf.gg or call 01481 727039 The Golf Club, Rohais De Haut, St Peter Port, Guernsey GY1 1FD

Guernsey’s Courses

ST PETER PORT

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For more information please visit thegolfclub.gg

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• The Golf Club @ St Pierre Park 9-hole golf course, state-of-the-art, 2-tier, floodlit driving range with Toptracer ball tracking, as well as JamGolf – the Channel Islands’ largest golf superstore. www.golf.gg

•R  oyal Guernsey Golf Club Championship par 70 golf course on L’Ancresse Common, taking advantage of the natural undulating beauty of the environment. www.royalguernseygolfclub.com •L  a Grande Mare Golf Club 18-hole golf course, set over 100 acres of parkland on the West Coast. www.lagrandemaregolfclub.com


on

EVENTS AT THE GOLF CLUB

for a great round

The Golf Club is the perfect venue for a private party or corporate event. Whatever the size of your group, we have a range of entertainment options to suit.

Time to make fantastic memories with family and friends of all ages on Guernsey’s golf courses: a hotbed of collaboration, competition and camaraderie.

Hire your own exclusive driving range bays and private dining area in our all-new Premium Bays, play nine or 18 holes on the golf course, or putt your way through Pirate Bay and have a meal in Nineteen Bar & Grill.

PREMIUM BAYS

DRIVING RANGE

GOLF COURSE

PIRATE BAY

Premium Bays are the ideal location for an exclusive, private event. With ‘sit down’ dining for up to 14 people, or drinks and buffet for up to 25, these private bays are the perfect venue. Two bays, table bar service and unlimited balls; dining options can be arranged through Nineteen Bar & Grill.

Our state-of-the-art Driving Range has 14 floodlit and heated bays, which can be hired out individually or as a ‘range takeover’ on the top level. Ball tracking and Toptracer games add a bit of friendly competition and a full bar service including range menu is available from Nineteen Bar & Grill.

Maybe take your work event onto the golf course. Whether you are entertaining clients or having a staff day out, there is an option for you. Play nine or 18 holes, followed by a meal in Nineteen. Your branding can be placed on the course for your event.

Pirate Bay is one of Guernsey’s premier attractions. Our course features 12 exciting, interactive and challenging holes suitable for players of all ages. Pirate Bay can be hired exclusively – perfect for an afternoon or early evening event, followed by food and drinks in Nineteen Bar & Grill.

Golf in Guernsey epitomises all there is to love about the game: the enthralling rugged green landscape, the balmy weather and the accessible nature of the island’s courses ensures every age of golfer can play there - making it a great activity to also try as family group while on holiday.

two-tier, floodlit driving range with Toptracer ball tracking for those trying to maintain form. The health benefits of golf are wide ranging; first and foremost, playing golf is great fun but it also boosts mental and physical well-being, reducing stress and anxiety and helping with balance and muscle endurance.

The Golf Club at St Pierre Park with its 9-hole course, designed by former Jersey resident and Ryder Cup Captain Tony Jacklin CBE perfectly encapsulates ‘golf for everyone’. With no requirement to be a member, this club has rejuvenated the golfing community in Guernsey with its ‘open to all’ policy challenging the sometimes stuffy and elitist perceptions of the game.

Cardiovascular, respiratory and metabolic health is improved in golfers. It also sharpens reflexes, teaches patience and favours skillful precision over strength. It’s a great game to introduce to young children, Junior golf is booming in Guernsey, thanks to The Golf Club. Its junior Academy regularly sees 50 young players sign up for competitions.

From experienced players and complete beginners to families with mixed abilities and competitive juniors, there’ll be something to suit everyone. Even for those short on time, you can play a round in about an hour and a half.

Yet arguably golf ’s greatest USP is that you play a game that is easy to learn, but impossible to master, with the wind in your hair, the sun on your face and plenty of fresh air in your lungs. In Guernsey, golf offers the opportunity for family and friends to make fantastic memories together, revelling in the joy of collaboration, competition and camaraderie during yearned-for quality time. And it’s a game you can play forever as, unlike many sports, you’re never the wrong age for golf.

Golf swing need perfecting? No problem: there is a range of academy facilities, driving ranges and practice holes across Guernsey - not to mention sport massages for golfers to loosen limbs. The Golf Club at St Pierre Park boasts a state-of-the-art

Family-friendly Nineteen Bar & Grill is perfect for drinks or a bite to eat during your visit to The Golf Club site. Catering for all tastes, Nineteen serves steaks, burgers, pizzas, seafood and sharing platters, as well as vegan and vegetarian dishes.

email info@golf.gg or call 01481 727039 The Golf Club, Rohais De Haut, St Peter Port, Guernsey GY1 1FD

Guernsey’s Courses

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For more information please visit thegolfclub.gg

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• The Golf Club @ St Pierre Park 9-hole golf course, state-of-the-art, 2-tier, floodlit driving range with Toptracer ball tracking, as well as JamGolf – the Channel Islands’ largest golf superstore. www.golf.gg

•R  oyal Guernsey Golf Club Championship par 70 golf course on L’Ancresse Common, taking advantage of the natural undulating beauty of the environment. www.royalguernseygolfclub.com •L  a Grande Mare Golf Club 18-hole golf course, set over 100 acres of parkland on the West Coast. www.lagrandemaregolfclub.com


chocolate Caragh and the

Q. What was the inspiration behind starting your chocolate business? I moved to Sark in 1989 with my husband as he lived there as a young adult and wanted to return. We had holidayed there already and I loved the serenity, natural energy and beauty of the island. The people are lovely and there is a wonderful sense of community. I was a nurse so it was easy to get work as we settled in. From my first visit, I was stunned by the quality of the local dairy products. The milk and cream were just wonderfully rich and I was so surprised that people on Sark weren’t making things with them. Having come from Southern Ireland I was very used to people making the most of local ingredients. So, that got me thinking - ice cream, cheese or chocolate – needless to say chocolate won. Q. How did you go about setting up your business – taking it from conception to actual production? I taught myself how to temper chocolate, mould, dip, roll and enrobe. All in our small cottage - before the internet! I actually had to get books and learn by making lots of mistakes. It took three years of trial and error to get the basic collection ready and we launched in April 1992 with a few small boxes in our friends’ craft shop on the avenue in Sark.

On the enchanted island of Sark, Caragh has been conjuring up magical chocolate creations for over 15 years. It all began with chocolate making experiments at her kitchen table with high quality chocolate and delicious cream, Sark Gold. 62 | Caragh chocolates

Q. Was it an instant success? They were really well received, sold very quickly and our chocolate business was born. We stayed in the cottage for another four years and it was very much a kitchen table business, which I combined with looking after our five small children. We then moved to a bigger farmhouse next door and isolated one side of the house for the chocolate making with a commercial kitchen, storage, café, tea garden and shop.

Q. What were your biggest challenges? Many!! Using fresh local cream is unusual in commercial chocolates (it’s generally UHT) so it took a while to work out how to stop the chocolate separating when the cream was heated. Another massive challenge was learning all the skills - tempering chocolate, so that it crystallizes to get a good shine and snap. If the temper fails then the chocolate will bloom. Packaging and branding was our hugest challenge - we had basic boxes for many years, and our efforts to rebrand went down a couple of dead ends. It was when our son joined us for two years, we finally found a branding agency that understood our story and shared the same passion for Sark. Q. Who is behind dreaming up your delicious flavours and different products? My husband, family and customers are the inspiration for the flavours and ideas. We all love pralines, nuts, fruit, caramels and Manons. We only make what we love and enjoy and that’s a great way to stand behind your chocolates and feel proud of them. Q. Have you won any awards for taste? We have won several Great Taste Awards for our caramel truffles, praline crunch bars, mint bars and chilli bars. We have won Academy of Chocolate Awards for our sea salted caramel bars and I also won Good Housekeeping Business Woman of the Year in 1995. Q. Who are your biggest customers? Our biggest customers are within the Channel Islands - locally visitors to Sark, the high street in Guernsey, the Airport, Condor Ferries and then in London. We also mail order our chocolates all over the world.

Caragh Chocolates is open daily from March to October. Pop in to share their love of chocolate and of Sark – and of course delight in some chocolate tasting.

Q. Your packaging is gorgeous, where did the inspiration for the logo come from? It was designed by our branding agency in the UK after two years’ development and many conversations about how we wanted the branding to reflect our home, our island and way of life. The horse and carriage is an iconic part of Sark life and we wanted it to be part of our identity as we had used this on our logo since 1992. Across the range we incorporated our ferry, our dark skies status and our enigmatic way of life. It was our son who has had the drive and energy to see this project through and with all his help we finally had the new packaging printed in the UK and shipped to Sark! Q. What’s been your most unusual order/request? Well, it was the chocolate favours we did this May for the royal wedding at Windsor castle. Q. Have you always lived on Sark and what do you love most about it? I have lived on Sark for 30 years so I’m getting the hang of it but it’s very similar to Southern Ireland which is my 2nd most favourite place in the world (after Sark). I love the natural beauty and how connected you feel to nature as you have to cycle and walk everywhere, it’s got a tempo to life that is calmer, kinder and relaxing. Q. What would be your top ‘to do’ recommendation for visitors to Sark? The ultimate ‘to do’ is visit La Coupee (a natural causeway connecting big and little Sark) which is the most iconic geographical feature in all the Channel Islands with panoramic views of the entire CI’s and France. Caragh chocolates is happily nearby so you can pop in and see the chocolates being made and have a house hot chocolate!

Caragh chocolates | 63


chocolate Caragh and the

Q. What was the inspiration behind starting your chocolate business? I moved to Sark in 1989 with my husband as he lived there as a young adult and wanted to return. We had holidayed there already and I loved the serenity, natural energy and beauty of the island. The people are lovely and there is a wonderful sense of community. I was a nurse so it was easy to get work as we settled in. From my first visit, I was stunned by the quality of the local dairy products. The milk and cream were just wonderfully rich and I was so surprised that people on Sark weren’t making things with them. Having come from Southern Ireland I was very used to people making the most of local ingredients. So, that got me thinking - ice cream, cheese or chocolate – needless to say chocolate won. Q. How did you go about setting up your business – taking it from conception to actual production? I taught myself how to temper chocolate, mould, dip, roll and enrobe. All in our small cottage - before the internet! I actually had to get books and learn by making lots of mistakes. It took three years of trial and error to get the basic collection ready and we launched in April 1992 with a few small boxes in our friends’ craft shop on the avenue in Sark.

On the enchanted island of Sark, Caragh has been conjuring up magical chocolate creations for over 15 years. It all began with chocolate making experiments at her kitchen table with high quality chocolate and delicious cream, Sark Gold. 62 | Caragh chocolates

Q. Was it an instant success? They were really well received, sold very quickly and our chocolate business was born. We stayed in the cottage for another four years and it was very much a kitchen table business, which I combined with looking after our five small children. We then moved to a bigger farmhouse next door and isolated one side of the house for the chocolate making with a commercial kitchen, storage, café, tea garden and shop.

Q. What were your biggest challenges? Many!! Using fresh local cream is unusual in commercial chocolates (it’s generally UHT) so it took a while to work out how to stop the chocolate separating when the cream was heated. Another massive challenge was learning all the skills - tempering chocolate, so that it crystallizes to get a good shine and snap. If the temper fails then the chocolate will bloom. Packaging and branding was our hugest challenge - we had basic boxes for many years, and our efforts to rebrand went down a couple of dead ends. It was when our son joined us for two years, we finally found a branding agency that understood our story and shared the same passion for Sark. Q. Who is behind dreaming up your delicious flavours and different products? My husband, family and customers are the inspiration for the flavours and ideas. We all love pralines, nuts, fruit, caramels and Manons. We only make what we love and enjoy and that’s a great way to stand behind your chocolates and feel proud of them. Q. Have you won any awards for taste? We have won several Great Taste Awards for our caramel truffles, praline crunch bars, mint bars and chilli bars. We have won Academy of Chocolate Awards for our sea salted caramel bars and I also won Good Housekeeping Business Woman of the Year in 1995. Q. Who are your biggest customers? Our biggest customers are within the Channel Islands - locally visitors to Sark, the high street in Guernsey, the Airport, Condor Ferries and then in London. We also mail order our chocolates all over the world.

Caragh Chocolates is open daily from March to October. Pop in to share their love of chocolate and of Sark – and of course delight in some chocolate tasting.

Q. Your packaging is gorgeous, where did the inspiration for the logo come from? It was designed by our branding agency in the UK after two years’ development and many conversations about how we wanted the branding to reflect our home, our island and way of life. The horse and carriage is an iconic part of Sark life and we wanted it to be part of our identity as we had used this on our logo since 1992. Across the range we incorporated our ferry, our dark skies status and our enigmatic way of life. It was our son who has had the drive and energy to see this project through and with all his help we finally had the new packaging printed in the UK and shipped to Sark! Q. What’s been your most unusual order/request? Well, it was the chocolate favours we did this May for the royal wedding at Windsor castle. Q. Have you always lived on Sark and what do you love most about it? I have lived on Sark for 30 years so I’m getting the hang of it but it’s very similar to Southern Ireland which is my 2nd most favourite place in the world (after Sark). I love the natural beauty and how connected you feel to nature as you have to cycle and walk everywhere, it’s got a tempo to life that is calmer, kinder and relaxing. Q. What would be your top ‘to do’ recommendation for visitors to Sark? The ultimate ‘to do’ is visit La Coupee (a natural causeway connecting big and little Sark) which is the most iconic geographical feature in all the Channel Islands with panoramic views of the entire CI’s and France. Caragh chocolates is happily nearby so you can pop in and see the chocolates being made and have a house hot chocolate!

Caragh chocolates | 63


Guernsey through the Lens Incredible rock formations, strong light intensity and diverse tidal contrasts ensure Guernsey is a photographic must, says Channel Islands photographer Marc Le Cornu.

I have lived in the Channel Islands all my life, apart from a year I spent in Kentucky USA. I was born in Jersey and work as a photographer across the islands. I’m a former Group Commander in the Fire and Rescue Service, and it was while in this post that I first started using drones for the emergency services. It was 2016, and it gave me an incredible insight into everything from a new perspective. Before long I decided to set up my own part-time aerial imagery business - I have always loved taking photos, but it was through using drones that I really found my calling. The business ‘took off ’ (pardon the pun!) immediately and I’ve not looked back since, becoming my full time job in April 2019. I feel blessed to be able to do a job I love, capturing beautiful images of my homeland – I’m passionate about the Channel Islands and their natural beauty.

>

Image: La Valette bathing pools

Channel Island photographer Marc Le Cornu runs BAM Perspectives from a base in Jersey but operates throughout the Channel Islands. Insta: @bam_perspectives Twitter: @bamperspectives Facebook: @BamPerspectives-Jersey 64 | Guernsey through the lens

Guernsey through the lens | 65


Guernsey through the Lens Incredible rock formations, strong light intensity and diverse tidal contrasts ensure Guernsey is a photographic must, says Channel Islands photographer Marc Le Cornu.

I have lived in the Channel Islands all my life, apart from a year I spent in Kentucky USA. I was born in Jersey and work as a photographer across the islands. I’m a former Group Commander in the Fire and Rescue Service, and it was while in this post that I first started using drones for the emergency services. It was 2016, and it gave me an incredible insight into everything from a new perspective. Before long I decided to set up my own part-time aerial imagery business - I have always loved taking photos, but it was through using drones that I really found my calling. The business ‘took off ’ (pardon the pun!) immediately and I’ve not looked back since, becoming my full time job in April 2019. I feel blessed to be able to do a job I love, capturing beautiful images of my homeland – I’m passionate about the Channel Islands and their natural beauty.

>

Image: La Valette bathing pools

Channel Island photographer Marc Le Cornu runs BAM Perspectives from a base in Jersey but operates throughout the Channel Islands. Insta: @bam_perspectives Twitter: @bamperspectives Facebook: @BamPerspectives-Jersey 64 | Guernsey through the lens

Guernsey through the lens | 65


Lose Yourself in Nature Beautiful footpaths to explore

Fishing boat from the breakwater with Herm in distance

Queen Elizabeth II Marina

Castle Breakwater Lighthouse

My top 5 Photography Spots in Guernsey La Valette bathing pools The drone enables the possibility to create some great abstract images using the lines and shapes of the pool walls contrasting against the colour of the water. For aerial photography, early mornings and evenings are prime times, when there are fewer people around. This also brings the added bonus of golden hour light (the hour before sunset) where everything gets illuminated by the glow of the sun. Theatrical, long shadows create some fantastic shapes and, of course, you also capture some truly beautiful sunsets and sunrises. Castle breakwater lighthouse So many great shots and angles are possible at the lighthouse, which is really pretty in itself. Depending on which way you shoot, the background can feature Herm, St Peter Port or the amazing Castle Cornet. Guernsey is such a picturesque island to photograph with an incredible variety of

My top tips • Pay attention to the tidal changes • Use Guernsey’s natural light

and shadows to dramatic effect

66 | Guernsey through the lens

Salerie Corner

locations. If I can’t make it to Castle Breakwater Lighthouse, I’m spoilt for choice by towns and harbours, the beaches and cliffs, the heritage and occupation sites and beautiful countryside. Petit Port The whole of the south coast is stunning, with its dramatic cliffs and charming coves, but I particularly like Petit Port as the beautiful sandy beach means the water looks so as clear, sparkling and turquoise as the Mediterranean! Because Guernsey’s huge tidal movements also allow for completely different shots of the same location, it is crucial to pre-plan photography and check the tides. It also helps me to think about what type of shot I’m looking for, for example a low tide on the south coast means less water and therefore the water colour will look much lighter and brighter as the sun lights up the sand beneath. Fort Le Marchant From the air, departing Fort Le Marchant, if you look back towards the island, it is possible to capture the whole island in a panoramic shot with the fort and common in the foreground – absolutely stunning! Guernsey has so many of

• Never be afraid to try new perspectives • Network with other photographers in Guernsey to swap tops tips

• Join in amateur photography meet ups

https://www.guernseyphotoclub.org.gg/

A taste of the sea

Car Free

Explore by pedal power

Ideal for Island Hopping Less than an hour by sea from Guernsey or Jersey

Petit Port

www.sark.co.uk

Fort Le Marchant

Castle Breakwater Lighthouse

Island Flavours

Les Val desa Terres

these captivating shots – and with it being just a short boat trip to the other islands, you could easily explore the other Channel Islands on a holiday with photography as the focus. There are so many world class professional and incredibly talented amateur photographers around the islands and they are all an inspiration. Social media forums allow photographers to share their images and swap advice on all areas of photography including specific Channel Islands aerial photography groups. I’ve found this a great way to meet like-minded individuals when travelling between islands.

The Perfect Place to Let off Steam Condor 19 ad.indd 1

An Island of History Take a tour back in time

The World’s First Dark Sky Island

Unspoilt & Peaceful 20/03/2019 12:17

PEOPLE OUR PEOPLE, SPEAKING YOUR LANGUAGE Our French, UK and Guernsey tax advice allows you to make the most of your lifestyle in France. Contact us for a bespoke, comprehensive and bi-lingual service that’s independent and shaped to your circumstances.

Les Val des Terres The winding roads of Les Val des Terres look amazing from above, as cars pass through the trees going around the curving bends. Shadows are really important in photography and I really enjoy the way they add an extra dimension to photos. I use the Sun Surveyor app to show me where the light will be at any time of day, it also tells me the direction and length of the shadows I can expect. Timing is crucial when photographing Guernsey, and the app also pinpoints the exact times of sunrise, sunset, golden hour and blue hour.

IDEAS | PEOPLE | TRUST www.bdo.gg french.tax@bdo.gg tax@bdo.gg

• Look for obscure angles and use height • Research the local drone laws • Pack wet weather gear – just in case! Brittany Ferries Advert 01.indd 1

21/02/2019 18:38:52


Lose Yourself in Nature Beautiful footpaths to explore

Fishing boat from the breakwater with Herm in distance

Queen Elizabeth II Marina

Castle Breakwater Lighthouse

My top 5 Photography Spots in Guernsey La Valette bathing pools The drone enables the possibility to create some great abstract images using the lines and shapes of the pool walls contrasting against the colour of the water. For aerial photography, early mornings and evenings are prime times, when there are fewer people around. This also brings the added bonus of golden hour light (the hour before sunset) where everything gets illuminated by the glow of the sun. Theatrical, long shadows create some fantastic shapes and, of course, you also capture some truly beautiful sunsets and sunrises. Castle breakwater lighthouse So many great shots and angles are possible at the lighthouse, which is really pretty in itself. Depending on which way you shoot, the background can feature Herm, St Peter Port or the amazing Castle Cornet. Guernsey is such a picturesque island to photograph with an incredible variety of

My top tips • Pay attention to the tidal changes • Use Guernsey’s natural light

and shadows to dramatic effect

66 | Guernsey through the lens

Salerie Corner

locations. If I can’t make it to Castle Breakwater Lighthouse, I’m spoilt for choice by towns and harbours, the beaches and cliffs, the heritage and occupation sites and beautiful countryside. Petit Port The whole of the south coast is stunning, with its dramatic cliffs and charming coves, but I particularly like Petit Port as the beautiful sandy beach means the water looks so as clear, sparkling and turquoise as the Mediterranean! Because Guernsey’s huge tidal movements also allow for completely different shots of the same location, it is crucial to pre-plan photography and check the tides. It also helps me to think about what type of shot I’m looking for, for example a low tide on the south coast means less water and therefore the water colour will look much lighter and brighter as the sun lights up the sand beneath. Fort Le Marchant From the air, departing Fort Le Marchant, if you look back towards the island, it is possible to capture the whole island in a panoramic shot with the fort and common in the foreground – absolutely stunning! Guernsey has so many of

• Never be afraid to try new perspectives • Network with other photographers in Guernsey to swap tops tips

• Join in amateur photography meet ups

https://www.guernseyphotoclub.org.gg/

A taste of the sea

Car Free

Explore by pedal power

Ideal for Island Hopping Less than an hour by sea from Guernsey or Jersey

Petit Port

www.sark.co.uk

Fort Le Marchant

Castle Breakwater Lighthouse

Island Flavours

Les Val desa Terres

these captivating shots – and with it being just a short boat trip to the other islands, you could easily explore the other Channel Islands on a holiday with photography as the focus. There are so many world class professional and incredibly talented amateur photographers around the islands and they are all an inspiration. Social media forums allow photographers to share their images and swap advice on all areas of photography including specific Channel Islands aerial photography groups. I’ve found this a great way to meet like-minded individuals when travelling between islands.

The Perfect Place to Let off Steam Condor 19 ad.indd 1

An Island of History Take a tour back in time

The World’s First Dark Sky Island

Unspoilt & Peaceful 20/03/2019 12:17

PEOPLE OUR PEOPLE, SPEAKING YOUR LANGUAGE Our French, UK and Guernsey tax advice allows you to make the most of your lifestyle in France. Contact us for a bespoke, comprehensive and bi-lingual service that’s independent and shaped to your circumstances.

Les Val des Terres The winding roads of Les Val des Terres look amazing from above, as cars pass through the trees going around the curving bends. Shadows are really important in photography and I really enjoy the way they add an extra dimension to photos. I use the Sun Surveyor app to show me where the light will be at any time of day, it also tells me the direction and length of the shadows I can expect. Timing is crucial when photographing Guernsey, and the app also pinpoints the exact times of sunrise, sunset, golden hour and blue hour.

IDEAS | PEOPLE | TRUST www.bdo.gg french.tax@bdo.gg tax@bdo.gg

• Look for obscure angles and use height • Research the local drone laws • Pack wet weather gear – just in case! Brittany Ferries Advert 01.indd 1

21/02/2019 18:38:52


S St Malo highlights

Ramparts Known as the walled city, St Malo is surrounded by ramparts that allow visitors to walk around the entire old city and enjoy the spectacular views of the marina, seafront and much more!

La Cité d’Aleth While used as a German base during WWII, this mid-18th century fort now serves as a memorial for the moving history of St Malo and its liberation during WWII. Grand Aquarium For a family favourite, St Malo’s Grand Aquarium hosts a huge variety of underwater life with over 600 species of fish, giant turtles and even a shark tank!

The Carved Rocks of Rotheneuf Don’t miss the breathtaking sculptures of monsters and dragons, carved into the granite cliff rocks at the sea edge, by a hermit, Father Adolphe Fouré, in the 1870s. Musée Jacques Cartier This 16th-century manor house was the home of controversial explorer Jacques Cartier (1491–1557), and now is a museum to illustrate the explorer’s life. Ile du Grand Bé At low tide, cross the beach to walk out via Porte des Bés to Île du Grand Bé, the rocky islet where the great St-Malo-born, 18th-century writer Chateaubriand is buried.

Pictures left to right. Ramparts, La Cité d’Aleth, Grand Aquarium, Rotheneuf Sculptures, Musée Jacques Cartier, Ile du Grand Bé. 68 | St Malo highlights


S St Malo highlights

Ramparts Known as the walled city, St Malo is surrounded by ramparts that allow visitors to walk around the entire old city and enjoy the spectacular views of the marina, seafront and much more!

La Cité d’Aleth While used as a German base during WWII, this mid-18th century fort now serves as a memorial for the moving history of St Malo and its liberation during WWII. Grand Aquarium For a family favourite, St Malo’s Grand Aquarium hosts a huge variety of underwater life with over 600 species of fish, giant turtles and even a shark tank!

The Carved Rocks of Rotheneuf Don’t miss the breathtaking sculptures of monsters and dragons, carved into the granite cliff rocks at the sea edge, by a hermit, Father Adolphe Fouré, in the 1870s. Musée Jacques Cartier This 16th-century manor house was the home of controversial explorer Jacques Cartier (1491–1557), and now is a museum to illustrate the explorer’s life. Ile du Grand Bé At low tide, cross the beach to walk out via Porte des Bés to Île du Grand Bé, the rocky islet where the great St-Malo-born, 18th-century writer Chateaubriand is buried.

Pictures left to right. Ramparts, La Cité d’Aleth, Grand Aquarium, Rotheneuf Sculptures, Musée Jacques Cartier, Ile du Grand Bé. 68 | St Malo highlights


Take a car to St Malo and Brittany becomes your oyster. From short local hops to day excursions, we set the satnav to explore some of the highlights within a two-hour drive

So Long St Malo

…30 minutes

You can drive to Dinard in half an hour or take your time, exploring riverside villages and gorgeous countryside as you skirt the Rance before crossing the barrage. Alternatively, take a little ferry straight from St Malo and reach the lively little town in no time. You’ll find a beguiling mixture of family-friendly resort and sophistication - some go for its swish casino and thalassotherapy spa, others for the charmingly retro seaside vibe and excellent weekend markets. If you’re driving, head off later and explore the coast towards St-Jacut and St-Cast for coves, tiny islands and more - the resorts are sleepier in autumn but that’s part of the charm. Great golfing territory.

…45 minutes

Any Channel Islander will tell you: Dinan is a gem. The port’s quays are lined with shops and restaurants, and a vertiginous medieval cobbled street leads to a warren of drunken half-timbered buildings housing restaurants, bars, shops and more artists’ and artisans’ work than you can shake a brush at. Walk off lunch by strolling under the imposing viaduct and along a towpath to a beautiful 6th century abbey. Towpaths are obligingly flat…

…one hour

Brittany’s capital, Rennes, is small but packed with vibrancy, from arts festivals and a jawgapingly enormous fresh produce market (on Saturdays) to cutting-edge boutiques and bars. Medieval fortresses? Mais oui. Halftimbered buildings? Oh, yes. There’s a lot to see

and if your appetite for city life is whetted, hop on the TGV - it’ll get you from there to Paris in a flash.

...90 minutes

Go to La Gacilly for picture-postcard perfection, but with real life among the geranium-stacked window-boxes and ‘proper’ shops. Scattered among them are more than 50 artisanal studios where craftsmen and women both work and sell. The list is vast: carpenters, cobblers, sculptors, glass-blowers, chocolatiers, potters, artists, dressmakers and more. These outlets are more than shops - they’re also workshops. Approach from any direction and the fields of herbs and flowers tell another story: the factories of French beauty giant Yves Rocher are based here. Don’t miss the visitor centre and, if you can catch it, the annual outdoor photography exhibition (June-September).

Short hops… Cancale - Brittany’s ‘oyster central’. Dine on the quay opposite the beds where they’re grown, or buy direct from the seaside stalls and picnic. Mont St Michel - The ‘eighth wonder of the world’ is a magnet for tourists, so expect crowds. The abbey is the big draw - set aside a day. Combourg, Dol de Bretagne - both worth a visit and within a short drive of St Malo.

…two hours

Meander along the Côte de Granit Rose for a vibe as mellow as the pink granite landscape. Drive to Lannion as the starting point for a walkers’, cyclists’ and bird-lovers’ paradise. The fun is in following the curves of the coast, with its series of islands and islets, pine-fringed sandy beaches and sleepy resorts. For the serious walker, the 133km stretch from Lannion to Roscoff is stunning in all the right ways.

Main image, Mont St Michel Bottom images L to R: Dinan, Perros-Guirec Côte de Granit Rose, La Gacilly, bay of Morlaix

70 | Day trips from St Malo

Day trips from St Malo | 71


Take a car to St Malo and Brittany becomes your oyster. From short local hops to day excursions, we set the satnav to explore some of the highlights within a two-hour drive

So Long St Malo

…30 minutes

You can drive to Dinard in half an hour or take your time, exploring riverside villages and gorgeous countryside as you skirt the Rance before crossing the barrage. Alternatively, take a little ferry straight from St Malo and reach the lively little town in no time. You’ll find a beguiling mixture of family-friendly resort and sophistication - some go for its swish casino and thalassotherapy spa, others for the charmingly retro seaside vibe and excellent weekend markets. If you’re driving, head off later and explore the coast towards St-Jacut and St-Cast for coves, tiny islands and more - the resorts are sleepier in autumn but that’s part of the charm. Great golfing territory.

…45 minutes

Any Channel Islander will tell you: Dinan is a gem. The port’s quays are lined with shops and restaurants, and a vertiginous medieval cobbled street leads to a warren of drunken half-timbered buildings housing restaurants, bars, shops and more artists’ and artisans’ work than you can shake a brush at. Walk off lunch by strolling under the imposing viaduct and along a towpath to a beautiful 6th century abbey. Towpaths are obligingly flat…

…one hour

Brittany’s capital, Rennes, is small but packed with vibrancy, from arts festivals and a jawgapingly enormous fresh produce market (on Saturdays) to cutting-edge boutiques and bars. Medieval fortresses? Mais oui. Halftimbered buildings? Oh, yes. There’s a lot to see

and if your appetite for city life is whetted, hop on the TGV - it’ll get you from there to Paris in a flash.

...90 minutes

Go to La Gacilly for picture-postcard perfection, but with real life among the geranium-stacked window-boxes and ‘proper’ shops. Scattered among them are more than 50 artisanal studios where craftsmen and women both work and sell. The list is vast: carpenters, cobblers, sculptors, glass-blowers, chocolatiers, potters, artists, dressmakers and more. These outlets are more than shops - they’re also workshops. Approach from any direction and the fields of herbs and flowers tell another story: the factories of French beauty giant Yves Rocher are based here. Don’t miss the visitor centre and, if you can catch it, the annual outdoor photography exhibition (June-September).

Short hops… Cancale - Brittany’s ‘oyster central’. Dine on the quay opposite the beds where they’re grown, or buy direct from the seaside stalls and picnic. Mont St Michel - The ‘eighth wonder of the world’ is a magnet for tourists, so expect crowds. The abbey is the big draw - set aside a day. Combourg, Dol de Bretagne - both worth a visit and within a short drive of St Malo.

…two hours

Meander along the Côte de Granit Rose for a vibe as mellow as the pink granite landscape. Drive to Lannion as the starting point for a walkers’, cyclists’ and bird-lovers’ paradise. The fun is in following the curves of the coast, with its series of islands and islets, pine-fringed sandy beaches and sleepy resorts. For the serious walker, the 133km stretch from Lannion to Roscoff is stunning in all the right ways.

Main image, Mont St Michel Bottom images L to R: Dinan, Perros-Guirec Côte de Granit Rose, La Gacilly, bay of Morlaix

70 | Day trips from St Malo

Day trips from St Malo | 71


holiday A sparkling

in Champagne

“I only drink champagne on two occasions, when I am in love and when I am not.” Coco Chanel

If Coco Chanel had come up with her famous quotation in the past few months she may have had to add a third “and when I am on holiday”.

a billion more resting underground in this lovely region less 45 minutes away from Paris by high speed train.

Because the Champenois want champagne to become a holiday destination as well as the best known sparkling wine in the world.

The Champagne region was defined in 1927 and is dominated by two main towns, Reims (famed for its Gothic cathedral as well as its sparkling wine) and Epernay and you could certainly spend a day or two in each without getting bored. Not far away is Troyes with its famous half-timbered houses - but do plan ahead.

In July they launched an initiative - “Refined Art de Vivre” offering the visitor to the region a host of experiences from cycling through the vineyards (on electric bikes) to gastronomic workshops matching cheese with champagne, luxury picnics, stained glass production, cellar tours (of course), and even the “Habits de Lumière”, a three day extravaganza in December where the Avenue de Champagne is wrapped in lights, vintage cars are on display, fireworks brighten the skies at night and street performers warm hearts during the day. And all of this is just a click away on www.visitlachampagne.travel where you can choose a place to stay, a restaurant to eat in as well as an activity to suit every pocket. You’ll also find details of how to get there by train or car. No longer is Champagne a place to spend a few hours on your way to somewhere else but a unique experience to head for - something that UNESCO celebrated in 2015 by making the Champagne “Hillsides Houses and Cellars” a World Heritage site. Our love affair with champagne (the drink) continues unabated with the UK’s champagne lovers downing nearly 27 million bottles of the stuff in 2018 - more than anywhere else outside of France. For a region that covers just 0.5% of the vineyard area of the world it produces an awful lot of bottles - more than 301 million were shipped in 2018 - but don’t worry, they’re unlikely to run out as there are

72 | A sparkling holiday in Champagne

If you want to visit a cellar and see just a few of the several hundred kilometres of underground cellars you will need to make an appointment with your favourite Champagne House - don’t just turn up and hope they will let you in. You can book through www.visitlachampagne.travel or on the website of each House where details and prices are given. And even if you are going in mid-summer, take a lightweight jacket or sweater - cellars are chilly places even when the sun is beating down over ground. Although the region has more than 340 Champagne Houses with famous names like Taittinger, Moët and Chandon and Pol Roger, it is also home to 4,600 producers and some of these smaller, less known champagne growers will make you equally welcome. But remember that they are very often small affairs with limited resources bear in mind that September is harvest time and they will be fully stretched then looking after grapes rather than visitors. We may be aware of the pleasures of champagne the drink but if the Champenois have their way, more and more of us will discover Champagne the region.

A sparkling holiday in Champagne | 73


holiday A sparkling

in Champagne

“I only drink champagne on two occasions, when I am in love and when I am not.” Coco Chanel

If Coco Chanel had come up with her famous quotation in the past few months she may have had to add a third “and when I am on holiday”.

a billion more resting underground in this lovely region less 45 minutes away from Paris by high speed train.

Because the Champenois want champagne to become a holiday destination as well as the best known sparkling wine in the world.

The Champagne region was defined in 1927 and is dominated by two main towns, Reims (famed for its Gothic cathedral as well as its sparkling wine) and Epernay and you could certainly spend a day or two in each without getting bored. Not far away is Troyes with its famous half-timbered houses - but do plan ahead.

In July they launched an initiative - “Refined Art de Vivre” offering the visitor to the region a host of experiences from cycling through the vineyards (on electric bikes) to gastronomic workshops matching cheese with champagne, luxury picnics, stained glass production, cellar tours (of course), and even the “Habits de Lumière”, a three day extravaganza in December where the Avenue de Champagne is wrapped in lights, vintage cars are on display, fireworks brighten the skies at night and street performers warm hearts during the day. And all of this is just a click away on www.visitlachampagne.travel where you can choose a place to stay, a restaurant to eat in as well as an activity to suit every pocket. You’ll also find details of how to get there by train or car. No longer is Champagne a place to spend a few hours on your way to somewhere else but a unique experience to head for - something that UNESCO celebrated in 2015 by making the Champagne “Hillsides Houses and Cellars” a World Heritage site. Our love affair with champagne (the drink) continues unabated with the UK’s champagne lovers downing nearly 27 million bottles of the stuff in 2018 - more than anywhere else outside of France. For a region that covers just 0.5% of the vineyard area of the world it produces an awful lot of bottles - more than 301 million were shipped in 2018 - but don’t worry, they’re unlikely to run out as there are

72 | A sparkling holiday in Champagne

If you want to visit a cellar and see just a few of the several hundred kilometres of underground cellars you will need to make an appointment with your favourite Champagne House - don’t just turn up and hope they will let you in. You can book through www.visitlachampagne.travel or on the website of each House where details and prices are given. And even if you are going in mid-summer, take a lightweight jacket or sweater - cellars are chilly places even when the sun is beating down over ground. Although the region has more than 340 Champagne Houses with famous names like Taittinger, Moët and Chandon and Pol Roger, it is also home to 4,600 producers and some of these smaller, less known champagne growers will make you equally welcome. But remember that they are very often small affairs with limited resources bear in mind that September is harvest time and they will be fully stretched then looking after grapes rather than visitors. We may be aware of the pleasures of champagne the drink but if the Champenois have their way, more and more of us will discover Champagne the region.

A sparkling holiday in Champagne | 73


wonder

walled

Heading across the water to St Malo for a few days offers the best aspects of a city break combined with a beach holiday and foodie trip. It’s all there to explore...

St Malo is many people’s first taste of France, thanks to its proximity to the Channel Islands and the UK’s south coast. A gateway to the rest of the country, it’s also a wonderful city worth exploring in its own right. Even on foot, there’s an incredible amount to do and see. As the ferry pulls into the pretty port, there’s a swathe of coastline and islets to take in before you set eyes on the walled city. Its piratical history is reflected across many bars, restaurants and crêperies inside the walls. There’s also a huge amount to learn about St Malo during the Second World War. A stroll along the promenade hugging the sandy beach of Les Bas Sablons takes you to Fort d’Aleth. The hill’s battle-scarred fortifications attest to the heavy fire they endured. Then at the top stand ruined bunkers, one of which is home to Memorial 39-45, a museum detailing the area’s German occupation and its celebrated liberation. Now, the area is a haven for campers and it’s easy to see why – the views from the top are spectacular and swimming and sailing opportunities abound. Plus, Le Cite and neighbouring Saint-Servan and Les Corbieres are awash with great eating and shopping. On the pretty Esplanade du Commandant Menguy, the Crêperie Solid’Or is popular with locals and offers an array of delicious Breton galettes and local cidre in traditional cups.

74 | Walled wonder

> Walled wonder | 75


wonder

walled

Heading across the water to St Malo for a few days offers the best aspects of a city break combined with a beach holiday and foodie trip. It’s all there to explore...

St Malo is many people’s first taste of France, thanks to its proximity to the Channel Islands and the UK’s south coast. A gateway to the rest of the country, it’s also a wonderful city worth exploring in its own right. Even on foot, there’s an incredible amount to do and see. As the ferry pulls into the pretty port, there’s a swathe of coastline and islets to take in before you set eyes on the walled city. Its piratical history is reflected across many bars, restaurants and crêperies inside the walls. There’s also a huge amount to learn about St Malo during the Second World War. A stroll along the promenade hugging the sandy beach of Les Bas Sablons takes you to Fort d’Aleth. The hill’s battle-scarred fortifications attest to the heavy fire they endured. Then at the top stand ruined bunkers, one of which is home to Memorial 39-45, a museum detailing the area’s German occupation and its celebrated liberation. Now, the area is a haven for campers and it’s easy to see why – the views from the top are spectacular and swimming and sailing opportunities abound. Plus, Le Cite and neighbouring Saint-Servan and Les Corbieres are awash with great eating and shopping. On the pretty Esplanade du Commandant Menguy, the Crêperie Solid’Or is popular with locals and offers an array of delicious Breton galettes and local cidre in traditional cups.

74 | Walled wonder

> Walled wonder | 75


Back in the walled city, the ramparts beg to be walked. Dotted along the smooth stone walkways are turrets and battlements with look-outs and information points covering people, places and dates of local importance. There’s also a beautiful gallery inside La Tour Bidouane that’s worth a visit. On the sea side are two bathing pools to explore, as well as beachside kiosks such as La Buvette des Bains for a relaxed pit-stop. Come apéritif time, wind down with drinks, oysters and cured sausage. At ground level there are tiny boutiques, galleries and artisan shops to peruse. Homewares, jewellery and furniture are also well covered, making for enjoyable browsing. Every souvenir imaginable can be found, but the biscuits are a must. Ice cream fans need look no further than the

76 | Walled wonder

GRAND AQUARIUM DE SAINT-MALO - N O U V E L L E V A G U E - CRÉDITS PHOTOS : © ILL.LAVERDETLUNETLAUTRE, 2018.

FANTASQUATIC !

tremendous sundaes of Sanchez artisan glacier on Rue de la Vieille Boucherie. Or just relax in one of the unique bars and cafés – La Java on Rue Sainte Barbe is great for all ages, with swings at the bar, floor-toceiling collected dolls and toys and an extensive hot and cold drinks menu. Or try La Fabrique on Rue de Chartres for world beers, wines and every imaginable spirit and cocktail.

+33 (0)2 99 21 19 00 aquarium-st-malo.com

Foodies have the seafood world at their fingertips. Moules et frites, oysters, langoustines, lobster, crab – platters of fruits de mer are ubiquitous. And the French love for pizza provides a raft of options. La Voyages in Place Chateaubriand boasts good food and friendly waiters. Its marina view is matched by the sunset arrival of chattering sparrows flocking to the cobbled square’s two trees to roost.

Staying within the walls lends romance to the trip. Hotel Maison des Armateurs on Grand Rue is the perfect blend of modern and art deco. Original features such as the period balustrade and full-length windows lend it Parisienne chic. It’s luxurious yet boutique and its central location pulls you into the heart of St Malo, where you’ll be very happy to stay. www.maisondesarmateurs.com

Pleasure or passion ? For a golf trip or for holidays with your family, enjoy our 18-hole golf course, our hotel and many activities in our resort.

NEAR ST MALO

Booking on +33 (0)2 99 73 53 00

WWW.LESORMES.COM H O L I DAY S

&

S TAY S

G O L F

&

R E S O R T

H O R S E

C L U B

CO R P O R AT E

E V E N T S

FA M I L Y

E V E N T S


Back in the walled city, the ramparts beg to be walked. Dotted along the smooth stone walkways are turrets and battlements with look-outs and information points covering people, places and dates of local importance. There’s also a beautiful gallery inside La Tour Bidouane that’s worth a visit. On the sea side are two bathing pools to explore, as well as beachside kiosks such as La Buvette des Bains for a relaxed pit-stop. Come apéritif time, wind down with drinks, oysters and cured sausage. At ground level there are tiny boutiques, galleries and artisan shops to peruse. Homewares, jewellery and furniture are also well covered, making for enjoyable browsing. Every souvenir imaginable can be found, but the biscuits are a must. Ice cream fans need look no further than the

76 | Walled wonder

GRAND AQUARIUM DE SAINT-MALO - N O U V E L L E V A G U E - CRÉDITS PHOTOS : © ILL.LAVERDETLUNETLAUTRE, 2018.

FANTASQUATIC !

tremendous sundaes of Sanchez artisan glacier on Rue de la Vieille Boucherie. Or just relax in one of the unique bars and cafés – La Java on Rue Sainte Barbe is great for all ages, with swings at the bar, floor-toceiling collected dolls and toys and an extensive hot and cold drinks menu. Or try La Fabrique on Rue de Chartres for world beers, wines and every imaginable spirit and cocktail.

+33 (0)2 99 21 19 00 aquarium-st-malo.com

Foodies have the seafood world at their fingertips. Moules et frites, oysters, langoustines, lobster, crab – platters of fruits de mer are ubiquitous. And the French love for pizza provides a raft of options. La Voyages in Place Chateaubriand boasts good food and friendly waiters. Its marina view is matched by the sunset arrival of chattering sparrows flocking to the cobbled square’s two trees to roost.

Staying within the walls lends romance to the trip. Hotel Maison des Armateurs on Grand Rue is the perfect blend of modern and art deco. Original features such as the period balustrade and full-length windows lend it Parisienne chic. It’s luxurious yet boutique and its central location pulls you into the heart of St Malo, where you’ll be very happy to stay. www.maisondesarmateurs.com

Pleasure or passion ? For a golf trip or for holidays with your family, enjoy our 18-hole golf course, our hotel and many activities in our resort.

NEAR ST MALO

Booking on +33 (0)2 99 73 53 00

WWW.LESORMES.COM H O L I DAY S

&

S TAY S

G O L F

&

R E S O R T

H O R S E

C L U B

CO R P O R AT E

E V E N T S

FA M I L Y

E V E N T S


D Dorset highlights

Hengistbury Head Situated on the south of Christchurch Harbour, Hengistbury Head is ideal for walkers, with views over the Isle of Wight and the Isle of Purbeck. Steam train in Swanage Enjoy a unique journey through beautiful scenery passing the magnificent ruins of Corfe Castle, travelling down to the blue flag beach at Swanage.

Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum With 4 purpose-built galleries and a stunning garden, there’s so much to see at this once home to Merton and Annie Russell-Cotes in 1901. Moors Valley Country Park & Forest Great for families with miles of fantastic walking and cycling trails, adventure play equipment, tree top walkway, ‘Go Ape!’ high ropes, visitor centre and restaurant.

Monkey World Ape Rescue Centre Meet a selection of rescued primates from around the world here in Dorset. If the centre sounds familiar, you may have see it on the TV show, Monkey Life. Ringwood Brewery Take a brewery tour. Taste the malted barley, sniff the hops and see the fermentations bubbling away and enjoy a complimentary drink in their Pin Room.

Pictures left to right. Hengistbury Head, Steam train in Swanage, Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum, Moors Valley Country Park & forest, Monkey World Ape Rescue Centre, Ringwood Brewery.

78 | Dorset highlights


D Dorset highlights

Hengistbury Head Situated on the south of Christchurch Harbour, Hengistbury Head is ideal for walkers, with views over the Isle of Wight and the Isle of Purbeck. Steam train in Swanage Enjoy a unique journey through beautiful scenery passing the magnificent ruins of Corfe Castle, travelling down to the blue flag beach at Swanage.

Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum With 4 purpose-built galleries and a stunning garden, there’s so much to see at this once home to Merton and Annie Russell-Cotes in 1901. Moors Valley Country Park & Forest Great for families with miles of fantastic walking and cycling trails, adventure play equipment, tree top walkway, ‘Go Ape!’ high ropes, visitor centre and restaurant.

Monkey World Ape Rescue Centre Meet a selection of rescued primates from around the world here in Dorset. If the centre sounds familiar, you may have see it on the TV show, Monkey Life. Ringwood Brewery Take a brewery tour. Taste the malted barley, sniff the hops and see the fermentations bubbling away and enjoy a complimentary drink in their Pin Room.

Pictures left to right. Hengistbury Head, Steam train in Swanage, Russell-Cotes Art Gallery and Museum, Moors Valley Country Park & forest, Monkey World Ape Rescue Centre, Ringwood Brewery.

78 | Dorset highlights


B

oss

of the

British yachtsman, Alex Thomson launches latest high-tech HUGO BOSS IMOCA 60 racing yacht, built in Hythe, Hampshire, in a bid for Vendée Globe 2020 round-the-world success.

At 18.28 metres, and with a mirror-like gleaming hull, Alex Thomson’s highest-spec carbon fibre racing yacht HUGO BOSS wowed the fans when it hit the water for the first time. Conceived in collaboration with naval architect VPLP, and named after partner HUGO BOSS, Alex Thomson Racing’s eye-catching yacht features a striking black carbon hull with neon-pink detailing on the coach roof, keel and rudder. The colour scheme, which is a first for the IMOCA class, was devised by designer Karim Rashid. Key features include a streamlined bow, state-ofthe-art hydrofoils and extensive solar panelling across the deck and coach roof which, the team hopes, will allow them to complete the Vendée Globe 2020 round-the-world race without the use of fossil fuels. Built by Jason Carrington close to the ATR team’s Gosport HQ in Hampshire, the HUGO BOSS was completed with a team of 100 naval architects, engineers and builders. At a cost of £5.5 million, the 26-month build project

required more than 50,000 hours of construction. At 60ft, the vessel weighs in at 7.6 tonnes and features a sleek design that echoes the brand identity of the team’s Title Partner, HUGO BOSS. Thomson, one of Britain’s most prominent yachtsmen, is optimistic that this is the boat that will finally carry him to Vendee Globe glory after a period of on-the-water testing. Certainly 45-year-old Thomson has high hopes of being the first Briton to nail the non-stop, solo round-the-world race dubbed ‘the Everest of sailing’ - and only time will tell how the HUGO BOSS compares to the other nextgeneration Vendee crafts. Never seen on-board technologies, developed alongside Technology Partner Nokia Bell Labs, which is incubating this work for the ATR team, are what the team describe as “a host of gizmos and gadgets”. Only eight of the 30+ boats competing in the next edition of the race have been newly built. Racing pundits feel he has a good chance and fans are rooting for him across the South Coast.

Alex Thomson racing at a glance

• The boat is named after ATR team’s

• Alex Thomson Racing is based in Gosport

• Alex Thomson is the youngest skipper

in Hampshire

80 | Boss of the waves

So what next? Well, the boat will debut in the double-handed Transat Jacques Vabre race in October 2019 before Thomson undertakes his first solo race in the New York to Vendée in June 2020, the penultimate race in the IMOCA calendar before the Vendée Globe itself in November 2020. Until then, the ATR team is keen to deny rivals any opportunity to study the new hydrofoils - potentially Thomson’s secret weapon. The stakes are high and nobody at Alex Thomson Racing will breathe easy until it is too late for any rivals to copy what has been done. As Thomson himself admitted, the race is “less about man versus the elements and mainly a design race, like F1”, and, after four attempts, legions of fans are hoping that, this time, experience and a bold design pays off.

Title Partner, HUGO BOSS

to win a round-the-world yachting race • The latest HUGO BOSS yacht is 18.28 metres (60ft) •  e HUGO BOSS will debut in Transat • It took over 2-years to build and involved 50,000 hours Th Jacques Vabre race (2019) of construction • After that, it competes solo race in the • It cost over £5.5 million New York to Vendée (June 2020) • It weighs in at 7.6 tonnes • The Vendée Globe itself is (Nov 2020)

Photo credit: Lloyd Images/Alex Thomson Racing Boss of the waves | 81


B

oss

of the

British yachtsman, Alex Thomson launches latest high-tech HUGO BOSS IMOCA 60 racing yacht, built in Hythe, Hampshire, in a bid for Vendée Globe 2020 round-the-world success.

At 18.28 metres, and with a mirror-like gleaming hull, Alex Thomson’s highest-spec carbon fibre racing yacht HUGO BOSS wowed the fans when it hit the water for the first time. Conceived in collaboration with naval architect VPLP, and named after partner HUGO BOSS, Alex Thomson Racing’s eye-catching yacht features a striking black carbon hull with neon-pink detailing on the coach roof, keel and rudder. The colour scheme, which is a first for the IMOCA class, was devised by designer Karim Rashid. Key features include a streamlined bow, state-ofthe-art hydrofoils and extensive solar panelling across the deck and coach roof which, the team hopes, will allow them to complete the Vendée Globe 2020 round-the-world race without the use of fossil fuels. Built by Jason Carrington close to the ATR team’s Gosport HQ in Hampshire, the HUGO BOSS was completed with a team of 100 naval architects, engineers and builders. At a cost of £5.5 million, the 26-month build project

required more than 50,000 hours of construction. At 60ft, the vessel weighs in at 7.6 tonnes and features a sleek design that echoes the brand identity of the team’s Title Partner, HUGO BOSS. Thomson, one of Britain’s most prominent yachtsmen, is optimistic that this is the boat that will finally carry him to Vendee Globe glory after a period of on-the-water testing. Certainly 45-year-old Thomson has high hopes of being the first Briton to nail the non-stop, solo round-the-world race dubbed ‘the Everest of sailing’ - and only time will tell how the HUGO BOSS compares to the other nextgeneration Vendee crafts. Never seen on-board technologies, developed alongside Technology Partner Nokia Bell Labs, which is incubating this work for the ATR team, are what the team describe as “a host of gizmos and gadgets”. Only eight of the 30+ boats competing in the next edition of the race have been newly built. Racing pundits feel he has a good chance and fans are rooting for him across the South Coast.

Alex Thomson racing at a glance

• The boat is named after ATR team’s

• Alex Thomson Racing is based in Gosport

• Alex Thomson is the youngest skipper

in Hampshire

80 | Boss of the waves

So what next? Well, the boat will debut in the double-handed Transat Jacques Vabre race in October 2019 before Thomson undertakes his first solo race in the New York to Vendée in June 2020, the penultimate race in the IMOCA calendar before the Vendée Globe itself in November 2020. Until then, the ATR team is keen to deny rivals any opportunity to study the new hydrofoils - potentially Thomson’s secret weapon. The stakes are high and nobody at Alex Thomson Racing will breathe easy until it is too late for any rivals to copy what has been done. As Thomson himself admitted, the race is “less about man versus the elements and mainly a design race, like F1”, and, after four attempts, legions of fans are hoping that, this time, experience and a bold design pays off.

Title Partner, HUGO BOSS

to win a round-the-world yachting race • The latest HUGO BOSS yacht is 18.28 metres (60ft) •  e HUGO BOSS will debut in Transat • It took over 2-years to build and involved 50,000 hours Th Jacques Vabre race (2019) of construction • After that, it competes solo race in the • It cost over £5.5 million New York to Vendée (June 2020) • It weighs in at 7.6 tonnes • The Vendée Globe itself is (Nov 2020)

Photo credit: Lloyd Images/Alex Thomson Racing Boss of the waves | 81


boutique

SouthCoast The English Riviera stay

Cary Arms & Spa, Babbacombe Beach, Torquay This most delightful boutique hotel lies just beyond the Jurassic Coast and offers breathtaking views of the red-tinged cliffs, woodlands and sweeping curves of Babbacombe Bay. A choice of rooms, suites, beach huts, and cottages surround this traditional Devon-style hotel where a charming rustic beamed bar and restaurant, a spacious resident’s lounge and a spa with wonderful bay views forms the heart. Be warned, the hilly surroundings are steep and require a bit of leg power, but the rewards are incredible vistas at every turn, and the staff are more than happy to drop you back, if you’re staying behind the inn in one of the cottages.

The UK’s South Coast isn’t just the major international gateway to and from Europe, it is officially the UK’s most sun-soaked place blessed with some truly sumptuous boutique hotels. Amanda Walker picks three fabulous South Coast stays - all within easy reach of the Port of Poole. 82 | South Coast stays

overhangs the sea and features a large decked area with chairs and umbrella. Rooms come with complementary crisps, sloe gin, milk, water, tea, coffee, biscuit tin, apples and a fridge! Food Great breakfast with lots of options, lunch and dinner tend to stay the same with a couple of different specials on each night. If you happen to be staying on a Saturday during the summer months, make sure you book a table at the Lobster Bar from 12-3pm (until end of September). Spa A bijoux spa with hydrotherapy pool, sauna, gym, relaxation area and a choice of treatments. Dog friendly Dogs are welcome in selected accommodation and can be taken everywhere apart from the spa and conservatory restaurant.

See & do Walking, fishing (free rod and tackle hire), beachcombing, paddle-boarding, Torquay and Paignton or take the steam train to Dartmouth. Rooms Rooms, suites, beach huts and cottages all beautifully furnished. Choose Beach Suite 8 at the bottom of the hotel where your balcony literally

The best bit Breath taking views and gorgeous walks. Prices for deluxe rooms start from £265 per night B&B ( for 2 people). Distance from Poole Port: 2 hours 23 minutes.

South Coast stays | 83


boutique

SouthCoast The English Riviera stay

Cary Arms & Spa, Babbacombe Beach, Torquay This most delightful boutique hotel lies just beyond the Jurassic Coast and offers breathtaking views of the red-tinged cliffs, woodlands and sweeping curves of Babbacombe Bay. A choice of rooms, suites, beach huts, and cottages surround this traditional Devon-style hotel where a charming rustic beamed bar and restaurant, a spacious resident’s lounge and a spa with wonderful bay views forms the heart. Be warned, the hilly surroundings are steep and require a bit of leg power, but the rewards are incredible vistas at every turn, and the staff are more than happy to drop you back, if you’re staying behind the inn in one of the cottages.

The UK’s South Coast isn’t just the major international gateway to and from Europe, it is officially the UK’s most sun-soaked place blessed with some truly sumptuous boutique hotels. Amanda Walker picks three fabulous South Coast stays - all within easy reach of the Port of Poole. 82 | South Coast stays

overhangs the sea and features a large decked area with chairs and umbrella. Rooms come with complementary crisps, sloe gin, milk, water, tea, coffee, biscuit tin, apples and a fridge! Food Great breakfast with lots of options, lunch and dinner tend to stay the same with a couple of different specials on each night. If you happen to be staying on a Saturday during the summer months, make sure you book a table at the Lobster Bar from 12-3pm (until end of September). Spa A bijoux spa with hydrotherapy pool, sauna, gym, relaxation area and a choice of treatments. Dog friendly Dogs are welcome in selected accommodation and can be taken everywhere apart from the spa and conservatory restaurant.

See & do Walking, fishing (free rod and tackle hire), beachcombing, paddle-boarding, Torquay and Paignton or take the steam train to Dartmouth. Rooms Rooms, suites, beach huts and cottages all beautifully furnished. Choose Beach Suite 8 at the bottom of the hotel where your balcony literally

The best bit Breath taking views and gorgeous walks. Prices for deluxe rooms start from £265 per night B&B ( for 2 people). Distance from Poole Port: 2 hours 23 minutes.

South Coast stays | 83


The Market Town stay

The Eastbury Hotel, Sherborne, Dorset Just a few minutes’ walk from Sherborne Abbey, the town’s 1,000-year-old honeyed monument, the Eastbury Hotel is a handsome Georgianinspired landmark. Unchanged in character since it was a gentleman’s home in the 1920s, the red-red-brick exterior exudes historic charm - and the interior is just as pleasing. In the summer months, enjoy cocktails in the Eastbury’s sizeable garden planted with abundant shrubs, mature trees and neat lawns.

See & do Golf (Sherborne’s course two miles away), the Renaissance mansion Montacute House is 12 miles west, Sherborne Castle, Walter Raleigh’s grand lodge, as are the ruins in the grounds.

Spa Try a good range of couples treatments in the newly-opened Eastbury Spa by Amelia Rose & Caudalie tucked away in a wooded area of the hotel’s walled gardens.

Rooms Room styles are a mix of modern chic-edged or classic Georgian. Both have nice soft linens, tea /coffee facilities and home-made snacks. Wi-fi is free.

Dog friendly Nine lovely dog-friendly rooms including five Victorian Garden Potting Shed suites which have their own entrance, patio, fire pit and are set in stunning gardens - all have dog beds, bowls and dog treats.

Food Chef Matthew Street’s menu is a byword for well conceived inventiveness for which has gained a well-earned reputation. Expect modern British dishes with the emphasis on local produce - the seven-course tasting menu is a genuine delight.

The best bit The gardens are stunning: pretty seasonal blooms, herbs and shrubs that include hazel, lavender, roses, acers, honeysuckle, magnolia and bluebells. Prices from £195 for a double room B&B. Distance from Poole Port: Approx 1 hour.

84 | South Coast stays

The Jurassic Coast stay

The Pig on the Beach, Studland, Dorset With the dramatic chalk stacks of Old Harry Rocks in the foreground, the yellowpainted Pig on the Beach enjoys a privileged position gazing out across Studland Bay. Many of the 23 rooms offer uninterrupted views of Dorset’s sandy coastline with the Isle of Wight in the distance. As the former home of the aristocratic Bankes family of Kingston Lacy, and some of the eccentric oddities they used in the decor, such as gargoyles and ornate Portuguese woodwork can still be found there today. The current owners have furnished it with cool linens, antiques, textiles and quirky curios - to great effect.

See & do The beach is 5 minutes away with quiet walks through dunes and heathland - a pathway leads from the hotel to The Pig’s own beach hut on the sands. Rooms Take your pick from an array of delightful rooms, many with original features, or a converted shepherd’s hut and a two-storey folly with thatched roof. Each has a vintage style with fabrics, chandeliers and gorgeous linen - plus the Pigs’ signature Roberts radios and well-stocked ‘larders’. Food Expect fresh local produce and fruit, vegetables and herbs picked from the hotel’s walled kitchen garden. The menu specialises in simple seafood dishes using sustainable fish and shellfish created by the forager and Dorset food champion - the Head Chef.

Spa Head to the shepherd’s hut for Pig-style pampering - peaceful relaxation, sea air and rejuvenating therapies. Dog friendly Dogs are welcome to join guests on a stroll around the grounds but are not permitted inside the property. The best bits: A sea view conservatory restaurant, a herd of Dorset Horn sheep, roaring log fires and afternoons spent in the beach hut. Prices from £150 per person, per night. Distance from Poole Port: 45 minutes.

South Coast stays | 85


The Market Town stay

The Eastbury Hotel, Sherborne, Dorset Just a few minutes’ walk from Sherborne Abbey, the town’s 1,000-year-old honeyed monument, the Eastbury Hotel is a handsome Georgianinspired landmark. Unchanged in character since it was a gentleman’s home in the 1920s, the red-red-brick exterior exudes historic charm - and the interior is just as pleasing. In the summer months, enjoy cocktails in the Eastbury’s sizeable garden planted with abundant shrubs, mature trees and neat lawns.

See & do Golf (Sherborne’s course two miles away), the Renaissance mansion Montacute House is 12 miles west, Sherborne Castle, Walter Raleigh’s grand lodge, as are the ruins in the grounds.

Spa Try a good range of couples treatments in the newly-opened Eastbury Spa by Amelia Rose & Caudalie tucked away in a wooded area of the hotel’s walled gardens.

Rooms Room styles are a mix of modern chic-edged or classic Georgian. Both have nice soft linens, tea /coffee facilities and home-made snacks. Wi-fi is free.

Dog friendly Nine lovely dog-friendly rooms including five Victorian Garden Potting Shed suites which have their own entrance, patio, fire pit and are set in stunning gardens - all have dog beds, bowls and dog treats.

Food Chef Matthew Street’s menu is a byword for well conceived inventiveness for which has gained a well-earned reputation. Expect modern British dishes with the emphasis on local produce - the seven-course tasting menu is a genuine delight.

The best bit The gardens are stunning: pretty seasonal blooms, herbs and shrubs that include hazel, lavender, roses, acers, honeysuckle, magnolia and bluebells. Prices from £195 for a double room B&B. Distance from Poole Port: Approx 1 hour.

84 | South Coast stays

The Jurassic Coast stay

The Pig on the Beach, Studland, Dorset With the dramatic chalk stacks of Old Harry Rocks in the foreground, the yellowpainted Pig on the Beach enjoys a privileged position gazing out across Studland Bay. Many of the 23 rooms offer uninterrupted views of Dorset’s sandy coastline with the Isle of Wight in the distance. As the former home of the aristocratic Bankes family of Kingston Lacy, and some of the eccentric oddities they used in the decor, such as gargoyles and ornate Portuguese woodwork can still be found there today. The current owners have furnished it with cool linens, antiques, textiles and quirky curios - to great effect.

See & do The beach is 5 minutes away with quiet walks through dunes and heathland - a pathway leads from the hotel to The Pig’s own beach hut on the sands. Rooms Take your pick from an array of delightful rooms, many with original features, or a converted shepherd’s hut and a two-storey folly with thatched roof. Each has a vintage style with fabrics, chandeliers and gorgeous linen - plus the Pigs’ signature Roberts radios and well-stocked ‘larders’. Food Expect fresh local produce and fruit, vegetables and herbs picked from the hotel’s walled kitchen garden. The menu specialises in simple seafood dishes using sustainable fish and shellfish created by the forager and Dorset food champion - the Head Chef.

Spa Head to the shepherd’s hut for Pig-style pampering - peaceful relaxation, sea air and rejuvenating therapies. Dog friendly Dogs are welcome to join guests on a stroll around the grounds but are not permitted inside the property. The best bits: A sea view conservatory restaurant, a herd of Dorset Horn sheep, roaring log fires and afternoons spent in the beach hut. Prices from £150 per person, per night. Distance from Poole Port: 45 minutes.

South Coast stays | 85


More than 30 years ago, Dorset’s primate rescue and rehabilitation centre opened to provide a safe haven for badly-treated chimpanzees found in Spanish tourist resorts.

Today, Monkey World is the world’s largest primate rescue centre, attracting more than 400,000 visitors and with a reality TV show, Monkey Life, that has aired in 140 countries around the globe. Sarah Woods talks to Dr Alison Cronin MBE, the centre’s Director. Q. How did the idea of Monkey World come about? My late husband Jim Cronin opened Monkey World in 1987 to offer a safe sanctuary for the chimps being maltreated as part of the Spanish tourist trade - he saw animals that had been drugged, had their teeth pulled out and with serious injuries such as machete wounds and broken bones. Since then Monkey World has expanded to rescue primates from all over the world, assisting 27 foreign governments to date. Many of the individual primates that come to us are thousands of miles from their native home, having been smuggled from the wild to be used in laboratories, as exotic pets, as photographer’s props, or as circus animals. Q. How big is Monkey World? Monkey World is growing - year on year - and we still have a waiting list of monkeys and apes that need sanctuary. On our 65 acre site we have more than 260 primates plus 30 care staff who look after them. Plus, of course, more than 400,000 visitors per year! We are now the largest primate rescue centre in the world.

86 | Alison Cronin MBE interview

Q. What species of monkey do you have at the park? Currently, we have 22 different species of primates including 54 chimpanzees that have been rescued from Spain, Greece, France, England, Austria, The Netherlands, Israel, Cyprus, Dubai, Mexico, Turkey, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, and Lebanon. We also are home to 15 orangutans, five species of gibbon, and our monkey species include stumptailed macaques, patas monkey, woolly monkeys and capuchins. Though it is easy to blame the pet trade or trafficked wildlife on other countries, a large number of marmosets that are brought to us are UK-bred. By the time they reach us they are in pretty bad shape, mentally and physically - it’s heartbreaking. Q. Do your primates need lots of care? Yes, they do. Our team of medical specialists monitors them closely so that they receive exacting treatment. To bring them back to good health, a highly varied diet is important, as many primates arrive malnourished. Most are also traumatised and in poor psychological health but with proper care most rescued primates can lead full, active, social and happy lives again. Q. Where do the primates live at the park? Our enclosures are large and enable primates to move around freely as they would in the wild. There are sleeping sites and nesting materials and plenty of private areas to ensure they can choose to be away from the others in

Monkey World, Ape Rescue Centre, Longthorns, Wareham, Dorset. BH20 6HH Tel: +44 (0) 1929 462537 E-mail: apes@monkeyworld.org www.monkeyworld.org

the group, and public view if they wish. They live in social groups, with the choice of indoor or outdoor areas in which to play and explore, which is fundamental. We try to ensure that their environment is ever-changing, much like it would in their natural habitat. This may be as simple as developing new things to climb on each year so that they remain curious, challenged and stimulated by their environment. Q. What do your apes and monkeys eat? To encourage natural feeding behaviours we present food in unpredictable ways and have designed and developed feeding ‘puzzles’ so that our primates have to work for their food as they would in the wild. Our food bill is enormous as they have complex nutritional needs and we buy huge quantities of certain vegetables, fruits and nuts, tinned pulses, cereals, dried pasta and certain supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil. Q. How can people help? We welcome all levels of support from adopting a primate (packages start at just £25) and helping campaigns (join our 100,000 followers on Facebook) to donations of food and other appeals (see: https://monkeyworld.org/ support-us/donations-and-appeals/). And of course, every visitor to the park helps us care for our 260 primates - we are open every single day of the year except Christmas Day! Doors open at 10am. Alison Cronin MBE interview | 87


More than 30 years ago, Dorset’s primate rescue and rehabilitation centre opened to provide a safe haven for badly-treated chimpanzees found in Spanish tourist resorts.

Today, Monkey World is the world’s largest primate rescue centre, attracting more than 400,000 visitors and with a reality TV show, Monkey Life, that has aired in 140 countries around the globe. Sarah Woods talks to Dr Alison Cronin MBE, the centre’s Director. Q. How did the idea of Monkey World come about? My late husband Jim Cronin opened Monkey World in 1987 to offer a safe sanctuary for the chimps being maltreated as part of the Spanish tourist trade - he saw animals that had been drugged, had their teeth pulled out and with serious injuries such as machete wounds and broken bones. Since then Monkey World has expanded to rescue primates from all over the world, assisting 27 foreign governments to date. Many of the individual primates that come to us are thousands of miles from their native home, having been smuggled from the wild to be used in laboratories, as exotic pets, as photographer’s props, or as circus animals. Q. How big is Monkey World? Monkey World is growing - year on year - and we still have a waiting list of monkeys and apes that need sanctuary. On our 65 acre site we have more than 260 primates plus 30 care staff who look after them. Plus, of course, more than 400,000 visitors per year! We are now the largest primate rescue centre in the world.

86 | Alison Cronin MBE interview

Q. What species of monkey do you have at the park? Currently, we have 22 different species of primates including 54 chimpanzees that have been rescued from Spain, Greece, France, England, Austria, The Netherlands, Israel, Cyprus, Dubai, Mexico, Turkey, Thailand, Saudi Arabia, and Lebanon. We also are home to 15 orangutans, five species of gibbon, and our monkey species include stumptailed macaques, patas monkey, woolly monkeys and capuchins. Though it is easy to blame the pet trade or trafficked wildlife on other countries, a large number of marmosets that are brought to us are UK-bred. By the time they reach us they are in pretty bad shape, mentally and physically - it’s heartbreaking. Q. Do your primates need lots of care? Yes, they do. Our team of medical specialists monitors them closely so that they receive exacting treatment. To bring them back to good health, a highly varied diet is important, as many primates arrive malnourished. Most are also traumatised and in poor psychological health but with proper care most rescued primates can lead full, active, social and happy lives again. Q. Where do the primates live at the park? Our enclosures are large and enable primates to move around freely as they would in the wild. There are sleeping sites and nesting materials and plenty of private areas to ensure they can choose to be away from the others in

Monkey World, Ape Rescue Centre, Longthorns, Wareham, Dorset. BH20 6HH Tel: +44 (0) 1929 462537 E-mail: apes@monkeyworld.org www.monkeyworld.org

the group, and public view if they wish. They live in social groups, with the choice of indoor or outdoor areas in which to play and explore, which is fundamental. We try to ensure that their environment is ever-changing, much like it would in their natural habitat. This may be as simple as developing new things to climb on each year so that they remain curious, challenged and stimulated by their environment. Q. What do your apes and monkeys eat? To encourage natural feeding behaviours we present food in unpredictable ways and have designed and developed feeding ‘puzzles’ so that our primates have to work for their food as they would in the wild. Our food bill is enormous as they have complex nutritional needs and we buy huge quantities of certain vegetables, fruits and nuts, tinned pulses, cereals, dried pasta and certain supplements such as Evening Primrose Oil. Q. How can people help? We welcome all levels of support from adopting a primate (packages start at just £25) and helping campaigns (join our 100,000 followers on Facebook) to donations of food and other appeals (see: https://monkeyworld.org/ support-us/donations-and-appeals/). And of course, every visitor to the park helps us care for our 260 primates - we are open every single day of the year except Christmas Day! Doors open at 10am. Alison Cronin MBE interview | 87


IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY - you will hear the general emergency signal which consists of seven short blasts followed by one long blast on the ship’s whistle and alarm bell. This is the signal to call passengers to their muster stations. Please listen carefully to the announcements that follow this signal.

COMMODORE CLIPPER

EN CAS D’URGENCE - vous entendrez le signal d’alarme,

c’est-à-dire sept petits sifflements suivies par un long sifflement et enfin la sonnerie d’alarme. C’est le signal pour appeler les passagers à rejoindre les points de rassemblement. Veuillez écouter attentivement les annonces qui suivent ce signal.

ACTION: Remain calm. Liberation / Rapide: Return to your seat. Follow crew instructions, and listen carefully to all crew and announcements made. Clipper: Go to your nearest muster station. Please study the safety plan carefully.

PASSENGER DECK

PRIMARY ROUTE

SECONDARY ROUTE

UPPER DECK

Veuillez rester calme. Liberation / Rapide: Retournez à votre siege. Ecoutez attentivement les annonces du Capitaine et suivez les instructions de l’équipage. Clipper: Dirigez vous vers le point de rassemblement le plus proche. Etudiez attentivement le plan d’évacuation.

GILETS DE SAUVETAGE: Se trouvent

EVACUATION: Each part of the

EVACUATION: Toute place assise est

REMEMBER: Remove sharp objects. Remove all high heels. Leave all personal belongings.

A

MUSTER STATION

sous votre siège. Seront distribués par un membre d’équipage. Enfilez votre gilet de sauvetage en suivant les instructions de l’équipage. Les gilets pour enfants seront distribués par l’équipage. Les gilets pour adulte conviennent à un enfant de plus de 32 kg.

DECK 8

DOWN TO LOWER DECK

associée à une zone d’évacuation précise. Dans l’éventualité d’évacuer le bord, les canots de sauvetage et toboggans seront déployés. L’équipage se tiendra à sa position d’évacuation. Les passagers abandonneront le navire sous les instructions du personnel naviguant. Notre équipage entièrement formé vous dirigera vers le point d’évacuation ou le radeau de survie le plus proche à bord du Commodore Clipper.

ATTENTION!

Retirez tous objets coupants. Otez les chaussures à talon. Ne prenez aucuns effets personnels avec vous.

RAFT

RAFT RAFT

LIFEJACKETS / GILETS DE SAUVETAGE 1

2

LOWER DECK

RAFT

3 RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

LOWER CAR DECK

DECK 7

5

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

4

CONDOR RAPIDE

ACTION:

LIFEJACKETS: These are found under your seat on Liberation/Rapide, and issued by a crew member on Clipper. Use only when instructed by the crew. Lifejackets will be issued separately for all infants and children weighing less than 32kg/5st. vessel has a designated evacuation route as shown on the vessel plans, in the unlikely event of an emergency, life rafts and slides will be deployed. Our fully trained crew will direct you to your nearest raft evacuation point or lifeboat embarkation point onboard Commodore Clipper.

CONDOR LIBERATION

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

6

B

MUSTER STATION

SLIDE TO RAFT/TOBOGGAN MENANT AU CANOT DE SAUVETAGE RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

Safety pages | 89


IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY - you will hear the general emergency signal which consists of seven short blasts followed by one long blast on the ship’s whistle and alarm bell. This is the signal to call passengers to their muster stations. Please listen carefully to the announcements that follow this signal.

COMMODORE CLIPPER

EN CAS D’URGENCE - vous entendrez le signal d’alarme,

c’est-à-dire sept petits sifflements suivies par un long sifflement et enfin la sonnerie d’alarme. C’est le signal pour appeler les passagers à rejoindre les points de rassemblement. Veuillez écouter attentivement les annonces qui suivent ce signal.

ACTION: Remain calm. Liberation / Rapide: Return to your seat. Follow crew instructions, and listen carefully to all crew and announcements made. Clipper: Go to your nearest muster station. Please study the safety plan carefully.

PASSENGER DECK

PRIMARY ROUTE

SECONDARY ROUTE

UPPER DECK

Veuillez rester calme. Liberation / Rapide: Retournez à votre siege. Ecoutez attentivement les annonces du Capitaine et suivez les instructions de l’équipage. Clipper: Dirigez vous vers le point de rassemblement le plus proche. Etudiez attentivement le plan d’évacuation.

GILETS DE SAUVETAGE: Se trouvent

EVACUATION: Each part of the

EVACUATION: Toute place assise est

REMEMBER: Remove sharp objects. Remove all high heels. Leave all personal belongings.

A

MUSTER STATION

sous votre siège. Seront distribués par un membre d’équipage. Enfilez votre gilet de sauvetage en suivant les instructions de l’équipage. Les gilets pour enfants seront distribués par l’équipage. Les gilets pour adulte conviennent à un enfant de plus de 32 kg.

DECK 8

DOWN TO LOWER DECK

associée à une zone d’évacuation précise. Dans l’éventualité d’évacuer le bord, les canots de sauvetage et toboggans seront déployés. L’équipage se tiendra à sa position d’évacuation. Les passagers abandonneront le navire sous les instructions du personnel naviguant. Notre équipage entièrement formé vous dirigera vers le point d’évacuation ou le radeau de survie le plus proche à bord du Commodore Clipper.

ATTENTION!

Retirez tous objets coupants. Otez les chaussures à talon. Ne prenez aucuns effets personnels avec vous.

RAFT

RAFT RAFT

LIFEJACKETS / GILETS DE SAUVETAGE 1

2

LOWER DECK

RAFT

3 RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

LOWER CAR DECK

DECK 7

5

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

4

CONDOR RAPIDE

ACTION:

LIFEJACKETS: These are found under your seat on Liberation/Rapide, and issued by a crew member on Clipper. Use only when instructed by the crew. Lifejackets will be issued separately for all infants and children weighing less than 32kg/5st. vessel has a designated evacuation route as shown on the vessel plans, in the unlikely event of an emergency, life rafts and slides will be deployed. Our fully trained crew will direct you to your nearest raft evacuation point or lifeboat embarkation point onboard Commodore Clipper.

CONDOR LIBERATION

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

6

B

MUSTER STATION

SLIDE TO RAFT/TOBOGGAN MENANT AU CANOT DE SAUVETAGE RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

RAFT

Safety pages | 89


Profile for The Marketing Bureau

Good Times Autumn / Winter Edition 2019  

Condor Ferries onboard publication

Good Times Autumn / Winter Edition 2019  

Condor Ferries onboard publication

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