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THE MANEATER

TRaDItioN &

TRanSFORmAtioN

OCT. 19, 2016 VOL. 83 | ISSUE 9 THEMANEATER.COM


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THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

Show your Tiger spirit during

Homecoming Week Don’t miss out on these fun activities before the game Thanks to MU, the celebration of Homecoming came to life. It all started in 1911, when former Athletics Director Chester Brewer decided to invite alumni to make their way back home to Mizzou for the annual football game against Kansas. Don’t miss out on these events to take part in one of the greatest traditions Mizzou has to offer. Michelle Lumpkins, reporter

Wednesday, Oct. 19 Talent Show If cheering on your fellow Tigers while they dance, sing and make jokes sounds interesting to you, then stop by Jesse Auditorium at 6:30 p.m. for the last day of Mizzou’s talent show. If you can’t make it, watch it live at mizzou. com.

Thursday, Oct. 20 LBC Homecoming Ball Take part in a tradition dating back to the 1980s in the Kimball Ballroom of Stephens College, including the reveal of LBC Homecoming court!

Almost Midnight Breakfast From 9-11 p.m., grab your student ID and stop by Tiger Plaza for a free breakfast.

Friday, Oct. 21 NPHC Homecoming Step Show At 8 p.m., stop by Jesse Auditorium to watch National Panhellenic Council organizations face off and see who can step the best.

Campus Decorations From 6-9 p.m., walk through Greektown and stop by each fraternity and sorority to see their 2016 Homecoming decorations and enjoy their skits.

Spirit Rally At 8:30 p.m., stop by Traditions Plaza to get pumped for the game against Middle Tennessee State. Don’t miss celebrating with Truman the Tiger, the Mizzou Spirit Squads and Marching Mizzou.

Saturday, Oct. 22 Homecoming Parade

Football Game

At 9 a.m., show your Tiger pride by coming to the parade and getting pumped for the game. The parade will make its way through campus and downtown Columbia and will feature decorative floats and bands from across the state.

At 3 p.m., don’t miss out on cheering on the Tigers at Faurot Field as they take on the Middle Tennessee State Raiders. Also, make sure you’re around for halftime when they announce the 2016 Homecoming King and Queen!


THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

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How MUPD, CPD prepare for the parade Homecoming Parade Committee member Abrea Mizer: “We’ve been working really hard to make sure the parade will run smoothly and to make it as quick as possible, yet still enjoyable for everyone.” CARLY BERTHIAUME Reporter The Columbia and MU Police Departments have been working in conjunction with the Homecoming Parade Committee to map out a final route for the annual parade Saturday morning, and the process has been complicated due to construction. Elle Miller, one of three Homecoming directors, was tasked with leading the parade committee. She said not much will change from last year’s route. The start and end points will remain the same, and the only minor adjustments will be made to the route itself. “With so many entries and limited road space, they have to work really diligently to utilize the road space in the best way possible,” Miller said. “It takes a lot of brainpower and hard work

of University Avenue and South Ninth Street, the police departments have taken into consideration any possible protests. Though MUPD spokesman Brian Weimer declined to share specifics, he said that they have laid out a plan if a similar situation were to arise. However, he said that the greatest concern was for public safety, considering how many pedestrians will be on the streets. In addition to Columbia residents and MU students and faculty, thousands of people travel to Columbia from out of town to tailgate and watch the Homecoming Parade each year. More than 130 organizations registered by the Oct. 3 deadline to participate in the parade, which is roughly 30 fewer groups than last year. Miller and Abrea Mizer, a member of the Homecoming Parade Committee,

“WE’VE BEEN WORKING REALLY HARD TO MAKE SURE THE PARADE WILL RUN SMOOTHLY AND TO MAKE IT AS QUICK AS POSSIBLE, YET STILL ENJOYABLE FOR EVERYONE.” — ABREA MIZER, PARADE COMMITTEE MEMBER

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said that they hope this will enable the parade to end sooner. “We’ve been working really hard to make sure the parade will run smoothly and to make it as quick as possible yet

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to figure out the most efficient way to approach that.” After a Concerned Student 1950 protest halted last year’s Homecoming Parade for 10 minutes at the corner

Mizzou fans enjoy the 2010 Homecoming Parade on Oct. 26, 2010, on the corner of Ninth Street and University Avenue. Maneater File Photo still enjoyable for everyone,” Mizer said. This year is also the first in which there are levels of involvement for Homecoming, which has allowed the student body to participate to a greater extent. In the past, all campus organizations competed against each other regardless of group size. This year, they will compete against groups of similar size. “An organization that had, say, 200 members could have been competing with an organization with 10, so we

kind of restructured it in a way that had levels of involvement,” Miller said. “That really has allowed for maximum participation and gives everyone a fair shot at winning.” Despite the incident last year, she and the committee are optimistic to see how the parade will turn out. “We’re going to trust [the police] to handle the security, and we’re going to handle everything else,” Miller said. Edited by Kyra Haas khaas@themaneater.com

MOVE Investigates: Did we actually have the first Homecoming?

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The “Tail of Traditions” might not have started with MU.

BROOKE COLLIER AND NANCY COLEMAN of the MOVE Magazine Staff

It’s November 1911, and Missouri football coach Chester Brewer is prepared to take on the Kansas Jayhawks. The stadium is packed with a thunderous crowd of spirited students anxious for the big game against their longtime rival to begin. Joining the students are over 9,000 enthusiastic alumni who returned to their alma mater for the game, accepting Brewer’s invitation to come home. Over a century later, Mizzou alumni still come back to Columbia every fall to a Homecoming complete with tailgates, decorated downtown businesses, an intense football game against an intercollegiate rival, a parade and more. Homecoming is one of Mizzou’s most treasured traditions, not to mention a concept that the university takes pride in inventing 105 years ago — but is it our idea to claim? Baylor University in Waco, Texas, had “Good Will Week” in 1909, two years before Brewer’s Homecoming. The festivities involved a parade, concerts,

speeches, a dance and, of course, a football game. Baylor invited alumni to “renew former associations and friendships” and “catch the Baylor spirit again,” according to the university’s website. Alumni also attended a series of class reunions upon returning to Baylor. While Baylor has what seems like a good grasp on the Homecoming claim, the university didn’t hold another “Homecoming” until 1915, and it didn’t become an annual university tradition until 1934. At the University of Illinois in 1910, a big game was coming up against the University of Chicago. Illinois hadn’t won a football game against Chicago in seven years. Two Illinois seniors, Clarence Williams and Elmer Ekblaw, wanted to break the streak. According to the university’s website, they came up with the plan to invite alumni back to help support the team. So many alumni came to watch the game that Illinois had to get more seating for its stadium. Since this Homecoming for the university was such a major success, Illinois continued to host it every year except 1918 because of the influenza epidemic.

Other universities have tried to claim the first Homecoming as their own, depending on when their versions of the tradition originated on their own campuses. The University of Michigan traces the start of its Homecoming to the school’s “Alumni Games” in 1897, an event in which the current football players had competed against alumni, but it wasn’t officially called “Homecoming” until 50 years later. Northern Illinois’ first Homecoming dates back to 1903, but their athletes played alumni as opposed to a rival school as well. At Indiana University, Gala Week began in 1908 as “a time of general homecoming and reunions,” according to the student newspaper. The addition of a rivalry football game came in 1909, but Indiana didn’t throw in a homecoming parade until 1958. Looking at other universities across the country, Mizzou didn’t chronologically hold the first Homecoming event. But the university has continued the tradition every year since 1911 for the longest consecutive time period, and the key components of Homecoming — a parade, a football game against a rival school and spirited

Portrait of MU Homecoming founder Chester Brewer. Courtesy of Mizzou Alumni Association.

rallies — have always been a part of the ritual. So depending on which criteria are taken into account, Mizzou both did and did not hold the first Homecoming. But Mizzou still proudly claims the title, 105 years later. Edited by Katie Rosso krosso@themaneater.com


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THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

Suspensions prevent DU and KA from Homecoming participation Chapters paired with DU and KA have fewer members in their groups as a result of the suspensions. ZIA KELLY Reporter Members of Delta Upsilon and Kappa Alpha, two fraternities suspended in the past month, will not be able to participate in Homecoming activities. Both fraternities have been placed on temporary suspension for misconduct. “To participate in Homecoming you need to be in good standing with the university and the Office of Greek Life,” Homecoming Steering Committee Adviser Aly Friend said. “If you’re not, then it's just not something you can participate in.” Along with affecting the fraternities themselves, the suspensions will also influence the chapters that were placed in their Homecoming groups. Fraternities and sororities are placed into groups by the Steering Committee for Homecoming activities. DU would have been partnered with Sigma Kappa and Sigma Alpha Epsilon, and KA with Gamma Phi Beta and FarmHouse. These groupings participate in

most Homecoming activities together. According to the Homecoming website, the responsibilities of groups in the “Traditions” category, which includes all Greek chapters, include organizing and registering donors for the annual blood drive, creating a float for the parade and writing and performing a group skit to be performed at Jesse Auditorium. Groupings that originally included the suspended fraternities will have to do without those members while organizing all the events. “I think those groupings have to look at what they’re doing a little bit differently because fewer people will be a part of that grouping and participating,” Friend said. Friend said the Steering Committee is working with members from Sigma Kappa, SAE, Gamma Phi Beta and FarmHouse to come up with solutions to issues that could be caused by a shortage of members. “We have talked with the liaisons with the groups and have mostly expressed that if you approach something, a deadline or something ... that we are available,” Friend said. Friend also said since many of the Homecoming events are still in the planning

Kappa Alpha Order is one of two Mizzou fraternities currently suspended from campus activities, including Homecoming. Bailey Valadez | Staff Photographer process, the groups would be able to resolve issues before they began to inhibit their chapters Homecoming activities. “We won’t let it have a negative impact on

their Homecoming experience overall,” she said. Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com

LBC Homecoming celebrates inclusive traditions LBC President Shelby Anderson: “It's open to anyone who wants to celebrate black students and understand the history of them not being allowed to participate in the Homecoming festivities Mizzou hosted.” AYESHA VISHNANI Reporter In 1988, the MU Homecoming theme was “Show Me Old Mizzou.” For black students, the concept of “Old Mizzou” meant racism, exclusion and traditions like waving Confederate flags and the marching band playing “Dixie,” a song rooted in blackface culture. In response, the Legion of Black Collegians began its own Homecoming tradition. The legion launched a theme called “Show Me a New Mizzou: Black to the Future” to create a more inclusive tradition for black students who did not feel they could participate in Homecoming. In 1995, the tradition ended for a while,

but it was revived in 2008. The current traditions are a combination of those initially started in 1988 and newer ones, such as the royalty court candidates’ dance and the night of reveal, which were started by Curtis Taylor Jr., who was activities chair in 2013. LBC President Shelby Anderson said the legion is always striving to educate people. “We pick the people with the most passion, that strive to educate and are knowledgeable and interested in changing the aspects of the black community,” she said. The first public event held following the appointments of the court is the royalty court debates. This year, students discussed various issues that affect the black community, such as cultural appropriation and the effectiveness of campus protests in creating change.

Anderson said the debates allow other students to understand who the candidates are. They also allow LBC to see how these students respond under situations of pressure. The debates are judged by an LBC panel, and the students who win are awarded points. These go toward overall points, which students can also receive for attending practices and events. The final point tally is combined with votes to decide the winners. At the LBC Homecoming Ball on Oct. 20, the nominees will perform a prepared dance with a member of the opposite sex in the same class year. The ball is followed by dinner. The ball then opens up to the general public. Later in the night, royalty court winners are announced. Anderson said LBC also takes part in the main festivities of MU Homecoming, such as

being a part of the Homecoming Parade. She also said there is often a misconception about who can participate in LBC Homecoming events. She said LBC has reached out to the Panhellenic Association and Interfraternity Council members to take part in the celebrations. “It's open to anyone who wants to celebrate black students and understand the history of them not being allowed to participate in the Homecoming festivities Mizzou hosted; that's the primary goal,” Anderson said. “But anyone who wants to join and celebrate that is welcome.” Edited by Kyra Haas and Katie Rosso khaas@themaneater.com, krosso@themaneater.com


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THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

Shakespeare’s prepares for ‘busiest weekend of the year’ The Columbia staple strives to serve the community as best as possible for Homecoming.

The Homecoming Steering Committee organizes a food drive every year that benefits The Food Bank for Central and Northeast Missouri. Those involved with this year’s food drive have called it “extremely successful.”

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Source: Janese Silvey

Feeding the hungry

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Shakespeare’s Pizza Downtown on the corner of Ninth and Elm streets. Alessandro Comai | Staff Photographer

Homecoming 31,403

Homecoming. “So rarely have we ever done sort of a special, gimmicky thing,” Epstein said. “We try to just be Shakespeare’s, and it seems to be a part of the Homecoming weekend celebration for everybody.” This year, Shakespeare’s will participate in Decorate the District, a Homecoming tradition that has taken place for several years, said Aly Friend, Mizzou Alumni Association coordinator of student programs. This tradition involves various groups throughout the community, not exclusively Greek organizations, decorating the exteriors of businesses along the Homecoming parade route with a specific theme in mind. This year’s theme is “A Tail of Tradition,” with a sub-theme of “Truman’s Tall Tails.” The whimsical illustrations will be judged by a panel upon completion. Due to a large number of groups decorating this year, Shakespeare’s will be decorated by three organizations, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Tau Delta and the Student Nurses Association. “It’s an easy way for groups to get involved [and] spread a little love downtown,” Friend said. If you’re planning on going to Shakespeare’s this weekend, be aware of your timing. The wait for pizza can range anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour, and sometimes goes over for brief periods. “We’ve worked very hard over the last 43 years,” Epstein said. “But we’re also very fortunate to be a business that is so well-recognized [and] part of ‘home’ to these people.” Edited by Katie Rosso krosso@themaneater.com

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Maybe it’s the signature pizza, the welcoming and lively ambiance or the reliable uniformity of the overall experience that makes Shakespeare’s so special. When you go there, you know you’ll get good college-town pizza and share laughs with your friends. Shakespeare’s has been one of Columbia’s main attractions for 43 years, and it is as much a part of tradition as Homecoming. This year, it’s back in its original location on Ninth Street and is busy preparing for the big event. According to general manager Toby Epstein, Homecoming is the busiest weekend of the year for the restaurant, and a lot of preparation and work goes into the chaotic event. “The most we can do is prepare ourselves as best as possible so that we can serve everybody as well as we can and under the circumstances of the Homecoming crowd,” Epstein said. According to Epstein, about 1,200 pizzas will be made Saturday, and a couple thousand pounds of flour and cheese are expected to be depleted in the process. Storing the excess ingredients prior to the weekend typically poses a challenge. In addition to food preparation, work schedules and hours of operation must be planned. Many more employees will work and for longer shifts. The restaurant will open early Saturday, at 9 a.m., and will stay open as long as the demand for pizza is present. Hours on Friday and Sunday will likely remain routine, though. “It’s not like another weekend where we might want to engage in some kind of

make sure everyone gets a break or two while working, and we try and keep the kitchen light-hearted and enjoyable for the staff and customers,” Arnzen said. “The owners will bring in snacks and drinks to [have] in between meal breaks.” While occupying its temporary space on Eighth and Elm streets, Shakespeare’s had the means to bring business outside for Homecoming. The larger outdoor space allowed the restaurant to put up tents, add seating to the parking lot and sell pizza and beer outside. “If you can expand your business as much as possible to bring in as many people as possible, that’s kind of your goal,” Epstein said. Without additional space, though, Shakespeare’s seldom organizes large events specifically in honor of

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Assistant MOVE Editor

marketing or we want to have a special event go on,” Epstein said. “We know it’s going to be chaos and the best thing for us to do is sort of brace ourselves.” Shift manager Luke Arnzen began working at Shakespeare’s in 2006 while he was a student at MU, and has worked the past seven Homecomings since he graduated. “The best way to describe it is ‘organized madness,’” Arnzen said in an email. “The only thing to do is not let the work overwhelm you. At some point all the pizza will be made and everyone gets to go home.” According to Arnzen, preparation for the weekend — specifically, ingredients and toppings — begins Thursday, so enough is ready for Friday and Saturday. “We get extra help from employees that don’t normally work that day. We

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VICTORIA CHEYNE

ELLIE HICKS & CLAIRE NICHOLS // GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

The food will be dispersed among the food bank’s pantries and children’s take-home bags. story by JACKSON KINKEAD

MU students donated over 31,000 pounds to Homecoming’s annual food drive, Tiger Food Fight, on Sept. 30. Ryan Eisenbath, a senior who is one of the 2016 Homecoming Steering Committee Tri-Directors, said this year’s food drive went well. “More organizations participated than ever,” Eisenbath said. The food drive partnered with The Food Bank for Central and Northeast Missouri, which works with 32 counties in Missouri and is a member of Feeding America. The collected food will be dispersed among the food bank’s pantries, children’s takehome bags and veterans in Boone County below the poverty line.

Janese Silvey, the food bank’s communications coordinator, said in an email that the 31,000 pounds of food roughly translates to 21,600 meals. Silvey said the food drive was “extremely successful this year” and the food bank is very appreciative of everyone who donated and volunteered. While various clubs, fraternities, students and locals donated the canned goods, the food drive’s committee members and 10 Homecoming king and queen candidates volunteered for and ran the event. Edited by Claire Mitzel cmitzel@themaneater.com


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THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

With Homecoming near, pomping hours increase Greek students explain the Homecoming decoration tradition they both love and hate. MALLORIE MUNOZ Reporter For students in Greek organizations, pomping is an activity that demands substantial time and energy. For the rest of MU, pomping is of little significance until the week of Homecoming and might even be a completely foreign word. Pomping is the collaborative creation of a large, decorative display of tissue paper. The required materials include small pieces of tissue paper and a thin marker with red tape wrapped around the cap. The tape serves as a place marker for the tissue paper, which is then dipped in glue and placed through the board. The process is repeated until the board is complete. Sororities and fraternities who are paired for Homecoming activities work together on the board, which is displayed outside of the sorority or

fraternity house. Although the process can be tedious, students still enjoy the social aspect. “I don’t mind pomping that much because we get to hang out with girls,” freshman Phi Gamma Delta pledge Brian Etling said. Pomping is nothing new to MU, and Kappa Kappa Gamma alumna Donice Yeater remembers it as a “unique way to make and bond with your friends.” “We would listen to music and pomp,” Yeater said. “It is a rather brainless activity, so it served as a nice break from school.” Twenty-one years later, Yeater’s daughter has been preparing for Homecoming week and does not have as fond an opinion of pomping. “I think it is a waste of time,” Kappa Alpha Theta sophomore Helen Yeater said. “I could be studying for my three tests I have next week instead.” Although the required pomping hours

HOMECOMING

BLOOD DRIVE r e s u l t s

information from The Maneater and The Missourian

2016 4,374 units (13,122 lives saved)

2015 5,114 units (15,342 lives saved)

2014 5,738 units (17,214 lives saved)

2013 6,327 units (18,711 lives saved)

2012 4,643 units

(13,929 lives saved) CASSIE ALLEN // GRAPHIC DESIGNER

“I THINK IT IS A WASTE OF TIME. I COULD BE STUDYING FOR MY THREE TESTS I HAVE NEXT WEEK INSTEAD.” — HELEN YEATER, A SOPHOMORE IN KAPPA ALPHA THETA vary by each sorority, the general weekly requirement is six to nine hours. “I have only had about six required hours a week, until this week where I have 23 since Homecoming is so close,” Yeater said. Despite the long hours, Homecoming at MU is a tradition students are proud

of. “Although I don’t really like the concept [of pomping], I really love being involved in the Homecoming tradition and can’t wait to see all of the houses decorated,” Yeater said. Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com

You’re social. Follow us We’re social. @TheManeater Let’s socialize.


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Vol. 83, Issue 9

OCT. 19, 2016

MSA split on pedestrian safety solution One committee chairman proposed ticketing jaywalkers and bikers on sidewalks.

A man jaywalks across Rollins Street near Cornell Hall on Oct. 18. Alessandro Comai | Staff Photographer

LAILAH TARAKAI Reporter Four pedestrians were killed and at least six others injured in motor vehicle collisions within Columbia city limits between October 2014 and April 2015. Three of these incidents happened on the same day: Jan. 22, 2015. In one, the victim was an MU student. The student and another pedestrian were injured. The third accident was fatal. There have been 23 reported accidents on campus in the last two years, four of

which were in 2016. The Missouri Student Association Campus and Community Relations Committee, which is responsible for advocating at the city level for students, has been working on a pedestrian safety project, but Chairman Hunter Windholz said he was not sure if anything would come of it. “Personally, it’s my belief that nothing’s going to happen,” he said. “Nothing’s going to happen with this until we’re forced to be reactive.” In the last CCRC meeting, Windholz

brought up the possibility of working with the MU Police Department to ticket jaywalkers and bikers on sidewalks. Despite negative feedback from committee members, he is still looking to set up a meeting with MUPD about the possibility. “We’re going to continue to be proactive until we’re forced to be reactive essentially because we want to stop this before someone gets killed,” Windholz said. While Windholz continues to pursue the safety issue on campus, Department

Prison Labor

of Student Services Director Casey Frost said her department was not working on the issue. DSS is the department in MSA’s executive branch that addresses student safety. “Yeah, it hasn’t really been brought to my attention before,” Frost said. “It’s not really an area I’ve ever dealt with.” However, Frost said that this issue was “definitely a dangerous thing.” “It’s basically one of those things that if it is a problem that students [want to

WALK | Page 10

Majors and MINORS

Despite activist efforts, MU continues New Middle East to use products made with prison labor minor fosters growth MSA Senator Sterling Waldman: “There have been no actual changes since the passing of the legislation.” FIONA MURPHY Staff Writer Last spring, student governments in joint session passed Resolution 55-32, which advocates for MU to divest from prison labor. However, the university continues to receive products made by incarcerated offenders through Missouri Vocational Enterprises. MVE is a program of the Division of Offender Rehabilitative Services within the Missouri

Department of Corrections. MVE has 25 different industries and 14 service locations in correctional institutions across Missouri. “MVE utilizes offender labor, along with supervisors and administrative staff, to provide quality products and services to state agencies and other not-for-profit entities,” MVE’s website states. The website displays endorsed MU-labeled products including license plates and the gold name tags student organizations use. The Missouri state statutes that established MVE prohibit selling to private individuals and businesses, preventing the Mizzou Store from purchasing and selling the

LABOR | Page 10

The Middle East Studies minor does not have a language requirement and draws from courses that already exist on campus. OLIVIA GARRETT Reporter Starting this fall, MU students can earn a minor learning about the Middle East. The new Middle East Studies minor was approved by Provost Garnett Stokes at the end of last spring. “I get emails usually once a week from a student saying they want to do it.” said Nathan Hofer, an assistant professor of Religious Studies who is the director of the minor program.

MINOR | Page 10


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THE MANEATER | ETC. | OCT. 19, 2016

Inside this Issue

Courtesy photos: Cattlewomen: Wikipedia Commons; Sean Culkin: the Culkin family; Mitchell McKinney: MU Department of Communication

NEWS

OPINION

love is a cattlefield

rise and shine

Mizzou Collegiate Cattlewomen are having a cow over beef education (pg. 9)

Columnist Emmett Ferguson is not a morning person, but taking an 8 a.m. has its perks (pg. 14)

SPORTS

renaissance man

feel the burns

Tight end Sean Culkin has spent plenty of time on the bench — at his piano at home (pg. 15)

Even at 6 a.m. practices, men’s cross-country coach Marc Burns is bringing a positive energy to the team (pg. 15)

Names and Numbers

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33 Classes that focus either entirely or partially on the Middle East. These classes count toward a new Middle East Studies minor.

Mitchell McKinney, director of MU’s Political Communication Institute. He studies political debates.

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Sanctions on MU’s Delta Upsilon chapter from the university since August 2015. The fraternity is temporarily suspended.

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21 Katharine Ross, swim team captain and one of the most decorated swimmers in Missouri history.

The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reproduced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. “Is there dick-to-noodle contact? Make sure you spell it ‘d-i-c-c’ so it goes in print.�

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Points scored so far this season by freshman soccer player Sarah Luebbert, the most for any Missouri player since 2010.

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NEWS

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What you need to know This Week on campus

Student ORGanizations

Mizzou Cattlewomen educate students about the beef industry MCCW Secretary Maddie Grant: “We’re just trying to feed the world honestly.”

MAGDALINE DUNCAN

a year, and if at least 75 percent of their members take an online training course to become beef-advocacy certified, the MBIC provides funding for the MCCW to attend the Cattle Industry Convention. All members who attend the convention need to be beef-advocacy certified. The convention is held in a different major city every year, and this year’s convention will be held in Nashville, Tennessee. “The Missouri Beef Industry Council sees the MCCW as a partner in this industry; they’re kind of the boots on the ground when it comes to the college campuses, and they’re able to share the beef story with their peers,” said Taylor Tuttle, director of Marketing and Education for the MBIC. The MCCW and the MBIC have similar goals. “It’s just a natural fit because the MBIC, our whole goal is to drive beef demand and educate consumers about beef demand and beef production, and

Staff Writer The next time you see a cow hanging out on Lowry Mall, the Mizzou Collegiate Cattlewomen are probably responsible. The group’s biggest event of the year, Meet Your Meat, is intended to fundraise as well as spark conversation with passersby. Each year they purchase 600 steaks to sell as ribeye sandwiches for the event, and each year they sell out. “It’s such a great opportunity for us to just have people who are hungry and maybe want to see the cow, and then maybe hook them in and talk to them about what we’re doing in the industry and maybe some misconceptions. How we’re just trying to feed the world honestly,” MCCW Secretary Maddie Grant said. The group is sponsored by the Missouri Beef Industry Council. The two organizations have a contract: If the MCCW assists the Missouri Beef Industry Council with at least ten events

courtesy of Wikipedia Commons

Politics

McKinney recognized for political debate knowledge Mitchell McKinney: “I’ve been a political junkie my whole life.” CLAIRE COLBY Staff Writer More than 84 million Americans watched the first presidential debate, according to Nielsen. Mitchell McKinney watched the people watching it. McKinney, the director of MU’s Political Communications Institute, is internationally recognized for his work studying political debates. McKinney provides frequent commentary for news outlets such as NPR, The New York Times, CNN, and The Washington Post. During the 2012 election cycle, he served as the principal political debate analyst for NPR News and USA Today, and was quoted by more than 800 news outlets. “I’ve been a political junkie my whole life,” McKinney said. “When I was an undergrad, I did student government and then I did internships in Washington, DC. So when I was crafting my research agenda as a faculty member, in grad school, I was drawn to political campaigns and presidential campaigns.” As a graduate student, McKinney began to study “one of the key moments” of the presidential campaign — the presidential debate.

He studied speech communication and government at Western Kentucky University before receiving his master’s degree in organizational and political communications from the University of North Carolina. McKinney earned his doctoral degree in political and organizational communication from the University of Kansas before coming to MU 16 years ago. In this election cycle, McKinney and his colleagues are analyzing the relationship between social media and and college students’ political participation. “We’re analyzing how these young voters — the millennials — are using social media to engage in the debates,” McKinney said. “I call it ‘social watching.’” Specifically, the team is studying the usage of Twitter by politically aware millennials. “We’re looking at what is the nature of the second screen activity, of the tweeting,” said McKinney. “Is it just attacking the candidates that you don’t support? Is it snark? Cynicism? Humor? We’re interested to find out what it is when folks are engaged in a presidential debates, and they’re tweeting out their

vote | Page 11

Check out our online coverage, including Mizzou football from all angles. photos by Emil Lippe | Senior Staff Photographer

beef | Page 11


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WALK Continued from page 7

address] then we will,” Frost said. The city of Columbia has a different mindset. “Deaths and serious injuries on our transportation systems are preventable and therefore they’re unacceptable,” said Ian Thomas, Fourth Ward councilman and co-chairman of Columbia City Council’s Pedestrian Safety Task Force. “If somebody makes a mistake, they don’t have to die for it or kill somebody else for it.” After holding meetings over the course of a year, the task force came up with many suggestions to increase public safety, but the No. 1 recommendation was a Vision Zero Policy, which aims to reduce the number of pedestrian and traffic fatalities. The task force is working to get the city to adopt that policy. The policy is relatively new to the U.S., with New York being the first to adopt it in 2014. After a significant decrease in pedestrian and traffic fatalities, more cities began

MINOR Continued from page 7

“Whether or not they actually follow through, who knows. But I get a constant stream of emails from students who are interested.” Currently, Hofer estimates that anywhere from six to 12 students will file for the minor by the end of this year. Three students have already visited Hofer, who provides advising for the minor, to get the forms to file it. “ There’s a bunch of people who have done all the requirements [for the minor]; they just haven’t filled out the forms yet,” Hofer said. That’s because many of the course offerings for the minor already exist. However, Vice Provost for Undergraduate Studies Jim Spain said until recently, the faculty had not identified the proper learning outcomes to establish the minor. “The courses existed, but a defined curriculum for a minor didn’t,” Spain said. The process of proposing the new minor officially began last fall when two students

LABOR Continued from page 7

products made by the program. MU must buy products directly from MVE as a result. Despite the legislation passed last year through MSA and joint session calling for the university to stop using products made by prison labor, MU continues to invest in MVE products. “There have been no actual

THE MANEATER | NEWS | OCT. 19, 2016 to adopt this policy across the country, including Seattle and San Francisco, all of which have seen reductions in death and serious injuries. “It’s a very effective policy if it’s implemented right,” Thomas said. The Vision Zero Policy is based on three categories: education, enforcement and engineering. Education will include a public service announcements, television advertisements, radio and newspaper advertisements and possible driving defense classes required for speed violators to inform and warn people to drive more carefully. Enforcement entails creating and implementing new laws such as passing bans on texting or using the phone while driving and having severe punishments for violators, reducing speed limits and making the penalties for DUIs tougher. “What I’m hoping is that the city of Columbia will develop its own ordinance that will be much stronger than [what it currently] states,” Thomas said regarding Missouri’s law allowing individuals 21 and older to text and talk on the

phone while driving. Thomas hopes when the policy is adopted, texting and cell phone usage while driving will be illegal for all ages. Engineering solutions could include narrowing down lanes, making pedestrian areas more visible by repainting crosswalks more frequently and setting up lights, adding medians in roads and creating curb extensions near crosswalks. “Ironically, you make a much safer road system when you reduce the visibility for the driver,” Thomas said. T homas says that contradictor y to what “traditional traffic engineering has said,” clearing out surrounding trees and increasing the number of lanes on a road makes roads more dangerous because people typically drive faster now that they have an “immense view.” He says adding medians with trees and reducing lanes will make people drive more carefully and slowly because they no longer can see 50 feet on either side of them. If the policy is adopted, it is the task force’s plan to team up with the PedNet Coalition

short-term to help fund all that needs to be done until the city of Columbia is able to fund it themselves. The PedNet Coalition is a local nonprofit organization that advocates for safe transportation and currently has received a grant through the Missouri Foundation for Health to help the city adopt the Vision Zero Policy. According to the task force’s report, PedNet will work with the city to create a an education campaign and also provide funding for the city to increase the staff of the police department so that the specific enforcements that the policy calls for will be implemented. In regards to long-term funding for the Vision Zero Policy, the task force has proposed a “One Percent for Safety” policy. This means that the city would take 1 percent of the budget of major road projects and put that money into the Vision Zero fund. “That money would then be used to fund both a Vision Zero coordinator [and] some funding for doing some TV ads, for doing radio ads, for doing newspaper ads, for providing extra resources for

the engineering department to do some assessments of some of the intersections,” Thomas said. The task force also plans to improve the crosswalk system on College Avenue. “I think [the HAWK project] was a good move, but I don’t think it’s working properly yet,” Thomas said. Thomas said the Missouri Department of Transportation has synchronized the traffic lights so that cars don’t need to stop at every light and can continue driving at a steady speed. Because of this, when pedestrians hit the button to cross, they have to wait instead of getting the right of way immediately like they’re supposed to. Thomas said he didn’t like the synchronization because “it keeps the traffic moving too fast.” The task force is in the process of meeting its goal for the city to adopt the Vision Zero Policy in the next 6-12 months. They will be presenting their report and policy to the council on Nov. 7. Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com

contacted Hofer asking how to create a minor about the Middle East. “I came to Mizzou in 2011, and I thought when I got here that there should be a minor or a major,” Hofer said. “The only thing I didn’t know was whether there was enough student interest, so it was in my brain as soon as I got here, but I didn’t really do much about it.” Geography professor Joseph Hobbs, who currently teaches Geography of the Middle East, first heard about the minor from students in his class. “I was in the wilderness here for a long time in terms of teaching the Middle East,” Hobbs said. “I came [to MU] in 1988 and my course on Geography of the Middle East was literally the only course on campus dealing with the Middle East, and it had that status for quite a long time, actually.” Now, there are 33 courses on campus that focus either entirely or partially on the Middle East and count toward the minor. “We now have a number of authorities on the Middle East on campus, which is just wonderful,” Hobbs said. Students working to get the minor must achieve 15 credit

hours, which can come from courses housed in 11 different departments of the College of Arts and Science, including art history, peace studies, political science, religious studies and sociology. This curriculum was examined and approved primarily by the division curriculum committee and the campus undergraduate curriculum committee, which are composed of faculty. The committees examine whether proposed curriculums of new academic programs are reasonable, whether it would achieve stated learning outcomes, and whether the new program replicates or competes with current programs. Getting the faculty on board was easy, Hofer said, and the only challenge was convincing the curriculum committee that the courses and faculty for the minor already existed. “Not a single person said, ‘This is a bad idea,’” Hofer said. “Every single faculty member that I talked to, every administrator, staff, student — everybody thought that it was a great idea.” Hobbs said he believes the new minor will give professors who want to introduce a course

regarding Islam or the Middle East more latitude when they approach department chairs, because now they can situate those courses within the minor. “I have confidence that I can get students to enroll in those classes, perhaps because they’re already in the minor or have an interest in the Middle East,” Hobbs said. Students pursuing the minor are typically journalism, political science or international relations majors who possibly intend to go to law school or graduate school, Hofer said. While major societal or industry changes might result in the introduction of a new academic program, new minors are not added regularly, Spain said. “It’s in part because of how long we’ve already been here

and how mature we are as far as how well-established, welldeveloped and comprehensive our academic portfolio already is,” Spain said. It’s possible the minor could develop to become a larger program, Hofer said. “The future plan is to get as many students active in Middle East studies courses as we can, and if we can get enough students and if we can get more language courses, then maybe we can get a program, not a department, but a program,” Hofer said. “If we have a program and we can raise some money, then we can get budget to invite speakers, run events on campus, perhaps even start a study abroad program somewhere in the Middle East.” Edited by Claire Mitzel cmitzel@themaneater.com

changes since the passing of the legislation,” said Social Justice Committee member Sterling Waldman. “A lot of community effort would go into any changes made.” At MSA’s full Senate meeting Wednesday, the Social Justice Committee announced it will be working to screen the documentary “13TH” to encourage community involvement on the issue. The film chronicles the history of racial inequality in the United States, as well as

examines how the U.S. currently has the highest incarceration rate in the world. A majority of inmates in the U.S. is black. The Social Justice Committee aims for the free screening to take place in November, Waldman said. No official date has been set for the screening or any other community involved activities. A spokesperson for MU did not respond to a request for comment by press time. Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com


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THE MANEATER | NEWS | OCT. 19, 2016

VOTE

Continued from page 9

comments, what are they saying? That’s sort of a massive project.” For the first debate, McKinney and his colleagues surveyed more than 400 college students across the country before and after their viewing of the debate. The survey results indicated a more than 10 percent increase in the likelihood that those students surveyed will vote for Democratic nominee Hillar y Mitchell McKinney is a political communication professor Clinton, according to in the department of communication. the statement released Courtesy of the MU Department of Communication by the study’s directors through the MU News and a tremendous colleague,” Warner Bureau. McKinney and his team followed a said. “He is incredibly professional. similar procedure for the second debate. He is incredibly organized. He’s really Four hundred college students were funny, and he’s really impressive.” The team will continue data collection surveyed before and after the town hall-style debate. The researchers noted with the third and final presidential an increase of 6 percent in students’ debate on Oct. 19. “This has been quite an unusual likelihood to vote for Clinton following the second debate, according to the election cycle,” McKinney said. There’s statement released following the a lot of unknowns. In some ways for studying these things, it makes it very completion of their second study. Political communications assistant exciting in the sense that we don’t know professor Benjamin Warner is working what to predict. We don’t know what to expect.” with McKinney on these studies. Edited by Kyra Haas “He’s been a mentor to me since I arrived, and a tremendous collaborator khaas@themaneater.com

BEEF

Continued from page 9

also educate consumers about where their food comes from and who is producing it,” Tuttle said. The MBIC is part of the nationwide commodity checkoff program, which means that it is producer-funded. For every head of cattle sold in Missouri, $1 is collected and is in turn spent on education, promotion and research for the beef industry. The “Got Milk?” campaign is another example of a commodity checkoff program. “Our whole goal is to drive beef demand by educating consumers about beef, about who is producing it, the nutritional value of beef, the importance of beef in your daily diet and really just help be that liaison between consumer and producer,” Tuttle said. The MCCW believe that there are a lot of misconceptions about the beef industry, and they want to start conversations with consumers about why they have the opinions that they do. “We’re not necessarily out there to change everybody’s mind and tell people that don’t want to eat beef that they have to,” Grant said. “We’re mostly just out there to show people the facts from our end because there’s a lot of facts there that are incorrect and are coming from sources that have nothing to do with agriculture.” One of the major consumer concerns that the MCCW tries to address is antibiotic usage in the beef industry and whether it causes antibiotic resistance in

humans. “The number-one location that you can find the most antibiotic resistance are in human hospitals,” MCCW President Kaitlin Epperson said. “So I would argue that most of the antibiotic resistance we see is not coming from agriculture. It’s coming from human usage.” Many consumers are also worried that growth hormones the beef industry uses to promote growth in cattle will affect their own growth. “Science has continually proven that that’s not going to happen,” Epperson said. “The amount of hormones that are used in the beef industry as a growth promotant is so small that by the time you analyze the meat products and such, it’s not visible in the product. It’s impossible to come up with any sort of animal product that doesn’t naturally have hormones present.” Another major concern is that the methane emissions from cattle are contributing to global warming. “The amount of emissions we’re getting from things like automobiles and factories and all sorts of things that our new technologies allow us to do is a much larger concern to the ozone and the environment as a whole than the cattle industry,” Epperson said. The MCCW encourages students to ask them any and all questions that they may have about the beef industry. Watch for Meet Your Meat on Lowry Mall this spring. Edited by Kyra Haas khaas@themaneater.com

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MILLENNIAL MANNERS g n i p p i T

Who needs tipping? Lots of people. Columnist Ben Jarzombek makes sure you know who to tip and how much in this week’s Millennial Manners.

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THE NORM:

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THE NORM:

THE NORM:

THE NORM:

BEN’S

BEN’S

BEN’S

BEN’S

BEN’S

BEN’S

15-20% 10-20%

OPINION:

20%

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$1-2

OPINION:

20-25% DEPENDS AGREES

$2-4

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AGREES ONLY FOR

TOUGH ORDERS

TORI AERNI // GRAPHICS MANAGER

TORI AERNI // GRAPHICS MANAGER Millennial manners

Tip of the iceberg: Don’t stiff employees on tips BEN JARZOMBEK

There’s a pretty good chance you’ve been compelled to tip someone at some point in your life. There’s also a pretty good chance that you’re in college (and subsequently close to broke). Tipping may seem like a luxury only afforded to you when your finances are slightly more in order than they presently are, but this is completely untrue. Not only is tipping the polite thing to do, but it’s fairly necessary in some professions. Regardless of your opinion on tipping, it can’t be denied that some people make their livings from tips. However, tipping is not a “one-size-fits-all” practice. For that reason, I’ve decided to create a handy guide for tipping all the people in your daily life.

Restaurants The norm: 15-20 percent Ben’s opinion: 20 percent It’s 20 percent, or more if you feel so inclined. Anyone who tells you otherwise lacks basic human decency. Considering that the vast majority of any server’s pay comes from tips, slighting them can make a huge dent in their income. If something in your dining experience has caused you to want to tip less, take a second to consider if it was the direct fault of your server. If the food was bad or your drink wasn’t made right, don’t blame your server for it. Barbers/Stylists/Spa Technicians The norm: 10-20 percent Ben’s opinion: 20-25 percent if you’re a regular. Before my current stylist, I got my hair cut by the same woman for almost nine years. She was wonderful, and I always tipped her 25 percent. When I switched to the woman who now cuts my hair, I continued with the 25 percent rule when she went above and

beyond my expectations. Bottom line: If you’re seeing the same person regularly, tipping well is a nice gesture. Dry Cleaner/Tailor The norm: Don’t tip. Ben’s opinion: Depends on the job. It’s a fairly common consensus that these people need not be tipped. For day-to-day tasks (dry cleaning a normal item, simple alterations), I would agree. However, if you’ve tasked your tailor with the impossible or brought something to the cleaners with a pamphlet worth of instructions, I think a tip upon pickup is a good move. Bars The norm: $1-2 for beers, 15 percent on cocktails Ben’s opinion: A good baseline rule. While the standard bar tipping etiquette is generally a good route, you can switch it up depending on the situation. For example, tossing your bartender $20 early on in the evening might ensure they take care of you a bit quicker or make your drink a double for

no extra cost. Regardless, tip a dollar or two for beers and a bit more (15-20 percent) on cocktails or other complex orders. Food Delivery The norm: $2-4; 10-15 percent Ben’s opinion: Follow the norm. Up until researching other opinions on tipping, I always tipped delivery drivers 20 percent of the bill. However, most sources say that’s not necessary at all, and 10-15 percent is perfectly fine. I say follow that, unless the delivery was difficult in some way (large order, difficult commute, etc.). Baristas The norm: Not required. Ben’s opinion: Only for tough orders. In the same vein as bars, tipping at coffee shops really depends on your order. For a simple cup of coffee, don’t feel compelled to tip. However, for a pour-over or more labor-intensive drink, tossing a dollar or so into the jar never hurt anyone.


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MOVE MAGAZINE | OCT. 19, 2016

Welcome to the jungle: Shaving shouldn’t be an expectation for women Sex Edna delves into womanly landscaping as a sexist and stupid standard.

SEX EDNA

Sex Edna is a sex and advice specialist for MOVE Magazine. She’ll take any and all questions about sex into consideration, but she’s really just making it up as she goes along like everyone else. If you think you’ve done something too different or too weird, Sex Edna probably has a story about messy situations or awkward interactions to match. She uses a pseudonym to protect her identity and the identities of her partners. We all get excited when we’re about to get some action. Even if it’s unexpected and out of the blue, it can turn your day around. But if you are a woman and getting down to some surprise business, many of us have had the horrifying revelation. “I didn’t shave.” It may be your armpits or your legs, but the worst monster to deal with is pubic hair. For women, there tends to be certain expectations with your landscaping. If you watch any sort of porn, most women are practically bald down there. If there is anything, it is some sort of fancy design, possibly a

landing strip or a charming heart. Men are expected to do some upkeep to maintain a level of respect for who they sleep with, but it’s not the same. Some trimming or minor shaving will take care of most of what is there. It is much more involved and a pain for women, quite literally. Long-term and effective ways of removing pubic hair are expensive. Laser hair removal treatments, usually an annual affair, can cost up to $500 per session. Brazilian waxes, which can last for several weeks, can cost up to $80 a session. That’s a lot of money to live up to a man’s pornographic fantasy, so women are often stuck with the good ol’ razor. Anyone who has used a razor to shave their pubic hair knows that it is not only a process of going again and again to get the close, smooth shave, but that it is usually only good for a day or two. After that, hairs become short and prickly and hellishly painful. Skin often becomes irritated, red and bumpy. It takes several days to heal and for hairs to reach a length where they are soft and comfortable again. They say beauty is pain, but it shouldn’t have to be, especially when it is an ideal that is constructed just to please whatever person you are having sex with. Even though it seems to happen over and over again, it feels like some women don’t have a choice. We are scared to be ostracized by those we

want to be intimate with because of the hairstyle we are rocking on our vaginas. If women judged men based on how hairy their testicles were, we would be living in a much different world. But there’s a secret that most people won’t share: As long as everything is clean, and you’re with someone you want to have sex with who wants to have sex with you, no one will care. Let your

hair grow. Don’t mess with your stupid pink razor. And, if you are sleeping with someone who shames you for what you decide to do with your body hair, they don’t deserve your temple of a body. Find someone who is deserving, even if it’s just yourself. Have a question for Sex Edna? Send it to sexedna@themaneater.com or tweet at us @SexEdna.

Downtown watch

STAFF MOVE Editor: Katie Rosso Deputy MOVE Editor Katherine White Columns Editor Victoria Cheyne Engagement Coordinators Grant Sharples Ben Jarzombek Staff Writers Brooke Collier Hannah Simon Lyndsay Hughley Mackenzie Wallace Michelle Lumpkins Michaela Flores Nat Kaemmerer Videographer Hunter Bassler Ad rep Sally Cochran Columnists Ally Rudolph Alycia Washington Bianca Rodriguez Cassandra Allen Jack Cronin Kristyna Kresic

Meet an Author If you’re looking for a fun morning that features books, free coffee and Harold’s Doughnuts, Kenneth Winn will be coming to Boone County Historical Society at 10:30 a.m on Oct. 22. Winn will discuss his book Missouri Law and the American Conscience, which contains 10 essays about Missouri’s history. This event is on the third Saturday of every month so if you can’t go this month, there’s always the next.

Homecoming Tunes The Blue Note is hosting a Homecoming takeover with Davon Sparkling, DNA, Ebony Tusks and Maz Blanko on Oct. 21. The concert will be $5 for regular cover and $7 for minors. The doors open at 8 p.m., and the show starts at 9 p.m. The party will be about MU pride and will feature $3 Fireball shots and $3 Logboat cans.

Let’s Get Social Twitter: @MOVEManeater MOVE MAGAZINE on Facebook MOVE.themaneater. com

Move recommends Rocky Horror Picture Show On Oct. 20, The Blue Note will host a screening of Rocky Horror Picture Show. If you’ve never been to a live show and experienced the audience participation, this is your chance. The show is at 7 p.m. and costs $8 in advance and $10 the day of the show. It’s the same day as the live Rocky Horror remake with Laverne Cox so you can forget that the reboot is even happening.

Cooking Date Night If you are looking for a new date night, a Back 2 Basics cooking class with your significant other would be the perfect choice. The menu for the date night includes a Philly cheesesteak, a loaded french fry bar and homemade Butterfinger bars. Plus, you’ll get to eat good food without having to do dishes. For those over 21, you also get your choice of one glass of wine or some sparkling juice you can pretend is wine.

See the Fall Colors If you want to get outside but don’t necessarily want to walk, take the tram tour of Katy Trail on Oct. 26-27. The trams are free (though donations are encouraged) and the tour is two hours long. Stretching 9 miles each way, the tour goes between Rocheport and McBaine. Reserve your spot by Oct. 21.

MOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVE MOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVE MOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVE


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A PLACE FOR FREE EXPRESSION We want to hear your voice. Submit letters to the editor at: www.themaneater.com/letter-to-the-editor FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION EDITORIALS REPRESENT THE MAJORITY OPINION OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

OPINION

THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED BY THE MANEATER COLUMNISTS DO NOT REPRESENT THE OPINIONS OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

EDITORIAL

According to Emmett

Campaign to fight homelessness Why the 8 a.m. can dehumanizes instead of helping be a good thing, Big Hearts, Real Change is a campaign started this year by The District of downtown, The Loop of Business Loop 70 and United Way. The goal is to discourage giving money to panhandlers and instead donate by texting a phone number or calling a hotline run by Phoenix Health Programs to report those who need help. But when you look at the details, organizers’ hearts seem small and the change seems smaller. Aside from promoting the campaign online, many local businesses have posted flyers in their windows with the campaign’s slogan: “It’s okay to say no.” The fact that local businesses have gotten behind the campaign feels slimy and uncomfortable, and their motivation is questionable. The flyers don’t feel like an encouragement to help the homeless, but instead feel like a push to give money to their businesses instead of to homeless individuals. The website is also vague as to how donations are used. The proceeds raised from its text-togive campaign go to the Basic Needs Coalition, an organization that aims to “assist the citizens of Columbia and Boone County, Missouri, in meeting their basic needs for food, clothing, shelter, and transportation.” It takes away the contribution to the individual

and just throws money into the great big pot of the bureaucracy trying to solve the problem of homelessness in Columbia. Those in charge of the program don’t even consider the homeless as individuals — they consider them problems. “Phoenix Health Programs can come out and specifically address problems that people are worried about,” said Jennifer Coffman, assistant director of outreach for The District. “They walked around and identified a core group of 13 people who were here [downtown] all the time, and by the time they got the program public, they had solved three out of the 13 problems.” This program dehumanizes people. People are not problems. These are people who struggle with homelessness or choose to be homeless. Because of privacy concerns, it is not even known what happened to these people who have become less visible on the streets of Columbia. We don’t know how they were helped and where they might be now, or if Big Hearts, Real Change actually made a difference in their lives. Homelessness is a complex issue that this campaign reduces to a financial problem for individuals in order to solve an aesthetic problem of their own. We don’t know if Big Hearts, Real Change are making real change for anyone but themselves.

POLITICS VRBATIM

Conspiracy theories are normal in U.S. politics

It’s too easy to believe everything is carefully orchestrated against your preferred candidate in an election. TESS VRBIN Tess Vrbin is a sophomore journalism student at MU. She is an opinion columnist who writes about national politics for The Maneater. Donald Trump wants America to believe the 2016 presidential election is rigged. He claims Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton and the mass media are behind it. He claims the women who have accused him of sexual misconduct are liars. He claims that unless people keep an eye on the polling booths on Nov. 8, undocumented immigrants will vote illegally and swing the election in Clinton’s favor. A Boston Globe article from Saturday details the outrageous thoughts of some paranoid Trump supporters at a rally in Cincinnati. One person said he would use racial profiling to identify suspected illegal voters and “make them a little bit nervous.” Another person talked about starting a revolution with “a lot of bloodshed” if Clinton wins. As sad, scary and outlandish as their views are, paranoia and conspiracy theories in American politics are nothing new. In fact, historian Richard Hofstader’s 1964 essay “The Paranoid Style in American Politics” is relevant more than half a century later. Hofstader traces the history of political paranoia from his time, soon after the Red Scare, all the way back to the late 18th century when the U.S. was just beginning. For anyone who knows this history, says Hofstader, “the real mystery … is not how the United States has been brought to its present dangerous position but how it has managed to survive at all.” Here are just a few quotes from the essay that ring true for the Trump camp. “The modern right wing . . . feels dispossessed: America has been largely taken away from them and their kind, though they are determined to try to repossess it.” Trump’s campaign slogan, “Make America Great Again,” suggests the nation is in worse shape than it used to be.

However, historically marginalized groups including women, African-Americans and the LGBTQ community have more rights and opportunities now than ever before. Straight white men haven’t experienced such growth because they already had all the social and economic advantages they needed. But non-college-educated whites — Trump’s most important demographic — might be unaware of that because they don’t have the education. “If for every error and every act of incompetence one can substitute an act of treason, many points of fascinating interpretation are open to the paranoid imagination.” Trump supporters believe Clinton’s use of a private email server to handle classified information was an unforgivable crime, even though the FBI didn’t recommend charges against her. Clinton has admitted multiple times that it was a mistake, but “Lock her up!” is a regular chant at Trump rallies, which brings me to my next point. Hofstader says paranoid minds see their opponents in “apocalyptic terms” and want them “totally eliminated.” There’s evidence of that all over this election, from “Lock her up!” to Trump’s suggestion in August that the “Second Amendment people” take action against Clinton. Trump literally called Clinton “the devil” and said she “has tremendous hate in her heart” during their debate on Oct. 9. His supporters see Clinton’s email mistake as more serious than Trump’s litany of transgressions, which I won’t even bother to list. In the Boston Globe article, one woman said that if Clinton beats Trump, “our country is not going to be a country anymore.” You can’t get much more apocalyptic than that. “The paranoid mind is far more coherent than the real world.” The real world is messy and complex. It’s much harder to acknowledge that than it is to think everything is carefully orchestrated a certain way, such as against your preferred candidate in an election. Paranoia and fear do wild things to the human imagination. I feel sorry for those who believe Trump’s far-fetched claims, because according to Hofstader, "We are all sufferers from history, but the paranoid is a double sufferer, since he is afflicted not only by the real world, with the rest of us, but by his fantasies as well.”

especially for freshmen Sleep, scheduling and how to say no.

EMMETT FERGUSON

Emmett Ferguson is a freshman journalism major at MU. He is an opinion columnist who writes about student life for The Maneater. College brings about many fears. Whether you’re afraid about passing that final or if your fake ID will make it past the bouncer, there is one thing that trumps all others: the 8 a.m. class. There are very few students who, when signing up for classes, will seek out anything that starts before 10. However, an 8 a.m. can be one of the best things to have, especially as a freshman. I’ll be the first to admit that the idea of an 8 a.m. can seem daunting. When I made my schedule and ended up having a class twice a week from 8-11 a.m., I thought long and hard about whether college was really worth it. After several hours of introspection and reading some Nietzsche, I decided to continue with my education despite the early-morning plague that fate had cast upon me. I made it to my 8 a.m. in the first week of class, and the second, and the third. It wasn’t even all that bad. Just a boy with his dreams, a dedication to education and a Nalgene bottle full of black coffee against the world. I’ve gotten better at waking up, and I am not a

HAVING AN 8 A.M. HAS MADE ME LEARN HOW TO SAY NO. morning person. My own mother won’t even try to wake me up anymore because she accused me of trying to hit her whilst unconscious. But I still make it to my 8 a.m., and I have learned a lot in the process. One thing that having an 8 a.m. did teach me is to value sleep. I liked sleep in high school and even dabbled in napping. Now, I’d climb the highest mountaintop just to shout my proclamation of love for sleep. While it seems like an 8 a.m. would hurt our newly intensified relationship, it has only been strengthened. Having an 8 a.m. taught me how to schedule my sleep. I know how many hours of sleep I need to be at my best, how much I need to just barely be able to make it through the day and how much until I am a zombie, shuffling around to find caffeine. Having an 8 a.m. also forced me to have some semblance of a schedule to my days. I’m able to get all my homework done relatively early, partly because the seductive allure of my messy sheets is only feet away. In very few situations have I been attracted to anything more than my bed while working at 1 a.m., so I find it very easy to motivate myself to get my work done at an earlier hour. Having an 8 a.m. has also made me learn how to say no. When it’s late at night and something fun comes up, it was at first hard to deny going. That is no longer the case. No matter what is happening I can say no, and that has proved to be an invaluable skill. Peer pressure no longer has any effect on me. The entire student body could be egging me on to go be the starting quarterback in a homecoming game against Kansas, and my response would be, “Sorry guys, it’s already 9; I’m late for a snuggle with my comforter.”


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THE BEST SOURCE FOR Mizzou SPORTS

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courtesy of Mizzou Athletics

Football

Piano man Sean Culkin defies athlete norms The redshirt senior gave up going to the beach to accumulate a diverse list of titles.

NICK KELLY Staff Writer If a pianist, an outdoorsman and a finance major walked into a bar, it wouldn’t just be the start of a bad joke. It would signal Sean Culkin’s entrance. Most know Culkin, a redshirt senior, as the starting tight end on the Missouri football team or the talented high school basketball player who received college scholarship offers. “Athlete” takes up only one spot on his diverse list of titles,

though. His varied set of activities began when he first sat on his Yamaha piano bench in early elementary school. His father, Chuck Culkin, who plays piano for fun, sparked Sean’s interest. Once he saw Sean’s excitement for the instrument, Chuck signed his son up for lessons just as Chuck’s mom had done for him. Between lessons and watching instructional videos on the internet, Sean grew into a piano player who dazzled anyone willing to listen.

“He is a beautiful player,” Chuck said. “He has really good touch.” Sean’s relocation from Indian Rocks Beach, Florida, to Columbia forced him to abandon his piano-playing. The Yamaha piano did not make the trip, but his guitar did. Sean began strumming guitar strings as an early teenager after he went to a camp in North Carolina. Lessons helped him become a competent guitarist, and he uses those skills to play with his father, who still plays the piano.

It’s not a perfect symphony, mainly because Chuck admits he’s not on the same musical level as Sean. “He has a better sense of rhythm, and that would show up in our playing together,” Chuck said, laughing. When Sean wasn’t playing piano or guitar, he was likely outside. Sean often took advantage of the ocean two minutes away from his house. He would swim, fish and go out on his boat, a

CULKIN | PAGE 17

Cross-Country

Burns makes impact through coaching philosophy Two years after coach Marc Burns took over men’s cross-country, the coach-athlete dynamic has been through major changes. TITUS WU Staff Writer Every Missouri men’s cross-country workout varies, whether by time of day, mood or mileage. But at the beginning and end of every workout, there’s always one guy pumping runners up, going around and talking, reminding runners to get good rest and food. “[Marc Burns is] a very positive coach,” redshirt freshman Tyler Gillam said. “He’s always up and ready to go

and get things done. He gives off energy, which is good. Sometimes at 6 in the morning [for practice], you’re like, ‘Oh my gosh.’ But Burns is all energetic, asking, ‘Are you ready to go?’” It’s been two years since Burns came to Mizzou and former coach Joe Lynn left. When Burns took over, the whole dynamic of the men’s team changed. “Whereas right now as a senior I’m running 80 miles per week, I was doing 85 miles per week as a freshman under Joe Lynn, and I would have progressed to 100 miles,” redshirt junior Sheldon

Keence said. Lynn believed longer distances meant better results. Burns believes in shorter distances but higher-quality runs. Though the distances are shorter, the transition wasn’t smooth and easy. “It was tough at first to get the whole team to buy in,” Keence said. “When you come in and you’ve chosen to do longdistance training, you think that must work, because you’ve chosen to come [to Mizzou specifically] for that longdistance training. So whenever that whole philosophy changes, it catches

you off guard.” Some runners did leave, unable to adjust to Burns’ new style. But the runners who’ve stuck with it do not regret staying. “I think it took a bit of time for everybody to get used to the coaching style,” redshirt senior Drew White said. “I haven’t ever seen the team any better than we are right now.” It wasn’t just the workouts that changed, but the atmosphere, too. Many

BURNS | PAGE 16


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | OCT. 19, 2016

Swimming

Ross’ final season means leading by example Ellie Suek: “You see her behind the blocks and she’s just got that look to her. You always know that it’s going to be fast, but you never know just how good it’s going to be.” PETER BAUGH Sports Editor Growing up, Katharine Ross always loved to perform. It didn’t matter what she was doing — ballet, tumbling or something else — she liked showcasing her talents. “All those things that I did, I never really enjoyed the practice part of it, but I just love the performance,” she said. When she was 12 years old, the Iowa native decided to focus on what she did best. She quit all of her activities except one — swimming. Ross is now a senior and was voted captain of the Missouri swim team. She is an All-American breaststroker and excels when it matters most: race time. Just like when she was little, she loves to perform. “Every race, I have a choice to make this a great race,” Ross said. “I’m in control of it. It’s mine.” Ellie Suek is Ross’ close friend. The two are both senior swimmers on the Mizzou team, and they roomed together at Southeastern Conference Championships in 2015. Suek says her friend is a fun, comforting presence on the team. When it’s time to race, though, Ross is completely focused. “She’s just really fierce,” Suek said. “You see her behind the blocks, and she’s just got that look to her. You always know that it’s going to be fast, but you never know just how good it’s going to be.” The combination of Ross’ mental and physical abilities has made her one of the most decorated swimmers in Missouri history. She is the program’s first SEC champion and placed fourth in the 100yard breaststroke at last season’s NCAA Championships. The national stage was nothing new to Ross when she came to Columbia. As a 16-year-old, she qualified for Olympic Trials in the 100-meter breaststroke. She had fun, she said, but the experience was overwhelming. Ross felt a difference when she swam at her second Olympic Trials this summer. She felt like she belonged. Ross posted a best time of 1:07.94 in the 100-meter breaststroke, earning the No. 11 seed for semifinals. She ultimately finished 16th and was one of four current Mizzou swimmers to advance past preliminaries. “[Making semifinals] meant a lot to me because I got to represent Mizzou,” she

BURNS

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of the runners constantly described Burns as far more laid-back and handsoff. “He puts more responsibility on us, and it keeps us accountable,” Gillam said. “I think the team tries to keep everyone else accountable, so it instills

Senior Katharine Ross swims the 100-meter breaststroke for a time of 1:00.97 during the Show Me Showdown. Jessi Dodge | Photo Editor said. “I think a lot of people really started to notice us.” Coach Greg Rhodenbaugh said Ross’ improvement comes as a result of her hard work and belief in the Missouri program. He can remember when Ross first visited Missouri on a recruiting trip. He said he was impressed with her speed, and

BOTH IN AND OUT OF THE POOL, ROSS IS A STRONG FIT WITH THE MISSOURI PROGRAM. SHE’S WISE, COMPASSIONATE AND NOT FLASHY. AND NOW, AS A SENIOR, ROSS FEELS SHE CAN LEAD BOTH BY ACTIONS AND WORDS. the two connected. “Katharine comes from a Christian home, so we had very like-minded philosophies,” he said. “She had to decide

collegiate swimming. She has high hopes for the Missouri program this season. She wants the team to finish in the top 10 at NCAA Championships, and she is excited

coached three schools — Loyola, Wichita State and Bradley universities — before Mizzou. He built up a solid foundation in all three schools and led them to multiple regional titles. He was also a runner himself, from junior high through his years at Loyola University, his alma mater. From these experiences, Burns developed a strength-based philosophy on balancing a team-orientated outlook with individualized focus. And that’s where understanding and connecting

look at what people did in high school, talk to their high school coaches, find out what’s worked for them, find out how much volume they can handle.” He said he does this because some college coaches disregard athletes’ high school experiences. “You’ve just raised quality and volume at the same time, and that’s a dangerous combo,” Burns said. But understanding his athletes as runners is only one part; he also tries to understand them as people. He talks about anything from sports to school with many of his runners to bridge the gap. When the connection is formed, he discusses the future with many of them, tries to get to know their families, and attempts to connect with them on a personal level. “So if someone’s coming in and they’re freaking out over a big test, my first reaction is to say, ‘Look, go back and study and do great on that test,’” Burns said. “And then we’ll talk about your workout later. Or like, ‘Hey, I’m exhausted.’ ‘Okay, sleep in tomorrow, come and see me.’” It’s not a one-way relationship;

“I THINK HE’S STUCK TO HIS GUN ON WHAT HE BELIEVES IN. HE WAS REALLY PASSIONATE ABOUT WHAT HIS COACHING STYLE WAS, AND HE DID A GOOD JOB MAKING SURE WE BOUGHT INTO THE SYSTEM.” –SHELDON KEENCE, REDSHIRT JUNIOR more of a team dynamic. He wants to make you be responsible for what you’re doing. That way, you’re more invested.” Burns isn’t a novice coach. He

whether she wanted to come to a Christian college or come to a secular college and try to live a Christian lifestyle.” Ross feels she made the right choice. At Missouri, she has been exposed to other cultures and ways of thinking that have strengthened her faith. Now, four years after her first visit, Ross is in the midst of her final season of

with athletes becomes key. “Everybody comes in with a different background of training ... If someone’s not ready for it, they’ll have a tendency to get hurt,” Burns said. “So you got to

to help the team’s medley relays. Rhodenbaugh hopes Ross can place even higher than last year in the 100yard breaststroke at this season’s NCAA Championships. He also thinks she can place in the top eight in the 200-yard breaststroke and score points for the team in the 200-yard individual medley. Both in and out of the pool, Rhodenbaugh feels Ross is a strong fit with the Missouri program. She’s wise, compassionate and not flashy. And now, as a senior, Ross feels she can lead both by actions and words. “I’ve been able to help lead the team by example through swimming and kind of leading us at our meets and things like that for a while,” she said. “But now this is finally a time where I think I can take the responsibility to kind of more vocally take charge of the team and be able to hopefully influence some people in that way.” Edited by Theo DeRosa tderosa@themaneater.com athletes get to know him as well. He sometimes brings his wife and four children to practices or races, and many runners appreciate the family feel. His passion for running is obvious, something passed on by all of Burns’ former coaches. And in turn, that passion passes onto Burns’ Tigers. “I think he’s stuck to his gun on what he believes in,” Keence said. “He was really passionate about what his coaching style was, and he did a good job making sure we bought into the system.” Indeed, one of Burns’ proudest accomplishments was that after leaving Bradley, the team there still won multiple Missouri Valley Cross-Country titles. “When you leave a place, you want to leave it better than when you got there,” he said. “And that’s exciting to see.” And with Mizzou, his goal is no different. Edited by Peter Baugh pbaugh@themaneater.com


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | OCT. 19, 2016 Volleyball

Ali Kreklow reflects on family atmosphere Kreklow: “I’ve been in the volleyball gym since I could walk. I grew up in the volleyball world.�

CHELSEA ROEMER Staff Writer The Missouri volleyball team prides itself on a family-like atmosphere. For junior Ali Kreklow, it truly is her family. Kreklow, a setter for the Tigers, is the daughter of head coach Wayne Kreklow and assistant coach Susan Kreklow. Growing up with parents who coach, she was exposed to the sport of volleyball at a young age. “I’ve been in the volleyball gym since I could walk,� she said. “I grew up in the volleyball world. Once I learned how to play, I was ready to get started.� Before starting her career with the Tigers, Ali earned many accolades for both her high school and club teams. Kreklow attended Rock Bridge High School, where she was team captain for the 2012 and 2013 seasons. She led the Bruins to the Class 4 state quarterfinals her senior year and was a four time all-district honoree. In her club career, Kreklow was a member of Performance Volleyball. She helped her team qualify for the USA Junior National Championship in 2013. When it came time to look at colleges, Kreklow knew she wanted to stay close to home. “I love Columbia, and I am a homebody,� she said. “I like being around my family.� In her first two years at Mizzou, Kreklow continued her success. She amassed over 1,000 assists and 300 digs for the Tigers as a freshman and

sophomore. Though she has not seen as much playing time as a junior, she still averages 4.14 assists per set.  Kreklow spends a large amount of time with her parents during practices, games and traveling from August to November. “I get to see them every day and we can expand our relationship,� Kreklow said. “I can separate them as my parents from my coaches.� Growing up, Kreklow was unable to spend a lot of time with her parents. “They were gone a lot, and I now know why they were gone all the time, but now we get to travel together,� Kreklow said. Ali is not Wayne and Susan’s only relative to go through the Mizzou program. Molly Kreklow, Ali’s cousin, was a setter for the Tigers from 2010 to 2013. Molly played all four years as a student at Mizzou and went on to pursue a career with the U.S. national volleyball team. “Molly and I are close,� Ali said. “We weren’t when we were younger because we were so busy with sports. I watched Molly go through her four years at Mizzou. She is a role model, and I know she is there for me.� As a junior, Ali Kreklow is near the end of her collegiate career. After this season ends, she will only have one year left playing with not just her teammates, but also with her parents. “Having parents as coaches has its pros and cons,� she said. “But being

Ali Kreklow (middle) following a game against South Carolina. Emil Lippe | Senior Staff Photographer able to go through this experience is something I wouldn’t trade for the world.�

Edited by Peter Baugh pbaugh@themaneater.com

CULKIN

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Baja 23 that hung on a lift in the backyard. Sean often used the boat to wakeboard and skimboard. “It was tough to honestly make sure I was taking care of football responsibilities [such as] lifting and playing basketball when my friends were going to the beach,� Sean said. “I managed to get it done.� His schedule still forces him to turn down fun for work. While playing for the football team, Sean earned a degree in finance, a major that his neighbor and teammate Joey Burkett described as difficult. Sean graduated from Mizzou in May and works with equity managers for an insurance company as an intern. It’s no surprise Sean received recognition as a semifinalist for the William V. Campbell Trophy, given to the nation’s best football student-athlete. This success didn’t come without social sacrifice, though. “You’ll go in there at 11 p.m. on a Thursday night, and he is sitting at his kitchen table studying,� Burkett said. “It’s something you don’t really see very much.� Tight end coach Joe Jon Finley also spoke highly of Sean’s work ethic and his smarts both on and off the field, saying Culkin is smarter than he is. Finley said Culkin also outshines him when it comes to interviews. “He’s very well-spoken as well,� Finley said. “When he does radio shows, he sounds like the coach, and I sound like the football player.� Sean has yet to add coach to his diverse list of titles, but he has dabbled in teaching. He went on mission trips with members of his Christian high school to Alabama, Nicaragua and El Salvador, teaching local kids about Christianity. During these trips, Culkin also helped with other projects such as erecting buildings. When he has time in Missouri, he works with kids involved with Fellowship of Christian Athletes. So how does he find time for his atypical activities? “He manages his time incredibly well,� Chuck said. “Most people when they only have a half hour, they kick back and do work later. If he has a half hour, he is spending all of it doing his work. He is always doing things.� Whether those things are mission trips or Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata, Sean enjoys it all. “A lot of people go into football and that’s all they think about,� Chuck Culkin said. “I like that there is a lot more to him.� Edited by Peter Baugh and Nancy Coleman pbaugh@themaneater.com, ncoleman@themaneater.com

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THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

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Erin Cooper makes history as MU’s first female band director

Marching Mizzou drum major Andrew Hopkins: “We have a new level of diversity on campus that we didn’t have before.” CLAIRE COLBY Reporter For the first time in its 131-year history, Marching Mizzou is under the leadership of a female band director. Erin Cooper, who served for a year as director of bands for Southeastern Oklahoma State University, is the only female athletic band director in the Southeastern Conference. “Our clear priority is choosing the best candidate, and she just happened to be female,” said Julia Gaines, director of the MU School of Music. Nonetheless, Gaines expressed enthusiasm regarding the historic hire. “I’m just excited that we can have this role model for our female students who want to go into band directing,” Gaines said. “The majority is male, so it’s nice to be able to say, ‘Hey, here’s a female who’s done it.’” Junior drum major Andrew Hopkins expressed a similar sentiment. “When I found out that she was the first female band director at Mizzou, I was really looking forward to her bringing some new ideas that she might be able to implement at Mizzou,” Hopkins said. “I was really looking forward to some of the new experiences that she would be able to bring. We have a new level of diversity on campus that we didn’t have before.”

Prior to her appointment as director of Marching Mizzou, Cooper studied music education at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. She then received her master’s degree in instrumental conducting from the University of Delaware and her doctorate in musical arts for wind conducting from the University of Alabama.

“I’M JUST EXCITED THAT WE CAN HAVE THIS ROLE MODEL FOR OUR FEMALE STUDENTS.” — JULIA GAINES, DIRECTOR OF MU SCHOOL OF MUSIC “So far, she’s just fantastic,” Hopkins said. “We’re doing so much this year that’s both new and better protocol for all of our rehearsals. We are at a really great place this year. She’s fairly direct, and she’s to the point, but it gets the job done.” Marching Mizzou is the largest student organization on campus with more than 300 members. The group performs at both home and away football games. Currently, the organization is preparing

Marching Mizzou pauses between songs before the LSU-Missouri game Oct. 1. Jessi Dodge | Photo Editor for their Homecoming performances. “Tuesday through Friday, four to six, we’re on the practice field every day,” freshman Shoshana Jackson said. “We just run over drills constantly to make sure that we have everything down.” Jackson plays clarinet for the band. “A really unique part of the university

is Homecoming, and Marching Mizzou has been a great tradition, too,” said junior Chris Dade, a trumpet player. “Incorporating two of the university’s best traditions is sort of unique, and we’re lucky to be a part of that.” Edited by Kyra Haas khaas@themaneater.com


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THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

Dan Meers as Truman the Tiger in Hawaii. photos courtesy of Dan Meers

Coming home again: Alumni relive their Homecoming traditions 1986 alumnus Jeff Zumsteg: “We’re all true Mizzou, and that has to come first.”

T

CASSIE ALLEN Reporter

ruman the Tiger kicks off each Missouri football game by riding around on a firetruck and flinging his tail around. From 1986 to 1990, Dan Meers played the role of Truman the Tiger for countless games and events. Meers describes Homecoming as the best weekend of the fall and a time of high energy and excitement. From those who just graduated to those who graduated 30 years ago, Homecoming is a staple in the lives of dedicated alumni. Meers’ experience as Truman inspired him, and he now is the mascot for the St. Louis Cardinals and the Kansas City Chiefs. “My favorite thing to do, that I got

in trouble for, probably for my own safety, was to get on the railing in front of the student section,” Meers said. “I would fall back into the stands and let the students catch me, then they’d slowly move me up the bleachers.” To Meers, Homecoming takes things to a whole new level. He typically spent the weekend doing appearances and activities, and he always slept great after Homecoming weekend. “Football Saturday was kind of ingrained in me, even though I was graduated,” 1986 alumnus Jeff Zumsteg said. “After six years, it’s just part of what I did.” Zumsteg and his friends have been tailgating since he graduated. This year will be his 37th consecutive year marching on the field during Homecoming, starting when he joined Marching Mizzou and now as part of the Marching Mizzou Alumni Band. Marching Mizzou is what connected

Zumsteg with many of his friends. They see each other annually during Homecoming. They also go on trips each year, which began in college. The group tailgates from a limousine, which started as the “tiger mobile.” “A friend in college’s father bought this checkered limousine, and we painted it with brushes with yellow and black tiger stripes, and it was our first tailgating car,” Zumsteg said. “It probably couldn’t be driven out of Columbia because it’s so old, but it’s still around today. Someone bought it, and we see it at tailgates still when we come down.” Zumsteg and his family have a deep connection with the university. His sister and brother-in-law both attended Mizzou and so did many of their children. “My father passed away five years ago the week of Homecoming, and the

“MY FAVORITE THING TO DO, THAT I GOT IN TROUBLE FOR, PROBABLY FOR MY OWN SAFETY, WAS TO GET ON THE RAILING IN FRONT OF THE STUDENT SECTION. I WOULD FALL BACK INTO THE STANDS AND LET THE STUDENTS CATCH ME, THEN THEY’D SLOWLY MOVE ME UP THE BLEACHERS.” — 1990 GRADUATE DAN MEERS


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THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

funeral should’ve been on Homecoming Saturday, but my mother said, ‘No, you’re going to Homecoming,’” Zumsteg said. “We’re all true Mizzou, and that has to come first.” Scott Ashton, a 1988 graduate, was an student staff member at Hatch Hall. His daughter is a student at MU about to experience her first Homecoming. “College is like a four-year nonstop live-in summer/ winter camp,” Ashton said in an email. “You can spend your time there anyway you want, but if [you] do it right, once will stick with you forever.” Ashton plans on tailgating for Homecoming this year, and his parents are coming from Pennsylvania to spend the weekend in Columbia for the first time since he graduated in the ’80s. “You can’t come to a Mizzou game and not tailgate; it is a great tradition,” Ashton said. “The game is awesome, but getting a chance to socialize and enjoy the company of those you love is something I wish everyone could experience.” To Ashton, Homecoming means a celebration of good times. “Other than an excuse to get back to Mizzou and enjoy the company of family and friends, Homecoming is a celebration of my years at the university and an opportunity to share what a great place it is with others,” Ashton said. “I have a ton of very fond memories of my time there, and it holds a very special place in my heart. I am proud of my Mizzou and hope that all my kids can experience that same thing.” Each alumni has a different piece of advice for students as Homecoming draws near, but Meers incorporates what is important for first-timers to know. “It’s your family,” Ashton said. “You might not realize as a freshman that these people become your family, but after you start coming back sophomore year, you feel it. The people you put around you are important. As a freshman, you think, “This is just fun, this is just football,’ but it’s your second family. Go to as many events, as many games as you can. Take it all in. It’s hard to do it all, but take as much in as you can.” Edited by Katie Rosso krosso@themaneater.com

CO MO

then

&now

“MY FATHER PASSED AWAY FIVE YEARS AGO THE WEEK OF HOMECOMING, AND THE FUNERAL SHOULD’VE BEEN ON HOMECOMING SATURDAY, BUT MY MOTHER SAID, ‘NO, YOU’RE GOING TO HOMECOMING.’ WE’RE ALL TRUE MIZZOU, AND THAT HAS TO COME FIRST.” —1986 GRADUATE JESS ZUMSTEG


22

THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

Mizzou superfan gears up for her final Homecoming on campus Although senior Shannon Fennell wasn’t sure if she wanted to come to Missouri, she has fallen in love with MU’s traditions. MAGDALINE DUNCAN Staff Writer Senior Shannon Fennell didn’t plan on going to school in Missouri, almost a nine-hour drive from her hometown of Allen, Texas. But when she toured the university, she fell in love. “It was literally the worst day to ever go on tour,” Fennell said. “I’m on Tour Team; I know. It’s rainy, it’s muggy outside, it’s disgusting, and I fell in love. I fell in love with everything about the school; it made me feel at home.” Fennell won “Fan of the Game” during her first game in Tiger’s Lair, and for Homecoming in 2015, she had “MIZ” shaved into the side of her head. “Parents would compliment me on it, like, ‘Oh, you’re that spirited, you’re that tour

guide,’ and I’m like, ‘Yeah, I am actually,’” Fennell said. Fennell was president of McDavid Hall and has been a member of Marching Mizzou, Phi Sigma Pi, Sigma Alpha Iota, Tiger’s Lair, Women of STEM, Griffiths Leadership Society for Women, Tour Team and Summer Welcome. Fennell wanted to be a Summer Welcome leader because her own Summer Welcome reassured her that she had made the right decision in picking Mizzou. “Summer Welcome solidified that it’s going to be OK,” Fennell said. “These are your people; this is your time; you are going to love it here. And I wanted to make that for everyone else as well. Find your niche, I want you to love it here because I love it here.” Although Fennell said that choosing her favorite MU memory is like having to

pick a favorite child, she picked a moment from her freshman year in McDavid Hall, when her building went to support their hall coordinator at one of his drag shows. Another defining moment for Fennell came during last fall’s protests and the ensuing Yik Yak threats, when she scrolled through her Facebook feed to see fellow MU students offering up their homes to those who didn’t feel safe on campus. “That was such a defining moment of, ‘Wow, this is actually what it means to be a Tiger,’ that people actually care about me, no matter what my skin tone is,” Fennell said. After all the negative publicity surrounding last fall’s protests and the allegations against Delta Upsilon, Fennell recommends that anyone on the fence come and see her school for themselves. “Just come visit here because you will

notice that we are a family, and most people that say these things don’t even go here,” Fennell said. “They don’t understand; they don’t know how it feels to be here.” After graduation, Fennell hopes to continue with Griffiths Leadership Society and join the Mizzou Alumni Association and the alumni band, which plays in the pre-show at Homecoming. Though she’s no longer a part of Marching Mizzou, she still knows the songs by heart. “It’s engraved in you,” Fennell said. “I can pick up my piccolo and still be able to play all the fight songs.” Edited by Kyra Haas khaas@themaneater.com

Q&A

Middle Tennessee football writer talks chance of upset, who to watch in Saturday’s Homecoming matchup

NICK KELLY Staff Writer Missouri faces Middle Tennessee State at 3 p.m. Saturday in the Tigers’ Homecoming game. Tyler Lamb, who covers football for Middle Tennessee State’s Sidelines, spoke with The Maneater’s Nick Kelly about what to expect Saturday. The Maneater: This is a Middle Tennessee team that has made several comebacks this year. How has this team been able to make several comebacks this season? Tyler Lamb: They never quit. The team has great leadership on both sides of the ball, starting with the quarterback Brent Stockstill, who is the coach’s son. He is exactly what you want in a quarterback leading your program. On defense, you have guys like Steven Rhodes, who is a former Marine. He knows how to lead a group of guys. I think it definitely starts with those two guys. ME: Who needs to have a big day for them if they are to get the upset? TL: For them to be able to complete an upset, they need to do what they’ve been doing. That is just being consistent on offense, being explosive and keeping defenses on the edge of their toes. They have a great offensive attack with quarterback Brent Stockstill and wide receiver Richie James and running back I’Tavius Mathers. Those three guys are really the workhorses for this offense. Just last game, Stockstill passed for over 400 yards, James hauled in a couple hundred yards receiving and Mathers rushed for over 100 yards. Although they lost, those are their guys on offense. Teams have had trouble with those three guys all season long. It is like they’re on a different page when playing those schools. We’ll see what they do this week, but it will definitely start with them if they want to complete the upset. ME: What is Middle Tennessee’s biggest weakness?

TL: It’s probably their secondary. I am hesitant to say that because they’ve won a couple of games for MTSU this year. They were really key in the Louisiana Tech game when they held strong while Louisiana Tech was driving in the final minute of the game. They got to fourth down and had to throw a pass into the end zone, but Mike Minter stepped up and broke up the pass. MTSU went on to win that game. But at other times, like this past weekend against Western Kentucky, they allowed Mike White to throw for 391 yards. They allowed Taywan Taylor, who is a very similar receiver to J’Mon Moore,

to catch for 197 yards. You can’t let that happen if you want to win against Western Kentucky, and you especially can’t allow that to happen if you want to win against Missouri. ME: What is your prediction for the game? TL: I expect Middle Tennessee to come ready to play. That was a hard loss last week when they lost 44-43. They played hard all game, and unfortunately, their extra point got blocked in double overtime, and that was how the game was decided. I believe they will come back out ready to go. They know the opportunity they’ve been presented with this week. Another reason I think they will

come ready to go is because it is a nationally televised game. MTSU may get about two of those all season long. MTSU is comprised of mostly guys from out of state. For guys like Jeremy Cutrer, who is from New Orleans, or Maurquice Shakir, who is from Los Angeles, it is a chance for their family and friends to see them play. I believe they will want to show out for them. I believe the final score will be 42-21 Missouri. I believe Missouri is too athletic for Middle Tennessee, but I also believe Middle Tennessee will be able to put some points on the board as well.


23

THE MANEATER’S HOMECOMING ISSUE | OCT. 19, 2016

Upholding tradition at The Mizzou Store Marjorie McKenzie has worked nearly every semester at the store for almost 50 years, excluding her first after retiring. CLARE ROTH Reporter Beyond the black and gold, The Mizzou Store is built on community and tradition. When you walk into the store, you’re almost always greeted by a friendly face: Marjorie McKenzie, a 49-year employee of the store. McKenzie is a testament to tradition. She is known among students and professors for her sweet demeanor and routine location. She started out working in the clothing department during a busy rush in January 1967, back when the only actual clothing items sold by the store were sweatshirts and gray T-shirts. She became a cashier after a year of working in clothing, and then she became a greeter after retiring. McKenzie has worked every semester of her nearly 50 years at The Mizzou Store, excluding her

first after retiring. A bustling homecoming weekend is one of McKenzie’s faavorite times to work. “I like it when it’s busy. It’s a lot easier when it’s crowded and I see a lot of people. Time goes faster,” Mackenzie said. “I’ll usually get a smile. You know, once in a while the kids walk by busy with their headphones, but I usually get a smile.” Taylor Halliburton, a cashier at the store, agrees that Homecoming creates an enjoyable atmosphere to work in. “The crowds are fun. People typically buy tiger ears, necklaces and, of course, Homecoming shirts,” Halliburton said. The Homecoming T-shirts were designed by junior Cameron Rolf. “It makes me really proud to think someone else likes something I made enough to wear it,” Rolf said. “It's funny though because, at times, I think my friends are more

proud of what I made than I am. I actually had one friend tell me that he loves wearing his shirt so much because it makes him feel like a proud dad. Hearing stuff like that always makes me smile.” Michelle Froese, assistant director of strategic communications at The Mizzou Store, said that when it’s a gameday weekend, profits increase, especially for Southeastern Conference games. Profits also surge on “black-out,” “gold-out” or “stripe-out” game days. The time of the game and weather also play a large role in sales. “The perfect storm for profits is a later-afternoon SEC game,” Froese said. “Especially if it starts out a little warm and gets chilly. People want to buy sweatshirts in that type of weather.” Froese said that contrary to popular belief, Homecoming is not necessarily the most profitable

A Truman the Tiger statue sits by Mizzou gear at The Mizzou Store. Maneaer File Photo weekend at The Mizzou Store. Family Weekend is often more profitable, due to the large influx of alumni and parents with students to buy for. “Homecoming weekend is not

just about football,” Froese said. “It’s about tailgating, the experience of coming back. People still want that black and gold T-shirt.” Edited by Katie Rosso krosso@themaneater.com


OCTOBER 12, 2016

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