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THE MANEATER

Seven theories about “Game of Thrones” season 7 (pg. 7)

JULY 12, 2017 • THEMANEATER.COM

TEXTBOOKS

RESIDENCE HALLS

MU Residential Life to rent out empty rooms If all seven residence halls were left vacant, Residential Life could stand to lose up to $5.5 million. SARAH HALLAM

News Editor

students with links to the material. “As we started guiding [students] to these resources, they began relying on them more and less on the textbooks,” Woelk said. Though Woelk has used a traditional textbook for his Chemistry I class in the past, this next year he will only use an online version that can be purchased with an online homework account. He said comprehensive textbooks are often unnecessary for

Finding a place to stay for Family Weekend and Homecoming just got a whole lot easier. Starting this upcoming semester, MU Residential Life will rent out rooms in three residence halls that would otherwise be closed due to low enrollment. Families, alumni, sports fans and conference attendees will be able to rent out two-bedroom, four-bed suites in Discovery, Center and Excellence halls for $120 a night. The rooms will include economy bed linens and access to the lounge areas and their cable TVs, as well as the opportunity to purchase discounted meal tickets that can be used at Plaza 900 and Rollins dining halls. Alcohol will not be permitted in guest housing areas but is still permitted in designated tailgating areas, as per university policy. Residential Life at MU has already set up a website where potential visitors are able to request rooms for high-demand weekends such as Family Weekend, Homecoming and the weekend of the Missouri vs. Auburn football game. While there is no projected amount of revenue this program will bring in, within one week of announcing the expansion of guest housing, Residential Life has received more than 500 requests for room

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UM System President Mun Choi answers questions following the presentation on open educational resources on Wednesday June 21. VICTORIA CHEYNE | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Choi announces investment in costfree, affordable academic resources The UM System president spoke about Online Educational Resources and AutoAccess online texts at The Mizzou Store June 21 afternoon. ZIA KELLY

University News Editor Students at all four UM System campuses will be saving a combined $7.2 million on textbooks

during the upcoming academic year, according to university officials. UM System President Mun Choi addressed a crowd gathered in front of The Mizzou Store on June 21 to announce a systemwide initiative to promote the use of free and lowcost academic resources. Choi promoted the use of both Online Educational Resources and AutoAccess online texts as a method to cut down on students’ overall cost of attendance. “Tuition is a measure [of cost of college] — it is not the only measure,” he said

during the announcement. OERs refer to instructional materials that are available on the internet, free of charge. These are most often videos, diagrams or PDFs that supplement or entirely replace traditional textbooks. Klaus Woelk, a chemistry professor at Missouri University of Science and Technology, said he has been using OERs for about a decade in his classes. He said once the professors look over the material for factual accuracy, they provide

HONEYWELL

College of Engineering partners with Honeywell STEPHI SMITH

Reporter

The College of Engineering signed an industry partnership

agreement with Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies on June 6, allowing students to work closely with the company on research projects and have access to its technology. The partnership will allow students and faculty to access facilities, more student internships with Honeywell and an increase in research education. This is one of about 200 partnerships that MU schools and colleges have with private

industries in a variety of fields, and campus officials have plans to seek more. Mark McIntosh, vice president for research and economic development of the UM System and vice chancellor of research, graduate studies and economic development at MU, said the UM System has allocated $39 million for strategic investments in partnerships for the 2017-18 academic year.

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Julie Aitkens, director of engineering at Honeywell; Elizabeth Loboa, dean of the MU College of Engineering; Garnett Stokes, MU Interim Chancellor and Provost; Andy Gibler, assistant manager; Robin Stubenhofer, vice president of engineering at Honeywell; Mark McIntosh, interim vice chancellor for the Office of Research, Graduate Studies and Economic Development. PHOTO COURTESY OF MU NEWS BUREAU


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Continued from page 1 classes and they are often a financial burden for students. “I’ve always thought that textbooks are not as important, but [they are] shooting up the price,” he said. During his speech, Choi said the UM System will also encourage professors who do use texts for their class to use those available on AutoAccess — an online textbook portal that allows students to download virtual copies of books and order printed pages to the campus bookstore. Choi referred to the promotion of the programs as an investment because the UM System will provide financial incentives for faculty members to move to online resources.

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The allocation will be used to seek out industries for the UM System campuses to partner with. McIntosh said this assists students in preparing for a work environment outside of college. “The UM System and Mizzou continue to seek partnerships with industry members who are interested in workforce development and developing collaborative partnerships,” McIntosh said. Some industries may select students for internships, hire them for fulltime employment after graduation or send staff to campus to guest lecture. The purpose of these partnerships, McIntosh said, is to create jobs and economic development for the state of Missouri. “There are three areas of activity to be focused on here [with the partnership involving Honeywell],”

T H E M A N E AT E R | N E W S | JULY 12, 2017 He said the UM System will provide incentives between $1,000 and $10,000 depending on the amount of work professors need to do to make their courses accessible online. The College Board estimated that the average student spends $1,298 annually on textbooks and other course materials. New copies of print textbooks can often cost $300 or more. Michelle Froese, assistant director of strategic communications for Student & Auxiliary Services, said any course materials provided through AutoAccess are required to be less expensive than their market price. AutoAccess has been used on MU’s campus since 2014 and began with one book publisher that had an agreement with the university. Now, the university will have agreements with 12 companies and more classes, such as four

undergraduate courses in the School of Health Professions. Students have pushed for the expanded use of OERs and affordable textbook alternatives. Members of the Missouri Students Association met with an OER interest group and representatives from The Mizzou Store last fall to discuss the promotion of online resources. MSA President Nathan Willett and Vice President Payton Englert ran on a platform that included the expansion of OERs and online textbook use. “Buying textbooks is a burden for a lot of students,” Englert said. “If we can make it easier for students to attend college and maintain a high quality of education, then we should absolutely be doing this.” Edited by Cassie Allen callen@themaneater.com

Devlin said. “Access to facilities, student exchange and contract research.” The benefits go beyond facilities. Partnerships like this one aim to increase infrastructure opportunities for students, providing them with more resources to use. In addition, the college also looks to increase joint research grants and a professional place for students and faculty to work on projects. Honeywell receives funding from the federal government, specifically the Department of Energy, for projects relating to national security and works to manufacture technology relating to national nuclear information. Honeywell works closely with the Kansas City National Security Campus, a government-sponsored agency aimed at working with engineering projects and national security technology. Honeywell has other formal partnerships across the country with different universities, including Missouri University of Science and Technology, New Mexico State

University and Kansas State University. Since MU engineering students have a history of working with the company, Honeywell reached out to the university last spring, Steven Devlin, the assistant dean for Industrial Relations and Entrepreneurship at the College of Engineering, said. Later, the staff at Honeywell was introduced to faculty at MU and an official partnership was arranged. College of Engineering Dean Elizabeth Loboa said her staff has worked with nearly 100 companies in the past four years on industry-funded research projects. Loboa also said students benefit from the campus’ relationship with private industries. “These kinds of relationships help expand and enrich the experiential learning opportunities for MU Engineering students, they help our faculty engage in further cutting-edge research which may lead to higher level educational curriculum and they help break down walls between the university and industry,” she said.

MSA President Nathan Willet PHOTO BY VICTORIA CHEYNE

Devlin said the college has identified 75 other companies it will reach out to for partnerships. Most of these involve biomedicine or engineering, such as the Wallace H. Coulter Foundation and the Coulter Translational Partnership. Throughout the UM System, industry partnerships are being considered as a way to supplement academic programs while a decrease in funding has restricted the operating budgets for many divisions. At a UM System Board of Curators meeting last April, curators discussed the use of industry partnerships as a way to help fund the construction and renovation of university facilities in lieu of state funding for capital projects. “It’s vital that we look to other funding sources in order to maintain and exceed the levels of education and experiential learning we provide for our students,” McIntosh said. Edited by Zia Kelly zkelly@themaneater.com

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reservations, MU spokeswoman Liz McCune said in an email. Since Residential Life is an auxiliary operation and doesn’t receive funding from the university or the state, it must raise all the funds itself to cover its own operations. To keep all seven residence halls closed would cost Residential Life around $5.5 million. Residential Life will be taking security precautions for the use of these halls, McCune said. Employees will provide extended desk hours on weekends with games and other special events. “These halls will be strictly monitored to ensure the safety of our guests and the Mizzou community,” McCune said. The new expansion of guest housing could also directly compete with other hotels in town by offering similar amenities at a considerably lower price. According to previous Maneater reporting, hotels nearby such as the Holiday Inn Executive Center could cost up to $244 a night for only two beds on Homecoming weekend. However, MU Vice Chancellor for

Discovery Hall MANEATER FILE PHOTO

Operations Gary Ward has Columbia Tribune that he it will be nearby cities, Kingdom City, that will be by the new guest housing.

told the believes such as affected

“My understanding, and this would have to be verified with them, is the hotels are full anyway, so we won’t be competing on game days,” Ward said in an interview with the

Tribune. “We could be competing with out-of-town hotels.” Edited by Zia Kelly zkelly@themaneater.com


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T H E M A N E AT E R | N E W S | JULY 12, 2017

Administrative restructuring to include 10 to 15 layoffs in the Division of Student Affairs Layoffs include two longtime MU employees: Frankie Minor and Mark Lucas. JAKE CHIARELLI

Associate Editor

Layoffs and substantial administrative changes were announced for the Division of Student Affairs on July 6 as part of a restructuring initiative, which will place its management under control of the Division of Operations. According to an email to faculty from interim vice chancellor for Student Affairs Gary Ward, the restructure will also eliminate seven director-level positions. Among the layoffs were director of Residential Life Frankie Minor and director of Student Life Mark Lucas — both had worked at the university for more than two decades. Former Residence Halls Association president Matt Bourke worked with Minor during his time with RHA. “Frankie Minor is one of the most student-focused, caring, and dedicated individuals I have ever been able to work with,” Bourke said via email. “I will truly miss being able to stop by his office, tell him about a project I was working on, and somehow always

manage to get a lesson in Mizzou or residence hall history.” Both Minor’s and Lucas’ automatic replies from their university email accounts confirm that they no longer work at the university. The university anticipates that 10 to 15 facilities management positions will be laid off as a result of the move. One hundred sixty-five other facilities management positions, which include “maintenance, custodial and design staff who take care of dining and residence halls, the student unions and recreation complex,” will be relocated to the Division of Operations, according to the Division of Student Affairs’ website. Management of MU facilities will be handled by the Division of Operations effective July 6. This does not include MU Health Care or intercollegiate athletics facilities. These positions will be eliminated to make way for a new “Dean of Students,” who will oversee Student Unions, Student Recreation, the offices of Student Life and Student Conduct, as well as Residential & Greek Life offices, according to the Division of Student Affairs’ website. The university has not announced who will fill this position. MU spokesman Christian Basi said the changes will save the university about $1.5 million. However, more changes are likely to come.

Basi said the university plans to hire an outside consultant at the end of July to review the Department of Student Affairs and present recommendations on further changes to the chancellor’s office. The review will potentially be completed during the fall semester. “We’ve been reviewing and will continue to review… how each and every dollar is spent at the university and make a determination as to whether those dollars are being spent in a way that is strategic to the university and its mission, which is to educate students,” Basi said. Aside from the 165 staff being relocated to the Division of Operations, several facilities management employees will be laid off, according to the Division of Student Affairs’ website. Basi said as many as 10 to 15 additional layoffs could take place, and the university intends to notify those employees who will be losing their jobs by August. The number of additional layoffs will partially depend on voluntary separations, or employees who choose to leave the university for a different job. Basi said the number of individuals who decide to take the potential layoffs as an opportunity to do something else or find another job may affect the number of layoffs. Basi said there have been approximately $2.3 million cut directly

Former Director of Residential Life Frankie Minor COURTESY OF MU RESLIFE

from the Division of Student Affairs since the first round of budget cuts in June. The merger with the Division of Operations is expected to save the university approximately $750,000 and the administrative reductions an additional $745,000. “We’re utilizing that money to address the budget crisis, specifically in that division, as well as strategically [investing] in programs that will impact students directly,” Basi said. Edited by Zia Kelly zkelly@themaneater.com

*

2017 Movie Buyout: Spider-man: Homecoming July 8, 2017 7:00 p.m. Regal 14 Theaters $5 Peter Parker attempts to balance his life in high school with his career as the web-slinging superhero Spider-Man. Tickets available at the MSA/GPC Box Office. Outdoor Film: Footloose July 14, 2017 9:00 p.m. Kuhlman Court, Rain site: Jesse Auditorium A city teenager moves to a small town where rock music and dancing have been banned, and his rebellious spirit shakes up the populace. Free pizza.

Outdoor Film: Fate of the Furious July 21, 2017 9:00 p.m. Kuhlman Court, Rain site: Jesse Auditorium When a mysterious woman seduces Dom into the world of terrorism and a betrayal of those closest to him, the crew face trials that will test them as never before. Free food and drinks. Trip: St. Louis Shopping Trip July 22, 2017 Depart: 9:00* AM; Returns: 8:00 PM; Pickup/Drop off at MU Student Center IKEA & West County Mall, St. Louis, MO $5 MU Students, $10 MU Faculty & Staff, and $15 Public Summer is coming to a close and it’s time to start getting ready for the fall. Pick up all your fall essentials at IKEA and West County Mall! Sign up at the MSA/GPC Box Office at the MU Student Center. Don’t forget to check out our Fall Welcome events in August! k of our Sneak Peee schedule! m Fall Welco

* For all ticketed events, purchase tickets at the MSA/GPC Box Office in the MU Student Center, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

Children must be accompanied by an adult at all time at outdoor films. You must be 12 years of age or older to attend trips. Anyone aged 17 or younger must be accompanied by an adult.

Please leave all pets at home for summer films.

STUFFTODO .MISSOURI.EDU

Request for accommodations related to disability can be made to Kathy Murray at 573-882-3780 at least one week prior to the event.


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T H E M A N E AT E R | N E W S | JULY 12, 2017

The Briefing BY SAM NELSON, DAVID REYNOLDS AND ANNA SIRIANNI

Work group to address student concerns about student charge changes A work group that will include a student representative will address concerns surrounding student charge that arose after a decision to limit the payment option across campus was announced in June. The group will also make student charge-related decisions going forward. Starting Aug. 1, purchases at Campus Dining Services locations and services at MizzouRec can no longer be paid for with student charge, along with some purchases at The Mizzou Store. Students will still be able to purchase books, school supplies and other academic materials using student charge at The Mizzou Store, but they will no longer be able to use the payment option for clothing, food, cosmetics or personal hygiene items. Missouri Students Association President Nathan Willett appointed Jack Blevins, the former MSA budget chairman and current Student Fee Review Committee chairman, to represent students on the work group. Blevins said that data is being collected by administrators to help the work group make further decisions about student charge and its approximate 150 uses across campus throughout the fall semester to be implemented in the spring, in addition to the changes that have already been decided on for the fall

semester. “The change is intended to help students and their families pay for academic materials over the course of the semester without acquiring unnecessary debt,� MU spokeswoman Liz McCune said. Debt from student charges had been adding up, according to UM System President Mun Choi. As an alternative, the university will urge students to opt for the use of EZ Charge, a prepaid charging option, for the fall semester and onward.

Student unions, rec center hours to be restricted amid budget cuts Hours for the MU Student Center, MU Student Recreation Complex and other campus facilities will be reduced for the 2017-18 school year amid substantial budget cuts to the university. Instead of closing at 11 p.m., MizzouRec will be open from 5:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. on weekdays, and it will close at 7 p.m. on Fridays. It will be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturdays and noon to 10 p.m. on Sundays. Previously, it was open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and noon to 11 p.m. on Sundays. On Saturdays during the school year, both Memorial Union and the Student Center will open at 9 a.m. instead of 7 a.m. Campus Dining Services locations will also be affected. Rollins @Night will be open from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday through Wednesday instead of its previous hours of 6 p.m. to 1 a.m. Emporium CafĂŠ will close at 10 p.m. instead

$40

of 11 p.m. during the week. On weekends, it will be open from noon to 10 p.m.

UM System Board of Chancellors revokes Bill Cosby’s degree The UM System Board of Curators has rescinded Bill Cosby’s honorary degree, according to the Columbia Missourian. At a June 23 meeting, the Board of Curators voted to rescind Cosby’s honorary doctorate in humane letters that was issued by MU in 1999.  The decision was based on the recommendations of both UM System President Mun Choi and the MU Faculty Council, who cited the numerous sexual assault allegations against him. Approximately 20 other universities around the country have revoked honorary degrees given to Cosby, including Fordham University and Brown University.   MU spokesman Christian Basi further explained the reasoning behind the decision in a statement. "Honorary degrees throughout the University of Missouri System are reserved for those who have ascended to the pinnacle of their fields while conducting themselves consistent with the university's core values," Basi said. Cosby was charged with sexual assault in 2015, and over 50 women have alleged that he sexually assaulted them. A recent criminal trial ended in a mistrial when the jury could not reach a verdict. There are multiple civil lawsuits pending against Cosby.

THE MANEATER The Student Voice of MU since 1955

Vol. 83, Issue 31 (4UVEFOU$FOUFSt$PMVNCJB .0  QIPOF t GBY

FEJUPST!UIFNBOFBUFSDPN XXXUIFNBOFBUFSDPN

Twitter: @themaneater Instagram: @themaneater1955 facebook.com/themaneaterMU The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reproduced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. “When you sit over there it’s like everything the sun touches is your kingdom.�

Reporters for The Maneater are required to offer verification of all quotes for each source. If you notice an inaccuracy in one of our stories, please contact us via phone or email. Editor-in-Chief Victoria Cheyne

Sports Editor Eli Lederman

Business Manager Jake Chiarelli

MOVE Editors Claire Colby, Libby Stanford

Production Coordinator Cassie Allen Copy Chiefs Sam Nelson, David Reynolds, Anna Sirianni Online Development Editor Michael Smith Jr. News Editors Sarah Hallam, Zia Kelly, Katherine Stevenson

Opinion Editor Hunter Gilbert Visuals Director Lane Burdette Social Media Editor Kaelyn Sturgell Sports Social Media Manager Titus Wu Adviser Becky Diehl


OPINION

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Want to write for us?

We’re hiring!

Email hgilbert@themaneater.com for more information on the opinion section.

THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED BY THE MANEATER COLUMNISTS DO NOT REPRESENT THE OPINIONS OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

RILED UP

The BCRA is a despicable piece of legislation

Congress in a Joint Session meeting COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

52 48 44 40 36 32 28 24 20 16

Proposed bill Current Law

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Regardless of your opinion of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, the Better Care Reconciliation Act, or BCRA, is a despicable, vile piece of legislation with catastrophic implications. A recent Congressional Budget Office report estimates that the BCRA would result in 22 million Americans losing health care by 2026, 15 million within a year. These numbers, while marginally better than estimates regarding the nowinfamous House effort (the AHCA), are unacceptable. Why would Republican lawmakers be so eager to kick so many Americans off of health care? The simple answer is the $700 billion in tax cuts over the next decade, 45% of which would go to the top 1 percent. That’s the simple answer, but in this case, it’s safe to defer to Occam’s razor. America does not have single-payer health care. Single-payer health care is

Uninsured populaTion under age 65

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Matthew Riley is a sophomore journalism major at MU who writes about politics for The Maneater.

cycles. When, for example, Republicans in the House passed their repeal-andreplace effort in May, Democratic representatives could be heard singing “Hey, Hey, Hey, Goodbye” in an effort to taunt their colleagues. This kind of behavior is immature. The potential deaths of thousands of Americans who can’t afford health insurance as a result of this bill’s passing are not worth victories in future elections. This bill is truly evil. It wipes away the best parts of the Affordable Care Act, such as guaranteed coverage despite preexisting conditions, slashes Medicaid funding, drastically raises premiums for the elderly and much, much more. All of this means that more people would be uninsured following this bill’s passing than were uninsured prior to the passage of the Affordable Care Act. Estimates range on how many deaths removing the ACA will cause, but conservative guesses are in the range of 28,000 a year — 28,000 American deaths each year in the name of lower taxes for the richest of the rich. This cannot stand. It’s up to us, the American people, to stop this bill from passing and to hold accountable anyone who votes for it. Currently, a vote on the bill is delayed. For the sake of not just yourself, but for the hundreds of thousands of lives at stake, find out your senator’s stance on this bill and call them to make sure that they know that you, like so many Americans, don’t want the BCRA.

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MATTHEW RILEY

Opinion Columnist

a system in which the health insurance of every citizen is provided for by the government of a nation. As the New York Times reported, many congressional Democrats have been shifting to the left on the issue of health care, with some going so far as to endorse a single-payer system. But while the merits of such a policy are plenty, this is not the time to push for single payer. Republicans control the House of Representatives, the Senate, and the presidency, making the hypothetical passage of a single-payer system just that: hypothetical. Calls for single payer now could muddy the waters of the conversation, switching the narrative away from the BCRA. This isn’t the time for principled stands on either side of the political aisle. There’s a time and place for a serious discussion about single payer, and that time is not now. So, if we don’t have single payer, that makes every American either a health insurance customer or a potential customer. If we’re made to be customers, the adage “the customer is always right” should be adhered to. As reported by The New York Times, not a single state supports the American Health Care Act, essentially an early version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act. An NPR poll found that only 17 percent of Americans support the bill. But Democrats shouldn’t take solace, let alone rejoice, in the knowledge that the passing of this egregious act could sully Republican chances in upcoming

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The supposed replacement for the ACA is a hodgepodge of slashes to millions of Americans’ health-care coverage.

GRAPHIC BY CASSIE ALLEN | SOURCE: CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE, STAFF OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE ON TAXATION


6 SUMMER WELCOME

Sturgell: “Our original group consisted of 36. This was all of us on selection day. Two had other opportunities arise and weren’t able to join us this summer.”

Sturgell: “One weekend, our group visited my hometown and our drive-in theater.” PHOTOS COURTESY OF KAELYN STURGELL

My experience as a Summer Welcome leader It’s more than just leading student groups and yelling as loud as you can. KAELYN STURGELL

Staff Writer

Before I knew every word to the alma mater and fight song, before I knew the accessible entrances to every building on campus, before I knew what “SWumi” meant, before I could answer questions confidently and before I embarrassed myself every night by dancing, I was a nervous freshman. When I first applied to be a Summer Welcome leader at MU, I just thought it’d be a fun, low-stress summer job. My hometown didn’t have many options for me to go back to, and leading Summer Welcome would pay me the same amount of money I made each summer while working a shorter period of time. I submitted my online application before Thanksgiving break and waited until after winter break for the first round of interviews. I wasn’t sure what to expect, but after three rounds of interviews and days of anxiously staring at my phone, I got a call saying I got the job. I was ecstatic but also nervous. I was only a second-semester freshman and I only knew one other person in the group. Previous leaders told me Summer Welcome would be the most challenging yet transformative experience of my life, but I didn’t see that. After all, it was just a job and it seemed like a pretty easy one based on what I experienced when I went through the program. The rest of the spring semester, the other Summer Welcome leaders and I met once a week for two hours of training. We always started with

introductions and an ice-breaker of that debriefing time was spent question, but the rest of the time learning more about our top five was spent listening to speakers and talents according to CliftonStrengths absorbing information about the (previously known as StrengthsQuest). university. A lot of people seemed The test was taken at the Career to already know each other from Center and allowed us to better Greek Life and other organizations, understand ourselves and each so I began to feel a little isolated. I other. We were able to capitalize on expressed these concerns to both of our talents in order to be the most our student coordinators and they productive group we could be and reassured me that once summer were able to learn how to healthily started it would all feel natural. resolve conflict. These things would They were both leaders the previous follow us the rest of the summer. summer, so they knew what they Formal training started as soon were talking about. I was still a little as we got back to Columbia. For the wary, but I stuck next 17 days, with it. we sat through Finals ended, presentations I moved out of from almost Johnston 309 e v e r y and I spent a department week at home and academic before I had to college on be moved back campus. We to Columbia. On would eat May 20, I settled breakfast at into Gillett 215 7:30, listen to (single rooms speakers from are much nicer 8-12, eat lunch than doubles, and listen to just sayin’) more presenters and packed a from 1-5. Each duffle bag. It’s presentation was a tradition to accompanied spend the first by a “onefew days of Styrgell: “As a Summer Welcome leader, you liner” sheet training on a do more than lead students. One of the other thatcondensed camping trip daily duties is helping facilitate parent group all the where you get to discussions.” PHOTO COURTESY OF KAELYN information we bond with your STURGELL needed to know co-workers with on one or two no distractions. pages. We were told we’d be tested We loaded up our cars with food on the material towards the end of and caravanned to Florida (a city in training. Missouri, not the state). We slept in Even though our training cabins, cooked our own meals and technically ended at 5 each day, we did team-building exercises; some would work anywhere from 10 to 11 were fun but some got heated. After each night on revue. Revue is the each activity, we debriefed. Some variety show that is performed every

night of Summer Welcome. The show is meant to be entertaining but also informative, which meant we had to apply a lot of the things we learned in our trainings earlier in the day. We did this every day for 17 days. We got little sleep, were given a lot of information and had to be mentally and physically alert through all of it. And while it was astonishing how much we were learning and the amount of fun we were having, it didn’t come without its low points. One night, half of us would cry and half of us would console. The next night, we’d switch. There was talk about quitting and uncertainty of our qualifications and worthiness of holding the position, but, in the end, we all stuck it out. Training flew by and, before we knew it, we had our first session of freshmen. We were all nervous and unsure of how the day would go. When we had each gone through Summer Welcome as a freshman, we only really paid attention to our small group leaders. Going into it, we had no idea the jobs and duties that went into each session. Each day, a leader is assigned anywhere from one to three different duties. That could be leading a student group, but it could also be checking students and guests in for the day, giving campus tours, facilitating a discussion among parents and guests, taking students to their divisional orientation, setting up for the ice cream social, driving people around in a golf cart, working the desk or serving Shakespeare's pizza and Insomnia Cookies at the dance party. There were always things to do and be done outside of student groups. After that first session, we learned what ice breaker games worked best for students, what questions parents

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T H E M A N E AT E R | M OV E M AG A Z I N E | JULY 12, 2017

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HBO PREVIEW

Seven theories for “Game of Thrones” season 7 COURTESY OF BAGOGAMES VIA FLICKR

Jon Snow knows nothing, and neither do we.

the prophecy as well. Only time, and hopefully season 7, will tell.

LIBBY STANFORD

2. The ice dragon If there is one thing “Game of Thrones” is known for, it’s dragons. Thus far, only Dany has managed to come into contact with and control the dangerous creatures, but there is a theory that an ice dragon lurks in the wall. This theory comes from multiple places. Author of “A Song of Ice and Fire,” George R.R. Martin, wrote a children’s book in 1980 called “The Ice Dragon,” so the idea wouldn’t be far-fetched. We also know that ice dragons are part of the ASOIAF world from Old Nan’s tales in the books. Although her tales are supposedly fiction, she has been right a number of times. In these tales, she mentions dragons much bigger and stronger than the fire-breathing dragons. These dragons are also said to be made completely of ice and are able to instantly freeze anything they breathe on.

MOVE Culture Editor

Winter is here. Now, what are they going to do about it? Season 7 of “Game of Thrones” is set to premiere July 16, and the show’s millions of fans have been anticipating it since the last season ended in June 2016. Three trailers and a whole lot of buzz later, MOVE is here to break down the top seven theories for season 7 of “Game of Thrones.” Warning: spoilers ahead. 1. The prince that was promised/Azor Ahai This theory could be considered the most important to the whole series, as it involves Westeros’ savior. According to Melisandre, the everfaithful witch-priest lady who births shadows and burns children, the prince that was promised, Azor Ahai, was prophesied 5,000 years before the events of the “A Song of Ice and Fire” series take place. Azor Ahai is meant to save the people of Westeros from the apocalypse that is to come. Considering the horde of ice zombies quickly approaching the wall, the apocalypse is near. There are many speculations as to who Azor Ahai could be. However, the evidence seems to be pointing to Jon Snow or Daenerys Targaryen. Both Jon and Dany were born beneath a red star. They have both been resurrected in some way as well: Jon, in season 6 episode 2 and Dany each time she has emerged from fire unscathed. However, neither of them have been known to wield a flaming sword, a characteristic necessary to the Azor Ahai prophecy. We have only seen one character do this in the show thus far. Beric Dondarrion, who has also come back to life more than once, wields a flaming sword in both season 6 and a trailer for season 7. So, who is Azor Ahai? It could be Jon, Dany or Beric. It could also be all three or none of them at all. Some fans theorize that Tyrion Lannister might have something to do with

3. Cleganebowl Sandor Clegane, or “The Hound,” is back and more vengeful than ever. What better way to celebrate his return than to see him fight his monstrous brother Gregor, or “The Mountain?” This duel has been theorized for a while and was almost considered debunked when The Hound was thought to be dead. The theory is that The Hound will make his way back to King’s Landing and fight The Mountain in a trial by combat. The Mountain will be Cersei Lannister’s victor. This was originally thought to be the trial for Cersei between her and the High Sparrow. But the season finale ended all hopes of that happening when we saw the High Sparrow and a host of other people get incinerated by wildfire. Although, fans still hold faith that Cleganebowl will happen someway, somehow. 4. Tyrion Targaryen Tyrion Lannister is arguably the most popular character on “Game of Thrones.” He’s witty, charming and incredibly intelligent — all components of a character that

should have a major effect on the ending of the show. Despite being a member of the richest family in Westeros, Tyrion is an outcast. As far as we know, Tyrion is the son of Tywin and Joanna Lannister. However, this theory claims that Tyrion is not the son of Tywin. Instead, he is the son of the mad king Aerys Targaryen. Fans have theorized that at some point during Tywin and Joanna’s marriage, Aerys found his way to Joanna and Tyrion is a product of that. This would mean that Tyrion is Daenerys’ brother as well as Jon’s uncle. In the book, it is noted that after Tywin and Joanna’s marriage, Aerys was obsessed with her. Tywin has also always despised Tyrion. Although this is assumed to be because of Tyrion’s dwarfism, Tywin could also hate him because he knows that Tyrion is not his son. Tyrion is also able to interact with Dany’s dragons as only a true Targaryen would, and he has mentioned his affinity for dragons in both the books and the show. Not to mention, in the book Tyrion has more of the appearance of a Targaryen than a Lannister, with his hair being more silver than gold. This theory would also prove the threeheaded dragon theory, that there will be three riders of Dany’s three dragons. 5. Bran the Builder This is a lesser-known theory that, if proven true, could have a major effect on the ending of the show and the meaning of Bran’s character as a whole. We know that Bran Stark is able to affect the past and alter the future as seen in season 6 episode 5. Fans theorize that Bran’s ability to go to the past and affect the future could mean that he is the real Bran the Builder, the ancestor of the Starks who built Winterfell as well as The Wall. Bran the Builder was also one of the First Men who invaded Westeros and were the catalyst for the creation of the White Walkers. After the Children created the White Walkers, a war broke out between the White Walkers and the First Men. Bran the Builder saved the people of Westeros from this war by building the wall. If the theory is proven true,

it would mean that Bran played a part in everything that has happened so far, and he could be the reason for Westeros’ demise or their savior. 6. Varys the merman This theory sounds far-fetched, but there is a large amount of evidence supporting it. In ASOIAF, mermenlike creatures called merlings are referenced numerous times. They are credited with building the Iron Islands as well as the city of Asshai. The theory is that these merlings are real and Varys is one of them. In “A Game of Thrones,” Arya Stark is in the dungeon and sees Varys and Illyrio Mopatis ascend out of a well. There is also the time that Tyrion threatens to throw Varys in the sea in defense of Shae. Varys responds, “You might be disappointed in the results. The storms come and go, the big fish eat the little fish, and I keep on paddling.” Varys being a merling would also explain his mysterious past and the fact that he is a eunuch with no attraction to humans, male or female. This theory will likely not play out in the show at least, but wouldn’t it be really cool if it did? 7. The three-headed dragon The image of the three-headed dragon is all over ASOIAF. The Targaryen sigil is the three-headed dragon, Dany has three dragons, Aegon the Conqueror conquered Westeros riding on a dragon with his two sisters and, if the Tyrion Targaryen theory is proven true, there are three Targaryens at the helm of the show. Dany, Jon and Tyrion all have a number of similarities. They were each orphaned at some point in the show, they are each the third child in their families, all of their mothers died during childbirth, they are all outcasts ... we could go on. Wouldn’t it make sense if they were the three to take the Iron Throne riding Dany’s dragons? The wait for season 7 is almost over, and the only thing we can be sure of is that it will be shocking. Tune in to HBO Sunday, July 16 at 8 p.m. Until then, let these theories and many more fill your “Game of Thrones” void.


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T H E M A N E AT E R | M OV E M AG A Z I N E | JULY 12, 2017

SW

ride, the small town vibe, lack of distraction and being physically close to each other in a way hadn’t before (try to Continued from page 6 imagine 32 people sleeping in were dying to have answered one house), we were able to and the most efficient way to open up and be honest about hand out Andy’s to an anxious ourselves. There were tears, line of students and guests. We hugs, laughs and so much love. That love followed us got into a rhythm. Every now and then the routine would be the rest of the summer. Our disrupted by a rude guest or “co-workers” became our a student that didn’t care, but confidants and our SWesties Welcome best a fellow leader would always (Summer be there to pick you up and friends). We gave each other reassure you about the good career advice, connected work you were doing. each other with resources, Despite the fun we had on congratulated each other on the clock, our experiences achievements and mourned weren’t just limited to Rollins. our losses. If a group of us had an hour These moments came to an break in our schedule, we’d unofficial close at our endmake the trek to Truman’s of-summer banquet. We got Pond and just relax. Some of us dressed up, ate catered food would tan, some would write and laughed so hard we cried postcards and others would at the superlatives each of us be in the pool were awarded. We gave lounging on a Afterward, tube or playing each other we went to basketball. At career advice, Traditions Plaza night, if we and took a lot connected weren’t too of pictures. It each other tired, we’d hadn’t really hit dress up in with resources, us that it was something congratulated over after that other than each other on night. Except, our uniform, it wasn’t really achievements walk to over. Shakespeare’s and mourned The lessons and eat some our losses. I learned, the pizza while people I met l a u g h i n g a b o u t and the personal growth I the day. The biggest bonding experienced will stick with me experiences, however, took forever. Because of Summer place on the weekends. As a Summer Welcome Welcome, I’m a stronger leader, you only get half of leader, more confident in Friday and all of Saturday off myself and more attentive to each week. This wasn’t too others’ needs. I’m now slower bad since the week would go to speak and quicker to act. I by so fast, but we were always loved Mizzou before I started excited for the weekend and working for it, but after this summer, I’m so proud of what an opportunity to sleep in. One week, we ended up is accomplished here every having all of Friday off so 32 day and, after welcoming the of the 34 of us planned an out- incoming freshmen, I know of-town trip to my hometown we’ll continue to do great in southwest Missouri and things. After all, the whole also to Kansas City. We made job is about the students and Google Docs for scheduling preparing them for the best and sign-ups, and on Friday years of their life. If you’re interested in being morning we caravanned out of a Summer Welcome leader Columbia. That trip brought us closer next summer, you can attend together than we already an information session in the were. Between a 3.5-hour car fall.

What other Summer Welcome leaders had to say: “Going into Summer Welcome, I was fairly confident in my identity, but during those eight weeks, I grew in ways I didn’t realize I needed. I learned how to operate in a group of people with personalities just as big as mine, what strengths I bring to a group and how those impact my leadership styles. Being a Summer Welcome leader was an invaluable experience that has allowed me to sharpen and professionalize the skills I learned from my other organizations.” - Patrick Skrivan, junior “Being a 2017 Summer Welcome leader was an experience of a lifetime. I learned so much from every one of my students I interacted with, not only about myself but about different experiences that I had never had contact with. Summer Welcome helped me grow as a leader and enabled me to become an even more active student at Mizzou going forward while also providing me with lifelong friends that were my coworkers.” - Derrek Hardy, sophomore

Top: Sturgell and her 33 new friends. Bottom left: Sturgell: “We didn’t get many breaks, but when we did we played games like Cards Against Humanity.” Bottom right: Sturgell: “I always took group pictures with my students. Here is one of my seven student groups at Tiger Plaza.” PHOTOS COURTESY OF KAELYN STURGELL

Wednesday, August 16th Rollins St. Outside the Student Center 10:00 PM Sign up online at TIGERSLAIR.MISSOURI.EDU. Tiger’s Lair is the official cheering section for Mizzou Football. Benefits of joining include sitting in the best seats in the house, a section T-shirt, special trips, events, and giveaways. You must have previously purchased your Student Season Ticket Combo or Football Only Ticket Package from Mizzou Athletics. Cost to join is $25. Sponsored by The Department of Student LifeCampus Activities, Mizzou Spirit and the MSA/GPC Department of Student Activities.

We are committed to ensuring that our events are accessible and inclusive to all. If you have a disability and anticipate barriers to your participation, please contact Kathy Murray at 573-882-3780


T H E M A N E AT E R | M OV E M AG A Z I N E | JULY 12, 2017

9

MEAT OF THE MATTER

My summer of meat: observations of a vegetarian Fiona Murphy: “There is a type of humanity I gain from interacting so personally with meat that stretches and strains my empathy towards both animals and the ones eating them.” FIONA MURPHY

Staff Writer

Being a vegetarian isn’t hard. Despite that being what most meat-eating people use as their end-all, be all excuse, all anyone needs to become a vegetarian is a clear mindset, a little bit of willpower and an immediate and acceptable answer to the question, “But why?” When people ask, I tell them I’m a selfish vegetarian, an answer that may be difficult to comprehend. I am selfish by keeping meat out of my diet simply because being powered by plants gives me a certain energy, an alertness that comes with digesting all the food you just ate in under an hour. Feeling light and healthy because of your food feels right, and of course, so does the benefit of helping the environment, choosing not to participate in the cut-throat corporate meat industry and gaining some sort of bizarre elitist status after you have to “come out” to people you’re eating with about your radical lifestyle choices. But I have blood on my hands. Pig’s blood usually, if

you do it?” I asked myself the same question on the first day when I was asked to fish for pig intestines in a salty, yellow pail of liquid. Yes, parts of my job are ironic and gross, but I don’t feel bad or sick anymore. I am fortunate to work at Lucky’s, where the farms we get our meat from are graze-only, hormone and antibioticsfree. I am unafraid of telling customers which farms our cattle are from or answering the “whether the animal was happy” question. It’s comforting as a vegetarian to know people care, and I like to get my hands a little dirty because it makes me feel like I am earning the title of vegetarian since I know the dark side so well. I also get to be the buffer for moral meat and consumers who are curious about what they’re putting into their bodies. However, I’ve noticed even the most conscious of shoppers are a bit sensitive. People’s relationship with food is fascinating because the process of getting and eating is so detached nowadays. Generally speaking, folks don’t like to think about slaughterhouses and the common poor-living conditions of farm animals because it makes them feel guilty; there’s a responsibility there. The meat and poultry industry is the largest segment of U.S. agriculture, according to the North American Meat Institute, and it’s nearly impossible to hunt and store your own food now, so many Americans rely on a system that generates a product, and no one asks questions. Mass production in the industry

But I have blood on my hands. Pig’s blood usually, if it’s the beginning of the week, and chickens’ or cows’ if it’s pretty much any day of the week. it’s the beginning of the week, and chickens’ or cows’ if it’s pretty much any day of the week. I am a vegetarian and an eager employee of Lucky’s Market’s meat department. I spend most workdays gutting fish, slicing bacon, grinding chicken and, the most troubling part, making bratwursts. I get to see how the literal sausage gets made. A living, breathing hypocrite, as my vegan friend from back home described me. “How could

is key, and it often comes with cutting the corners of morality and respect for what we eat by keeping pigs in body cages and not allowing cows to sit or see the sun. Watch Netflix’s “Cowspiracy” to see what I’m talking about and ensure no sleep tonight, accompanied by guilt with the next purchase of your favorite hot dogs. I inquired to my colleagues about their experience on the relationship between people and their meat.

“Only sometimes do customers ask me to double package their meat so they don’t have to touch it. And they’re probably just vegetarians,” Korey Kilpatrick, a twoyear employee of Lucky’s, said. (My co-workers relentlessly remind me of my rank as vegetarian in their department, don’t you worry.) Other members of the department either shook their head or had trouble recalling a specific event of particular customer. So maybe I’m sensitive to this issue because of my restricted diet. I just find it curious when I tell people who order both chicken and pork brats that I am required to separately package the animals, and they scrunch their noses and scoff “animals?” Even the word poultry is somewhat distracting. To be clear, your hamburger is a product of

death and I find it increasingly important to remember that. Killing a cow gives you food and, in turn, life, but I think we’re missing a vital piece of the cycle if we forget that. Sure, consumers can feel better shopping for meat at a natural grocery store, but I hope that ease stems from a conscious mindset and an active form of empathy toward other beings. Many of us have a choice of which animal products we put into our bodies, so I celebrate the consumers who refuse ignorance and adjust their habits accordingly by shopping deliberately. I simply fear people don’t care or know what the death was or how it went. They get their packaged mush of bright pink ground beef and the contrived food chain continues. I move three four-pound pig’s bellies in and out of a freezer all day and customers get uncomfortable when I

remind them that their brats are different animals. There is a type of humanity I gain from interacting so personally with meat that stretches and strains my empathy towards both animals and the ones eating them. My ambition is to have people think, not to make them feel guilty or even necessarily change their ways. I understand the pressures of convenience; I just want to put skin in the game of being the top predator on this planet. So, if you ever find yourself a customer at Lucky’s roaming the meat department, call me over and I’ll give you all the information you need to know about tonight’s potential dinner−except of course, about how it will taste.

Lifelong vegetarian Fiona Murphy reflects on her summer working in the meat department of Lucky’s grocery store. | FIONA MURPHY, STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


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T H E M A N E AT E R | M OV E M AG A Z I N E | JULY 12, 2017

Q&A

Kristin Chenoweth is still ‘defying gravity’ The Tony award winner has done gigs in live theater, television, film, voice-over and more throughout her career and has no plans of slowing down. VICTORIA CHEYNE

Editor-in-Chief

You may know her as MVP of the Bartlet administration Annabeth Schott, Broadway burnout April Rhodes, Glinda the Good Witch of the South or even out of character as an avid spokesperson for adoption and fine arts. No matter where you’ve seen her, Tony Award-winner Kristin Chenoweth has proven herself as a triplethreat powerhouse and versatile performer across multiple mediums, with a voice and stage presence that exceed her small stature. Chenoweth talked to MOVE Magazine via email about her latest album, The Art of Elegance, her path to stardom and her plans for the future. Q: Your latest album comprises numerous love songs that you’ve “wanted to sing since [you] were 12 years old,” according to Entertainment Weekly. What made you want to put your personal touch on these songs? What do you love and enjoy about them? A: I guess I respect a lot of people who have done records of standard classics. You look at Willie Nelson who just won the Grammy for it...there’s a reason people

want to put a stamp on these songs; they stand the test of time. I guess I wanted the same chance as people I’ve admired through the years, paying homage to composers like Gershwin, Porter, Hoagie Carmichael… Q: What does this album say about where you are in your career and life? A: I think there’s a common misconception about me as a performer that I’m still a little girl that played Sally Brown or still the girl that did Glinda. Sure, that’s still a part of me, and there is a part of me that will always feel ageless...haha. But I guess The Art of Elegance album represents a “growing up” period. It sort of started with my album Lessons Learned and has continued with Coming Home into The Art of Elegance. It’s just what happens as life evolves and you grow up and you’ve lived a little bit more. You start to look at things in a different way, and that includes music. Q: It is no secret that you have an iconic and unique voice. When and how did you discover this asset? When did your sights shift from solely singing to a career in musical theatre? A: I originally wanted to be a ballerina. I attribute a lot of my early acting skills from being in ballet. Then I got my first solo in church, and everything kind of shifted to the voice. My parents took me to Tulsa University, where I took piano lessons. They let me sing for the voice faculty there. I believe the word ‘prodigy’ was used. So at that point, my parents looked at me and said, ‘Do you want to be a show business kid,

or do you want to go to high school?’ I decided being in drama and choir and being a ‘normal’ kid was what I wanted for a while. Because deep in my heart, I knew I’d spend my lifetime getting opportunities as an actress. To me, lots of people have unique voices, lots of people can act, lots of people can dance...but really when you find a role of song that fits you, that’s where you spend your time creating. That’s the most fun about being an artist. I also enjoy surprising people, since I do have my Master’s in opera and still train that way...it’s always fun to see people shocked that that’s where my voice can live as well. Q: Your career has spanned nearly three decades. What compels you to keep taking on new projects and roles? How do you maintain momentum in your career? A: I always look at the role that’s being offered. I’ve been lucky that I’ve not been “type-cast”— I always dissect a role or a song so I can make it mine. Of course there’s bucket list of roles I wanted to do, like “On the Twentieth Century” on Broadway...and then there are roles that come your way that you have no idea about, like Easter in “American Gods” which [debuted] on Starz this spring. I learned from Madonna to not let people put you in a box. Stay open to what may come, and it might not be even how you see yourself. Q: How do you find new projects? Are they brought to you, or do you seek out or inspire the opportunities?

MOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVE MOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVE MOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVE MOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVEMOVE

Kristin Chenoweth COURTESY OF GIAN ANDREA DI STEFANO

A: Lots of times, they are brought to me, which is a real blessing and something I don’t take lightly and that I appreciate. But also, there are just ideas I have in my head…ideas for TV shows for jewelry, for songs...so I guess you could call it is a combo platter. Q: You have a hand in philanthropy as well as an empathy for adoption. Have you considered combining the two interests? A: This is a great question. I don’t know, I guess kids are kids, adopted or not. The work we do at my camp and

my theater is the same sort of encouragement that I give kids that have been adopted. So I guess it’s all the same to me. Q: What are your personal and professional goals for the future? A: I’m a lifer. I don’t know about how to do anything else. My goals are to continue to sing and continue to grow and evolve as an artist. To grow my theater in Oklahoma. And perhaps to learn to cook somehow. This interview has been edited for grammar and length.


SPORTS

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Want to write for us? Email elederman@themaneater.com for more information on the sports section. CROSS-COUNTRY

POKER

Schweizer builds Former Missouri long snapper opens a future for up about his decade-long poker career Mizzou women’s cross-country After capturing her third national title in track and field, Karissa Schweizer will look to bring Mizzou women’s cross-country its first team national championship. MATTHEW HOSLER

Staff Writer

Ryan Tepen COURTESY OF JOE GIRON | POKERPHOTOARCHIVE.COM

Ryan Tepen: “I was thinking: Do I really want to be a college football coach? Or maybe I ought to get better at this game.” NICK KELLY

Staff Writer

Ryan Tepen panicked when he saw border patrol officers grasping machine guns. It was 2 a.m. He had just quit his risk management job in Springfield, Illinois the week before to move to Mexico, which at the time seemed like the right decision. Now, Tepen was not so sure as the Mexican border came into view. He saw tornup fences and police flagging down cars for inspection. The highway lanes narrowed. His plan to travel to Mexico in hopes of reviving his poker career became less appealing as he drove closer to the Tijuana checkpoint. “I thought I was making the biggest mistake of my life,” Tepen said. When it came time for the police to search Tepen’s black Honda Civic, they found no drugs. Instead, they discovered a car full of misery with little money or hope to be found. It was common for Tepen to lack money and optimism throughout the decade in which he tried — often unsuccessfully — to make poker his sole source of income. Tepen, a former Missouri long snapper and student coach, struggled to know

when to call it quits from poker. His son’s arrival this past January helped him make that decision. Tepen passed through the checkpoint without issue, but once through, he could not get ahold of anyone he was supposed to meet up with. His iPhone switched to Mexico’s cell service as he drove by run-down buildings covered in spray paint. He couldn’t call his friends in Mexico because they could only use Skype. Tepen decided to stop at a restaurant in Rosarito near the place he was told he would stay. Fortunately for Tepen, Chris Conrad, who Tepen became friends with on the previous year’s poker circuit, found him at the restaurant. It was a fortunate coincidence for the discombobulated Tepen. After they greeted each other, Conrad brought Tepen to the four-bedroom beachside penthouse where Tepen would live while in Mexico. Tepen slept on an air mattress in Conrad’s room so he would not have to pay for his own. It wasn’t a smooth ride for Tepen to get there, but Conrad took care of him like he promised when he convinced Tepen to join him in Rosarito. Back in Springfield, when Tepen slumped home after days filled with cold calls and zero friends, he often popped open a Busch Light and called Conrad. Conrad could hear Tepen’s misery through the phone. This wasn’t the professional poker player Conrad met who smiled

enough in one day for 10 people. So Conrad told Tepen to come to Rosarito, where it was legal to play on PokerStars, Full Tilt Poker and Cereus, three websites the U.S. shut down in 2011. This opportunity was too good for Tepen to pass up. Before long, Tepen was on his way to Rosarito with $100, hoping to restore his happiness. Football or poker? Tepen’s poker career began in Columbia’s bars during his freshman year in 2003. Football became his top priority during his sophomore year in 2004 when he joined the team as a long snapper and scout team offensive lineman. He later found it too physically demanding, so he became a student coach. He helped coach the offensive line and in the weight room. Tepen planned to pursue coaching after graduation. An online satellite poker tournament during his senior year in 2007 altered that path, though. Tepen took first place, winning a $12,000 prize package to the Bahamas. He stayed at the Atlantis resort for six days, where, of course, he played more poker. While playing, he noticed 18- and 19-year-olds running around with “ungodly amounts of cash” of about $40-50,000. “I was thinking, Do I really want to be a college football coach?” Tepen said. “Or maybe I ought to

game | Page 15

In November, it will be the oneyear anniversary of rising senior Karissa Schweizer’s first national title. She captured her NCAA crosscountry championship with a time of 19:41.6 in the 5,000-meter race at the national championship course in Terre Haute, Indiana. She followed up her first title with two more, the 5,000-meter indoor and outdoor national titles during her track and field campaign. After winning her third national title at the historic Hayward Field in Eugene, Oregon at the national outdoor championships, Schweizer became the fourth female runner in NCAA history to win the distance triple crown, which includes the NCAA cross-country title and the indoor and outdoor 5,000-meter titles in track and field. Her latest national championship win tied her with J’den Cox for the most individual national championships in Missouri history at three. Schweizer then competed in the USA track and field championships, where she faced both collegiate and professional athletes in the 5,000meter run. She finished fourth with a time of 15:18.69 but was the top collegiate athlete in the event.

RUN | Page 15

Karissa Schweizer was recognized Nov. 28, 2016 for her NCAA cross-country title. MANEATER FILE PHOTO


12 TRACK AND FIELD

Ward and Schweizer shine at USATF Championships M

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Top: Ja'Mari Ward competes in at the USA Track & Field Championships as a freshman. Ward is from Cahokia, Ill. | COURTESY OF MIZZOU ATHLETICS Bottom: Karissa Schweizer (657) competes at a meet. | MANEATER FILE PHOTO

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Schweizer started off her event well before slipping to seventh in the middle of the race. However, the three-time 5,000-meter national champion rallied late to secure a strong finish. Schweizer traveled to Los Angeles to attend the Collegiate Women Sports Awards Show on June 26. She was one of 12 finalists for the Collegiate Woman Athlete of the Year award and the Honda Cup. The awards show was televised on CBS Sports Network. Two of Ward and Schweizer’s teammates competed at the meet as well. Redshirt sophomore Gabi Jacobs failed to place after fouling on all three attempts in the senior discus while freshman Emily Stauffer finished 12th in the junior shot put with a mark of 4.34. Edited by Joe Noser jnoser@themaneater.com

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Two Tigers shined at the 2017 USA Track and Field Outdoor Championships in Sacramento, California on June 23. Freshman Ja’Mari Ward won the long jump event, ensuring him a spot in the Pan American Championships in Lima, Peru July 21-23. Junior Karissa Schweizer finished fourth overall in the 5,000-meter run and broke her previous school record with a time of 15:18.69. After fouls on his first two attempts, Ward recorded a jump of 7.81 meters on his third attempt to take the junior long jump title for the second straight season.

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GARRETT JONES

Staff Writer

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Ja’Mari Ward advanced to the Junior Pan American Championships while Karissa Schweizer broke her own 5,000meter school record.

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T H E M A N E AT E R | S P O RTS | J U LY 1 2, 2 0 1 7


13

T H E M A N E AT E R | S P O RTS | JULY 12, 2017 FOOTBALL

A look into gamedays at the Zou JACK PARODI

Staff Writer

Fans watch a Missouri-Toledo football game at Memorial Stadium in 90 degree heat. Students line the stands during a football game versus Furman at Faurot Field. MANEATER FILE PHOTOS

As a Mizzou student, you’ll only have four — or five — years to take in college athletics while in school. You can make the most of these years through the experience of a home football game. No matter if kickoff is at 11 a.m. or 7 p.m., you can guarantee everyone is getting up bright and early to get ready for the game. Alumni and fans from across the country arrive at the crack of dawn to set up their tailgate spots. Students pick out which black and gold outfits to wear for the day, along with Tiger ears if they’re feeling wild. Generations of Mizzou students and fans gather in the stadium’s surrounding parking lots, covering them with tents, grills and, of course, cornhole games. All the way from the columns to the end of Tiger Avenue, trailers and cars line the streets. I vividly remember getting woken up at 7 a.m. to some fans tailgating outside of my dorm room freshman year; Mizzou had a night game that day. The campus is electric. It’s like “Friday Night Lights” on steroids. You can even go over to the west end of the stadium a couple hours before the game starts to see the football players enter Faurot Field. As great as the atmosphere is outside the game, it pales in comparison to the atmosphere at Faurot Field. One word of advice I have for every incoming freshman is to join Tiger’s Lair, the student cheer section with seating between the 40-yard lines. The seats are the best

in the house and everybody in Tiger’s Lair goes nuts. And if you get to the game early enough, you might get painted head-to-toe in black and gold to support your team. You might get lucky and even appear on TV. There are a few traditions that Mizzou students participate in at football games. The most common tradition is the “Key Down.” Every time Mizzou is on defense and forces a third or fourth down, fans take out their keys and jangle them as loudly and obnoxiously as possible. Another tradition Mizzou students participate in is the “Missouri Waltz.” You’ll first put your arms in the air and sway them back and forth while singing to a tune. Once that part is over, you simply jump around and go crazy. The “Missouri Waltz” happens every home game before kickoff and the start of the third quarter. It’s really simple and a lot of fun to participate in. This is something the stadium does as a whole, and it is a sight to see. After every game, all the fans inside Faurot get together to sing the alma mater, “Old Missouri.” At first, you definitely won’t know all the words, and that’s OK. If you go to most home games, you’ll catch on to it easily and be a professional “Old Missouri” singer by the end of freshman year. While football games aren’t the only thing that will make your time at Mizzou great, you should feel lucky to go to a school with such tradition. There isn’t an experience like game days at Faurot anywhere else. Edited by Joe Noser jnoser@themaneater.com

2017 SEC Football Schedule Date:

Opponent:

Location:

Sept. 9

SOUTH CAROLINA

Faurot Field

Sept. 23

AUBURN

Faurot Field

Oct. 7

KENTUCKY

Lexington

Oct. 14

GEORGIA

Athens

Nov. 4

FLORIDA

Faurot Field

Nov. 11

TENNESSEE

Faurot Field

Nov. 18

VANDERBILT

Nashville

Nov. 24

ARKANSAS

Fayetteville

* Term Papers * College Applications * * Dissertations * Theses * Proposals * * Resumes * Cover Letters * * English as a Foreign Language *

www.writeworksllc.com

Affordable editing services for students Check out our website for more information!


14

T H E M A N E AT E R | S P O RTS | J U LY 1 2, 2 0 1 7

Mizzou graduate arrested after joyride at Mizzou Arena Nathan Conant, 23, inflicted an estimated $100,000 in damage on the facility. GARRETT JONES

Staff Writer

A 23-year-old Columbia man was arrested by MUPD on June 25 after he allegedly drove his Volkswagen Passat through a closed gate and a garage door into Mizzou Arena earlier that morning. Nathaniel Conant inflicted an estimated $100,000 worth of damage to the facility. He couldn’t exit through his original point of entry, so he drove through a separate press gate. Several nearby golf carts were also damaged. According to the Boone County arrest log, Conant was charged with two counts of burglary and an additional count of property damage. He posted a $10,500 bond. The buzz that has been generated from the No. 7-ranked recruiting class in the nation has had Mizzou basketball fans chomping at the bit to watch their Tigers do battle in Mizzou Arena this season. But for Conant, November apparently wasn’t

Kubota construction equipment parked outside of the Mizzou Arena on July 9, 2017, two weeks after $100,000 in damage was done to the arena. LANE BURDETTE | VISUALS DIRECTOR

soon enough to get a look at the Tigers’ home court. Conant

was

initially

identified as a suspect by

MUPD but eventually turned

Missouri with an English degree

utility worker at Mizzou athletic

at 3:55 p.m. on June 25.

been working in the athletics

Edited by Joe Noser

himself in and was arrested Conant

graduated

from

in December 2016. He had

events before his arrest.

department as a temporary

jnoser@themaneater.com

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graduation, making the Tigers one of the deeper teams in the SEC. After the conference season is complete, the team will look to improve its 16th place finish in the national championship meet, which will be held Nov. 18 in Louisville, Kentucky. Edited by Joe Noser jnoser@themaneater.com

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place next season. The Tigers’ first goal will be to win the SEC championship meet. Last year, the team finished third behind Arkansas and Mississippi. Schweizer won the individual title and Kempfer finished fifth, but the team had no one else in the top 35. Arkansas and Mississippi have both lost top runners to

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pushes him out of the house to go play poker. Tepen doesn’t play often, but Scherder wants him to get his poker fix from time to time. “She is very supportive,” Tepen said. Because of his dependability, Tepen has earned the nickname “wild card.” Similar to how a wild card improves a poker player’s hand, Tepen makes everything better for Scherder, she said. “He makes my day better and makes me want to just love people more,” Scherder said. Whether it was defending his friends in a bar fight or losing poker tournaments, Tepen said he wouldn’t trade the experiences he had playing the game. He continues to play in his free time, but he is in full dad mode now. He no longer needs to go to Mexico to find happiness. Tepen can go home to his family instead. And he couldn’t be more thrilled. “I have lived my retirement,” Tepen said. “People want to retire early so they can travel the world. I have traveled the world. I partied hard. I had a blast when I was in my 20s. Now, I have different priorities.” Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

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Email our editors at editors@themaneater.com for more information, or look for applications on our website themaneater.com/workforus

lifestyles, the self-proclaimed church girl and the poker player, Tepen, went on a date shortly after seeing each other at Christmas Eve mass in 2015 at St. Clement Catholic Church in Clement, Missouri. When Tepen told Scherder what he did for a living, she laughed. She didn’t think he was serious. He told her to search his name on Google, and Scherder realized he was serious when she saw his name on poker websites. Tepen’s poker career didn’t last much longer after he met Scherder. They had a son, Sebastian. His arrival prompted the need for stability. Sebastian Tepen arrived on Jan. 27, about 13 months after Tepen and Scherder started dating. It brought about a different Tepen. Tepen, 31, now drives slower. He rarely uses curse words. Instead of T-shirts and gym shorts, he will soon wear a suit and tie for his new job as a financial advisor at Edward Jones. He even missed a poker tournament to attend Scherder’s son Dominic’s first communion. Tepen now attends church every week. Tepen also drinks maybe one day a week, a far cry from what he used to consume on the poker circuit where he said drinking was his drug. He has changed so much that Scherder sometimes

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the 10,000-meter run during the track and field season. Her improvement has given the Tigers two elite runners and a nationally recognized one-two punch to lead the team next season. A strong incoming freshman class and more championship experience for Schweizer and Kempfer should make the team a fierce competitor for first

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Wild card Michelle Scherder decided she would date a guy only if she met him at church. “I talked to God, and this is how it had to be,” Scherder said. Despite the difference in

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the world championships, Schweizer will compete in the event as an alternate. Schweizer and redshirt junior Jamie Kempfer are set to headline the Tigers’ strong returning corps for the 2017 cross-country season. In addition to her All-American showing at last year’s cross-country national championships, Kempfer finished as an All-American in

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success. “When he would go through little slumps,” his mother said, “I would say, ‘Ryan you probably need to get a normal job instead of that up-and-down of poker.’” Eventually, he took the risk management job in Springfield in 2013. Tepen said this was the greatest valley of his poker career. When asked about his lowest moment, he took more than a minute to answer. “You try to forget the tough times,” he said. Happy days awaited him when he joined Conrad in April for the Spring Championship of Online Poker. He won $50,000 in one week. When Tepen wasn’t winning, he was frequenting local restaurants, the movie theater and the strip club, a favorite stop for Tepen and his friends. It became a high point for Tepen, one of the last he had in his poker career. He stayed in Mexico for five weeks. He continued to try to make poker his sole source of income until he found out his girlfriend was pregnant before the World Series of Poker in 2016.

Are you interested in becoming a writer, photographer or editor ?

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If either pro runners Molly Huddle, who graduated from Notre Dame in 2006, or Shannon Rowbury, who graduated from Duke University in 2007, drop out of the 5,000-meter run at

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RUN

Continued from page 10

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Poker educated After Las Vegas, Tepen returned to Columbia and began reading books on poker. “I finally realized I had to do my homework and get

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get better at this game.” After he graduated from Missouri with an agricultural and business management degree in May 2007, he decided to pursue a poker career. Tepen’s mother, Debby, said she assumed he was going to get a more traditional job, so she was surprised, but she also knew her son. “Ryan is the one who was always kind of a free spirit,” his mother said. “He always did what he wanted to.” The next thing on Tepen’s to-do list after graduation: Play poker in Las Vegas. He arrived just before the 2007 World Series of Poker. He got a side job as a reporter for Poker News, but his first night off, he won a tournament at Caesar’s Palace for $4,000. Add in the success he had playing cash games, and Tepen quickly reached $10,000 in earnings. Within three months, he lost that money through poker. It forced Tepen to move back to Missouri.

better at poker,” Tepen said. He later found a teacher in Bryan Devonshire, a professional gambler since 2003 who also backed other gamblers financially. Tepen met him in Las Vegas during his 2007 trip. When Tepen went back to Las Vegas during a vacation from his job at Kwik Trip in 2010, he ran into Devonshire again. Tepen asked Devonshire to back him, which would provide Tepen with more stability. Devonshire would pay for Tepen’s entry fee to tournaments in return for a percentage of Tepen’s winnings. Devonshire agreed. He began backing Tepen in online tournaments while teaching him through an eight-part video series they created together. “I watched him take things I taught him, and he would internalize it in his own way,” Devonshire said. “A month later, he would come back and teach me things about the same concept.” Tepen won $50,000 in his first Los Angeles tournament during his second 2010 trip. He made $10,000 in the next tournament he played. He paid off credit card bills, and he was debt-free. He traveled to San Diego and then Philadelphia because he could. He sat courtside at a Bulls-76ers playoff game. Soon after, his money disappeared. He wasn’t maintaining his poker

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Continued from page 11

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15

T H E M A N E AT E R | S P O RTS | JULY 12, 2017


Student Life

Get Involved! 40,000

than students who

are not involved MORE THAN

1 4 IN

Mizzou students participates in

GREEK LIFE

OUT OF Mizzou students are involved in at least one student organization

550 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Not sure where to start? Stop by 2500 MU Student Center, and talk to an Involvement Ambassador today.

Here are just a few ways to get involved. Learn more at studentlife.missori.edu. Take a local, regional, national or international service trip. Participate in student governement. Become a wellness peer educator. Join a student organization. Serve on a student conduct peer hearing board. Plan concerts, speakers and events. Advocate for campus enviroment and sustainability issues. Develop leadership skills. Facilitate activities at a high- and low-ropes course.

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