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Tap tap! Who’s there? (pg. 3)

THE MANEATER APRIL 19, 2017 • THEMANEATER.COM

ABORTION ACCESS

For women seeking abortions, state restrictions make access a challenge

Missouri has some of the strictest and most actively debated abortion laws in the country, NARAL ProChoice Missouri director Alison Dreith said. FIONA MURPHY AND CLAIRE COLBY of The Maneater Staff

Alison Dreith never imagined that she would receive an abortion. But last May, at the age of 35, she went with her husband to Illinois for the procedure. One in three women in America will have an abortion during their lifetime, but in Missouri, restrictions on access to abortion services have made getting abortions very difficult. Missouri law requires a 72-hour waiting period for women before they have their initial consultation with a abortion provider. Dreith, who lives in St. Louis and is the executive director of NARAL ProChoice Missouri, decided to get her abortion in Illinois because she didn’t want to be forced to wait. Through

NARAL, she knew the provider in Illinois personally, which she said made the choice to go out of state easier. “[Having to get an abortion] was really shocking,” Dreith said. “I decided to have my abortion procedure in Illinois because I had waited long enough … I didn’t want to be shamed by Missouri law and wait 72 hours again.” Missouri’s sole active abortion clinic is in St. Louis, making it one of five states to have only a single clinic — 94 percent of Missouri women live in a county without an abortion provider. Antiabortion pregnancy centers, such as My Life Clinic on Providence Road, outnumber abortion clinics in the state 74 to one. “Missouri has always been a very pro-life state,” said Kristen Wood, president of Mizzou Students for Life. Wood and her organization volunteer at My Life Clinic, which promotes alternatives to abortion. These pregnancy centers offer free consultations and ultrasounds, but not

STATE | Page 4

FOOTBALL

New, returning players impress at Missouri’s spring football game Downing, Brandon and McCann were among the players who stood out on Saturday. NICK KELLY Staff Writer

Missouri football gave its fans a glimpse of what to expect this fall at the annual Black and Gold Spring Game at Memorial Stadium on Saturday. The Tigers’ offense defeated the defense 24-0. Here are some players who stood out from the intrasquad scrimmage: Dawson Downing Dawson Downing, a redshirt freshman running back, earned the nickname “Ghost” from his teammates

after a productive spring camp. Offensive guard Kevin Pendleton said Downing showed why when he made safety Anthony Sherrils whiff on a tackle. “You think he is there for one second, then he is gone,” Pendleton said. The defense made that mistake on multiple occasions during the spring game with starting running backs Ish Witter and Damarea Crockett held out for precautionary reasons. Downing rushed for a 31-yard scamper on the first drive against the first-team defense. He followed up with a twoyard touchdown, the first touchdown of the game. Downing finished with nine rushing attempts for 57 yards. When running backs coach Cornell Ford told Downing before the game

that he would take the field with the first-team offense, Downing said, he immediately had butterflies. “I know some of the other guys have been through this a lot of times, and it probably didn’t mean a whole lot, honestly, but I was super excited for my chance to play in front of a real crowd,” Downing said. Pendleton said Downing, a walkon from Mission, Kansas, deserved the success because of his willingness to do whatever coaches asked of him in spring camp. “He is a great dude, and I love to see him getting these opportunities and making the most out of them,” Pendleton said. Rashad Brandon The offense dominated early in the game, scoring on the first two drives, but defensive tackle Rashad Brandon

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halted those efforts. Brandon, a junior college transfer, stuffed consecutive running plays on the third drive, giving the defense its first stop of the game. It’s nothing new for Brandon. He dominated offensive linemen in practice during his first spring with the Tigers. Pendleton said he is glad Brandon plays for Missouri, not its opponents. “He is a tough dude,” Pendleton said. “He is going to give some guys some fits.” Brandon’s efforts have been muchneeded for a depleted defensive line. Defensive tackles Terry Beckner Jr. and Markell Utsey have been limited all spring because of ACL injuries from this past fall. In addition to the

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THE MANEATER | NEWS | APRIL 19, 2017

The Briefing EMILY GALLION News Director

Staff open forum provides few answers on potential layoffs, cuts Concerns over budget cuts and possible layoffs to staff and nontenure track faculty were not exactly resolved at the biannual administration open forum Tuesday night. Hosted by the MU Staff Advisory Council, the forum allowed staff to ask a panel of administrators questions, which could also be submitted in advance. There were about 100 people at the open forum, according to the Columbia Missourian. The administrators on the panel reiterated that decisions regarding layoffs are not final, but they did say the transition assistance program would continue to ensure that any potentially laid

off employees would still receive temporary income and benefits. The university’s operations division has already laid off 20 administrative employees, which goes into effect in July.

Trinity Lutheran Church religious freedom case goes to Supreme Court A religious freedom case involving religious organizations’ ability to receive grant funding — that originated in Columbia — will be heard by the Supreme Court on Wednesday. The lawsuit, Trinity Lutheran Church of Columbia v. Comer, arose after the church applied for grant funding to resurface its playground, for safety reasons. The Missouri Department of Natural Resources denied the application on the grounds of the Blaine Amendment, which prohibits the use of state money

by religious organizations. The church argued in its petition to the Supreme Court that the resurfacing of the playground is a secular matter.

Public affairs dean search is up in the air After two of three finalists for the new Truman School of Public Affairs dean turned down interviews, the school is unsure of how it will move forward with its search. In an email to public affairs staff, Provost Garnett Stokes said the school will find an interim replacement for current Dean Barton Wechsler, who will retire Aug. 31 after holding the position for five years. Wechsler was the first dean of the school, according to the Columbia Missourian. “I will confer with various groups in the school, on campus and externally, to get thoughts about the best path forward,� Stokes said in the email.

PHOTO FEATURE

Fighting Oppression BAILEY VALADEZ

$40

THE MANEATER The Student Voice of MU since 1955

Vol. 83, Issue 27 (4UVEFOU$FOUFSt$PMVNCJB .0  QIPOF t GBY

FEJUPST!UIFNBOFBUFSDPN XXXUIFNBOFBUFSDPN

Twitter: @themaneater Instagram: @themaneater1955 facebook.com/themaneaterMU The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reproduced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. “Fuck you, Trebek�

Reporters for The Maneater are required to offer verification of all quotes for each source. If you notice an inaccuracy in one of our stories, please contact us via phone or email. Editor-in-Chief Jared Kaufman Managing Editors George Roberson, Katie Rosso Copy Chief Nancy Coleman News Director Emily Gallion Engagement Director Jake Chiarelli Online Development Editor Reiker Seiffe

Staff Photographer

Sports Editor Eli Lederman

Oppression: an idea that stretches across divisions and social groups. “If someone is oppressed, it is wrong and cruel to tell that person that they are not,� Opinion columnist Jessie Staley says in her column. “Dominant parties do not have a right to define oppression — the oppressed do.� To read more, find Jessie Staley’s column online this week.

News Editors Kyle LaHucik, Madi McVan MOVE Editors Victoria Cheyne, Bailey Sampson, Katherine White Opinion Editor Kasey Carlson Photo Editor Jessi Dodge

Graphics Manager Tori Aerni Newsletter Manager Regina Anderson MOVE Social Media Manager Kaelyn Sturgell Sports Social Media Manager Titus Wu Assistant Production Manager Cassie Allen Deputy Copy Chiefs Anna Sirianni, Katherine Stevenson Copy Editors Nat Kaemmerer, Sam Nelson, David Reynolds, Libby Stanford, Jeremiah Wooten Assistant Online Editor Michael Smith Jr. Adviser Becky Diehl

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NEWS

In Your Inbox: Continuing coverage of fallout from budget cuts, daily arts and culture recommendations, and sports analysis in The Maneater Daily. Subscribe at bit.ly/ManeaterDaily.

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RETIREMENT

LAWSUIT

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Cathy Scroggs to retire in July

Settlement reached in student death lawsuit

Scroggs first joined MU in 1985 and has served as vice chancellor since 2003.

The owners of the property were aware of the faulty railing that freshman Jack Lipp fell over, but did not fix it.

OLIVIA GARRETT Staff Writer

Cathy Scroggs, vice chancellor for student affairs, has announced that she will retire on July 31. Scroggs completed her doctorate in higher education administration at MU and has served as vice chancellor since 2003, according to a news release. “Mizzou has been my home for 32 years, and I’m very proud of the work we have done to support and serve students,” Scroggs said in the news release. “Students come first in Student Affairs, and that will never change.” At MU, Scroggs previously served as director of student life, assistant director of residential and Greek life and assistant to the vice chancellor for student affairs, according to the release. When she first accepted the role of vice chancellor, Scroggs told The Maneater that someone in that position needed to see “the big picture.” “I tell everyone I interview for a position in the division, ‘You must love working with students. If you don’t then you [don’t] belong in Student Affairs,’” Scroggs said in an email Friday. During her time as vice chancellor, the Division of Student Affairs has renovated Memorial Union, Brewer Fieldhouse and Rothwell Gymnasium, created the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center and given the Gaines/Oldham Black Culture Center a physical space. Scroggs also “helped lobby for the creation of the LGBTQ Resource

OLIVIA GARRETT Staff Writer

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Cathy Scroggs speaks to open the 2017 MSA presidential inauguration ceremony on April 13, 2017. SOPHIE NEDELCO | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Center” when she was assistant to the vice chancellor for student affairs, according to the news release. "I hope I'll be able to respond to the needs, questions and concerns of individual students," Scroggs told The Maneater when she began as vice chancellor. "I hope if students see barriers that prevent them from having a positive experience, they talk to me, and I hope to remove those barriers." According to the Student Affairs website, Scroggs has been a member of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce, served as a board

president of the Heart of Missouri United Way and was a member of the board of the Voluntary Action Center. “Someone told me you’ll know when you’re ready and I just knew I’m ready,” she said in the email Friday. Scroggs said she’s been contemplating retirement for the past two years. No decision has been made yet on her replacement, MU spokesman Christian Basi said in an email. Edited by Kyle LaHucik klahucik@themaneater.com

The parents of Jack Lipp, an MU freshman who died in 2014 after falling off a two-story balcony, reached a $5 million settlement with Ginger C, LLC, the owners of the property where Lipp was injured. On Dec. 13, 2014, Lipp leaned on a faulty railing and fell two stories at a Pi Kappa Phi rush party. He died Dec. 25 as a result of his injuries. The original lawsuit also included the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity and American Campus Communities as defendants, but they were later dropped. According to the lawsuit, Ginger C, LLC was aware of the defective balcony railing, which had been temporarily repaired by previous owners who chose not to permanently repair it because the property was scheduled to be demolished. At the time, ACC planned to build a student apartment complex at the site of the incident, but the Columbia City Council had tabled redevelopment plans. The property was then leased to three MU students for the 2014-15 school year, and they hosted the party at which Lipp fell. The mother of one of the tenants had complained to Ginger C, LLC about the unsafe balcony; ACC had also inspected the property and was aware of the defective railing. An ACC apartment complex is now being built on the property. Edited by Madi McVan mmcvan@themaneater.com

TAP DAY

90th annual Tap Day welcomes over 60 new students into six honor societies The students who were inducted were secretly selected throughout the year. SARAH HALLAM Staff Writer

It’s no secret that traditions are taken very seriously at MU, and one of the most historic traditions continued Friday at the 90th annual Tap Day in Jesse Auditorium. Tap Day is a ceremony occurring every spring that identifies new members of the six recognized secret honor societies on campus. The

tradition dates back to 1927, when the first Tap Day was conducted on Francis Quadrangle by the Columns. To be “tapped” is considered a great honor. Students and faculty can both be tapped into these societies for various different reasons including selflessness, community service and leadership skills. There are six recognized secret societies at MU: QEBH, Mystical Seven, LSV, Mortar Board, Omicron Delta Kappa and the Rollins Society. Only initiated members know what their societies’ letters mean and what the true inner workings of each society are. Each society leads their selected individuals, or “taps,” on stage to be

revealed. Taps wear long robes and hoods masking their faces, which are taken off by previously inducted members once they are announced to be in the society. Junior Brandon Splitter, who was tapped into the Omicron Delta Kappa honor society, was aware of the high honor that came with Tap Day. “I knew about [Tap Day] since I came to Mizzou for Summer Welcome, and I realized that it is an amazing opportunity and is one of the things that really sets Mizzou apart from other schools,” Splitter said. “It was just an incredible experience.” Each honor society is different. The LSV selects its members one year prior to Tap Day, and members

carry out service throughout the year in secret. LSV recognizes men and women who “continually strive to promote and improve the status of women on campus.” Olivia Webster, a junior psychology student who was tapped into LSV, is a member of the Delta Xi Nu multicultural sorority and works with women on campus to make sure that their voices are being properly heard. “It was an exciting feeling,” Webster said. “I wanted to cry. Everybody else was crying, but I was just too nervous to.” Edited by Madi McVan mmcvan@themaneater.com


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“I had a lot of guilt afterwards surrounding going to Illinois, and not waiting for Missouri law, which I fight everyday,” Dreith said. She said her guilt turned to relief when she realized most women around the country don’t encounter the same issues Missouri women do. “Most women don’t have to wait 72 hours, and aren’t given an informed consent booklet that has medically inaccurate information.” Dreith said she encountered women in a variety of situations in life at the abortion clinic she went to in Illinois. Many other women had also traveled long distances — she said the average time Missouri women travel to receive an abortion is 150 miles. Some people were there for the first time, some were there for a checkup and some, like Dreith, were seeking abortions. “One really rewarding thing about my experience was sitting in the waiting room where women were talking to one another, hearing the reasons for being there, sharing how far they came from, and giving advice,” Dreith said. “They were really lifting one another up and holding each other during that time, and it was quite a beautiful thing.” Edited by Jared Kaufman jkaufman@themaneater.com

Senior linebacker Joey Burkett, 34, signs a ball following the Black and Gold Game. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER.

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The state requires those printed materials to display the statement ‘the life of each human being begins at conception. Abortion will terminate the life of a separate, unique, living human being.” underneath the photographs in the booklet. In addition, abortion opponents are pushing for a complete ban on abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The bill has earned approval from a House committee, but has yet to be debated on the floor. Mizzou Students for Life members have petitioned in favor of this legislation. "There have been a lot of attempts to change, back and forth, but we are trying to get a 20-week ban passed,” Wood said. “We had our members and we reached out to people, trying to get them to sign a ban on abortion for twenty weeks, saying that we would support that to give to our legislators.” Dreith said NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri combats 30 pieces of state anti-abortion legislation each year. She said that the waiting period, consent booklet and active legislation mean Missouri has some of the strictest abortion laws in the nation. Therefore, most women nationally don’t face the same obstacles women in Missouri do when seeking abortions.

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shortage of defensive tackles, defensive end Marcell Frazier broke his right arm a week ago in practice. Tucker McCann It turns out kicker Tucker McCann can kick. After a 2016 season in which he struggled to kick extra points, McCann showed he has done his best to leave last year behind on Saturday. McCann made three of three extra points in addition to a 46-yard field goal in the spring game. McCann said his mechanics have not changed. He has just tried to

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forget about 2016. “You can’t think about the bad times, not even the good times,” McCann said. “You just have to move on.” Emanuel Hall Emanuel Hall distinguished himself on Saturday among a crowded group of wide receivers. Hall caught three passes against the Missouri defense, two of which went for touchdowns. Both touchdowns came via deep passes from backup quarterback Jack Lowary. Hall said the deep ball is his go-to route. “I am just a fast guy,” Hall said. “I like beating people deep. It is hard to run with me, in my opinion.” Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

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abortion procedure services. My Life Clinic offers free items, such as diapers and baby clothes, as incentives for attending bible study, parenting classes and support groups. “Our goal is to make abortion unthinkable,” she said. “While making it illegal is a big step in the right direction, we want people to see the horror that abortion is. We want people to know that there are so many better alternatives, and we want to make sure that they know that we’ll help them get there and we’ll help them get those resources and we care about them.” Pro-life groups aim to alleviate the fiscal burden on pregnant women, but pro-choice advocates argue that getting the procedure is a more financially sound option. According to Planned Parenthood’s website, the average cost of an abortion is $1,500 in the first trimester, but the price is often less depending on which abortion procedure is used. In the United States, there is a national ban on using federal money to fund abortions, and in Missouri it

is illegal for insurance providers to cover abortion. “One of the main reasons women seek abortion is because they don’t have the economic opportunity to raise that family in a way they think fit,” Dreith said. “It’s [difficult] for low-wage workers having to take the time off work, without getting paid, to get the procedure. It’s a significant burden for Missouri women.” Outside of Missouri, private insurance companies can decide whether to cover abortions, but due to the federal ban, the government cannot offer any financial aid for the procedure. Twenty-four states prohibit comprehensive plans from covering abortion in health insurance, according to the ACLU, yet all states have some form of restriction on abortion funding. Prior to the procedure taking place, Missouri law requires physicians to provide women with a consent booklet of “printed materials provided by the department” describing the anatomical and physiological characteristics of the unborn child. These materials are required to include “color photographs or images of the developing unborn child” at various stages of development, according to chapter 188 of the Missouri Revised Statutes.

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THE MANEATER | NEWS | APRIL 19, 2017


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THE MANEATER | NEWS | APRIL 19, 2017 INAUGURATION

Willett/Englert take office at MSA presidential inauguration Vice President Payton Englert: “One of the first orders of business is getting a new couch so we can continue coffee talk.” FIONA MURPHY Staff Writer

and advocate for the student body. In Willett’s address, he recounted with fondness the first time he visited MU as a child, when he attended a football game. He thanked his cabinet and emphasized the importance of uniting the students and student organizations on campus. Englert said after the ceremony the first order of business will be to get a new couch. Englert said the night Tigers Together won the election, the couch went missing from Speakers Circle. During campaign season, the slate sat a yellow couch in Speakers Circle advertising for students to sit and talk with the candidates.

Willett emphasized his goal to increase communication between student organizations and stated his plans to begin “hosting legislators” on campus to gain “more of a perspective of students.” At Summer Welcome this year, Willett said he will be presenting information about MSA to each group of incoming students. “I think that’s where we really see change in the involvement at Mizzou,” Willett said. “It starts right when you walk in the doors.” Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M MM MM MM M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM MM M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM MM M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMM MM MM M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM M MM M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M MM M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M MM M M M M M MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M MM MM M M M M M M M

MSA President Nathan Willett and Vice President Payton Englert officially took office Thursday night at the presidential inauguration after winning the election with the largest voter turnout in the association’s history.

Willett/Englert were sworn in at full Senate the previous night. Wednesday’s ceremony featured addresses from former Missouri Director of Agriculture Richard Fordyce; Cathy Scroggs, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs; and MSA Chief of Staff Leslie Parker. Fordyce highlighted the importance of student government and the value in youth leadership. Scroggs congratulated former MSA President Sean Earl and his cabinet on their accomplishments. She highlighted Willett/Englert’s campaign slogan “Tigers Together” and encouraged the cabinet to listen

For ongoing coverage of MSA, budget cuts and everything in between:

follow @TheManeater

M

A NEW ERA AT THE MANEATER


6 BREAKFAST

New takes on the most important meal of the day HANNAH MCFADDEN Reporter

The hallowed words of your parents, teachers, doctors, friends, relatives and every nutrition website ring in your ears: “Breakfast is the most important meal of the day!” And yet here you are, scarfing down a sugary Pop-Tart as you run to your first class. The good old days of waking up to a hot breakfast and having time to sit down and eat it are over, and it’s up to you to try and revive them. Granted, not everyone has time to bust out an apron and whip up some eggs benedict before class, but it’s still important to start the day with a good meal. Start by cutting out prepackaged breakfast foods that are loaded with sugar. If you don’t buy Pop-Tarts and sugary cereal cups, then you can’t be tempted to eat them on the fly, because they won’t be in your dorm or apartment in the first place. It’s as easy as that. Instead, load up on some healthy basics, like toast, oatmeal, granola and Greek yogurt. Those are perfect starters to make less boring breakfasts. Here’s how to revamp... ...Toast Ditch the butter and jam routine. Grab some hummus from Emporium Café and use that as a savory base on your toast. Top it off with some cherry tomatoes from Plaza and a little bit of

parmesan cheese for a well-balanced meal on the go. Not into hummus? Try Elvis’s classic peanut-butter-banana combination and add on honey and raisins. The best thing about these toast recipes is that most of the ingredients can be found in a dining hall, and you don’t have to wait in line to get them. ...Instant Oatmeal First things first, don’t buy the maple-cinnamon-apple-brown-sugar twelve packs of instant oatmeal. The combination of high-sugar and lowprotein content will get you nowhere in terms of healthy eating. Instead, start fresh. Buy the plain instant oats, and get creative. Walnuts, almonds, cranberries, banana chips and apple slices are perfect to toss in for flavor, and they’re full of fiber and protein. A great underrated food combination is creamy peanut butter and oatmeal. It gives the oatmeal a new thickness with a familiar flavor, and you get extra protein in the process. Mix in the peanut butter while the oatmeal is still hot so that the distribution is even. If you absolutely can’t give up the sweetness in your oatmeal, swap out the mounds of brown sugar for half a tablespoon of honey. This is probably the fastest healthy breakfast you could make, so it’s perfect for those mornings when you oversleep and are rushing to get ready. All it takes is some hot water and a handful of mix-ins, and you’re

ready to go. ...Granola The best thing about granola is that it can be found in most of the dining halls, so it’s an easy breakfast go-to that’s also full of protein. Much like oatmeal, another great thing about granola is the many ways it can be customized. Dried fruit is a classic pairing, but if you’re up for an adventure, pour in some almond milk, then mix in dark chocolate chips and dried banana chips. ...Greek Yogurt Don’t reach for the blueberry or vanilla single-serve cups. Start with a clean slate, and grab a tub of plain yogurt instead. Plain Greek yogurt has more

protein and less sugar than flavored options, and you can create more flavor combinations. Like granola and oatmeal, the possibilities are endless. Raisins, almonds, cashews, apple slices, strawberries and coconut shreds all make for a healthy meal, whether you add all of them to your yogurt or just one. If you’re in a hurry or you’re just feeling lazy, you can toss in a handful of trail mix for a quick variety bowl. You can even try to recreate healthier versions of store-bought flavors. For a lemon-pie-inspired yogurt, mix in a tablespoon of honey and some lemon juice or lemon zest. Edited by Katherine White kwhite@themaneater.com

Reporter Hannah McFadden says that plain instant oatmeal is the way to go for breakfast. JULIA HANSEN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

EXERCISE

How to achieve your fitness goals with quick, easy exercises MICHELLE LUMPKINS Staff Writer

After lying in your bed contemplating if you should go to the Student Recreation Complex, you finally work up the energy to roll out of bed. You throw on some track shorts, fill your water bottle and grab your headphones, only to realize it is pouring outside. You think to yourself: “This must be a sign. I just shouldn’t work out today.” It is easy for us to make excuses for why we can’t work out. Sometimes you just don’t have time, the weather is interfering, the pressure of the gym makes you nervous or maybe Netflix just sounds more amusing. But just because you don’t want to make the journey to MizzouRec doesn’t mean you can’t break a sweat in the comforts of your home. Freshman Alexa Bowman works out in her residence hall, Schurz, from time to time. Doing exercises in her hall allows her to work out when she is in a time crunch. “They are something quick and easy to do when I don’t have time to go to the gym,” Bowman said. “I don’t want to gain the freshman 15.”

If you're anything like me, you might be holding back a tear or two because you are realizing her fear of gaining the freshman 15 is your bitter reality. It’s easy to get wrapped up in school work, bad eating habits and late nights. Don’t let that discourage you — find some time to set aside to try out a few of Bowman’s favorite quick exercises: Mountain climbers Place your arms shoulder-width apart, mimicking a plank position. Bring one leg up to your chest at a time. This exercise allows you to go as fast or slow as you want. You can get your heart rate up by completing it quickly, or take it slow by isolating each movement. It is perfect for your dorm or at home because it requires minimal space. Bowman typically completes three sets of 20. Bicycle crunches Lay on your back with your hands covering your ears. Bring your opposite knee up to your elbow. Keep switching between each side without dropping your shoulders or letting your legs touch the floor. For example, bring your left knee up to your right elbow,

and then bring your right knee up to your left elbow. Again, this can be completed quickly or taken slowly to isolate your abs. Bowman typically completes two sets of 30 (15 on each side). Russian twists Sit on the floor and lean back on your torso while crossing your legs in the air. Grab an object in the room, like a book, and begin rotating your torso from side to side while holding the object in your hands. Bowman does three sets of 30. “I like Russian twists,” Bowman said. “They really get me going.” Push-ups This starting position is the same as the mountain climbers. Place your arms directly under your shoulders, mimicking a plank position. Lower your body and focus on keeping your back straight. Once you have lowered yourself, return to the starting position and repeat the process. If a regular push-up is too challenging, you can try a modified push-up. Instead of starting in a plank position, cross your legs and place your knees on the ground at a

45-degree angle. Keep your arms the same as a regular push-up, directly under your shoulders, and lower your body. Bowman aims for one set of 20 push-ups. Planks There are many different variations of planks. Bowman’s favorite is the standard, forearm plank. Place your forearms on the ground with your feet hip-width apart. Tuck your toes in to lift yourself up and tighten your core. Make sure to keep your back as flat as possible during the exercise. Bowman completes two blocks of one minute each. Don’t let the intimidation of the gym (or the walk there) stop you from your fitness goals. You don’t need fancy equipment or a gym membership to make a change. There are a variety of fitness programs, or even these exercises, that allow you to still work out. Any type of workout is better than nothing! So, turn on your favorite show on Netflix, pick a spot on the floor, and start working toward your fitness goals. Edited by Katherine White kwhite@themaneater.com


7

THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | APRIL 19, 2017

Shakespeare’s bathrooms PHOTOS BY BAILEY VALADEZ | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A piss-poor guide to the bathrooms of downtown CoMo Urine for a treat here, folks. Here are seven must-see, must-pee or must-avoid restrooms in the District.

JARED KAUFMAN EDITOR-IN-CHIEF My water bottle is my security blanket — I’ve almost always got it with me. But a collateral effect of my friendship with my Nalgene is that I’ve become something of a frequent urinator. When I need a bathroom, I often need to, as they say, go with the flow and find what’s closest. So, it’s nice to know what I’m getting into before I run to the urinal at top speed. I spent several hours over a couple days venturing in and out of bathrooms. I visited over a dozen bathrooms in downtown Columbia, which left me feeling rather pooped. But I have a duty (lol) to you, dear reader, so I kept on pushing. Here is my guide to the bathrooms of downtown Columbia. Enjoy the go! Harold’s Doughnuts The men’s bathroom in Harold’s Doughnuts is, as bathrooms come, a classy one. Nice faux-stone tiling covers the bottom third of the walls, and the panelling around the bathroom stall door is a nice, knotty wood. So I don't mean to talk shit about this bathroom, but there’s one major, perhaps fatal, design flaw. In the men’s bathroom, anyway, there’s no dividing wall between the urinal and the sink. You can practically see yourself in the handwashing mirror while you pee. Urinals themselves are typically awkwardly close together, but being able to comfortably take care of business while someone washes his hands is disastrous and counterproductive. Rating: 2 out of 4 rolls of toilet paper

There’s a counter in the bathroom that’s actually a vintage TV set, with a small piece of electronic equipment (a motor? A carburetor?) on top, painted the same color as the walls. The water, according to a small Post-it note below the tiled mirror, is “extra hot,” an allegation I can independently verify. Sparky’s has also provided those in need with some light bathroom reading, including a small children’s book called “The Aliens Have Landed” and collection titled “Art in Vienna” of works from the mid- to late1800s. The highlight of the restroom art gallery is a painting of Jesus standing next to the U.N. Building, which is as tall as he is. He’s either holding his hand out to guide spiritually fallen bathroom-goers, or he’s poking the building, I can’t tell. Red letters in the sky proclaim, “Jesus appears at U.N. Building!” and “Jerusalem” and “6 6 6.” Quality content. Rating: 4 out of 4 rolls of toilet paper El Rancho Unsurprisingly, this bathroom was perpetually occupied. Entrance proved impossible. Rating: Unrateable Kaldi’s Coffee This is a restroom in an identity crisis. On the one hand, it wants to be a multi-person operation: In the men’s room, at least, there’s a partition wall between the urinal and the sit-down toilet (what do you even call that?). But on the other hand, it can only be a single-player game, because the toilet isn’t completely closed off. They went a bit overboard with the partition walls, true, but at least there’s trendy abstract art on the wall and wavy metal around the mirror. Rating: 3 out of 4 rolls of toilet paper

Sparky’s Homemade Ice Cream’s bathroom

Shakespeare’s Pizza The yellow brick road in this revamped historical CoMo pizza joint leads, as every good yellow brick road should, right to the bathrooms. You’ve got it all: bad pizza, “men’s” and “women’s” on wooden pizza-oven trays, partition walls that are Shakespeare’s Green, and a vintage metal sign between the bathrooms that says, ironically enough, “DEPOSITORS.” However, the reason to go to the bathroom at Shakes (perhaps the only reason to go to Shakes?) is the toilet paper. It’s two-ply. Two, whole, extra-soft plies, folks. This is nice TP, some of the plushest in all downtown. This toilet paper had me feeling all … wiped out. Rating: 4 out of 4 rolls of toilet paper

Sparky's Homemade Ice Cream Aesthetically, this is one of the most overwhelming bathrooms downtown, but it fits perfectly with Sparky’s. It’s not a relaxing experience, by any means. The walls are lime green and, like in the main shop, lined with wacky art.

Fretboard Coffee Fretboard is a coffee shop in a garage in the North Village Arts District. They’ve got a sitting room off to the side that’s almost all exposed brick, and the bathroom is just as industrial. Some candles on a wooden ledge set the mood right when you walk in. This bathroom has two sinks — a small hand sink

that’s functional, and a larger washbasin that’s quite literally boarded up. The wood seems haphazardly cut and rotting, and cut-up burlap coffee sacks form a curtain for storage under it. There’s also a large storage unit made of wood and sacks that remind you you’re peeing in a coffee shop. It’s a cool look that fits in with Fretboard’s aesthetic, and it’s one of the more unique bathrooms downtown. Rating: 3 out of 4 rolls of toilet paper

MidiCi’s bathroom

MidiCi For all the bathroom connoisseurs out there, MidiCi, downtown’s new Neapolitan pizza joint, is the place to visit the loo in luxury. This European-style water closet is, hands-down, the nicest bathroom in the whole District. What I can only describe as “mood lighting” illuminates the textured metal wall across from the sinks, and you feel like restroom royalty the moment you step in. Text on the mirror reminds you that “You are the best thing that can happen to anyone.” Around the room are tall green plants, a bench and a regal chair, in case you need to relax a little before returning to the real world. A small golden cart sits between the sinks and has succulents, decorative glass bottles and candles. Overall, I feel I am not worthy of this washroom. But if you’re a lofty lavatory lover, MidiCi is for you. Rating: 4 out of 4 rolls of toilet paper Honorable Mentions Coffee Zone — Average bathroom, but it sometimes smells like cigarettes. Clearly, the “Thank You For Not Smoking” signs aren’t doing much. You are not welcome. Pizza Tree — The two bathrooms in downtown CoMo’s best pizza shop feature teal walls and artwork. You should be coming here for the pizza, not the bathrooms, anyway. Do it for the right reasons. Ernie’s Cafe & Steak House — To access this bathroom, you have to go up a set of rickety stairs to an alcove above the diner. This bathroom is small and always freezing — quite frankly, pretty crappy.


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | APRIL 19, 2017

Summer break is less than a month away, and finals might not be the only thing stressing you out. For those who want to get fit but struggle to actually make it to the gym, MOVE has compiled a variety of playlists to inspire you to get off the couch and onto the treadmill.


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | APRIL 19, 2017 SLEEP TIPS

Tired of not sleeping? MOVE can help fix that Sleep is a necessary function, so why is it a struggle to get the recommended eight hours? BROOKE COLLIER Staff Writer

Tests, group projects, nightly homework and a hefty class schedule can take a toll on a student’s sleep cycle. It feels like there aren’t enough hours in a day to get everything accomplished, so students typically sacrifice their seven to eight hours of sleep to accomplish more. Even though the work gets done, falling behind on sleep isn’t good for students’ brains and overall health. The brain goes to sleep each night so it can create new pathways to help a person learn and remember information, according to the NIH. That alone is a good incentive for college students to maintain healthy sleeping habits. Try some of MOVE’s tips to get you there: 1) Create a sleep schedule Going to sleep and waking up at the same time every day creates consistency, making for a better night’s sleep. Once it becomes habit, the body will begin to feel tired around the determined bedtime and awake around the time the alarm rings. It’s best to strive for seven to eight hours of sleep, and you can plan this schedule with the iPhone’s Clock app under “Bedtime.” It’s easy

to use and see how many hours of sleep you’ve scheduled. This app also tracks your sleep so you can check your sleep history. If you don’t have an iPhone, there are other apps out there that track sleep as well. The Sleep Cycle app monitors your sleep and will sound an alarm when it notices when you’re in your lightest sleep cycle within a 30-minute time frame that you designate. Waking up out of a light sleep cycle is easier than waking up out of a deep sleep cycle, so you’ll feel more rested and ready to start the day. 2) Create a bedtime ritual Now that you’ve set a time to go to sleep each night, it can be hard to actually follow it and fall asleep on time. So to help ease into sleep, pick a few relaxing activities to do before bedtime. Your body will also get accustomed to these new habits and realize that it’s almost time to sleep when you do them. But what’s a relaxing activity? Here are a few options to try: If you’re into Netflix… Napflix has 10 different categories of videos to choose from. These videos have mind-numbing content that will surely relax your brain, such as a video of the aurora borealis set to calming music. A timer feature is located on the top left corner, where the video will stop playing after 10, 20 or 30 minutes; by that time, you’re already fast asleep. If you enjoy reading… Because of all of the assigned

reading college students get, it’s hard to get around to reading for fun. Pick up the book you’ve been putting off and read for an hour a night before you go to sleep. This takes your mind off of school work and is a relaxing activity that can prepare you for bed. If music is your relaxation getaway… Neuroscientists from Mindlab International have created a Spotify playlist with 10 relaxing songs that will have you drifting off to sleep in no time. According to the scientists, one song in particular, “Weightless” by Marconi Union, reduces anxiety by up to 65 percent. This song is so effective that Dr. David LewisHodgson warned people not to drive and listen to it because it can cause drowsiness.

3) Still can’t relax and go to sleep? Making to-do lists or journaling can be helpful. Everyone makes to-do lists, but with the workload all laid out, it can be more stressinducing than relaxing. If you make an achievable list of things to do in one day the night before, you’ll have a fairly stress-free day. It feels good to get things accomplished and to strike them off the list throughout the day. At the day’s end, to feel even more relaxed after a productive day, write tomorrow’s to-do list. It’ll take those things off your mind, and you’ll have the rest of the evening to do what you want, like fall asleep. Edited by Katherine White kwhite@themaneater.com

G#’S MUSIC RADAR

Cold War Kids’ ‘L.A. Divine’ is its weakest LP yet The indie rockers’ hometown tribute boasts a handful of memorable tracks, but lacks creativity. GRANT SHARPLES MOVE Columnist

Grant Sharples is a sophomore journalism major who writes about music for MOVE Magazine. There’s no denying that Cold War Kids established itself as an indie rock staple when it released Robbers & Cowards in 2006. Songs such as “Hang Me Up to Dry,” “Hospital Beds” and “We Used To Vacation” represented the perfect mix of then-modern indie and gritty blues rock. It’s been over a decade since its release, and Cold War Kids released its sixth full-length record, L.A. Divine, on Friday. Leading up to L.A. Divine, the band’s albums became more and more polished with a pop sound. This style has been successful at times for the band, as proven by 2014’s “First” and 2013’s “Miracle Mile.” However, this deviation from the group’s original sound has ultimately been its downfall. This is apparent in L.A. Divine.

The move toward producing pop music doesn’t suggest an artistic choice but instead a desire to get more radio play. It seems obvious enough that the band tried to create an album full of radio-friendly singles with repetitive choruses. With L.A. Divine, it feels as though the album is one gigantic song. Fluency is certainly a good thing, but hearing the same style over and over can become tiring. With that being said, about half of these tracks can stand alone quite well, but it’s when they’re clumped together as an album that it can become problematic. Cold War Kids tries to make up for the large quantity of “singles,” all with the same sound and repetitive tendencies, by breaking them up with three interludes. These are definitely intended to bring an artistic character and sense of cohesion to the album, but the interludes are by far the worst part of L.A. Divine. Each interlude feels like an unfinished thought or musical idea, and it seems the band was too lazy to give them the necessary thought and attention. Additionally, the second interlude, “Wilshire Protest,” is probably the worst attempt at a spoken-word piece I have ever heard. The instrumentals sound like they were borrowed from an obscure Tony Hawk-inspired video game from 2005. These instrumentals take away from the desired self-serious effect the band was likely going for. More importantly, the lyrics are

Cold War Kids

COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS downright detestable. For example: “Looking down at our phones for the fastest way to get home. Don’t text me that you’ll be late. I can wait.” Negative commentary aside, there are still some wonderful tracks on L.A. Divine. One of the highlights includes “So Tied Up,” which showcases vocalist Nathan Willett’s impressive range and features up-and-coming solo artist Bishop Briggs. “Restless” is an attempt to be the baby sibling of “First,” but it’s still memorable on its own, and the vocal work is powerful and soulful. “Open Up the Heavens” is a wonderful mix of the group’s old style. It retains the

gritty guitar from its debut record, a well-needed escape from the bright and shiny nature of the rest of the album. Willett’s vocal work is as extraordinary as ever. It shines through as a highlight on nearly every song. His soulful voice sparks feelings of triumph but also dejection. These two sentiments are perfectly executed in “Restless” and “Can We Hang On.” L.A. Divine is definitely Cold War Kids’ weakest album yet. It lacks the creativity and inspiration that Robbers & Cowards had but features a handful of impressive songs that fans can walk away with or come back to at a later time.


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | APRIL 19, 2017

THE LAST JEDI

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Run, don’t Skywalk, to these five answers about ‘Last Jedi’ KATHERINE WHITE MOVE Culture Editor

There’s nothing like the sound of a John Williams score and the sight of a Sith-red Star Wars logo to get your heart rate up in the morning — if you’re a fan of a galaxy far, far away, that is. And boy, have Jedi wannabes had some new info to keep us up at night this week. That’s because Star Wars Celebration 2017 was in Orlando this weekend, making me wonder how hard it would really be to dig a tunnel straight to Florida. If you’ve got questions about what the heck is going on in that The Last Jedi trailer, missed the announcements and need to catch up or just want to hear some hot takes, keep reading. Many Bothans died to bring us this information. What was that my boy Luke said in that trailer? The first trailer for Episode VIII: The Last Jedi, (which I’ll remind you, is plural), was really what you’d expect of a first trailer: flashy scenes of space battles and training montages, things we already knew would be in the next movie. There are just a few nuggets of information to chew on for the next however-long-Disney-and-Lucasfilmwant-us-to-suffer. The main nugget here is, of course, Luke Skywalker’s line at the end of the trailer: “I only know one true thing: It’s time for the Jedi to end.” Many on the internet jumped to condemn this, but I don’t have a bad feeling about it. There’s a much larger context to consider. For one thing, we don’t know when this line is said; presumably, it’s at the very beginning of the movie, when Luke is likely still upset about his failed new Jedi Order and being alone on this rock. In this case, Rey has plenty of time to change his mind. It also could be not the real Luke saying it, as we see Rey run out of what is likely a cave strong with the Force, and if you remember The Empire Strikes Back, you remember that these places are hallucination-filled. Another important thing to consider is that this doesn’t imply that Luke is somehow bitter or pessimistic at all.

In the broad span of Star Wars, the Jedi Order is actually not that great! Upon first watch, it’s easy to interpret it as simply Jedi are good, and Sith are bad. But every iteration of the Jedi Order has ultimately failed. What made Luke successful in the original trilogy was going against major tenets of the religion, namely that you shouldn’t develop connections to others, and that you should bury your emotions deep down. In fact, this exact philosophy is what turned Anakin Skywalker to the dark side. Luke may be saying that this old, clearly corrupt version of the Jedi must end. Or, he really could be saying that the Jedi have to end instead of reform, no matter what. Either way, he’s not saying “being good is terrible, and the dark side is cool now” — he’s saying light side users need to operate under much less harmful tenets. What other stuff should I know about the trailer? Get ready for some more Jedi lore. One scene shows Rey running her hands over an ancient tome with the Jedi symbol on it. There’s a pretty good chance that this is the Journal of the Whills, a poetic text that focuses on the Force and the Jedi, kind of like a way cooler Iliad. It’s one of George Lucas’ original ideas that found itself confirmed in canon just recently. The Force Awakens novelization by Alan Dean Foster, the same author who penned the novelization for A New Hope years ago, begins with this excerpt, stated to be from the Journal of the Whills: “First comes the day Then comes the night. After the darkness Shines through the light. The difference, they say, Is only made right By the resolving of gray Through refined Jedi sight.” The Guardians of the Whills also popped up in canon with Chirrut Îmwe and Baze Malbus in Rogue One, so there’s definitely canon support for this theory. Plus, current writers have been on a trend of using some of

Lucas’ OG ideas recently, like Vader’s edgelord castle on Mustafar that we saw in Rogue One. Some other interesting parts of the trailer: If you listen closely, you’ll hear distorted audio clips from the original trilogy, like Leia Organa’s famous “Help me Obi-Wan Kenobi. You’re my only hope” playing when she appears on screen. Also, the burning mask will have people arguing for months, but I’m placing my tent in the “It’s Kylo Ren’s helmet” camp because the size of the eye slit. (Yes, I do have homework that I’m avoiding.) Also, one thing we didn’t see in the trailer was Kelly Marie Tran’s character, who was revealed after its release to be Rose, a member of the Resistance. She’s the first prominent Star Wars character to be played by an Asian woman, she’s a maintenance worker for the Resistance, she gets pulled into an adventure with Finn (according to director Rian Johnson during the Last Jedi panel), and I love her already.

Speaking of Rey, do we know who she’s related to yet? Not yet, but apparently her actress, Daisy Ridley, thinks we do. In a wild interview from Celebration weekend, she told ABC News, “I didn’t know that when Darth Vader said ‘I’m your father’ people didn’t believe it, they didn’t believe that it was true, and it was interesting because at the end of The Force Awakens I thought everyone was going to be like, ‘Oh cool, that’s been answered,’ but it hasn’t, and I think that even though a lot of questions are answered in The Last Jedi, I think it’s still that thing of discovery.” That’s confusing as heck, Daisy. I still think Rey is a Kenobi. Watch the video yourself to come to your own conclusions, and see the face of Mark Hamill, who plays Luke, in a state of pure fear that the Disney cops will assassinate her for pushing the envelope of her nondisclosure agreement.

Wow, watching that trailer reminded me how much I love Rey. Do I really have to wait until December to see her be a badass again? Luckily, no! One of the biggest announcements at the Celebration was Star Wars: Forces of Destiny, an animated miniseries geared toward younger fans that stars the series’ awesome female characters. All of my favorite women will be included, from the well-known Leia, Padmé Amidala, Rey and Jyn Erso to the lesser-known Ahsoka Tano, Hera Syndulla and Sabine Wren. Helping to craete Forces of Destiny, Dave Filoni, who also directed and wrote animated series The Clone Wars and Rebels. So, not only will they be canon, they’ll probably be pretty good. Star Wars has really been owning its abundance of amazing female protagonists lately, and I’m loving it. (Speaking of awesome Star Wars women, Captain Phasma fans will be getting a novel and a Marvel comics miniseries about what happened to her between The Force Awakens and The Last Jedi!)

What’s next? Looking to the future, I’m hoping and praying that the next big announcement we get is an Ahsoka Tano movie. She’s one of the best characters in the entire franchise, but fans who only watch the movies don’t know about her (yet). However, there’s just enough info out there for me to piece together a conspiracy theory that that will soon change. The official Star Wars account and Filoni (who developed the character and has supervised the two Star Wars shows she’s been in) have both followed actress Rosario Dawson on Twitter. Dawson has stated in the past that she’d love to play Tano, the former Padawan of Anakin Skywalker. Filoni only follows around 50 people, mostly people that he worked with for Star Wars, so that gives me hope. Plus, Dawson has recently liked several tweets that say she’d make a great Ahsoka, or ask her to tell us if she is going to play the Togruta. Here’s to the possibility of my favorite alien kicking ass on the big screen with her two white light sabers soon.


SPORTS

Online this week: Kevin Knox’s decision, tennis’ SEC tournament and baseball against Ole Miss, plus recaps from this weekend in Mizzou sports.

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Junior Trey Harris hops onto home after scoring a run during the home game facing UIC on March 5, 2017. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

BASEBALL

Trey Harris awarded player of the week

The junior outfielder slugged five home runs last week, winning Collegiate Baseball Newspaper National Player of the Week. GARRETT JONES Staff Writer

Junior outfielder Trey Harris was named Collegiate Baseball Newspaper National Player of the Week in its most recent issue Monday morning. Harris had a monster week for

Mizzou, helping the Tigers to a 3-2 record in five games last week. Over those five games, Harris hit five home runs, four of which were in consecutive at-bats during the Kentucky series on Friday and Saturday. He also drove in eight RBIs and scored seven total runs. Harris’ three home runs in Saturday’s game made him the first Tiger to accomplish that feat since Jacob Priday in 2008. Harris’ power surge rocketed him up the statistical leaders for home runs in the Southeastern Conference. He now sits third in the SEC with 11 homers, the most by a Mizzou player since 2012. Over the last nine games, Harris

has distinguished himself as the team’s offensive leader. He now leads the team in batting average, runs, hits, home runs, RBIs, walks, and slugging in that span. Over the stretch, he is hitting a team-best .353 with eight homers and 14 RBIs. Perhaps the most impressive of all the above stats is the fact that he’s drawn six walks in that span. Prior to the 2017 season, Harris had drawn just 27 career walks. He’s already eclipsed that with a career-high total of 29 this season, a total that ranks third in the SEC. Unfortunately for the Tigers and Harris, he suffered an injury in Sunday’s 6-1 loss to Kentucky. He went down

clearly in pain in the sixth inning of Sunday’s contest but ultimately exited the game under his own power. Head coach Steve Bieser wasn’t too concerned after the game. Harris was left out of the lineup for Missouri’s Tuesday night contest versus Missouri State with no word on his status coming from the athletic department. Harris’ bat will be missed in the lineup, and whether or not he is featured in the the lineup in the Tigers’ upcoming weekend series in Oxford, Mississippi against Ole Miss will be a telling sign as to how severe the injury is. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

TENNIS

For women’s tennis’ Tate Schroeder, 2017 is just the beginning

The freshman has emerged as a star for the team, earning 17 wins over the course of her career at Mizzou. TOBY LOWE Staff Writer

Tate Schroeder always wanted to play in the SEC. “I love the team and just pictured myself really fighting for this school,” the Missouri tennis freshman said.

She kept it simple when discussing her decision to join the team back in 2016. Schroeder, then the No. 44 player in the 2016 recruiting class, was a dynamic addition to a team that finished 11th in the Southeastern Conference and was under the new leadership of first-year head coach Colt Gaston. The transition from high school to college can be daunting for anyone. Add the pressure and commitment of competing in Division I athletics, and that task can become even more strenuous.

“There are so many differences,” Schroeder said. “Every day is constantly a grind and you’re always having to push yourself to be the best possible teammate, the best academics possible and the best athlete that can, and if you think you’re giving enough, it’s probably not enough, so you have to give even more than you have.” On the court, Schroeder has been extraordinary during her freshman campaign, posting a 13-6 singles record in the the spring season, including two separate five-match win streaks. What has allowed Schroeder to be

so successful in making the transition to Division I college tennis? She credits her teammates. “I think that my team has really helped me just really hit the bars every day in practice and just really focus on the little things, and the little things make a difference in the end,” she said. Schroeder’s unrelenting will to succeed is often visible to match attendees. Her fiery personality on match days not only helps elevate her personal play but also the play of her

MEN’s | Page 13


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Kameron Misner key piece in Missouri outfield The freshman from Poplar Bluff, Missouri, is relishing the opportunity to play for his home-state school. GARRETT JONES Staff Writer

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Most notably, he’s been a headache for opposing defenses on the base paths, racking up an impressive 14 steals. This leads the team and brings Misner to second overall in the Southeastern Conference. Whether it’s hitting walk-off home runs, swiping bases or being a balanced presence in the clubhouse, Missouri baseball fans can be sure that they have a valuable player in Misner moving forward. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

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the Kansas City Royals. Ultimately, he decided not to sign with the 2015 world champions and enrolled at Mizzou. “Playing for your home-state school, it’s kind of a feeling you can’t describe,” Misner said. “It’s just an awesome opportunity.” So far, Misner has lived up to the MLB potential that Kansas City saw in him last June. In his freshman season, through 34 games, he’s batting at a .284 clip with four home runs and 24 RBIs, as of Tuesday night.

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alive, claiming the victory 6-4, 2-6, 6-4. The win left Middlebrooks fighting in a winner-take-all match. The freshman was tied 4-4 in the third set as she dug deep to rekindle some of her early season magic. She delivered the Tigers the 4-3 victory, sending her three senior teammates off with an upset win. "The girls earned it,” Gaston said after the match. “These girls, particularly the freshmen, have been through a lot, losing some close battles. That was the biggest thing that I was proud of today.” Missouri will now shift its focus to the SEC Tournament as they face Ole Miss at 1 p.m. Wednesday, looking to use this victory to propel a successful tournament run. Mizzou finished with a spring season record of 11-12, including a conference record of 2-10. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

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same Sunday. Junior Clare Raley and Schroeder earned their first victory of the weekend in a 6-3 win to get the Tigers on the board. Spearman and Middlebrooks continued to thrive in their new partnership as they claimed the doubles point for Mizzou with a 6-3 victory. After Alabama tied the match up at 1-1, Santos completed what might have been her most impressive victory this season. The senior concluded her final regular season match with a striking display, blanking her opponent in the first set 6-0. She continued to shine in the second set, winning 7-6 against the nation's No. 15 ranked player, Erin Routliffe Alabama proceeded to pull out a pair of third-set matches to take a 3-2 lead. In the third set of her match, Amina Ismail found herself 4-4 after splitting the first two sets. The junior showed tremendous resolve as she successfully fought to keep her team

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Staff Writer

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TOBY LOWE

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Missouri women’s tennis wrapped its regular season schedule up with a trip to Alabama to battle its final two Southeastern Conference opponents. On Friday, Mizzou visited No. 11 Auburn, where it fell 4-1 despite a strong performance in doubles competition. On Sunday, against the No. 33 Alabama Crimson Tide, the Tigers had just enough left in the tank to pull off an upset in stunning fashion, prevailing 4-3. Coming into the Auburn match on a nine-match losing streak, Mizzou looked determined to turn things around. The nationally ranked pairing of senior Bea Machado Santos and junior Amina Ismail added another win against a ranked opponent to

its increasingly impressive resume, upsetting the No. 16 ranked pairing in the nation 6-1. Coach Colt Gaston continued to tinker with the lineup down the stretch. Senior Cassidy Spearman and freshman Mackenzy Middlebrooks would have no problem with the change: In their first pairing of the season, the duo clinched the doubles point for Mizzou, with room to spare, 6-1. In singles, Spearman’s late season struggles continued as she fell in straight sets 6-3, 7-5. Freshman Tate Schroeder was defeated in a highly competitive match. Schroeder fell on the wrong side of two incredibly close sets, never quite able to gain control in a 7-6, 7-6 loss. Sunday brought the final opportunity for the Tigers to snap their losing streak as they traveled to Alabama. After finding early success Friday, the doubles lineup remained the

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Missouri finishes the season ranked 13th in the SEC.

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prospect in Missouri. Ranked as the third overall prospect in the state, Misner racked up numerous accolades during his time at Poplar Bluff High School. He was acknowledged twice in the 2016 Rawlings Perfect Game awards, as he was named to the secondteam All-Central Region squad and an honorable mention on the AllAmerican team. But the biggest honor, by far, came in June 2016. Misner was selected in the 33rd round of the MLB draft by

Mizzou tennis concludes regular season with victory over Alabama

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Freshman Kameron Misner appears to dab while swinging at a pitch. EMIL LIPPE | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

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March 5 was a big day for Missouri baseball. The team had just completed a weekend sweep of their home-opening series against the UIC Flames in a wild, 11-10 contest that saw a freshman drill a walk-off homer to finish off a Tiger victory. It was the culmination of a period of optimism. After a mediocre 26-32 season the year before, the Tigers had a 10-1 start and were in the middle of a 10-game win streak. Freshman Kameron Misner is the embodiment of that optimism. He’s also the player who drilled that 415foot blast that won the game. “That was my first career walkoff anything,” Misner said. “I had never hit a walk-off before. It’s just one of those feelings you can’t really explain. I don’t really ever know on home runs; I always sprint out of the box, but that one felt good.” After the game, junior outfielder Trey Harris described Misner as “country strong.” It’s an apt description. An imposing figure, the Poplar Bluff, Missouri, native stands at 6-foot-4 and weighs in at 219 pounds. He also comes off as a player who is easy for teammates to root for. “To see Kam hit that home run was way more exciting than mine,” Harris said after the March 5 contest. “The way we played this weekend was so fun, even better when it’s with people that you care about.” Before Misner arrived on campus, he was a highly touted high school

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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | APRIL 19, 2017


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | APRIL 19, 2017

TATE

Continued from page 11

this came in the Tigers’ early-season victory against then No. 17 Texas A&M. During the match, Schroeder was narrowly edged out in a first-set tiebreak and was trailing 4-0 in the second before rattling off wins in 11 of the final 12 games to clinch a critical match for her team. Coach Gaston saw the match as a stepping stone for not only the team, but the program as a whole. “I think that this is the match where I know I can go back to and talk to the team and we can stop talking about being [just] close,” Gaston said. “We can stop talking about all the other things that have held onto us, from taking this program and running with it.” Schroeder’s play this year has provided the Tigers with a stabilizing force in the middle of their lineup. Schroeder has handled the No. 3 position for the majority of the season, and her ability to collect wins on a consistent basis despite the fluctuating skill level

of her opponents has developed into a decisive trend that has been crucial to the Tigers’ success. What should come as a concern to SEC foes in the coming years, coaches and athletes alike, is the immense improvement Schroeder showed throughout the fall and spring seasons. With her dominant play, Schroeder has worked her way into the No. 2 position in the lineup in the latter part of the season and has achieved just as much success. “Tate’s been stepping up this year, and, I mean, her record’s kind of proven itself, and I think it was her time,” Gaston said. “She’s young and she’s coming up, and I think it’s a good time for her to kind of get a feel for that top spot. It’s somewhere I see her progressing in years to come.” Schroeder concedes mental improvement on the court has transformed her play on the court. “Definitely trusting my strategy and my instincts,” she said. “Before, I was bad on certain disciplinary shots, but now I’m just trusting my game and I know where to hit when I’m on certain parts of the court.” Already playing at a high level, she has set lofty goals for herself that she wants to achieve before her time on the court comes to

an end. “Individually, I want to be an AllAmerican, and I want to do something special for Mizzou,” she said. In order to achieve her goals, Schroeder has made an effort to soak up all the knowledge from two of her most experienced teammates, seniors Bea Machado Santos and Cassidy Spearman. “I mean, Cass and Bea honestly give me so much advice on a daily basis,” Schroeder said. “If I’m having a tough day then they say all the positive things that I’ve done in the day. They just really try to build everyone up as much as possible, and Bea has really helped me with figuring out how to be a top player in the SEC. And same with Cass. I mean, Cass works so hard and pushes me so much in practice.” As Missouri moves into postseason play, beginning with the SEC tournament this week, Schroeder still sees plenty of opportunities for success left in the season. “It is going to be an uphill climb,” she said. “I mean, we have come so close this season and we’re tired of being close and so we’re really excited for the rest of the season because I know we’re going to do special things.” As her phenomenal freshman season

comes to a close, Schroeder recognizes the position she will be in next year as she welcomes in the freshman class as her role on the team progresses. “I just really want to be a leader on the team and really help the newcomers get settled in and let them know our culture, what our culture is all about and what ‘one way’ really means, so it’s really exciting,” Schroeder said. “One way” is a phrase Gaston has instilled in his team from the moment he assumed his position as head coach. “When you’re on the court, there’s only one way to go at it: 100 percent,” Gaston said. “Since I’ve been here, I’ve heard a lot of people talking about Mizzou Made and I love that kind of stuff. It all goes together. There’s one way to do it and that’s working harder than everyone else. You don’t train average. You go above and beyond.” Schroeder has certainly bought into Gaston’s “one way” philosophy, and with her competing in a Tigers uniform for the foreseeable future, there is only one direction the Missouri women’s tennis team will go: up. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

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OPINION EDITORIALS REPRESENT THE MAJORITY OPINION OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

We want to hear your voice.

Submit a letter to the editor by emailing letters@themaneater.com.

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THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED BY THE MANEATER COLUMNISTS DO NOT REPRESENT THE OPINIONS OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

EDITORIAL

Non-tenure track faculty deserve protections and respect Budget cuts present a great danger to the status quo at MU. They also endanger faculty and staff — people make up the majority of the university’s spending, after all. Some employees have already been laid off. Earlier this month, the Division of Operations announced the layoffs of 20 employees effective July 1. It’s unclear if more employees will be dismissed, how many more could be laid off, and how much notice faculty and staff would have if terminated. But it is clear that this budget cut situation has created instability and uncertainty, especially for vulnerable staff members and non-tenure track faculty, the instructors with less permanent contracts and fewer benefits. They would be the first to go — and the most hurt by being laid off. Whatever happens next, the livelihoods of these crucial faculty members must be taken into account. NTT faculty are typically on year-to-year contracts, and are therefore much easier to cut than faculty who were hired onto the tenure track. In 2016, NTT faculty made up 43.6 percent of MU faculty. Now, thanks to budget cuts, the job security of that large chunk of MU faculty is hanging in the balance. With that in mind, Faculty Council passed a resolution supporting NTT faculty and asking for additional protections for them. Key components of Faculty Council’s resolutions

urged MU to honor NTT contracts for the 2017-18 school year, establish contracts longer than one year and put severance compensation on par with tenure-track faculty. According to the UM System Collected Rules and Regulations, NTT faculty are required to be given at least three months’ notice before being let go unless “extenuating circumstances exist.” Fortunately, administrators confirmed last night at an open forum that if

Fewer NTT faculty members also mean fewer classes offered. Tenure-track faculty may have to take on more work to be able to pick up the slack of lost faculty members, taking them away from valuable research that contributes to our university’s reputation, finances and contribution to society. Large cuts like this affect how people see MU and could be another hit on enrollment, contributing to even more budget problems.

WHATEVER HAPPENS NEXT, THE LIVELIHOODS OF THESE CRUCIAL FACULTY MEMBERS MUST BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT. faculty and staff were laid off, they would receive temporary income and benefits. Faculty Council is right to call for more protection for non-tenure track faculty. The university needs to prioritize these valuable faculty members. If NTT faculty positions are cut, the wellbeing of these faculty are at risk. If an NTT faculty member is let go by the time fall contracts at universities across the entire country are already signed, they could be out of a faculty job for an entire year. And if a faculty member who is long-rooted in Columbia is forced to seek work elsewhere, their kids and partners will be uprooted and will have to find school and work elsewhere.

Even if these positions must be cut to match the budget shortfall, Faculty Council’s requests regarding notice given to laid off faculty and suggestions for future handling of NTT job security are spot-on and worth acting on. It’s unfortunate that our university is in the tenuous situation it is. It’s hard to make “supreme” the welfare of the people — as our motto suggests — with stringent budget cuts. We know the cuts need to come from somewhere. But too few protections for non-tenure-track faculty hurt more than just those instructors who might be laid off. They hurt other faculty, our students and our university.

THE TRUTH HUNTER

Home defense shouldn’t be such a polarizing topic

In the wake of a home invasion in Oklahoma resulting in the death of three burglars, some are questioning where the line should be drawn for home defense. HUNTER GILBERT Opinion Columnist

Hunter Gilbert is a freshman data journalism major opinion columnist who writes about rights and tech for The Maneater.

Near the end of March, a burglary in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma caught the media’s attention. While burglary isn’t that uncommon in the U.S., the end result of this specific burglary was just that. Three teenagers in black masks, brandishing a knife and brass knuckles among the three of

them, broke into a home with the intent to steal. Two of them were shot and killed before leaving the house by the homeowner’s son, and the third died in the driveway from a gunshot wound received while in the house. Legally, the son, who is 23, was within his rights to shoot the three. Had he done it outside of his home, it would have been considered criminal homicide. The only two reasons this event made headlines were that the son used an AR-15 pattern rifle to kill the three burglars and the event relates to the highly debated Castle Doctrine. A Castle Doctrine, or a defense of habitation law, gives a person with the legal right to be in an abode, car or home the right to use deadly force on an invader. The state of Oklahoma recognizes that the citizens of the state have a right to absolute safety **within their own homes** or places of business. This is recognized under a state statute pertaining to “Physical or Deadly Force Against (an) Intruder,” the origins of which can be traced back to the Oklahoma Firearms Act of 1971. Furthermore, if a person or employee of a business feels their life is in “imminent peril of death or great bodily harm,” they are within their right to use defensive force as they see fit. Whether

it be deadly or otherwise, the individual has the right to defend themselves against intruders or perceived threats. The homeowner’s son was in the right to shoot the three teens. It doesn’t matter how nice the teens were in their day-to-day lives, and it doesn’t matter how well they were raised. In the moment in which they were shot, they were breaking the law. Plain and simple. If the man felt as if he could die or be greatly harmed, which he could have been, given the circumstances, he was in his right to shoot them. This is one of the reasons people own a gun in the first place. The AR-15 is incredibly common, so it comes to no surprise that this is the kind of rifle the son used to defend himself. But you are still more likely to be killed by a knife than a rifle, let alone a self-loading rifle such as an AR-15, according to the FBI. I own one, and I wouldn’t use any other gun I own to defend myself had I been in his situation. When your life is on the line, why would you settle for anything less than the perfect tool for the given situation? The man was within his right to defend himself.

Keep your eyes PEELED for opinion columnist applications coming later this semester


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | APRIL 19, 2017

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Blake Harris talks about his commitment to Mizzou CHELSEA ROEMER Staff Writer

When Blake Harris got to the University of Missouri, he felt like a superstar. There were cheering fans, banners hanging from fraternity houses and tons of social media buzz. Harris, a four-star point guard, took his official campus visit the weekend of April 8-9 alongside No. 1 recruit Michael Porter Jr., who is already committed to Missouri, and No. 2-ranked small forward recruit Kevin Knox, who has yet to make up his mind about where to play. Harris, the No. 20 point guard in the nation according to ESPN, had previously signed with Washington with Porter Jr. back in November before decommitting after the firing of coach Lorenzo Romar. “Missouri was always ranked in the top three for me,” Harris said. “I knew that it was always going to be an option.” One visit was all it took for the point guard from Chapel Hill, North Carolina. Harris announced just hours after his visit ended that he would be committing to Mizzou. “After one full day at Mizzou, I knew I wanted to commit, and I called my parents and told them,” Harris said. “When Coach Martin dropped me off at the airport, I told him I wanted to play for Mizzou.” The visit began at the airport,

where Harris, along with Knox and Porter Jr., were welcomed by not only the coaching staff, but also by the students, who showed that they were thrilled to have them. In the days before the athletes showed up to campus, several of MU’s fraternities made preparations to take part in the recruitment process themselves. By the time the players arrived in Columbia, Greektown was decorated with large banners

showed up in a golf cart,” sophomore Alpha Epsilon Pi member Jonah Roberts said. “We took a photo with the athletes and Porter Jr. even threw a football around with us. It was incredible and something we will remember at the house for a long time.” The dedication that went into creating the banners did not go unnoticed by the athletes. “It was crazy,” Harris said. “I

“WHEN WE SHOWED UP, THERE WERE ABOUT 20 STUDENTS WAITING FOR US WITH POSTERS. IT WAS LIKE WE WERE SUPERSTARS.” -BLAKE HARRIS covered with creative slogans and illustrations to attract the athlete's attention. “We had thrown the idea of making a banner around for a while, and the design came from the concept of selling them the vision of creating a legacy here,” freshman Phi Delta Theta fraternity member Zachary Reader said. “Our hope was to serve as a part in welcoming them to the university.” One fraternity, Alpha Epsilon Pi, was lucky enough to spend some time with Harris, Porter Jr. and Knox when the trio showed up at their house to admire their banner. “There were about 20 of us just sitting on the porch, and the boys

had seen the banners before because there were pictures of them on social media that I retweeted. We talked to the frats and took pictures in front of the signs. We even took pictures with their moms because it was mom’s weekend.” Outside of the warm welcome from the Greek community, countless other students had the opportunity to meet Harris around the campus and take pictures. Those who encountered Harris and the other athletes were awestruck and admired their willingness to stop and take the time to meet them. “My overall first impression of them was they were kind and down to earth,” freshman Briana Savidge

said. “They really seemed to be enjoying their time here.” Harris himself also enjoyed stopping to take pictures with fans. “Taking pictures was really cool, but it was tiring since I don't normally take that many,” Harris said. “But it made me feel like Mizzou really wanted me there.” Porter Jr. and Harris are now back to playing on the same team again, a concept that played a heavy role in Harris’ decision to come to Mizzou. “Michael and I are close,” Harris said. “He and I talked about how it was different than any other school because of the amazing fans and incredible facilities.” It goes without saying that students are excited to have Porter Jr. and Harris here next year. “The way they handled the visit shows that they are really connected to the Mizzou community,” junior Theta Chi fraternity member Cole Stoecklein said. “I can't wait to see them be leaders on the court next year.” The addition of a new coach and two major recruits casts a ray of light on the Mizzou basketball program that was not around just a month or so ago. “I am excited to have my college experience at Mizzou,” Harris said. “I think we can do big things and I’m ready to win.” Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com


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