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THE MANEATER

MARCH 15, 2017 • THEMANEATER.COM

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ENTREPRENEURSHIP

A BUSINESS out of

THIS WORLD Student entrepreneurs like Bea Doheny, founder of Astronobeads, find support in Entrepreneurship Alliance. story by OLIVIA GARRETT photo by JULIA HANSEN

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unior Bea Doheny’s astronomythemed bracelets have been worn by astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson and promoted by astronaut Scott Kelly on social media. She has sold over 3,000 bracelets and currently employs three fellow MU students. “I honestly thought it was going to be a little hobby I would do when I launched everything, and it just really blasted off,” Doheny said. “It’s crazy to see all of the places that it’s been and the people that have reached out to me and sent me emails on how much they love their bracelets.” Doheny’s business, Astronobeads, began with a Google search and an

email to Greg Bier, the director of the Entrepreneurship Alliance program at MU. Doheny pitched her idea of solar-system-inspired jewelry to Bier, and he invited her to take a class he was teaching. “To get involved with the Entrepreneurship Alliance, the students have to take Management 4720: Experiential Entrepreneurship,” Bier said. “So, they might take that class as a freshman or sophomore, but they’ll be involved with the Entrepreneurship Alliance the rest of their college career and even beyond their college career.” For Doheny, the EA helped set her up with a mentor, provided $1,000 in seed funding and even helped her

gain access to office space in the Student Center where she builds her bracelets. “With Astronobeads, we invested a couple hundred dollars, and here we are 10 months later and Bea has made over $50,000 in sales and shipped products to over 30 different countries,” Bier said. “That was a good investment.” But not every EA student receives seed money or the same level of support that Doheny did. To access the full resources of the program, a student first needs to ask for it. “If a student can give us a budget and convince us that it is money well spent, that they’ve got some skin in the game, we’ll make that

investment,” Bier said. EA students who do receive seed funding through the program do not have to share any profits or equity with the university. The seed money comes from the Don and Trudy Steen Entrepreneurship Venture Fund, which involves a $1,000,000 pledge to support the program. “In good faith, if you are successful and you’re the next Mark Zuckerberg, please remember that you graduated from Mizzou, but there’s no strings,” Bier said. “We don’t want a student to get tied down in all of those details. We just want a student to be successful.” For students who might need more resources than what the program can

for the rest of the story, see ENTREPRENEURSHIP on pg. 4 MISSOURI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION

MSA budget will be $150,000 less next year

WEATHER

MSA adviser Bryan Goers: “Everyone should expect cuts.”

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FIONA MURPHY Staff Writer

The MSA budget is $150,000 less than last year, at a total of $1.47 million, due to low enrollment numbers and less carryover. The Missouri Students Association Department of Student Activities,

STRIPES and student officer salaries from both Executive Cabinet and Senate received the most cuts from last year’s budget. However, most organizations within MSA are facing at least some cuts of their budget from last year. MSA adviser Bryan Goers said the “theme” of this budget season is that “everyone should expect cuts.” The Student Activity Fee is where most of the MSA budget comes from. Due to low freshman class enrollment this year and the large senior class

leaving this spring, organizations and auxiliaries within MSA will have less money to work with. Carryover of money that wasn’t used from last fiscal year’s budget also dropped $66,000. STRIPES received a $10,000 cut. The auxiliary has a contract with Avis Columbia, the company that rents STRIPES its cars. STRIPES uses at least a dozen cars on weekends, but because of the cut to its budget,

MSA | Page 4

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 62/49

FRIDAY 70/41

SATURDAY 60/34 Weather compiled from Weather Underground


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THE MANEATER | NEWS | MARCH 15, 2017

The Briefing THE MANEATER STAFF Student Health Center reduces free services available to students Students will have to pay for all Student Health Center office visits starting July 1, according to an announcement earlier this month. The center cited rising health care costs as why the current health fee will no longer support the center’s services, including the Behavioral Health Center. The Counseling Center is not a part of the Student Health Center and will not be affected. The email stated that the center had joined most major health insurance networks and suggested students could receive quality health care through their insurance plans. However, the announcement comes at a time when a Republican

plan to replace the Affordable Care Act could take away health coverage for 14 million Americans in the next year, according to the Congressional Budget Office. MSA vice president inspires creation of new scholarship MSA Vice President Tori Schafer lost her bid for MSA president, but she’s getting a scholarship named for her, according to a letter Schafer received that she posted to Facebook on March 13. The author of the letter has a granddaughter at MU who was sexually assaulted during her freshman year. The writer said their granddaughter contemplated suicide but was inspired by one of Schafer’s posts encouraging survivors to call a hotline. The author said the family

intended to start a full-ride scholarship in Schafer’s name for survivors of domestic violence. Schafer later tweeted that the scholarship will be named after “Make it Matter,� her former MSA campaign slogan. UM System president ends executive incentive program The program, which provided nearly $1.2 million in bonuses to top administrators over three years, was ended by UM System President Mun Choi last week. According to a state audit of executive compensation in the system, the incentives may violate the state constitution. The audit took issue with multiple aspects of incentive payments, including a lack of transparency or formal system for issuing bonuses.

THE MANEATER The Student Voice of MU since 1955

Vol. 83, Issue 23 (4UVEFOU$FOUFSt$PMVNCJB .0  QIPOF t GBY

FEJUPST!UIFNBOFBUFSDPN XXXUIFNBOFBUFSDPN

Twitter: @themaneater Instagram: @themaneater1955 facebook.com/themaneaterMU The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reproduced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. “hello Maneater we are word humans�

Reporters for The Maneater are required to offer verification of all quotes for each source. If you notice an inaccuracy in one of our stories, please contact us via phone or email. Editor-in-Chief Jared Kaufman

Graphics Manager Tori Aerni

Managing Editors George Roberson, Katie Rosso

Newsletter Manager Regina Anderson

News Director Emily Gallion Copy Chief Nancy Coleman Engagement Director Jake Chiarelli Online Development Editor Reiker Seiffe Sports Editor Eli Lederman News Editors Kyle LaHucik, Madi McVan MOVE Editors Victoria Cheyne, Bailey Sampson, Katherine White

CORRECTION: A previous version of the article “Bright Flight scholars may receive less money than originally awarded by the state� on page 3 of the March 8, 2017, issue misstated the minimum ACT score needed to qualify for the Bright Flight scholarship. It is 31. The article also misstated the source of an additional potential $1.5 million that could cover spring 2017 scholarships. It would be a supplemental appropriation to the 2017 budget. The Maneater regrets these errors.

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Opinion Editor Kasey Carlson Photo Editor Jessi Dodge

MOVE Social Media Manager Kaelyn Sturgell Sports Social Media Manager Titus Wu Assistant Production Manager Cassie Allen Deputy Copy Chiefs Anna Sirianni, Katherine Stevenson Copy Editors Nat Kaemmerer, Sam Nelson, David Reynolds, Libby Stanford, Jeremiah Wooten Assistant Online Editor Michael Smith Jr. Adviser Becky Diehl

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NEWS

Online this Week: A look into several new fees on campus and a profile of the dean of the College of Human Environmental Sciences.

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POLICING

A RISE IN ARRESTS

CALLS FOR SERVICE BY CITIZENS

=2015 =2016

REPORTS OF INTERNAL POLICE MISCONDUCT

4,836

4,351

28 SUSTAINED

40 REPORTED

39 SUSTAINED 51 REPORTED

150,874 CALLS

146,683 CALLS

CPD calls and arrests rose in 2016, according to an internal affairs report.

RECORDED ARRESTS TORI AERNI | GRAPHICS MANAGER

CPD report shows increased arrests in 2016 The report also included statistics about police misconduct, which rose from 41 cases in 2015 to 66 cases in 2016. SAM FORBES Staff Writer

An annual internal affairs report released March 1 revealed the Columbia Police Department made 11.1 percent more arrests in 2016 than in 2015. According to the report, 3.1

percent of all citizen contacts resulted in arrests. This amounts to 4,836 recorded arrests, a noticeable increase from the 4,351 arrests made the previous year. Despite these statistics, it is unclear whether the increase was a result of more misdemeanors or more felonies committed. Sgt. Brian Tate, who is part of CPD’s internal affairs division, said his department does not separate arrests by type and only calculates the total number of arrests. “To try and determine why exactly arrests rose from the previous year would only be speculation at this

point,” Tate said. “It is not atypical for arrests to fluctuate from one year to the other.” However, Tate suggested the rise could be due to increased demand from Columbia’s growing population. Calls for service by citizens rose by 2.8 percent, and officers made a total of 150,874 citizen contacts, up from 146,683 in 2015. “It goes without saying because calls for service rise, the chances for additional arrests will increase as well,” Tate said. “Columbia is a community growing yearly, so therefore the chances for calls for service and arrests may continue to

increase.” The report also included information about cases of police misconduct. Citizens reported 66 cases in 2016, yet 23 were determined to be unfounded and 20 were exonerated by Chief Ken Burton. Regarding cases of internal misconduct, officers reported 40 cases, 28 of which were sustained. This is a decrease from 2015, when 51 cases were reported and 39 were sustained. Edited by Madi McVan mmcvan@themaneater.com

INCLUSIVITY

Campus center opens to study issues of diversity in media The center has started a mentorship program for undergraduate and graduate students interested in issues of diversity in the media. OLIVIA GARRETT Staff Writer

The communication department launched the Media and Diversity Center, which will promote research and media literacy programs.

“Primarily, we’re interested in conducting cutting-edge research in relation to issues of diversity and the media,” co-director Elizabeth BehmMorawitz said. “We’re also interested in training undergraduate students at the University of Missouri and graduate students to become good social scientists.” The center, which opened on Feb. 24, hopes to draw attention to research into “the diversity of representations in traditional and digital media as well as the effects on beliefs, attitudes, behaviors and policy support,” according to the

center’s website. For the six graduate research associates and two undergraduate associates involved with the center, Behm-Morawitz and co-director Julius Riles have started a mentorship program to facilitate the training of undergraduate students and help graduate students enhance their mentorship abilities through workshops. “We are trained to become more effective mentors,” graduate research associate Grace Choi said. “Having an open, collaborative environment where I can talk to other people about

this issue can be very encouraging.” Another focus of the center is promoting collaboration not only within different departments at MU, but also between researchers at other institutions around the country. Of the center’s 11 research associates, seven come from other schools, such as Texas A&M University, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of San Diego. “[We contacted the researchers] so that we could start collaborating and having discussions and putting

OPen | Page 5


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Entrepreneurship program fosters student success

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about floating, a practice where a person floats in highly concentrated salt water, while he was still in school in 2012. The EA supported him by providing seed funding for him to attend a float conference. In 2016, he and a business partner opened Clarity Float Spa in Columbia, the first retail storefront business started by an EA student. Clarity employs seven people and has provided over 1,000 floats to over 500 customers so far. “Clarity more than likely would have happened with or without the EA, but it was almost like I had a fire started and the EA was like pouring gasoline on the fire,” Knabe said. “I think the biggest part of it was seeing other successful business owners talk about their stories.” When Meyer speaks to the management class, she encourages students to reach out and connect with her. Knabe is one of the students who took advantage of the networking opportunity. “I was intrigued by [Meyer’s] business, and I really liked what they were doing,” Knabe said. “I don’t think it was until we were working on Clarity, we were

basically starting to build out the space when I reached out to her. It’s good to get some interest from a fellow EA-er who then went on to start a business.” In April, Knabe will reverse roles and visit the class as a guest speaker. “It’s really cool,” Knabe said. “That was such a big part of the EA for me when I took it, and to be able to contribute back to that is almost kind of surreal.” Other ventures started by current and former students involve subjects ranging from drones to wood furniture and marketing services to apps. Other students are now working at startups or innovating in larger companies. For some, the connections made through MU’s entrepreneurship programs are ongoing. Bier will be serving as the officiant at Meyer’s wedding later this year. “The cool thing about EA is it’s not just your class,” Doheny said. “It’s all of the EA alums. It’s almost like that club is forever.” Edited by Kyle LaHucik klahucik@themaneater.com

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STRIPES is taking one car out of commision. The DSA College Music Committee took a $10,000 cut, while the Special Events Committee was taken out of DSA completely to save funds. The committee made the least amount of money in DSA last year. “DSA is facing the heavier cuts, and a lot of that is because with less students coming in, there’s less students that will be attending events,” Budget Chairman Jack Blevins said. “This would just make sense to cut back on some of the events we do.” Many of the cuts within DSA are based on the amount of revenue DSA produces. The Student Films Committee plans to reduce the number of films played each week because of its $8,000 cut.

campus activities because we keep having to cut from them every year,” MSA Vice President Tori Schafer said. “We don’t want to cut them to the point where they can’t do the amazing programming they want to do.” Auxiliaries within MSA receive the first draft of the budget when Schafer releases it to the Budget Committee. They received a copy of the budget last week. Heads of auxiliaries often meet with the committee to recommend where their organizations can receive cuts. “I’d say communication is one of the areas we have struggled with during this budget season,” Blevins said. “However, we’ve been trying to make up for some of that in the last couple weeks. We’ve been meeting with the staff adviser for DSA to see where to move allocations around within DSA.” Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com

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MSA

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DSA decided to cut from the committee to avoid additional cuts to their other organizations. DSA Associate Director Kathy Murray said programs like Netflix are hard to compete with on campus and have resulted in a loss of revenue. “For College Music or Films, their goal is not so much to make money when they’re selling tickets, it’s more so to break even,” Blevins said. “That’s a lot of the mentality behind DSA when they’re putting on their events.” Because DSA has taken heavy cuts this year, auxiliaries that don’t normally face cuts, such as KCOU and MUTV, are seeing changes. Now, both auxiliaries are facing a budget reduced by $1,000, ensuring some money is filtered back to DSA. “I personally think that DSA should not be a part of MSA and be moved under

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Management 4720: Experiential Entrepreneurship allows students to pitch and pursue business ideas using Entrepreneurship Alliance funds, which include a $1,000,000 pledge.

conferences, attend acting retreats, brave zipline and high ropes courses, and welcome guest speakers. Former student Kelsey Meyer has been a recurring guest speaker for the class since she graduated in 2011, when she was a member of the program’s predecessor, the Flegel Academy for Aspiring Entrepreneurs. Meyer went on to found Influence & Co., a content marketing firm based in Columbia that employs 65 full-time employees, about 10 part-time employees and 60 more freelance writers. Not only does she visit EA classes, but she also provides internships and jobs to students. “A good reason to stay connected with the university and with the EA is that it’s a good talent pool that we can meet them, start doing part-time employment when they’re still in school, and when they graduate, we have a few people who we already know to look at for full-time employment,” Meyer said. The EA attracts students from all over campus, such as Connor Knabe, who graduated from the College of Engineering in 2015. Knabe became passionate

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provide, beginning in spring 2018, the EA will bring certified angel investors to campus and host an event similar to the television show Shark Tank, Bier said. “So, a student might pitch and, just like the TV show, walk away with nothing,” Bier said. “Another student may pitch and all of our alum investors are interested in that idea and they will have to negotiate the terms of what that investment looks like. The university is not going to get in the middle of that investment between our angels, our alums and that student.” Unlike other programs on campus, the EA does not advertise or actively recruit new students.

“We kind of expect entrepreneurs to take some initiative and to find out what is going on in the entrepreneurial ecosystem on campus or around Columbia,” Bier said. “We’re not looking for a student that just wants to take a class on entrepreneurship and learn the different sections of the business model canvas, or how to write a business plan. We’re looking for a student that is willing to put themselves out there and actually pursue their idea.” Students also learn about the program through wordof-mouth. “Anytime someone brings up the EA who isn’t familiar with it, I say: ‘You need to take it. It’s the best class at Mizzou,’” Doheny said. “I always encourage people to look into it if it fits with their schedule. It’s just really been such a neat way to meet a whole bunch of cool people and gain a different outlook.” Before last fall, the management class was only available to 25 students a semester. But because of student demand, a second session was added. Along with traditional classroom activities, students travel to pitch competitions and

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THE MANEATER | NEWS | MARCH 15, 2017

OPEN

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together situations in which we can promote each other’s work, but also use each other’s resources to engage in more research in this area,” Riles said. This collaboration could take the form of grant applications, joint presentations at conferences, visiting each other’s campuses as guest speakers, allowing students to network with individuals from other universities and expanding research. “We want to use the center to draw attention to the research that’s happening

in the College of Arts and Science and at the University of Missouri,” Behm-Morawitz said. “We see this primarily as an opportunity for our undergraduates and our graduate students here, but by drawing in faculty from other institutions, we’re able to extend the educational experience of our students.” Choi is responsible for promoting outreach by running the center’s website, Twitter account and Facebook group, which highlight both positive and negative examples of diversity in the media and provide a forum for discussion. “We want to make people aware of what’s going on in the media, so one of our goals is to increase diversity

Marathon Madness PHOTOS BY BAILEY VALADEZ AND EMIL LIPPE After dancing for 13.1 hours to fundraise for pediatric patients throughout mid-Missouri, participants and donors in Saturday’s 10th annual MizzouThon raised more than $300,000. The money raised is donated to the MU Women’s and Children’s Hospital to help support the Music Therapy Program, the Telehealth, Love, and Care Program, and the Blood Disorders and Cancer Unit.

in the media,” Choi said. “If we see something that’s very problematic that’s going on, then we want others to be aware of that as well, so we would spread that information to other people.” The Facebook group is open to not only research associates, but also to anyone who is interested in the goals of the center. One of these goals is developing community partnerships to increase media literacy through presentations. Currently, the center is reaching out to residence halls and other departments on campus, as well as an LGBT community center in Columbia. “What we mean by media literacy is people’s ability to

access, analyze, evaluate and create or produce media,” Behm-Morawitz said. “It’s about becoming more critical media consumers as well as increasing people’s skills to interact in mediated environments and create their own mediated stories.” Research projects are done in the communication department’s space, as the center does not have a physical location. The Media and Diversity Center also does not receive any funding from MU. It is instead being supported by the faculty members involved. Although Behm-Morawitz has been interested in the idea of an initiative with these goals since at least 2010, planning for the center

did not become official until 2016 when Riles was hired. “We were just kind of waiting to expand our faculty in the area of media effects before officially launching and going forward with the center,” Behm-Morawitz said. “With Dr. Riles hired, it was the perfect time to push forward with the plans now that we had two faculty on board here with really similar interests.” Undergraduates who are interested in participating in the center’s research projects or with the mentorship program should contact either Riles or BehmMorawitz, Riles said. Edited by Kyle LaHucik klahucik@themaneater.com


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As the fourth-largest city in Missouri, Columbia has no shortage of pizza restaurants or college students. There is also no shortage of local musicians who perform at pizza restaurants for college students. Many of these artists aren’t big name acts; they are simply musicians who call Columbia home. From rap and rock to folk and punk, these local musicians span every genre and offer something for each music fan. The following nine songs, however, are MOVE’s take on the best of what Columbia’s music scene has to offer. The Motel Brothers top off my list with their acoustic hip-hop, Fuego Bentley’s “Trill Waves” provides a chill track to listen to in the middle, and The Blue Hearts Club wrap it up with their soulful piece.

MATT MCMULLEN // GRAPHICS ASSISTANT COMPILED BY CASSIE ALLEN


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | MARCH 15, 2017

The Naturelles win quarterfinals at the international college a cappella competition

RASHI SHRIVASTAVA Staff Writer

Reaching higher notes and greater heights, one of MU’s a cappella groups, The Naturelles, has caught a new lead toward an 11-year dream. The Naturelles are a group of 15 female singers who recently competed in the International Championship of Collegiate A Cappella Midwest Quarterfinal hosted at Washington University in St. Louis. For the quarterfinals, the group had to compete against 10 other college groups of the 300 total at the competition. The Naturelles made history by being MU’s first a cappella group to win the quarter final and make it to semifinals. A cappella is all about composing a symphony using only the human voice and its vibrant characteristics. A cappella singing requires great coordination and development of the individual singer as well as the group as a whole. “The Naturelles is not a cookie-cutter girls group,” Naturelles President Brittany Wood said. “We perform meaningful and edgy songs.” After moving away from cliché pop songs and incorporating diversity and depth in their performances, The Naturelles have made their way into semifinals. The Naturelles were formed in 2007 and have been performing ever since. All 15 current singers are non-music majors. They also have a vocal percussionist (a beat boxer) and a music director who helps put the pieces together and arranges

voice parts. They draw inspiration from the songs they listen to frequently on Spotify or the radio. The group meets twice a week to practice for competitions and events on campus. “A lot of us don’t have huge music backgrounds,” Wood said. “None of us are here to be music teachers or to be singers. We’re just here trying to get an education for something else, but we’d never want to give up that hobby.” Wood said one of the challenges they face while practicing is coordinating everyone’s schedules. “Sometimes it’s just hard being able to get everyone’s schedules to line up,” Wood said. “People have busy lives, and none of us are music majors, so we have to work the extra mile to sound good and make sure everyone’s at practice. Because we don’t have instruments, we rely solely on our voices, so when voices are missing, it’s very obvious.” Even though scheduling can be challenging, their love of music brings them together. “We work together well and we’re all pretty passionate,” Wood said. “It’s pretty fun being an all-girls group. It’s like a whole other group of girls, you know, maybe I wouldn’t have met without having music, but music kind of brought us together.” For the quarterfinals, The Naturelles performed a combination of three songs. They began with “River” by Bishop Briggs, transitioned into “Til it Happens to You” by Lady Gaga and ended with “This is Gospel” by Panic! At The Disco. They are currently preparing for the semifinals March 25 at Indiana University, where they will compete against 10 other a capella groups. “We’re excited for semifinals coming up soon,” Wood said. “We don’t really go to competitions to compete; we’re just trying to have fun and perform. It’s something that we all do because we

like music. Winning was a perk, obviously, and a motivation to keep working hard, but in the end we’re excited that we get to keep singing.” Edited by Katherine White kwhite@themaneater.com

STAFF

Naturelles President Brittany Wood: “The Naturelles is not a cookie-cutter girls group. We perform meaningful and edgy songs.”

Angles Editor Victoria Cheyne Culture Editor Katherine White Features Editor Victoria Cheyne Social Media Manager Kaelyn Sturgell Angles Columnists Cassie Allen Nick Corder Ben Jarzombek Ally Rudolph Grant Sharples

Culture Writers Brooke Collier Lauryn Fleming Nat Kaemmerer Michelle Lumpkins Hannah Simon Caroline Watkins Features Writers Michaela Flores Caroline Kealy Mackenzie Wallace Videographer Hunter Bassler Header photo by: Maddie Davis

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MUSIC REVIEW

Columbia marks 22nd sold-out tour stop for EDM duo Louis the Child MITCHELL BARTLE Columnist

Chill waves of smooth synth, punching bass and catchy lyrics are coming your way this Thursday when up-and-coming electronic music duo Louis the Child performs at The Blue Note. Composed of Robert Hauldren and Frederic Kennett, the Chicago-based duo has had a light-speed launch into the electronic music scene since the release of “It’s Strange” in 2015. Two years later, and Louis the Child has opened for The Chainsmokers and Madeon and performed at festivals including Coachella, Lollapalooza and Electric Forest. Big upcoming festival appearances are set for Hangout Music Festival and Bonnaroo this year. This duo isn’t slowing down anytime soon. Louis the Child’s music draws influence from electronic artists like Flume, Madeon and Odesza. Within the genre of EDM, the duo would fall into a subgenre called future bass, a style that has been pioneered by Flume. Future bass is characterized by rhythmic synthesizer modulation, relying more on the rapid articulation of complex chord progressions than percussion to set the pace and drive of a song. Their single “It’s Strange” is a prime example of this style. Their remixes also rely heavily on

Robert Hauldren and Frederic Kennett of Louis the Child PHOTO COURTESY OF LOUIS THE CHILD

the techniques used in future bass. If you haven’t heard of the group, give its music a listen before the concert, and be prepared to sing along to their singles “Love Is Alive,” “Fire” and “Weekend.” With feel-good melodies that are almost impossible not to dance to, these songs have more pop appeal with catchy, singalong lyrics that have real anthem potential. “Love is Alive,” features electropop singer Elohim who “just [wants to] go where love is alive.” It’s a repetitive but catchy song

with a solid bassline that carries Elohim’s airy voice along through frequency shifts and interesting percussive patterns to produce a surreal soundscape that’s sure to create a magnetic live atmosphere Thursday night. Their single “Fire” features the lyrics of the soul-pop artist Evalyn. She begins each verse with quick phrases, building energy in her voice. The lyrics of freedom and reckless independence develop into the chorus, where her passion becomes a fire she builds until the last lyric, “And if I go down in flames, the smoke gonna spell my

name,” followed by a powerful drop into future bass synth waves and an uplifting melody. Louis the Child and Swedish duo Icona Pop teamed up to produce the song “Weekend.” Out of the three mentioned singles, this one has the biggest pop influence. It follows the common theme of confusion following a weekend of partying, and it mostly features lyrics by Icona Pop with interludes of future bass solos by Louis the Child. It’s a song with the kind of catchy chorus and happy melody that you may find yourself humming days after the concert. Louis the Child has yet to release a full-length album. Other than an EP, Dimensions, in 2013 that featured heavy synth and house-style tracks, the group has only dropped five singles and produced a handful of remixes. The duo has an EP of six songs, Love is Alive, set to debut March 24 and an album in the works. In a November 2016 interview, Kennett told the Chicago Tribune that the duo has “hundreds of songs” stockpiled and ready for release, so it sounds as though Louis the Child is going to be sticking around the electronic music scene for some time to come. The concert starts at 9 p.m. Thursday at The Blue Note. Tickets are sold out locally, but there are still a few available on StubHub.


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | MARCH 15, 2017

Review: Lorde releases ‘Liability,’ second track off upcoming album ‘Melodrama’ Get ready for her upcoming album, “Melodrama,” by listening to this single. MALLORIE MUNOZ Reporter

After just under four years of musical absence, singersongwriter Lorde released her first singles off her upcoming album Melodrama, “Green Light” on March 2 and “Liability” on March 9. The release date for the album has finally been announced as June 16, but after listening to her latest releases, I would be willing to wait a lifetime if it meant the album would be anything like the two newest tracks. The New Zealander has matured since her last album, Pure Heroine, and the growth shows in her single “Liability.” The track is incredibly vulnerable and honest, creating a sort of intimacy between the singer and her fans that previous

songs have not been able to do. Lorde addresses the realities of being young and famous and does so in the most humble way. In an interview with Zane Lowe on Apple Music, the singer shared what led her to write the song. “I had this realization that because of my lifestyle and what I do for work, there’s going to be a point with every single person around me where I’m going to be a tax on them in some way,” Lorde said. Although addressing a specific “he” who she explains hurt her in the opening lines of “Liability,” the singer is really addressing everyone who has been with her throughout her fame: those who have “danc[ed] in [her] storm” — the storm being her new life as a celebrity. Despite the obvious heartache the singer has endured, there is a brief empowering moment where it is understood that the only person she has to rely on is herself.

“So I guess I’ll go home/ into the arms of the girl that I love,” she sings. In perhaps the most relatable part of the song, Lorde speaks about herself in the third person: “She’s so hard to please/But she’s a forest fire.” Despite its implication of alienation, it’s one of the most comforting lines of the song. There is a certain warmth in knowing the 20-year-old finds contentment in herself, and this serves as a model for those listening. Famous or not, sometimes “you” are the only one you have, and that is okay. Lorde’s complete honesty and acceptance of her alienation as a celebrity shines through her unusual falsetto. “I understand I’m a liability… I’m a little much for everyone,” she sings. Instead of coming across as dejected and isolated, the singer possesses a confidence in her words and a hint of belief in herself, making the track a possible anthem of

self-love despite its heavy subject matter. That being said, the most heart-wrenching part of the song closely follows: “The truth is/I am a toy that people enjoy/’Till all of the tricks don’t work anymore/ And then they are bored of me.” Again, the singer turns it around and finds hope in herself, singing she’s “better on [her] own.” The only thing that the song is missing — and it is not necessarily a bad thing — is the dark, sultry tone that Pure Heroine introduced us to. “Liability” does not need this, though. There is something about the simple

piano gently playing behind Lorde’s soft voice that pulls the song together. Taking a break from her smoky sound and allowing her vocals to steal the show is exactly what makes this song sound so vulnerable and personal. Although there’s still a few months left before the album’s release, Lorde has left us with plenty to sit with until then. MOVE gives “Liability” 4 out of 5 stars. PHOTOS COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | MARCH 15, 2017 G#’S MUSICAL RADAR

How the science behind musical preference works With the help of an expert, columnist Grant Sharples explores the complexity of personal taste in music. GRANT SHARPLES MOVE Columnist

Grant Sharples is a sophomore journalism major who writes about music for MOVE Magazine.

There’s no doubt in my mind about my love for Bon Iver. There’s also no doubt in my mind that I loathe Meghan Trainor’s music, but why is that so? Why are there artists whose music I find amazing, and also music I despise with a burning passion? Simply put, everyone has different opinions as to what constitutes “good” and “bad” music. The complex part is understanding how and when these personal opinions are formed. These musical perspectives begin to form in our youth, when everything in the world is new to us and we are learning how everything works. In this stage of immense learning, we are also subconsciously discovering what music is and what it sounds like. If one of our parents happens to be listening to Bloc Party around us

as a child, we will develop a general thought about what we’re hearing. We will think to ourselves, “Bloc Party = music.” Todd Schachtman, an MU psychology professor, says that this may be due to a process called “imprinting.” Learning during imprinting, a stage of learning during a certain window of development, is very powerful and quick. “It might be true that exposure to many different types of music when one is young can increase the range of types of music that one appreciates in adulthood,” Schachtman said. Schachtman also said that parents can influence their child’s musical appreciation. He said parents can “model” the enjoyment of music as a whole. “If kids see their parents preferring to enjoy music — going to concerts, listening to music while sitting in their car — rather than doing other things, it can influence how much they think listening to music is a valuable activity,” Schachtman said. According to a 2013 NPR article, a study found that “young adults have strong positive memories of the music their parents loved when they were the same age.” This reveals that the connection between our parents’ tastes and our own is positive. This is something I experienced as a child. I’m undeniably a huge fan of genres such as indie rock and alternative, and I believe this is

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largely due to the fact that my mom introduced this genre to me at a very young age. She was constantly playing bands like The Cure, Yeah Yeah Yeahs and The Killers in the car. When I was subconsciously discovering what music was, this is what I consistently heard. This environment cultivated my proclivity for indie rock and alternative music. Additionally, my dad would play bands such as Death Cab For Cutie and The Postal Service in the car, unknowingly turning me into a massive fan of Ben Gibbard’s music. After our childhood, when we have developed a taste for a certain kind of music, we begin to seek it out in our adolescence and formative years. We have been led in a specific direction, but now we may run into other genres and subgenres that don’t feel quite as familiar. Sometimes, we strike gold and make great discoveries. Friends and acquaintances also greatly factor into this, but it’s much more common in teenage years and adolescence, as discussed in a 2014 article in The Modern Ape. As an example, one of my friends told me about a band called Car Seat Headrest. If he had never suggested the band to me, I might have never found out about them. A 2014 article in Elite Daily says that our musical tastes reach an “adult-like completion” when we’re 14. Basically, whatever we

are listening to at the time of our freshman year of high school is likely to be the kind of music we will be listening to for a long time. This development of musical preference is representative of how we develop as human beings. As we mature and grow, we gain a deeper insight of the world we live in, as well as our place in it. Through this process of self-discovery, our outlook on music changes as well. Each stage of our youth marks a different musical time. For example, in middle school, I had my “poppunk/emo phase,” complete with Hurley shirts, Blink-182 music and a Warped Tour concert tee. My best friend at the time showed me a lot of Blink-182’s music, and I took it upon myself to discover more of that genre. As I aged, my tastes surely matured, lending to the notion that each stage of life opens us up to musical exploration and evolution. There are numerous factors that play into our musical preferences, and those I explore here don’t even begin to scrape the surface. The amazing part of it, though, is that our musical expansion parallels the other evolutions we experience as humans. Some music will stick with us through adulthood, and some will only be there in the eighth grade. But as we go through each stage of life, our music is there developing alongside us.

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OPINION

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

We want to hear your voice.

Submit a letter to the editor by emailing letters@themaneater.com.

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THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED BY THE MANEATER COLUMNISTS DO NOT REPRESENT THE OPINIONS OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

HERE’S A WHO

You can give relationship advice even if you haven’t been in a relationship KENNEDY HORTON Opinion Columnist

Kennedy Horton is a sophomore studying English. She writes about student life and social justice for The Maneater. I’ve heard this before, nearly verbatim: “You can’t give relationship advice if you haven’t been in a relationship.” The comment may have been preceded by an “I feel like” to lessen the blow of such an obtuse statement. Either way, the idea is expressed that if you have not been in a relationship, you cannot give sound relationship advice. I would just like to, as nicely as possible, call BS on that. First, “relationship” is often meant to imply a romantic relationship, also known as the end-all, be-all, holy grail, Arthur’s sword, philosopher’s stone of relationships. The idea that a lack of that specific relationship prevents you from a thorough assessment of one is foolish. Even

if you’ve never been in a romantic relationship, most of us have bonds that are intimate in their own respects. A relationship is simply an agreement requiring at least two of the following: love, mutual respect and common goals. Sex and romance can be a part of some relationships, but they’re optional. Everyone has been in a relationship. The relationship between you and a parent, for example, requires all three of the aforementioned requirements. They love you; you love them. You both want the best for each other. You don’t curse them out; they don’t kick you out of their house. It’s a no-brainer. A relationship that doesn’t have love can almost be easier and less complicated, like the relationship between you and a co-worker. Take boring Brian who sits in the adjacent cubicle, for example. You don’t know him, you don’t really want to know him, and yet you two are in a relationship. There’s no love. You both want to coexist in a nonhostile work environment. And you respect him enough to not let him overhear

you telling anyone how boring he is. See? It’s not rocket science. Sure, there is something to be said for experience, but many people value and request objective opinions. As a person who has never been in a serious romantic relationship, I am often the go-to person when my friends have questions, comments and concerns about their current or potential romantic situations. Sometimes we just like to vent to

JUST BECAUSE I DON’T HAVE FIRSTHAND KNOWLEDGE DOESN’T MEAN I DON’T HAVE ANY KNOWLEDGE. I DON’T NEED TO BE STABBED TO KNOW IT HURTS OR TO KNOW IT KILLS.

someone on the outside. People often value an impartial perspective. And people in romantic situations can often be blinded by their own emotions. An objective viewer can see things someone on the inside may not be able to. Someone may not feel what you feel, but you may not see what they see. The saying goes, “Experience is the hardest teacher,” but it’s not the only one. My romantic info comes from four main places: the experiences of my friends, lessons from my parents, lessons from the Bible and good old common sense. Just because I don’t have firsthand knowledge doesn’t mean I don’t have any knowledge. I don’t need to be stabbed to know it hurts or to know it kills. Some things are majorly obvious. I’m not saying don’t seek out the best advice for your specific situation; I’m just recommending not being so quick to write off someone’s advice for the wrong reasons. Don’t let anybody, whether they’re your friend or not, devalue or invalidate your opinions or advice due to a lack of experience.

THE TRUTH HUNTER

Nintendo Switch won’t thrive without third-party support Nintendo cannot expect to sell a successful console solely off of first-party and minor third-party games, regardless of how good they are. HUNTER GILBERT Opinion Columnist

Hunter Gilbert is a freshman who writes about law and tech for The Maneater.

Nintendo is an iconic company that helped make video games relevant again after the Atari 2600 and the video game crash of 1983. However, Nintendo has arguably shot itself in the foot again with the release of the Nintendo Switch. It goes without saying that I love Nintendo. My earliest memory of playing and beating a “difficult” game was on the Gamecube: “Metal Gear Solid: The Twin Snakes.” First-party Nintendo intellectual properties such as “Mario,” “Zelda” and “Metroid” are all phenomenal franchises that have had tremendous

impacts on multiple generations. But in a modern gaming environment, one in which games take far longer to make, Nintendo cannot afford to bank on selling a console driven solely by gimmicks and first-party exclusives such as “Zelda.” The Wii was a one-trick pony, a fad that raked in ludicrous amounts of money for Nintendo. Nintendo attempted to tap this market again with the WiiU, which was Nintendo's worst-selling home console. It had plenty of fantastic games, such as “Mario Kart 8,” “Super Mario Maker” and “Super Smash Bros,” but that wasn’t enough to drive sales. Gamers want to play more than Nintendo games for the most part, so why on earth would they buy a console that doesn’t offer best-selling games such as “Call of Duty,” “Battlefield” or “Destiny”? Third-party games drive sales. There is a reason why you may see an Xbox One bundled with “Madden” or a PlayStation 4 bundled with “Call of Duty.” Exclusive games to specific consoles are great; I enjoy ones put out by both Microsoft for the Xbox One and Sony for the PlayStation 4. Sony has released an unprecedented amount of exclusives this year. But at the end of the day, core gamers’ bread and butter are third-party titles. The PlayStation 4

Nintendo’s new gaming console, the Nintendo Switch. COURTESY OF BAGOGAMES FLICKR

didn’t surpass 53 million sales solely off exclusives like “Uncharted 4,” “Bloodborne” and “The Last of Us: Remastered.” The Xbox One didn’t reach 26 million in sales of “Halo 5,” “Forza Horizon 3” and “Gears of War 4” alone, either. You may be thinking, “Well, why doesn’t Nintendo try to get thirdparty games on the Switch?” The simple answer to that is they can’t. The Nintendo Switch isn’t powerful enough to run a game like “Fallout” or “Call of Duty” like the PS4 or Xbox One. It can run “Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim,” which is a third-party game, but it is dated since it was released in 2011. Simply put, Nintendo needed

to make a more powerful console, one that can actually play major third-party titles in order to give the buyer a reason to justify buying the damn thing besides “Mario” and “Zelda” games. Obviously, hardcore Nintendo fans will buy this console regardless. The market that Nintendo should be setting their sights on is the gamers who either don’t have a PS4 or Xbox One, but at the moment the Switch lacks the software options that would interest the majority of these prospective consumers. The Nintendo Switch shouldn’t be a toy or a console that you pull out to play only three times a year. Nintendo needs to just make normal consoles again.


SPORTS

Online this week: Continuing coverage of NCAA Women’s Basketball Tournament, NCAA wrestling, and the tennis match at Mississippi State.

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Missouri women’s basketball huddles after a home game against Ole Miss. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL

Missouri earns No. 6 seed in NCAA Tournament This is Missouri’s first back-to-back NCAA Tournament berth since the 1985 and 1986 seasons. LANGSTON NEWSOME Staff Writer

No. 25 Missouri women’s basketball (21-10) celebrated backto-back NCAA women’s tournament berths Monday as the Tigers were selected as No. 6 seed in the Stockton

region. Mizzou’s first-round matchup is Friday against No. 11 seed South Florida (24-8) in Tallahassee, Florida. The game will air live on ESPN2 at 4 p.m. The Stockton region’s No. 1 seed is Southeastern Conference champion South Carolina (27-4), which Mizzou beat 62-60 at home earlier this year, followed by Oregon State (29-4) and Florida State (25-6) to round out the top three seeds. Mizzou is playing in the Tallahassee subregional, which also includes

Miami, Creighton and Western Illinois. The 11th seed is viewed as low for USF, as the Bulls finished 24-5, excluding three games against No. 1 Connecticut. USF was defeated 10044 by Connecticut in the American Athletic Conference championship game. To stop the Bulls, Mizzou needs to key in defensively on sophomore Kitija Laksa and junior Maria Jespersen. Laksa averages 19.2 points per game on 40.5 percent shooting from the

field and 39.1 percent shooting from deep. Jespersen averaged 14.8 points per game on 41.3 percent shooting from the field. Their performances landed them both on the AllConference First Team, and Jespersen also received the conference’s Most Improved Player of the Year award. If Mizzou defeats USF, it would take on the winner of No. 3 seed Florida State and No. 14 seed Western Illinois on Sunday. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

COLUMN

For hope for Mizzou men’s basketball, look to Minnesota turnaround Minnesota went from a team with an 8-23 record in the regular season last year to a No. 5 seed in the NCAA Tournament this season. Do they have a template that Missouri can use moving forward? NICK KELLY

Sports Columnist Nick Kelly writes about Missouri sports for The Maneater.

The time has begun for fans to place their bets on which horse they think can win the race affectionately known as March Madness. Is your money on North Carolina? Or did you pick its neighbor in Durham to hoist the trophy instead?

Perhaps you want to deviate from the conventional path and pick a No. 3 seed such as Oregon. No matter who you picked, I can say one thing with the utmost confidence about your bracket: The Missouri men’s basketball team is not that team. After an 8-24 campaign, the Tigers will watch the NCAA Tournament from home for the fourth consecutive year. Many Missouri students will also be watching March Madness wondering if they will see the Tigers in the tournament before they are sending their kids to college.

Fear not, Missouri fans. A program can be turned around in one season. Just ask your fellow midwesterners up in the North Pole … I mean, Minnesota. At this time last year, Minnesota was filled with a lot of snow and little hope for the Gophers men’s basketball team. Minnesota finished 8-23 in 201516, but the team had issues off the court, too. Minnesota suspended three Gophers for the last four games of the season for their connection to an explicit video posted on social media.

Another player, Reggie Lynch, was arrested in May on suspicion of sexual assault. He was not charged, however. The Gophers’ culture served as a repellant for talented in-state recruits. No 2017 prospects from Minnesota chose to play for the Gophers. One of those players, Nathan Reuvers, said he didn’t think he would “be good in that culture.” He instead committed to Wisconsin. Now a year later, Minnesota has made it through the season without

HOPE | Page 13


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | MARCH 15, 2017

Mixed results define early season for Mizzou softball Despite powerful hitting and standout pitching, the Tigers’ record has not reflected their play. story by HANNAH HOFFMEISTER photo by JULIA HANSEN

W

hen asked about the Missouri softball team’s season so far, ace righthanded pitcher Madi Norman’s answers have a recurring theme: focus. “I think focus would be the main thing that we need to carry through the season,” the redshirt sophomore said. Last season, the Tigers went 42-16. In 2017, the team lost three of its best hitters and the ace of its pitching staff in Paige Lowary. They also added 10 new players, including seven freshmen. After playing their first series of Southeastern Conference play against No. 1 Florida last weekend, the Tigers now sport a record of 11-10 on the season. “We’re young, and we really just have a lot to learn, so at the beginning of the year, we had to find [ourselves] as a team and find our identity,” freshman shortstop Braxton Burnside said. “I think in the past couple weekends we’ve definitely found that, which has allowed us to get more wins. And I think that will only help us down the road.” AT THE PLATE Burnside, a native of Paragould, Arkansas, is off to a quick start this season with 21 hits, seven doubles, six home runs and 19 RBIs. She leads the team in all four categories. “Obviously, no one expects to come in here and do great right off the bat, but so far it’s been pretty good,” Burnside said. “Coming in and playing at the SEC level is completely different, but I was definitely up for the challenge, so it’s been exciting.” As a freshman, Burnside said that her favorite part of playing college softball so far is the challenge. “Every single day at practice, and every single game that we’ve played up to now, has been a learning experience for me,” she said. “And I think just soaking that all in, so I can add on to that for the next three years here, has been pretty awesome.” Offensively, the Tigers have produced runs with exceptional extra-base power, thanks in part to a few veteran pillars in the lineup. The team currently has 62 extra-base hits, slightly fewer than half of last year’s total, even though the team is just a third of the way into the

Sophomore first baseman Rylee Pierce holds a tag on Oregon’s baserunner but receives a safe call from the umpire. JULIA HANSEN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

season. Burnside leads the team with a .318 average and is followed closely by three veteran players. Senior Chloe Rathburn and sophomore Rylee Pierce are both hitting .317, and junior Amanda Sanchez is not far behind with a .313 average. Both Burnside and Pierce have started every game this season, as has senior Kirsten Mack. “[Sanchez] could fall out of bed hitting; it’s just what she does, so we come to expect it and sometimes take it for granted, but she’s as good a hitter as there is in the country,” coach Ehren Earleywine said after the team’s first home tournament, in which Sanchez had 10 hits over six games. Although five players have batting averages above .300, scoring has been hit or miss for the Tigers. In its 11 wins, the team has outscored its opponents 73-26, shutting out opposing teams on five occasions. In the 10 losses, the Tigers have scored 41 fewer runs than their opponents. This is where Norman’s theory about focus comes in. “We’ve all got different areas we need to improve on, so I think mainly just focus and commitment to every play and every pitch, and really just understanding that every play and pitch is crucial and is a game changer ... I think that’s going to take us a long way,” Norman said. ON THE BUMP Norman, also new to Missouri this year, is a redshirt sophomore. She came to Mizzou after making two starts last season at Louisville due to an injury from her freshman season. She has a 6-4 record after 15 appearances, including 10 starts. Her biggest win came against No. 7 Washington on Feb. 24, when she pitched a complete-game shutout with 10 strikeouts in the team’s 9-5 win. She struggled against No. 1 Florida this past weekend, letting up six earned runs in a rough start. “I’ve had ups and downs, which is probably normal for someone who just took a redshirt, but I feel like I’m very in control, and I can control big teams,” Norman said. “But just really staying focused is just what’s going to be really crucial for me in the upcoming games.” Senior Cheyenne Baxter has also been a steady starter for the Tigers with 38 strikeouts in 41 1/3 innings

this season. Sophomore Danielle Baumgartner tossed her first college no-hitter and the university’s first no-hitter since 2013 against Butler on March 5. The fourth and final member of the pitching staff, Parker Conrad, has thrown eight innings so far in her freshman season. Conrad has not pitched since Feb. 17. “I think we’re doing a really good job of managing our pitchers … we’re pitching smarter, we’re pitching people in the right situations, so I think that’s awesome,” Norman said. “Our pitching staff really gets along great, which is something really cool to be a part of. You don’t find that on a lot of pitching staffs, which is part of what I think makes us really effective.” The long season could prove to be a factor in the pitching staff’s effectiveness. With 34 games still to go, Baxter has already pitched more this season than she did last season. Norman has also pitched more this season than she has in any collegiate season. DISTRACTIONS The beginning of the season has come with some distractions. The team unveiled its new stadium, Mizzou Stadium, in time for the home tournament last weekend. “Probably one of the coolest atmospheres I’ve ever had the privilege of playing in,” Norman said. “Friday night in the stadium opener, I kind of got a little bit caught up in all the people and the glitz of the stadium.” Mizzou went 3-3 in the tournament, including a 9-8 loss in nine innings to Maryland after entering the seventh inning with a 7-1 lead. “I’d give them about a C-minus,” Earleywine said after the tournament. “We have to beat Maryland. You have to be 4-2 this weekend, period. You hope that you can squeak one out from Oregon and be 5-1, but to be 3-3 is just unacceptable. So, C-minus, but I will say this: We seem to be making incremental, small baby steps of making improvements. And if you put four or five little things together, you can change the entire softball game. And we will.” Distractions consumed part of last season when it was announced that Earleywine was under investigation by the athletics department and the Office for Civil Rights and Title IX. The investigation concluded in

August when interim Chancellor Hank Foley released a statement that said, “It was determined that there was no violation of our nondiscrimination policies.” With the investigation concluded and new players on the squad, it seems that last season’s drama has passed. Earleywine is in his 11th season coaching at Mizzou. “He’s probably one of my favorite coaches I’ve ever had,” Norman said. “He’s very straightforward, and he tells you what you need to work on. He’s one of the most brilliant people in the game of softball that I’ve ever met, so it’s awesome to come into a program and have total confidence in your coach.” Earleywine was impressed by the new stadium and felt that the atmosphere would only improve as the team’s record does. “These stands will be completely full when we get back to our real winning ways, which we will. I don’t know when that’s going to be … but it will be in the very near future,” he said after the tournament. MOVING FORWARD The team has a solid pitching staff, new hitters and a passionate head coach. The key for the rest of the season will be pulling everything together to make a cohesive team. “We obviously haven’t had the outcomes that we were looking for — that everyone was looking for — but I think the process has been really good,” Burnside said. The team struggled against No. 1 Florida this past weekend in a series that was cut short because of inclement weather. Norman struggled in the game Saturday, letting up six runs and four walks. Sunday’s game, a pitcher’s duel, was much closer. Baxter pitched a complete game, letting up the solo run of the game in the first inning and holding the Gators to five hits. “I felt comfortable all night long, and I was really able to get into a groove after that first inning,” Baxter said after the game in a press release. “Coach [Adam] LaLonde and Kirsten [Mack] did a great job with our pitching game plan tonight and we did a good job executing.” The team plays next on March 15 at home against Iowa in a doubleheader starting at 3 p.m. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com


13

THE MANEATER | SPORTS | MARCH 15, 2017

Softball shut out in consecutive games against No. 1 Florida The Tigers were outscored 7-0 over the two-game series. JUSTIN BJORSETH Reporter

No. 24 Missouri softball headed south March 11-12 to open up conference play in Gainesville, Florida, against the No. 1 Florida Gators. Missouri had a rough go of things over the two games, failing to put a runner across home plate in either one of the outings. The Tigers dropped the Saturday contest 6-0 and wasted a stellar start from senior Cheyenne Baxter

command on the day, and the Gators made Norman pay for giving them free baserunners. The lone bright spot for Mizzou on Saturday came from sophomore Danielle Baumgartner, who relieved Norman on the mound and would keep Florida from scoring for the remaining 2.2 innings, allowing just one hit over that time. The offense remained silent on Sunday, and the Tigers lost 1-0. The loss brought the Tigers’ record on the season to 11-10, hovering far closer to .500 than many would have anticipated coming into the season. Missouri followed its one-

hit performance on offense Saturday with a three-hit day on Sunday. It was the second time in as many days that the opposing starter would go the distance and have a strikeout total in the double digits (12). Shutouts seem to be a pattern for the Tigers, who have now been held scoreless in eight of their 10 losses this season. The Tigers allowed their only run of the day in the first inning, which allowed them to remain within striking distance at each at-bat. But despite the opportunity, they were unable to get any runs on the board. The Tigers are still in search of a true leader

on offense to break through in big situations. Baxter’s dominance on the mound was the lone positive on the day. She now has a team-leading 2.71 ERA and has allowed one run or fewer in five of her past six outings. The final game of the series was postponed on Monday due to inclement weather. The game will not be rescheduled. The Tigers will look to rebound this Wednesday when they return home to take on the Iowa Hawkeyes in a double header at Mizzou Stadium. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

record next season and return to the NCAA Tournament? It won’t be easy, but the Gophers show it can be done. Understand, though, that the circumstances at Missouri are different than what they were at Minnesota. A culture issue did not plague the Tigers this season; they just struggled to win. Minnesota also had experienced more recent success. The Gophers finished

with winning records the two seasons prior to 2015-16 and won the NIT championship under coach Richard Pitino in 2014. He was also coming back for a third season in 2016-17. Missouri will have a new head coach next season after three consecutive losing seasons. So, what changed for Minnesota? The Gophers added young talent in the form of in-state recruits,

which they combined with hard work during the offseason. “We did it the oldfashioned way,” Pitino said after a win over Arkansas State in December. “We took our lumps in the offseason, which we deserve. We just sat there and listened to [the criticism], and we worked.” Missouri players and their next leader might want to take note. What worked for

Minnesota won’t necessarily work for the Tigers, but it’s not a bad place to start. Don’t expect that same turnaround in the first year of the new coach’s regime. There’s a reason Pitino won Big Ten Coach of the Year this season, after all. But take comfort in the fact that a complete turnaround is possible.

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issues off the court, and its losing ways are no more. The Gophers flipped their record in 2016-17, finishing 23-8 in the regular season, and received a No. 5 seed in the NCAA tournament. Can Missouri flip its 8-24

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NCAA WRESTLING CHAMPS

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when they were defeated 1-0 on Sunday. The offensive struggles were apparent on Saturday, as the Tigers had just three baserunners all afternoon and did not tally a hit until the final inning of play. Florida’s starting pitcher Delanie Gourley went the distance and picked up 10 strikeouts against the slumping Mizzou offense. Despite keeping Florida off the board for the first two innings of play, redshirt sophomore Madi Norman would last just 3.1 innings. She allowed eight hits, four walks and six earned runs. She did not have her full

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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | MARCH 15, 2017

THE MAKING OF A CHAMPION:

Schweizer wins second NCAA title story by MATTHEW HOSLER • MANEATER FILE PHOTO

Junior Karissa Schweizer is the first female twotime national champion and the first female multisport national champion in Mizzou Athletics history. Only a few laps remained in the 5K at the NCAA Indoor Track and Field Championships, and Missouri junior Karissa Schweizer was settled in third place behind Notre Dame’s Anna Rohrer and Michigan’s Erin Finn. The trio had been battling it out all race, and no one seemed to have the advantage. With 400 meters left, Schweizer left the rest of the field behind to capture her second national title in 15:19.14. The 5K win made Schweizer the first female two-time national champion and the first female multisport national champion in Mizzou Athletics history. With less than half a mile to go in the NCAA Cross Country National Championships on Nov. 19, Schweizer was in a battle for third. Analysts at Flotrack.org had predicted she wouldn’t even finish in the top five. As she battled for third in a hard-fought race, she decided to throw one last gear change in. She pushed past everyone else, including Finn and Rohrer, to capture her very first national championship. Heading into the 2017 championships, Schweizer was

ranked fourth in the 5K with a personal best of 15:37.4 and 11th in the 3K with a personal best of 9:06.6. She was almost able to capitalize in the 3K and win a third title, but she fell just short to finish in second place. She left the meet with a personal best in the 5K and her second national title. Schweizer made the race seem effortless, but there were weeks of preparation that led to her historic victory. THE DECISION Heading into the championships, Schweizer was a qualifier in three events — the mile, 3K and 5K — so she had to decide which races she wanted to run in. While Schweizer ran the mile and 3K during the SEC Championships and won gold in both, it was never in the plan for her to run the mile at the nationals, assistant coach Marc Burns said. “It was an easy decision,” Burns said. “It is just scheduling. She honestly has a mix in all three races, but she truly has a chance in both [the 5K and 3K]. It has been a while since the 5K, though.” While the decision was made by the coaching staff, the staff does talk to the athletes about the races they would like to run, especially with races of this magnitude. “I had a pretty big role in the decision,” Schweizer said. “They let me just do the mile and 3K at SECs, so they asked me what I wanted, and it was an easy decision.”

THE PLAN Burns describes Schweizer’s kick at the end of a race as one of the best in the country. It is what won her both national championships and almost a third one in the 3K. “We want her to be comfortable early on, close to the leader, but not leading,” Burns said. “She has to save all the emotional power for the second half of the race, save it for the last 600, 400. It is not win or go home. She is capable of winning, but she kind of has to run a perfect race. It depends if she is feeling good that day or not.” Schweizer’s impeccable drive led to the plan for the 5K. All she had to do, Burns said, was just sit with the lead pack and kick. Her goal was to just race and be a competitor, Schweizer and Burns said. She executed as planned, as she was within a second of the leaders through 4600 meters. Then, she jumped ahead and finished the last 400 meters in 65 seconds, beating the next finisher by eight seconds. “What is exciting about these races is it is just about being able to race,” Burns said. “Nothing else matters. Time means nothing. She can race with anyone in the country. She has the best kick in the field; she outkicked a 2:08 800-meter runner the other week. She is a competitor. I describe it as a chess match; just get her in the right place and right time and give her a chance to win.” If a race is a chess match, it seems that Schweizer has the complete

flexibility of a queen. She has the endurance to run with any distance, the strength to compete with any runner and is ready for anything. “I try to really focus on the race aspect,” Schweizer said. “I will respond to any starting pace. If it comes out fast or slow, I am ready to go with anything and compete. I will make a move around 600 or whenever I feel good.” Before races, there is not much talking between Schweizer and Burns. Schweizer prefers not to talk about race plans and just set in mentally. Burns has praised Schweizer’s poise before and during races. THE TRAINING After the two victories at SEC Championships, Karissa knew she had two weeks to prepare for the NCAA Championships. She and the team spent Feb. 26, the Sunday following the SEC Championships, traveling back to Columbia, giving her an unusual off day off. Schweizer usually likes to just relax and catch up on her studies on off days, Burns said. On Monday, the training began. During the season, Schweizer only ran one 5K on Dec. 3 at the Boston University season opener. The plan was to get Schweizer to run more miles and 3Ks throughout the season to make the 5K easier for her when it came time for her to run it on the national stage, Burns said. He wanted Schweizer to get the idea that running a fast 5K would seem so much slower and make the race


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | MARCH 15, 2017 come smoother to her. Two weeks ahead of the National Championships, both Schweizer and Burns knew what type of workouts she needed to get ready. “She had not run a 5K in a while, so I knew I wanted to start with a 5K-specific workout to start training,” Burns said. “Then, I wanted to do something faster. The next week, I wanted something light then just to recover.” As evidenced by her national championship in cross-country, Schweizer is a skilled long distance runner, as she won 6K at nationals. In comparison, training for the 5K race is not much different, but there are some key distinctions between the two regimens. “We usually get on grass more during cross country season,” Burns said. “There is a lot of carryover from one to the other. We like to put more emphasis on changing gears [during track season]. You run up against more track-orientated people during track. It changes the dynamic. That is why we like to spend the early years of careers and have them run shorter distance to give them the keys to win a national title.” Schweizer took those keys and drove away with her two national titles. Schweizer is often found training on her own, though she does like to run with sophomore Jamie Kempfer for longer workouts. When it comes to track workouts, she is either on her own or paired with a younger member of the men’s team to help her through her workouts. The team will usually have a redshirt member of the men’s team help pace her during workouts, Burns said. “There is nothing harder than doing a track workout on your own,” Burns said. “It helps you with rhythm, toughness. There is a huge benefit from it.” To recover, one thing Schweizer

Karissa Schweizer (9) COURTESY OF MIZZOU ATHLETICS

specifically mentioned she loves to do is the AlterG treadmill. An AlterG machine is an antigravity machine that takes away part of Schweizer’s body weight to let her run lighter and have less wear on her body. The runner is locked inside a type of chamber from the waist down and can run on 20 to 100 percent of their normal body weight. It is a relatively new technology, but it has become a necessity for some athletes in order to recover faster. Burns said Schweizer usually runs between 85 to 90 percent of her body weight when she uses the machine. The machine prevents the body from fully pounding on the ground to stop the wear it can have on the body. AlterG is often used to rehabilitate injured patients and athletes. Schweizer tries to get a workout in on the AlterG once a week, and Burns said she has her own personal one in the track and field offices. “We got her own AlterG last year,” Burns said. “The women’s team likes to use it a lot. She has always been really healthy her entire career. [The

use of AlterG] adds up over the season’s wear and tear. Doing this lets her run fast when she needs to.” While Schweizer’s training never changes significantly at any point in the season, her training is altered depending on whether she is running just one race or if she is running two or three. Heading into nationals, Burns knew she had never ran a 5K and 3K double this season but was confident in her ability to compete in both. “She has a unique ability to recover,” Burns said. “She does not do a lot of back-to-back workouts that we like to do to prepare athletes for doubles. She just recovers fast. She did just as well day one of the SEC Championships than she did day two. THE EXECUTION The plan for Schweizer was set; she knew what she had to do entering Friday’s race. It was a relatively simple plan and, in theory, seemed like an easy one to execute. All she had to do was be there in the end, and it was hers to lose.

She came out in the middle of the pack, a few seconds off of the leaders. Rohrer came out fast, leading the pack in the first 400 meters with a 72-second 400. Schweizer was not too far off with a 74. She kept this distance through 800 meters with a 2:28.09 split. It seemed as though Rohrer and Finn wanted this race to come out fast, as they both ran a 2:26 split through a half-mile. At the 1,600-meter mark, the leaders began to separate themselves from the pack, and only a few competitors seemed to have a chance to win. Schweizer and another runner were two seconds off of Rohrer and Finn, as they came through 1,600 with a 4:53 to Schweizer’s 4:55. Schweizer had caught up 400 meters later at the 2,000-meter mark with a time of 6:07, and the top three were all lined up with each other. Rohrer, Finn and Schweizer were still on one another’s shoulders preparing for the final push with them all hitting 12:20 for the 4,000meter mark. Just as Burns had planned, Schweizer thrust it into gear with 400 meters remaining. She dropped a 33-second first 200, then a 32-second last 200 to capture the 5K title. Now, Schweizer will look to put in a strong three weeks of training as she prepares to add to her trophy case later this spring when outdoor season hits. Regardless of the sport or season, Schweizer heads into her races appreciating the fact that she is competing at this level. “I am really just happy to be here,” Schweizer said. “I want to go out there and see where I place. I want to walk off the track and feel I did my best.” Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

THE WINNING WORKOUT OF KARISSA SCHWEIZER

(8 MILES) (11 MILES)

(12-14 MILES)

, (9 MILES)

- lE -

OUT

COMPILED BY MATTHEW HOSLER // GRAPHIC BY BECCA WILKES


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