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WEEKLY WEATHER

THE MANEATER

FEB. 15, 2017 • THEMANEATER.COM

WEDNESDAY

FRIDAY

47/34

69/46

THURSDAY

SATURDAY

63/43

68/46

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MISSOURI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION

Missouri Students Association

2017 Presidential Elections

Campaigning begins

From left to right: Shruti Gulati and Josh Stockton, Tori Schafer and Riley de Leon, Nathan Willett and Payton Englert. PHOTOS COURTESY OF CAMPAIGNS

Three slates begin MSA presidential campaigns

FEBRUARY 13 MISSOURI MissouriSTUDENTS StudentsASSOCIATION Association

EMILY GALLION

First Presidential Debate Second Presidential debate

News Director

The MSA Board of Elections Commissioners announced three president and vice president slates, Tori Schafer/Riley de Leon, Nathan Willett/Payton Englert and Josh Stockton/Shruti Gulati, on Monday morning. Schafer/de Leon have given their campaign the slogan “Make It Matter, Mizzou.” Schafer, a junior studying political science and journalism, is the current Missouri Students Association vice president. She is a regional adviser for the national It’s On Us campaign. De Leon, a junior studying journalism, is currently the social media and technologies coordinator at the Department

of Student Communications. He got involved with MSA his sophomore year. The Willett/Englert slate is running under the slogan “Tigers Together.” Willett is an economics and business major who has served on Sigma Chi’s executive board and the RAMS steering committee as well as MSA Senate. Englert is a junior studying health sciences. Her past leadership includes the Greek Week steering committee, the Mizzou Wishmakers’ executive board, and MSA Senate. The Stockton/Gulati slate’s slogan is “It Starts With Us.” Stockton is a junior studying finance and was the first president of MU’s Delta Kappa

2017Presidential Presidential Elections 2017 Election First Presidential Debate

FEBRUARY 21

Campaigning begins

5 p.m. at Bengal Lair FEBRUARY 13 Hosted by The Maneater and Four Front Epsilon chapter. He has also been involved in Mizzou Alternative Breaks and the MSA Senate FEBRUARY 21 Budget Committee. 5 p.m. at Bengal Lair Gulati is a marketingFEBRUARY major, 27 Hosted by The Maneater and Four Front a facilitator at MU’s Professional 6 p.m. at The Shack Development Program Hosted and by a The Maneater and The Board of Elections Commissioners (BEC) student clerical assistant at the Engineering Library, according FEBRUARY 27 6 p.m. at The Shack to her Facebook page. Hosted by The Maneater and The Board of Elections Commissioners (BEC) Two debates are scheduled before the election. The first, 6 March hosted by The Maneater and Vote at vote.missouri.edu Four Front, will take place at 5 March 6 p.m. Tuesday in Bengal Lair. The Vote at vote.missouri.edu second, hosted by The Maneater and the BEC, will take place at 6 p.m. Feb. 27 in The Shack. March 8 Voting opens March 6 and closes Announcement follows MSA March 8 full Senate March 8. Announcement follows MSA full Senate COMPILED BY EMILY GALLION Edited by Katie Rosso COMPILED BY EMILY GALLION DESIGNED BY MATT MCMULLEN // ASSISTANT GRAPHIC DESIGN MANAGER DESIGNED BY MATT MCMULLENHANDBOOK, // ASSISTANT MANEATER GRAPHIC DESIGN MANAGER SOURCE: BOARD OF ELECTIONS COMMISSIONERS REPORTING krosso@themaneater.com SOURCE: BOARD OF ELECTIONS COMMISSIONERS HANDBOOK, MANEATER REPORTING

Second Presidential debate

Voting Begins at 6 p.m.

Voting Begins at 6 p.m.

Polls close at 6 p.m.

Polls close at 6 p.m.

COMMUNITY ACTIVISM

Planned Parenthood rally attracts hundreds outside local clinic Demonstrators filled the sidewalk on both sides of Providence Road on Saturday. SAM FORBES Reporter

Protesters gathered across the street from Columbia’s Planned Parenthood to advocate the defunding of Planned Parenthood by the government. BAILEY VALADEZ | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

An anti-Planned Parenthood rally outside the Columbia clinic drew hundreds of protesters and counterprotesters Saturday morning. The event, which was planned by anti-abortion groups 40 Days for Life and Team Play, was held in solidarity with over 225 similar protests nationwide. According to the #ProtestPP website, the purpose of these rallies is “to call on Congress and President [Donald]

Trump to strip Planned Parenthood of all federal funding and reallocate those funds to health centers that help disadvantaged women without destroying human life through abortion.” Kathy Forck, 40 Days for Life’s regional coordinator, led the demonstration, introducing pro-life speakers from across mid-Missouri and starting chants such as “You can now fund yourself!” and “What do we want? Defund! When do we want it? Now!” “I would not even take my dog into that place,” Forck said. “Planned Parenthood has to be cleaned up, and the first thing would be taking the money from them.”

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THE MANEATER | NEWS | FEB. 15, 2017

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STUDENT VOICE OF MU SINCE 1955

MSA DEBATE SEASON The Maneater/Four Front Debate

Feb. 21 5 p.m. Bengal Lair

$40

The Maneater/BEC Debate

Feb. 27 6 p.m. The Shack

THE MANEATER The Student Voice of MU since 1955

Vol. 83, Issue 19 (4UVEFOU$FOUFSt$PMVNCJB .0  QIPOF t GBY

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Twitter: @themaneater Instagram: @themaneater1955 facebook.com/themaneaterMU The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reproduced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. “What color do you think of when you think of BDSM?�

Reporters for The Maneater are required to offer verification of all quotes for each source. If you notice an inaccuracy in one of our stories, please contact us via phone or email. Editor-in-Chief Jared Kaufman

Graphics Manager Tori Aerni

Managing Editors George Roberson, Katie Rosso

Newsletter Manager Regina Anderson

News Director Emily Gallion Copy Chief Nancy Coleman Engagement Director Jake Chiarelli Online Development Editor Reiker Seiffe Sports Editor Eli Lederman News Editors Kyle LaHucik, Madi McVan MOVE Editors Victoria Cheyne, Bailey Sampson, Katherine White Opinion Editor Kasey Carlson Photo Editor Jessi Dodge

MOVE Social Media Manager Kaelyn Sturgell Sports Social Media Manager Titus Wu Assistant Production Manager Cassie Allen Deputy Copy Chiefs Anna Sirianni, Katherine Stevenson Copy Editors Nat Kaemmerer, Sam Nelson, David Reynolds, Libby Stanford, Jeremiah Wooten Assistant Online Editor Michael Smith Jr. Adviser Becky Diehl

Want to work with us? themaneater.com/workforus


NEWS

Online this Week: Follow-up on the lack of curators, a look into a growing internship scam on campus, and SEC swimming championships.

CHARTER SCHOOLS

MU-sponsored charter schools have mixed success by accreditation standards Missouri School Boards’ Association Deputy Executive Director Brent Ghan: “They’re using public money, but they’re not as accountable for that public money.” ZIA KELLY Reporter

Public charter schools have been an alternative for K-12 students in Kansas City and St. Louis since 2000, and as of a state policy change in 2012, the overwhelming majority of them are operated by highereducation institutions around the state — mostly by UM System schools. Although charter schools were set up in Missouri to give students in struggling public schools access to higher-quality education, the results of charter schools, including those run by MU, have been mixed. The MU Office of Charter School Operations currently sponsors six schools with a total of 10 locations in Kansas City and St. Louis. Gerry Kettenbach, the office’s director, said that because many students come to the university from these cities and then go work there after they graduate, the university has a stake in primary and secondary education in those areas. “Public charters are probably one of the bigger pieces of the school choice movement,” Kettenbach said. “What the school choice movement says is that for your tax dollars, you ought to have more than just the local school to go to, so charters were born.” Charter school sponsors like MU

Gerry Kettenbach, Director of Charter School Operations at MU COURTESY OF CHARTER OPERATIONS

do not put any funding toward the school, since charter schools receive all of their funding through the state like a traditional public school would. Charter schools, like public schools, receive state funding based on the number of students who attend the school. So when a student transfers from a public school to a charter school, they take the state funding with them. When the state routes funding to a charter school, a percentage goes to the sponsors of the schools to cover operational costs. Having an outside entity like a university oversee the performance of a school is what distinguishes a charter school from a traditional public school — and also what many critics of charter schools say is their fundamental flaw. Unlike typical

public schools, charter schools are not accredited by the state, which means they are not held accountable if they are not meeting state performance standards. “They’re using public money, but they’re not as accountable for that public money,” said Brent Ghan, the deputy executive director of the Missouri School Boards’ Association. School accreditation in Missouri is largely determined by an annual Academic Performance Report score, which is calculated by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. APR scores are based on factors such as test scores, attendance and graduation rates, among other things. If a public school does not receive at least 70 percent of the possible points on the report, it is considered unaccredited or provisionally accredited. Of the charter schools that MU sponsors, only four of the six would be considered fully accredited by public school standards, according to their 2016 APR scores. One, Ewing Marion Kauffman School, is among the highestperforming secondary schools in Kansas City and scored 100 percent of the possible points on the 2016 APR. But the five Confluence Academy campuses collectively received just above 50 percent of the possible points, which would deem them only provisionally accredited if they were held to public school standards. The average for St. Louis public schools and charters was 74.6 percent. Another MU charter in St. Louis, Carondelet Leadership Academy, also received an APR score that would deem it provisionally accredited.

Class | Page 5

ADVOCACY

Social Justice Symposium teaches advocacy and awareness Keynote speaker Marcia Chatelain: “We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.” MAGDALINE DUNCAN Staff Writer

About 120 participants gathered in the Student Center on Saturday for the free, day-long Social Justice Symposium designed around the three core aspects of social justice: advocacy, awareness and activism. The symposium, hosted by the Department of Residential Life and various offices and resource centers within the Department of Student Life, featured a keynote speaker, breakout sessions and small groups that participants returned to throughout the day for reflection. Keynote speaker Marcia Chatelain talked about taking action, and she

addressed current social justice movements such as Black Lives Matter and the Women’s March. Chatelain, an MU graduate, is an assistant professor of history and African American studies at Georgetown University. Chatelain encouraged participants to take part in activism any way they can, whether through social media or consumer boycotting. “We are seeing, every day, people who are saying, ‘I am no longer waiting for someone to rescue me from this,’ and, ‘I am no longer waiting to imagine myself as the perfect activist, as someone who gets all of the terms, as someone who is beyond critique, as someone who can learn nothing more and then I will act,’” Chatelain said. “Those thoughts are not helping us now. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.” Chatelain denounced the “special snowflake” label often placed on progressives.

“Being a progressive is about being called out, challenged, told to check your privilege, told to check yourself, ‘read this book and then come back to me,’” Chatelain said. “I don’t know what progressive spaces some other people are in, but that is some of the most challenging work to try to be consistent with your values and your action, to be inclusive in your organizing, to think about the ways you talk and the impact you’re having on people, this is the most challenging space.” One of the small group sessions featured an activity where participants were able to see which areas of their lives they were considered to have privilege. Participants colored in a privilege wheel to visualize in what areas they were privileged or marginalized and minoritized. This activity showcased the complexity

Aware | Page 5

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The Briefing EMILY GALLION News Director

Stockton/Gulati slate receives infraction on first day of campaigning

MSA presidential slate Josh Stockton/Shruti Gulati received an infraction from the Board of Elections Commissioners on Monday, the first day of campaigning, for distributing fliers on Lowry Mall. M-Book policy prohibits posting flyers or posters on the interior or exterior of university buildings as well as light posts, unless approved by Business Services. The BEC requires all slates to follow M-Book policies. The BEC also stated in a news release that it did not receive the appropriate form from the slate detailing planned posting locations, which was also considered a violation. This is the first infraction for the slate. They were issued a written warning. State lawmakers consider raising marriage age from 15 to 17 State Rep. Jean Evans, R-St. Louis, is sponsoring legislation to raise the age a child can marry with parental consent from 15 to 17, the age of consent in Missouri. Evans argues that children should not be married before they can consent to sex. She also said that requiring parental consent does not protect children from sex trafficking, as parents can sell their children. However, Fraidy Reiss, founder and executive director of Unchained At Last, told the Columbia Missourian that the age should be increased to 18 because minors often do not have the same access to legal representation or shelters as legal adults. Judge rules Columbia police violated law by recording phone call Circuit Judge Frederick Tucker stated Friday that the Columbia Police Department broke the law when an officer recorded a phone conversation between a defendant and his defense lawyer. Tucker said that CPD did not wiretap the phone of the defendant, Moniteau County’s prosecuting attorney Shayne Healea, but instead did not provide him a secure location to speak to his attorney, a violation of attorney-client privilege but not wiretapping. It is not clear how the recording was made.


THE MANEATER | NEWS | FEB. 15, 2017 4 What you need to know about 2017’s first Board of Curators meeting The board discussed recent budget cuts, funding, building projects, tuition and more. THE MANEATER STAFF The UM System Board of Curators held its first meeting of 2017 on Feb. 9 and 10 in Columbia. Here are the major takeaways from the meetings: Five vacant seats, no student representative There was no student representative at the meeting because Gov. Eric Greitens withdrew MU senior Patrick Graham, an unconfirmed appointee of former Gov. Jay Nixon, from the board last week. Six curators were present, but only four seats are currently filled of the ninemember board. Two curators, whose terms recently expired, still attended the meeting in order for the board to hold quorum. Room and board costs will increase for students across the UM System The board approved increases to room and board rates at all four universities in the UM System. The “predominant plan” for MU housing and dining will total $10,070 in fiscal year 2018, a 3.3 percent increase from fiscal year 2017. The lowest rate increase is 1.1 percent at University of MissouriSt. Louis, and the largest is 4.6 percent at Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla. Despite room and board rate increases, the board approved the elimination of

RALLY

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After an opening prayer, St. James resident Nancy Hall shared her story of having an abortion and later experiencing “a roller coaster of emotions.” Hall is the regional coordinator of “Silent No More,” an organization that says it helps women who regret their abortions. “The choice I made to take the life of my baby girl that day opened a door of guilt, shame and regret,” Hall said. “My hope today is that other women can realize that there is forgiveness, and there is healing for the choices they’ve made. As I continue my journey, I stand before you as a woman who, by the grace of God, is able to speak out against the lies of Satan.” Kristen Wood, an MU junior and president of

out-of-state tuition for Illinois undergraduate students at UMSL. New building for State Historical Society and expansion to MU teaching hospital Plans for a new Center for Missouri Studies building, which would house a gallery and administrative offices for the State Historical Society of Missouri, were also introduced. The society’s current location in the basement of Ellis Library, where it has been since the library’s opening in 1905, can only show less than 1 percent of what the society holds, according to previous Maneater reporting. The new location will be across from Peace Park and Lee Hills Hall. A project design for an MU Teaching Hospital West Wing expansion and renovation was also introduced. After lunch, the board discussed a proposed south end zone facility to be constructed at Memorial Stadium. The board approved the architecture firm Populous to design the $96.7 million project by a 5-1 vote.

list for their assistance. She stressed the importance of financial education when talking about benefits and retirement.

Benefits for the millennial generation, financial assistance Jill Pollock, interim vice president for human resources and chair of MU’s Total Rewards Advisory Committee, spoke about benefits and retirement. Pollock also talked about how volunteer finance students from the Office for Financial Success are helping individuals with their financial needs. Their help has been “enormously popular,” Pollock said, noting there is currently a waiting

Diversity, equity and inclusion amendments Title IX program consultant Emily Love talked about the proposed amendments to Combined Rules and Regulations from the systemwide diversity audit in April 2016. The changes included updating policy for consistency and clarity, expanding definitions of consent and incapacitation, expanding the role of the adviser and the inclusion of faculty members in hearing processes. The implementation of a systemwide preferred name policy for students and statements about nondiscrimination were also mentioned. These policy changes aim to protect students from issues of sexual harassment and discrimination, while also providing options for students in times of need. Love also presented an annual report on the MU’s Ethics and Compliance Hotline, which allows for students, faculty and staff to report transgressions anonymously. In 2016, there were 123 calls to the hotline, 112 initial reports and 11 information referrals. Allegations of discrimination and of inappropriate behavior each accounted for 17 of the initial reports. The efforts that have resulted from this audit were highly praised by curators and interim UM System President Mike Middleton; however, there was recognition that diversity and equity issues are not resolved. “This team has done a

Mizzou Students for Life, also spoke at the rally. She mentioned certain antiabortion initiatives her group is enacting, including a stand in the Student Center this past Wednesday which claimed that Planned Parenthood was unnecessary. “[Federally qualified health centers] require less taxpayer money, and therefore they can do so much more with our money than the billions of dollars that are donated to Planned Parenthood,” Wood said. This statement caused multiple counter-protesters to shout “Stop the lying!” from across the street, to which Wood replied by chanting “We are the pro-life generation!” While Forck and her organization planned the event, the crowd of counterprotesters was almost double their size. MU students, members of the LGBT community and others spanned the entire length of

the clinic and chanted “When health care is under attack, what do we do? Stand up, fight back,” and “Keep your rosaries off my ovaries.” Darla Horman, treasurer of the Columbia chapter of the National Organization for Women, attended the counter-protest along with many other NOW members. “I am here to support Planned Parenthood and to support a woman’s right to safe, legal abortion and contraception,” Horman said. “I think there’s a general sentiment among us: We are simply anti-Trump. His policies are contrary to our vision of an America that is democratic, fair and just.” Horman said she supports the protesters’ right to disagree but emphasized that Planned Parenthood works within legal boundaries. In a Wednesday interview, Forck said she was optimistic about President Trump’s recent election and his

remarkable job,” Middleton said at the meeting. “We may see some policy direction in the very near future and that may well prompt the modification in the way we are doing things. I would urge you to be ready to see this same process be utilized again in a year or two as we try to maintain our compliance with the law and protect our students, faculty and staff from [these issues].” In a unanimous vote, curators motioned to adopt the changes proposed to the Combined Rules and Regulations regarding diversity, equity and inclusion.

facilities,” Foley said. “$400 million on a 30-year loan means we need to generate between $17 million and $20 million a year to carry a loan of that size.”

Institute for Korean Studies grand opening One of the first of its kind in the nation, the MU Institute for Korean Studies hosted its grand opening Thursday. During a recess from its meeting, the board attended the opening, where IKS co-director Sheena Chestnut Greitens and her husband, Gov. Eric Greitens, were in attendance.

Budget issues and discussion of solutions Ryan Rapp, chief financial officer and interim vice president for finance, attributed budgetary constraints to an imbalance of recent budget cuts with enrollment growth and the perception of public higher education as a private good instead of a public good. The Board of Curators then discussed options for addressing financial difficulties and recognized the challenge of budgeting when they rely on funds from the state and economic conditions out of their control. Proposed solutions included increasing tuition, philanthropy, relying on industry partners and increasing incentives for employees and departments to decrease costs.

Report from the chancellor Interim Chancellor Hank Foley updated the board on the recently completed renovations to Lafferre Hall, MU’s partnership with the Stamps Scholars Program, a revamp of the MU website and the renewal of the MU research reactor’s operating license. Foley emphasized the need for encouraging “high-impact research” and recognized that it would be a challenge to gain the capital needed for that goal. “We need about $400 million, is my estimate, in new

Future of the board The next planned Board of Curators meeting is scheduled for April 27-28 at Missouri S&T. To reach quorum, the Board needs at least five members in attendance. Currently, there are only four members. Gov. Greitens has yet to nominate or appoint individuals to the five open seats, in addition to the vacant student representative position. Kyle LaHucik, Libby Stanford, Clare Roth, Zia Kelly, Jackson Kinkead and Olivia Garrett contributed to this report. Edited by Madi McVan mmcvan@themaneater.com

BAILEY VALADEZ | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

policies toward abortion. “Elections have consequences, and our new president loves the babies,” Forck said. “He has fulfilled several of his campaign promises already. He terminated the Mexico City policy and said he would appoint a supreme court justice who is pro-life, and he

has. He talked the talk and now he’s walked the walk, so we’re very happy with the election.” Forck stated that these views were her own and not those of 40 Days for Life, saying her organization is not political in nature. Edited by Madi McVan mmcvan@themaneater.com


CLASS

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The Office of Charter School Operations closed two schools after the 2015-2016 school year because of suboptimal performance: Jamaa Learning Center received 43.6 percent, and Better Learning Communities Academy received 28 percent. Another criticism charter schools often draw is that they divert students — and the funding they bring — from local public schools. Kettenbach said that though the public school no longer receives those funds, it no longer bears the costs associated with educating the student who has transferred out. However, Ghan said it isn’t that simple.

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that school are allowed to transfer to a charter school that has been established in the area. As the state law stands, charter schools can only be established in urban areas, or, if they are in a nonurban school district, they must be sponsored by local school boards. Currently, no school district outside of St. Louis or Kansas City has done so. Conservatives in the state legislature have worked to expand school choice beyond that. Although past legislation to expand charter schools in the state was stopped by former Gov. Jay Nixon, Gov. Eric Greitens has signaled support for the school choice movement, and lawmakers have responded. Rep. Rebecca Roeber, R-Lee’s Summit, is championing a bill that would allow charter schools to be established by entities like

universities or other potential sponsors outside of unaccredited or struggling school districts. This would mean that students would be eligible to transfer from public schools that are not deemed unaccredited. Roeber declined to comment because the bill isn’t out of committee. The Missouri School Boards’ Association has testified against the bill. Ghan said that expanding charter schools could divert resources away from public schools, and smaller school districts will not likely have the student populations to justify the creation of a charter school regardless. “Charter schools are not a magic bullet, and there doesn’t seem to be a good rationale to us to expand charter schools when their performance has been mixed at best,” he said. Edited by Kyle LaHucik klahucik@themaneater.com

education. “Being a person of color, you’re like, ‘I’m going to be more marginalized,’ and that’s how you expect it, but you get down to education and citizenship and things you don’t ever think about, so it really opens your mind and makes you think concretely about everything,” diversity peer educator Alex Carranza said. “I might be oppressed in one part of my life, but I’m actually really privileged in this other part ... It really challenges

you to get to know who you are and challenge yourself and feel like you should use those privileges to do something.” A large focus of the symposium was active allyship and taking action to advocate for those in marginalized communities. Freshman Jahai George said the best way for his peers at MU to advocate for him is simply to listen to the experiences of marginalized students and try to understand their viewpoints.

“Even if we might not share the same experiences day in and day out, it makes it better to know that even though this person doesn’t go through it, that they can understand that this is a serious thing and not a personal experience,” George said. “A lot of people invalidate your personal experience because it is personal, every experience is valid if it provokes an emotional response.” Edited by Madi McVan mmcvan@themaneater.com

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“You still have your teachers to pay, you still have your facilities to operate, so it is not as simple as saying, ‘Well, when a child leaves, and the money follows that child, therefore you don’t have as much cost to educate kids,’” he said. “Really, the cost doesn’t change that much if some kids leave. You basically retain the same operating costs.” Public schools in St. Louis have seen this happen since the rise of charter schools began 17 years ago. Sarah Potter, communications coordinator for the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, said there has been a distinct fall in enrollment in St. Louis public schools from 1994 to 2016 — part of this, however, could be families moving away from the school districts. If a public school has been deemed either unaccredited or provisionally accredited, students who attended

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of privilege beyond the more wellknown categories of race, gender or sexual orientation. Participants were encouraged to analyze other areas in which they may have privilege, such as citizenship, gender expression, mental health, family structure and

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THE MANEATER | NEWS | FEB. 15, 2017


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WHO RUN THE WORLD? GIRLS

MALLORIE MUNOZ Reporter

Girl power never requires an occasion, but when it’s the week of Galentine’s Day with Women’s History Month closely following, a playlist celebrating women seems fitting. As a girl-power enthusiast, here are five of the ultimate female empowerment songs ranging from the ’70s to 2017.

“GLASS CEILING” BY METRIC “Start to push/break your own glass ceiling/Can’t count/can’t catch the pieces falling”

A powerful song from a strange synth-pop band. Vocalist Emily Haines promotes breaking free of the “glass ceiling” that prevents women from equal status. She encourages women to stand up and keep moving, for “every speed on our knees is crawling” and women are not going to get anywhere at that rate.

“HEY GIRL” BY LADY GAGA “Tell me that you need me/’Cause I need you just the same”

Florence Welch of Florence and the Machine angelically accompanies Gaga in this intimate duet, and it blows me away every time. The two challenge the notion that women in the same industry have to be in competition against one another, promoting affinity instead. On estimate, I have listened to this song over 100 times in the last four days. Seriously.

“INDEPENDENT WOMEN” BY DESTINY’S CHILD “All the honeys who making money/Throw your hands up at me”

Beyoncé is a feminist icon and has been since day one. When looking for the perfect lady jams for my weekly ladies’ night, Destiny’s Child was my first stop. These ladies are independent and take pride in their hard work, as they should. This song is the perfect example of women empowering women, and no feminist playlist would be complete without it.

To hear these songs and 30 more lady jams, check out the Spotify playlist on move. themaneater. com

“GIRL POWER” BY THE CHEETAH GIRLS “Throw your hands up if you know that you’re a star/You better stand up if you know just who you are”

Throw it back. You can never go wrong with The Cheetah Girls. One of my favorite memories is getting the aux cord at La Siesta and playing this song, getting the entire restaurant dancing and clapping along. Girl power is a language spoken by all, and The Cheetah Girls embody this perfectly. TORI AERNI // GRAPHICS MANAGER


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | FEB. 15, 2017

Characters mature as ‘Girls’ comes to its final season The show kicks off season 6 with a tryst in the Hamptons. HANNAH SIMON Staff Writer

I started watching Girls because I thought it would be like Sex and the City, millennial edition. What I soon realized is that Girls is not nearly as glamorous. It is edgy, real and sometimes annoying, but that is what makes it so relatable. With Sex and the City, girls often find themselves questioning which woman they most embody — Carrie, Samantha, Charlotte or Miranda — just as Shoshanna did in season one of Girls. However, with Girls, viewers see themselves as one with the group, not specifically as Hannah, Shoshanna, Marnie or Jessa. Last season ended with Jessa and Adam finally confronting the anger and hurt that has been bubbling under the surface of their new relationship: the fact that Jessa betrayed and hurt Hannah, her best friend, and that Hannah was the ex-girlfriend Adam was ready

COURTESY OF PASTE MAGAZINE

to forget. Hannah wants to start writing again and, with support from her mom and Elijah, participates in The Moth, a story slam that allows storytellers to share real-life experiences that correspond with the chosen theme. Marnie readies to go on tour with Desi, her newlyminted ex-husband, with Ray tagging along as her emotional support. Season 6 opens with

Hannah landing an article in the New York Times’ Modern Love section. The article, titled “Losing my best friend,” shares the story that Hannah debuted at The Moth: Jessa’s betrayal. This article kicks off Hannah’s writing career, and she starts to get noticed from other publishers. This season, the show continues its experiment of filming in different locations, as it did with Shoshanna in Japan last season. The

first episode is filmed in the Hamptons, where Hannah is on assignment to write a piece. The second episode brings us to Poughkeepsie, New York. Lastly, the third episode is shot in one man’s apartment for the entire episode. The directors pay more attention to location and how it corresponds with the plot of each episode, rather than having the location be in the background of each plot.

As always, Girls continues to lace tension-filled, escalating scenes with comedy. At one point in the new season, Hannah keeps a distraught Desi out of the house her, Desi and Marnie occupy for a time in episode two with a frosting spatula. As commonly known, a frosting spatula is ultra-intimidating and life-threatening. In past seasons, it was frustrating to watch how self-infatuated the characters were, hurting friends due to their own selfishness and judgements of how their friends should be. This season, though, you see the characters mature and begin to empathize with their friends, keeping their own judgments at bay to help them. Once Girls has completed its airtime, I know I will find myself flipping back to old episodes as I continue to do with Sex and the City. The show, under the creative genius of Lena Dunham and Jenni Konner, will surely be missed. The final season of Girls airs Sunday on HBO. MOVE gives season 6 of “Girls” 5 of 5 stars.

From the archives: Sharing stories and shattering the glass ceiling MU graduates created a longform magazine, “The Riveter,” to highlight female voices. MACKENZIE REAGAN Former MOVE Editor

In May of 2014, the New York Times fired executive editor Jill Abramson. The New Yorker ran a series of three articles, the first of which was published just hours after her termination was announced and speculated the cause of her firing. Allegedly, it was Abramson’s perceived “brusque” and “pushy” nature and a dispute over pay inequality. Public outcry and social media clamor — “Would you say the same thing about a male journalist?” — ensued. In that moment, we were all Jill. Whether we were young or old, in our first year at the School of Journalism or in our third decade as a professional, covering breaking news or arts and entertainment, we could relate. Whether we’d been fired by a sexist boss or hit on by a leery male source while on the job, we knew what it was like to be a woman and a journalist. While subsequent articles in other publications (including The Gray Lady herself) refuted the New Yorker’s claims, countless

more women were galvanized by this collective snub. Even if Abramson was fired over something entirely unrelated, the public outcry that ensued highlighted a broader ugly truth: it’s hard out here for a female journalist. Think of the last time you looked at a “women’s magazine.” More bylines featured female names, right? But recall the topics of many of those articles — how to lose ten pounds by stressing, how to make leather skirts office-appropriate, a home decorating feature, a blurb on the hottest superfood (this month, it’s air), a haircut that’ll change your life and flatter your cheekbones. When female writers are given the chance to write, they’re often pigeonholed and shoved into a tiny, unassuming, polite pink box. Enter The Riveter. Launched in 2013 by MU journalism graduates Joanna “Yanna” Demkiewicz and Kaylen Ralph, also a former Maneater editor, The Riveter aims to increase the number of female voices in longform. After nearly a year, the publication is slowly but surely chipping away at the underrepresentation of women in narrative journalism. It’s a longform women’s magazine that features “Riveting Storytelling by Women.” Sexism and the underrepresentation of women in the media is a

“systemic problem,” but publications like The Riveter that are dedicated to increasing the number of female voices are one part of what needs to be a “multi-faceted solution,” said Ann Friedman, the former executive editor of GOOD magazine and a member of the “Mizzou Mafia,” as MU journalism grads are affectionately called. In addition to contributing to ELLE, The New Republic, The Guardian and Newsweek and various other publications, Friedman maintains the blog Lady Journos, which links to “the work of journalists who happen to be women” in an effort to “help close the byline gender gap.” One challenge, Friedman said, for young women in the media is “getting them to own their opinions” and to eschew “put-upon professionalism” — that polite pink box. “(It’s) important to have women who … write for a variety of outlets” and on a variety of topics, Friedman said. Indeed, part of The Riveter’s goal is to give different views on typical “women’s issues.” “For example: If you think women write too much about motherhood, we want to offer a different motherhood perspective,” Demkiewicz said. Friedman encourages young female journalists to “Have confidence in (their)

point(s) of view. … Your point of view is an asset. Your personal opinions are relevant,” she said. And no two points of view are alike. There’s no one “women’s view,” Ralph said. “A story written by a woman is often stamped with the qualifier of being from a ‘woman’s perspective.’ Duh!” The two hope that, with their magazine, they can “demonstrate how unnecessary that kind of qualification is.” Yes, The Riveter declares, all women are different, and all women’s voices deserve to be heard. In late summer 2013, after a successful campaign on crowdfunding site indiegogo, Ralph and Demkiewicz’s dream has become a reality. On July 14, Issue 01 is launched. The cover of the first issue is decorated in sketches of rivets, the tiny tools used to join materials together. It’s a nod to the publication’s name as well as a metaphor for its purpose. “Rivets hold objects together, and we believe our work can help overcome the dissonance and imbalance in the publishing world,” Demkiewicz said. It’s also a reference to the iconic Rosie the Riveter image, the World War II-era woman that’s become a common motif in feminist artwork and a symbol of female equality, of women being capable of doing the

same work as men. “But Rosie as an icon is obviously more complex than that. We wanted The Riveter to be similarly complex. It’s open to interpretation,” Demkiewicz said. Rosie, while said to be modeled after Michigan factory worker Geraldine Hoff Doyle, is for all women. Demkiewicz credits friend and fellow MU ’13 grad Mike Pottebaum with officially coming up with the name of the publication. Pottebaum’s aunt paints pictures of “contemporary Rosie,” explains Demkiewicz, a testament to the timelessness of the iconic image. Whether alive in the ‘40s, as Doyle was, or barely even halfway to 40, like many of The Riveter’s readers, women continue to relate, at least on some level, to the 70-yearold image. The Riveter is more than a collection of articles; it’s a hub for carefully curated content and a forum for discussion. It’s a haven for female writers who might get slighted elsewhere. Behind every article is a woman with a story to tell. The publication challenges traditional notions of “women’s magazines” with thought-provoking articles on a range of topics. With each story it shares, The Riveter is, at least metaphorically, dropping the mic –– and shattering the “polite pink box” in the process.


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | FEB. 15, 2017

Women in STEM continue to break down barriers Students are plugging in, making an impact within their fields of study and encouraging young girls to do the same. KAELYN STURGELL Associate Editor

When Kate Peiffer sits in class and looks around, she senses something missing. As a junior civil engineering major, she’s mastered substituting numbers for words in lecture notes, but she has yet to get over the intimidation she feels from being one of the few women in the room. According to the U.S. Economics and Statistics Administration, women hold less than 25 percent of jobs in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. While being part of a minority group within a major can be daunting, Peiffer also finds it empowering. “I have found that sometimes people have responded to me with hesitation when they hear that I am majoring in engineering,” Peiffer said. “I feel like they’re almost waiting for me to say what back-up plan I have when I change my mind. STEM fields are challenging, but I truly believe women should have the same opportunities as guys when it comes to excelling in the field.” Some women in STEM have yet to experience the gender gap. Michaela Thomson, a freshman biochemistry major who plans on eventually attending medical school, is currently enrolled in diverse general education courses. But she expects a noticeable difference in her peers the further she gets in her major and career. “I’m sure as I continue in my undergraduate classes and take higher-level biochemistry classes, the male-to-female ratio will change,” Thomson said. “And, way in the future, I will have to find a way to balance family life and work life.” To help combat the feelings of isolation in the later years of her major, Thomson plans on joining Women in STEM, an MU organization that supports its female members by equipping them with resources, connecting them to similar students and providing them with career

opportunities. Peiffer is a member of two similar organizations that are specific to her major. MU’s Society of Women Engineers and the American Society of Civil Engineers both emphasize community and try to interest college students, young girls and even parents in engineering and STEM. Through ASCE, Peiffer has helped host an Engineering Day for Kids that brings in elementary school students who have parents who want them to pursue a STEM topic. Society of Women Engineers hosts a similar event called Mother/Daughter Engineering Day, during which girls from elementary to high school do activities and learn more about what engineers do. Events like Engineering Day for Kids and Mother/Daughter Engineering Day aim to encourage girls to pursue their love of STEM by destigmatizing their interests and giving them someone to look up to and to be inspired by. Peiffer’s biggest role model was, and still is, her great-grandmother, who graduated with a nursing degree from the Kansas City General Hospital in 1942. “I know that her determination played a large role in acquiring her nursing degree when few women were attending post-secondary education,” Peiffer said. “I like to think that her perseverance is hereditary.” But not everyone personally knows a woman in a STEM, which is why representation in film, books and other media is important. Stories about women like Katherine Johnson, whose life inspired the 2016 film Hidden Figures, have inspired girls of all ages, including Thomson. “I loved the movie Hidden Figures. It really highlighted the role of AfricanAmerican women in the development of NASA,” Thomson said. “I thought it was inspirational, and it challenged women to continue to break down barriers in their fields.” Breaking down barriers is something senior biological sciences major Brianne Schmiegelow is familiar with. After graduating from a small, rural high school, she felt like she was forced to play catch-up in her classes. “Because our school was so small, we didn’t have the resources for a strong science program,” Schmiegelow said. “With the help of some friends and professors, though, I was able to stick with it and get to where I am at now.” After graduating in May, she plans on attending UM-Kansas City’s School of Dentistry in August. She was accepted into the program last fall. Being a woman in STEM has its fair share of struggles, but Schmiegelow doesn’t want that to hold young girls back. “Dream the biggest dreams you possibly could, and then find a way to make it there in a way that is true to you and the passions you have,” Schmiegelow said. “We all hit lots of road blocks along the way, but if you stick to your goals, there’s always a way to get there.” Edited by Katherine White kwhite@themaneater.com

From top: Freshman biochemistry major Michaela Thomson poses in her biochemistry Lab. Thomson intends to continue on to medical school. Brianne Schmiegelow is a senior biological sciences major currently working on research on the enamel of alligator teeth. Schmiegelow will attend the UM-Kansas City School of Dentistry starting this fall. Junior civil engineering major Kate Peiffer smiles for a portrait in Overholser Atrium in Lafferre Hall. JULIA HANSEN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | FEB. 15, 2017

Confessions of a modern woman The real meaning behind the dreaded “F-word”: feminism.

Column Michelle Lumpkins Staff Writer As I grip my keys with my thumb hovering over the panic button, I feel my heart thumping against my chest. Subconsciously, my mind recites my parents’ habitual reminders to never wander alone and to always observe my surroundings. My car appears close, yet I unconsciously quicken my pace and weave between the few cars left in the ominous mall parking lot. Every few seconds, I anxiously glance over my shoulder and shift my eyes from side to side, praying no one lurks among the shadows. Growing up, I was never afraid of the dark, but of who potentially waited for me in it. You may be thinking to yourself, “Is she serious?” Yes, walking to my car alone sounds like a simple task instead of something to feel tense about. Yet the reality is this is only one of the many things that my parents have constantly warned me about. Ever since I can remember, my parents gave me the same cautious guidelines over and over again. I envied how much easier it was for my brother to go out with friends, walk down the street or stay out late. I never understood why I had to be so much more careful. I can still remember my too-cool, teenage self rolling her eyes, crossing her arms and thinking in her head, “Thanks, guys, but I know you tell me this every time before I go out.” Now that I’m in college, their advice plays in the back of my mind consistently as

I’m walking around campus, through parking lots or home from a night out. I can still hear my dad in the front seat of the car preaching to me about how to stay safe and the importance of always keeping my guard up. “If you put your drink down, always get a new one.” “Always stay in a group or go to the bathroom in twos.” “Never walk alone.” “Kick, scream, run, do absolutely anything you have to do to get away.” “Follow your instincts.” My naive, optimistic mind refused to believe the terrible people they described actually existed in this world. Back then I didn’t understand, but now I’m thankful to have parents who prepared me for the reality we live in. This is not just my parents being overprotective. In fact, one in five women and one in 16 men are sexually assaulted in college, according to the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. I’m not sharing this to create fear or make it seem like there are predators lurking in the shadows of every parking garage, because obviously that is far from the truth. However, I am trying to make people aware of the fact that this frames the mindsets of modernday women everywhere. This reality of a modern-day woman is one of the reasons I consider myself a feminist. It deeply concerns me that other women find it appalling to identify themselves as feminists. As soon as the dreaded “F-word” is brought up, many tune out in horror. It is completely mind-boggling that the idea of equal opportunities is something too taboo for a person, especially a woman, to want to support it.

It is painful to read Facebook posts where women argue back and forth about whether or not they identify as a feminist, someone who believes in equality for all genders. Women are pinning themselves against each other instead of supporting each other. They should be working together, as there are multiple reasons to be a feminist. For example, modern-day society often tries to find faults in a woman's appearance, actions and characteristics to justify sexual assault. But “no” means “absolutely not,” and a short skirt is not an open invitation. We shouldn’t be afraid to put our drinks down or wear a low-cut shirt that could potentially become justification for another person’s actions. If it’s not a resounding “yes,” then it’s a “no.” The image of what a woman should look like and be treated like is created for us through social media, the music industry, celebrities and pop culture in general. Young girls see these unrealistic lifestyles and hate themselves for not living up to those standards of life, while boys see how women are portrayed in modern-day music videos and assume objectification is normal. Women are taught at an early age that there is always someone better than us instead of introducing the importance of self-love. Everyone is entitled to their own beliefs; I just cannot comprehend why a woman would not believe in equality for all genders. Now you may be thinking, “Equality for all genders? What is this crazy feminist talking about?” The goal of feminism is not about feeling superior to men or dominating them.

LACEY PAUL | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Feminism is about breaking down the walls of society that believe certain characteristics, qualities, goals, opportunities, et cetera, only pertain to certain genders. Feminism is not just about fighting for women, but supporting gender equality for everyone. For example, throughout history, men have been criticized for showing their emotions. If a man becomes emotional, it shows a lack of masculinity because emotions are only supposed to be reserved for “hormonal women.” This is the kind of thinking feminists aim to change.

The changes that feminists strive for will create a safer environment for all. In the meantime, the modern-day woman will refuse to be silent and continue to fight for the future she hopes for. The modern-day woman is not afraid, but she is told to always keep her guard up. The modern-day woman is not weak, but she must always carry mace. The modern-day woman is told her skirt was too short, when in reality a man overstepped his boundaries. The modern-day woman is not a victim, but an everyday hero.


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THE MANEATER | MOVE MAGAZINE | FEB. 15, 2017

FROM THE ARCHIVES

Now, trash the roses and cheat on your Valentine In this column from Feb. 15, 2005, columnist Brenden Clawson shits upon Valentine’s Day. BRENDEN CLAWSON Columnist

Today is a special day. It's the day in which garbage collectors across the country will take millions of discarded Valentine's Day cards, chocolate boxes and gas station bouquets and deposit them in landfills. While Monday was the day we celebrated all the joy and happiness brought on by new love, today is the day we commemorate all the broken hearts and shattered dreams that are left after the breakup. Today is Feb. 15, antiValentine's Day. It's love's hangover. If Valentine's Day was the day you met the bright, beautiful girl of your dreams, anti-Valentine's Day is the day she gives you syphilis. If Valentine's Day was the day you were overjoyed by the diamond necklace and roses your boyfriend gave you, anti-Valentine's Day is the day you come to realize that the diamonds were dug up by wage slaves, and the roses will slowly whither and die, just like your relationship. If Valentine's Day was the day you spent the afternoon cuddled up with your significant other, antiValentine's Day is the day you cuddle up with a bottle of Jack Daniel's, lie on your couch in the fetal position and cry yourself to sleep. So, as you sit next to your girlfriend or boyfriend on this special day, ask yourself if you are truly observing the spirit of anti-Valentine's Day.

If you are staring into his or her eyes and daydreaming about how you two are going to live happily ever after, then you definitely aren't properly observing the spirit of anti-Valentine's Day. Instead, you should imagine what it's going to be like after you two get married. Sure, you'll be happy at first. But soon you'll get bored with each other. All of his or her quirky little eccentricities that you used to think were endearing will begin to get on your nerves. As time goes by, you'll grow to resent each other, and soon that resentment will turn into abject hatred. You'll both cheat on each other, but who can blame you? After all, you'll both be trapped in a strangling and loveless marriage. It will all end in a bitter and prolonged divorce in which you two try to ruin each other's lives. The entire experience will leave you an emotional cripple, unable to enter into any meaningful relationship with another human being for the rest of your life. And your kids will be really fucked up. True, anti-Valentine's Day may not be the most cheerful of holidays. But at least it's better than anti-Thanksgiving, where your entire extended family spends the night in the hospital because the turkey was infected with salmonella, or anti-Mardi Gras, where your dad calls to yell at you because he saw you topless in a "Girls Gone Wild" video. And let's not even bring up anti-St. Patrick's Day. So have a very merry antiValentines Day and remember that love may be a battlefield, but life definitely is a bitch. Angles Columnists Cassie Allen Nick Corder Ben Jarzombek Ally Rudolph

Angles Editor Victoria Cheyne Culture Editor Katherine White

Grant Sharples Culture Writers Brooke Collier

Features Editor Bailey Sampson

Lauryn Fleming

Social Media Manager Kaelyn Sturgell

Michelle Lumpkins

Videographer Hunter Bassler

Caroline Watkins

Features Writers Michaela Flores Caroline Kealy Mackenzie Wallace

Nat Kaemmerer Hannah Simon

Header photo by: Lane Burdette

MILLENNIAL MANNERS

Men should split the cost of birth control BEN JARZOMBEK MOVE Columnist

Ben Jarzombek writes about etiquette for MOVE Magazine. My usual go-to when starting hot takes goes something like this: “It’s 2017; I can’t believe that this is still an issue.” However, it is 2017, and so many crazy things have happened that I really am not surprised by anything anymore. One thing I have been fired up about lately is birth control. Before you stop reading, this isn’t about its availability or my personal stance on whether your health care should cover it; that’s another discussion for another day. What I want to talk about is the practice of splitting the cost of birth control. It’s my personal opinion that, in a committed relationship, both parties should split the cost of their preferred birth control option. This is an opinion that doesn’t tend to be very popular with my male peers. Tradition seems to hold that if the preferred method is condoms, the man purchases them; if the woman prefers to use a female contraceptive, she

bears the cost. While this seems to pass as the status quo for most people, it has never sat well with me. The main rebuttal I hear against splitting the cost of birth control is that women don’t use birth control exclusively to prevent pregnancy. While I completely understand that, that line of thinking tends to miss the point. If you’re in a committed relationship with someone, and you and your partner use contraception for its initial purpose, then I don’t see why you both can’t help pay the cost. If a man happens to use condoms and a woman uses a female form of contraception, then I’d give the guy a cop-out. However, I’ve not known this to be the case most of the time. Another point that tends to be brought up in this discussion is how women in relationships pay for their birth control. If insurance happens to pay for 100 percent of birth control costs, I’m not saying that guys should Venmo their girlfriends half of her health insurance bill. In addition, I wouldn’t advocate that girls who get their birth control paid for by their parents should scam their boyfriends out of money every month. When insurance doesn’t pay for the entire cost of birth control and the woman is paying the difference,

I believe the man should contribute to the out-ofpocket costs. I’m not just trying to hate on guys, though. If it so happens that you and your partner use condoms as your primary method of birth control, then I think the woman should contribute to the cost. Anyone who’s bought condoms before knows they aren’t the cheapest, and if you aren’t into regularly swiping them from either Planned Parenthood or the sexual health resources on campus, the cost can add up. Why do I believe this? It’s simple: We should be living in a society where issues like this are not taboo things we just don’t like to think about. Sexual health and contraception should be open for discussion in relationships. Gender roles and norms can (and should) be ignored, especially with respect to who’s paying for birth control. Just because one party isn’t actively using the birth control doesn’t mean both parties aren’t benefitting. Whether it’s splitting the cost of the pill or condoms, having the conversation about paying for contraceptives is important, and I think it’s time we stop letting one party pay for everything because “that’s just how it’s always been.”


OPINION

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FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

We want to hear your voice.

Submit a letter to the editor by emailing letters@themaneater.com.

THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED BY THE MANEATER COLUMNISTS DO NOT REPRESENT THE OPINIONS OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

HERE’S A WHO

We need to fight the urge to point the finger back Our truths can be painful to acknowledge, but they are necessary to adjust. KENNEDY HORTON Opinion Columnist

Kennedy Horton is a sophomore studying English. She writes about student life and social justice for The Maneater. We hear this all the time. Person A will be discussing their disadvantages as a certain minority: woman, person of color, LGBTQ+, disabled, et cetera. Person B, a person in a privileged group, will say the infamous, “But we’re not all like that!” Whenever this happens in conversation, I just want to end it. I’m not an argumentative person. I tend to lose the energy to argue

almost as fast as I get the spark. Often, I just sigh out of hopelessness for Person B and all the Person Bs of the world. This argument is bothersome and irrelevant. It’s dismissive, it’s not empathetic, and it’s less of an argument and more of a tactic to absolve oneself of guilt. We as humans want our hands to be clean. It’s impossible, but we try as hard as we can. We hate for anyone to point out shortcomings in ourselves or the shortcomings of a group we identify with. That’s just part of life though, and to use that tactic is to make the conversation and the issues about yourself instead. A dialogue between a marginalized person and a person of privilege is not supposed to be an attack on the latter. It’s supposed to be a learning opportunity. Because we have a habit of being automatically defensive when someone says something we do not like, we typically do not see it this way.

But Person A is just telling the truth. It comes partially from their experience, which cannot be negated. Their story is not a condemnation or a personal assault. Person B just feels that way because they’re insecure or ashamed of the things their specific privileged group is responsible for.

INSTEAD OF, “WE’RE NOT ALL LIKE THAT,” TRY, “WHAT CAN I DO TO HELP?” They’re projecting, and that isn’t fair. Another reason this phrase is so dangerous is because it acts as a way to take ourselves out of the equation. For example, if someone says to me, “In my experience, black people have been very homophobic,” and I return with, “But we’re not all like that,”

I’m counting myself in that “we’re.” By doing that, I’m falsely telling myself, “I don’t need to be doing as much to help, because I’m part of the group that isn’t doing anything wrong, so there’s nothing I need to change.” Not only does this result in a stagnation of progress, but it’s a defective mindset. Even if you are not being problematic, if your friend or family member is doing so, you have a responsibility to try to correct them. Everyone has something they can be doing to make our shared space better. Besides being an inappropriate statement, it’s just redundant. Obviously not every single person of a group is doing the same thing. And that’s never the point. The job of the advantaged listener is not to debunk the truth of the disadvantaged. It’s to listen. Instead of, “We’re not all like that,” try, “What can I do to help?”

THE TENACIOUS TYPIST

Embrace BDSM and don’t let stigma get in the way of your whip JESSIE STALEY Opinion Columnist

Jessie Staley is a freshman who writes about student life for The Maneater.

Admit it. At one point or another, there is one thing many people have at least considered: BDSM. For the newbies, BDSM stands for bondage, discipline, sadism and masochism, and the D and S may also be referred to as dominance and submission. It is not for the faint-hearted, that’s for sure. BDSM brings to mind scenes of people in cages pretending to be wild animals and terrifying women in leather ready to whip you if you speak out of turn. Above all, it makes us think of “Fifty Shades of Grey.” These images, and BDSM culture as a whole, probably don’t sound too appealing to the average person, right? BDSM is only for the unusual weirdos and perverts. Wrong. BDSM culture is not at all scarce and is certainly not exclusive to the people who like to be beaten during sex. Around 20 percent of the world population and, according to a 2005 survey, a growing 36 percent of the American population indulges in BDSM. That is around 106 million Americans just in 2005. Imagine what the percentage and number of people is now. Other surveys have shown even higher numbers. In no way is it rare. BDSM also includes an extremely wide range of activities and toys. It doesn’t have to involve a dominatrix or any sort of pain. Any sexual

activity that involves bondage, discipline, dominance, submission, sadism and/or masochism can pretty much be considered part of BDSM by definition. BDSM culture can also involve exhibitionism, voyeurism and degradation. Exhibitionism is having sex or being naked in front of other people, and voyeurism is observing sex or other people naked. Degradation is “dirty talk” or harsh acts meant to belittle your partner. Certainly, role play should not be excluded from the list either. Basically any sex that is above generic, “vanilla” sex is most likely BDSM material. The stigma against BDSM culture is made up of mostly false assumptions that it is only for the few freaks with daddy issues, which is not true. A large portion of the world population, and even more of the American population, is involved in BDSM sexual activities to varying degrees. Being interested in getting tied up or being called a “whore” in bed is nothing to be ashamed of or confused about. You are not alone. Sexual freedom is growing in popularity as time goes on, and now is the time to raise awareness and comfortability concerning the subject of BDSM. BDSM is not strange, wrong or uncommon. You should feel neither pressure to maintain a vanilla sex life nor the need to completely switch to sexual masochism. To each their own, and despite cultural opinion, what you do in bed or anywhere else you like to get it on is your own business and no one else’s. So here’s to embracing the sexual revolution and abandoning the stigma against BDSM culture.

BDSM defined

BDSM culture is growing in commonality and popularity, so let’s stop the stigma against it.

BONDAGE: Acts involving the physical restraint of a partner.

DOMINANCE AND SUBMISSION: A set of behaviors, customs and rituals involving the submission of one person to another.

SADISM AND MASOCHISM: Any activity or practice involving the inflicting or receiving of pain.

DEGRADATION: “Dirty talk” or harsh acts meant to belittle your partner.

VANILLA: Not interested in or involved with BDSM or activities related to BDSM. TORI AERNI // GRAPHICS MANAGER


SPORTS

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INside this section: Women’s basketball gets back on track, women’s golf wins its first tournament of the season, and a breakdown of great baseball series to come.

Sophomore guard Terrence Phillips, 1, celebrates after the Tigers’ 72-52 win over Vanderbilt at Mizzou Arena on Feb. 11. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Missouri picks up 20-point win over Vanderbilt Jordan Barnett had his second straight game of 23 points to lead the Tigers to their second SEC win. JOE NOSER Staff Writer

Junior forward Jordan Barnett is a man on a mission, and he continued to prove that Saturday afternoon. Barnett had his second straight game of 23 points. Sophomore guard Terrence Phillips added 12 points and six rebounds, and Missouri cruised to a 72-52 victory over Vanderbilt at

Mizzou Arena. Mizzou (7-17, 2-10) picked up its second Southeastern Conference win of the season and largest conference win since Jan. 18, 2014 against Alabama, while Vanderbilt (12-13, 5-7) fell out of a tie for fifth in the SEC standings and saw its slim postseason tournament chances get even slimmer. Missouri outrebounded Vanderbilt 43-25 and dominated the game’s physical battle, opening up opportunities from the outside while giving Vanderbilt little room to get its premier shooters open. The Tigers also had 16 offensive rebounds to the

Commodores’ six and had 21 secondchance points, while Vanderbilt had just four. Coach Kim Anderson said his team played its most complete and physical game of the season.   “It was a great performance by our guys,” Anderson said. “Going into the game, we really challenged our guys to go get offensive rebounds [because] we felt like we could get some second-chance points, and if you look at it, that was really the difference in the game.” Vanderbilt, who entered the contest shooting a league-best 39 percent from behind the arc, had its

worst 3-point shooting performance of the season, going just 6-28 from downtown. Additionally, Vanderbilt big man Luke Kornet, the NCAA career leader in 3-pointers made by a 7-footer, had a game he most likely will want to forget, going 4-14 from the field and 0-9 from 3-point range. Vanderbilt coach Bryce Drew said his team got some open shots but just could not make them fall. “I thought we had some really good looks, especially in the second half, but when you miss and you don’t get any easy baskets from

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WRESTLING

Tigers lose to Northern Iowa, ending conference win streak J’den Cox: “I’m cool with wins and losses, and those things are going to happen, but I didn’t feel any fight [today] and that hurt for me as a person, as a senior, as a teammate.” JOE NOSER Staff Writer

It was supposed to be a fairytale ending for No. 1 J’den Cox’s Senior Day at Hearnes Center: His

team would earn yet another regular season Mid-American Conference title against the No. 19 Northern Iowa Panthers, and he would wrestle his final MAC meet in style. But the Panthers had other ideas. Despite Cox’s 17-1 technical fall victory in the final match of the meet, the Tigers were throttled by the Panthers on Sunday afternoon, losing 25-10. Head coach Brian Smith said the loss was a difficult one to swallow. “You get your ass whooped and it’s never fun, especially when you have a good program and expect

to put trophies in the trophy case,” Smith said. “They were a team that had more purpose today. There’s no doubt that Northern Iowa came to win this dual.” The Panthers won all but three of the matches on Sunday, including two upsets to start the dual, and jumped out to a commanding 9-0 lead. Smith said he was especially displeased with a lack of aggressiveness his wrestlers showed, especially in the first three matches. “We didn’t score a takedown until the fourth match,” Smith said. “That’s insane; you can’t win matches that

way. It’s tough.” Following a loss by John Erneste, who competed at 133 pounds, No. 9 Jaydin Eierman picked up two takedowns in the first round of his match against Jake Hodges in the 141-pound division. Eierman kept the pressure on and very nearly secured a fall before picking up the 8-4 victory, putting the Tigers on the board. Eierman said his goal had been to get the Tigers moving in the right direction to mount a comeback.

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Women’s basketball offense explodes as the Tigers smash SEC rival Arkansas 67-56 Missouri’s night was highlighted by Lindsey Cunningham’s career-high 21 points. LANGSTON NEWSOME Staff Writer

After dropping two straight road Southeastern Conference games, Missouri (17-9, 7-5) returned to Mizzou Arena on sunday in desperate need of a win over Arkansas (13-12, 2-10). The Tigers responded by crushing the Razorbacks 67-56 behind impressive shooting performances from Lindsey and Sophie Cunningham. As a team, the Tigers shot 44.2 percent from the field and 59.1 percent from three. “Those two Cunningham kids are really good players,” Arkansas coach Jimmy Dykes said. “They play hard. They play the game with a lot of competitive fire, juice about them and confidence. [Lindsey Cunningham] is a really solid player, and I personally enjoy competing against them.”   Senior Lindsey Cunningham scored a career-high 21 points, going 5-5 from deep and adding six rebounds. “I think you guys know me by now,” she said. “I don’t go out there to get this many points, this many rebounds. Whatever, I just got out there and play, and do what my team needs of me. They were hitting me tonight when I was open, and luckily they were able to fall.” Missouri’s leading scorer sophomore Sophie Cunningham chipped in 19 points, seven boards and five assists. She also had things working from deep, hitting four 3-pointers. Freshman

Amber Smith had a huge game off the bench. Smith had her first career double-double with 11 points and 10 rebounds. Eight of those boards came in the second half. “Shots will fall, shots come easily,” Smith said. “But my biggest thing is rebounding. Coach always says go get us extra shots, or don’t be hesitant, be relentless to the boards. I think I fulfilled that tonight.” Three minutes into the game, the Tigers already had three turnovers and were down 6-3.   Lindsey Cunningham’s two early threes helped turn the tide in Mizzou’s favor. Soon after, Sophie Cunningham and Sierra Michaelis joined the 3-pointer barrage, each hitting one. With 2:56 left in the first, Missouri was 5-5 from deep and leading 17-16. The Tigers finished the first quarter up 20-16, holding the Razorbacks without a point in the final 3:38 and to 0-5 in their last five field goal attempts. The Tigers started right where they left off as Smith drained a three to begin the second quarter, followed by another triple from Sophie and Lindsey Cunningham to put Missouri up 29-19 with six minutes left in the half. The Tigers ended the second quarter on an 8-0 run and led Arkansas 41-25 at the half. The Tigers shot 76.9 percent from three, draining 10 triples in the first half. Sophie Cunningham led all scorers with 11 points and went 3-4 from three. The second half started on a scary note when Cierra Porter took a hard fall while chasing down a loose ball and afterwards walked straight to the locker room. She would return to the bench later in the quarter. In the third, Arkansas

Senior guard Lindsey Cunningham, 11, jumps for a shot against Arkansas. Cunningham was the Tigers’ highest scorer, with a total of 21 points. JULIA HANSEN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

outscored Missouri 13-11 in the period until Lindsey Cunningham drilled her fifth three of the game, a career high. This put Mizzou up 55-38 heading into the fourth. Even though the fourth quarter began with a 5-0 Arkansas run, Mizzou fans could take an exhale of relief; Porter returned to the game with 8:07 left. “[Cierra Porter] hit her head pretty good,” Missouri coach

Robin Pingeton said. “... They wanted to evaluate and make sure there weren’t concussionlike symptoms … I asked her if she was OK. She wanted back in, [and] the doctors had cleared her. So we went ahead and subbed her back in.” The Tigers were held scoreless in the first 4:45 of the fourth quarter. Arkansas outscored Mizzou 18-8 in the fourth and was down 63-56 with 2:28 left, giving the

appearance of a close game. Despite only winning by 11, Missouri comfortably rolled to a 67-56 victory. Next, the Tigers will take on Florida on Thursday in Gainesville. They will then return to Mizzou Arena on Feb. 19 for the Play4Kay PinkOut Game against No. 6 South Carolina. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

Women’s golf team takes fifth in first spring tournament Coach Stephanie Priesmeyer: “We [were] really close to breaking out a low number.” GARRETT JONES Staff Writer

Following a successful fall 2016 season, Missouri women’s golf finished its first spring tournament in fifth place, at +12 as a team. Freshman Jessica Yuen led the team and placed 13th overall in the Florida State Matchup. Missouri was one of 12

teams that participated Friday through Sunday at Don Veller Seminole Golf Course in Tallahassee, Florida. The Tigers opened with a strong first round, posting a collective +5 overall. With 293 team strokes, the performance ranked in the top five for team standings. Yuen led the Tigers individually with 2-under-par 70. “We had a pretty slow start this morning on our front side,” head coach Stephanie Priesmeyer said in a news release Friday evening. “We had a few wayward drives that cost us early. We started to settle in and had a nice stretch

of nice holes and connected with some birdies. Jess [Yuen] was very consistent, and really everyone had a lot of opportunities to make birdies today. I think those missed putts will become makes these next couple of days.” After two rounds, the Tigers regressed to sixth place overall. Clara Young was the lone Tiger to not shoot over par in the second round, turning in a round of even-par golf. “We had a better start today, but our middle was a little rough,” Priesmeyer said in a second news release Saturday evening. “When we

made the turn, we struggled with holes one through three. We had a lot of good shots during our round but really struggled to hole out our good birdie opportunities. The team is in a good position to move up quickly once those putts start falling. We are really close to breaking out a low number.” Senior Jessica Meek and sophomore Cayce Hendrickson shot solid rounds of 70 and 71, respectively, to close out the tournament on Sunday. Yuen wrapped up an impressive performance at even par, 13th place overall individually.   Meek finished

tied for 25th at +2, with Young not far behind tied for 28th at +3. Emma Allen would finish tied for 33rd at +4, and Hendrickson would finish 43rd at +5. Florida State dominated its hosted tournament, taking the individual and team medals. Morgane Metraux won the individual title at -11 for the tournament. Up next for the Tigers is the Mountain View Collegiate Invitational, which will be held March 10-12 in Tucson, Arizona. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | FEB. 15, 2017

Five can’t-miss baseball matchups this season GARRETT JONES Staff Writer

Missouri is set to take to the diamond and rekindle Tigers fans’ passion Friday. This year, Missouri baseball will play 56 games against 28 different opponents at 10 different venues. Before the team takes the field, here’s a guide to five opponents you’ll definitely want to watch the Tigers face this season. March 25-28: vs. Southeast Missouri State Redhawks The Tigers take a quick break from Southeastern Conference play when the SEMO Redhawks come through Columbia for a weekend series. For new Missouri coach Steve Bieser, this won’t just be a battle with another in-state opponent. Bieser coached SEMO’s baseball team from 2013 until he left for Mizzou this season. The two teams split a series at Taylor Stadium last season. The Redhawks finished with an impressive 39-21 record in 2016. March 31 to April 2: vs. No. 2 Florida Gators This weekend series is the can’tmiss matchup of the year at Taylor Stadium. Florida baseball might be the best team to come through Missouri in any sport this school year. Florida finished 2016 with an astounding 52-16 record and received a No. 1 seed in last year’s College World

Series. In addition to their success as a team, according to MLB.com’s Jim Callis and Jonathan Mayo, Florida right-handed pitcher Alex Faedo is projected to be the No. 1 overall pick in the 2017 MLB Draft. If Faedo and Missouri’s Tanner Houck, a top-10 projected pick himself, face each other in one of these games, it could be one for the ages. Unfortunately, this game falls during academic spring break, but if you can’t make it back to Taylor Stadium for one of these games, it’s definitely worth watching on SEC Network. April 28-30: vs. No. 20 Texas A&M Aggies Texas A&M has seen recent success, appearing in the NCAA tournament for three straight seasons. Right-handed pitcher Corbin Martin is projected as a top-10 pick on MLB.com, but the Aggies also bring a high-powered offense that could provide many exciting games at Taylor Stadium. May 5-7: at No. 7 Vanderbilt Commodores Vanderbilt has been one of the most successful teams in the NCAA in recent years, winning the College World Series in 2014. They produced a No. 1 overall pick (Dansby Swanson in 2015) and once again have a squad with no shortage of talent. Righthanded pitcher Kyle Wright, another top draft prospect, is a player to keep an eye on.

Sophomore infielder Ian Nelson, 6, makes a play from third for Mizzou Gold during a scrimmage between Mizzou Black and Mizzou Gold on Oct. 28, 2016. Mizzou Black won 13–2. JULIA HANSEN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER May 12-14: vs. No. 4 South Carolina Gamecocks The Gamecocks have emerged as a preseason favorite to challenge Florida for the SEC Championship. It will definitely be worth taking a study break during finals week to watch the Tigers take on the two-headed monster that is the South Carolina combo of right-handed pitchers Wil Crowe and Clarke Schmidt. This lateseason matchup will give a good sense of how the Tigers’ bats fare against strong pitching. Evaluating the rest of the schedule

The most captivating matchup of the rest of the home schedule should be the weekend SEC series against Arkansas, a team that finished in a similar spot to the Tigers in the SEC standings last season. An interesting matchup could be on hand when Missouri plays Alabama for the first time since the 2015 season, when the Crimson Tide took two out of three games from the Tigers in a weekend series. The Tigers open up their season Friday night against Eastern Michigan at 7 p.m. in Florida. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

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Swimming sweeps several events at the Ohio State Invitational Both Missouri men’s and women’s swimming posted dominant performances at the meet ahead of SEC Championships. TITUS WU Staff Writer

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“I was hoping [my victory] would kick-start something,” he said. “I obviously wanted to get the tide rolling, and I tried my hardest to do so. I just needed to go out there and do my job.” Eierman’s victory proved to be all for naught. No. 2 redshirt senior Lavion Mayes followed

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diving won seven events against 11 other schools at the Ohio State Invitational this weekend in Columbus, Ohio. The meet came ahead of the Southeastern Conference Championships in Tennessee this week and featured a different group of swimmers for Missouri. Missouri women’s and men’s swimming, currently ranked No. 13 and No. 14

in their respective NCAA rankings, faced another nationally ranked team, Ohio State, ranked No. 22 for women’s swimming and No. 18 for men’s swimming. The Tigers swept the men’s 100 back, earning the top three spots in the race. Junior Drew Dvorchak, who took the victory, added two more wins in the 100 and 200 fly. In both fly races, Dvorchak achieved new personal bests,

knocking more than two seconds off his previous time in the 200 fly. On the women’s side, sophomore Samantha Wilts swept the 100 and 200 back events, also clocking in new personal bests in both races. Her time of 1:56.78 in the 200 back is the 10th best time in Missouri history. Sophomore Griffin Schaetzle, in addition to finishing in second in the

100 back, also won the men’s 200 back, with fellow Tiger Grant Kelton following close behind in second place. The women’s team clinched the top three spots in the 200 free. SEC Championships began Tuesday night in Knoxville, Tennessee, at the University of Tennessee and will continue into the weekend. Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

the game,” Drew said.   Vanderbilt was also unable to find an answer to Barnett, who shot 6-10 from the field and added nine rebounds in 29 minutes of play. Barnett said he’s been enjoying his recent run of success. “[The game] was really

fun, not just from the standpoint of me scoring, but [also because] I know I played as hard as I can,” Barnett said. “It seems like we forced them to lay down, and it was fun to win like that.” The win was also Anderson’s

300th of his career, a milestone he suggested was a little bittersweet due to the tumultuous last three years he’s had at Missouri. “It took a long time to get [300 wins] from the time I got here to the time I got it, and that’s disappointing,”

Anderson said. “But it felt

Eierman’s victory with a rare poor performance, losing the final regular season MAC match of his career to No. 8 Max Thomsen, 7-2. Redshirt junior Joey Lavallee battled through multiple injuries to pick up an 8-3 win over his opponent, but repeated words from Missouri coaches toward the referees cost the Tigers an overall team point, giving UNI a 12-5 lead. UNI did not look back after the Lavallee match. Tigers redshirt sophomore Daniel

Lewis, redshirt freshman Dylan Wisman and redshirt senior Matt Lemanowicz were all defeated by their opponents, making Cox’s final regular season conference match meaningless as to which team would win the dual. Cox, who had to compose himself after the meet before speaking to the media, expressed disappointment and sadness with his team’s overall effort. “I’m cool with wins and losses, and those things are

going to happen, but I didn’t feel any fight [today], and that hurt for me as a person, as a senior, as a teammate,” Cox said. “When the guys look back and see that I said this, they can tell me I was wrong, but they’re not going to change my mind on that.” Eierman said he was frustrated that the team couldn’t find a way to win in Cox’s final conference dual. “I feel for him,” Eierman said. “He’s like my brother, [so losing] hurts my heart.” Smith said he will do

his best to get his team ready for Southern Illinois on Wednesday and other approaching postseason matches. “We’ll see what guys show up [Wednesday] and I hope there’s more energy,” Smith said. “I hope I can coach them to wrestle with more energy and passion. That’s how this program has succeeded: wrestling with some emotions.” Edited by Eli Lederman elederman@themaneater.com

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Wednesday at Mizzou Arena. Edited by Eli Lederman

elederman@themaneater.com



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