Page 1

M

THE MANEATER and

MOVE MAGAZINE

THE YEAR IN MEMES

DEC. 7, 2016 VOL. 83 | ISSUE 15 THEMANEATER.COM


2

THE MANEATER | ETC. | DEC. 7, 2016

Inside this Issue

Breaking free

Growing up courtside

Last week, columnist Kurtis Dunlap said Thanksgiving break was the worst. Here’s why he thinks winter break is the best (pg. 7)

Cullen VanLeer was raised on basketball film. Now, he’s passing his knowledge on to his teammates (pg. 11)

leading the line

top alt albums

With defensive end Charles Harris leaving for the NFL draft, Marcell Frazier is expected to step up (pg. 12)

Bon Iver’s album causes a never-ending nightmare for copy editors, and more top alternative albums from 2016 (pg. 9)

Names and Numbers

18 Sanctions against the Delta Upsilon fraternity by MU in the past year. DU’s suspension was extended for at least two years.

4 Interim Chancellor Hank Foley, who hopes to keep his job permanently as the UM System begins its search to fill the position.

M

THE MANEATER

The MANEATER FALL STAFF Want to work with us? themaneater.com/workforus

Missouri volleyball players who earned regional honors Tuesday. The Tigers are in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament.

(4UVEFOU$FOUFSt$PMVNCJB .0  QIPOF t GBY

FEJUPST!UIFNBOFBUFSDPN XXXUIFNBOFBUFSDPN

facebook.com/themaneaterMU twitter.com/themaneater instagram.com/themaneater1955

Editor-in-Chief Jared Kaufman Managing Editors George Roberson, Katie Rosso

56

Online Development Editor Reiker Seiffe

Copy Chief Nancy Coleman

News Editors Emily Gallion, Kyra Haas, Claire Mitzel, Allyson Vasilopulos

Sports Editor Peter Baugh

Graphics Manager Tori Aerni

Missouri swimmer Michael Chadwick, who won a bronze medal at the World Championships in Canada on Tuesday.

The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reproduced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. “If you wanted historically accurate, it would be Abe and John Wilkes Booth hooking up.�

MOVE Editors Victoria Cheyne, Bailey Sampson, Katherine White Photo Editor Jessi Dodge Opinion Editor Kasey Carlson

Social Media Manager Jake Chiarelli Newsletter Manager Regina Anderson Assistant Online Editor Michael Smith Jr. Production Assistant Cassie Allen

Percent increase of the Engineering supplemental fee since 2007. MU in-state tuition has increased by 12.5 percent.

3FQPSUFSTGPS5IF.BOFBUFSBSF SFRVJSFEUPPGGFSWFSJGJDBUJPOPGBMM RVPUFTGPSFBDITPVSDF *GZPVOPUJDFBOJOBDDVSBDZJOPOF PGPVSTUPSJFT QMFBTFDPOUBDUVTWJB QIPOFPSFNBJM

Deputy Production Manager Hope Johnson Deputy Copy Chiefs Anna Sirianni, Katherine Stevenson Copy Editors Sherell Barbee, Theo DeRosa,

Nat Kaemmerer, Madi McVan, David Reynolds, Jeremiah Wooten Adviser Becky Diehl Cover design Tori Aerni


NEWS

What you need to know This Week on campus

3

Residential Life

Two residence halls set to close next year This semester, nearly 25 percent fewer freshmen moved into residence halls than anticipated. ZIA KELLY Staff Writer Students will not be able to choose to live in Schurz or McDavid halls when the residence hall selection process opens this spring, Residence Halls Association President Matt Bourke confirmed at an RHA Congress meeting Monday night. Both residence halls are being taken “offline,” which means that when students select rooms, the halls will be unavailable.

This semester, 23.5 percent fewer freshmen than anticipated signed residence hall contracts, according to a presentation given by Residential Life Director Frankie Minor at Monday night’s meeting. However, MU spokesman Christian Basi said taking the buildings offline does not mean they will definitively be unused next academic year. He said the number of buildings used to house students will depend on how many opt to live on campus, which is dependent on the currently unknown freshmen enrollment numbers. Additionally, the number of students who will live on campus during the 2017-18 school year might be impacted by a new initiative to encourage

HALL | PAGE 5

RHA President Matt Bourke confirmed that Schurz and McDavid halls might be closed temporarily for the 2017-18 school year. LANE BURDETTE | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Greek Life

Cost of Attendance

Shadow fees lurk in tuition bills While state law has put significant limits on MU’s in-state tuition and mandatory fee hikes in recent years, unregulated supplemental fees have skyrocketed. KAITLIN WASHBURN Reporter

spring semester, although they may not represent themselves as part of a Delta Upsilon chapter, according to the news release. On Sept. 28, Delta Upsilon was placed on temporary emergency suspension by both MU and the Delta Upsilon Board of Directors following an incident in which students outside the Delta Upsilon house reportedly directed racial slurs at two members of the Legion of Black Collegians. Other infractions, including alcohol violations, were cited in MU’s decision to suspend the chapter. The press release states that “the Board of Directors did not base any of its decision to suspend the chapter on the

When Ethan Calfee was deciding where to continue his college career, it was MU’s lively campus and affordable ticket price that sealed the deal. Transferring from Northwest Missouri State’s preengineering program, Calfee also considered the University of Texas at Austin and Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla. UT, though, was out of his price range and too far from home, and Missouri S&T’s campus life didn’t appeal to Calfee. MU had both an exciting and diverse campus and tuition that he could afford. Calfee is not alone in his assessment. Among the 100 “Best College Values” rated by Kiplinger’s magazine, MU ranked in the top third for total cost of attendance. It is also among the 20 most affordable public colleges in the Midwest. The university has achieved these rankings thanks in part to the state’s Higher Education Student Funding Act, or HESFA, which was passed in 2007 and prohibits public universities from raising tuition and mandatory fees by more than the yearly increase in the consumer price index. And mandatory fees, which include the student health fee, recreation fee and a few others, involve input and oversight from a committee of student leaders. But when Calfee recently took a closer look at his bill from the university, he found an additional $984 in fees from this semester that he had no idea existed. Called “supplemental fees,” these are levied by individual colleges on campus and in many respects are shrouded in secrecy. Supplemental fees are not subject to HESFA, which means they can be increased each year by as much as the individual colleges deem appropriate. And, unlike mandatory fees, students have no input regarding the amount by which the fees are increased each year; nor do they have any say in how

Frat | PAGE 5

STUDENT | Page 4

Delta Upsilon, a fraternity recently under investigation by the university and the national organization, was formally suspended Dec. 6. MANEATER FILE PHOTO

Delta Upsilon suspended by nationals The suspension will last a minimum of two years, and ultimately the decision to reinstate the chapter will be up to the Delta Upsilon national fraternity. MADI MCVAN Reporter The MU chapter of Delta Upsilon has been suspended for at least two years, the Delta Upsilon International Fraternity Board of Directors announced Tuesday. The decision was made on Nov. 19 after a hearing in which a group of undergraduate members

and alumni advisers met with the Board of Directors, according to a Dec. 6 news release. The chapter was informed of the suspension Monday, after the fraternity, advisors and the university worked out the details of the suspension. According to the news release, “the suspension is a result of repeated violations of Fraternity and university policy and state law.” The chapter will not be reinstated until at least fall 2018. The suspension means that all initiated members will have a suspended status, and all fraternity operations must stop. Because the house is not owned by the international fraternity organization, residents may continue to live there through the


4

THE MANEATER | NEWS | DEC. 7, 2016

Student leaders criticize lack of transparency in supplemental fees at MU continued from pg. 3 revenue from the fees is spent. Since the implementation of HESFA, in-state tuition at MU has increased by 12.5 percent, while the supplemental fee for the School of Engineering has increased by 55.6 percent — more than four times as much — according to a Maneater analysis of past MU budgets. “I get that I’m going to have to go into debt. I get that I’m going to have to work hard to make monthly payments,” Calfee said. He has taken out a handful of student loans and works at Shakespeare’s Pizza to make ends meet. “But at the very least, they should tell me what I’m paying for, right? At the very, very, very least, I should get an explanation.” Bill Vega, the chair of the Student Fee Review Committee, understands Calfee’s frustration and confusion. “I don’t think the fact that they’re charging these fees is the problem,” Vega said. “I have my problem with the opacity of the process, the lack of student input, lack of oversight and the lack of checks.” Critical Audit Nicole Galloway, Missouri’s state auditor, agreed with Vega. In an audit report released in August, Galloway criticized the UM System for both the increases in the fees and the lack of transparency surrounding them. The report cited a “significant growth of supplemental fees” compared to the “moderate growth rate of institutional costs.” The audit found that since implementing HESFA, Missouri’s four-year public institutions had increased supplemental fees by 138 percent overall and 112 percent per full-time student. The report also took issue with how “tuition and fee information provided by the institutions is not verified and documentation of the tuition review process is not always maintained.” Alex Howe, treasurer of the Graduate Professional Council, realizes that the university’s budget is under pressure due to a combination of HESFA and maximum enrollment numbers. “Given [HESFA], given the practical limits on enrollment, supplemental fees are the only

pressure release valve that the campus has to make more money,” Howe said. “It’s not their fault. They need to have a budget. But no one is looking at supplemental fees.” The Process and Inaction At a February 2015 Board of Curators meeting, curators approved 18 UM System-wide supplemental fee increases for the 2016 fiscal year, including seven from MU. There was much discussion surrounding the fees, along with criticism from some of the curators. “I don’t think these fees are particularly transparent and they make it very difficult for students to plan financially,” curator David Steelman said. Brian Burnett, the UM System’s vice president of finance, explained how the fees are presented and approved. “It’s really a two-step process,” Burnett said. “The deans have to go through the campus level review … then they have to come through the system review.” Burnett went on to say that the fee proposals must demonstrate they are truly needed and will “meaningfully impact students.” Former UM System President Tim Wolfe, who has since resigned, further defended the process in the meeting. “We have to focus on quality, while balancing price and affordability,” Wolfe said. “It does give that unique revenue source to those programs that are in need to improve the quality or continue to maintain the quality of those particular programs.” He added that the curators and the administration would “like nothing better than to not do this … [but] we run the risk of affecting the quality of our education and our research without these kinds of fees.” Tracy Mulderig, the student representative to the Board of Curators at the time, voiced concerns that she and other student leaders had about the fees. “The sticker price is impossible for students to understand,” Mulderig said. “Future students are looking at tuition and campus fees in order to weigh the cost of attending our university. But these students do not get an accurate understanding of supplemental course fees until they receive their first bill.”

Photo illustration of paying a bill on MyZou. JESSI DODGE | PHOTO EDITOR Curator Donald Cupps was surprised to learn that it took until the first bill for a student to learn what a supplemental fee is. “If that’s true, that’s not good,” Cupps said. “And certainly I know that the university wants to have complete transparency and give them as much notice as possible.” Despite taking issue with the fees and their opacity, Steelman still voted in favor of them. “I am going to vote for these very, very grudgingly,” Steelman said. “And I really hope that we have a very serious discussion as a board and as an administration on the continuation of supplemental fees in lieu of a more transparent tuition.” Yet since that meeting where the curators unanimously approved the fee proposals, there has been no apparent effort among UM System leaders to change the way they handle supplemental fees. Interview requests to the curators, the office of the UM System president, Burnett’s office and various MU deans went unanswered. John Fougere, chief communications officer for the UM System, emailed a statement saying the “campuses typically discuss fees with student groups and student feedback is considered when reviewing proposals.” “While we appreciate the

stated commitment to receiving student input on supplemental fees, we would encourage the administration to reconsider whether their current mechanisms for doing so are adequate,” Howe said. Demand for Student Input A 2014 report drafted by both the Graduate Professional Council and the Missouri Students Association outlined their grievances and presented a plan to create a college fee committee. The committee would be made up of various student leaders and would meet only to discuss and approve potential supplemental fees and increases. Howe said such a committee could easily be integrated with the Student Fee Review Committee, which reviews the university’s mandatory fees. The SFRC is made up of a student-appointed chair, two vice chairs, seven undergraduate students and three graduate students. Howe is a vice chair on the committee. “MSA, GPC and SFRC are all onboard with putting supplemental fees under SFRC,” Howe said. “It’s an existing committee that has a track record of doing well with student fees, making good decisions and being representative of graduate, professional and undergraduate

students.” Vega agrees that student oversight is crucial, but he said smaller steps could be made in the short term. “At the bare minimum, we could get on the cashier’s website, under the explanation of fees … we could get every supplemental and say here’s what it goes to and here’s why,” Vega said. “That should be already happening, but it’s not.” After spending over a year and a half trying to learn about supplemental fees, Vega has never received an answer to how this money is spent. “What is that doing for me?” Vega said. “Is that buying me more water bottle dispensers and drinking fountains, or is that compensating some of the faculty that are really integral to the operation of the college? There may be no shade, no wrongdoing, no ill will, but there’s no way to back that up. No one has any idea.” Calfee thinks MU’s priority should be ensuring that students are kept informed and have trust in the university. “At the very, very, very least, I should get an explanation … and if [students] can’t trust you, you don’t have a school,” Calfee said. Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com

Sign up for The Maneater Daily newsletter for everything you need to know to start your day at Mizzou in one easy email:

bit.ly/ManeaterDaily


5

THE MANEATER | NEWS | DEC. 7, 2016

Sandy from Plaza to donate surprise GoFundMe contributions to MizzouThon Freshman Adam Treutelaar: “Sandy puts a smile on my face every time I go to Plaza, and I'm sure she makes her grandkids even happier. The least I can do is spend as much as I'd spend on a meal swipe to help her do that.” VICTORIA KUZ Reporter

FRAT

Continued from page 3

members’ alleged involvement

in an incident with the Legion

M

of Black Collegians.”

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

current residents to re-sign contracts. In previous years, ResLife has capped the number of returning students who are permitted to live in the halls for

M

M M

M M

M M

M

M

M M

M M

M M

M M

M

M

M

M

HALL

Continued from page 3

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

The students responsible for creating the GoFundMe that raised over $5,000 for Plaza 900 employee Sandy Cunningham (center) stand for a photo with her and Plaza 900 Manager Monelle Hausheer (left). JESSI DODGE | PHOTO EDITOR “I think the thing I appreciate the most is the consistency of happiness that she brings,” Reader said. “She caters to a lot of freshmen, with the nature of freshmen being so up and down, her endless willingness to serve and encourage through her role means more to us than she will ever know. And that’s the exact reason we took the initiative to pay it back to her.” Donations exceeded $3,000 within three hours. By 11 p.m. Tuesday, $5,505 had been donated by 639 people, and the link had been shared more than 8,400 times. The students behind the campaign did not necessarily anticipate its rapid growth. “This action was no doubt inspired by the incredible amount of gratitude we feel toward faculty and staff throughout

the entirety of campus,” Schnelle said. “We were just so moved by Sandy’s selflessness that we started this project without considering the magnitude it might reach and any unplanned implications it may have.” When Sandy ultimately found out about the page, she decided to instead donate the thousands of dollars given to her back to the community. In a statement released a few hours after creating the fundraiser, Davis, O’Neal, Reader and Schnelle expressed their gratitude to the MU community and explained that Sandy had chosen to transfer the GoFundMe donations to MizzouThon, the largest studentrun philanthropy at MU. MizzouThon raises money for the MU Women’s and Children’s Hospital through events all year, most notably the 13.1-hour dance

marathon in the spring. After the fundraiser closes, a check will be presented to MizzouThon on Sandy’s behalf. In the meantime, both donations and students’ positive thoughts of Sandy continue to flow steadily. The campaign founders encouraged students to keep donating to the page for MizzouThon “in the spirit of Sandy.” “Sandy puts a smile on my face every time I go to Plaza, and I’m sure she makes her grandkids even happier,” freshman Adam Treutelaar said. “The least I can do is spend as much as I’d spend on a meal swipe to help her do that.” Edited by Allyson Vasilopulos and Nancy Coleman avasilopulos@themaneater.com, ncoleman@themaneater.com

M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM M M M M MMM M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMMM MM M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMMMM M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

If you frequent the dining hall Plaza 900, chances are you’ve been greeted by the smiling face of Sandy Cunningham, better known as simply “Sandy from Plaza.” “Sandy greets every student that walks into Plaza with a smile — and without a doubt, her personality is just as radiant,” freshman Lucy Reis said. “She stops her work to have a conversation, and cares about what students are up to.” Sandy is known for greeting students at Plaza 900 by asking them about their day. MU students Ben Schnelle and Catherine Hoffman took the time to ask Sandy about her life instead — specifically what she wanted for Christmas. “Initially we asked her, and she was so modest she wouldn’t even give an answer,” Schnelle said. Eventually, she gave an answer that did not cater to herself at all. Sandy wanted gift cards so that she could buy gifts for her grandchildren. “Pretty much every Mizzou student (past and present) knows and loves her, so I just thought it would be great to do something special for her,” Hoffman said in a text message. Schnelle shared Sandy’s answer in a group chat, and several other students, including Joe Davis, Chase O’Neal and Zack Reader, collaborated on the idea of a GoFundMe page to raise money for Sandy. The original goal of the campaign on GoFundMe, an online crowdfunding platform used to raise money for various types of events, was to raise $500 by winter break to buy gift cards from department stores for Sandy to purchase presents. The fundraiser was shared on Facebook at about 2:15 p.m. Dec. 1, and it quickly went viral among the MU community. Within 45 minutes, the $500 was raised as students poured in their support for Sandy.

The release goes on to say that “unsubstantiated claims of predatory drug use, which have been refuted by the International Fraternity, were also not considered in this decision.” The suspension will last a minimum of two years, and

the decision to reinstate the chapter will ultimately be up to the Delta Upsilon national fraternity, IFC spokesman Jacob Farkas said. “In recent years, the chapter has struggled to follow Fraternity policy despite unprecedented levels

of support from staff, alumni and the university,” said Justin Kirk, Delta Upsilon national executive director, in the news release. “Delta Upsilon is committed to being an integral, productive part of any campus community, therefore, we hold all of our members and

chapters accountable to a set

a second, third or fourth year. But according to Minor’s RHA Congress presentation, this year, ResLife is encouraging students to stay in the halls. Students will initially have access to a limited number of halls so that ResLife can operate a smaller number of full halls rather than more that may be below capacity.

Basi said freshman enrollment numbers and housing contract renewals will be watched over the next several months to determine how many halls will be available. In addition to the the current hall options, a new residence hall, which RHA has proposed to name after journalist Lucile Bluford, will be opening next

fall in the Dobbs area near the Laws and Lathrop buildings, which will be demolished at the beginning of next school year. ResLife has made lastminute decisions during the summer in the past about which halls will be in use for the fall semester, Basi said. Last year, four halls were scheduled to be taken offline for the fall 2016

semester, though Respect Hall was ultimately used to house graduate students this year. The final call about whether Schurz or McDavid will be housing students next year will not be made until the number of students living in the halls becomes more clear. Edited by Emily Gallion egallion@themaneater.com

of standards. Unfortunately,

repeated failure to meet those

standards led to this tough decision.”

Edited by Emily Gallion

egallion@themaneater.com


6

A PLACE FOR FREE EXPRESSION We want to hear your voice. Submit letters to the editor at: www.themaneater.com/letter-to-the-editor FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION EDITORIALS REPRESENT THE MAJORITY OPINION OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

Editorial

OPINION

THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED BY THE MANEATER COLUMNISTS DO NOT REPRESENT THE OPINIONS OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD.

New swipe donation program is good but needs work

Starting next semester, students with dining plans will be able to donate spare swipes to those who go hungry. Campus Dining Services and Tiger Pantry have teamed up to create a pilot program where students will be able to donate up to 10 meal swipes, which will go to students who are registered Tiger Pantry clients. Swipe donation programs have been a goal of various Missouri Students Association platforms for years. It’s encouraging to see that students will now have the chance to help others with their excess swipes, but there are still limitations. Students can only donate a maximum of 10 swipes, which have to be donated before the last two weeks of the semester. Swipes can also only be used at all-you-can-eat locations, not at a-lacarte locations.

It’s great that a program has been created, but adjustments to the limits would allow students to help more people. While it is understandable that the program has a deadline to prevent an influx of last-minute donations, most students do not know they will have

IT’S GREAT THAT A PROGRAM HAS BEEN CREATED, BUT ADJUSTMENTS TO THE LIMITS WOULD ALLOW STUDENTS TO HELP MORE PEOPLE.

swipes left over until the last coupleweek stretch. Allowing students to donate swipes until the very end of the semester may not allow every donated swipe to be used, but it is better that somebody could be helped, rather than nobody benefitting. The cap on the donation of swipes also seems unreasonable. No one buys a dining plan intending to have leftover swipes — it just happens. If someone has 30 more swipes than they need, buying 40 blueberry muffins from Emporium is less fulfilling than buying 30 hot meals for someone in need. Allowing people to donate would place less guilt on students with a plethora of swipes and help those who aren’t as fortunate. Because Tiger Pantry is an MSA auxiliary and MSA members have wanted a program similar to this for so

long, MSA should make sure to promote this program early and often, so that students know that they have the potential to help do good. While

the

program

could

use

improvements, it is a good start to help students who need swipes and students who need to get rid of them. In the meantime, if students are looking to use swipes to help others, Tiger Pantry sets up tables outside of a-la-carte locations like Emporium for students to buy nonperishable items with swipes and then donate. If you are looking to help a fellow student in need with your meal plan, take all of the opportunities available to you.

The Truth Hunter

A voter recount would help integrity of election process Jill Stein's filing of a voter recount protects one of our basic tenets of democracy. HUNTER GILBERT

Hunter Gilbert is a freshman at MU. He is an opinion columnist who writes about rights and tech for The Maneater. Hillary Clinton holds a 2.2 million-vote margin over President-Elect Donald Trump in the current standings of the popular vote. This margin has grown as some states continue to report their total vote counts. Although winning the popular vote is not necessary to win the presidency, this discrepancy can still be infuriating and confusing to those who do not understand the exact way we elect presidents. Whether the electoral college is the proper way to elect a president or not, the process is ingrained in the foundation of our nation’s electoral system. But the preservation of the integrity of the electoral process by holding a recount of the popular vote is necessary to ensure the basic tenets of our democracy. Jill Stein, the candidate who ran under the Green Party platform, proposed a vote recount in Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, saying that the “presidential election [is] tarnished by the use of outdated

and unreliable machines and accusations of irregularities.” One could say the entire election, especially from the polling perspective, was irregular. The polls were incredibly inaccurate — most predicted a landslide victory for Clinton. In reality, some states that supported President Obama during both of his elections voted for the Republican candidate this year. In some of these states, this has not occurred since Reagan. The drastic voting changes are why a majority of the populace was so incredibly surprised by the results and why the polls were so far off. If there is any possibility of a conspiracy in Michigan, Wisconsin or Pennsylvania, the vote should be recounted to protect the integrity of our democracy. Without being sure of the integrity of the vote, the entire process is hollow and lacking the principles on which this nation was founded. From a tampering perspective, it is important to point out that the voting machines themselves cannot be hacked in the traditional sense. Each individual machine could be spliced and interacted with and tampered via a physical connection (incredibly difficult to get away with) but the idea of some Russian cackling in his basement in Moscow destroying the election isn’t really feasible. This is because they are not

The full text of the amendments on the ballot in Missouri this year are displayed at a polling place. MANEATER FILE PHOTO connected to the internet. The stations used to count the vote are not even connected to a network. Donald Trump said on several occasions that he believed the systems were rigged against him. But multiple organizations pointed out how this was impossible, and any sort of vote flipping would be tied to a malfunctioning machine, not a large-scale conspiracy or hack. The irony is the fact that this claim of rigging the election in several specific counties is now coming from the other side of the political spectrum. The evidence of the Democratic

and Green parties, mainly from October news pieces when Clinton held a large lead in the polls, can be used against their argument. Currently, no evidence regarding any tampering has been found, including any tampering with the results. Whether you agree with the result of the Electoral College or not, we should as a nation, at least, be able to agree that the vote was held under untampered conditions. If you are looking at the recount as a chance to change the election, the vote differential in Michigan can’t

mathematically

change

the

result, because Clinton’s vote deficit would still be larger than the margin of votes the recount might restore to her. The recount at its core is an attempt to assure voters that their votes remain intact, that no tampering has obscured the voice of the people by flipping their vote. In such a case, everyone, regardless of their political affiliations, should be interested, since this could potentially reveal a crack in the foundation of our democracy.


7

THE MANEATER | OPINION | DEC. 7, 2016 POLITICS VRBATIM

President-elect Trump’s disrespect of our First Amendment rights cannot be tolerated The best solution is to keep actively exercising our free expression. TESS VRBIN

Tess Vrbin is a sophomore journalism student at MU. She is an opinion columnist who writes about national politics for The Maneater.

Green Party candidate Jill Stein requested a voting recount in Michigan last week, he filed an objection. Speaking on his behalf, his lawyers claimed in the objection that the recount would cause “constitutional chaos,” even though Stein’s request, which is a form of petition, was perfectly legal. Trump’s two most recent attacks on free speech have happened within the past month. A few weeks ago, the cast of the Broadway musical Hamilton directly addressed Vice President-elect Mike Pence and said they were concerned Trump’s presidency threatened certain groups’ safety. Trump reacted by throwing a tantrum on Twitter and calling the cast’s peaceful statement “harassment.” Last week, he tweeted that people who burn the American flag should go to jail or lose their citizenship. In the 1989 Supreme Court case Texas v. Johnson, the court ruled that flag-burning is in fact constitutionally protected free speech, even though most Americans disagree with it. For months, Trump has railed against America’s free press.

Since he became president-elect, he has repeatedly ditched the group of journalists assigned to cover him. Every time a news outlet reports something negative about him, he accuses the outlet and the media in general of being biased against him. In late February, he said he would try to “open up” libel laws to make it easier to sue the media if he got elected. In New York Times v. Sullivan, a 1964 Supreme Court case, the court ruled that the press can only be punished for publishing falsehood if they did it with “reckless disregard for the truth.” Trump, not the media, holds that disregard. The First Amendment does not just protect free speech, assembly, petition, press and religion. Through those things, it protects diversity of thought, ideology and methods of communication. Overall, it protects the truth. To prevent people from expressing themselves is to hinder awareness of reality. Trump wants people to say only what he agrees with and wants to hear. That’s not fair, nor is it representative

of America’s many forms of diversity. He also wants to be completely free of criticism no matter what he says, and that’s irrational. There’s almost always going to be someone who disagrees. It’s OK to disagree, and it’s OK to respectfully criticize others. So what can we as citizens do to protect and respect our First Amendment rights while our next president does neither? We simply keep exercising them. We should keep speaking our minds, practicing our religious faiths (or lack thereof) and gathering and petitioning to support causes, no matter what they are. We should also take the time to educate ourselves about the ideas and beliefs of others so that we can support their rights instead of just defending our own. The press should keep reporting the truth, whether it’s good or bad, and the public should support the press by actively consuming news from reliable sources. Trump can insult our rights all he wants, but he can’t take them away.

M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMMMMMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMMMMMMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M MMM M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M M

Donald Trump’s election last month has endangered some important policies and norms in America. Once he takes office with the Republican Party controlling Congress, the Affordable Care Act could be repealed or at least significantly weakened, which would leave millions of Americans without health insurance. Trump believes climate change is a hoax, so he could withdraw the U.S. from the Paris Agreement to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. A phone call between

Trump and the president of Taiwan on Friday threatened to sour America’s relationship with China. But one of the most important things Trump’s election endangers is the First Amendment. I’m not saying it might go away, because only a new constitutional amendment can nullify an existing one. I highly doubt Congress will actually propose a new amendment limiting our freedoms of expression and approve it with a two-thirds vote in each house. But what good is the constitutional protection of certain rights if the face of our nation constantly disrespects them? The president sets an example for the rest of the country, and Trump’s numerous attacks on free expression give others permission to do the same. His proposed ban on Muslims entering the U.S. attacks freedom of religion. His condemnation of the widespread protests against his election in November attacks freedom of assembly. He hasn’t said much pertaining to freedom of petition, but when

The Fifth Lap

Winter break is actually the best time of the year Cookies, presents and no homework are what make finals week worth the pain and suffering. KURTIS DUNLAP

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

M

Kurtis Dunlap is a fifth-year senior at MU. He is an English major. He writes about student life as an opinion columnist for The Maneater.

The week that so many people fear is almost here: Finals are just beyond the horizon. Although finals week leads to overconsumption of caffeine, way too many hours spent in

the library and last-minute cramming sessions, there is light at the end of the tunnel. Winter break is the reward — a well-deserved one — that students get for making it through finals week. It is by far the best of the breaks we get. When you go home for winter break, you aren’t really expected to get a job like during the summer. You get to lay around, sleep in late and eat whatever you want on your parents’ dime. Winter break is the perfect length. It’s too short to go out and get a job and just long enough so you can recharge and relax from an overload of homework, tests and papers. When you go home for winter break, your parents show how much they’ve missed you by treating you the best they ever could. They want to cook for you, they want to do

your laundry, and they pretty much do anything you want to do. Because the break isn’t that long, they want to cram all the parenting they’ve missed during time you’ve been away into a short window, which

friends from high school and see family members that you maybe haven’t seen since summer. Winter break is just long enough for you to spend time with family, but it is also short enough that you can

WINTER BREAK IS THE PERFECT LENGTH. IT’S TOO SHORT TO GO OUT AND GET A JOB AND JUST LONG ENOUGH SO YOU CAN RECHARGE AND RELAX FROM AN OVERLOAD OF HOMEWORK, TESTS AND PAPERS.

results in our responsibilities amounting almost to zero. Going home for Christmas break is the time of year that I look forward to the most. You get to catch up with

come home, see your family and leave. You have the ability to avoid family drama while still seeing your loved ones. The holiday season is the happiest time of the year:

lights on houses, carolers in the streets and gingerbread men baking in the oven. No other season is like the holiday season, and not having to deal with homework and tests is just icing on the Christmas cookies. Going home for winter break can also be a little turbulent. You want to see as many people as you can, but sometimes you find yourself being stretched so thin that you don’t have time to just sit and relax. You also get to see all your old high school friends, which could be a good or bad thing. Winter break is almost here, and it couldn’t come at a better time. Finals week is the last hurdle that stands between us and a home-cooked meal. All we can do is buckle down, get those papers in and ace all those tests; then, we are off to enjoy the best time of the year.


8

2016, THANKS FOR THE MEME-ORIES From Here Comes Dat Boi to Arthur to Harambe, 2016’s memes may just be the best thing to come out of this ridiculous year. Well, maybe not Harambe. Take a look back at some of our favorites:

JANUARY

APRIL

BERNIE VS HILLARY

CONFUSED MR. KRABS

On Jan. 28, Jeff Wysaski posted the first series of comparison photos between the thencompetitors for the Democratic nomination: Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. The meme is simple: The header asks a nonpolitical question, and Bernie answers in a hip way while Hillary answers in a less-hip way. The meme has been criticized for being sexist.

The confused Mr. Krabs meme appears to be a warped shot from the Spongebob Squarepants season 2 episode “Patty Hype,” according to knowyourmeme.com. The meme is used to express confusion and general angst about practically any situation.

MAY

DAT BOI Featuring a frog on a unicycle, the Dat Boi meme appears to have originated on the Facebook page, “Fresh Memes About the Mojave Desert and Other Delectable Cuisines,” according to New York Magazine. One member of Animation Factory, the group responsible for the original GIF of the unicycling frog, called their work “bizarre off-the-wall garbage.”

JUNE

AUGUST

NOVEMBER

HARAMBE

ARTHUR FIST

DARK KERMIT

In late May, Harambe, a 17-year-old silverback gorilla, was shot and killed at the Cincinnati Zoo after a toddler fell into his enclosure. What started as genuine outrage over the incident morphed into a Twitter meme that put Harambe’s death on the same level as others we lost in 2016, such as Prince, David Bowie and Muhammad Ali.

Information compiled by Kyra Haas

The screengrab of Arthur’s fist originates all the way back in 1999, in “Arthur’s Big Hit,” the first episode of season 4 for the children’s TV show. Arthur’s fist has spawned a slew of other Arthur memes, which often take innocent scenes from the PBS show and caption them with sexually questionable or explicit material. The network responded to the trend, saying they were “disappointed by the few that are outside of good taste.”

In the 2014 “Muppets Most Wanted,” Kermit must confront his evil lookalike, Constantine. Little does Kermit know that one day his rival will represent the inner selves of memers around the globe. The meming began Nov. 6 when the Twitter account @aaannnnyyyyaaaa posted the now iconic meme with the text: “me: sees a fluffy dog / me to me: steal him.”

TORI AERNI // GRAPHICS MANAGER


9

MOVE MAGAZINE | THE YEAR | DEC. 7, 2016

The top 10 alternative albums of the year From Radiohead to Local Natives, don’t miss these 10 albums alternative bands released this year. KAELYN STURGELL Reporter

T

his year was one for the books, with the election, the death of Vine and the mumps outbreak. However, new music releases didn’t let us down. Whether they were filled with fun, summer hits or politicallycharged assertions, these 10 alternative albums of 2016 not only got us through the year but shone above the rest. 10) Kings of Leon, WALLS Most people know a Kings of Leon song when they hear one. Caleb Followill’s voice is distinctive, the guitar almost always has the same tone, and the mix is familiar. Although the band doesn’t try anything extremely new or experimental with their latest album, WALLS lulls the listener all the same with uplifting jams like “Waste a Moment” and soothing heartsongs like “WALLS.”

alternative groups, the band gained momentum. The album is filled with heavy-hitting songs like “Same Old Blues,” “You’re Mine” and “Cruel World.” If you aren’t already familiar with the album, listen to it from the beginning to the end. 7) Weezer, Weezer (White Album) Even though they’re getting pretty old, Weezer’s most recent album sounds a lot like their earlier work. After a few reprehensible albums (Raditude? Really?), the group finally realized their mistake in trying to produce music simply to produce music. Weezer began to show their change of heart in a previous song, “Back to the Shack,” but fully redeemed themselves with the White Album. The band began writing intelligent lyrics again, this time about science, love, feminism and California. Perhaps, years from now, people will view Weezer’s White Album much like the Beatles’ Abbey Road.

Home of the Strange

Sunlit Youth

9) Local Natives, Sunlit Youth Local Natives haven’t been around as long as Kings of Leon, but that doesn’t mean their album doesn’t deserve to be in the top 10. The release of Sunlit Youth was preceded by three singles that all became popular on alternative radio. Each song on the album has a different feel and a different story. If the music itself doesn’t hook you, heavy lyrics like, “And if we don’t care, then who cares?” definitely will. 8) Phantogram, Three Not a lot of people are familiar with Phantogram. Before this album, the New York duo had only produced two studio albums and had a handful of popular singles including “Fall in Love” and “Black Out Days.” However, after the band released three singles off of Three (coincidence?) and played shows with big-name

6) Young the Giant, Home of the Strange This album is different from the band’s previous work. The album sounds more airy and light-hearted, and it features more electronic elements than Mind Over Matter and their self-titled Young The Giant. Songs like “Titus Was Born” and “Art Exhibit” are slow, acoustic melodies, while “Something to Believe In” and “Silvertongue” are heavier, drum-centric tunes. The variety of the album really shows the versatility of the band. 5) Radiohead, A Moon Shaped Pool Radiohead is another band that has been around for a long time and is still producing quality music. After deleting themselves from the internet, a stunt done earlier in the year by The 1975, and sending cryptic flyers in the mail to fans, the band went back online with a claymation video featuring a new song titled “Burn The Witch.” They later went on to release the remainder of the album, which merited high grades from almost every

review site. While the songs sound like sweet lullabies, the lyrics are a little haunting. 4) Panic! At the Disco, Death of a Bachelor While I don’t personally like the musical direction Death of a Bachelor took, it’s hard to deny the massive impact Brendon Urie made with this album. Despite now being a one-man act, Urie has continued to write the P!ATD legacy with his crazy vocal range and stage presence. He attracted a younger audience with carefree songs like, “Hallelujah” and “Don’t Threaten Me with a Good Time,” which also revived “Rock Lobster” by the B-52’s. 3) Glass Animals, How To Be a Human Being Glass Animals have always been good at creating themes in their music. The band’s first album, ZABA, was inspired by the jungle, and their sophomore album is all about different types of people. It’s more synthheavy than their previous work, but that’s exactly how they were able to fine-tune every song to a specific character.

2) Bon Iver, 22, A Million After a five-year hiatus, Justin Vernon, the man behind Bon Iver, announced his return. When I say “he” announced it, I really mean his longtime friend Trever Hagen penned an essay for boniver.org about Justin’s experience with fame and his latest album. The album is the result of years of introspection and exploration. It’s wild. Don’t believe me? Look at the track names and album artwork. As different as it is from his previous acoustic melodies, it’s beautiful all the same and gives you a new perspective to everyday interactions.

I like it when you sleep, for you are so beautiful yet so unaware of it

1) The 1975, I like it when you sleep, for you are so beautiful yet so unaware of it I don’t think anyone could convince me that The 1975’s sophomore album, ILIWYSFYASBYSUOI, shouldn’t be at the No. 1 spot. To many, this album was a drastic shift from the band’s previous work. The group left behind its black-and-white aesthetic in a dramatic social media shutdown and returned boasting neon pink. Singles such as“Love Me” and “The Sound” initially worried fans that the band went pop. However, after a couple of listens of the 17-song album and after reading along with the lyrics, fans quickly realized that The 1975 is still the same socially progressive, anti-culture British dude band. The album has spent 38 weeks and counting on Billboard’s 200 chart and peaked at the No. 1 position less than a month after its release. Really take the time to get to know this album and the inspirations behind it; you won’t be disappointed. Edited by Katherine White kwhite@themaneater.com


10

MOVE MAGAZINE | THE YEAR | DEC. 7, 2016

-

THE YEAR THAT WAS TORI AERNI // GRAPHICS MANAGER HANNAH SIMON

2

016 is the middle child that could not live up to the expectations set by 2015. The world still holds out hope that 2017 will be its retribution, but that hope is hanging by a thin thread. Of course, not everything was bad about 2016. For instance, Rob and Chyna had a baby, and the women’s gymnastic team dominated at the Olympics. Yet even these happy bursts of life could not make up for the year that made you feel like you were drowning in an ocean of lard. The election This campaign season embarrassed the U.S. in front of every country that has internet access. You would think this roller coaster of an election would be worth it — that the sexist, racist, xenophobic Donald Trump would have been crushed in the end. You would have hoped that Hillary Clinton, the most qualified candidate the nation has ever seen, would have broken the glass ceiling. Good normally does defeat evil — at least that is what fairy tales told us — but alas, 2016 bashed the nation over the head with a meat cleaver. Harambe Whether you think Harambe should or should not have been killed on that fateful day in May is an argument that I will not get into. What does bother me about the entire situation, though, is the joke that has been made out of the gorilla’s death. Harambe may not be a human being, but that does not mean that the death of a gorilla should be made into a joke that frat boys shout at you off the top of their balconies. This event proved how obnoxious human beings can be. Alan Rickman, 1946-2016 I will miss the man who played our favorite greasytendrilled character in all of the Harry Potter movies.

Rest in peace, Alan Rickman. Thank you, 2016, for taking this beloved man away from the world, because David Bowie, Prince and Muhammad Ali were not enough for you. Thank you for twisting the dagger in all of our hearts. Ryan Lochte As if Donald Trump wasn’t providing this country enough international embarrassment, Ryan Lochte’s Olympic lie will surely leave us cringing for years to come. His fabricated story about being robbed at gunpoint at a gas station in Rio — when really he was just immature and intoxicated — not only embarrassed the nation but his mother as well. How could you embarrass the woman that brought you into this world, Ryan? That was not cool. Vine To be honest, I have not used Vine since my freshman year of high school. It was a never-ending stream of sixsecond videos that took up hours of my time. Though it was entertaining to watch absurd dance moves and magic tricks, the death of Vine is for the best. Go outside, smell the roses, take this as a wake up call to pick your head up, and get a life outside of your phone. For those who will feel a hole in their heart due to this loss, you can either suck it up or add it to the long list of things that 2016 screwed us over with. Mumps If there is one thing that sums up this sucky year, it’s the outbreak of mumps that has caused 128 MU students, as of Nov. 30, to resemble blowfish. Surely it is every student’s aspiration to show up to finals with their face 10 times larger than normal, because you know what they say: the bigger the head, the bigger the brain. You got the last word this time, 2016, but watch out because 2017 is coming for you. That is, unless Donald Trump wants ruin that year for us as well. Edited by Katherine White kwhite@themaneater.com

for more

2016

in review

content,

visit move.themaneater.com


SPORTS

THE BEST SOURCE FOR Mizzou SPORTS

11

Sophomore guard Cullen VanLeer, 33, watches to see if his shot makes it into the hoop during the home game against Western Kentucky on Dec. 3. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

MEN’S BASKETBALL

Cullen the coach: VanLeer turns to education roots to mentor teammates Cullen VanLeer, a sophomore guard on the Missouri men’s basketball team, has helped his young teammates transition to Southeastern Conference basketball. NICK KELLY Staff Writer When many children his age were still learning their ABCs and 123s, Cullen VanLeer learned the game of basketball

next to his dad. John VanLeer, who is in his 24th season as head coach at Pacific High School, often brought his toddler son with him to scout opponents. Throughout the games, Cullen watched his dad write down notes about specific players and plays that might work against the opponent in the future. Despite Cullen’s age, John didn’t have to worry about watching him and the game at the same time, though. “It wasn’t like I had to give him a video game,” John said. “He would actually watch the game.” Cullen’s early exposure to basketball

has turned him into Cullen the coach, who has become an extension of the Missouri coaching staff on the floor. Cullen’s basketball IQ has proved even more valuable this season as the education major helps freshmen transition to Southeastern Conference basketball. Cullen didn’t acquire a wealth of basketball knowledge by accident. At an age when many children watched cartoons, Cullen watched basketball film. Every day before elementary school, Cullen spent 90 minutes at school with John, who also teaches physical education. The early

mornings provided Cullen with time to absorb more basketball information. He didn’t wait long to apply what he learned. When it came time for recess, Cullen, to no one’s surprise, typically played basketball. A pick-up game filled with boys and girls trying to make highlightreel-worthy baskets just wasn’t enough, though. Instead, Cullen the coach made an appearance as he put his friends and classmates through basketball drills. Turning recess into his basketball practice was just the beginning of Cullen

COACH | PAGE 15

NEWS AND NOTES

Chadwick shines on world stage, Harris and Penton honored by SEC, volleyball players win regional honors Michael Chadwick earned a bronze medal at swimming World Championships. PETER BAUGH Sports Editor Here’s a look around Mizzou Athletics after a busy Tuesday:

Chadwick sprints to bronze at World Championships Mizzou senior Michael Chadwick earned a bronze medal at the World Championships (25m) in Windsor, Canada, and helped the U.S.’ 400-meter freestyle relay to a third-place tie with Australia. Chadwick led off the relay with a split of 47.56. He was joined by Paul Powers

and Olympic gold medalists Tom Shields and Blake Pieroni. Powers is a junior at Michigan, Shields is a CaliforniaBerkeley graduate, and Pieroni is a junior at Indiana. “Not making the Olympics over the summer, it’s my first time representing the U.S. on an international scene,” Chadwick said in an interview before the meet. “So it’ll be my first time

actually representing the United States in a different country, so I’m excited to finally have the opportunity to do it and showcase what I can do on an international stage.” The meet runs through Dec. 11. Chadwick is set to compete in the 50and 100-meter freestyle events, and will

NOTES | PAGE 13


12

THE MANEATER | SPORTS | DEC. 7, 2016

Missouri advances to Sweet 16, will face No. 2 Minnesota on the road Friday The Minnesota Golden Gophers are undefeated at home. CHELSEA ROEMER Staff Writer Missouri volleyball defeated Purdue 3-1 on Friday in Columbia, advancing to the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament. The game served as a rematch from 2013, when the Tigers fell to Purdue in the first round of the NCAA Tournament. “I am very proud of these girls,” coach Wayne Kreklow said. “I knew it was going to be a tough match, but we were relentless in transition and played really well.” Purdue coach Dave Shondell acknowledged the loss. “What a performance by Missouri tonight,” Shondell said. “We just did not have the answer tonight. They had too much skill.” Shondell also noticed the Tigers’ growth from 2013. “Missouri has a unique style of play,” he said. “They are amazing both offensively and defensively. This is a better team than I saw three years ago.” The Minnesota Golden Gophers swept Hawaii to advance to regionals, becoming the next opponent the Tigers will face in the NCAA tournament. The Golden Gophers are ranked No. 2 in the country and are undefeated on their home court. They have improved to a 27-4 record. “I already know that the Minnesota head coach will be calling me this week,” Shondell said. “He will want to know

Missouri volleyball, the 2016 SEC Champions and now a Sweet 16 contender, gather together to celebrate the win against Purdue after the conclusion of the fourth and final set. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER everything there is to know about this Missouri team.” Kreklow reflected on the team earning a spot in the tournament regionals. “I’m really proud of these guys,

they have worked to hard for so long,” Kreklow said. “It’s really nice to see everyone get where they want to go; we have wanted to get here for a long time.” The Gophers will host the Tigers in

Minneapolis on Dec. 9. First serve is set for 7:15 p.m., and the match will be streamed on ESPN3. Edited by Anna Sirianni asirianni@themaneater.com

Frazier expected to fill Harris’ role on defensive line After announcing his intentions to enter the NFL draft on Thursday, Charles Harris said Marcell Frazier will likely take the lead of the group. NICK KELLY Staff Writer As Missouri defensive end Charles Harris announced he will forgo his senior season and enter the NFL draft in April, family members, coaches and players smiled. Many Tigers fans also smiled knowing a ninth Missouri defensive lineman will be drafted in an eight-year period. Those grins likely didn’t stay for long, however, when they realized what it means for the Tigers. A lot might change for the defensive line. Harris led the team with nine sacks and 12 tackles for loss, and he finished second on the team with 61 total tackles in 2016. He played a vocal leadership role as well. Life without Harris won’t be easy for the Missouri defense next season, but Harris said the player who will likely fill the void revealed himself last

Friday against Arkansas. “The torch will be passed on to Marcell Frazier,” Harris said. “I put that pressure on him because I know he wants that pressure. It is definitely Marcell.” Frazier showed he can handle that pressure against the Razorbacks. His three sacks and four tackles for loss earned him recognition as Southeastern Conference Defensive Lineman of the Week. Frazier, a junior, finished the season with 8.5 sacks. Not too bad of a finish for a junior college transfer in his second season with Missouri. “It is amazing how he came in, transferring from [junior college],” Harris said. “He picked [everything] up instantly.” Jordan Harold and Spencer Williams will also return next season after starting at times in 2016. Harold registered 1.5 sacks and 2.5 tackles for loss. Williams did not get a sack or tackle for loss. Other defensive linemen who contributed in 2016 and will be back next season include freshman Markell Utsey and sophomore Nate Howard at defensive end. A.J. Logan and Terry Beckner Jr. also return and are projected to start at the two defensive tackle spots next season. Tre Williams, one of Missouri’s top overall prospects

Junior defensive lineman Marcell Frazier, 16, stretches for a tackle during the away game against Tennessee on Nov. 19. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER coming out of high school last season, is another player to watch. Defensive tackles Rickey Hatley and Josh Augusta played their senior seasons in 2016

and will not be back. Despite Hatley, Augusta and Harris’ exit, Harris is excited for the Missouri defensive line’s future. “I have no doubt in my mind

D-Line Zou will be great next year and will continue to be great,” Harris said. Edited by Peter Baugh pbaugh@themaneater.com


13

THE MANEATER | SPORTS | DEC. 7, 2016

NOTES

Continued from page 11

likely swim on more relays, depending on what the Team USA coaches decide. Penton, Harris earn all-SEC honors Redshirt junior Charles Harris remembers living in the residence halls with senior Aarion Penton when they were freshmen. Penton got a decent amount of playing time that season but only started two games for the Tigers. Harris took a redshirt season and did not appear in any games. Three years later, the two Mizzou stars were recognized as some of the best players in one of college football’s most formidable conferences. “Now we can just see each other grow and develop and get awards,” Harris said. “It’s always a blessing.” Harris and Penton were voted to the all-Southeastern Conference Team by the conference's coaches Tuesday. Penton received first-team honors, while Harris was named to the second team.   Penton led the SEC with five interceptions in 2016. Harris tallied nine sacks and 61 tackles after earning all-SEC honors the year before.   “Anywhere I can bring attention to the Mizzou football program is a plus, not just for myself but also for the university,” Harris said. “Of course I love

Michael Chadwick looks at the scoreboard after a victory in his race on Nov. 17. EMIL LIPPE | SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER wearing that logo on my chest, the Tiger logo.” Harris will forgo his final season of eligibility and enter the NFL draft. Penton is also a potential draft pick.

and redshirt junior Kira Larson were

Volleyball brings in more accolades The Missouri volleyball team continued to bring in awards on

Tuesday, as coach Wayne Kreklow and four players earned regional honors from the American Volleyball Coaches Association. Kreklow was named Southeast Region Coach of the Year after leading the Tigers to their second SEC Championship. Redshirt junior Melanie Crow, senior Carly Kan, sophomore Alyssa Munlyn

home, however, it is suggested that we keep up with training so we are in good shape when we return to campus. And when we come back, that’s when the real work begins. Since we don’t have to worry about classes or any other obligations, we can put all of our physical and mental energy into swimming. Every practice is important in building our bases so we can go even faster with a bit of rest at the end of the season. There is no holding back during winter training. We have nothing to do but train, and we train hard. We continue our vigorous schedule from the school year, which includes swimming, weight lifting and doing dry land work. But everything is amped up because we have nothing else to focus on. Some days, we put in as many as 8 miles of

swimming. It is excruciating work as we break down our bodies as far as they will go. We push until there is nothing left, and it’s easy to see how winter break can take a toll on us. But rest assured. Our team knows how to have a good time and keep an upbeat attitude even though we may wear ourselves out. My favorite tradition is the ultimate Nerf war through Hawthorn Hall. We split up into four teams and each takes a floor in the dorm. From there, it is a slug fest until the last team stands. It is a great way to break up training and have fun with the team. My other favorite tradition, which was put into place just last year, is the “waffle-off.” After a gruesome Saturday morning practice, the team

usually eats at Waffle House. Last year, being the competitors we are, two of my teammates decided to settle who could eat five waffles the fastest. It was quite a sight to see as Alex Walton devoured his waffles in a record-setting time of 5 minutes and 14 seconds. It will be fun to watch a new challenger take on the reigning champ this year. Winter training is quite a beast to tackle. Through all of the training, it would be hard without a team like Mizzou to tackle it with. As much as some on the team might complain about soreness and exhaustion, we are aware at the same time that winter training is vital for long-term success. While working hard and having fun through excruciating training, our team knows how to thrive through winter break.

named to the All-Southeast regional team. The Tigers compete in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament Friday at Minnesota. Edited by David Reynolds dreynolds@themaneater.com

Athlete angle: Winter break is no break at all in swim GRIFFIN SCHAETZLE Griffin Schaetzle is a sophomore swimmer at Missouri. He is The Maneater’s athlete columnist. Students can see the finish line. A few hectic weeks of school are the only thing standing between them and a long, much-needed winter break. For the Mizzou swim team, however, the finish line means bracing for the toughest training of the season. While almost everyone else gets to enjoy a nice long break at home, we get to swim, swim and swim some more. When the semester ends, we get a little less than a week to enjoy our family and the holidays. While we are


Spaces filling fast for Fall 2017! SECURE YOUR SPACE BEFORE WINTER BREAK

Select floor plans sold out PRIVATE BEDROOMS & BATHROOMS

FULLY FURNISHED WITH LEATHER-STYLE SECTIONAL SOFA STATE-OF-THE-ART FITNESS CENTER WITH STRENGTH EQUIPMENT, CARDIO MACHINES & FREE WEIGHTS

Apply online today at

UCENTREONTURNER.COM

Leasing Center: 114 S 9th Street #101 Property: 625 S Fourth Street 573.514.7782 Renderings & amenities are subject to change. Limited time only. See office for details.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS CENTER WITH iMACS & FREE PRINTING RECREATION CENTER WITH BILLIARDS, PING PONG & ARCADE GAMES


15

THE MANEATER | SPORTS | DEC. 7, 2016

COACH

Continued from page 11

passing on the basketball knowledge he gained through hours spent watching basketball with John. “I just try to use my IQ to help everybody else and boost their IQs,” Cullen said. Fast forward to college, and not much has changed. Cullen isn’t putting his teammates through basketball drills, but he still mentors and instructs them. “He can teach you every position,” freshman Willie Jackson said. “If you need help going over plays, you can talk to Cullen.” Cullen doesn’t just mentor Jackson. He offers up his knowledge to all

freshmen who are willing to listen. Freshman Frankie Hughes, who leads Missouri with 14.1 points per game, attributes his fast start in part to Cullen’s guidance. “Cullen is kind of like my backbone,” Hughes said. “He helps me out so much in practice and in games.” Still, Cullen isn’t vocal. Described as a quiet guy by his teammates, Cullen sticks to one-on-one conversations. Jackson said he typically talks to Cullen after every practice as Cullen offers words of wisdom. Because he is a quiet individual, Cullen’s words to the team carry more weight. “If Cullen speaks up to say something, there is a reason,” freshman Reed Nikko said. It took someone else speaking up for Cullen to realize he wanted to pursue a degree in education. A local high school

coach spoke to Cullen’s class during the summer before his freshman year about following passions. The coach said it never felt like he had to go to work because he did something fun every day. Immediately, Cullen thought of his dad. Growing up, Cullen spent time with John, watching him enjoy every day of his job. It became clear to Cullen which direction he should take his career. “[I enjoyed] seeing how he impacts people and players and how they come back after and rave about what he has done for them,” Cullen said. “I really decided then that was the path I wanted to take.” He soon decided he wanted to join both of his parents in the education field. His mom, Lori VanLeer, serves as the Lake Washington School District superintendent in Washington, Missouri, and coached volleyball for 11

years. Lori said Cullen wants to teach biology, possibly physical education and, of course, coach basketball. She sees that combination as the perfect fit for her son. “I have always told Cullen that his brain is his bank because his body is going to wear out,” Lori said. “It is the best of both worlds. He will be able to teach and help young people, but also stay connected to sport.” And with the wealth of basketball knowledge Cullen started to accumulate on scouting trips with his dad, he doesn’t want to keep it to himself. “When you have a lot, you should share a lot,” Cullen said. “That is what I try to do.” Edited by Tyler Kraft tkraft@themaneater.com

We will be back in print on Jan. 25

but until then, catch us online and on social media

@TheManeater Have trouble keeping your hot takes to yourself? Are you analytical and insightful? Do you hate character limits? APPLY TO BE A MANEATER SPORTS COLUMNIST KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR APPLICATIONS OVER BREAK @MANEATERSPORTS ON TWITTER


Vol83issue15