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M THE MANEATER

The student voice of MU since 1955

www.themaneater.com

Vol. 80, Issue 31

JUNE 3, 2014

Fellowship

Graduate student to tell stories of empowerment

COURTESY OF ZAHRA RASCOL

Zahra Rasool, a journalism graduate student, poses for a portrait on Tuesday, May 20 on the Francis Quadrangle. As the recipient of the O. O. McIntyre Fellowship award, Rasool will tell the stories of women who are striving for equality and empowerment in India.

ERICA BRAHAM Reporter When graduate student Zahra Rasool first stepped onto the MU campus, she

was extremely overwhelmed. Having moved abroad from India in 2009, the U.S. was a very different place. “I was very conscious about who I was,” Rasool said. “I was conscious about

my accent. I wear a headscarf. You know, I stood out everywhere I went. The color of my skin was different. These were things I realized for the first time. I thought to myself, ‘If I do not take the

initiative to speak up, I am not going to fit in over here.’” With these initial thoughts, Rasool

GRAD| Page 6

opus group

leadership

Petition circulates to repeal development agreement MSA, GPC

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The fate of a new student housing complex in downtown Columbia still remains up in the air. City Council voted 5-1 during a meeting May 19 to approve an amended and restated development agreement between the city and the Opus Development Group to build a 650-bed complex. The new agreement replaces the older, similar one being contested with a petition started by local attorney Jeremy Root. However, another referendum petition

NEWS

HAWK lights are set to be installed on College Avenue along a barrier in 2015.

meetings,” Root said. “I appreciate the use of normal process, but the normal process should not include disregard of all citizen input, which unfortunately this did.” The new agreement was discussed during a meeting May 19, where public comment about the development was available. A majority of the residents who spoke expressed opinions that the development would not benefit Columbia. Major concerns expressed by residents were the lack of adequate infrastructure and how the makeup of the downtown would change with more young undergraduates becoming a major part of the downtown scene.

MOVE

Ragtag cinema, Columbia Staple, is a must see for incoming locals.

has unique relationship ELIZABETH LOUTFI News Editor After the collapse of the University Village apartments in February, the Graduate

LEAD | Page 7

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News Editor

will be circulating to repeal the new agreement with Opus, again backed by Root. “Frankly, we should not have to gather signatures again on the same project,” Root said. “The only reason we do is because council is interfering with our repeal efforts on the first project.” The new development agreement still does not satisfy the arguments that were made when the first petition was created, Root said. “The only change, as far as we can see, is that the agreement was passed and approved through two normal council meetings instead of two special council

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MAGGIE STANWOOD

MOVE

Senior shows her work inspired by imagination in the Craft Studio in June.

SPORTS

The proof of Mizzou Baseball’s SEC struggle is all in the numbers.


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THE MANEATER | ETC. | JUNE 3, 2014

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In Focus: Finishing Strong

THE MANEATER

MIKE KREBS | PHOTO EDITOR

A competitor swims the 100-meter freestyle during the Special Olympics Missouri State Summer Games on Saturday at the MU Student Recreation Complex. The games were held at a variety of locations in Columbia and featured a variety of events including basketball, volleyball, swimming, powerlifting and track and field.

Welcome new students! • We are The Maneater, the student voice of MU campus since 1955. We’re excited to see you on campus (and hopefully in our newsroom) this fall. Look for our newsstands around campus and make sure to pick up a copy of The Maneater. New issues come out on Wednesdays. • Sign up for one of our ListServs on our website or in our office.

G216 Student Center • Columbia, MO 65211 573.882.5500 (phone) • 573.882.5550 (fax) editors@themaneater.com www.themaneater.com The Maneater is the official student publication of the University of Missouri and operates independently of the university, student government, the School of Journalism and any other campus entity. All text, photos, graphics and other content are property of The Maneater and may not be reprodvuced without permission. The views and opinions expressed herein are not necessarily the views of the University of Missouri or the MU Student Publications Board. The first copy of The Maneater is free, each additional copy is 25¢. Krebsy has a little photo job.

facebook.com/themaneaterMU twitter.com/themaneater plus.google.com/themaneater Reporters for The Maneater are required to offer verification of all quotes for each source. If you notice an inaccuracy in one of our stories, please contact us via phone or email. Lauren Rutherford Interim Editor-in-Chief Elizabeth Loutfi, Claudia Guthrie, Covey Eyonak Son, Maggie Stanwood News Editors MacKenzie Reagan MOVE Editor Steve Daw Forum Editor Aaron Reiss Sports Editor Ollie Naeger Online Development Mike Krebs Photo Editor Allison Mann Production Manager

Laura Everett Production Assistant Ben Kothe Graphics Manager Mitchell Gerringer Graphic Designers Scott MacDonald Copy Chief

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Colin Kreager Interim Business Manager Mitchell Gerringer Promotions Manager Becky Diehl Adviser


NEWS

MU, city and state news for students

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COURTESY OF JOHN JUETTNER

MU alumnus John Juettner recently published his debut novel “The Mother Who Loved Halloween.”

msa elections

alum author

BEC handbook passed after talks of reform COVEY EONYAK SON News Editor After weeks of discussion, the Missouri Students Association Senate passed a new presidential election handbook during its last session of the 2013-2014 academic year. The new handbook seeks to foster “more competition” through fewer regulations, Board of Elections Commissioners chairman Derek Chung said. Chung discussed several potential changes to the presidential election process with Garrett Poorman, junior and former Tigers Advancing Political Participation president, who had made several proposals to Chung regarding the handbook. Creating more transparency One major proposal made by Poorman sought to improve transparency in the election by making all campaign expenditures public and requiring all election forms to be published to MSA’s website within three days of their filing. “Currently, there is nothing to address how (the slates) spend their money,” Poorman said. “I think students should be able to see that, especially when students donate to a lot of these slates. At least the BEC should have a record of (the spending) so that if an issue with the auxiliaries came up, the BEC can identify that and enforce the rules.”

BEC | Page 8

MU alum publishes first novel, ‘The Mother Who Loved Halloween’ MADDIE MAGRUDER Staff Writer Since he was a junior in high school, John Juettner knew he wanted to write. Now as a MU alumnus, the Chicago writer recently published his first long-form work of fiction, a novel titled “The Mother Who Loved Halloween.” “The Mother Who Loved Halloween” is a mystery thriller that tells the story of three main characters who all become connected on one Halloween night when

a boy goes missing. The first character is the boy’s mother, who has to deal with his disappearance and the aftermath of the event; the second is the detective who tries to figure out what happened; and the third is the person responsible for the disappearance. An extra layer is added to the story from an underlying force of evil. Juettner said the intangible force is at the more literary end instead of the more plotdriven end. “It’s my own little literary device to try to look at some different aspects of how

human nature works,” Juettner said. “But it’s always kind of present, driving these characters one way or the other.” Juettner said his desire to write was solidified after he attended a writer’s week at his high school. When he started seriously considering colleges, MU seemed like an attractive option; he decided to major in journalism with the hopes of getting a full-time job as a sports reporter and writing novels on the side.

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renovations

Jesse, Swallow halls close for Renew Mizzou Renovations in Jesse and Swallow halls are projected to be completed by April 2015 and February 2016, respectively. LIBBYE TELLOR Reporter Jesse and Swallow halls will close for the upcoming school year as the Renew Mizzou renovations begin, and services and offices in the buildings

are relocated. MU spokeswoman Jesslyn Chew said the Renew Mizzou project “calls for safety and access upgrades” with respect to Jesse Hall. Improvements include air conditioning, heating, ventilation, an alarm system, a sprinkler and a second elevator. The construction in Jesse Hall is expected to run from this July to April 2015, displacing several key services from the building during that time. However, Chew said services vital to students will remain close to the center of campus. “It’s unlikely that students will be inconvenienced by the project because the critical student services will

remain near the center of campus,” Chew said. “Offices such as Admissions, Cashiers, Financial Aid and Registrar whose employees frequently interact with current and prospective students will move to Ellis Library.” According to Chew, Swallow Hall will close to install an upgraded modern interior, larger space for academic use and renovate the exterior brick. The renovations in Swallow Hall will start in July and is expected to run until February of 2016. The Museum of Anthropology,

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THE MANEATER | NEWS | JUNE 3, 2014

McReynolds retires after 36 years McReynolds advised thousands of journalism students. LUCILLE SHERMAN Reporter Jill McReynolds, who has been an adviser at the School of Journalism for the past 26 years, is retiring after a 36-year career at MU. McReynolds has worked at MU since graduating from Stephens College. She started helping set up conferences, and went on to work in the Registrar’s Office as the secretary to the director of registration for four years

and an admissions adviser for another four years. McReynolds later became the first pre-journalism adviser, and has worked in the School of Journalism ever since. Eight years ago, McReynolds became the senior journalism adviser when the school expanded its number of advisers. “It’s been a great ride,” McReynolds said. Her favorite part of the job, McReynolds said, was the students. Lynda Kraxberger, associate dean for undergraduate studies at the School of Journalism, said she enjoyed working with McReynolds from her first day, and that what most stands

out about McReynolds is her calm demeanor and passion for students. “For many, many years, Jill was ‘it,’” Kraxberger said. McReynolds ’ intimate knowledge of the School of Journalism has been extremely helpful to many MU faculty members, Kraxberger said. “There are so many intricacies and policies, and Jill knew every single one,” Kraxberger said. “She knew more than any individual faculty member could know. She became my teacher for what I needed to know, and it has meant so much to me to have her as a teacher.” Over the years, McReynolds has advised thousands of students who came through her

office, many of whom moved onto professional journalism, from CNN reporters to National Geographic writers. “We see students who are wildly successful,” Kraxberger said. “Jill especially had compassion for the underdogs.” Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education Jim Spain said he not only came to know McReynolds through his interactions with academic advisers, but also because his daughter was a student in School of Journalism. “Jill’s service has always been driven by what is in the best interest of the students,” Spain said. “It has also been driven by high expectations. Some people do work to promote themselves,

but she does work to promote the students.” Both Spain and Kraxberger said McReynolds leaves behind a very strong legacy of people who care about students. Although McReynolds and her experience will be greatly missed by students and faculty throughout the school, Kraxberger said, the change presents an opportunity to look at what needs to be improved with a fresh set of eyes. “We have leaned on her experience, and she has given us opportunities to say, ‘How can we do better?’” Kraxberger said.

17 items on May 16, though according to a May 28 news release, the tax cuts had not been accounted for in the Fiscal Year 2015 budget. “Its far-reaching fiscal impact has thrown the budget dangerously out of balance,” Nixon said. “The only thing these giveaways have in common is that they were not accounted for in either the state budget or in the budgets of the cities, counties, and fire districts they would affect.” A fiscal analysis done by the Office of Administration’s Division of Budget and Planning said the tax breaks would cut local and state revenues by more than $776 million annually. $425.1 million would come from a reduction in state sales tax and $351.4 from local sales tax.

According to the news release, these reductions would affect county and city services and taxes that are acquired for K-12 schools, soil and water conservation programs, state parks, conservation and highways. These tax breaks were approved on the last day of session for the Missouri General Assembly. This included House Bills 1296 and 1865 and Senate Bills 584, 612, 662, 693, 727 and 860. “In the last eight hours of the 2014 session, this legislature went on a special interest handout spree, passing tax breaks for everything from fast food restaurants to power companies, with no plan to pay for them,” Nixon said in a May 16 news release. These bills will throw the

budget “severely out of balance,” Nixon said. Additionally, a proposal for a sales tax increase to fund transportation, which will appear on the ballot in August, would increase sales tax revenue by $6.1 billion over ten years, according to a June 2 news release. According to a release by the Missouri House of Representatives, the proposal would raise the sales tax by three quarters of a cent per dollar. The current sales tax rate for Missouri is 4.225 percent, which is below the national average of 5.95 percent. Although funding and improving transportation is important, Nixon said that after the tax breaks, it’s not economically feasible.

“The burden of this $6.1 billion sales tax increase would fall disproportionately on Missouri’s working families and seniors by increasing the cost of everyday necessities like diapers and over-the-counter medication, while giving the heaviest users of our roads a free pass,” Nixon said. Nixon said this change in taxes and funding will shine a negative light on Missouri. “If this effort is successful, Missouri will have the dubious distinction of being a state that, in a matter of months, cut taxes on lawyers and lobbyists, but hiked taxes on bar soap and baseball gloves,” Nixon said. Nixon said the focus should be on education, while transportation infrastructure should take a back seat.

Legislation could reduce Missouri revenue, increase sales tax for transportation funding

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Gov. Jay Nixon is denouncing legislation passed by Missouri lawmakers that would create tax breaks that could add up to $483 million in reduced revenue for the state. “By going on a $776 million special interest spending spree, members of the legislature have broken their own budget, and I’m prepared to fix it,” Nixon said in a news release. The General Assembly passed these tax cuts for about

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News Editor

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MAGGIE STANWOOD

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Gov. Jay Nixon expressed concern for bills that could reduce Missouri funding.


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THE MANEATER | NEWS | JUNE 3, 2014

College Ave. project benefits from MSA collaboration The roadwork is set to be completed by the summer of 2015. JOSEPH FAFINSKI Reporter Historically, navigating across College Avenue between the Rollins Avenue and University Avenue blocks has long proved to be a dangerous challenge for the students of MU and the entire community. The MSA Campus and Community Relations Committee sought to express the stance of the MU students regarding this issue, and work with the Columbia City Council to see what could be done to increase pedestrian safety in the area. Chad Phillips, chairman of the CCRC, took notice of the College Avenue pedestrian safety issue and brought students to the Columbia City Council meeting in hopes of presenting the students’ concerns. “I realized that there is power in numbers and reached out to any concerned student groups or MSA members still in Columbia and available to attend,” Phillips said. Their work has helped to result in the construction of two new HighIntensity Activated crosswalk beacons and a fenced, stone-stamped median on College Avenue. The roadwork is set to be completed by the summer of 2015. Phillips said this project gained steam when councilwoman Ginny Chadwick, a valuable connection for MSA, brought it to his attention. Chadwick noted that it could have an impact on students in the area. Right away, plans began to come together. “Immediately, MSA Senate and Executive branch members began formulating a plan of action and determined what proposed solutions

MIKE KREBS | PHOTO EDITOR

Motorists drive on College Avenue just north of Rollins Street on Monday in Columbia. Two new HAWK (High-Intensity Activated Crosswalk) beacons and a fenced, stone-stamped median are set to be completed on College Avenue to increase pedestrian safety.

would be best for students,” Phillips said. Phillips worked especially close with MSA Senate Speaker Benjamin Bolin, who lauded Phillips’ actions. “Chad deserves all the credit. He brought everyone together for this issue,” Bolin said. Bolin said the Columbia City Council weighed all possible options in regards to the project, which originally ranged from doing nothing to adding a physical barrier in the College Avenue median.

By reaching out to MU students, Phillips enabled them to make their own concerns known regarding College Avenue and its dangers. 2014 MU graduate Dean Pearce, who lived on East Campus last year, said he had noticed the dangers of the College Avenue crossing when he was a student at MU. “In my time on East Campus, I saw so many students, including myself, run past speeding cars on College (Avenue),” Pearce said. “I always felt like I was

we felt that the best way to make sure we not only maintain (the center), but that it continues to exist, would be to put it under the university, not student government.” MSA Senate Speaker Ben Bolin said different executives have had ranging priorities in the past. “We’ve definitely seen, in years prior … that how a president or vice president perceives (and) how we measure value (especially in tight budget years) makes a difference,” he said. Lucas said the previous structure of having such a center embedded within student government was something not found in most other universities. “It (was) something that is rather unprecedented,” he said. “When (the center’s coordinator, Danica Wolf ) goes to conferences, there is probably not a university in America that has such a center reporting to student government.” Wolf could not be reached for a comment. Lucas said a combination of this unusual structure and “high scrutiny” across the country regarding Title IX mandates, a set of guidelines that prohibits sexual violence, sexual harassment and discrimination based on sex, had finally led to discussions about changing the structure. Law firm Dowd Bennett, LLP, which

Bolin said to continue that was commissioned by the UM System Board of Curators to investigate MU’s relationship, the RSVP Center will handling of Missouri swimmer Sasha continue to attend MSA’s auxiliary Menu Courey’s case, concluded in April meetings and that he hopes the two that MU did not properly follow Title IX organizations will co-program events. “This way, we can continue to get guidelines. “A crisis leads to greater scrutiny students’ fire into programs for us all,” and it leads to a greater chance of he said. Because the center was written implementation of change,” Lucas said. as a part of the “And that is what’s association’s happening.” A crisis leads constitution, MSA At this time, Senate passed Lucas said, there to greater Resolution 53-49 are no plans to in a special session financially expand scrutiny and it leads on May 6 to the RSVP Center or to a greater chance authorize the use make any changes of a referendum for to its existing of implementation of students to vote services such as the change, And that is on a constitutional Green Dot training amendment. program. what’s happening.” The referendum Scrog gs said was made available it is important for 24 hours, and to maintain the MARK LUCAS had 344 votes cast r e l a t i o n s h i p Director of Student Life in favor and 28 between student leaders and the center during its votes against the change, according to the Board of Elections Commissioners transition. “The RSVP Center came out of a grant Chairman Derek Chung in an email. Student Life will begin to fund the … received from the U.S. Department of Justice,” she said. “As the grant RSVP on July, with the start of fiscal money was running out, MSA was very year 2015, Lucas said. committed — and continues to be Elizabeth Loutfi contributed to this committed — to RSVP and agreed to report. fund it.”

going to get hit at some point, which means something should be done.” Phillips said he is proud of the collaboration on the issue between MSA and City Council. “By gathering students, we were able to have several students alongside myself speak passionately about this issue and make the City Council aware that the student body does care and we do have a voice on city projects that may affect us, such as this one,” Phillips said.

RSVP Center moves from student government to MU’s hands Director Mark Lucas said the center’s “unprecedented” structure and recent national scrutiny regarding Title IX influenced the decision. COVEY EONYAK SON News Editor After years of being a Missouri Students Association auxiliary, the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center will find a new home as an official part of MU — a move that many believe will help protect the center’s longevity. By moving the center from MSA to the Department of Student Life, it would be funded by the department with no change in the amount of student fee used, Director of Student Life Mark Lucas said. Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Cathy Scroggs said while she had no question of the current MSA administration’s commitment to the center, changing the structure of the center would eliminate any potential shift in priorities. “Rather than to allow some of the vague (things) that could happen over the years with students and priorities,

TheManeater.com


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THE MANEATER | NEWS | JUNE 3, 2014

GRAD Continued from page 1

set out to work hard and strive for excellence. As a journalism major, Rasool began to exercise her voice and learn how to take initiative. Recently, Rasool received the O. O. McIntyre Fellowship award, a $12,000 stipend to be utilized in completing a project in the journalism student’s field of study. With inspiration from her experiences in both the U.S. and India, Rasool decided to use this award to document several stories of women in India who are striving for equality and empowerment. John Schneller, committee chair of the O. O. McIntyre Fellowship board, commended the merit of Rasool’s project. “Journalism, at its root, is about civic participation, and

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Zahra has identified a way to share the collective voices of Indian women with the rest of the world,” Schneller said. The project is still in the early stages of development, but Rasool said it will consist of a series of stories about the changes that women in rural areas of India are trying to make in their communities. “In India, there are women involved in politics, but the number is very, very small,” Rasool said. “According to Indian law, women are allowed to and even encouraged to participate in government. Unfortunately, women often do not participate because of culture and tradition. The culture and tradition is so ingrained that it is extremely difficult for women to participate.” As a young girl living in India, Rasool and her brother both had the opportunity to

Stricken by these differences, study and receive an education. In the U.S., Rasool saw that the Rasool has chosen not only to document standard empowerment f o r Journalism, in India, but w o m e n ’s to show the education at its root, differences w a s is about civic between U.S. important and Indian to the participation, and empowerment society as Zahra has identified of women in a whole, her project. a n d a way to share the Psycholog y she saw collective voices professor equality Etti Navehenacted of Indian women has more here with the rest of the Benjamin worked closely than in with Rasool her home world,” for the past country. four years. In “ ( I n spending time the U.S.) JOHN SCHNELLER with Rasool, I saw how O. O. McIntyre Fellowship N a v e h wo m e n Board Committee Chair Benjamin could be said she has free and witnessed pursue what they wanted to pursue,” Rasool’s determined, strong, and kind personality and has Rasool said.

found her to be a woman who strives for excellence, equality and justice. “She is about doing the right the thing,” Naveh-Benjamin said. “Zahra is trying to bring her perspective of justice and inclusion to a culture she loves, a culture she calls home, but a culture she would like to see change. This is not easy, but I am fully confident that Zahra is up to the task.” Rasool hopes that through the project, she is able to show what women empowerment means from a new and unexpected perspective. “The western mindset of empowerment is very different from India’s mindset of empowerment,” Rasool said. “I hope to show that women in rural areas who are held down to their cultures, traditions and communities are able to create change that affects a lot of people.”

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THE MANEATER | NEWS | JUNE 3, 2014

LEAD

If GPC wants to add a new program or increase funding to an existing program, GPC asks the Student Fee Review Committee to increase student fees by a Continued from page 1 certain dollar amount, Culmer said. “Regardless of what the money is for, Professional Council and Missouri Students based on the Articles of Cooperation, half Association each took steps to protect MU’s of that money must go to MSA,” he said. graduate and professional students. Yet, if MSA were to hypothetically Both student governments passed resolutions that would investigate the expand programming, Culmer added, there collapse further and recognize the death is no mechanism in the articles that says of Columbia fireman, Lt. Bruce Britt. But GPC has to give a proportionate increase both resolutions were written and passed as well. The formula Culmer presented would in separate conversations by separate make the reference point of GPC’s student governments, despite that MSA contributions the actual MSA/GPC budget, and GPC were essentially doing the same instead of GPC’s own budget. things. The only difference was that GPC’s He said it would ultimately increase resolution did not recommend demolition. MSA and GPC, while separate student GPC’s monetary contributions towards governments, share a duty to represent MSA. “Instead of having the reference point the MU and the 34,000 graduate and undergraduate students that attend the that GPC’s contributions be its own budget, we would make the reference point the university. However, they have not always been actual MSA/GPC programming budget,” separate organizations. GPC has been its Culmer said. “So … GPC could increase fees independent of that budget.” own entity from MSA for over 31 years. He said the formula he presented When MSA and GPC were still one large would ultimately increase GPC’s monetary student government, graduate students contributions towards MSA. petitioned the university to have two During March of 2013, both separate governments. They had decided GPC’s duties to graduate and professional organizations were going to agree on the students merited its own separate formula and amend the articles. As a good organization. Though it took several years, faith gesture, Culmer offered to phase out their request was eventually granted in the section of the articles that allocated $5,000 to GPC. 1982. In last year’s MSA budget, the amount A memorandum, dated Jan. 24, was reduced to $2,500. They planned on 1983, from Norman F. Moore, the vice phasing it out completely in this year’s chancellor for Student Personnel at the budget. time, to professor Sam Stout and MSA Both parties ultimately couldn’t come to vice president Ed Reeves, the co-chairs an agreement, Culmer said. of Student Organizations, Governments “(MSA and GPC) differed in the way we and Activities, was the first document to wanted to determine (what) the baseline recommend the recognition of GPC as a contribution would be,” he said. separate student government from MSA. alabama GPC’s contributions last year made up “GPC speaks of not being represented approximately 9 percent of MSA’s budget well if at all by MSA; that MSA is basically arkansas and graduate students make up 18 percent a group of undergraduates concerned with of the campus population, Culmer said. georgia matters of little concern to graduate and Communication ceased during early professional students,” the memorandum summer 2013, Wright said, after Culmer mississippi read. “MSA responds by saying the process left office last May. is open; anyone can be elected or serve on Schools in the SEC: A breakdown Culmerofsaid mississippi he still hopes the Articles stateof committees, and thus those can body severalconcerns schools’ student governCooperation will be looked at again. ments. become a part of MSA’s mission.” I’d like to see the articles be tennessee However, Moore wrote thatSEC he did not share “Obviously, Some schools the same amended to serve both governments better see this as a viable optiondual-government for both graduatestructure, where vanderbilt and more fairly,” he said. graduates are represented in their own and undergraduate students. separate student government.He At other added that communication “What it has boiled SEC down to graduates for me and undergraduschools, sometimes ates remain under the same student bodyseems to fall short between the is that, for a large constituency of our government. student body, what we have doesn’t work,” two student governments. The offices for the MSA and GPC the memorandum wrote. “I am therefore accepting the recommendation of SOGA to recognize GPC as a separate student governing body.” Both organizations continue to overlap, as per their Articles of Cooperation, which outlines the organizations’ financial obligations to each other. Fifty percent of GPC’s student fee funds go directly to MSA. Most of this money is used to fund MSA auxiliaries and the Department of Student Activities, because they affect all MU students, former GPC President Jake Wright said. In addition, every year, the MSA budget features a small allocation of $5,000 to GPC. However, former GPC President Kristofferson Culmer spent the last of his three consecutive terms as president attempting to renegotiate the articles with Wright, then-GPC president-elect; former MSA President Nick Droege and former MSA Vice President Zach Beattie. Culmer’s goal was to create a new formula for how much GPC fiscally contributes to MSA. He said the proportion of contribution has fluctuated over the years as a result of a growing student body and fee increases. “The proportion of contribution has gotten out of whack over the years,” he said. “MSA has increased (their) programming (and) GPC has gotten increases (in funding).” During Culmer’s terms in office, GPC expanded its travel budget and implemented a new Professional Development Series. MSA has recently added two new auxiliaries, Tiger Pantry and Truman’s Closet.

presidents are both in the Center for the undergraduate and graduate student Student Involvement, but the presidents bodies can overlap between the two typically only met once a month this year, student governments. The Preamble of the MSA Constitution states that it is Wright said. “I definitely think there could be more “the undergraduate student government consistent communication between of the University of Missouri-Columbia,” both governments, with GPC having yet there are no requirements that any of representatives on (MSA) committees its members be undergraduate students. In and having members of each government last year’s MSA executive cabinet, former attend each others’ meetings,” Culmer said. Director of Student Services Sean Joy was He said that last year, he attended a a graduate student. Joy said he was able to provide a few Senate meetings and saw former MSA Senate Speaker Jake Sloan attend some of graduate student’s perspective during cabinet meetings last year. GPC’s General Assembly meetings. “I think that the connection and The Articles of Cooperation have always stated the MSA president is an ex-officio of communication between MSA and GPC GPC and vice versa with the GPC president. is very important,” he said. “I think there “When I was president, me and the needs to be at least a representative from three MSA presidents I served with all had GPC, and same with MSA, that goes to great personal relationships,” Culmer said. each other’s meetings … so that they can “I’d say we developed friendships during work together.” An official representative from each my time as president. I really worked on that, because before … the communication government is currently not part of any formal agreement between MSA and GPC, hadn’t been the best.” Culmer said while the two student but Joy said adding one was a conversation governments share a lot of the same campus last year. He hopes that future MSA and resources, it is important that they remain GPC cabinets will pursue an agreement. Farouk Aregbe has been the coordinator separate as long as communication remains constant, because both constituencies are of student government services since July sufficiently different and are best served by of 2006. He advises MSA with special attention to the MSA auxiliaries. that current structure. He said that, regardless of the structure Both Culmer and Wright have faith in the dual-student government structure. of MSA and GPC, it is important that the They both stress that graduate and two student governments are successfully professional students require a separate and fully serving the MU student body place from the undergraduate student body through their joint programming. “It is important that we have those where their voices can be heard. MU is not the only school in the SEC to services,” Aregbe said. “That is the angle have two separate student governments. that I come from. As far as MSA and Vanderbilt University, Mississippi GPC, I think students benefit from us State University and the University of having a good relationship, and I think Mississippi follow the same structure of that is what we have to work towards — a solid relationship built solely on benefiting having a separate undergraduate student a breakdown of several schools’ government and a graduate student students.” student body governments. Both organizations continue to work council. Some SEC schools share the same dual-government structure, where as separate entities. Aregbe Other SEC schools, such as the graduates are represented in their own separate student government. At othersaid as long as theremain two student schools, graduates undergraduates under the governments same student are hosting University ofSEC Tennessee and the and University body government. of Georgia, have one student government, healthy lines of communication, they will in which both graduate and undergraduate be able to successfully serve the students. “People have needs that need to be met,” students have representation. SEPERATE GOVERNMENT represented “And whatever structure allows us “Having separate graduate in and he said. meet GRADUATE those needs best … that’s what STUDENTS student undergraduate studentgovernment governments to FOR makes sure that the different concerns I am for. Whether we need two student of both populations are being listened to governments or not, I’ll let the folks that and being addressed by other decision- are in charge of that hash that out. But makers on campus,” Wright said. “There what’s important is, at the end of the day, are some issues that undergraduates face if a student needs a ride home, they get it. that graduate and professional students, by If a student needs the Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention Center, they and large, do not.” Technically, though, members of either can go there.”

SCHOOLS IN THE sec

student governments IN THE sec Some SEC schools share the same dual-government structure, where graduates are represented in their own separate student government. At other SEC schools, graduates and undergraduates remain under the same student body government.

SEPERATE GOVERNMENT represented in student government FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS

alabama arkansas georgia mississippi mississippi state tennessee vanderbilt Source: The student body presidents of the University of Mississippi, University of Georgia, University of Tennessee, University of Arkansas, Vanderbilt, Mississippi State University, University of Alabama BEN KOTHE // GRAPHICS MANAGER


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NOVEL Continued from page 3

Juettner ended up deviating from his original plan — he now works for a law firm in downtown Chicago, but still manages to write in his spare time. He said the hourlong train rides to and from work offered a good time to work on the novel. The idea for “The Mother Who Loved Halloween” was born Juettner’s sophomore year at MU, during a creative writing class. One

RENEW Continued from page 3

which is currently housed in Swallow Hall, will be moved to Mizzou North, where the Museum of Art and Archaeology was relocated due to the radiation concerns in Pickard Hall. The decision to move the Museum of Art and Archaeology, which was made by former Vice Chancellor Jackie Jones, was heavily criticized for potential inconvenience and lack of input from faculty and students. Feedback to moving the Museum of Anthropology from those in the Department of Anthropology, including Director of Graduate Studies Todd VanPool, appears to be more positive. “We have had excellent support from the administration,”

THE MANEATER | NEWS | JUNE 3, 2014 week, he got an assignment to write a free-form poem. The poem he wrote for the assignment became the starting-off point for the novel. “(The poem) kind of turned into a rough outline of one of the more important scenes in this book,” Juettner said, “so really the genesis of the idea for this novel started while I was in that poetry class at Mizzou because if I wasn’t in there, I don’t know, maybe the idea wouldn’t have come.” Juettner said the reception he has received has been positive. He got many responses in the first seven to ten days after the book was

released, meaning readers finished the e-book fairly quickly. “People have said they were reading it in two or three days or a weekend or something like that,” Juettner said. “That’s the kind of story I wanted it to be. I wanted it to keep the pace going really, really fast and keep the pages turning by throwing in enough suspense and mystery and action to really keep the plot moving forward.” “The Mother Who Loved Halloween” can be purchased through various e-book suppliers, including Barnes and Noble, Amazon and Apple.

VanPool said. VanPool said the move will only be a temporary inconvenience, and that the renovations would be useful for the department. He also said the project would also allow better collaboration between the Art History and Archaeology staff and the Department of Anthropology. The staff in both museums will share an office suite at Mizzou North, and the renovated Swallow Hall will include both the Department of Anthropology and Department of Art History and Archaeology. Vanpool said the reconstruction of Swallow Hall could have many benefits for the Department of Anthropology. The graduate students and faculty would benefit from additional high-quality laboratory spaces and a more comfortable building due to heating and cooling improvements, he said.

Michael O’Brien, College of Arts and Science dean and Museum of Anthropology director, said the museum will be able to provide the same research and education services it did in Swallow Hall, even in its new location. O’Brien also said classes will continue to use the museum like before in the new location. O’Brien said the new proximity of the museums could be beneficial to the public, by allowing for “vast anthropological and archeological holdings” to be housed at Mizzou North. “I hope both the public and academic communities come to appreciate what I have referred to as one-stop museum shopping,” he said. The project is projected to cost more than 21 million dollars and is funded mostly by campus savings and a part of Campus Facilities’ capital repair budget.

BEC

Continued from page 3 Chung agreed to a part of Poorman’s proposal, and changed the “Acknowledgement of Sponsorships” form to include the campaign’s expenditures. However, Chung said online publication of finance information might be more challenging. “We’ve been having a lot of trouble with technology,” he said. “The way we poll and my access to the website may cause some issues, but it’s not a bad idea.” Eliminating bias from the polls Poorman hoped for another drastic reform of the election by limiting the number of polling locations slates are allowed to use from five to two. He said this would allow the BEC to better monitor the locations. A more ideal reform, Poorman said, would see the BEC run polling locations, instead of the slates themselves. After discussing the changes with Chung, however, Poorman learned that the BEC might not have the resources necessary to facilitate the operation of its own polls. If slates run their own polls, Poorman said, they should not provide any incentives to students who vote, in order to eliminate any bias in the voting process. “I think if you are going to have candidates run the polling

locations where they are promoting themselves, there shouldn’t be a quid pro quo scenario,” Poorman said. However, Chung said because such restrictions could potentially limit competition among the candidates and decrease students’ participation in the election, Poorman’s proposals regarding polling locations will not see light in the 2014 handbook. “I believe it is in the nature of competition to allow up to five (polling locations),” Chung said. “But it’s up to the slate if it wants to fill those … I also believe that if the students’ passions are decreased by regulations of the election, that may do more harm than good than any stricter regulation would.” Donations for Endorsements Another major change Poorman proposed to Chung was forbidding the exchange of philanthropic donations for the endorsement of a slate. MSA President Mason Schara and Vice President Kelsey Haberberger’s 2013 campaign stirred controversy when the slate promised to make a philanthropic donation for the Greek chapter with the most tweets about the slate. “I think making a donation is great, … but there shouldn’t be strings attached to that, like, ‘we’ll give money to your charitable organization if you endorse us on Twitter,’” Poorman said. “This change would give clarity to one of last year’s gray areas by defining the practice as strictly off-limits.” Chung said he will not include this change in the handbook, however, because he believes practices such as the Twitter contest was not unethical, and that such a regulation would actually hurt the “competition” of the election. “There is a section of the handbook that limits ‘inhibiting the free participation of a student in the election process … I believe this is an ironclad part of the handbook when it comes to these issues,” Chung said. “Certain endorsements and promotions are OK, as long as they don’t inhibit the free participation of students in the election process.”


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Politics

Sexual assault, rape and politics JORDAN MCFARLAND They are words with blurred meanings. They are misconstrued by lingering traditional reactions and fear. They were also the cover story of the May 26 edition of TIME magazine. In reading the story, marked by a “RAPE” collegiate pennant, the similarities were too much to ignore. Eliza Gray focused the feature on the college town of Missoula, Montana, the supposed ‘rape capital of America.’ As Gray pointed out, though, it isn’t just the University of Montana, it’s campuses across the nation. That includes Mizzou. According to a January report by The White House Council on Women and Girls, sexual assault has happened to 20 percent of students. A mere 2.4 percent report the incident. What’s the big deal in all of this then, one may ask, if it only happens to 20 percent of students? The answer lies in the question precisely. If a perpetrator assaulted a person, there would be no argument. There, society has unambiguous definitions of the victim and the accused in the case of assault. But with rape, with sexual assault, a scary word exposing some flaws in that same society, the definitions are up to interpretation. Between the lines, the victim is pressured in a “blame-the-victim” environment where tradition has led us to say “well, you shouldn’t have walked back alone” or “why didn’t you have pepper spray?” Rather than prejudice, especially on a college campus, we should be offering support, condemning the act and giving our best effort to prevent future occurrences. The White House issued its own recommendations urging college campuses to not just act, but combat the epidemic of sexual assaults. The list included conducting anonymous sexual assault surveys as well as the adoption of anti-assault policies. President Obama took it a step further, creating the White House Council on Women and Girls in January as well as the resource website notalone.gov. The council produced these recommendations in light of the sexual assault cases in the Navy. Therein I raise this point, if the proudest Navy in the world is not immune to these acts, nothing makes a college campus immune either. In order to prevent these acts later in life, we must axe their origins today, at the foundations of many Americans’ lives: our proud universities and colleges. There I answer the first question: it is unquestionably a big deal. Also, with it I raise another question: is Mizzou doing enough? Sure, we students may have seen the handful of Emergency phones or have been introduced to the “buddy rule” by Residential Life, but as a campus, what have we put our foot down for? Individual organizations, such as the MU Police Department and the Missouri Students Association have attempted to tackle the issue, and surely so has Greek Life. But the fact of the matter is, it is not enough. Every time you see an incident in a Clery report, multiply that sole incident by ten. The weight of that number, or any number is pure blasphemy. When the issue is as convoluted as this one, we must act more than we preach, and preach more. As Vice President Joe Biden put it, “You don’t want to be a school that mishandles rape. Guess what? Step up. It’s absolutely time because the moral disapprobation of society

EDITORIALS REPRESENT THE MAJORITY OPINION OF THE MANEATER EDITORIAL BOARD

Student Parent Center options need to be explored Following the catastrophe of the University Village collapse, there is suddenly a glimmer of hope for the future of child care on campus. In February, the University Village apartments collapsed. Located in the same complex as those apartments was the Student Parent Center. As reports of the poor conditions at University Village were made public, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin announced that the apartments and the Student Parent Center — which is housed in the complex — would [close June 30, pending demolition shortly thereafter. Student parents who had previously frequented the center’s service began searching for new places to send their children for day care while they attend classes. Two weeks ago, Loftin announced that the university was asking private developers to send proposals for a new child care facility. First of all, we thank the university for making the decision to close and demolish University Village. The current location of the child care facility is incredibly dangerous, and it is a hazard to both parents and children. It is nice to know that you’re going to finally shut it down.

However, we need to discuss all of your options before you can make a decision about the next Student Parent Center. We think that your decision to ask private developers to submit proposals for a new Student Parent Center is a double-edged sword. On one hand, the presence of a private developer could mean the facility will be well-built and ideally located. The safety of the children should be of utmost importance, and a private developer may be able to ensure that. However, having a private developer construct the new center could also mean a possible rise in prices for the student parents. This provides a problem, seeing as some student parents may not be able to afford a higher-priced center for their children. Does the university have enough funds to build a Student Parent Center on its own? The possibility of a self-built center presents the opportunity of lower costs for students, but only if the funds are available. Considering that the last Student Parent Center built by MU was in such poor condition, if the university does decide to build

another one on their own, they need to make sure that it is more safe and structurally sound than the previous one. And what about the Child Development Lab? Although it is another existing child care center, it is relatively expensive, to the point where many student parents cannot afford it. There is also a long waiting list of children to be enrolled in the lab. Is there a way to make the lab more affordable and more available for students? In the end, we’re simply asking that the university to look at every possible option before coming to a decision. We don’t want them taking the cheap way out, or creating unnecessary costs if it’s not going to exponentially benefit its customers. Student parents make up a small portion of campus, but they are just as important as the rest of the student body. If MU administrators do not explore all of their options before making an informed decision about the future of on-campus child care, we could have a repeat of what happened at University Village. And that’s the last thing that any of us wants.

MSA, GPC must improve communication

Just because the Missouri Students Association and Graduate Professional Council are two separate organizations doesn’t mean they shouldn’t cooperate with one another. This past year, MSA and GPC showed a serious lack of communication between themselves. Although both organizations’ offices are located in the Center for Student Involvement, they still deemed it necessary to set up official meetings in order to talk with one another. The Articles of Cooperation between the two student governments state that the MSA president is an ex officio of GPC, and vice versa. Why haven’t we seen this rule used more this year? While we understand these organizations are two separate entities for a reason, we know that nothing will get done unless there is communication between MSA and GPC. After the collapse of the University Village Apartments in February, MSA wrote and released a resolution about what they thought

was necessary. GPC, however, took until March to release their two resolutions regarding what happened at University Village. The collapse of the apartments directly affected graduate and professional students, and yet the resolutions from GPC came later than from MSA. We feel if GPC and MSA had been cooperating and communicating properly, their resolutions would have come out around the same time. This is one of many issues from this past year that would have been resolved better had there been more communication between the two organizations. GPC is constantly used as a model for other graduate and professional councils within the SEC and on a national level. MU is hosting the National Association of GraduateProfessional Students’ annual conference in November, when councils from around the country will be coming to our campus to participate. GPC is a nationally recognized and respected university organization, and yet, this year it lacked serious communication with

other organizations on its own campus. In 1982, the decision was made to separate GPC from MSA in order better support the nonundergraduate students that make up MU’s campus. MU has shown over the years that having two separate student governments works, or else GPC would not be as nationally recognized as it is. But this system of dual governing cannot function if there is no communication between the branches. The organizations, students and officials will all suffer if this happens. So, to the new GPC President Hallie Thompson, we say this: please make an effort to improve relations between MSA and GPC. We know that you want what is best for the graduate and professional students on campus, but unless there is significant and productive communication between the two organizations, no one will be better off. We need to see a significant improvement in communication between our two student government organizations.

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MOVE

The key to your entertainment

11

KEVIN MATHEIN | STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

RagTag Cinema is located at 10 Hitt Street, Columbia, Mo. The cinema celebrated its sixteenth birthday on Sunday.

RANTS AND REVIEWS

AROUND TOWN

“Chef” is a hearty Ragtag brings out Columbia’s true culture PATRICK MCKENNA summer gem Staff Writer

ROBERT MECCHI By now, I’m sure that most of you have heard one thing or another about “X-Men: Days of Future Past.” Most of the buzz surrounding this movie is positive, and I’m not here to dispute that. I initially wanted to introduce myself through a review of “X-Men,” but seeing as how the film has already pulled in a whopping $216 million, I decided to review a pleasant little indie film called “Chef ” instead. “Chef,” starring Jon Favreau (who also wrote and directed), John Leguizamo and Sofia Vergara, is a bit more complex than its title lets on. The plot revolves around Chef Carl Casper (Favreau) who suddenly quits his job at a high-class Los Angeles restaurant in favor of buying a food truck and exploring the creative freedom that being his own boss affords him. During this culinary endeavor, Casper also finds an opportunity to reconnect with his distant son and worried ex-wife. The plot of the film is nothing to write home about, but the dialogue and chemistry between everyone on screen is so enjoyable that you forget about how generic the overarching plot is. The film is surprisingly hip to the effects that social media has had on small business, but thankfully, it’s neither cynical nor critical of how services like Twitter have changed the entrepreneurial landscape. Sure, jokes are made about the instantaneous consensuses that are made as a result of social media, but most of the humor revolves around the

ColUMN | Page 14

For a city that thrives upon its lively downtown, riddled with cultural landmarks that help brand it as one of the hippest places to live in Missouri, it should come as no surprise that Columbia is home to an independent film theater renowned

throughout the entire country. Ragtag Cinema, going strong since its founding in 2000 by two indie-flick directors, Paul Sturtz and David Wilson, offers an outlet for community members and MU students to see films they wouldn’t necessarily spot at their local multiplex. “My favorite thing about Ragtag in general is how the love of movies

brings so many different people with different backgrounds together,” Ragtag membership coordinator Lindsay Yungbluth says. Since its inception, Ragtag has enriched the Columbia community by promoting film as an art form and encouraging media literacy, education and a general appreciation

CINEMA | Page 14

somebodies

Peace Frame Productions: Coming to a TV near you EMILY BATHE Staff Writer Look out, NBC, FX and Netflix. A new comedic series, “Somebodies,” may be headed your way. With the help of their Kickstarter campaign that raised $3,000, the MU student-led production company Peace Frame Productions has written and produced six episodes of the series. “When you tell people you’re starting a web series, they don’t usually take that seriously,” MU senior Bryan Petcoff says. “(But) now, we’ve gotten to the point where we can do more because people believe in us.” Petcoff, co-founder of Peace Frame, ensures that the production company is much more than something “college kids are doing for fun.” Peace Frame has also done short films, wedding videography, music video production and video editing services. Petcoff and the four other Peace Frame

co-founders (all Mizzou students or alumni) specifically have high aspirations for the future of “Somebodies.” The group is currently working on submitting the series to NBC Comedy Playground, the network’s contest to fill spots for two new series, which will be launched in 2015. “Our goal with the web series is to pitch it to a network — if not NBC, then a smaller one,” co-founder Mitchell Bequette says. “The biggest goal is to get as many people to see it as possible, so we can gauge what we are and aren’t doing well.” “Somebodies” centers around a group of friends who try to become famous on the Internet through their sketch ideas. The cast varies from episode to episode, but includes co-founders Petcoff, Bequette, Samuel Ott, Michael Coleman and Matt Suppes, as well as MU students Abigail English and Hailey Moore. “We like that we can do a satirical but almost raunchy comedy that also brings up a lot of real life situations that are

relatable,” Petcoff says. Although the group is trying to get their individual projects discovered, Bequette wants Peace Frame to be able to develop along with the series as well. “I want Peace Frame to be able to grow so we can produce our own films and be able to fund our own movies,” Bequette says. “It would be awesome to have it still be a part of the process of getting to a network … we want it to be discovered as a legitimate production company.” Petcoff and Bequette advise everyone to check out Peace Frame’s films as if they are any other work — and to make sure to do so before it “blows up.” “The thing that stands out to me the most about what we’re doing is that everything is a passion project for us at this point,” Petcoff says. “All of us are working tirelessly all the time because this is something we care about; (because) we are doing this around other jobs and school and everything — that alone is a reason for someone to give it a chance.”


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THE MANEATER | MOVE | JUNE 3, 2014

‘Imaginative Play’ to open at Craft Studio Senior Sumire Taniai’s work to be featured at Craft Studio. MADDIE MAGRUDER Reporter The Craft Studio will showcase the work of senior Sumire Taniai from Monday, June 9, through Friday, June 20. Taniai, who is currently working on her Bachelor of Fine Arts degree, says this will be her first solo exhibition. Taniai’s paintings have been on display around Columbia, including the annual Boone County Art Show, Columbia Art League and Orr Street Studios, but her exhibition “Imaginative Play” marks the first time she is making multiple pieces to cohesively go together for a show. “Working for exhibition (is challenging because) you focus on one theme and then you have to build (on that theme),” Taniai says. Taniai was born in Japan and moved to Missouri when she was 12. After taking art classes all four years of high school, she originally pursued a major in graphic design before switching to painting her sophomore year at MU. “Imaginative Play” will feature three large oil paintings, two smaller framed paintings, two sculptures and an interactive piece in which the audience contributes a little of its own imagination to the exhibit. Taniai says her inspiration came from the imagination of children. Their minds are so expansive, she says, and she hopes to capture that through her art. “Children’s imaginations are wild and fun, and it’s

COURTESY OF SUMIRE TANIAI

Senior Sumire Taniai’s exhibition, “Imaginative Play,” will be featured in the Craft Studio from Monday, June 9 through Friday, June 20.

really powerful,” Taniai says. “And recently video games (and) competitive sports are

taking over the children and then they’re not using much imagination, so I’m hoping that

they’ll use more imagination.” An opening reception will be on Thursday, June 12 from 4

to 6 p.m. at the Craft Studio, complete with drinks and homemade Japanese snacks.

Take a look inside the pages of Yellow Dog Bookshop A closer look at downtown Columbia’s favorite used book store. SHANNON MURFF Staff Writer Delicious food, fun nightlife and marvelous boutiques are just a few of the many things that make downtown Columbia great. But the best part about CoMo’s cityscape? Its community pride and dedication to local small businesses. A prime example: Ninth Street’s locally-owned Yellow Dog Bookshop. Husband and wife team Joe Chevalier and Kelsey Hammond met working in a bookstore in

California and had long dreamed aimed to make the store a hub of opening for creativity a bookstore and idea of their own. exchange within We want After moving the community. to Columbia “ We want to make in 2006, they to make it found their it a Columbia a Columbia chance. They landmark ,” landmark. purchased a Chevalier says, used book store somewhere “somewhere called Get Lost, people can stop changed the people can stop in every week name and some in every week or so … (to) see of the inventory, what’s new.” added a few or so … (to) see The store boasts p e r s o n a l what’s new.” crowded shelves touches and filled with officially opened books of every their doors in JOE CHEVALIER shape, size and August 2013. Yellow Dog Bookstore ever y genre They chose to Owner imaginable. name the store From cookbooks Yellow Dog Bookshop, after to classics, biographies to their golden lab, Scout, and bestsellers, Yellow Dog offers

something for ever yone, provided they have the patience to look. Those who do are met with a cozy and inviting atmosphere, complete with crafty handmade signs designating the different sections and genres, and comfy corner armchairs. In the back of the store is the popular Kids’ Nook, stocked with shelves upon shelves of children’s books, small toys and a sprawling, brightly colored mural on the wall. The cozy environment is as essential and comforting as the books. However, what makes a used book store the place to go for all your literature needs is the price. The books have been previously owned, but are still in a quality condition and marked way down from what regular retailers would

normally charge. In warmer months, a cart outside Yellow Dog Bookshop on the sidewalk advertises low prices and popular titles, making it a more desirable place to shop for someone whose appetite for books is bigger than their wallet. Yellow Dog isn’t all just books, though. Artistic greeting cards and journals for sale can be found along a back wall –– some made by local artists, some by artists from California and even a few designed by Kelsey Hammond herself. Whether you’re looking for a new favorite book, a gift for a friend or just exploring the downtown area, this indie bookstore is worth bookmarking.

TheManeater.com


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THE MANEATER | MOVE | JUNE 3, 2014 Pop culture shock

What would Emma Watson do? Study. MCKENNA BULKLEY

MOVE columnist McKenna Bulkley on why we should strive to be like Emma Watson. It’s finally summer, which means it’s graduation season. From eighth grade promotions to Mizzou’s own graduation a few weeks ago, it’s the end of school for a lot of students. Or, if we aren’t fortunate enough to be graduating just yet, at the very least it’s a 12-week break from class for the rest of us. Hallelujah. By the end of April it feels like I’m crawling towards finals feeling preemptively defeated and really cranky. With good reason too, because school is hard. Like, really hard. And sometimes it’s easy to get lost in the stress and commotion of life

and forget how important education is. Especially when we take a look at the price tag of a college education, which personally kind of makes me want to cry whenever I think about it. So when we forget the importance of higher education, or when we think that dropping out sounds appealing (such as during every all-nighter ever and before/ after every major test), we need to look towards Emma Watson to remind us to carry on. In addition to being an extremely successful actress and model, Emma Watson can now add “college graduate” to her resume. Watson graduated from Brown University on May 23 with a bachelor’s degree in English literature, proving to the world just how perfect she really is. Between temporarily transferring to Oxford, taking a year off and starring in four movies, she still managed to get a degree in only five years, a feat that is difficult even for students without movies to film and premieres to attend across the world. Unfortunately, we can’t all be Emma Watson. Trust me, if I could be any

celebrity in the world it would be her, because she’s pretty great. But even if we can’t be the awesome British actress, we can add a little Watson into our daily lives. When it comes to college, we need to start thinking, “What would Emma Watson do?” And Emma Watson would channel her inner Hermione Granger and work her butt off trying to get her degree even though it’s difficult and time consuming, so we should follow her lead. Now I know we all don’t — or at least I don’t — have the financial stability or the ability to go to an Ivy League school like Watson does. She did have an advantage against us average unknown students in that regard, but if she can graduate from a top-notch school like Brown University while still filming several movies and attending awards shows across the country and becoming a certified yoga instructor — because what doesn’t she do? — without so much as a Time-Turner all while still looking fabulous, then we regular human beings can also channel that inner Hermione

Brad ‘N Butter

First quality, Grade AA Columbia Living CONTENT:

excited to highlight ways to save time and resources and, hopefully, ways to make BRAD CAST SPUDICH life less stressful and more exciting. Pop Culture … McKennaCollege Bulkleyis a time for growth and Music ……… Patrick the McKenna perfect time to learn and try new As we somewhat reluctantly (and Movies ……… Robertthings. Mecchi completely Internet ……… Ellie Papadikis awkwardly) transition into adulthood, we’re at a strange balance Lifestyle ……… Brad between Spudich freedom and responsibility. Living without parents is great until you When Austrian slug: psychologist Alfred realize that you haven’t mastered things MOVEcolumnists031 Adler coined the term “lifestyle,” he used like the fine arts of grocery shopping and title: NOW MOVING it to describe the cognitive schema and remembering to pay your rent on time blurb: MOVE Magazine presents: your fall 2014 its effect on human’s perceptions and (personal experience).   reactions to the world.  When I applied to columnists You can look forward to my column be a lifestyle columnist, I wanted to write as a conglomerate of writing about local about food and good living. Throughout the summer and until the businesses, food and cooking, living ecoend of the fall semester I’ll be writing friendly on a college budget, and how this column to bring you a hodgepodge to have a great time without spending a of articles highlighting all things good: ton of money. I’ll be highlighting ways positive life changes, saving time and to make things simpler. In the past year money, embracing Columbia, having a I’ve learned through trial and lots of good time and really anything captivating. error about cooking for myself, living My goal is to give readers tips to live life somewhat-independently, and trying to better and have more fun. be a pseudo-adult.  This year I’m working As college students, both free time to waste less, de-clutter my life, manage and disposable income are luxuries that my time better, and embrace everything we rarely have.   As I’ve “matured” and learned to “take care of myself,” I’ve MU and Columbia has to offer. Consider this an experiment.   If become more interested in taking control you’re not exactly sure what a “lifestyle of my quality of living.   I’m hoping to columnist” is, that’s OK. I can tell you continue to embrace living simply by practicing principles of minimalism, that I’m extremely excited to work with sustainable living, self-reliance and the ambiguity of the term and to bring creating meaningful experiences. I’m different ways to make life better.

MOVE columnist Brad Spudich on livelihood and embracing the locale.

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and graduate from college. We can do it. Even if it sucks sometimes. It sucked for Watson, who had to deal with being famous while just trying to go to class without getting her picture taken, and it sucks for Mizzou Tigers, who have to go to class in negative temperatures and get really irregular annoying schedules (darn you, my one class at 1 p.m. on Fridays! Why are you necessary?) but we shall persevere. If Emma Watson can do it, we can too. Besides, who doesn’t want to have something in common with Emma Watson? Even if it’s just something like a college degree in a different field of study and from a different school, that’s still one more similarity than we had before. Now, I realize that my overwhelming adoration for her might make me a little biased, but I think Emma can be seen as a role model for high school and college students. If you’ll excuse me, I have to go change my major to English literature so I can be more like her.

MOVE magazine presents: Your fall 2014 columnists

McKenna Bulley

Patrick McKenna

Robert Mecchi

Ellie Papadikis

Brad Spudlich


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THE MANEATER | MOVE | JUNE 3, 2014

COLUMN Continued from page 11

alienation elder generations experience while attempting to use social media. It’s quite refreshing to see a film that not only acknowledges how useful social media is to small businesses, but wholeheartedly embraces the benefits of being able to instantly reach out to fans and followers. However, just because the film is tech-savvy doesn’t mean that Favreau has ignored the

CINEMA Continued from page 11

for independent film. The countless perks of Ragtag include its inviting environment and staff, its unique seating and concessions and, of course, the brilliant films it offers. Seating in the theater

importance of true human interaction. Many of the film’s most intimate moments come from simple conversations and interactions between characters. New ground is never really broken, and it would be a stretch to call this film ‘edgy,’ but the flow of dialogue in the film just feels so real and heartfelt that nearly every character becomes relatable. Nothing feels forced, and the severe lack of melodrama in the film keeps it that much more grounded in reality. I was never worried about the lives of these characters being in danger, but that doesn’t mean I

wasn’t invested in seeing them succeed. A large part of this is due to how infectious the upbeat tone of the film is. The thumping soundtrack certainly helps move the film along at a brisk pace, peppering in a mix of Cuban instrumentals and modern hits wherever appropriate. The music complements the film’s less dialogue-heavy scenes, especially the scenes that showcase Favreau’s eye for gorgeous cooking segments. There are times that this film feels like the most well-produced Food Network segment ever made. The camera often lingers

just long enough on a meal in the making, and the framing of many of the cooking segments proves that Favreau and his director of photography are no pedestrian cinematographers. Trust me, you don’t want to see this film on an empty stomach. If you do, at least make sure you have some popcorn to snack on during the mouth-watering scenes. While I thoroughly enjoyed this film, there are a few caveats regarding how much you may enjoy it. If my review has made the film seem appealing in any way, you would probably enjoy this film. However, if you are

fan of more dire, dangerous circumstances and copious amounts of action in your films, “Chef ” would probably feel like a waste of time. Although I felt that the ending of the film was a bit too abrupt, it would feel like nitpicking to hold that one criticism against the film. “C h e f ” gets my recommendation for being heartfelt, intimate and funny in all the right places. It’s a great film to start the summer with, and if you have even a passing interest in either food or humor, I highly recommend you give it a chance.

consists of huge, comfortable leather couches, while its nextdoor-neighbor Uprise Bakery offers not only popcorn, but also pastries, soups, salads and high-quality drinks. (The building, dubbed “Hittsville,” also houses Ninth Street Video on Hitt and Hitt Records). In addition to the movies it offers year-round, Ragtag plays a crucial role in Columbia’s own

True/False Film Festival — in fact, if it weren’t for Ragtag, there would be no True/False. Not only does the theater sponsor the fest and screen many of its films: True/False boasts Sturtz and Wilson as its “co-conspirators.” The duo founded the festival just four years after opening the theater. “Both Ragtag and True/ False provide an inclusive

environment for those that make, appreciate or are curious about film,” True/False press liaison Jessica Anania says. “(The festival) showcases the best of Columbia and gives students and community members the opportunity to immerse themselves in documentaries, art, and music.” In addition to its pivotal role during the film fest,

Ragtag often re-screens the films shown at the festival throughout the year. “That enables people who might have missed a film during the fest to see it later,” Anania says. From the films it brings to Columbia moviegoers to its role in one of the nation’s best film fests, the theater stands as the heart and soul of CoMo’s quirky culture.

turns

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SPORTS

THE BEST SOURCE FOR MU SPORTS

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MANEATER FILE PHOTO

Tigers freshman Jake Reed warms up during Missouri’s game against Illinois on Wednesday, April 23 at Busch Stadium in St. Louis. The Tigers ended the season with an overall record of 20-33.

Baseball

Stats follow Mizzou to SEC’s bottom Compared to its SEC foes, Mizzou’s offense was pitiful during the 2014 season. The Tigers were last in the conference in batting average, runs per game, slugging percentage, on-base percentage and total home runs.

Batting average Runs per game

.242 3.7

Slugging percentage

.309

On-base percentage

.327

Total home runs

10

Number of consecutive conference losses to end the season Source: secdigitalnetwork.com BEN KOTHE // GRAPHICS MANAGER

If you need more proof of Mizzou baseball’s SEC struggles, check the statistics. BRANDON KROOS Staff Writer If the conditions at Taylor Stadium were unusually breezy this season, Missouri’s offense was at fault. Tiger bats swung and missed to the point of practically generating a weather front with their whiffs. When they did make contact, it was not authoritative, finishing at the bottom of the Southeastern Conference in nearly every offensive category — parallel to the team’s last-place record in the conference (6-24). “We’re falling short,” Missouri coach Tim Jamieson said after a loss to Vanderbilt. “We’re playing competition that either … want it better than us or … are playing better than us.” The team’s batting average, runs per game, slugging percentage, on-base percentage and total home runs were all down from the preceding season, which was the worst in 38 years for the program in terms of win total. While Mizzou did have two more wins overall in 2014 than 2013 — 20 versus 18 — it won fewer games against SEC opponents in its second

season in the conference — six against 10. “It’s certainly a threshold we’ve crossed, but I’m not going to brag about it,” Jamieson said after the team notched its 19th win, against Illinois. Missouri also was one of two teams not to qualify for the SEC Tournament. Last season they made the conference tournament. Even the team’s pitching — the only piece that could generously be called a strength — was worse than last year. Earned run average was up while strikeouts were down. Missouri did allow fewer base runners, though, walking a conference-low 2.39 batters per nine innings. “That’s what our pitching staff is founded on, throwing strikes and throwing low in the zone,” junior Brett Graves said after a start against Georgia. The Tigers also improved in hits allowed per nine, but still posted the worst mark in the conference — just another statistic pointing to their miserable season. After a series victory on the road versus a ranked Kentucky team, the Tigers did not manage another victory in SEC play. They finished the season riding on a 15-game conference losing streak. To Missouri’s credit, the conference did put 10 teams into the NCAA Baseball Tournament, as many as the Big 12 and Pac-12 combined. “We’re trying to be like

Vanderbilt,” outgoing senior catcher Dylan Kelly said after being swept by the Commodores. “We’re trying to be like all these other top-notch teams in the SEC.” Missouri had the benefit of playing all three of the other conference teams who did not make the tournament, while avoiding ranked teams like Texas A&M and conference tournament champion Louisiana State. Injuries troubled the team throughout the season. Players who were expected to make major contributions — sophomore second baseman Brett Peel, junior outfielder Logan Pearson, senior pitcher and designated hitter Eric Anderson and sophomore righty Griffin Goodrich — all went down at some point. Anderson’s injury was especially damaging, as he was pitching like an ace at the time. Youth was a theme for the season, though, and with freshman outfielder Jake Ring and infielder Ryan Howard showing signs of raw talent, optimism exists for the program going forward. And with Jamieson returning for his 21st season at the helm, he’ll be looking forward. “Your frustration only gets you so far,” he said after a 13-inning loss to Georgia. “You got to find a way to make it better.”


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THE MANEATER | SPORTS | JUNE 3, 2014 the post game

Mizzou basketball will silence critics NICK YAHL

MANEATER FILE PHOTO

Tigers freshman Casey Stangel throws a pitch during Missouri’s game against Ole Miss on Friday, April 18 at University Field. The Tigers finished the 2014 season with an overall record of 43-18.

Mizzou softball looks to reload next year ALEX SCHIFFER Staff Writer This May marked the first time the Missouri Tigers would not be advancing to NCAA Super Regionals since 2007. But while this year’s team ended its season earlier than expected, there are reasons to already start looking ahead to next season. “There’s a lot of talent coming back — they’re a great group of girls and awesome coaches, so they’ll be back,” outgoing senior Mackenzie Sykes said of next season. Mizzou will lose Sykes, the team’s leader in RBIs this past season, and will also be without Alora Marble, who, while only being the team’s No. 3 starter, delivered a number of times when called upon throughout the season. “It’s the human being that Mackenzie is that I’m going to miss the most,” Missouri coach Ehren Earleywine said. “I truly admire her as a person. I can’t even get close to her as a person. Alora’s the same way. They’re just five-star human beings. I’d let them watch my kid for a month while I was on vacation and not have to worry about calling home.” But the Tigers aren’t just losing graduating seniors. The program announced May 28 that four players are transferring, including pitcher Casey Stangel. Stangel

was 15-10 with a 3.27 ERA as a freshman. Other players transferring are freshman infielder Kelli Schkade, sophomore outfielder Sarah Moore and sophomore catcher Carlie Rose. “We wish Sarah, Carlie, Kelli and Casey the best and thank them and their families for being a part of our program,” Earleywine said in a press release. Eight starters will return for Missouri, including AllSoutheastern Conference junior shortstop Corrin Genovese, junior Kelsea Roth and the rest of the infield. “She’s a leader anyway because she’s so personable,” Earleywine said of Genovese. “She has so much charisma. And the girls admire her because she does stuff on the field that they could practice for the rest of her lives and still not do it. So she’s just instantly been a leader since she got here.” Genovese has been known for her glove, but shone at the plate this year, batting .410 for the season, including a 9-16 performance in the Columbia Regional — setting the stage for a big senior year. Roth, on the other hand, had a down year after leading the team in home runs her sophomore season. She hit .256 for the year, with a mediocre 20 RBIs. If Roth can turn back the clock next season and be the power hitter she was her sophomore year, it would

help the Tigers offense get back to where it was during their Women’s College World Series years. “After Mackenzie’s gone, the only people that have been to the (Women’s College) World Series now is the coaching staff,” Genovese said. “So I think it has been motivation since three years ago when we lost to Louisiana State (in the super regional round) to get back there.” The Tigers’ outfield will be patrolled by third team AllAmerican Taylor Gadbois, who also batted .421 with 46 stolen bases this past season. The slashhitter will anchor an outfield looking to fill the void left by Sykes in left field. Mizzou’s rotation will return of its top pitchers, Tori Finucane. Despite the thumb injury that sidelined her during the Columbia Regional, Finucane is expected to be healthy for next season. The Tigers will also add a left-handed pitcher in incoming freshman Paige Lowary. Lowary was Iowa’s Gatorade Player of the Year in 2013 and is expected to see some time in the circle next season. Earleywine acknowledged the firepower the Tigers will return next year, but added it means nothing if they get banged up. “Yeah we got a really good team coming back next year and some really good kids coming in,” he said. “The cupboard’s full. We just have to stay healthy.”

Just about everything that could go wrong did go wrong for the Tigers basketball team this past season. From player suspensions to poor production throughout the season and missing the NCAA Tournament, it was all capped off by the sudden postseason exit of head coach Frank Haith. Not to mention the team’s two leading scorers, Jabari Brown and Jordan Clarkson, electing to declare early for the NBA draft. Now everybody’s thinking, what else could possibly go wrong? My guess is that until the team proves their worth once more, attendance will be sparse. Not a lot of people have faith in the program after all that went on this past year, and I don’t blame them. But with all of the mishaps and missteps that occurred throughout last year, it’s time we turn the page on Haith and last season and start fresh with coach Kim Anderson. And I don’t think the fresh start will turn sour. The Tigers aren’t going to be as bad as everyone says. Yes, the two leading scorers in Clarkson and Brown are gone. But weren’t they ball hogs? They both wanted to be superstars and carry the team by scoring all the points. When two guys both try to do things that are mutually exclusive, it can sometimes end with everybody losing. That’s what happened to Mizzou. That, and Haith had no clue how to coach under pressure situations. (Have fun in Tulsa, Frank.) So far since Anderson’s taken over, he’s done everything right. From the time he stepped into the media lions den at his introduction, you got the feeling that he wanted to be at Missouri. He put to rest a momentary sense of panic among the Missouri faithful by retaining four-star commits Jakeenan Gant and Namon Wright. He also kept assistant coach Tim Fuller, a dominant asset in the recruiting department, on staff. Looking at the roster right now, the Tigers have two scholarships left to fill with freshman guard Shane Rector choosing to transfer after getting minimal playing time. It’s a guessing game as to what the starting roster will be come November, but Anderson has options. Freshman Wes Clark will likely be the starting point guard at the beginning of the season, but Hawaii transfer Keith Shamburger and Baylor transfer Deuce Bello are both viable options. Shamburger, a senior, can continue to help Clark develop his game, and Bello, a great defender, could be a key contributor on both sides of the ball. Mizzou has strength on the wings, too. The two-guard is Missouri’s best position at the moment, with Wright and sophomore transfer Cam Biedscheid coming over from Notre Dame. Gant has the small forward position on lock, in my opinion. The post positions are where fans don’t give these guys the most credit, which is understandable. I’m certainly one of the people who criticized Johnathan Williams III and Ryan Rosburg for their lack of production on the offensive end. Williams averaged just 5.8 points per game, while Rosburg averaged an 4.8. With that being said, off-season improvements can make all the difference between a player’s first and second year in college. Hopefully Williams can make the necessary adjustments and become a more reliable scorer at the power forward position. Just like last year, Rosburg and junior Keanau Post will be the main contributors at center. Rosburg, while disappointing, is only improving and elevating his game on both sides of the ball. Post, who had flashes of greatness last season but never found a constant stride, should contribute solid minutes off the bench. All of this is to say the Tigers are better than what a lot of people give them credit for. If Anderson can get these guys to work together and adapt to his coaching style, I could see them being one of the better teams in the Southeastern Conference. That’s a pretty big ‘if,’ but the talent and depth are certainly there. Coaching was always the problem with Haith at the helm, so a fresh start with Anderson could go a long way. As I’ve said before, when Anderson is yet to coach a game, you can only be so critical. But you can be as optimistic as you please.


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Since 1955, The Maneater has been the student voice on the University of Missouri campus. Over the years, The Maneater has evolved — our most recent change was a move from publishing twice a week to once a week —yet even through evolution we remain the source for student news on the MU campus. The Maneater is made by students for the MU community. We currently have four news desks (City, State, Nation; University News; Campus Life; Student Organizations), a sports desk, MOVE magazine (our sassy little sister that loves all things art and entertainment), a photography desk, an opinion desk, a production department (page design) and an online development department that YOU can get involved in starting now!

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THE MANEATER | GAMES | JUNE 3, 2014

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The Maneater 9/11/13 Crossword

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