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Richard Crook takes you through the dos and don’ts of starting university

Guide to Manchester’s Arts

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Man hit by bus chasing thief

Caroline Lucas: Ties to

Hamas are legitimate Green leader condemns ‘violent part of Hamas’ But political wing is legitimate, she says Joshua Carroll News Editor

Arts & Culture

‘Freshers, drink with us to save our company’

Exclusive Caroline Lucas, the Green party leader, is happy with the relationship between Hamas supporters and the group who organised public demonstrations against the Iraq War in 2003. In an interview with The Mancunion, she said she is against violent action taken by Hamas against Israel but that the group has a legitimate political wing: “In the media ... people have said ‘this person supports Hamas and therefore they are intrinsically wrong and evil’: I think we just need to look at that a bit more carefully.” Ms Lucas was answering questions about her position as a vice president for the Stop the War Coalition; set up ten years ago in response to George Bush’s ‘War on Terror’. Stop the War have close relations to the British Muslim Initiative (BMI), a campaign group whose members openly support Hamas as a legitimate

political organisation in Palestine. At least one member of BMI, Ismael Patel, sits on Stop the War’s national steering committee. The EU classifies Hamas as a terrorist organisation, despite the fact that it is democratically elected. Ms Lucas compared Hamas’ situation with that of Sinn Fein in Northern Ireland. She said, “Hamas has a military wing but it also was elected democratically as the legitimate government of Palestine.” She said she did not believe allegations against BMI’s president, Mohammed Sawalha, that he fled to London from Israel and masterminded military strategy for Hamas: “That would concern me hugely, but I don’t know how true it is. You know: ‘fled from Israel’; Israel’s foreign policy is hardly a policy of upholding international law and humanitarian values. “If you were to say to me that you had absolute evidence that I was inadvertently sharing a panel with someone who advocated a military violent response in the Middle East

Places axed for home students ... Ruth Wildman & Joshua Carroll News Editors Home students were less likely to get into Manchester University this year, but more places have been made available for international candidates, figures indicate. There are around 800 less places for home students compared to 2010: undergraduate places have been cut by 676 (9.1 percent) and postgraduate places by 122 (5.6 percent). But for foreign students about an extra 443 places have been made available, meaning just under 400 places have been cut across the university. The data refers to figures for planned intake provided by Manchester University. More than 91,000 people applied for just over 13,000 places at the University this year. There were 25,000 applicants for 2,898 international postgraduate places. Across Greater Manchester, universities have seen applications increase by up to 15 percent compared to last year. The biggest surge in applications to Manchester was for postgraduate courses. The number of home students applying for them rose by 18.2 percent. The government controls how many students a university can take on. Though the cap on each institution is not made public. The Head of Admissions at Manchester University was not available to comment as The Mancunion went to press.

Photo: Adam Rossano

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Drugs: Emily Bunting investigates a high risk market for students

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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

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Caroline Lucas says characterising all Hamas supporters as “evil” is misleading. Photo: Lloyd Henning or anywhere else, I would be deeply worried about that.” The allegations are reported on the BBC’s website. Mr Sawalha has signed a declaration by a group of Islamic scholars which affirms loyalty to Hamas and their right to arm themselves. The declaration reads, “[Hamas] is the sole government authorised to [issue aid in Gaza] by reason

of its official legitimacy as well as its maintaining the Resistance against the Jewish Zionist occupation.” It continues; “The closure of the crossings or the prevention of the entry of weapons through them should be regarded as high treason in the Islamic Continued on page 2 Full Interview online now: www.mancunion.com

WORK AT THE HOME OF THE CHAMPIONS. Job opportunities now available within our Matchday Catering Team. Apply now: manutd.com/jobs More on page 9

Rooms from £75 per week all inclusive for enquiries contact 0845 300 8551 or visit www.hardy-farm.com


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Green leader Lucas defends ties to Hamas supporters Nation, and clear support for the Zionist enemy.” In 2008, a senior journalist at a Hezbollah newspaper, Ibrahim Moussawi, spoke at a Stop the War meeting in London. Ms Lucas told The Mancunion she did not want to discuss him because she had “no idea” who he was. An article in the New Yorker in 2002 claimed that Mr Moussawi had called Jews “a lesion on the forehead of history.” Ms Lucas emphasised the Green party’s commitment to peace campaigning: “Let me just say for the record while I’ve got it that of course we’re against violence coming from the state, Hamas, Hezbollah or anybody else.” She continued, “There is

certainly a part of Hamas that I would condemn, as I would condemn any organisation involved in violent military action, but there is also a part of Hamas which appears at least to be fulfilling the democratic mandate they have been given.” Other notable members of Stop the War include former MP Tony Benn- the group’s president, George Galloway MP-one of many vice presidents, and the political commentator Tariq Ali. In the winter of 2008/2009 the Israeli air force launched a sustained aerial bombardment on the city of Gaza, where Hamas are in government. Israel’s government said it was responding to Hamas rocket fire on Israeli villages.

The

Photo: Adam Rossano

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Editor: Nick Renaud-Komiya editor@mancunion.com Postal address: Univerity of Manchester Students’ Union, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PR News Editors: Josh Carroll, Joe Sandler Clarke, Umar Rauf & Ruth Wildman news@mancunion.com Phone (0161) 275 2933 Arts & Culture Editors: Phoebe Chambre & Dani Middleton arts@macunion.com Beauty Editor: Isabelle Dann beauty@mancunion.com Business & Finance Editors: Emily Bunting & Scott McEwan finance@mancunion.com Chief Sub-Editor: Emma Bean chiefsub@mancunion.com Columnist: Nick Renaud-Komiya Email beauty@mancunion.com Columnist: Lloyd Henning lloyd@mancunion.com Comment & Debate Editors: Paul Haslam & Ben Green comment@mancunion.com Fashion Editors: Claudia Canavan & Roisin Dervish-O’Kane fashion@mancunion.com Features Editor: Richard Crook features@mancunion.com Film Editor: Bill Knowles & Patrick Cowling film@mancunion.com Food & Drink Editor: Emily Clark foodanddrink@mancunion.com Lifestyle Editors: Lily Howes & Naila Missous lifestyle@mancunion.com Literature Editor: Steve Jones literature@mancunion.com Music Editors: Tom Geddes, Tom Hickman & Joe Smart music@mancunion.com Photo Editor: Jonny Whiting photography@mancunion.com Politics & Analysis Editors: Andrew Williams & Oliver Johnstone politics@mancunion.com Science & Technology Editors: Leah Wong & Aryan Safavi scienceandtech@mancunion.com Societies Editor: Ceri Wills societyspotlight@mancunion.com Sport Editors: Jack Burke & Patrick Madden sport@mancunion.com Theatre Editor: Andrew Campbell theatre@mancunion.com Web Editor: Lloyd Henning webed@mancunion.com Advertising John Conway Email studentdirect@salford.ac.uk Tel 0161 351 5402 Address Student Direct, University House The Crescent, Salford M5 4W

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Friends of Stop the War Muhammed Sawalha

Muhammed Sawalha is the president of the British Muslim Initiative (BMI), a group closely affiliated to Stop the War. He was a key organizer of the second flotilla that attempted to break Israel’s blockade of Gaza earlier this year, he is alleged to have been a Hamas operative. In 2005 the Sunday Times said of him “Sawalha’s link with Hamas emerged after he was named as a co-conspirator in an American court case involving racketeering and conspiracy.” A 2006 BBC Panorama documentary “Faith, Hate and Charity” investigating the activities of Islamic charities in Gaza and the West Bank repeated similar allegations. According to the presenter John Ware: “From London, Sawalha is said to have master minded much of Hamas’ political and military strategy. Wanted by Israel, he fled to London in 1990… In London, Sawalha is alleged to have directed funds, both for Hamas’ armed wing, and for spreading its missionary dawah”. Sawalha is also a signatory of the 2009 Istanbul Declaration, which calls for all crossings to Gaza to be opened. It reads, “The closure of the crossings or the prevention of the entry of weapons through them should be regarded as high treason in the Islamic Nation, and clear support for the Zionist enemy.”

A hotline has been set up for contestants of the show, hosted by Jeremy Paxman.

Ruth Wildman and Joshua Carroll News Editor

Former female contestants on University Challenge are the subjects of an online hate campaign. Marine Debray, team captain for Corpus Christi College in 2009, is one of several women targeted after appearing on the show. Posts on forums have shown doctored pictures of male genitalia pasted on Debray’s person and others referred to her as a “dumb blonde”. ITV, who produce the show for the BBC, said that they have a hot line for contestants that need “advice and support.” Debray, who studied English and Modern Languages last year, said, “People have been saying that I wasn't smart enough to be on the programme, and then there were quite a lot of comments about my appearance, in a sexualized way.” She was initially upset by the campaign but says it no

longer worries her: “What I tried to do was put that aside and try to move on with the positive comments. “People seemed to think that because I wasn’t this nerdy male I shouldn’t be on there,” she told the Daily Mail, “Look how Gail Trimble was asked to pose for Nuts magazine. Just because a woman is smart doesn’t mean that she has to show you her boobs.” Other women who were targeted after appearing on the show include Jenny Harris, who was the victim of an article that said she had “a brilliant mind, fuelled by a pair of breasts.” Ms Harris said, “An aspect of it is the idea that women shouldn't be showing off how clever they are, where this is more okay for boys.” In 2009 Gail Trimble, who won the series with Corpus Christi college before being stripped of the title, became the target of a similar campaign. One person wrote, “I bet she sucks [sic] like a jack rabbit.” ITV says online abuse against contestants is uncommon.

Nick RenaudKomiya Editor

Umar Rauf News Editor

Anas Al-Tikriti

Bullies target game show contestants in online hate campaign

Ed#1

Anas Al-Tikriti is spokesman for the British Muslim Initiative and the son of the former leader of the Iraqi Muslim Brotherhood, He is a contributor to the Guardian and in 2009 wrote a piece arguing that the position of Hamas was not about race, creed or religion but about land. He has lectured in Translation and Interpreting studies at Leeds University and at Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh between 2000 and 2003. He has also co-organised and led more than 15 demonstrations against the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq as well as against the Israeli occupation of Palestine. Most recently, he went to Iraq to negotiate the release of British hostage Norman Kember and others. Three of the four hostages, including Mr Kember were safely released on 23rd March 2006. Mr Al-tikriti is an international speaker and lecturer, and appears regularly in the Arab and international media commenting on Arab, Muslim and International affairs.

Ibrahim Moussawi

Ibrahim Moussawi worked as media relations officer for the satellite television station Al-Manar, which is affiliated with Hezbollah. He wrote an article for the Daily Star in 2002 explaining the religious basis for suicide attacks. In 2008 he was invited to speak at an event organised by Stop the War. Caroline Lucas, the group’s vice chair, says she does not know who he is. Members of the Conservative party, while in opposition, pushed to have Mr Moussawi banned from entering Britain. A year later when he tried to return, they succeeded. Before he was denied a visa to return in 2009, the Centre for Social Cohesion pledged to seek an arrest warrant for him. The home secretary at the time, Jacqui Smith, said he was denied entry to the UK on the grounds that his entry was not “conducive to the public good”. Moussawi allegedly called Jews "a lesion on the forehead of history".

So it begins. Keep your hands inside the ride and keep hold of the railing at all times. This is likely to be one ride you won’t forget in a hurry. If you have come here fresh from school, then I’d like to take this chance to welcome you to this adulthood theme park, complete with all the opportunities and adventures that await you. All this may sound like an outlandish, cheesy metaphor but you’ll be surprised how fast your time at university will simply whiz by. Once we reach Christmas you’ll have pretty much got through half of your first year here. If you are returning to this fair city after the holidays with your batteries duly recharged, then welcome back. Over summer here at The Mancunion, we have been preparing for the new academic year. It’s funny just how eerily quiet Fallowfield becomes once the students have gone away. It’s rumoured that the area’s non-student population (yes, they do exist) come out during this time and take part in ritualistic dances around the crossroads in front of Baabar. OK, I may have started that rumour, but you get an idea of how different this place is without the tens of thousands of students that call it home for most of the year. So what is our role in all this madness? The Mancunion is here to chronicle the student experience, to report the goings on, the intrigue and joy of being a student in Manchester. From hardhitting student perspectives on current affairs, to something to keep you amused between lectures, we’ll have it all. A platform for free speech and a showcase for your talents, this is your one stop shop. Remember, The Mancunion is a paper written by students, for students, so we’d love for you to get involved. Fancy yourself as a reporter? Want to dip your toe into the world of writing? Come and chat to us at the Student Fair this week or pop down to our information and recruitment meeting on Friday at 11 am in Meeting Room 2 of the Students’ Union building on Oxford Road. If there is something in this paper over the coming weeks that makes you laugh or fills you with righteous fury tell us. We’ll be publishing any letters (within reason) sent to us by our readers. Send your emails to editor@mancunion.com.


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Man hit by bus while chasing thief dies Joe Sandler Clarke News Editor

A man has died after a bus hit him as he chased a thief on Oxford Road. David Mark Schofield, a 21-yearold student from Liverpool John Moores University, was taken to hospital late on 10th September, but died the next day. CCTV footage appears to show Mr Schofield pursuing a cyclist who is believed to have stolen his phone. Police want to speak to two women who told the driver of the bus involved in the incident that Mr Schofield may have been the victim of a robbery moments before the collision. "We have a third-hand account that David was chasing a thief on a pedal cycle who stole his mobile phone - but as yet the two women who told the bus driver this have not come forward. It is therefore absolutely vital we speak to these women so please if you are reading or hearing this, we need

to hear from you,” said Chief Superintendent Russ Jackson. "You are not in any trouble whatsoever - we simply want to know what you saw and help us understand what happened, so we can at least give David's family the answers they deserve.” Police are also appealing for the cyclist, who wore a lightcoloured hooded top and rode a small bike, possibly a BMX, to come forward. The accident happened outside the BBC building on Oxford Road and police are confident there were many witnesses. "We want to hear from anyone who witnessed the collision or saw a pedal cyclist being pursued by someone,” said Chief Superintendent Russ Jackson. "Tragically, David's injuries have now proved fatal, and it is now even more important for his family that we establish exactly what happened in the moments leading up to his sad death.”

Business

‘Freshers, drink with us to save our company’ Umar Rauf and Joe Sandler Clarke News Editors

Britain’s largest nightclub operator is relying on Freshers’ Week to stay in business. Luminar Entertainment, which owns the Oceana and Liquid chains, has told lenders to wait until after the start of the university year to make a decision about whether to push the company into administration. The company has been making a net loss for the past 24 months and its share price has plummeted from highs of £8 a share in 2007 to just under 3p last week. The deteriorating state of the company’s finances last year forced Luminar to issue a profit warning, leading to the departure of founder and chief executive Stephan Thomas in March. The new chief executive Simon Douglas, aware that the company has been hit hard by high youth unemployment, has revealed plans to boost performance by targeting older customers, expanding the range of drinks and offering more live music. Previous attempts to turn

around poor sales figures have seen Luminar-owned nightclubs launching a series of aggressive drinks promotions. Double measures of spirits have been offered for as little as £1.30 while on slow evenings entrance fees to some nights have been slashed to just 1p. Last December the company refinanced its borrowing with Lloyds banking group, Royal Bank of Scotland and Barclays arranging a three-year loan of £99m with an interest rate of 7.8 percent. Luminar’s most recent trading update reveals a 20.2 percent decline in sales with admissions revenue down by 26.5 percent and the number of customers down 19.1 percent.

Luminar are relying on 1st years to avoid going into administration.

Experts back Lib Dem drug policy Joe Sandler Clarke

CCTV footage appears to show David Mark Schofield (seen on the right) chasing a suspected thief (left) moments before being hit by a bus.

Medic loses 87 patients’ records Umar Rauf News Editors

A medical student from the Manchester University has lost the personal data of 87 patients, at South Manchester Hospital, the Information Commissioners Office (ICO) has said. The student who had been on a placement, at the hospital’s burns and plastics unit, initially copied the information onto an NHS encrypted Memory stick for research purposes. She then copied the information onto a personal memory stick without

encryption in order to continue auditing the work after the placement had ended; and it was at this point last December the information was lost. An official watchdog investigating the matter has ruled that the hospital breached the Data Protection Act. In response, South Manchester NHS Foundation Trust said that they assumed that the medical student had received data protection training from medical school. This was dismissed my investigators from the ICO, who said that the trust should have given the student the same level of training it would otherwise give to its own staff. The acting head of

Online now: The CCTV footage on The Mancunion website. www.mancunion.com.

enforcement at the ICO, Sally Anne Poole said: “This case highlights the need to ensure data protection training for healthcare providers is built in early on...medics handle some of the most sensitive personal information and it is vital that they understand the need to keep it secure at all times, especially when they are completing placements. “While we are pleased that the University Hospital of South Manchester has taken action to avoid this oversight in the future, we will continue to work with healthcare bodies and education providers to make sure that data protection training is a mandatory part of people’s education.” Following the incident the Trust has now agreed to make significant changes to ensure that sensitive information accessed by student at the hospital is kept secure.

Health experts have backed calls made at the Liberal Democrat conference this weekend to decriminalise drugs. The UK Drugs Policy Commission, which includes the former chief executive of the Medical Research Council, Professor Colin Blakemore, said that the Lib Dem plan to end prison sentences for users of cocaine, heroin and other drugs and introduce a regulated market for the sale of cannabis would not cause a significant increase in drug use. Ewan Hoyle, of Liberal Democrats for Drug Policy Reform, welcomed the endorsement from the commission, but did not accept that a move to decriminalise drugs would represent a radical policy shift for government. Speaking at the party conference in Birmingham Hoyle, he said, "I do not see this motion as proposing radical reforms or as liberalisation of the drug laws."

818 computers stolen last year Joshua Carroll

Thieves stole a total of 818 laptops and desktops from students in Greater Manchester last year. The thefts took place from the start of term in September 2010, to the end of term in 2011 and include halls at the universities of Salford, Bolton and Manchester, as well as Manchester Metropolitan. The figures cover anyone who declared his or herself a student, regardless of age. Software firm BuddyBackup obtained the figures from Greater Manchester Police under the Freedom of Information Act.

Salford’s £30m student village Umar Rauf

UK fees: 3rd highest in the world Joe Sandler Clarke News Editor

Tuition fees at UK universities are the third highest in the world, and that’s before fees triple in 2012. Data published by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) showed that on average UK students were charged £3,100 for courses in 2008/2009. This means that only Americans and Koreans pay more than English students for higher education while students in France, Holland and Sweden continue to enjoy free university education. However, Andreas Schleicher, head of the OECD’s

indicators and analysis division, was at pains to point out that the cost of higher education in the UK can be misleading, as - unlike their Korean and American counterparts - UK students are supported by substantial government loans. Mr Schleicher did concede that for people from disadvantaged backgrounds, the cost of a university education in England may prove to be prohibitive. Speaking to the Daily Telegraph, Mr Schleicher said, “There is a clear risk in there if fees get to a level that's unmanageable, if you free things up entirely – and universities may well want to charge fees a lot higher than £9,000 – then you can run into problems." OECD data has already shown that rising fees in the US have led to a decline in the number of people choosing to go to university in recent years.

A proposed multi-million pound university revamp is set to go before planners this week. As part of its 20-year master plan announced earlier this year; Salford University wants to build a £30m new student village. As part of the proposals a new arts building has been approved and planners are currently considering proposals for a 2,000-bed development adjacent to Peel Park. In a bid to persuade planners to approve the plans Salford University said: “The university at present lacks animation outside teaching times and is largely devoid of activity in the evening and during the weekend.”


04 Got an account? Use it, say NatWest Joshua Carroll

Customers who have student accounts with NatWest must now deposit £750 every six months or face charges on their overdrafts. They will also have to make at least three purchases on card to prove that their student account is their main one. NatWest initially told customers they would have to deposit at least £750 every three months, but relaxed the rule after complaints from customers. Some students said they would not be able to make a deposit over the summer break because the last loan repayment of the academic year is in April. The consumer support company Which? said it had put pressure on NatWest after a student complained on their forum. The changes take effect from the 5th of October.

Abortion MP could lose seat Joe Sandler Clarke

The MP who tried to amend Andrew Lansely’s health and social care bill so that abortion providers could not offer pregnant women counseling, could lose her seat under proposals to redraw the electoral map in Britain. Planned changes to the electoral boundaries in Britain will see Ms Dorries’ Mid Bedfordshire constituency scrapped, leaving her future in parliament uncertain. The coalition government is attempting to reduce the number of MPs by 50 as part of a Tory-led plan to correct what they view as a historical bias in favour of Labour in Britain’s first-past-the-post electoral system. Ms Dorries wanted independent services to fulfill the counseling role for women considering abortions.

Bleach in milk at Stepping Hill Joshua Carroll

Milk contaminated with bleach has been discovered at Stepping Hill hospital, though there is no relation to the contamination of saline fluids there this summer, say police. An elderly patient drank a small amount of the milk last weekend and raised the alarm. They were unharmed. Greater Manchester Police said, “Stepping Hill is made up of a large a large community of people and it is unlikely that every incident reported is connected to the concerted and deliberate criminality already being investigated.”

Preview

‘No one has touched this since the Young Ones’ Ruth Wildman News Editor

Student life in Manchester inspired two writers to create the new Channel 4 sitcom Fresh Meat. It airs this week as new students join university across the country, and was created by Peep Show writers Jesse Armstrong and Sam Bain. The pair met at Manchester University, and shared a house throughout their time in the city. Sam Bain recalled his experiences: “It’s such a great time of life, such a ripe area [for comedy], we were surprised no one had revisited this since the Young Ones.” The series follows an eclectic mix of six “freshers” sharing a house (and occasionally a bed) as they move to Manchester to study, leaving home for the first time. “It's that classic scenario when people who may be very different are trapped together,” said Armstrong, “You get that where people who wouldn't normally even say hello to each other are forced into close proximity.” Former Manchester student Jack Whitehall plays JP, a public school boy

The original undergraduate anarchists: The Young Ones. with “an inflated sense of entitlement”, and Joe Thomas (Simon from the Inbetweeners) plays the insecure Kinglsey. Whitehall said, “Manchester is such a big university that you get all types of people up there. I lived with a guy at university who was basically JP. He was a friend of mine from Eton who I based some of my portrayal on ... hopefully he won't realise.” Other characters include socially awkward Howard, Josie, who hails from a small Welsh town and is keen to attempt everything that student life has to offer, Oregon, who hides behind a shield of cool whilst secretly terrified of being boring, and Vod, the coolest

Joe Thomas plays the shy and insecure Kingsley. housemate, who Oregon longs to resemble. The show was filmed over two months in Manchester and the cast lived in the same apartment building throughout filming, which allowed them, according to Greg McHugh (Howard), to do a lot of “method acting”. Zawe Ashton, who plays Vod, believes that the comedy could not have been filmed anywhere but Manchester, and said, “Manchester has the student vibe,

No punishment for OAP who stabbed intruder Umar Rauf News Editor

A 72-year-old florist will not be charged with murder for stabbing a burglar at his Old Trafford shop. Cecil Coley was playing a game of dominos with a friend after closing time when Gary Mulling 30, and three other armed men broke into the shop demanding money. There was a brief struggle before Mr Coley stabbed Mr Mulling to death. He collapsed outside on the pavement and died later in hospital. Mr Coley received a number of facial injuries and bruising to the body during the struggle. The chief crown prosecutor Nazir Afzal said that he was satisfied that Mr Coley was acting “in reasonable self defence” and that in light of the evidence he should not be prosecuted. Mr Afzal said, “It is difficult to envisage a more frightening set of circumstances than these.” The four intruders were armed with guns and a knife. In a statement, prosecutors said, "Householders, shopkeepers

and anyone going about their lawful day to day activities can be reassured that the law will protect them if they use reasonable force to protect themselves, their families and their property". Despite the reassurances of the prosecution many defence lawyers have suggested that there needs to be more consistency as to when self defence can be permitted. Some of those are calling for a new justice bill. Currently, the Criminal Law Act states that a person can use such force as is reasonable in the circumstance in order to prevent a crime. But there remains some ambiguity and the Criminal Justice and Immigration Act was brought in in 2008 to clarify the issue of self defence and the use of force to prevent an offence. Under the 2008 Act, homeowners who use

"reasonable force" in order to protect themselves against intruders are not prosecuted, providing the force used is deemed to be absolutely necessary. David Cameron has promised a new justice bill, which he has said will “put beyond doubt that home owners and small shopkeepers who use reasonable force to defend themselves or their properties will not be prosecuted” The justice secretary Ken Clarke, speaking after the government announced plans to change the law on self defence in the home, said, “It's quite obvious that people are entitled to use whatever force is necessary to protect themselves and their homes. “We will make it quite clear you can hit the burglar with the poker if he's in the house and you have a perfect defence when you do .”

Cecil Coley justly killed an armed intruder, judges say.

such a student atmosphere. It was great for doing research for Vod; I was eavesdropping on conversations all over the place. I couldn't have asked for a more authentic backdrop.” The series has eight episodes tracking the personal development of the housemates and the increasingly complicated network of relationships within the house. Fresh Meat begins Wednesday 21st September at 10pm.

Civil engineers are least satisfied Ruth Wildman News Editor

Civil engineers and those studying Materials and Minerals Technology are the least happy with their courses at Manchester University. Just under 37 percent of them said they were dissatisfied with the overall quality of their course. Students were asked to agree or disagree with statements on, among other things, how good staff were at explaining things, how interesting the course was, library and IT services and feedback. They also said how much advice and support they were getting. Among Materials and Minerals Technology students, 73 percent disagreed with the statement, “Feedback has helped me clarify things I did not understand”. Among civil engineers 69 percent disagreed.

Just more than one in ten civil engineers achieved first class honours last year. The same amount, 12 percent, only just passed. Everyone studying Archaeology was happy with their course, according to the survey by the Higher Education Funding Council for England. Over two thirds of archaeologists said that feedback helped them understand things better. A quarter of Archaeology students gained first class honours, 55 percent gained upper second class degrees (2:1) and 20 percent were awarded lower second class degrees (2:2). No students gained thirds or passes in Archaeology. Other courses with highranking student satisfaction at the University of Manchester were Zoology and Biology with 98 per cent, Dentistry: 97 per cent, Physics and Astronomy: 96 per cent and Electronic and Electrical Engineering with 96 per cent.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Medics protest drug patents – in the Alps Photo: Daniel Leach

Fees demonstrators lose human rights court battle Adam Castle says he was detained outside in freezing temperatures.

Joe Sandler Clarke News Editor

The High Court has rejected claims by three teenagers that their human rights were breached whilst detained during tuition fees protests in Whitehall, London, last year. Adam Castle, 16, his sister Rosie, 15, and Sam Eaton, 16, were held by police for over six hours without food or water in freezing temperatures during demonstrations on 24th November last year. But their claims for damages have been rejected. Judges ruled that the action taken by the Metropolitan Police was “necessary, proportionate and lawful”. Lord Justice Pitchford and Justice Supperstone went also ruled that the Met commissioner at the time, Sir Paul Stevenson, did not act outside of his power in his handling of the protest. Students were staging a national day of action against tuition fees and education cuts when the incident happened. The protests were organised to build on the momentum created when the building which houses Conservative party headquarters was broken into and vandalised.

Martin Westgate QC, who represented the teenagers at the initial hearing in July, argued that police had breached section 11 of the Children’s Act because children as young as 11 had been detained in a police “kettle”. At the initial hearing in July Mr Westgate said: "One 11-yearold was told to 'get back' at a fairly late stage in the containment." Last year The Mancunion reported that students from Manchester had been left stranded in London after police contained demonstrators outside parliament. The demonstration coincided with the MPs’ vote on tuition fees, and was separate from the incident relating to the human rights claim. Speaking to the BBC, Adam Castle, from north London, said: "We were punished for protesting and everyone was left demoralised.” He said that he and his friends were held for several hours in freezing conditions which they had not been prepared for. Ivan Hare, representing the Metropolitan Police, said that front-line officers had removed vulnerable people from the crowd during the kettling. Mr Hare also dismissed claims that children dressed in school uniforms had been held at the protest.

This is the moment a group of medical-students-come-climbers reached the top of Mount Breithorn in Switzerland. The Manchester Wilderness Exploration Society, led by 4th year medic and climbing instructor Daniel Leach, were promoting a campaign against drug patents which deny medicine to the developing world.

Comment

Finding new drugs is only half the battle Khalil Secker

We used the climb up Breithorn as an opportunity to raise awareness for a campaign by Médecins Sans Frontières’ (Doctors Without Borders) for ‘Access to Essential Medicine’. Apart from providing medical aid to war-torn countries and

Mancunion slims down in cost cutting drive Joshua Carroll News Editor

The Mancunion is smaller and will print fewer issues this year as executives struggle to drive down overheads. It will remain a weekly newspaper but only release one issue in December. This year’s paper has 32 pages, up to seven less than last year, and some sections from last year have been axed. The New Writing page, a platform for original poetry and literature by students, will not be returning. And the Fashion and Beauty pages have been merged to

save space. There are two pages allocated for sports coverage, one of which is edited by the Athletics Union (AU) and known as the Purple Page, in reference to the University colours. There will be 20 printed editions, down from 22 last year, but the paper is expected to have a greater online presence. The majority of student publications print a small number of issues per term, or else are fortnightly. In recent years The Mancunion has gone over budget by “thousands of pounds” according to a source at the Students’ Union (UMSU). Rising

publishing costs were also a factor in the decision to cut the number of issues and pages. The Mancunion’s editor, Nick Renaud- Komiya, said, “Changes have to be made in light of financial difficulties and this was the best solution which worked out for everyone. We remain the largest student publication in the country and are very privileged to print on a weekly basis throughout the academic year.” Mr Renaud-Komiya is also an elected executive member of UMSU, which provides the majority of funding for The Mancunion.

earthquake victims, the NGO gives pharmaceutical companies a hard time for overpricing drugs in the developing world. The key problem is that drug patents sold by universities in the UK to pharmaceutical companies last for at least 20 years. This blocks market competition and allows companies to charge extortionate prices. When

Bristol Myers Squibb bought the patent for the HIV drug Zerit from Yale University, they charged $15,000 per patient per year. But after Médecins Sans Frontières’ ran a campaign against their unfair pricing, they brought the cost down to just $350 per year. This saved thousands of lives. Scientific research and clinical practice is only half the battle in medicine; we also need to address the huge economic barriers to good health. The Manchester branch of Universities Allied for Essential Medicine (UAEM) says that a staggering one third of the world’s population “lacks

A dozen universities may cut fees Joe Sandler Clarke News Editor

At least 12 UK universities are considering significantly lowering their fees from the £9,000 limit for 2012. The coalition government will allow universities which charge less than £7,500 to take on more students from next year. And two universities are said to be ready to substantially lower their fees, while 10 are considering charging less than £7,500. The figures come from the Office for Fair Access (Offa), a government watchdog. A white paper published this Summer outlines plans to enable institutions to bid for up to 20,000 undergraduate places if they

charge less than £7,500. Vince Cable, the business secretary, has said that more places will be made available in the future.= Universities are also being encouraged to take on a more diverse range of students to get school leavers from poorer backgrounds onto courses. All students with A-level grades AAB or higher could be accepted for a course, the white paper says. Though universities would have to work out how many students they expect to apply with those grades. Eric Thomas, president of Universities UK (UUK), an umbrella group for vicechncellors, suggested at the group’s annual conference that allowing universities to give all AAB students a place could lead to inequalities: “ AAB students tend to come from more advantaged parts of

regular access to [vital] medicines. As a result, it is estimated that ten million people die every year from preventable or otherwise treatable diseases.” The Universities of Oxford and Edinburgh have already thrown out the patent system and allowed the drugs they develop to be produced by any company anywhere in the world. This encourages market competition and means that prices drop to levels that people in developing countries can afford. This is an essential move forward that Manchester University needs to be a part of. Khalil Secker is a second year medical student.

society so the makeup of students may alter.” He called on the government “not to accelerate the pace of change.” Mr Cable, speaking at the UUK conference, said “We are not trying to introduce a two tier system.” With universities in England facing cuts of 12 per cent this year, ministers hope the offer of more places will prove tempting for cash-strapped institutions. The white paper aims to encourage young people to apply to university despite fees rising almost threefold at most institutions next year. More than half of people applying to for course between 2010 and 2011 would not have done so if fees had been at next year’s levels, pollsters have found. It is not yet known which 12 universities are considering lowering their fees but The Mancunion can confirm that Manchester University, Manchester Metropolitan University and the University of Salford will charge up to the maximum limit.


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Ceri Wills Societies Editor

That’s right folks, there’s a new kid in town; A brand spanking new section dedicated entirely to societies! So much great stuff goes on which no-one gets to hear about, so this year we’re giving societies the coverage they deserve. I’m Ceri and I’ll be editing the section. Each week I’ll be bringing you news, information and features sharing what’s out there, what’s been going on and what’s coming up. There will be regular ‘Society Spotlights’ where a society gets the chance to give you an insight into what they do and how you can get involved, along with event listings so you can keep an eye on what’s on each week. I’m also aiming to fit in

The new Societies section is looking for societies to feature, event listings and contributors. If you're in a society and would like to be featured, contact me at societyspotlight@mancunion.com. You will also be able to find me at 11am in the Students' union bar every Wednesday.

Event

Listings TUESDAY 20th

Manchester Debating Union Debate ‘This House Would Return the British Empire to its Former Glory,’ 6pm, Club Academy (Students’ union basement). A light hearted debate followed by food and drinks BA Econ Society Welcome and Information Event, 2pm, Arthur Lewis Common Room. For students studying BA Economics Ip Man Wing Chun Kung Fu Demonstration of how to use wing chun on the street, along with free fighting. 2pm, Council Chambers, Students’ union 2nd floor

WEDNESDAY 21st

Student Action Introduction to Outreach, 6pm, Students’ union basement. Bring warm clothing, we will be giving out hot food and drinks whilst showing you the unseen sights of Manchester Philosophy Society Movie Night: Monty Python’s The Meaning of Life, 7.30pm, Club Academy. Free popcorn followed by drinks in the union bar RAW Rock Music Society Pub Quiz in The Ducie Arms, meet at 7pm at Student’s Union. Test your thinking parts.

THURSDAY 22nd

Hiking Society Vodka + Doughnuts introduction evening, Room 2 (2nd floor Students’ union). Sign up to our first two trips, to Snowdon, North Wales, and Helvellyn in the Lake District Gilbert & Sullivan Society (MUGSS) Welcome Wine Evening, 7pm, Jabez Clegg. Membership £5 and plenty of free wine, find out what it takes to put on a spectacular musical in a professional theatre Manchester Debating Union Debate ‘This House Believes Proprietors Should Be Free From Prosecution When Defending Their Own Property,’ 5pm, Club Academy. Social at Darbar restaurant followed by 5th Avenue Nordic Society Pub Night, upstairs in Font Bar, Fallowfield, 7pm. Welcoming new and old members of the Nordic Society, bring your friends

FRIDAY 23rd

International Students for Social Equality 'Introduction Meeting - Take up the Fight for Socialism,' 7.30pm, Students’ union, Room 2 Francophone Society Welcome meeting and sign up for French Classes, 7.30pm, former Activities Office, 2nd floor, Students’ union Chinese Performing Arts Society Welcome party, free acting workshop and screening, Club Academy, 2.30pm – 6pm RAW Rock Music Society The Pub Crawl Of Epic Win! 8pm, Students Union Bar. A mighty quest from the Union Bar up to Club HD

interviews, insider info and important information for society organisers so that everyone can stay informed and engaged. As editor, my part in all of this is to give you the space to shout about what you do and to find out what you want to know! Ultimately, this page is all about linking you to the societies you want to know more about, or ones you may never even have known existed, so that you can get involved and make the most of your time at university. We want as many of you engaged as possible, whether it’s through joining a society, starting a new one or contributing here. So whether you’re a society organizer, a student, a wannabe contributor or you’ve just got a great idea about what we should be doing, then get in touch! My contact details are listed at the bottom of the page.

Photo: Terrific Tor @ Flickr

Societies Get involved!

Introducing the NEW Societies section

There will be condoms

What to expect at the Freshers’ Fair Ceri Wills Societies Editor

It’s Welcome Week, so that can mean only one thing, the Student Fair! Your chance to sign up to every society under the sun, and with a massive 232 societies registered last year there’s something for everyone. It will be running from Tuesday 20th September until Thursday the 22nd, from 10:30am to 4pm. For those of you who’ve not yet had the delight of attending a Freshers’ Fair, it’s one of the mustsee sights of Welcome Week on Oxford Road along with snowdrifts of flyers and the party buses (if you don’t see them you’ll certainly hear them). It’s where every society gets its chance to lay out its stall to entice new members and publicise their events. Plus, it’s your only chance each year to have such easy access to such a wide variety of interests and activities, so it really is worth putting up two fingers to your hangover and hopping on a magic bus. Our societies cover a mindboggling array of interests and hobbies, creative, cultural or otherwise. They’re set up for all sorts of reasons, be it for serving and representing the needs of a

Anyone is welcome to join a society throughout the year particular group, campaigning for causes or just for fun. There’s no way I can even begin to cover the breadth of them, so why not take a peep at www.umsu.manchester.ac.uk/soc ieties/list/ and see for yourself. When you go along, remember your student ID number as you’ll need this to sign up for societies. But why sign up I hear you cry? Why sign up when there are a plethora of sights and sounds to soak up through the city? Firstly, they are a great way to meet new people. For those of you new here, your first few weeks will doubtless be filled with lecture halls of new faces, but we all know that when it comes to

making friends it’s all about quality over quantity. Joining a society about something you’re interested in is a failsafe way to find like-minded people interested in the same stuff that you are. It’s also a good way to keep busy. You might hate me for saying this but your time at university will fly by, and whilst existing in an alcoholic fog might be a fun way to spend your time, it’s certainly not memorable and nor can it go on your CV. Having a few regular events each week is a good way to build a routine, especially for those of you on courses where you don’t have many contact hours. Get involved in society committees too. If you love what you’re doing, whether it’s Ultimate Frisbee or life drawing, then go along to committee meetings and contribute to running the society. Many societies are run by final year students who, whilst passionate, are pushed for time. Getting involved in your first couple of years of university is perfect when your lectures aren’t yet allconsuming and you’ve got some time to spare. But don���t worry if you never get round to signing up to societies at the start of the year, or even at all in your first year. You have not

missed the boat. Many people believe that joining a society part of the way into the year is too late to get involved and that societies will have become exclusive cliques of friends by then, but I cannot stress enough that this is not the case. Anyone is welcome to join a society throughout the year. If you’re not sure where to find a society or how to sign up after Welcome Week then the first port of call is the UMSU website which you can find at www.umsu.manchester.ac.uk/soci eties where you will be able to find contact details for every society. I’d also recommend looking them up on Facebook for regular communication and event details. And of course, check this page every week for more information. There are a million reasons to sign up to societies, so I say go out there and give them all a go. But if I’ve not done enough to convince you, then perhaps there is one more thing to entice you to the Freshers’ Fair. The freebies. I can guarantee that you will pick up enough pens to last you the entire academic year, so don’t bother buying any. There will be free pizza on offer, plus I suggest you grab as many of the Domino’s token books as you can gather to bag yourself even more. Last year there was popcorn, pot noodles, beans, badges, bags, vouchers, sweets, toys, t-shirts … Need I say more? Oh, and for those of you set on spending your nights enjoying the, ahem, carnal delights you may find, there will be condoms.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Ben Moore Columnist A lot has happened since the end of the last academic year. In particular, this summer the nation was rocked as young people up and down the country took violently to the streets to wreak havoc in their communities. Although the initial riots were sparked when an unarmed Mark Duggen was fatally shot by police, the subsequent, unprecedented disorder was far removed from these sentiments of searching for justice and demanding police transparency. The more deep-rooted causes of the riots, including the rise of a pervasive gangster culture in many of our cities, and cannot be ignored. Much blame has fallen on opportunistic individuals and parents, but all too often these simplistic explanations fail to highlight more fundamental, structural problems that exist in today’s society. Rather than seeking out or accepting simplistic, peremptory explanations of the riots, we surely need to understand them in the context of their roots: in particular, of heightened inequality and unemployment. There is currently a national unemployment rate of 40 percent for 16 to 17 year olds, while the ‘New Labour’ government exacerbated the gap between rich and poor in the UK further even than in the Thatcher era. The appalling violence exhibited on our streets this summer was in part a result of years of a lack of opportunity to escape the poverty trap. In 2007, after housing costs, a shocking 48 percent of children living in inner city London

Citizenship education is not a magic solution to the problems, but it certainly can discourage the type of behaviour displayed during the riots were in poverty. This negligence of our policy makers to reduce inequality and poverty has created a generation of young, angry people starved of the support they need and heightened status competition, inevitably stigmatising the poor. For a generation of youth, this feeling of inferiority is a source of frustration and anger. Contrary to what some media reports might imply, and to the recent very public racial slur by TV ‘pundit’ David Starkey (a man clearly detached from reality), this is not a ‘black’ problem. Nonetheless, there is a cultural problem, and it lies in so called ‘gangster culture’, supported and perpetuated by a certain type of aggressive, chauvinist grime music, which openly glorifies gun violence. The murder-sanctifying violent lyrics of many

Calm before the storm: Fallowfield during the summer lull

can discourage the type of behaviour displayed during the riots. Relationships with the police also need to change. This can start with a greater respect for civil liberties; it is abysmal that in 2010 in London, black people were 26 times more likely than whites to be stopped and searched. This racial profiling is not only morally repugnant, but has also ostracised an entire generation of black youth from their local police force. It may never be cool to be friendly with a policeman, but that doesn’t mean there shouldn’t be some sort of relationship there; one which doesn’t stigmatise or aggravate the UK’s next generation. It also perpetuates and even encourages a life of crime; by saying to this group that we expect you to break the law and it may have another reverse effect by actually familiarising young people with the procedure of being arrested. Pent up frustration was released en masse during the riots. The police are supposed to protect all citizens and a large number of people do not feel they fall into this scope of protection, something which may further alienate them from the idea of citizenship itself, something which was apparent in the abhorrent attitudes shown towards local communities in the riots. If our society is broken, the answer is not to put a new, shiny engine in, but to question the direction it is heading. Issues need to be addressed. Strict measures for next summer’s Olympics will only delay a recurrence of such riots. There should be a full and thorough enquiry into how we are failing our young people, which should stretch through to the foundations of our society.

Photo: Nick Whiting

Featured Photo

such songs have further desensitised a wide section of young people already alienated by economic divisions and social injustice to the idea that crime is acceptable-and this detachment from civic responsibility and reality was all too evident when people walked out of Curry’s with their looted TVs, stopping and waiting for a green man before crossing the road. When people not only looted, but trashed family businesses, it was very much reminiscent of the gangster culture that is popular with inner city youth and inevitably invites the question: instead of symptomatically treating the problem through harsher prison sentences and ‘zero tolerance’, we might rather adopt a more causal approach that looks at the economic and cultural drivers of such behaviour – in particular, minimising the disparity of wealth in our cities, as well as providing opportunities to the poorest in society at a young age to escape poverty. We also need to stop blaming parents for such behaviour, in a way that does not deny parental responsibility. Parents have dramatically failed their kids if they have such little respect for society, but when these parents fail, institutions should exist that attempt to correct some of the mistakes made at home. This is where education is key. Schools can provide citizenship education, something that, bizarrely, the current government wishes to scrap from the national curriculum. With dynamic lessons and good teachers, a concerted effort can be made to encourage children to respect their communities and fellow citizens, as well as to obey the law. Citizenship education is not a magic solution to the problems, but it certainly

Column

Citizenship and Civil disobedience


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Welcome (Back) Paul Haslam Comment & Debate Editor

Hello, and greetings to all you fresh Welcomites, and to you not-so-fresh but seasoned Manchester residents! We hope the summer has been as eventful for all of you as it has been for the world at large, but without all the deaths. Here in Manchester the big news has been the riots (which hopefully you managed to avoid if you were here or elsewhere - in London, Bristol, Merseyside etc). In the USA extreme weather events have cracked the Washington Phallus monument, nicely symbolising the impotence of the political system there to do anything except perpetuate itself - much to the benefit of those taking part and at the expense of everyone else - but hurricane Irene thankfully failed to equal the destructive wrath of her predecessor, Katrina. As you read this it’s likely that the remnants of another hurricane, Katia, are sweeping the roads of Manchester, but thanks to her transatlantic journey she’s hopefully a bit too tired to do much damage. Across the Middle East the Arab Spring continued through summer, and it seems that the Gaddafi regime in Libya is now finished, although the less-media-friendly because less-visibly-insane regime of Bashar al-Assad in Syria is still using violence to repress opposition parties with one hand, whilst holding the promise of change in the other. Is it possible that the Arab Spring acted as some inspiration for the events which occurred here over the summer? It seems that riots have been in the air this year, even when here in the UK people have (comparatively) little to complain about. The almost-unanimous opinion that I hear voiced regarding the riots is that the people involved were/are scum - the chavs or scallies that we define as other, because they represent the opposite of the values we like to hold: entitlement instead of hard work, destruction of property rather than aquisition, seeking to benefit the self rather than the community. This isn’t, probably, very far from the truth at all. Reams and reams of print have gone into the discussion of the riots, and I’m a little late to the party, but there are a couple of things I’d like to say on this topic. A question I hear a lot is; “If you [the rioters] are all so disenfranchised and deprived of opportunity, then why would you make it worse by destroying the very areas you live in?”. Well, riots happen where they happen. Please, do not expect intelligent decision-making by large numbers of people gathered together, especially when they are a) pissed off, b) basically kids (look at the footage), and c) not especially given to caring in the first place. What does it matter to me (say, a 15-yearold living on a council estate) if I loot and burn down my local shop? It’s given nothing to me, I don’t work there, I’ll never own it, and any benefit I derive from its presence is pretty much indirect - not apparent to me even if I did care. Riots, if left to themselves, will literally burn themselves out - therefore, be grateful to our policemen, who acted well in the face of danger, for once using the human impulse to violence for good effect rather than wasting it on students in political rallies. Another thing that needs mentioning is the seed of the riots; that is, the (peaceful) rally over the police shooting of Mark Duggan. Whether this shooting was justified or not is not for me to say (I’m

To do list for Freshers: 1. You are no longer allowed to be called Freshers, as the connotations of excessive alcohol and general craziness are clearly imposed on you by the word. To free you from these expectations, Fresher’s Week has been redesignated Welcome Week, and similarly, I propose the term ‘Welcomites’ to fill the gap left by the excision of ‘Freshers’ from our lexicon. However, you are entirely free to pick your own moniker. 2. Read Sophie’s World and the Selfish Gene. The half-remembered contents of these two books will furnish you with enough knowledge to take part in the traditional pissed student conversations if you so choose. 3. If convenient, get a bike preferably one with road tyres. You can pick up a pair of Schwalbe City Jay tyres from Amazon for a tenner each. It’ll pay for itself in saved bus fares, although you might get a bit wet from time to time. 4. Join a society. It’s a great way to meet like-minded people. You might even have some fun. Similarly, meet as many people as you can in your halls - you never know who you might stay friends with in the years to come.

Paul Haslam

inclined to believe that although he probably was not a very nice man, I don’t believe he was an immediate threat at that particular moment) - however, the police reportedly refused to disclose the circumstances of his death within the legally required time, leading to a protest by about 150 people. It was this event which catalysed the events to come and it has uncovered, in my opinion, something which Britain has failed to notice has been

building for some time, although we might have hoped the problem had gone away: police discrimination against Britain’s black citizens. By losing this fact in the resulting noise of violence and free aquisition, we risk ignoring the general disenfranchisement of our inner-city black population, writing off people’s genuine frustration as apolitical looting and destruction (which is, to be fair, what ultimately resulted). However, the most interesting aspect of the rioting has been the political reaction to it - Prime Minister Cameron has once again proven himself as the man with his thumb on the pulse of Britain with his reaction and that of his party: top-down imposition of harsh sentences on children caught stealing socks in the middle of chaos. While this satisfies the public’s desire for justice and the maintenance of order, it does rather fly in the face of judiciary independence and the use of discretion in applying the law. Possibly, though, handing down tough sentences was the correct reaction - we can’t have people rioting in the streets just because they think they can get away with it. Cameron, however, has deftly seized the opportunity to drop the blame for ‘Broken Britain™’ squarely on the shoulders of those most disenfranchised by the current situation. It’s a moral failing, he says; a case of the loss of morality, a decay in community spirit, and he’s here to save the day with boy-scout style youth groups and the ‘Big Society™’. As far as social engineering goes, it’s fairly benign, and probably even a good idea whether it’s a substitute for world-class education, healthcare and job availability; things the Conservatives seem reluctant to provide, is another debate. It’s an old question, often asked by societies in what they perceive as a decline: is the youth of today more feckless, more dissolute, less trustworthy, than the youth of previous generations? What I say is no, there have always been dicks in society, and that is not likely to change. In times of crisis (and whether we are in one of those is besides the point, when we all seem to think that yes, we definitely are, and with terms like ‘Broken Britain’ Cameron seems to particularly get off on confirming that belief ) we look to the causes, and inevitably one of the most common is: ‘us’.

However, this never turns out to be the actual ‘us’; it’s always some unwelcome interloper masquerading as part of society - the Christians in Rome, some folk devil or another, which the public mind can hold up and say “If only these people weren’t here, everything would be ok!”. The results of people taking the energy of that desire and applying it are well enough known not that I’m suggesting that Cameron is planning some progrom against benefit sponges, he’s merely using the moment to enact changes which have been part of the Conservative agenda for decades - cut public spending, cut benefits, and then everyone will miraculously pull the motivation which has been languishing under the soothing tyranny of the welfare state out of their arses, and then suddenly, everyone will have jobs (because the jobs will come from..?), and everyone will be rich ( just like us)! Personally, I don’t subscribe to the view that poverty is the best way to generate motivation; it strikes me as a little bit heartless, and probably less effective than improving education and healthcare, both of which will no doubt suffer under the coalition’s cuts, and providing jobs whilst improving the infrastructure of the country by sponsoring public works. But then, I am a bleeding-heart liberal. Although some Conservatives have been making noises about taking punitive measures against the bankers who were so bad at their jobs that they nearly bankrupted the country, don’t hold your breath. It’s very unlikely that they’ll bite the hand that feeds very hard, if at all. Which is a shame as it seems that many people cite the apparent immunity of the banking and journalistic sectors from reaction against their (largely abstract) wrongdoings as a factor in the (much more visible) criminal activity that followed in our city centres. I’d quite like to see a comparison of the damage to Britain’s economy by the banking sector and the rioting, before we decide who deserves the harsher punishment.

If you’d like to write for the Comment section of the Mancunion, send a copy of your work to comment@mancunion.com. We are always looking for new contributions.


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09

Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

So I can give blood now… but no sex for a year Nick Pringle The government recently announced an end to the lifetime ban on gay men donating blood. It’s hard not to consider this a great result. However, men who sleep with men are still subjected to a 12 month period of no sexual contact if they wish to donate. For some men this will mean they can give blood. But for most, 12 months of celibacy is neither a fair nor practical option. How much longer will it take to have a blood donation service based purely on medical evidence rather than politics, stereotypes and generalisations? Starting in November I’ll be able to donate blood for the first time ever, so long as I haven’t had any sort of sexual contact with a man for the previous 12 months. It doesn’t matter how safe the sexual practice was, if it was with a regular or casual partner or where in the world that partner was from – any anal or oral sex between two men, with or without a condom, prohibits those men from donating blood until twelve months after having sex. Think that sounds unfair? Imagine living under a lifetime ban. Essentially, a man who sleeps with only women, but has risky, casual and unprotected sex is subject to far less restrictions than two men in a monogamous relationship who always do and always have practiced safe, protected sex. It is also likely that the two men in the second scenario can be far surer of their HIV status than the man in the first. The government’s rationale behind this

How much longer will it take to have a blood donation service based purely on medical evidence? is that men who sleep with men (MSM), usually gay or bisexual men, are proportionately more likely to contract HIV and other blood-borne viruses as a whole group. The Terrance Higgins Trust, a leading sexual health charity, stated that; “Changing [the 12 month deferral period] depends on reducing gay men’s risk of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections to the same level as the rest of the population” by increasing safer sex messages. This totally negates the fact that blood donation isn’t currently based on safer sex, and if it were this would provide some incentive for men who sleep with men to practice safer sex. The discriminatory ban came about under the Thatcher government as a knee-jerk reaction to the HIV/AIDS epidemic of the 1980s; it has taken almost 30 years to repeal this measure.

Unquestionably the revised period of 12 months is a huge improvement as a result of campaigns run by a number of UK organisations, including the National Aids Trust. However, it was the National Union of Students’ LGBT (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual & Trans) Campaign who first campaigned on the issue over seven years ago – and it is the NUS LGBT Campaign that continues to hold the government to account over this decision. One of the greatest problems that the Campaign has with the government’s recent decision is their failure to publish the evidence which accompanied their decision. Vicki Baars and Alan Bailey, NUS’s LGBT Officers, said that “It is absolutely critical that organisations… have the opportunity to look at and properly analyse the research used to justify the deferral period.” As with any decision taken by any government, having faith in decisions made rests upon understanding the reasoning behind them being taken. A reason given by the government for why prospective donors are not asked specific questions about their sexual practices is that this “could lead to a loss of existing donors who may find the process intrusive”. Indeed if this is the reasoning behind the decision taken, then the UK Government could find themselves subject to a legal challenge from Europe.

Nick Pringle is the Humanities Faculty Officer at the University of Manchester Students’ Union & also sits on the NUS LGBT Committee.

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Politics & Analysis

Rob Fuller analyses what each of the three main parties must prioritise if they are to have a successful autumn conference The summer is over and our beloved Members of Parliament are back at work for all of three weeks before they jet off around the UK. Yes, it’s that time of the year again – party conference season! For those of you who are unaware of the phenomena, party conferences are essentially music festivals for political parties. The party faithful travel to far-flung British cities (the further from Westminster, the better) to hear the biggest names in modern politics deliver grandiose speeches trumpeting the successes of the year gone by and what they hope to achieve in the year ahead. In theory, party conferences should play a serious role. They are meant to provide a forum for the party to come together and make important decisions about the future. Historically, conferences have been the venue for watershed moments in British politics. Throughout the ‘40s and ‘50s, the Labour Party conference often saw pitched battles over issues such as our nuclear deterrent and the importance of nationalising industries. Margaret Thatcher’s infamous 1980 party conference speech (“the lady is not for turning”) was a defining moment for many Conservatives. However, much like music festivals, conferences have become increasingly contrived affairs with very few surprises and certainly no big disagreements. But could 2011 be different? A successful conference is a good springboard for any party. It can unite the party base and create a narrative for voters, giving the party an edge over its rivals. But as anyone who has been to a music festival in this country knows, every now and then you are bound to experience rain – and for each of the

three main parties, there are storm clouds on the conference horizon. Riding relatively high in the polls, the Labour Party might expect to have the ‘easiest’ conference of the big three parties this autumn. The 2010 instalment, held here in Manchester, was dominated by the acrimonious leadership election, won by Ed Miliband to the surprise of many. Since then, the new leader has faced a barrage of criticism over his ability to take on the Conservatives. Yet a strong conference speech might silence Ed’s critics and give him the chance to prove that he can go after Prime Minister David Cameron and, in the long term, have a genuine chance of winning a general election. Expect to hear plenty about the economy, and even more about public sector cuts. It will be interesting to see how Labour approaches the phone hacking scandal, too. Will the leadership attempt to capitalise on perceived Tory involvement by attacking the government over the Andy Coulson affair? Or will they play down the scandal, keen either to rebuild bridges with the media or to avoid criticism over their own previously-close relationship with the Murdoch empire? Of course, no Labour Party conference would be complete these

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Andrew Campell Politics & Analysis Editor

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Politics & Analysis

Conference crunch time for the coalition

Andrew Campbell

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Comment & Debate

The Boundary Commission’s report considering the government’s controversial proposal to reduce the number of parliamentary seats in the UK, suggests significant changes to the way in which Manchester is represented in Parliament and raises fundamental questions of local identity. Under the proposals, which are planned to come into effect in 2013, the number of MPs will be reduced from 650 to 600, with the North West losing seven MPs. In Manchester, with the report ignoring the boundaries of local communities, the new constituencies would cut across areas that have different needs and distinct identities.

In the north, a considerable part of what is presently Salford Constituency is currently held by former Labour Cabinet Minister Hazel Blears and includes the Salford Quays and MediaCity area, an iconic symbol of Salford’s regeneration, as well as Salford Cathedral and the University of Salford. This would all become part of Manchester Central constituency. The rest of the current Salford Constituency would become part of a new Swinton Constituency. Salford is a city with a proud identity and a rich political heritage; these proposals show absolutely no regard for this. In the south, the marginal seat of Manchester Withington will move northwards to take in parts of Manchester Gorton, including Fallowfield, losing the two Didsbury Wards to Wythenshawe Constituency. The current Withington

days without a rehashing of the old BlairBrown rivalry. Expect plenty of questions and criticisms from the Tories about Labour’s past performance after revelations in Alistair Darling’s memoirs. For the Conservatives, life might be much harder. David Cameron and his colleagues will probably focus on two key areas. One will be the economy, and the deficit – which will undoubtedly take centre stage despite fears of a slowing recovery or even a double dip recession. Second will be one of Cameron’s favourite themes – that of ‘Broken Britain’, a theme which has returned to the fore following this summer’s riots. However, there will be serious fears at Conservative HQ that the message may end up being hijacked. There are growing numbers of backbench Tory MPs who are disgruntled about life in the coalition government. They consider Nick Clegg and the Lib Dems to be far too powerful, and want to see a stronger Conservative voice. After MP Nadine Dorries recently confronted Cameron on the issue at Prime Minister’s Questions, there is some appetite for a confrontation that could make the leadership feel somewhat uncomfortable. Furthermore, the old spectre of Euroscepticism has

Constituency includes several of Manchester’s most affluent areas such as The Didsburys, Chorlton and Withington Village. Under the report’s proposals both Withington and Wythenshawe will have a more mixed demographic. The needs of MPs' constituents are going to be different depending on their circumstances. Having constituencies with broadly similar demographics does have advantages in allowing an MP to provide effective representation and the kind support that their constituents require. The Boundary Commission’s proposals clearly do not take this into account. The report, commissioned by the government under the pretext of cost cutting, has understandably attracted accusations of gerrymandering. It is certainly true that the government commissioned the report in the knowledge that if the Boundary Commission was given the criteria of equalising the size of parliamentary constituencies then the result would almost certainly lead to an

reared its head again once again in light of the ongoing Eurozone crisis, and many Conservatives may be tempted to attack the government over their continuing support for the EU. Finally, we turn to the once-popular Liberal Democrats. In May of last year, Nick Clegg led his party into power for the first time in decades but, over one year on, his party will want something to show for it. Faced with regular accusations of being too close to David Cameron, combined with a heavy loss of support over the trebling of tuition fees and the failure of the AV referendum, Nick Clegg will have to work hard to satisfy his party. Expect to hear claims of Lib Dem successes aplenty from the podium, but plenty of grumbling elsewhere. Overall, though, the party faithful will probably remain resigned to its fate as the junior coalition partner, without too much talk of breaking away. So the question is, will this conference season – for once – get interesting? Every party wants an event as smoothly choreographed as Beyonce’s performance at Glastonbury, but keep an eye on the news. This year, for the parties and their leaders, things might just get a little bit tricky.

advantage for the Conservatives. Under The Guardian’s analysis of the report the Conservatives would only have lost six of the seats they currently hold in England had the last general election been held with the proposed boundaries, with Labour and the Lib Dems losing 14 and 10 respectively. With the proposal having to be voted on by parliament, will Lib Dem MPs really vote to set themselves at such a disadvantage going into what is looking like being a difficult election for their party? It would be act of gross masochism if they did. In 1974 the Conservative Government of the time reorganised county boundaries and the debate over what is ‘Real Lancashire’ continues to this day, indeed the ‘Campaign for Real Lancashire’ (www.forl.co.uk) includes three Lib Dem and four Conservative MPs amoung its patrons. If the government proceeds with these proposals, it will find real anger from voters over the way in which their communities are being redrawn without their consent.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Boris Johnson, British politics and ping pong Jess Brown

On the eve of the penultimate day of the 2008 Olympic Games, Boris Johnson made what is now regarded as an iconic statement. “The game of ping pong”, he opined, brandishing his open-buttoned jacket, “was invented on the dining tables of England in 19th Century. It was called wiff-waff”. Whilst Johnson’s claims to the historical ownership of ping pong have been hotly disputed by a wealth of wellrespected sporting historians, there is an interesting parallel to be drawn between British political proceedings and a game which consists of a small plastic ball being thumped back and forth between two players. The analogy can quite easily be applied to political conferencing, a succession of exchanges of party political banter residing at the very heart of policy formation. In the wake of summertime riots and continual gripes concerning the economy, we are living in a state of wartime-like austerity – and as such one would hope that a form of genuine political consensus could be found. Only a year ago, the anticipation of conflict between the Conservative/Liberal Democrat coalition at their respective party conferences was palpable, but the tension that had been mounting for a number of months was built into a media epic that ultimately failed to materialise. Nonetheless, the puppetry of political conferences has historically been a provocative show of sniping, ‘witty’ oneliners and precious little political substance. In order to ascertain the level of ping pong prowess prevalent in the current conference system, we could revisit an article published by The Mancunion back in 2009. We compiled a ‘conference price list’ which showed how much it would cost for an individual student to attend, for example, the Conservative Party conference. It was suggested that the total cost – in excess of £100 – would be unrealistic for the ordinary student, adding weight to our claim that the conference was an inaccessible puppet show for the privileged. However, when trying to ascertain ticket prices for this year’s conference season, the overall impression is one of increasing accessibility. The Liberal Democrats 2011 conference day tickets, for example, range from just £17 to £34 – not entirely unaffordable for a politically active student with an interest in current affairs. Does this suggest that the political conference season is beginning to divert away from the clichéd commentaries of puppetry and political ping pong? Further still, is it an indication the start of a smallscale re-democratisation of domestic politics? The setting of political conference season has, in recent years, been made infinitely more accessible due to the advent of 24-hour media, dedicated programming and politically devoted TV channels such as BBC Parliament. However, I take issue with the fact that conferences, at their heart, retain an air of delusion. Whilst many political

To dream of us all, together, dancing blissfully down the parquet halls of democracy seems a tad naïve

of democracy, this connection that so intrinsically links politicians with their electorate, more readily? Electoral facts speak volumes for the crisis of British politics. The 2010 general election saw just over half of the eligible electorate cast a ballot, with even fewer accepting the challenge of electoral reform in the AV referendum. Students at the time made it clear that they felt disenchanted with a system that was so extricated from everyday life; that voting was therefore not a reasonable course of action; that politics simply didn’t seem accessible. Conference season provides analysts with the opportunity to dissect the minutiae and excite enthusiasts about forthcoming policy initiatives, somehow

The week in

Washington Obama’s jobs plan could be his last chance to save a faltering presidency It was a good speech. Statistics and real policy ideas combined almost seamlessly with folksy, if condescending rhetoric. Politicians from both parties and all parts of the country, however briefly, seemed united in applause for a president promising that he would get Americans back to work. Yet Barack Obama’s jobs plan may still not be enough to save his presidency. Assuming that the bill is passed – which is by no means a certainty given the current political climate in Washington – the American Jobs Act will give more money to the unemployed and teachers; America’s decrepit ports, roads, airports and schools will be rebuilt; and tax cuts will be granted to both employer and employee as the 44th President desperately seeks to boost an ailing economy and his rapidly deteriorating presidency. President Obama’s jobs plan would, for many Americans, be a welcome break from the austerity measures and budget cuts imposed on the United States by a Republican-controlled Congress. What’s more, any move to create jobs is likely to go down well in a country where the unemployment rate has been hovering at just under the 10% mark for almost two years. Yet if Obama believes that his jobs plan will give him a much-needed boost in his bid for reelection next year, he may be mistaken. Writing in The Guardian, Professor Richard Sennet of the London School of Economics made the point that ordinary Americans probably won’t feel the effects of Obama’s jobs plan for quite a few years, if the stimulus bill of January 2009 is anything to go by. Furthermore, there are doubts – from both sides of the political spectrum – over whether or not the policy will actually work. Republican presidential hopefuls Rick Perry, Mitt Romney and Michelle Bachmann have all, predictably, poured scorn over the jobs plan. Meanwhile, liberal political commentator Cenk Uygur derided Obama for suggesting that both Medicare and Medicaid (government funded healthcare programmes for the poor and the elderly, respectively) would face cuts as part of this latest proposal. Perhaps most worryingly of all, top economists including the University of Manchester’s very own Jospeh Stiglitz have suggested that, despite the package being worth around $450 billion, it may simply be too small a stimulus to provide a tangible boost to the economy.

commentators have argued that the institution of party conferencing is an iconic symbol of British democracy, the underlying reality is somewhat different. To dream of us all, together, dancing blissfully down the parquet halls of democracy seems a tad naïve. Even with lower prices and increasing geographical mobility (this year’s conferences are being held in Manchester, Liverpool and Birmingham respectively), I still feel cheated by an insular conference system. In order to participate intimately with British politics, it is important that observers are given the opportunity to ask questions of the politicians who are accountable to us directly; to absorb fragments of the conference atmosphere; and, ultimately, that we are able to engage with the political elite as much as possible. This, unfortunately, is a barely viable option in the British political anathema. Yes, the Liberal Democrats have markedly reduced their prices for students. But in order to get a broader sense of informed student opinion, would it not be better to give people access to this event – so crucial to party policy formation – for a nominal fee or (God forbid!) for free? Would it not say more to our youth to extend this hand

attempting to ignite a small flame of effervescent democratic hope within a nation. Conference season has the potential to utilise and maintain a small strand of democracy that, like the AV referendum, is direct and multifunctional. However, the current situation is one of glaring neglect. Upholding any sort of direct democratic relationship in this manner has been thwarted by a growing concern within the traditional party system to curry favour, to stabilise the three-party system and to celebrate ‘old boy’ public school politics via a weeklong charade of back slapping and exuberant self-congratulation. Whilst we may have guffawed at Boris’ attempted stab to display some hidden sporting prowess, he inadvertently supported an analogy that highlights a fault most inherent within his profession. It is the regrettable lack of commitment to our outlets for direct democracy in Britain that pertains that the political conference will continue, much the same as in recent years, as just another stage-managed knockabout of game, set and match – without even so much as a rain check.

To compound this, observers are sceptical as to whether the President holds sufficient political capital to push such controversial legislation through a Congress controlled by fiercely partisan Republicans who will stop at nothing to prevent Obama from winning a second term. At the time of writing, Obama’s approval rating stands at a dismal 43%, with 49% of Americans disapproving of his three-year track record. With economic growth nudging just 2% and unemployment and poverty rates on the rise, a meagre 26% of the electorate approve of Obama’s handling of the economy. In short, the President finds himself as the unpopular Commander-in-chief of a miserable nation with a tanking economy. Even if the American Jobs Act is passed and the economy gets moving again, any challenger for the presidency in 2012 has a realistic chance of wiping the floor with him. Yet this is by no means certain. Indeed, the most startling thing about American politics right now is that despite Obama’s apparent weakness, the Republican Party appears to lack a truly credible candidate capable of defeating him outright. Tea Party favourite Michelle Bachmann looks to have made one gaffe too many after her comment that Hurricane Irene may have been the act of a God angered by government overspend, she now seems unlikely to win the Republican nomination. Despite her tremendous appeal to the Republican grass roots, former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin is simply too divisive amongst the majority of ordinary Americans to even consider running for the presidency this time around. That seemingly leaves Rick Perry, an evangelical Christian and former Governor of Texas, and multimillionaire businessman-turned-politician Mitt Romney – two men who, according to Daily Show host Jon Stewart, have the appearance of actors in “those middle-aged-male-kayaker-with-prostate-problems advertisements” – as the only feasible challengers to Barack Obama in 2012. As was the case four years ago, the Republican field looks decidedly weak, and the lack of a stand-out GOP candidate must give the Democrats hope that their man will not be a one term president. Yet with a disillusioned Democratic base, an economy in freefall and few substantial policy victories to look back on, it could be President Obama’s jobs plan that will ultimately decide his fate in 2012.

Joe Sandler Clarke


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Business & Finance Business & Finance

Societies Round-Up Each week we will be taking a closer look at a UMSU Business or Finance Society and finding out more about who they are, what they do and how you can get involved with them. A list of all of the societies you can get involved with are available at mancunion.com. Visit them all at the student fair to find out more.

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Drugs: a high-risk market for students Emily Bunting Business & Finance Editor As another year begins at the University of Manchester with flyers plastering the streets, aiming to grab students with offers into every bar, pub and club, it is clear that the student economy is buzzing with activity. Living in our Manchester student world however, the economy does not stop there. Steadily over the years another ‘industry’ forming an illicit economy has dug deeper underground and is known as the black market. High-risk drug dealing offers big rewards to students caught in the grip of increasing University fees and student living costs on the one hand and insufficient part-time earning opportunities on the other. Whilst to some, such a concept might seem ludicrous – how could one risk a potential 14 year prison sentence and/or an unlimited fine just to cover university costs? The fact that drugs are present and thought to be frequently traded amongst students, suggests that this illicit economy is structured in order to avoid such risks and is solid enough to entice students into its trade year after year. This is hardly surprising when you begin to consider just how far reaching this black market is. The United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime estimated the

The HMV home entertainment group has announced another series of disappointing trading results. In the Interim management statement, chief executive Simon Fox announced that in the 18 weeks up to the start of September total retail sales have declined 21.8%, a figure which considers the impact of the group’s 29 store closures. The summer results arrive on top of the group’s annual financial results published in June showing total group sales falling by 7.4 per cent and pre-tax profits declining 61 per cent from £74m in 2010 to £28.9m in April 2011. As a result, since September 2010, HMVgroup share prices have fallen by almost 90 per cent. The company, which has 285 stores in the UK, is just one of the high profile cases of businesses failing to compete in an industry with consumer tastes shifting from physical product to digital consumption. CD sales have declined for six consecutive years while digital albums now account for a fifth of all album sales. Digital singles now account

HMV is just one of the high profile cases of businesses failing to compete in an industry with consumer tastes shifting from physical product to digital consumption for around 99 per cent of all single sales in the UK,

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Irn-bru colour change? Soft drinks company, AG Barr, says its popular fizzy drink Irn-bru will not be changing colour as a result of European Commission proposals to limit a key additive in its production. Legislators contemplated plans to reduce the acceptable daily intake of E110 Sunset Yellow following a review of its effects on children. The acceptable level has been lowered from 50mg to 20mg, the same amount that is currently used in the drink’s production.

many legal industries, drug traders focus on increasing margins, they therefore want to cut out the middlemen. This leads to constant networking, as a student might begin to meet those local traders higher up in the ‘industry’ and so closer to the source of the drugs, resulting in cheaper and bigger bulk buying. Such a cycle illustrates the process of this economy, which also fluctuates with peak ‘seasons’ (the end of exams for example) often corresponding with the occasions when student living costs might increase. This

economic analysis demonstrates why the black market might be attractive to students who can earn somewhere in the thousands. It is also worth bearing in mind that as these students begin to become increasingly involved in the trade, they start to no longer cover university debts, but are instead funding an ever demanding habit of their own. Despite the risks and the tarnish such activity could leave record, the trade keeps speeding along, forming another world of business.

Trading Troubles for HMV Scott McEwan Business & Finance Editor

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Feature Page

Business News In Brief

Student dealers tend to form the very bottom of the trading hierarchy… they want to cut out the middlemen value of the drug trade at $400billion in its 1997 World Drugs Report, leading drugs to be considered one of the world’s largest traded goods (alongside oil). Due to the vast sums of money involved in such an industry, this translates into a global hierarchy of traders, filtering down to different areas and especially in the UK, to students. Whilst it is clear that economic factors provide a key reason for involvement in such a market, what is also interesting is how this market is both maintained and structured so it can continue to thrive. Student dealers tend to form the very bottom of the trading hierarchy and like in

Science & Tech

Retail banking ring-fenced The Independent Commission on Banking has suggested that all of Britain’s leading banks should ringfence their retail subsidiaries from their wholesale and investment operations. Retail banking will supply saving and lending facilities to individuals and small business. They will operate with their own board of directors and will be forced to hold much more capital to protect against losses. Government officials welcomed the proposals which will not be imposed until 2019.

Household budget squeeze The Institute for Fiscal Studies has warned that household budgets will be squeezed for the next ten years as government austerity plans take hold. The publication reckons British families are experiencing the greatest decline in living standards for 30 years.

Volkswagen vs. Suzuki

predominantly serviced by online music giant iTunes. Some record labels such as Mercury Records, which represents popular artists such as U2 and Arcade Fire, have ceased producing CD singles all together due to lack of profitability. HMVgroup plans to extend its diversification into the market for portable technology devices and live performance ticketing to cushion the effects of deteriorating sales in physical music and DVDs. Music and

visual retail account for 24 and 44 per cent of sales respectively whilst other products such as ticketing and technology now account for 12 per cent of sales, an increase on an 8 per cent share last year. HMV has also launched the rebranded HMV Ritz in Manchester on Whitworth Street. Despite continuing poor performances and climbing debts, the group has finalised a two year refinancing deal worth £240m.

Suzuki Motors is seeking the end of their partnership with Volkswagen over an accusation of contractual violation. Volkswagen accused Suzuki of infringing the terms of their partnership by forming an alliance with Fiat to manufacture diesel engines. Suzuki denies wrongdoing and is now requesting that Volkswagen sell its 19.9 per cent stake in the Japanese company. In turn Suzuki will sell its 1.5% stake in Volkswagen. Scott McEwan Business & Finance Editor


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

The first connection using graphene based sensors was developed in 2010 and it transmitted data at 10Gb/s (for comparison, this is 5000 times faster than a typical 2Mb/s home internet connection). To help imagine this, with a 2Mb/s connection, you could download a standard DVD in about five hours. You could download the same DVD in only four seconds using a graphene based optical cable. Not bad for something that was only discovered in 2004 using a pencil and some sticky tape. Fibre optic internet connections send data as light. We then require sensors to detect that light and create electrical signals so the data can be understood by a computer. Basing these sensors on graphene made them quicker to react to the light. They were found to be up to one thousand times faster than traditional sensors. Developing optical cables that use these sensors could increase the amount of data carried to twenty times that of a typical fibre optic connection. In trials, graphene based sensors received data without error. However, they still had a problem: they were very inefficient. Now, in recent research from a collaboration between the Universities of Manchester and Cambridge, this problem has been overcome. The previous graphene based light sensors only absorbed a tiny fraction of the light shone on them, so they did not produce strong enough electrical signals. Scientists increased this by attaching very small, metallic structures to the graphene which acted to guide and concentrate the light, resulting in up to a 20-fold increase in the efficiency of the sensors. Researchers believe this could be improved upon with further research. Faster internet connections are not the only application scientists identified. The light sensors they developed work in much the same way a solar cell would. Graphene based solar cells might generate more power than even the best of current generation solar cells. Peter Dickinson

Leah Wong Science & Tech Editor Men and women in white coats presented 33,804 signatures to Downing Street a year ago. One year on, has the government listened to what they had to say? With the threat of cuts coming from the coalition government, science had to sit up and take action before the rumoured 35% cuts to science funding were implemented. Last year, the Science is Vital campaign gathered signatures as part of a petition to protect science funding in the UK. Sick of putting up with government cuts to science, Dr. Jennifer Rohn of University College London decided to make her voice- and the voices of scientists, engineers and interested people in the UKheard. She became the founder and Chair of the Science is Vital campaign. One year on, you would be forgiven for thinking that the campaign was over but this is far from the truth. After someone dared to whisper that science funding might be cut by over a third, there was a general feeling of relief once the budget was released. Whilst a freeze in science funding for the next four years is better than was feared, this still has implications for science in the UK. Once inflation is taken into account, this amounts to a real terms funding cut of 10%. A far cry from the pessimistic predictions of 35%, but hardly beneficial to science.

Photo: Joe Dunckley

The "wonder material" graphene, already the strongest and thinnest known material, could now be used to massively increase the speeds of internet connections.

White coats at Downing Street: One year later

People at the Science is Vital campaign plan to monitor threats to science in the short term whilst looking towards the General Election to see what they can do to protect science in the UK when the next budget is set. Interestingly, the campaign looks to have an informal method of campaigning because they believe getting as many working scientists involved is much more powerful. Dr. Rohn calls this the “grassroots” approach. The campaign is currently working on science careers in the country which started after a meeting with the Rt Hon David Willetts MP, the Minister of State for Universities and Science. This

prompted a currently ongoing investigation into the structure of science careers. After over 400 responses in under 24 hours, the opinions of scientists in the UK became obvious. According to Dr. Rohn, “the underlying message is clear: the scientific career structure is not fit for purpose and there is a real case to be made for examining how we can make it fairer and more supportive.” A cut to science funding has the immediate effect of putting pressure on career prospects, availability of permanent positions and the salary of people in the science industry. In the long term, it can affect the

reputation of universities. Outside universities, there must be confidence in science industries to attract investors. A funding cut can undermine this confidence. Considering 30% of our GDP comes from areas heavily involved in science, protecting science funding is in the country’s best interest. Science is Vital is determined to persevere in the campaign to protect science funding in the UK. With the 2013 spending review coming up, the campaign will continue to pressure the government to protect the interests of this country by maintaining investment in science.

Pulsar in the sky with diamonds Leah Wong Science & Tech Editor Anyone who thought the Hope Diamond was a large gem may have another thing coming. Scientists think they may have found a diamond planet in our galaxy. The discovery of the companion star was made by a team led by Professor Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University of Technology, Australia. The discovery was then followed up by the Lovell radio telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory, Cheshire. It was due to the observations made at Jodrell Bank that the companion planet was found. A pulsar is an extremely dense, fast spinning body with a strong magnetic field. It emits a beam of radiation which creates a light house effect. The pulse of light emitted from these dead stars has a constant period which gives the star its name. The pulsar orbited by this small planet rotates 10,000 times per minute. From observing the planet,

named PSR J1719-1438, researchers were led to believe the star had a small companion planet. Around 70% of pulsars are in a binary system- a system with two bodies orbiting each other- with most companions being a dying, low mass star: a white dwarf. The size of the object orbiting PSR J1719-1438 makes it significant because it is smaller than a white dwarf. The planet is thought to orbit the pulsar in 130 minutes at a distance of 600,000km. This is similar to the radius of our own sun. With a diameter one fifth the diameter of Earth but a mass greater than Jupiter, the new planet is extremely dense. The distance between the pulsar and planet indicate the body must once have been a white dwarf with most of its matter eaten by the pulsar. It must therefore be composed mostly of carbon and oxygen. Scientists think that the high density of the planet means these elements must be in crystalline form. Crystallised carbon is popularly known as diamond.

Science & Tech

Broadband: 5000 times faster

Before we consider heading over there to mine what could be truly conflict free diamonds, we should remember that it is 4000 light years away. If NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft will reach Pluto in just under 10 years travelling at a speed of 16km/s, it will reach PSR J1719-1438 in 74 million years if travelling at the same speed. Synthetic diamonds suddenly look a lot more attractive. In the meantime, researchers looking into this unusual binary system are hoping to use the Hubble Space Telescope to get a closer view of the planet and to see whether it really does sparkle like a diamond.

Write for Science & Tech Contact us scienceandtech @mancunion.com


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Feature Richard Crook Feature Editor

What could possibly go wrong? If you’re feeling a bit nervous right now, you really shouldn’t be. In fact, you should be feeling pretty smug. You’re attending a fantastic university, you’ve moved to a vibrant and exciting city and, unlike the year behind you, your entire financial life won’t be forever undermined by the monstrous £9,000 annual debt. You will love the time you spend here, rain or shine. Mostly rain admittedly. But for those of you still a little anxious about the coming days, weeks and months, I’m going to try and ease those nerves with a guide drawn from my own calamitous experiences. The point is, whatever could go wrong it’s never as bad as it seemed at the time. To start this, let me take you back a year with one embarrassing story of mine that took place during Fresher’s- sorry, ‘Welcome Week’. On my second day at Manchester, having noted down the wrong room for an induction, I attended a post-grad sociology seminar. I managed to arrive at this wrong seminar late. So the tutor had already started when I sat down and I slowly realised my mistake. But, with my stupidity matched only by pride, I just sat there frozen, unable to leave and beginning to feel like Mr. Bean. I desperately looked around for a way out- a fire exit or an open window maybe. Time passed and all rationality left me. It was the worst thing that had happened to anyone. Ever. My now frantic eyes caught those of the tutor. Shit. She asked me, in front of everyone, to rate the supervisor I’d been allocated the previous year. What could I do? She had seen me nodding along to what she was saying. I was in too deep. I cleared my throat and pondered over the performance of my imaginary supervisor. I gave them a four out of five. But she wasn’t done. Then she asked what it was about him that impressed me. “Organised and approachable” I blurted out. Well, you can’t argue with that. There aren’t many jobs that prefer disorganisation and hostility. Ok, I blagged it. But then the tutor split us into groups to collect ideas. It had finally gone to far. 15 minutes too late, with three

It may seem incredibly important to get everything right in Welcome Week, but university is about trial and error, so you shouldn’t worry about making silly mistakes. smiling sociologists waiting for me to provide input, I stood up and simply walked out with my head held high. Ok, it may have been a brisk walk. A very brisk walk. And I don’t even do sociology. There is a point to that humiliating story. While this edition of The Mancunion will be filled with some great advice on how to make the most of everything, I don’t feel I am any expert on getting it right. So my initial concept, to tell you about cool places to go and the importance of being yourself… yada yada yada .. is now being thrown away in favour of a “it really doesn’t matter if things screw up” theme inspired by some of my own mistakes. Control the purse strings Avoid rash purchases. When I got all that cash suddenly in my student account, among other things I spent £80 on a pair of Adidas limited edition Chewbacca shoes. Ok that’s a bad example;

everyone knows those things are an obvious babe magnet. For most of you though, the student loan will be the first time you will have access to that much free money (it is free, right?) in one go. But student loans do have to go a long way. Save money pre-drinking. Make your own lunch instead of going for the everenticing £5 Dominos deal. Or share stuff with your flatmates. And by ‘share’ I mean mooch off. You won’t need six sets of pots and pans, so see what you can get away with using. And I know it’s tempting, with all that money now available, to go straight to ASOS.com and convince yourself that, because its been reduced from £150 to £100, you are actually saving £50. But you’re not. Believe me, you’re not. Overdrafts can only be extended so much. If you do make mistakes on splurges like I often did, you will soon learn to pace yourself. Keep it all organised Make sure your stuff is well coordinated and safe. I thought I didn’t need a keychain, and if you have seen how small the Owens Park keys are, you’ll know how stupid that was. I quickly lost it at a club and spent £40 replacing it the next day. Of course being a massive idiot, I decided I still didn’t need a keychain and went to Squirrels bar that night, where I lost it

for a second time in two days. With the one available replacement gone, I spent the week with an unlocked room, where my flatmates hilariously turned every single thing upside down. This goes for your notes too. Having lost my entire lecture notes two weeks before my Chinese history exam; I found revision a complete pain. Life and soul of the party, not live entertainment. Get completely ‘MC hammered’ by all means, but just try not to be the worst, or unshakable nicknames may be bestowed upon you. Residents in my halls were quick to do this last year with one exceptionally drunk girl, resulting in her being given an almost mythical status for drinking. Show signs of losing self-control before everyone else and you will be targeted during drinking games. Stand back a bit until others are beyond the point of return and you won’t end up having to explain, like a peckish friend of mine did, why you’re buttering a folded tea towel for a post-night out sandwich. But, if you are one of the ‘usual suspects’ back home: relax, most people will make idiots of themselves and as such, no one is judged. Just mocked profusely.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Union Feature Last year the University of Manchester Students’ Union mandated The Mancunion to feature the stories of students at Al-Najah University, which our students’ union is twinned with. Al-Najah is based in Nablus, in the West Bank. The aim of this is to show the everyday experiences of students in the Palestinian territories.

As Palestinians take the long road... Lama Mansour

Ignore your old reservations For example, I’ve always been a fan of the football game Pro Evolution Soccer. But in university halls, everyone seems to play FIFA. People assume Pro Evo players are a socially odd breed who Skype their cats. I guess everyone just tired of playing Merseyside Blue Vs Teesside and playing Roberto Larcos at the back for Brazil. I took the plunge, moved to FIFA and never looked back. Put aside misgivings and be open to anything. You may raise your eyebrows but jumping ship from Pro Evo to FIFA was a painful decision.

I spent a week with an unlocked room where my flatmates hilariously turned every single thing upside down The best of the rest Ok, the advice I’ve dished out is probably a bit of a given to more sensible, organised folk. But here are some other small ways in which you will find yourself re-thinking a few assumptions, finding a few new habits, taking a fresh approach. For instance, when it comes to clubs this week try and buy your tickets in advance and get to the desired venue by 11 pm at the latest to avoid ‘one-inone-out’ queuing. Also, check out the city early on by having a wander, it makes it seem far less daunting once you get to know the place. Stagecoach bus passes are worth investing in, too. Anyone that tells you, “I’m just going to walk, it’s better for you” has obviously never lived in Manchester in January. Finally, lecturers will tell you time and time again this week that Wikipedia is the root of all evil, the web-spawn of Satan. It isn’t. While I would never reference it in an essay, Wikipedia can usually give you a decent overview and often gives some good links to other, more respected sources. Lets be honest, Wikipedia has taken us all this far, don’t let lecturers panic you into thinking you’re now on your own. Hopefully, you can see that if a buffoon who pretends to be a sociology post-grad can get used to the overwhelming surroundings and tricky essays, then you will have no problem. The important thing to remember when reading this is that, despite feeling like I was making endless calamities, I’m still here. You’re unlikely to make or break lifelong friendships or ruin your degree in week one. On second thoughts, the only real way of avoiding a shallow and lonely university experience is to come and write with me for the features section of The Mancunion. Best unbiased piece of advice I can give you. So get in touch.

The challenge is not only academic. Of course, students have to work hard in high school in order to be accepted and then double their efforts at university as all students in the world must do, but this is only one part of the challenge. In Palestine, the situation is different because of the Israeli occupation. First, merely getting to school every morning can be a major challenge for Palestinian students, especially if they come from areas far from university. Movement between cities and villages in Palestine is not a free and guaranteed right. Any traveller may be stopped by Israeli Defence Force checkpoints for ID and vehicle inspections. This alone can wreak havoc for students who have fixed class and exam schedules. Not knowing what time they will make it to their classes is a daily concern that they are forced to deal with. During the second Intifada, students had to stop at checkpoints for long periods of time and had to deal with delays daily. Although the situation has sinced calmed, there is always a chance that a checkpoint could be reestablished at any time. Keeping this in mind, students leave for university early to avoid disruptions. My university is 25 minutes away from my home, but I leave at least an hour before my first class to make sure I get there on time. Even worse, making it to the university is not guaranteed as those checkpoints might block off the roads for hours or even days. When there is a completely closure, the only option for students is to go back home. However, sometimes returning home is not even an option as Israeli soldiers at checkpoints regularly take students’ IDs, keep them waiting for an indefinite time, and then in most cases release them hours later without any explanation for the detention. As a result, missed classes and exams and repetition of semesters because of involuntary absences are a part of the lives of students in Palestinian. “How hard was it for you to get to school today?” is often the first question that is asked as we meet for a morning coffee. On the days of particularly extreme levels of security, stories of our journey to school take up the lion’s share of conversation all day long. The rest of our conversations move away from transportation but not from Israel’s effect on our lives. As all university students, we talk about job opportunities, and dream about the successful careers we wish to lead. However, we are always aware that our in many ways our future is not in our own hands. Although the rest of the world is

There is a story and a long road that every student in Palestine goes through to reach university. also suffering from unemployment, in the occupied Palestinian territories the problem is a direct result of the occupation. Many farmers have lost their sources of income due to ongoing Israeli confiscation of Palestinian land, while many others who worked in Israel have lost their jobs or are threatened with losing them because they are Palestinian ID holders. Even initiatives to boost the Palestinian economy through new industrial enterprises are tightly constrained as Israel effectively controls all Palestinian internal transportation routes, zoning permits, land and sea borders, and access to natural resources. Graduates find that they cannot live up to their maximum potential, develop their skills or fulfill their ambitions working inside the Palestinian Territories because of the lack of employment opportunities. Often their only option is to leave their homes and families and work abroad for better opportunities. Yet even this unfortunate choice is only available to those lucky enough to get a work visa and pass strict Israeli and foreign security measures. As a result, the would-be community leaders, top graduates and advanced degree holders, on whom people are pinning their hopes to develop Palestine, are instead found working abroad where they can do little for their homeland. Similarly, the development of Palestinian universities is constrained by the “brain drain” of top Palestinian academics as well as financial deficits. Graduate degree programs are limited, with a very small number of faculties to choose from, and even these departments often do not live up to students’ professional and academic needs. With this daily stressful journey back and forth between home and university and dim prospects for professional opportunities after graduation, the motivation to go to university is decreasing as students know that the certificates that they

Al Najah University

may hold may mean nothing at the end. And yet, we remain determined. English philosopher Herbert Spencer once said, “The great aim

of education is not knowledge but action.” As Palestinian students, we put this principle into practice by the mere act of stepping out of our house every day.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Fashion & Beauty Anyone interested in getting involved and joining The Mancunion's fashion writing team can contact editors Claudia Canavan and Roisín Dervish-O'Kane by email on fashion@mancunion.co.uk or join our facebook group by searching for "The Mancunion: Fashion and Beauty 2011-2012". We are really excited about the fashion and beauty pages this year and would love to get as many enthusiastic and talented writers on board as possible. Roisín and Claudia

Welcome/back to Manchester Claudia Canavan & Roisin Dervish- O’Kane Fashion & Beauty Editors Whether you’re a worldly-wise seasoned scholar, fully-naturalised Mancunian or just nervously embarking upon your own journey of academic rigour and twisted selfdiscovery, we fashionable types at your favourite university publication are here to help you look your very best –whatever you get up to this year in Manchester. We want to celebrate this city, with its distinctive style and heritage, as well as the iconic individuals it has inspired, nurtured and produced. From Ian Curtis to Agyness Deyn and Henry Holland, the Gallagher brothers to Emmelline Pankhurst, our beloved

Henry Holland and Agyness Deyn in Piccadilly

Joy Division

Comment

Blogwatch

Is print fashion journalism dead? Claudia Canavan Fashion Editor As a member of a society firmly ensnared by the internet’s inescapable grasp- complete with fashion blogs, online magazines and instantly updated news sitesthe question of the necessity of print journalism is one which is hardly avoidable. The process of assembly and distribution arguably renders a paper such as this hopelessly old fashioned and unable to hold the attention of a student with a phone that acts as a portal to the online world and all of its ‘wonders’. In an attempt to quash this simplistic view and defend my career path, I point to the views of British Vogue editor and high priestess of our country’s fashion journalists: Alexandra Shulman.

A Fashion Alphabet

The process of assembly and distribution arguably renders a paper such as this hopelessly old fashioned In the September issue of her esteemed publication, she accepts that magazine’s are largely no longer the medium through which fashion news is transmitted. The blogsphere means that news travels from the ivory towers of the fashion elite to the fingertips of professional and amateur gossip mongers within hours- offering an instant gratification analogous to a sugar high. But, just like a mini Mars bar, it is a moment of snatched

pleasure which leaves no genuine sense of satisfaction and may quickly result in a slump. For it is undisputable that any other form of media communicates the range and depth of talent that a fashion magazine can deliver. The visual spectacular of photo shootsshowcasing a hub of creativity from photographer and model alike, is shown best in all of its vivid, non- pixalated glory when expressed via the pages of a tangible piece of media. Rather than digesting a hastily assembled, often poorly written few paragraphs detailing the work of a designer, one can enjoy a full, balanced story crafted by a talented professional. And whilst we on the fashion pages certainly make no claim to possess the means or the experience to successfully emulate the visual and literary feast that is a monthly glossy, we do hope to provide more than the scramble of words and photos that can often be found jostling for attention in the murky waters of the web. And so, for reading this, may I extend my sincerest thanks and gratitude. You may now turn your attention back to your chosen smartphone.

The rapid ascent of androgyny into mainstream fashion is emblematic of how society is seeking to defy our readymade gender roles. The minimalistic aesthetic of Kate Moss and her legions of devotees has inspired a generation, whilst the controversial presence of male model Andrej Pejic donning women’s clothing on the catwalk is testament to the fact that that dabbling in the wardrobes of the opposite sex is not limited to ladies. And, with many key trends in the coming season centred around the look, androgyny’s reign shows no sign of subsiding.

is for: Androgyny

fashion capital of the North has a famously rich and diverse history, of which you, our achingly hip and stylish student populace, are now a fundamental aspect. So most importantly, we want to celebrate your own substantial fashion know-how and generally show you off a bit. We shall be bringing you catwalk inspiration, alongside our more affordable interpretations, and boldly venture past the Arndale centre to find you the most exciting and unexplored treasure troves nestled in and around the city. We shall endeavour to come up with some weird and wonderful methods for end-of-loan, below the breadline wardrobe reinvention, and keep you up to date with all the most exciting local fashionable happenings. Perhaps most importantly, we shall be showcasing your most impressive ensembles for all those nosy fashion fiends among us to ogle and admire. Please accept our sincerest apologies in advance if you are interrogated about your jacket whilst innocently guzzling in the library café or snapped all breathless and sweaty (but looking effortlessly chic) on your way to a lecture, we have the best of intentions. So, Manchester’s brightest young things, future icons and all-round sartorial heroes: here’s to one fashionably frugal and seriously stylish year.

If you like your instant fashion fix shaken up with the monochromatic, moody and unashamedly avant-garde then Doppelganger (http://thedoppelganger.tumblr.com) is well worth exploring. Striking editorials from past and present seasons flow seamlessly into images of stunning haute couture, which is captured in meticulous detail. However, the irresistible allure of this impressive blog is that The Doppelganger’s obvious infatuation with the world of the aesthetic goes far beyond just clothes, and fashion in its tangible, everyday guise. This eclectic online gallery frames its architect’s mood and inspiration with artistic finesse, often combining images of classic and contemporary painting, sculpture and design interspersed with photography that reveals a healthy appreciation of the nude female form. So if you like to live your fashionable life a little on the edge or simply appreciate great photography and great breasts, have a peek and enjoy!

Beauty

A shade for all seasons Isabelle Dann Beauty Editor September is a time to embrace the new season with all its promise whilst musing fondly over holiday memories. Spring / summer fashions are stored away till next year in favour of novel autumn / winter sartorial offerings. However, for many, a beauty update is just as important when adjusting one’s seasonal wardrobe.

A.Hallucination A/W 11

Mannish Stella McCartney A/W 11

Let’s hear it for the boys Roisin Dervish-O’Kane Fashion Editor Judging by the throngs of impeccably dressed young men that stroll nonchalantly around campus, sartorial fascination among Manchester students is hardly limited to the supposed ‘fairer sex’. For this reason, we at The Mancunion solemnly swear to reward you dapper dressers by allocating menswear- be it haute couture or high street style, a fair share of our busy column inches. As for all of you in smelly tracksuit bottoms and your school leavers’ hoodies, here’s hoping you’ll have a browse and learn something. After all, as they say, there is no such thing as a selfless good deed. What better season to start our weekly celebration of men’s style. Freshly cut fashion meat appeared in the form of Emilo Pucci’s and Jonathan Saunders’ respective debut menswear collections and exciting shows emerged from designers

Loving & Loathing

It seems we all shall be drawing inspiration from the wardrobes of classically well turned out gents

Peridot

irrespective of our gender, shall be drawing inspiration from the wardrobes of classically well turned out gents. So keep your peepers peeled and your purse-strings tightened for our upcoming guide to the biggest menswear trends, this season’s key pieces and where to find them. Just remember to do the gentlemanly thing and learn to share your new timeless tailoring or classic winter knits with your wonderful, stylish girlfriends. Equality for all, we say. Kismet

A.Hallucination and C/BRUERBERG, who were both awarded the accolade of Vogue’s ‘ones to watch’. Elsewhere in the fabulously intangible world of the high-end fashion factory, girls dressed as boys marched down the runways of everyone from Stella to Chanel. The ‘mannish’ trend was impossible to ignore on the Autumn/Winter catwalks, and it seems that for the coming months, we all,

Craving & Saving

Loving:

Craving

Saving

American Apparel knit pencil skirts (£42)

Sohane Coat, £1,230, Isabelle Marant

Tweed Boyfriend Coat, £85, Topshop

This irresistible double-breasted, wool-blend coat from Parisian designer du jour Isabelle Marant’s Autumn/Winter collection has quite literally embedded itself into my poor impressionable and impoverished mind. The oversized shape, wearable smoky grey hue and simple, mannish detailing make it the perfectly versatile yet eye-wateringly unaffordable winter cover-up.

Topshop’s simple tweed number may lack the craftsmanship, perfect cut and certain je ne sais quoi of the Marant creation, but it also lacks one thousand, one hundred and forty five pounds of the price tag. Though not exactly cheap, this is a perennial classic, and its borrowed-from-your-boyfriend look will ensure that your autumn/winter aesthetic looks effortlessly on trend. Besides, a great coat is an investment and don’t forget that with your humble library card, you can save ten percent in store, thus rendering your purchase totally justifiable. Honest.

New for A/W, our favourite sweat shop free clothing destination has produced these fabulously flattering knitted pencil skirts in an array of hues. Perfect with a pair of opaque tights and ankle boots, or bare legs and heels for day to night transitioning.

Despite its ostensible simplicity, nail lacquer can offer an immediate update to one’s wardrobe and even encapsulate an entire seasonal mood. Bearing this concept in mind, behold my personal seasonal shades: “Kismet” by Nars for the summer gone by, a burnished mimosa frenzy; versus my must-have polish for the new season, “Peridot” by Chanel, an intoxicating melange of green and gold designed to mimic the eponymous stone:

Loathing: Ready attached braces A recent traipse around Topman and H&M revealed a worrying plethora of trousers with ready affixed braces, usually in an offensively bright colour. Unless you are Chuck Bass and pull off the dapper/dandy look with aplomb, I beg you to leave these sad creations to be resigned to the sale rail, where they belong.

DIY beauty couture ift (and super-cheap) splash of conut/ wurine intetor ’11your autum ject a sw uture Chanel In order to in rtrayal e from the co cu for a subtle po a ir ke ha ta e, ur yo to in wardrob ce la k ywhere. piece of blac catwalks ever show, fasten a at dominated th nd tre h tis of the fe


Coloumn

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07

Comment & Debate

08

Politics & Analysis

10

Business & Finance

12

Science & Tech

13

Feature Page

Fashion & Beauty

14

16

Arts & Culture

18

Music

20

Film

22

Food & Drink

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Lifestyle

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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Fashion & Beauty Anyone interested in getting involved and joining The Mancunion's fashion writing team can contact editors Claudia Canavan and Roisín Dervish-O'Kane by email on fashion@mancunion.co.uk or join our facebook group by searching for "The Mancunion: Fashion and Beauty 2011-2012". We are really excited about the fashion and beauty pages this year and would love to get as many enthusiastic and talented writers on board as possible. Roisín and Claudia

Welcome/back to Manchester Claudia Canavan & Roisin Dervish- O’Kane Fashion & Beauty Editors Whether you’re a worldly-wise seasoned scholar, fully-naturalised Mancunian or just nervously embarking upon your own journey of academic rigour and twisted selfdiscovery, we fashionable types at your favourite university publication are here to help you look your very best –whatever you get up to this year in Manchester. We want to celebrate this city, with its distinctive style and heritage, as well as the iconic individuals it has inspired, nurtured and produced. From Ian Curtis to Agyness Deyn and Henry Holland, the Gallagher brothers to Emmelline Pankhurst, our beloved

Henry Holland and Agyness Deyn in Piccadilly

Joy Division

Comment

Blogwatch

Is print fashion journalism dead? Claudia Canavan Fashion Editor As a member of a society firmly ensnared by the internet’s inescapable grasp- complete with fashion blogs, online magazines and instantly updated news sitesthe question of the necessity of print journalism is one which is hardly avoidable. The process of assembly and distribution arguably renders a paper such as this hopelessly old fashioned and unable to hold the attention of a student with a phone that acts as a portal to the online world and all of its ‘wonders’. In an attempt to quash this simplistic view and defend my career path, I point to the views of British Vogue editor and high priestess of our country’s fashion journalists: Alexandra Shulman.

A Fashion Alphabet

The process of assembly and distribution arguably renders a paper such as this hopelessly old fashioned In the September issue of her esteemed publication, she accepts that magazine’s are largely no longer the medium through which fashion news is transmitted. The blogsphere means that news travels from the ivory towers of the fashion elite to the fingertips of professional and amateur gossip mongers within hours- offering an instant gratification analogous to a sugar high. But, just like a mini Mars bar, it is a moment of snatched

pleasure which leaves no genuine sense of satisfaction and may quickly result in a slump. For it is undisputable that any other form of media communicates the range and depth of talent that a fashion magazine can deliver. The visual spectacular of photo shootsshowcasing a hub of creativity from photographer and model alike, is shown best in all of its vivid, non- pixalated glory when expressed via the pages of a tangible piece of media. Rather than digesting a hastily assembled, often poorly written few paragraphs detailing the work of a designer, one can enjoy a full, balanced story crafted by a talented professional. And whilst we on the fashion pages certainly make no claim to possess the means or the experience to successfully emulate the visual and literary feast that is a monthly glossy, we do hope to provide more than the scramble of words and photos that can often be found jostling for attention in the murky waters of the web. And so, for reading this, may I extend my sincerest thanks and gratitude. You may now turn your attention back to your chosen smartphone.

The rapid ascent of androgyny into mainstream fashion is emblematic of how society is seeking to defy our readymade gender roles. The minimalistic aesthetic of Kate Moss and her legions of devotees has inspired a generation, whilst the controversial presence of male model Andrej Pejic donning women’s clothing on the catwalk is testament to the fact that that dabbling in the wardrobes of the opposite sex is not limited to ladies. And, with many key trends in the coming season centred around the look, androgyny’s reign shows no sign of subsiding.

is for: Androgyny

fashion capital of the North has a famously rich and diverse history, of which you, our achingly hip and stylish student populace, are now a fundamental aspect. So most importantly, we want to celebrate your own substantial fashion know-how and generally show you off a bit. We shall be bringing you catwalk inspiration, alongside our more affordable interpretations, and boldly venture past the Arndale centre to find you the most exciting and unexplored treasure troves nestled in and around the city. We shall endeavour to come up with some weird and wonderful methods for end-of-loan, below the breadline wardrobe reinvention, and keep you up to date with all the most exciting local fashionable happenings. Perhaps most importantly, we shall be showcasing your most impressive ensembles for all those nosy fashion fiends among us to ogle and admire. Please accept our sincerest apologies in advance if you are interrogated about your jacket whilst innocently guzzling in the library café or snapped all breathless and sweaty (but looking effortlessly chic) on your way to a lecture, we have the best of intentions. So, Manchester’s brightest young things, future icons and all-round sartorial heroes: here’s to one fashionably frugal and seriously stylish year.

If you like your instant fashion fix shaken up with the monochromatic, moody and unashamedly avant-garde then Doppelganger (http://thedoppelganger.tumblr.com) is well worth exploring. Striking editorials from past and present seasons flow seamlessly into images of stunning haute couture, which is captured in meticulous detail. However, the irresistible allure of this impressive blog is that The Doppelganger’s obvious infatuation with the world of the aesthetic goes far beyond just clothes, and fashion in its tangible, everyday guise. This eclectic online gallery frames its architect’s mood and inspiration with artistic finesse, often combining images of classic and contemporary painting, sculpture and design interspersed with photography that reveals a healthy appreciation of the nude female form. So if you like to live your fashionable life a little on the edge or simply appreciate great photography and great breasts, have a peek and enjoy!

Beauty

A shade for all seasons Isabelle Dann Beauty Editor September is a time to embrace the new season with all its promise whilst musing fondly over holiday memories. Spring / summer fashions are stored away till next year in favour of novel autumn / winter sartorial offerings. However, for many, a beauty update is just as important when adjusting one’s seasonal wardrobe.

A.Hallucination A/W 11

Mannish Stella McCartney A/W 11

Let’s hear it for the boys Roisin Dervish-O’Kane Fashion Editor Judging by the throngs of impeccably dressed young men that stroll nonchalantly around campus, sartorial fascination among Manchester students is hardly limited to the supposed ‘fairer sex’. For this reason, we at The Mancunion solemnly swear to reward you dapper dressers by allocating menswear- be it haute couture or high street style, a fair share of our busy column inches. As for all of you in smelly tracksuit bottoms and your school leavers’ hoodies, here’s hoping you’ll have a browse and learn something. After all, as they say, there is no such thing as a selfless good deed. What better season to start our weekly celebration of men’s style. Freshly cut fashion meat appeared in the form of Emilo Pucci’s and Jonathan Saunders’ respective debut menswear collections and exciting shows emerged from designers

Loving & Loathing

It seems we all shall be drawing inspiration from the wardrobes of classically well turned out gents

Peridot

irrespective of our gender, shall be drawing inspiration from the wardrobes of classically well turned out gents. So keep your peepers peeled and your purse-strings tightened for our upcoming guide to the biggest menswear trends, this season’s key pieces and where to find them. Just remember to do the gentlemanly thing and learn to share your new timeless tailoring or classic winter knits with your wonderful, stylish girlfriends. Equality for all, we say. Kismet

A.Hallucination and C/BRUERBERG, who were both awarded the accolade of Vogue’s ‘ones to watch’. Elsewhere in the fabulously intangible world of the high-end fashion factory, girls dressed as boys marched down the runways of everyone from Stella to Chanel. The ‘mannish’ trend was impossible to ignore on the Autumn/Winter catwalks, and it seems that for the coming months, we all,

Craving & Saving

Loving:

Craving

Saving

American Apparel knit pencil skirts (£42)

Sohane Coat, £1,230, Isabelle Marant

Tweed Boyfriend Coat, £85, Topshop

This irresistible double-breasted, wool-blend coat from Parisian designer du jour Isabelle Marant’s Autumn/Winter collection has quite literally embedded itself into my poor impressionable and impoverished mind. The oversized shape, wearable smoky grey hue and simple, mannish detailing make it the perfectly versatile yet eye-wateringly unaffordable winter cover-up.

Topshop’s simple tweed number may lack the craftsmanship, perfect cut and certain je ne sais quoi of the Marant creation, but it also lacks one thousand, one hundred and forty five pounds of the price tag. Though not exactly cheap, this is a perennial classic, and its borrowed-from-your-boyfriend look will ensure that your autumn/winter aesthetic looks effortlessly on trend. Besides, a great coat is an investment and don’t forget that with your humble library card, you can save ten percent in store, thus rendering your purchase totally justifiable. Honest.

New for A/W, our favourite sweat shop free clothing destination has produced these fabulously flattering knitted pencil skirts in an array of hues. Perfect with a pair of opaque tights and ankle boots, or bare legs and heels for day to night transitioning.

Despite its ostensible simplicity, nail lacquer can offer an immediate update to one’s wardrobe and even encapsulate an entire seasonal mood. Bearing this concept in mind, behold my personal seasonal shades: “Kismet” by Nars for the summer gone by, a burnished mimosa frenzy; versus my must-have polish for the new season, “Peridot” by Chanel, an intoxicating melange of green and gold designed to mimic the eponymous stone:

Loathing: Ready attached braces A recent traipse around Topman and H&M revealed a worrying plethora of trousers with ready affixed braces, usually in an offensively bright colour. Unless you are Chuck Bass and pull off the dapper/dandy look with aplomb, I beg you to leave these sad creations to be resigned to the sale rail, where they belong.

DIY beauty couture ift (and super-cheap) splash of conut/ wurine intetor ’11your autum ject a sw uture Chanel In order to in rtrayal e from the co cu for a subtle po a ir ke ha ta e, ur yo to in wardrob ce la k ywhere. piece of blac catwalks ever show, fasten a at dominated th nd tre h tis of the fe


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Arts & Culture Near & Noteworthy Our pick of the best ahead... Asia Triennial Manchester 11 (01/10-27/11)

Email us at arts@mancunion.com Come to the first meeting of the year on Friday 23rd, Khaled Said Room 2, Students’ Union building, Oxford Road, 11-12

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This is your Phoebe Chambre Arts & Culture Editor Whether long-time inhabitant or newly enfranchised fresher to the walkways of Manchester, our introductory guide to arts and culture is specifically tailored to you. Your amusement, your convenience, your inspiration, and most importantly,

your diary. Because as we may or may not have demonstrated, there is something for everyone within the four walls of this city. A town whose vast and varied cultural fare webs out from the same central point: that of our curious city itself. Everyone, from Manchester Art Gallery, with their Ford Madox Brown Manchester years special, to CUBE’s spatial integration, and Islington Mill’s milling class roots,

seems to want a piece of the action. Not content with merely being based in Manchester, the galleries seem to want to display artists who want to engage with urban living; what it means to live in Manchester, what it means to visit Manchester, and how interpretations have ranged and changed. And guess what? As residents of this fair city (which in case you hadn’t noticed, has quite a few students) we make a

sizeable mouthful of Mancunians, honorary Mancunians, at least. And as Mancunians, we at The Mancunion want your input. So give us your thoughts: comment on our website, write to us, write for us, draw us something, take a photo, tell us what inspires you, makes you angry, or patriotic, or happy. And if you don’t like us (on Facebook), at least like your city. Because its right here, under your feet.

Manchester Art Gallery Mosley Street Open Tuesday-Sunday, 10am-5pm Free entry (except some exhibitions) This central representative of the Manchester Museums Consortium does what it says on the tin. Other Consortiums include the Lowry, Imperial War Museum, and our old friend the Whitworth. This particular tin contains a mere 25,000 ‘items’, three floors, and 21 rooms. Its hard casing of classical Palazzo architecture replete with columns invokes the hushed tones appropriate for the historical gravitas of such a building, and confirms its place among the old boys: Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam, or Oxford’s Ashmolean. The focus here is on the classics: British and European watercolours, ceramics, and furniture. However, classically for Manchester the exhibitions involve a twist on the traditional. They gravitate towards the urban, local and relevant. Currently, Grayson Perry: Visual Dialogues, fusing historic and contemporary items to invoke debate, awaits your consideration. And artfolk are mad for it, the forthcoming Ford Madox Brown: PreRaphaelite Pioneer, will not disappoint. The collection fittingly focuses on the artist’s years in Manchester. A Saturday afternoon favourite. Grayson Perry: Visual Dialogues, until 12/02/2012 Ford Madox Brown: Pre-Raphaelite Pioneer, 24/09-29/01/2012 (entry £6)

Whitworth Art Gallery Oxford Road Opening times: Monday-Saturday, 10am-5pm; Sunday, 12pm-4pm Free entry The Whitworth Art Gallery, friend and neighbour to Whitworth Park, esteemed part of the University of Manchester, and valued member of the Manchester Museums Consortium, is above all a pretty good gallery. For starters, a ravishing collection of the finest arts, textiles, wallpaper, prints, and sculpture to rival the heavyweight Victoria and Albert Museum in both size and significance. The Fine Art collection is built on themes of place and urban landscape in both modern and historic work, including the notable British watercolours collection. If that’s not enough to get your pulse racing, perhaps a brisk turn about the grounds will. That’s right, our only entry to include a garden, and a sculpture garden at that. The Whitworth builds on this fine base of a stockroom by consistently pushing the artistic envelope with its exhibitions. The upcoming Dark Matters exhibition does not disappoint on this front. It explores the impact of scientific and technological discovery on art; in particular interpretations of darkness and shadow. The sheer potential of artistic interpretation within this subject matter is equalled by the range of mediums and period in the exhibition: commissions, contemporary work, store room gems, a collaboration with Animate Projects, and a programme of film screenings. And it’s only down the road, so no excuses. Dark Matters, 25/09-15/01/12

Photo: Nick Harrison

A feast of a festival, celebrating all things Eastways bound. • Enkhbold Togmidshiirev (26/09-09/10) – hosted by Manchester Museum and Islington Mill. Look out for this Mongolian performance artist in locations around the city • Drained 2011 (01/10-27/11) - Manchester Cathedral. An Adeela Suleman commission; a sculpture created for this space, made of drains • Asia Triennial Manchester 11 Film Programme (01/10-27/11) – Cornerhouse bringing us, as ever, an opportunity for extraordinary viewing, including a retrospective of director Brillante Mendoza’s work

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CUBE Portland Street Opening times: Monday-Friday, 12pm-5.30pm; Saturday, 12pm-5pm. Free entry CUBE (centre for the urban built environment). This space is very proudly the only centre for art, architecture and design exhibitions in the North West. Sleek, white, modern, and functional, its identity is unsurprisingly bound up in this edifice and its location. Fittingly, the current Junebum Park commission currently showing is based on the Korean artist’s personal experiences in Manchester, and also rests on the actual building itself. Yet, contrary to (some) expectations for ‘sleek and modern’, Park seeks to introduce a playful element to something as potentially stern as a city front. Of equal importance, CUBELab artists, Julia Münz and Annika Unterburg bring us Seedbank for Treehouse. A blend of architectural prowess and childlike fantasy, the Venn diagram circles of which overlap at obsession. To top it all you even get a party bag to take home, no cake, but a potential treehouse for personal use. The Bauhaus of Manchester, with a sense of humour. You’ll be laughing all the way home. Junebum Park: To let, 02/09-05/10 CUBELab: Julia Münz and Annika Unterburg, 02/09-05/10


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Manchester Cornerhouse

Islington Mill

70 Oxford Road Free entry to all exhibitions. Cinema tickets, sadly, not free. Opening times: Galleries closed Monday, open every other day from 12pm. Box office open Monday-Sunday 12pm-8am.

James Street Free entry

A ‘creative hub’ to meet all your artistic needs. And that’s just the café. Or maybe the bar. This many-storied corner dwelling is indeed a tower of artistic delectables to sink your teeth into. Its got film, art, books, talks, and food. Upcoming exhibitions of note come from Daksha Patel and Rashid Rana (first major solo exhibition in the UK, in case you’re counting), both featuring as part of the Asia Triennial Manchester 11. If you’re into education, the Introduction to Contemporary Visual Arts: Modernism looks set to storm it. Look out also for the Matinee Classics from the film department, in particular, the forthcoming Terence Malick resurrections. Your creative consuming needs need look no further than this home on the corner. Daksha Patel, 09/09-18/10 Rashid Rana: Everything is happening at once, 01/10-18/12 Badlands, 02/10, 05/10 Introduction to Contemporary Visual Arts: Modernism, 10/10-14/11

Far-out. Both geographically and artistically. Our first and only Salford entry: the ex-real Victorian cotton mill. The Mill in Islington is no metaphor. Yet grind out a constant supply of culture the Mill does. A commune of variety, from yoga, to club-nights, studio-space and recording studios, two galleries, and also a bar; it’s worth the (15-minute) pilgrimage. It has its own B&B, though, if you can’t manage the return journey. The current Artist in Residence, David Wojtowycz, is showing his American Bodies exhibition throughout September and October. The Free for Arts Festival also has a foot in this door, with the Eat, Use, Destroy exhibition running at the Mill. And the Salford Music Festival will be represented until the 24th. The Salford Zine Library, that cultural beacon of Salford, also operates from here. All things local and/or original find a home here. This list is so far from exhaustive, I urge you to check out the many happenings for yourself. Plus, the Guardian calls it ‘cool and trendy’.

Manchester can make an honest claim to be the theatre capital of the North of England and as a student you are in a great opportunity to take advantage of this. From fantastic new writing to sellout musicals, Manchester’s theatre scene is flourishing. Here is a very short guide to what is on offer. The Royal Exchange is Manchester’s most vibrant theatre. Playing host to a stunning in-the-round glass performance space, producing consistently highquality comedy and drama and innovative new writing, the Royal Exchange is always worth a visit. The Royal Exchange is also very studentfriendly. Make sure to look out for the various student offers that are ongoing. A short tram ride from St. Peter’s Square will take you to Salford Quays and the fantastic Lowry Arts Centre. Just over ten years old, The Lowry hosts a great mix of original and touring productions. The Lowry has the large Lyric and Quays theatres that have hosted everything from Carmen with Opera North to King Lear with the Donmar Warehouse; they also have a studio space for new writing. Ticket prices at The Lowry do vary greatly depending on what you are going to see, although student discounts are almost always available and tickets for the studio are only five pounds. Had enough of Beckett and Brecht? Want to see Jason Donovan belt out The Sound of Music? Well, you are in luck. The Palace Theatre and Opera House Manchester are part of the huge Ambassador Theatre Group and host touring productions of blockbuster musicals such as Mamma Mia and We Will Rock You, recent West End and Broadway hits such as Sister Act and Legally Blonde, as well as the English National Ballet and Elvis impersonators. Tickets for the big productions can be pricy and it is advisable to book early to get the cheap seats.

Autumn Term

Had enough of Beckett and Brecht? Want to see Jason Donovan belt out The Sound of Music? Well, you are in luck Manchester’s universities are also a great place to experience quality theatre, and you don’t even have to leave Oxford Road. The University of Manchester Drama Society, Manchester Metropolitan School of Theatre and the Universities of Manchester Gilbert and Sullivan Society are all active in producing theatre for students and the wider public. Also for those of you who are reluctant to leave Oxford Road, there is National Theatre Live. This recent innovation means that instead of having to traipse all the way to London to see the National Theatre’s latest hits, all you have to do is drag yourself to the Cornerhouse Cinema and watch them transmitted live on one of their screens. All for not much more than the price of a cinema ticket. Further afield but still within an hour’s train journey of Manchester there are a host of well-regarded theatres such as the West Yorkshire Playhouse in Leeds, the Sheffield Crucible and, once it has been refitted, the Liverpool Everyman. All worth checking out if you get a chance. Put simply, Manchester is a great theatre city for students. You can see a range of high-quality theatre, within a short distance and at very reasonable prices.

One Man, Two Guvnors Photo: Joel Fildes

Andrew Campbell Theatre Editor

Preview

David Wojtowycz: American Bodies, September/October Eat, Use, Destroy: 30/09-06/10 Salford Music Festival: until 24/09

Theatre City

A guide to Manchester’s art scene...

Forget Lesbian Vampire Killers, remember The History Boys. Having opened to great acclaim at the National Theatre, this comedy starring James Corden is stopping at The Lowry on a national tour before heading back to London for a West End run. Having proved a huge critical and commercial success on the South Bank, tickets are in high demand so make sure you book in advance. The Lowry, Tue 11th to Sat 15th Oct.

Company Starring acclaimed actor and Sondheim regular Daniel Evans, this production of the 1970 Stephen Sondheim and George Furth musical should be well worth the 50-minute train journey to Sheffield. An ambitious piece about a single-man’s problems with commitment, Company is great entertainment and may appeal to those put off by more traditional musicals. Sheffield Crucible Theatre, Tue 29th Nov to Sat 7th Jan 2012

Angels in America Part One : Millennium Approaches With student tickets available for £5, this is a great opportunity to see a performance of Tony Kushner’s endlessly praised play about Aids, politics and modern life. Performed by students studying at Manchester Metropolitan University’s School of Theatre, this promises to be a lively production that showcases up-and-coming acting talent. Interior of the Royal Exchange Theatre, re-furbished after being damaged in the 1996 IRA bombing of Manchester.

MMU Capitol Theatre, Wed 12th Oct to Sat 15th Oct. Andrew Campbell


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Music ”

Do you have cutting edge opinions on music? If you think Pulp should be left in the ‘90s or think Tom is absolutely right about the rioters’ effect on independent music, get involved. To spout your opinions, judge the worth of a band and even get on the odd guestlist, email us at music@mancunion.com and join our Facebook group The Mancunion: Music Section.

@

The Academy this week... Tuesday – Academy 3 Howling Bells fly into Manchester to support their new album, The Loudest Engine. Recorded in the desert, where even Arctic Monkeys couldn’t help but grow up, expect a confident, psychedelic set. Thursday – Academy 3 The Wonder Years, hot off of a Kerrang! Tour, arrive ready to deliver a healthy dose of pop-punk to anybody who cares for it. It depends whether you can stand pop-punk whether this will appeal to you.

ACADEMY M A N C H E S T E R

ACADEMY MANCHESTER

Summer Highlights If you managed to miss any of the BBC’s incessant coverage of anything musical this summer, here’s our selection of the best bits:

1. Pulp Undoubtedly the biggest reunion of the summer, Pulp stormed festival stages worldwide. The band’s back catalogue is deep enough for them to play hugely different sets each night and still be playing classic after classic. At both Reading and Brixton, they didn’t disappoint.

2. Beyonce Don’t lie, there’s a little part of everyone that loved this show. The lights, that crowd, those thighs – Beyonce’s show far outshone her hubby’s effort two years ago, and whilst Jay-Z may not be best pleased about that, the crowd who turned up to watch Beyonce in the drizzle weren’t complaining.

3. Prince Is there a greater performer on the planet? Hop Farm brought Prince’s first ever UK festival performance, and the evergreen showman appropriately gave his ever-adoring fans a thrilling two-and-a-quarter hour set. His pure brilliance perfectly displayed by the fact that he was demanded for three encores, which he duly carried out. No one does three.

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Festival Reading Little John’s Farm, Richfield Avenue, Reading 26th-28th August Standout Act A lot of people reacted negatively to the Reading lineup this year. Anyone who’s seen Muse live will tell you that it was a stupid reaction to have. Now I’ve never been a huge Muse fan but it’s hard not to be convinced when you see their huge live show, performing “Origin Of Symmetry” in full. It’s Rock Opera at its finest, and I’m not talking Mamma Mia. Biggest Flop Beady Eye. As much of a rock star as Liam Gallagher is, it just sounds like tired, subpar Oasis. Not “Definitely, Maybe” Oasis either - Oasis that should have retired long a go. Apart from the hardcore Liam fans, the crowd wasn’t falling for it. Surprise Package Grouplove, Festival Republic stage. American indie art-rockers whose single ‘Colours’ has had some

Rob Fuller airplay. Surprisingly, the live show and the other songs were memorable too. Definitely a band to watch for the year ahead. Atmosphere It’s Reading. Even though it rained for days on end you know before you arrive you’re going to have a good time. It’s a friendly crowd, if you can handle the occasional bottle of warm piss thrown around and fanatical Muse and MCR fans wearing nothing but band merchandise. Worth The Money? Like every major festival, the price has basically doubled in the last decade. But, with three days of quality music and this year having 4 main-stage headliners, as well as 4 other stages, you can’t really go wrong.

4. The Big 4 (Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer & Anthrax) Getting these four bands in the same country would have been hard enough twenty years ago. This time, they were trying to play each other off the stage that they all shared at Sonisphere. All four in blinding form, the biggest highlight was Megadeth’s set; striving and succeeding to outplay former rivals Metallica.

5. Muse Muse ascended to Leeds’ main stage with a jaw dropping transcendent brilliance. With a flawless, dynamic set that included the entirety of their second album Origin of Symmetry, Muse captivated the minds of all festival goers who weren't just watching, but experiencing live music at its utmost magnificence.

6. Primal Scream Making one album the focus point of a lengthy summer-long tour is an ambitious decision in anyone’s books. Primal Scream not only brought a revitalisation of 1991 classic Screamadelica to Benicassim, but a full-blown festival in itself. Not only that, but their second hour, including ‘Rocks’, ‘Jailbird’ and many more, wasn’t half bad either.

7. System of a Down After five years away, SOAD’s return at Download was always going to be something special. Blasting out what was essentially a greatest hits set; at one minute, crushingly heavy, and at the next delicate and precise, their range was astounding. They may hate one another, but at least they can jam.

8. The Streets With the leading festivals featuring more comebacks than Andy Murray’s Wimbledon fortnight, it was in fact a departing giant that provided the stellar show. The Streets’ Beni performance put an onus upon their older creations and managed to bring an energy and attitude that brought the perfect send-off to a long and successful term at the top of UK garage.

9. Chemical Brothers They not only pushed the button at Big Chill, they destroyed the button and the surrounding area. A mesmerising light show and the well-balanced set, featuring crowd classics and lesser-known gems, was an utter joy. Is there anybody alive that dislikes ‘Hey Boy, Hey Girl?’ Probably, but it doesn’t matter a jot.

10. DJ Shadow An expensive and captivating light show at Parklife gave Shadow the daunting task of living up to the hype. In the end, he didn’t disappoint. Dishing out a generous portion of old material yet reigning in the crowds with plenty from debut classic Endtroducing, the show was masterfully mixed.

Benicassim Benicassim (near Valencia), Spain 14th-17th July Standout Act A tough one to call; The Strokes came to Beni with a lot to prove and I would go as far to say that they blew Saturday’s spectators away and Mumford & Sons brilliantly bedded new singles into their trustworthy set. But Arcade Fire pipped them both, by providing the most serene ending to a fantastic week, showcasing The Suburbs in all its glorious beauty. Biggest Flop Elbow. The Mancunian old-timers have been hitting the high notes for so long, but looked out of their depth on the main stage. Desperate attempts to encourage crowd participation fell on deaf ears and failed to disguise an embarrassingly mediocre backcatalogue. Surprise Package Tame Impala. The latest in a recent surge of burgeoning Australian talent, this psychedelic quartet stomped a bass-ridden beat across the east

Tom Hickman, Music Editor coast of Spain. Arriving on the main stage early on the Saturday evening, Tame Impala wonderfully exhibited the much applauded debut album Innerspeaker, most notably the funk ridden ‘Solitude is Bliss’. Atmosphere Possibly the only downside of Benicassim must be the number of shaven-headed, union-jack clad morons you have to feast your eyes upon each morning. In spite of this, the masses were hugely friendly and the venue’s locality to the Mediterranean provided a great way to spend your hungover daytime. Worth The Money? The leading four-day festival has never failed to draw some of the biggest headliners since its inception in 1995. With a week in the sun and four days of music for the same price as 3 days in the English rain, Benicassim must be seen as one of the best valuefor-money festivals going.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Round - Up

Column

High Voltage Festival Victoria Park, London 23rd-24th July

Tom Geddes, Music Editor

Standout Act As their last ever UK show, it was to be expected that Judas Priest were going to steal the weekend. With over three decades to hone themselves, they blasted out hit after hit, with lead singer Rob Halford still hitting higher notes than an abused cat, despite being 59.

Sonisphere Festival Knebworth House 8th-10th July

Tom Geddes, Music Editor

Standout Act Whilst many would think of one of the headliners (Metallica, Biffy Clyro and Slipknot) as the best of the festival, we all know that Limp Bizkit, however much they’re ridiculed, steal any festival. Who doesn’t seriously bounce as soon as ‘Rollin’’ hits? If that isn’t enough, they also sampled ‘Eye of the Tiger.’ Biggest Flop As much as it hurts to say this, hands down, the biggest disappointment of the weekend were Motörhead. What would have been an OK set of rushed classics turned embarrassing as Lemmy slurs nonsense between songs, even disappearing during a drum solo to, presumably, down another Jack Daniels. Surprise Package Tempting though it is to give this to Led Zeppelin throwbacks Rival Sons, they’ve made their name this year already. The real surprise was Vintage Trouble. A fifties style rock band fronted by a man with all the characteristics of James Brown, the unknowing audience lapped it up. A genuinely pleasant surprise. Atmosphere For a large, heavy festival, it’s not bad. Granted, you get the odd few intimidating meatheads running around shouting “SLAYARGH” at 2.AM, but overall, it’s a friendly vibe. No more so than in the pits, where everyone, no matter how preoccupied they are, were quick to help people to their feet. Worth The Money? For well under 200 quid, you can’t complain. This year worried many metalheads due to the dreaded ‘Biffy Clyro day’. But other stages always had plenty else going on, with a good cross section of rock and metal covered. With such a good atmosphere to boot, it’s worth an end of year blow out.

Outlook Festival Fort Punta Christo, Pula, Croatia 1st–4th September

Hugo Nicholson

Standout Act With over 800 artists booked over the four days of the festival, choosing one standout act is an extremely difficult task. Everyone had a favourite, and for me this was Jah Shaka, of the South East London-based Jah Shaka Soundsytem. His six-hour set on the final night kept people going long after they would otherwise have been able to; it was nothing short of phenomenal. Biggest Flop This title must surely go to Skream; perhaps the only impressive thing about his appearances on either the Main Stage or the boat party, which he was supposed to be hosting, was his ability to drink. During the latter, this skill rendered him unable to play at all, while on the Main Stage it led to him being forcibly removed, numerous times. Surprise Package For those that hadnt heard of them, Manchesters very own Broke ‘N’ English (who run their own night, Ballin’ On A Budget, at Mint Lounge) played one of the most surprisingly good sets at Outlook this year. Whether you’d heard of them or not, they were sublime. Atmosphere Despite having to queue for almost everything, the official campsite, overlooking the clear and bright Adriatic Sea, was a beautiful place to be during the day, with various performers playing sets on the beach from sunrise to sunset. The abandoned fort, venue for the late music (6pm to 6am), was indescribable, and the individual venues in and around the fort were all superb in their own right. Worth The Money? Completely.

Biggest Flop Whilst it’s tempting to mock Attica Rage for their ill-judged decision to end their set on a song they can’t play, the band to really suffer were Thin Lizzy; though they cannot be accused of putting on a bad show, painfully quiet mixing ruined what could have been a huge sing-a-long. Surprise Package Graveyard and Gentlemens Pistols both impressed with their retro vibes, but the real surprise was Von Hertzen Brothers. Opening the weekend, Finnish prog might sound tedious, but when it’s done well (check out ‘Freedom Fighter’) it leaves you awestruck. Atmosphere This is first and foremost a classic rock festival, so it shouldn’t come as a surprise that it was a bit ‘dad heavy.’ That’s not bad though. The drunken contentedness of the masses is calming and infectious. Though quiet mixing for the first day (thanks Hackney Council) did lower the mood. Worth The Money? At just under £100 (OK, £99) you can’t argue. Two days of solid bands, a highly varied beer tent and most important of all, the cheapest festival food I’ve seen all year. Though it would be a little better with the volume pushed a little higher.

Parklife Festival Platt Fields, Manchester 11th-12th June

Joe Smart, Music Editor

Standout Act Despite D/R/U/G/S offering a decent effort and the hoards telling everyone that the sun shone out of Katy B’s arse, the standout, for my money, was DJ Shadow. Making great use of visual effects in a show rumoured to have cost £10, 000, Shadow proved he’s still a major player in beat production with a masterfully mixed, electric set. Biggest Flop Poor Kelis. Not sure what she was aiming for, but her set consisted mostly of borrowed beats. Listening a mile away, you’d be forgiven for thinking you’d missed a set including Tinie Tempah, David Guetta and, strangely, Nirvana. Despite sounding like the Top 40, crowd favourites ‘Millionaire’ and ‘Milkshake’ still made an appearance, thank God. Surprise Package Not much of an unknown these days, but Darwin Deez fulfilled his hype with a high energy set, which the crowd responded to readily. DOOM so nearly won out, but his well-attended show was hampered by quiet vocals and a surprising lack of a DJ - it looked like the maskwearing rapper was flicking through an iPod for half the set. Atmosphere Despite looking like a festival-edition of Hollyoaks, Parklife is close to the hearts of most Fallowfield residents, becoming an end-of-exams tradition. With most attendees being students, there’s a chance you’ll run into familiar faces; fingers crossed it wasn’t that last-resort you were hoping you’d never see again. Worth The Money? At 60 notes, loans wont be rationed too strictly for this excursion. It’ll get bigger and better, but probably more expensive.

A right ruin Tom Hickman Music Editor There are many things a British summer brings to its melancholic public: the eternal quest for something resembling a hot day, an ever-growing collection of comeback tours and an ever more pressing search for a festival without either Arctic Monkeys or Muse somewhere on the bill. This year however, the summer break also brought a disastrous day in the history of British music. Thanks to the riots of August 2011, there was an earthquake within the industry, the repercussions of which will still be being felt for many months to come. Originally, the biggest fears were of damage to a small number of venues, and although a select few nights had to be postponed, this masked the far greater problem at hand. Along with the mandatory looting of JD Sports and Foot Locker came the tragic torching of the Sony DADC warehouse in Enfield, North London. A major distribution centre for record labels across the country; the leading lights of Britain’s music trade held stock in the warehouse. Such names as Rough Trade, Domino and Modular were all affected, but essentially will battle through. The far greater problem is the damage done to the little men, with a large number of independent record labels and record stores staring liquidation in the face. Closer to home, Manchester’s Piccadilly Records was left on its knees, with dwindling stock unable to satisfy customer demand. All in all, over 200 labels had retained stock in the Sony warehouse, only for the majority of it to be set ablaze.

I know we are now over a month on from the incident, but this single event of mindless vandalism could well have been the decisive nail in the constantly lowering coffin of independent record stores. So, who’s to blame for this? Is it our top columnists such as Alex Curran, writing her ‘insightful’ horseshit in OK! every week about “bargain” tops for hundreds of pounds? Is it the influx of the so-called ‘gangculture’? Now I’m no politician (we’ll get back to them in a minute), so cannot place judgement on the validity and causes of these social episodes, but I do know that no one gained anything from the sour occurrences of early August. These little fuckwits were inspired to burn down a factory, thinking they would get a free PS3 out of it and the result is UK’s largest stock of independently released records being reduced to mere charcoal. Obviously there was likely to be a social response, perfectly encapsulated by a tweet from Alex Kapranos (Franz Ferdinand) stating: “Where the fuck are the Bullingdon boys? Would you only end your holidays if it were Fortnum & Mason being looted?" Looks like a good step towards our ‘Big Society’ then. With hard copy sales of music already nigh on decimated by digital downloads, and the readiness of music anywhere on the internet, the actions of early August have gone a long way to signalling the end of the beloved record store. A place where you could wile away hours sifting through shelf after shelf, only to stumble across a peach of an album. Yes, we do still have HMV, but it’s just not the same.


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Film Bill Knowles Film Editor

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Big screen review

A quintessential British gent Rachel Longworth

Set in the early days of the Cold War, Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy is about lovers and liars, torture and betrayal in a world where nothing is certain; Tomas Alfredson’s adaptation of John Le Carre’s classic novel makes for a thrilling two hours of espionage immersion. The opening scene ends with bloodshed in Budapest, and we cross to Istanbul where Ricki Tarr (Tom Hardy) discovers an informant. The suspects have been narrowed to four and it is up to spy veteran George Smiley (Gary Oldman) to

forgo his retirement and identify the mole within MI6. The cast is top notch. Oldman squares up to Mark Strong, Colin Firth, Benedict Cumberbatch, Kathy Burke and Toby Jones, but this superb array of British actors doesn’t detract at all from the film itself. Oldman triumphs in his role; you can see Smiley’s every experience etched onto his grey wrinkled face and tired eyes. He is certainly no James Bond, and there is no femme fatale in sight, but he’s the quintessential British gent, and remains solid throughout (even when he uncovers secrets about his colleagues and his wife). Tinker Tailor keeps you guessing to the end. Peering through windows and doors,

catching the reflection in Smiley’s glasses, it’s as if you become a spy yourself. You’re amidst the action, always guessing – ‘it’s definitely pug-like Percy ( Jones). No that’s too obvious. It would only be interesting if Firth was the mole. Er, is it Smiley himself?’ You’re always being pushed to

Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy Director: Tomas Alfredson Starring: Gary Oldman, Colin Firth, Tom Hardy

keep up with the pace. The drab and dreary setting is simply delightful: smoke filled rooms and labyrinthine corridors within the male dominated circus of MI6. This film’s indulgences are not in the paired-down script but in the lavish detail; from the heavy sideburns and topknots to the (many) cigarettes. If nothing else this film will leave you craving a scotch and a smoke. An intricate chess game of bluff and betrayal across continents, with fantastic attention to detail, Tinker Tailor is tipped to be The King’s Speech of this year. It’s already smashed Venice Film Festival, and I spy with my little eye that it will be a huge Oscar winner. Check mate.

Worst Icebreaker Films

Right now, all across the country, thousands of first years are arriving at halls, putting up their Che Guevara posters and asking themselves if they’ll ever be able to live in the same flat as the Man United fans across the hall. We can’t (contrary to popular opinion) be drunk all the time, so to break the ice we have to be creative. Movies are a great idea, but you might just have to pick them carefully... 5. Das Boot Some of you will think that the best way to get to know your new housemates is by watching Wolfgang Petersen’s art-house masterpiece about some German guys stuck in a U-Boat. It’s not.

Winter Preview

4. Oldboy This is a tricky one. Great film show to friends, true. But then, at this early stage, when nicknames are just being forged, you really don’t want to leave yourself open to ‘psycho hammer boy/girl’ (at least try testing the water first with Battle Royale).

Guess what? It’s a prequel! (Why is the third film always a prequel?) We’re taken back to the childhood of the protagonists from the second movie, so expect lots of irritating kids shitting their pants when a light bulb starts ‘terrifyingly’ switching on and off.

3. Marley and Me Your housemates will hate you. No wait, everyone will hate you. 2. In fact, anything with Jennifer Aniston Jennifer Aniston movies are like a strain of the fresher’s flu virus. Someone in the flat is going to expose you all to one at some point, but noone’s ever going to thank them for it. 1. Rosemary’s Baby There’s nothing wrong with watching a horror film. But if you put on Polanski’s terrifying classic, you’ll probably end up disturbing your new housemates so badly that they’ll all just go home again.

After a summer of the usual action blockbuster variety, here’s a brief look at four more eye catching titles coming out in the next few months:

Paranormal Activity 3 (21st October)

Gary Oldman plays ‘quintessential British gent’ George Smiley

The David Lynch Foundation George Nichols

David Lynch is of course most well known for his surrealist films - The Elephant Man, Eraser Head and Mulholland Drive - but many may be unfamiliar with one of his greatest works; his charity, the David Lynch Foundation. It was established in 2005, created by Lynch himself from his belief that “every child should have one class period a day to dive within himself and experience the field of silence.” In an age where celebrities often use charities to save the current, trendiest animal it is refreshing to see Lynch tackle something so unspoken about.

It is refreshing to see Lynch tackle something so unspoken about Perhaps it would be accurate to describe his as a surrealist charity, and certainly its awareness video at Bestival (the David Lynch Foundation was Bestival’s ‘charity of choice’) was

as surreal as it gets. Meditation may not be on the top of people’s lists when there are pandas to save and cancers to beat, but nonetheless this is a worthwhile cause: seventy percent of students with a mental health issue go untreated and suicide is the number three cause of teenage deaths. The aim of Lynch’s charity is to deal with these staggering statistics by offering meditation as a solution. The concept of the charity, which relies on students volunteering for Transcendental Meditation, is almost as bizarre as the concepts for his films, but it can be quite effective. So, take some time to yourself and relax... it’s what Dave would want.

Anonymous (28th October) A film about Shakespeare in which it turns out our preeminent playwright was actually a mere actor, used as cover by a mysterious aristo (Rhys Ifans) who wants to keep his name out of the limelight. ‘Sacrilege!’ I hear you cry…well perhaps, but the cast is wonderful and Roland Emmerich has a decent track record for enjoyable (and brainless) flicks like Day After Tomorrow and Independence Day.

Hugo (2nd December) A new film by perhaps America’s greatest living director: Martin Scorsese. I know what you’re thinking, ‘It’s about guns, or Mafioso or death.’ Well you’re wrong. Turns out this is a family movie about an orphan in 1930s Paris. Interesting.

The Iron Lady ( 12th January) Politics students and raving Thatcherites rejoice! Finally a biopic about the forever controversial and divisive PM. Time will tell what stance this film will take politically, if any at all. Meryl Streep plays Thatcher, and judging by the trailer, she seems to have nailed the accent and mannerisms superbly. Jack Hadley


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

WHO WOULD WIN?

I don’t mean to be bitter but…

Terminator VS Predator Patrick Cowling Film Editor

for the joy of killing stuff. He’s got his little shoulder cannon, a number of massive spiky things; x-ray and thermo vision and can go invisible.

Before we begin let’s lay down some ground rules. No getting in a mardy and going back in time to kill your opponent’s mum before they are even born, it’s very bad form and shows a distinct lack of sportsmanship. Yes, I’m looking at you Terminator. As for you, Predator, none of your ‘I’ve lost, so let’s detonate my sneaky pocket thermonuclear device.’ No-one is impressed and you just look like a sore loser.

Terminator Stats: Terminator T1000 (from Terminator 2) is what the paperclip from Microsoft office will one day become. He’s made of molten metal so he can take any form and make a bunch of weapons out of himself and can handily survive being frozen by liquid nitrogen. Historically Terminator did fail to kill a 13-year-old boy on a scooter, but then again Predator did get battered by Danny Glover.

Predator Stats: Predator is a pig-faced alien hunter with dreadlocks that will travel millions of miles through space and fight the toughest opponents it can find – purely

The Fight: It’s going to be Predator doing all the shooting for most of the time because he’s a sneaky little shit. Even though all

his weapons will do nothing against the big liquid douche, I’d like to think that Predator is clever enough to come up with some sort of plan to kill him. We all know that if it was Predator versus the first Terminator then Predator would eat him alive, but against the T1000 it’s a different story. Despite all the shooting and sneaky stealth attacks, Terminator will take it all in his stride and will just keep on walking towards Predator, who is too much of a badass to be running and hiding forever. It will end with Predator wanting to fight with fists, where Terminator will regrettably mortally wound him. Predator will then ignore my explicit instructions and detonate his self destruct device, taking them both to the grave, but leaving Terminator the undoubted winner.

I hate Twilight. An obvious choice, but my hatred has been building up for a very long time. What happened to good vampire stories? Anne Rice spent her entire life writing books that delved into the psychological and ethical issues that would invariably arise from a rounded human being transformed into an immortal monster that survived from killing other humans. The very concept of immortality and all that it entailed, in terms of watching the world change from everything that you related to and identified and how this would drive you insane, were brought to life with incredible (and yes, slightly emo) imagination. And let’s not forget Bram Stoker’s amazing first tale of Vampires in Victorian London and all the countless book and film inspired adaptations that it created. Being Human and Interview With The Vampire to name just a few. What does Twighlight bring to this rich literary history of horror writing and cinema? In the words of Nelson Mandela – Sweet FA. When Edward Cullen goes out into the sun; he sparkles like a Christmas tree. And obviously he isn’t tortured by the need for blood and the mental weight of immortality, no, he’s a hippy vegan vampire that falls in love with the smell of some Goth chick. A panty sniffer if ever I heard of one. Then there’s the other guy – the lovable werewolf. Who should I sleep with – the dog or the corpse? I can’t even see the appeal of Edward Cullen to girls, even if they’re into that sort of thing. The Vampire Lestat or Angel from Buffy are fair enough, but Robert Pattinson? Mona the Vampire would turn him into charcoal in half a second. I really hope that in the last film he grows a pair, fangs or otherwise, and commits the genocide his kind are supposed to.

Want to write for Film?

Patrick Cowling Film Editor

Get in touch with us, film@mancunion.com

Big screen preview

Tintin on the big screen at last Steve Jones

When you were a kid, did you ever wonder if the toys you played with or the books you read would one day become multi-million dollar blockbusters? Like every other six year old, I was certain of it. But after sitting on my bed, munching popcorn and laughing at Michael Bay for his atrocious Transformers films, I was amazed to see a Tintin trailer which looked absolutely bloody marvellous. It’s based on three of the books which ran a direct story: The Crab with the Golden Claws, The Secret of the Unicorn and Red Rackham’s Treasure. Joyfully,

Tintin: Secret of the Unicorn Director: Steven Spielberg Starring: Jamie Bell, Andy Serkis, Daniel Craig Released: 26th October

these are probably the best books in the whole set, bar perhaps Tintin in Tibet. After Tintin buys a model boat at

a market, he discovers within it a map to hidden treasure. He sets off with that old blisterin’ barnacle, Captain Haddock (who has quite reasonably been made Scottish for the film) and his faithful dog Snowy to find it. But they’re not the only ones looking… A lot of exciting things happened in Tintin and there were some nasty moments (the villains being dragged to Hell at the end of Tintin and the Broken Ear did nothing for my sleeping pattern as a young’un) but I don’t remember it ever being as crazily riotous as this looks! Planes no-one can fly, quad-bikes with rocket launchers, jumping out of windows onto moving vehicles, lighting fires in a boat. They don’t even care! I’m ecstatic Spielberg got his mits on this.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Make friends with a chicken Emily Clark Food & Drink Editor

Without doubt, the thing I missed most as a first year was not my friends, parents or double bed but a good old hearty Sunday roast. Perhaps the thought of putting anything in my perilous Oak House oven scared me too much, so I deprived myself of my greatest yearning. Splitting the cost between a few mates means it works out to a few pounds per person and there is nothing better than good food and good company. I accidentally grilled the chicken on my first attempt and it still tasted amazing, so there’s no excuse! So here’s a recipe for an irresistible Sunday dinner.

Ingredients For the meat Whole chicken 1.8kg or 4-5 lb Butter 1tbsp Thyme 1tbsp FOR THE VEG Potatoes 10, such as Maris Piper, for roasting and mashing Leeks 2, halved, rinsed and finely sliced Milk a splash Carrots 6, peeled and sliced Broccoli 1, washed and divided into florets FOR THE STUFFING Slices of bread 5, chopped or blended into breadcrumbs Onion peeled and diced Dried sage or parsley or coriander 1tbsp, preferably sage Egg beaten For the gravy Chicken stock cube 1 White wine or cider 200 ml of either, cheap is fine Soy sauce 2tbsp Cornflour or gravy granules 1tbsp Essential equipment A roasting tin Tin foil 1 sheet A baking tray

Method If you are using a frozen chicken, defrost overnight. Check thoroughly, or you run the risk of food poisoning. 0 minutes Preheat oven to 200 degrees Celsius/mark 6. Remove giblets from inside chicken if needed. They will be in a plastic pack, and yes, you do need to put your fist up the chicken’s bottom. If using thyme, mix with butter. Rub chicken thoroughly with thyme butter and season. Place chicken in roasting tin and cover with foil (stops skin burning and meat drying out).

10 minutes

1 hour 30

Put chicken in oven. Note the time it went in. Each 450g/1lb needs at least 20 minutes, so a 4lb bird needs 1 hour 20 minutes and possibly 20 more. Every 20 minutes, spoon the fat collecting in the roasting tin over the chicken. Prepare vegetables: peel and chop potatoes into equal sizes. Chop off ends of leeks and halve lengthways. Wash thoroughly to remove dirt from layers, then slice finely. Peel and chop carrots. Wash broccoli, chop off main stalk and divide into florets. Peel and dice onion finely. Chop or blend bread into fine crumbs. Put onion in microwave with a small amount of water for 5 minutes. Mix with breadcrumbs and sage, season and put aside.

Take chicken out, checking it is properly cooked – in Delia Smith’s three ways:

50 minutes Put half the chopped potatoes in a bowl with some cold water and microwave for 10 minutes. Boil a full kettle. 1 hour Put microwaved potatoes around chicken, spooning the fat over them. Don’t cover them with the foil. Put non-microwaved half of the potatoes into a large saucepan with the hot water from the kettle and a pinch of salt. Use greaseproof paper to line baking tray (or lightly grease with oil). Mould stuffing mix into 6 balls, place on tray, then in oven for 30 minutes. Boil kettle again. 1 hour 10 Add carrots and salt to a pan of boiling water. Cook on a medium heat for 20 minutes. Boil kettle again. 1 hour 20 Take the foil off the chicken to crisp the skin. Microwave leeks in a bowl with some cold water for 10 minutes. Add broccoli and salt to a pan of boiling water. Cook on a medium heat for 10 minutes.

1) Pierce thigh with a knife. If the juices run clear it is cooked, but if pink, the chicken needs up to 20 minutes more in the oven. (There’s no shame in hacking away at it a bit if you want to make absolutely sure. Better be certain than eat raw chicken.) 2) Tip up chicken and see the juices running out of the cavity are clear too. 3) Tug a leg away from the body. If it gives easily, it is ready. Put chicken on a serving plate, giving it 10 minutes to ‘rest’, as is proper. Keep the foil on to keep it warm. Put roast potatoes in oven with stuffing if they aren’t yet done. Drain potatoes from pan, then mash with a masher or blender, to get all lumps out. Add a splash of milk and leeks then mix together. Drain broccoli. Take out stuffing and roast potatoes from oven. Drain the carrots, saving the water. Spoon off most of the remaining fat from the roasting tin, and add the white wine or cider. Scrape meaty bits off bottom of the tin then add 400 ml of the carrot water, the stock cube and soy sauce, stirring until mixed in. Mix cornflour with a small amount of water (this is vital!) then pour into the gravy slowly, whisking it in quickly, to stop it forming lumps. Once this thickens the gravy, pour into a serving jug. Serve everything up, name your most masculine participant the Chicken Carver and enjoy! Don’t forget to phone your Nan and tell her all about it. Extra Tip Use the leftover chicken in sandwiches, make a stock with the carcass and some vegetables for a great risotto or chicken and sweetcorn soup.

Food & Drink

Recipe

Work is the curse of the drinking classes Oscar Wilde

Review

Get 10% off the best pizzas in Manchester*

* Sunday to Thursday, anytime, any restaurant (except in December). Just show your student card.

www.cromapizza.co.uk City Centre • Chorlton • Prestwich

Five favourite watering holes Font (Fallowfield and Oxford Road) If you ever owe your mates a round, go to Font, with over 20 cocktails from as little as £2. Sip on a Sailor Jerry Mojito or a cream-topped Mudslide or an admirable array of other lagers and bitters. The food deserves a nod of the head, the sofas are comfy. Hula Tiki Head to almost any bar in the Northern Quarter if you want a damn good cocktail, but do try to catch the last moments of summer at Hula Tiki, the Hawaiian themed bar. With hula hoops (not the crisps), a wealth of rum, cocktails set on fire and lamps made of puffer fish, what more could you want? Kyoto Lounge To experience the geeky brilliance of a gaming bar, head to Kyoto Lounge. Their extensive range of

games includes COD, Street Fighter, Gran Turismo, Fifa, Guitar Hero – you name it. Your inner child will never complain again. Ram and Shackle With its rugged charm and dingy wall decor, Ram and Shackle is a personal favourite. It’s tucked away at the southern end of Fallowfield, with cheap drinks, lots of rooms to explore and places to hide. Treat yourself to an Irish coffee in the winter. Trof (Northern Quarter, Deaf Institute on Oxford Road, Fallowfield) Trof serves some of the best food in town, particularly their scrumptious Sunday lunch. The vibe is always charming and it helps that they do a fine cocktail . Deaf’s genre-spanning club nights are a hit with the kids.


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Lifestyle

Keep calm and read on Naila Missous Lifestyle Editor

I would be lying if I didn’t admit to being a self confessed workaholic. I did my work last year and it paid off. Unheard of for a first year? Don’t be so sure. I started first year with the same collection of emotions most students experience: nerves, excitement, happiness and feeling slightly homesick (from up the road in Cheshire...). However, what worried me the most was the anxiety that I may be slightly too keen for my studies in comparison to others. I remember scaling The Guardian’s ‘The Fresher’ section and reading celebrities who felt intimidated at their first seminar. But look at them now! “That could be me!” I’d think to myself, as I romanticised what hard work and befriending John Ryland would be like. I remember my first lecture and that is purely because there wasn’t meant to be a lecture. Around 10 students showed up

I did my work last year and it paid off. Unheard of for a first year? Don’t be so sure. to the massive lecture hall in the Kilburn building at 9am on Monday morning, clasping Oroonoko or whatever other highly exclusive yet seemingly dry read it was. I’d heard of people skipping lectures because they were too busy sleeping, but 10? Never mind, I thought. Let’s continue. We all sat there anticipating what would happen next.

Nothing. We then received a message from someone saying that lectures don’t start till the week after and that our timetables had in fact wrongly informed us of this. Great. I over-stretched myself slightly when it came to clubs and societies, but you never know what your niche may be until you try everything that you have even a slight interest in. I would say that finding one that really works for you and sticking with is probably the best solution. Nerves mixed in with anticipation are all a part of the thrill of coming to Manchester. The size of the campus and the differing people around is enough to scare anyone, but that’s the charm of our city campus. The hustle and bustle of Oxford road each morning as you make it into your lecture or the hush throughout Blue 3 in John Rylands will become engraved into your routine and trust me, after an almost four month summer, it’s nice to come back to it all.

The power of retrospect Lily Howes Lifestyle Editor Ever since I can remember September has come with the same mantra: new academic year, new start. I tell myself I’m going to turn over a new leaf. In primary school it was neat handwriting, high school was all about homework deadlines and by sixth form, I was convinced that I was going to start revising for my exams in early November. Now I’m going into my final year at university (where did the time go?!) and unfortunately nothing has changed. With my Pukka Pad at the ready I’ve got my ‘new year, new start’ hat on once again. It’s a certainty I’m not alone in this. But what I have learnt at long last is to be more realistic with my goals. There’s no way that I’ll be in the library five hours a day for the next nine months, and it’s highly unlikely that I’ll have my dissertation done two months before the deadline. But there are some easy steps that can be taken to make sure I’m not spending my Easter holiday dosed up on Pro Plus trying to manically churn out 10,000 words. Balance is key. Final year students it’s time to get serious but depriving yourself of all human contact is not the way to go. Be realistic, going out the night before you have a 9am seminar is

With my Pukka Pad at the ready I’ve got my ‘new year, new start’ hat on once again

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Science & Tech

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Welcome Week Survival List (You could survive without it but it’s always handy) 1. If you’re moving into halls, keep your door open when you’re unpacking. Then people will know someone exists in room 12 and yay, new friend. 2. If you’re staying at home, joining societies, Student Union events and course activities are a sure fire way to meet potential friends. 3. Smile at everyone! Not in a weird way, but in a “I’m just as nervous as you are” way. They’re all in the same boat remember 4. On nights out, have a few taxi numbers to hand. Manchester is big, so safety in numbers. 5. For the girls: bring a pair of flats with you. Heels look nice when you’re posing in the corridor before you leave, but firey feet at the end of the night just aren’t cool. 6. In halls, buy store cupboard essentials like salt, pepper, sugar etc so that everyone will be able to have at least a few essentials! 7. Sign up with a GP and Dentist as soon as you can (ahh Fresher’s flu...) 8. Introductory lectures usually have the most important information about certain books, so bring a pen and a paper. 9. Try to familiarise yourself with the Student Union and who your officers are for specific things (Women’s officer, Humanities officer etc) you never know when you might need them. 10. ENJOY AND WELCOME TO MANCHESTER!

work a treat; just make sure you’re strict. Simply by saying to yourself, “I can order that Domino’s pizza when I’ve read this chapter” or “I’m only allowed to go out tonight if I’ve finished this essay”. It’s the best of both worlds! If the library doesn’t provide the same stimuli it does for most, don’t force it. For some people it can just be full of distractions (especially when Fit Finder is up and running) so see what works for you. Maybe a quiet coffee shop or secret computer cluster, everyone works differently.

Photo: Lily Howes

Looking for a like minded individual to roam Platt Fields hand-in-hand with? Seeking a pint drinking partner or someone to romantically sweep you off to Orange Wednesdays? Or are you just after a free meal? The Mancunion’s most popular feature, Blind Date is BACK. Sign up by emailing your full name, year of study, course and phone number to lifestyle@mancunion. com with ‘blind date’ as the subject header. Then just sit back and wait for happily ever after to become a reality...

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Politics & Analysis

Photo: Shalom Photography

Blind Date

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Comment & Debate

Foam parties– Fresher’s favourite or danger zone with risk of temporary blindness and potential shoe loss? never going to end well but spending every weekend cooped up in your bedroom is going to leave you with the social skills of Will from The Inbetweeners. Bribe yourself. It really does

Blackwell’s will see a surge of students buying every kind of planner available this week in an attempt to be organised. Writing down timetables, plans and todo lists is common sense and

Anyone willing to make a Sat Nav around John Rylands stands to make some serious profit makes missing that incredibly important meeting with your tutor much less likely. The challenge is making sure said planners aren’t discarded down the back of your bed or left on a

Magic Bus before Reading Week. If all else fails at least the student loan in our bank accounts will be enough to encourage a positive attitude, for a week or so at least.


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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

256, if only every building was named after its number.

Welcome to university on rails. A simple story of how clichéd your experience will be, three years full to the brim with stereotypical student escapades of self-experimentation and freethinking. Lloyd Henning Columnist A goodbye will mark the beginning of your entrapment in higher education. Mum will sobbingly close your new bedroom's door as Dad puts on the stern grimace that says "don't fuck this up, you aren't living with us once you graduate". Left alone for the first time in your life, you will do what any intelligently designed being would - get pissed on cheap booze and blitheringly try to invite people to your flat for a party. Lectures will start and you will be confronted with the choice of either choosing to study for the degree that a year ago you thought "looked sort of interesting" or to sod that and enjoy the seemingly non-stop party lifestyle filled with wonders such as "the ring of fire". You will probably meet some amazing people, or at least people who profess how amazing they are. The tales of their life experiences will be enviable, although probably mostly fabricated. To look intelligent you

will say you've heard of books by authors with vowel-less names, desperately maintaining your lies by reading the synopsis on wikipedia. When having a 'cotch sesh' with your new friends, your music collection will come under scrutiny, to which you will be betray any individuality you may have and inform the critics that "yeah, I never listen to that shit anymore". There is even a chance that you may meet someone who, through some possible distortion of reality, finds you attractive. It will be just like those drearily rose-tinted films based in universities: you'll be slightly cautious and naive, but then they'll open your mind to experimentation and reveal you to yourself. Or, you'll occasionally spot each other at the kebab shop and then go back and shag. Then the whole of your year as a fresher will be gone quicker than you can make a pot noodle. What awaits you next is the dark middle chapter.

Second Year "I'm going to get involved in everything", is the general tone of

Photo: Lloyd Henning

The saga begins

Then the whole of your year as a fresher will be gone quicker than you can make a pot noodle. second year. You are now familar with how this university thing works and are prepared to explore as much as what's on offer as possible. Of course, you will do none of this. The first thing to hamper your idyllic reinvention is your new house. This is most likely the first

student radio station.

Hattie Pearson

Fuse FM celebrated its tenth birthday earlier this year and it’s certainly come a long way over the past decade. But this year will see even more new developments including a studio move in January. As Head of Communications at Fuse FM, each week I’m going to be bringing you all the latest updates, tips, advice & radio know-how from industry experts, info on how to get involved and

all the gossip from the studio! I caught up with Fuse FM’s very own Station Manager, Dan Alani to find out more. Hattie: “Hi Dan, let me start by saying congratulations on your new role, how are you feeling about the upcoming year?” Dan: “I’m really excited. I think all the hard work we did last year has given us a good platform to build on. I’m looking forward to all the big things happening over the course of the next year and getting new people on board.” H: “We’re going to be meeting committee members in the weeks

Third Year If there was ever a time where you were going to have to work, this would be it. You have now decided that you've had enough of trying to relive the freshers year magic. Your liver is now a black lump of compost and you

with bands, community projects, continuing our Pangaea coverage as well as putting on workshops with media experts.”

Fuse FM is YOUR For the very first time we are broadcasting all year round, that means instead of just four weeks broadcasting each semester we’re going to be on air for the whole semester. Yes, that’s right - the whole semester. Exciting stuff, ‘ey?

property you've ever selected for renting and perhaps you hadn't got the eye for detail yet. The intitial deal clencher that was the basement now turns out to be a dark, damp mess filled with what appears to be the remenants of some form of cult activities; and the rest of the house stinks like soggy flannels and dog biscuits. Nevertheless, you endeavour to throw a party! It's going to be like skins and american pie got together a spewed out a bastard child of narcotics, beer kegs and people dancing in their underwear. However, what you most likely to end up with instead is a room full of DJs and a hallway of people queuing for the loo.

H: “What are Fuse FM up to during Welcome Week?”

Dan Alani Fuse FM station manager

D: “We’ll be broadcasting live from ‘The Battle of the Brands” on Sunday 18th and ‘Touchdown’ on Saturday 24th. We’ll have our own stall too as at the Student Fair throughout the week, so don’t forget to come and say hi.” H: “When do we start broadcasting?”

to come to find out what they get up to, but for those that don’t know anything about Fuse how would you describe what we do?” D: “Fuse FM is a great way for students to share their passion for music, news, literally everything and anything radio!” H: “Fuse FM is more than just a radio station, what else do the team get up to?” D: “We run a monthly club-night called ‘Fuse Presents’ which showcases our DJs and gives opportunities to up and coming acts. This year we’ll also be expanding our video and online output ranging from live sessions

D: “It all kicks off on Sunday 18th September where we’ll be building up to the night’s events right through until the end of Welcome Week. Then we’ll be off air for two weeks before launching back into action at the start of October!” H: “What would you say to people who aren’t sure whether Fuse FM is for them or not, *whispers* this is your chance for a shameful plug?” D: “There’s literally something for everyone, it’s a great way to meet new people and most of all it’s a right laugh!” H: “This is all well and good, but how can people tune in?”

will find yourself sweaty, tired and entirely unfunctional the morning after just two pints at the pub. You can barely look at a fresher without pondering your own wasted existance. You are over the hill and your time here is almost up. All those things you said you would do at university are distant memories and you just want to get your degree and get out of here. Maybe you'll finally get to go on that journey around the world, chant with some monks and spend a season teaching to kids with chicken pox to ski. Most likely though will be you turning up back home (to your parents delight) and spend a few fruitless years trying to find a dream job before realising your real place in society and settling for a beige office and a life of admin.

*** The Queen of Hearts has finally abdicated and been replaced by an inspired collection of numbers. '256' is the new dive hole for fallowfield residents and is sure to succeed just by being closer to Owens Park than vodka revs. They appeared to have been doing lots of renovation work over the summer, and have remarkably been able to recreate it almost exactly how it was before. Of course the old furniture has gone and been replaced with brand new, gleamingly white tables and chairs - ready to for a finishing coat of sticky vodbull. I was fortunate enough to see the first ever puke to grace the newly opened venue. Pink and porridgey, the spew was splayed along the men's room urinal. The two chirpy members of staff who had to clean it up put on a brave face, knowing that this was just the beginning of the end.

Column

Student Eye

D: “Log onto our website www.fusefm.co.uk where you can listen live. Don’t forget to check out our Facebook page and Twitter for all the latest too.” www.facebook.com/fusefmma nchester @FuseFM

Fuse FM

Listings Live broadcasting from Sunday 18th: Battle of the Brands. Tune in from 6pm when we'll be coming live from the Student's Union.

Tuesday 20th Thursday 23rd:

Broadcasting from the Student's Union and reporting live from the Student Fair.

Saturday 24th:

Touchdown with Zane Lowe.

How to hear more

Like our page on Facebook www.facebook.com/fusefmma nchester Follow us on Twitter @FuseFM Check out our website for more info www.fusefm.co.uk

Get involved!

Have something to say on the column? Send your fanmail, poetry and love letters to lloyd@mancunio n.com


28

Literature

Preview

10th – 23rd October

Manchester Literature Festival Steve Jones Literature Editor

Famous for its eclectic and numerous institutions, the presence of some of the most renowned authors in Britain and, um, loads of people talking about books and stuff over tea, Manchester Literature Festival literally appeals to all ages and there is plenty that will interest students. For any of you who have just arrived at the university and are doing a Creative Writing degree, I’m afraid our own crème de la crème Martin Amis has fled to other pastures. But don’t reach for the noose just yet, no sir – widely celebrated Irish author Colm Tóibín has taken his place at the university and is dispensing his wisdom at the opening of the festival on 10th October. Something I’m not going to

Review

Steve Jones Literature Editor

Get ed! lv o v in Want to write for Literature? It’s incredibly easy! You don’t have to do a Literature degree (I don’t), you only have to enjoy reading and have a bit of a hand for writing. E-mail me at literature@man cunion.com and I’ll put you on the mailing list. Details of a meeting place and time to follow.

Book Club

Canal Street Gothic Reviewed by:

Sarah McLoughlin

This week, Steve Jones talks to Georgia Haire, a 3rd year History student who is preparing for winter by immersing herself in the doom and gloom of Jean Rhys.

miss is ‘Crime in a Cold Climate’ on the 17th October. Scandinavian authors have all come together for a night to discuss the incredibly gripping crime novels that have exploded out of their countries in recent years. Anyone who’s partial to a bit of Stieg Larsson or Henning Mankell, or who likes The Killing or the TV adaptation of Wallander (original Swedish version obviously – sod off Kenneth Brannagh) can’t let this little number slip through their fingers. And remember Anthony Horowitz? He did all those cool Alex Rider books with the gadgets and the flying. Now he’s written a new Sherlock Holmes story that he’s going to talk about on the 3rd November – a week or so after the festival ends as a kind of one-off. That might be worth some nostalgia value, and if you didn’t like the whole Robert Downey Jr./ Jude Law thing you can take a punt at this.

There’s so much more than what I’ve just mentioned. I haven’t scraped the surface. I didn’t really even manage to get to the surface. Just have a look on the website. And did I say how cheap all this is? With student discount a lot of the

events cost just £3. We’ll be covering this as it happens too, so if anyone wants to go completely free of charge and write a short review of any of the events then look down the page to the ‘Get Involved’ section!

With a delightfully flamboyant and glamorous reputation, Canal Street is the beating heart of Manchester’s gay (LGBT) scene. The rich and often complex history of Canal Street has been transformed into a collection of ten stories to celebrate the 21st anniversary of Manchester’s Gay Village. ‘Canal Street Gothic’ attempts to juxtapose the bright lights and bustling atmosphere we recognise today with a dark, illicit vision of the past. I was hoping for a realistic portrayal of a street with so much history and instead was

left feeling disappointed. Although amusing at times, in particular ‘Dr Nizami’s Pizzas’ which was set in the student epicentre of Fallowfield, I struggled to engage with most of the stories. They all too often featured two dimensional characters in downright bizarre situations - nudist pancake day, anyone? Instead of the grit and realism that was promised, David Thame presents a collection of stories that verge on being just a little bit unbelievable and dull at times. The potential for a great story to be told is still there, and at times we do see

glimpses of it in Thame’s work; ‘Regulars’, the book’s opener is a promising start, featuring real, believable characters. It is just unfortunate that ‘Canal Street Gothic’ runs out of steam before it really gets going.

What are you reading, who's it by and what's it about? ‘Quartet’ by Jean Rhys. Marya is living in 1920s Paris with her reckless husband. When he is imprisoned she’s left broke and alone. She’s taken in by her recent acquaintances, the Heidlers, who slowly overwhelm her with their own desires. The novel is based on Rhys’ relationship with Ford Maddox Ford, his wife Stella Bowen and Jean Lenglet, Rhys’ first husband. Is it un-putdownable or unpickupable? Un-putdownable.

Feature

A Day in the Life of... Dean Moriarty Bill Knowles decides to kick off our frankly moronic new running feature, attempting to live out a single day as a literary character. He chose Dean Moriarty, from Jack Kerouac’s On the Road. Bill Knowles I make sure to wake up late. Because that’s what Dean Moriarty would do. I don’t shave, and go find a roadside cafe to get a coffee and some

apple pie. I roll a cigarette and contemplate the day ahead. 24 hours as the semifictional contemporary of Kerouac and Ginsburg. Soon I will step onto the pavement and, for a second, consider the open road ahead. Then head south. All the way to

You must always judge a book by its cover. Does it have a pretty cover? Penguin Modern Classics always do.

Henning Mankell, author of the Wallander series

Withington. I have no second wife to leave, so instead I just don’t tell my housemate where I’m going. I arrive, unexpected, on a friend’s doorstep, wondering whether he has whiskey and amphetamines, tales from the Great Midwest or beat poetry to recite. He

The potential for a great story to be told is still there. doesn’t, but does have an Xbox 360 and cigarettes. Jazz cigarettes. So I stay and play FIFA. Because, I decide, Dean would want to. Later that evening, I tell my friend that we need to find women and music. I suggest Mexico City and ask him if he has a Cadillac. He does not, so we are forced to compromise. We get the 142 into town. We go looking for a smoky jazz bar, and arrive at Matt & Phreds in the Northern Quarter. The music is wild. I sit at a table and start drumming along to the beat until people eventually shush me. I go to the bar and ask how much a Manhattan

Do you identify with any of the characters, and if so why? You can definitely sympathise with Marya and her position, even though she is very self-pitying at points. What's the writing style? Is it, for instance, dialogue heavy or is it mostly excruciatingly lengthy Lord of the Rings style description? I think you could say it fits in with Modernist style literature. The novel is satirical and full of emotional descriptions of Marya’s surroundings and the people she encounters. Can you predict the end? I don’t think it’s going to be a happy one. The fatalistic tones in the novel are less than promising. Do you think other students will like this, or will they cry and gnash their teeth as they read, shaking the book and screaming abuse? I think it’s very likely it would be enjoyed and not yelled at.

is. The bartender tells me it is seven pounds. I quickly decide that, actually, Dean would probably prefer to go to The Deaf Institute tonight, so we leave and go there instead. I buy three drinks for myself. This, I decide, is somewhere I will truly get into character. The next day I wake up early, because I’ve left my curtains open and way too much light is streaming in to the room. My head hurts. I stumble downstairs to get some orange juice and paracetemol. Then I begin to try and remember, as I turn the TV to E4, my day as Dean Moriarty.


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Society Spotlight

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Literature

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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

In Brief

Steve Biko Building Refurbishment

Union News

What matters to you is what matters to us. As the new Executive Officer team got used to their new offices over the summer, we began our discussions about what we would make our priority this year. Last year campaigning to oppose the rise in fees to £9,000 per year was our major effort. This year you expect more, and so we will deliver more! Two priority campaigns, for two very important issues. Jeremy Buck Communications Officer

Protecting students from the impacts of reduced funding This year Universities up and down the country will be feeling the squeeze of having 80% government funding removed. This massive drop in public funding has no replacement this year, as the increased contribution from tripled tuition fees will not come into effect until September 2012. This leaves our University in a tight financial position and we want to ensure that a priority for this year will be ensuring that your overall experience here at Manchester goes protected and that the things you value most are not lost to the financial squeeze. Whether it be disability support, bursaries or counseling services, ensuring that the most important elements of your experience at University are both protected and developed. So we have some exciting ways to get involved and help protecting the most important parts of your life at university. We need as many students as possible to become Cutsbusters! We have 2,000 Cutsbuster cards ready and waiting at the Student Fair for you to collect, which will have our emergency contact details on them, ready for you to call, email or text when you hear of a service, course or resource being removed from students. We need you to let us know and we can help protect you and your fellow students from the impacts of the decision. We also have a week of events starting with a showing of the

film The Inside Job, winner of the 2010 Cannes Film Festival award for Best Documentary Feature, followed by a campaign introduction from members of the Executive Officer team. This is at 6 pm on Monday 26th September in the Council Chambers, on the top floor of the Students’ Union Building on Oxford Road.

Providing new and exciting ways to have your voice heard If you were here last year, you may have been a part of the push to fix some of the broken parts of the Union’s rulebook. Sometimes it’s really hard for students to achieve change at their Union and University, and becoming more responsive to your voice is a massive part of improving that. We came close to hitting our target last year, but when it came to getting the required minimum of 3,000 students to vote online for a change to our constitution, we fell short. This year we have new ways of engaging students, and want you to be a part of everything we do! We know you must have thoughts buzzing around your head about what you want to be different at University and in the Union, and we want to hear them! At the Student Fair, and on our website, we will be asking you to offer us your Ideas. These can be written down on Ideas postcards, which you will find at the Student Fair and all over campus over the next few weeks, and drop them into the boxes in the Union or hand them to Executive Officers. We will then collect them together, and find the six Big Ideas, the things that matter them most to

This year you expect more, and so we will deliver more!

It’s been a long time coming, but a refurbishment of the Students’ Union building on Oxford road is underway! After a bumpy start over the summer leading to some delays, we are well on the way to delivering a band new Student Activities Centre on the 1st floor, which will be supported by new staff offices too. This should be completed by the start of Semester 2, so expect a grand opening in the New Year. The Advice Centre is now on the ground floor, down the corridor on the right hand side of the foyer. Come and chat to Kevin and Rebekah about anything that is troubling you, and they will be able to give you free, independent and non-judgmental advice, just as they always have! The Executive Officers are now on the ground floor on the right hand

Manchester RAG win RAG of the year Students from all over the UK voted Manchester RAG best in the country at the RAG Conference in September. Congratulations to all our fantastic fundraisers who took part in JailBreak, Lost, Beerfest and the other events that RAG ran

Student Action launch new projects students at Manchester. You will then be able to discuss them and decide what action we take at [bold]Big Ideas: Have your say[end bold], which is happening at 5 pm on Thursday 13th October in Academy 1. We need over 1,000 students to attend, so make sure you put it in your diaries, calendars and set your alarm clocks. Later in the year we will be running an online vote, asking for your support in updating our rulebook to make us much more effective and responsive. The Charities Commission, who oversee us as a charitable body, may be able to give us some help by reducing the number of people required in a online vote. If you believe this will help the Union grow and deliver better representation, support and activities, then please email your support to communications@umsu.manche ster.ac.uk.

It’s a fresh new year over at Student Action, and there are loads of new volunteering opportunities available for you to help in the community, and get involved in helping of some of Manchester’s more disadvantaged

side of the foyer, where the General Office used to be, come and say hello, and they will help you with whatever you might want to do in the Union. The Activities and Media Office is now downstairs opposite our hairdressers. Here societies can sort out their admin with staff help, and Mancunion contributors can use the suite of computers. RAG and Student Action are also here too, and Amaya the Activities Officer will be hopping down here each day, so you know where to find her. Tickets can now be bought from reception and The Union Shop now has a seating area at the rear, for a quiet lunchtime rest. Hot food can still be bought in the bar, while Biko’s Café is closed ready to be moved downstairs later in the year. Cold food and snacks will still be available from The Union Shop, with a new super-cheap meal-deal, which is the cheapest in the area!

last year. Want to get involved this year? Come along to the RAG Challenge Fair, which is in Academy 2 from 10am to 5 pm on Thursday 29th September, and sign up to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro, volunteer in Vietnam or swim with sharks! Email info@manchesterrag.com to find out more, or visit them in the new Activities and Media Centre downstairs.

Union Corner

Union News

groups. The new projects include the After School Learning Club, Refugee Teaching Project, Manchester Young Creators and Fair Play Footie. To become a part of Student Action Manchester, find them at the Student Fair this week email action@umsu.manchester .ac.uk , or visit them in the new Activities and Media Centre downstairs.

Zero Tolerance

Word

Last year, University of Manchester OF TH E WEE Students’ Union made a massive K step forwards with regards to gender liberation, when students voted to pass the new Zero Tolerance to Sexual Harassment policy. One in seven women students is subject to serious sexual or physical during their time at uni, while 68 percent have suffered some form of sexual harassment. Quite often certain forms of harassment, like groping or wolf whistling, are seen as the norm; something that we should expect and accept. The fact is, acts like this can be really demoralising and degrading, even intimidating. Zero Tolerance to Sexual Harassment means that, if you report an incident of sexual assault or harassment within the Union, no matter what gender you or the other person are, it will be taken as seriously.

Get involved!

My Union is Online:

umsu.manchest er.ac.uk Twitter:@UMSU nion Facebook: university of Manchester Students’ Union


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Sport

Review

England’s

Indian Summer Ruthless England demolish sorry India to become World number one. Patrick Madden Sports Editor

England’s victory in the 2005 Ashes series was breathtaking, captivating - the product of six years of the rebuilding and rejuvenation of English cricket. A triumvirate of Duncan Fletcher, Nasser Hussain and Michael Vaughan oversaw a process which helped drag England from test cricket’s gutter. The sensational defeat of Australia a far cry from the 1999 loss to New Zealand, which saw them propping up the ICC test rankings. Yet rather than being a catalyst for dominance, victory over Australia was the swansong of a side soon to fall apart. Loss of form and injury ripped out the soul of the team, and what followed was the nadir moment of an Ashes series whitewash defeat in the winter of 2006. So, the rebuilding process

started again, and after a calamitous interjection which saw Peter Moores and Kevin Pietersen flounder as coach and captain - Andy Flower and Andrew Strauss have overseen one of the finest periods in England’s test history. Under Flower and Strauss, England have won eight and drawn one of their last nine test series – including Ashes successes both home and away against Australia. Total domination – culminating in this summer’s thrashing of India- has seen them soar up the world rankings to number one. India had arrived in England as the world’s best. They left not only without that mantle, but also with little pride intact. Whilst Indian hopes were hindered by the loss of star bowler Zaheer Khan to injury, only Rahul Dravid rose above and produced beyond the abysmal dross India served up all summer. Yet this shouldn’t take away

The Indian batsman were hapless in the face of the ruthless English bowling attack

For whilst India were woeful, England were majestic. from England’s victory. For whilst India were woeful, England were majestic.

The scale of England’s achievement should not be underestimated. Not only did they reach the number one spot by beating the supposed best team in the world, it was also only the seventh time in Test match history there has been a whitewash in a series of four games or more. It was a team performance of the highest calibre. At some stage nearly every individual made a significant contribution – there are no passengers in this England side. The batsmen consistently posted unassailable first innings scores, the bowlers took 20 wickets in every game and only once did they allow

Feature

Jay’s new boots prior to the Barton led sabotage!

Where are they now? Andy Hunt Jack Burke Sports Editor

Get ed! lv o v in To contact Jack and Paddy please email sport@mancunio n.com and also join the Facebook group www.facebook.c om/groups/Man cunionsport/ We’re always on the lookout for writers.

The lower leagues have always been littered with journeyman strikers who play for numerous clubs without ever truly settling, Andy Hunt was no exception. Beginning his career at non League Kings Lynn, Hunt then moved onto Kettering Town before making his move into the professional ranks at Newcastle United in 1991. He then switched to West Bromwich Albion in March 1993, scoring a hat trick on his debut against Oxford. His opening goal in the playoff final against Port Vale at Wembley later that year proved crucial as Albion secured promotion to the First Division. Yet the most memorable season of Hunt’s career was probably his last when he propelled Charlton back to the Premier League in 2000, scoring 24 goals in the process. Sadly, disaster struck for Hunt the following year when he was diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome which brought his career to a tragically premature end. Despite this illness,

India’s batsmen to eclipse 300 runs. Individually, Kevin Pietersen, Ian Bell and Stuart Broad were England’s outstanding performers – Pietersen and Bell amassing over a thousand runs between them, Broad’s Trent Bridge hat trick the series’ champagne moment. Under Strauss and Flower England have developed a winning mentality akin to the Australia of McGrath, Warne et al. They head to the subcontinent this winter as the world’s best, confident that unlike 2005 this is the start of a legacy, not the end.

The Mancunion

Tweetly

Hunt had still managed to clock up 341 appearances in the Football League across a 10 year period, scoring 122 goals. Not one to rest on his laurels however, Hunt moved into the travel and tourism industry. He and his wife now run the Green Dragon Adventure Travel Company from their home in the sunny climbs of Belize. The couples key attraction is their ‘Belize jungle dome’ where holidaymakers can enjoy adventure activities such as scuba diving, Jungle safaris and horseback riding, before retreating to the quiet intimate resort which is described as ‘your oasis in the central American jungle’. It’s certainly a far cry from chilly afternoons up front with fellow journeyman Bob Taylor which were regular when Hunt turned out for West Brom! For more information on Andy’s Belize tourism attractions visit www.greendragonbelize.com.

@jaybothroyd - I wear uggs and I'll keep wearing them I have nobody to impress they are comfortable , normally I wear flip-flops everywhere comfy & easy – Fashionista Jay Bothroyd wears what he wants.... @joey7barton - Can I just go on record as stating, I had nothing to do with @jaybothroyd 's ugg boots getting vandalised. He will confirm this... #innocent – Joey Barton pleads innocence after Bothroyd’s footwear is ravaged…

@themichaelowen - About to set off for training. It's great to be at training after a win. The place is buzzing. Then it's home for a Sunday Roast Dinner. – Michael Owen might actually be the world’s most boring man. @waynerooney - Going training. Me and Ashley Cole destroying Defoe with banter. I'm sure I can see tears!!!!!!! – If somebody reminded poor Jermaine of his persecutors past misdemeanours he’d hardly be short of ammunition… @StuartBroad8 - Bad news on the shoulder, torn a muscle, I know which one, just can't spell it. #gutted – Left or right, Stuart?

@joey7barton - Tate Modern summary; some great pieces, some good pieces, some weird/strange pieces and then some pieces an infant leaves in their nappy!!!! – Joey ‘Oscar Wilde’ Barton proves he’s quite the culture vulture with this insightful analysis of the Tate Modern…….

@J_Ennis - Just want to thank you all for your lovely messages! Two very long days! But have to be happy with my silver medal! Gold next time though! – Jessica Ennis may have only left the World Championships with a silver medal but she’s still The Mancunion’s number one.

@joey7barton - Red or Black now, strangely addictive watching this. How big are Ant and Decs foreheads? Is it just me.......? – Before opting for something more aligned to his intellect.

@warne888 - Love this quote - in case you forgot "Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath away." – Shane Warne goes all Joey Barton on us…


News

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Society Spotlight

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Manchester Edition: Monday 19th September 2011

Football

Northern Ireland’s

Mild-mannered Mowbray inspires Riverside Revolution

golden year Patrick Madden Sports Editor

If ever a football manager appeared in need of catharsis, it would surely be Tony Mowbray. Thomas McMahon

With his mumbling, nasal voice and hunched gait, the Middlesbrough boss does not immediately seem the man to lift a team from doldrums. Yet beneath the unassuming exterior lies a dynamic manager breathing new life into a hitherto broken club. Prior to Mowbray’s return, Gordon Strachan’s Boro plummeted as low as 20th in the Championship after being billed as pre-season favourites for promotion. With a raft of Scottish imports failing to perform on Teesside, the board turned to the former club captain to stave off the threat of relegation. It was a risky move, with Mowbray having endured a torrid spell at Celtic following his relegation with West Bromwich Albion. Despite indifferent early performances, the Riverside club rallied to finish 12th after a five-match winning run. Despite a number of high-profile departures in the transfer window, this season has seen that form continue, with Boro making their best start to the season since 200001. Indeed, the shift in playing style seen under Mowbray can be at

least partially attributed to the departure of the disappointing Kris Boyd. While Boyd’s abilities as a poacher are undoubted after his record-breaking spell at Rangers, the striker’s lack of mobility often contributed to the turgid nature of Middlesbrough’s play under Strachan. Now, the industrious Scott McDonald is charged with making space for the wing play of a rejuvenated Marvin Emnes, currently the club’s top scorer. The former Holland youth international is finally realising the potential which his £3 million move from Sparta Rotterdam suggested, with the pacy winger at last playing with confidence. The defence, meanwhile, has been boosted by the emergence of athletic young left back Joe Bennett, who was ostracised under Strachan. Startlingly, the two teams seemingly best equipped to challenge Mowbray’s revitalised unit are sides just promoted from League One. Gustavo Poyet’s Brighton have taken their earlyseason opponents by storm, playing a swaggering brand of attacking football at the new American Express Stadium in Falmouth. Alongside Scotland

Hometown Hero Tony Mowbray has given fresh impetus to the club he began his career with.

Startlingly, the two teams seemingly best equiped to challenge Mowbray’s revitalised unit are sides just promoted

Farah rise gives Team GB fresh Olympic hope Jack Burke Sports Editor

The Great Britain Athletics team returned home successful from the World Championships earlier this month having achieved the target of seven medals set for them by their coach Charles Van Commenee. Alongside reaching that target, the athletes performance in Daegu, South Korea was the best performance by a British team in 18 years, with the likes of Dai Greene and Katherine England collecting medals which were not expected.Yet this should not mask the disappointments of reigning world champions Jessica Ennis and Phillips Idowu, with both failing to retain their titles in heptathlon and triple jump respectively. The deposed champions must now go back to the drawing

board if they are to achieve Olympic glory on home turf next summer,with rivals only likely to improve leaving Ennis and Idowu having to perform at a higher level than ever before. Yet for another of Britain’s competitors these championships marked his step from nearly man to homegrown star come next year’s London games. The performance of Mo Farah to take gold in the 10,000 metre and silver in the 5,000 metre races is an illustration to us all of how hard work and tremendous mental strength can pay dividends. At the beginning of 2010 Farah had never won a championship race. Yet crucial changes to his training and mental preparation in the past year have propelled him to new levels of success. Born in Somalia but raised in West

Mo Farah heads into next years Olympics as Team GB’s best hope of gold medals in track and field.

London, Farah spent part of 2010 in Kenya, where he undertook a rigorous training regime in the remote mountains of the Great Rift Valley alongside some of the worlds best distance runners. This proved crucial physical

international Craig Mackail-Smith, former Valencia star Vicente Rodgriguez could be another transfer coup for the Seagulls if the 38-times capped Spaniard can stay fit. Brighton’s south coast counterparts, Southampton, also look like convincing contenders for successive promotions under Nigel Adkins. Irish forward David Connolly is enjoying an Indian summer while young winger Adam Lallana injects pace and creativity into the side. Midfielder Jack Cork, who enjoyed a fine spell on loan at Burnley last season, also looks a bargain at £750,000 from Chelsea. With Sam Allardyce’s West Ham United also looking ominous, it looks as if the battle for automatic promotion to the Premier League could once again develop into a pulsating contest.

preparation. He followed this up by working with American coach Alberto Salazar who tweaked Farah’s technique and race strategy. Yet the art of distance running requires more than just physical training, and working with the same sports psychology team that helped Michael Johnson win two gold medals at the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta was perhaps the clinching factor in the runner’s victory in the 10,000 metres. Farah had been beaten the previous Sunday in the dying seconds of the 5,000 metre event, which ended a 10 race unbeaten streak. Yet he bounced back leading the 10,000 metres from start to finish, a tactic which only shows how confident he was in his own ability. It will be great to see the 28 year old run in front of his home crowd next August, if he replicates his form of the past year at the Olympic stadium in East London then Great Britain will have its first ever male Olympic champion in the 5,000 and 10,000 metre events.

The final major of the golfing year may have been an anticlimax from a European perspective, but 2011 was a year to remember. The 2011 major calendar was bookended by disappointment – Rory McIlroy’s capitulation from a seemingly impregnable position in the US Masters and Keegan Bradley’s play-off victory in the USPGA – but inbetween came two moments to savour. The year’s opening major – The Masters – was won by South African Charles Schwartzel, but it was McIlroy who made the headlines at Augusta. The young Belfast man went from the sublime to the ridiculous, storming to -12 over his opening three rounds only to see his four shot lead disintegrate after a final round 80. In contrast tournament winner Schwartzel finished his weekend with a stunning 66 – including four birdies in the final four holes – holding off Australians Jason Day and Adam Scott, as well as a resurgent Tiger Woods, in the process. The headlines focused on McIlroy however, and whether at the age of 21 he possessed the mental resilience to match his precocious talent. Yet two months later at Congressional Country Club, McIlroy became the youngest winner of the US Open since 1923, smashing records and silencing doubters in the process. Memories of his Masters meltdown were banished as rounds of 65, 66, 68 and 69 saw him romp home eight shots clear of the field - his final score of -16 the lowest in tournament history.

Hyperbole followed, as golf’s poster boy - the new Tiger Woods - was lauded from Holywood, Northern Ireland to Hollywood, California. But it was another, rather unlikely Northern Irishman who stunned the galleries at the British Open. Royal St. George’s, in England’s Deep South (a 600 mile round trip for this intrepid, slightly stupid, reporter) a wet and windy tournament, a far cry from the pristine conditions at Congressional that McIlroy revelled in. It proved however the perfect stage for Darren Clarke, almost twice the age of his compatriot, to win his maiden major championship. Clarke, one of golf’s most likeable characters, was playing in his 20th Open championship, and his final score of -5 saw him fend off Americans Dustin Johnson and Phil Mickleson to become the first man from the home nations to lift the Claret Jug since Paul Lawrie in 1999. The image of Clarke sitting proudly with the famous trophy and a pint of Guinness epitomised the spirit of golf’s most famous tournament. His victory was the perfect tribute in a week when sport’s great and good gathered to pay homage to the late Seve Ballesteros. The year’s closing major, the USPGA, was dominated by America – Bradley defeating Jason Duffner at Atlanta in a three hole playoff – Luke Donald and Lee Westwood the only British interest finishing five shots off the leaders at -3. But this couldn’t dampen another fine, fairytale year for domestic golf, as Northern Irishmen old and new illuminated the world stage.

Rory McIlroy has been the undisputed face of gold in 2011


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Purple Page

Watch out for the Purple bug on Oxford Road this Week!

Are you Purple enough? So you’re in Manchester, you’ve found your halls, probably found the pub and hopefully made a few friends along the way... so what’s missing? Agi Duhig Athletic Union Chair Well you haven’t visited the Sport and Activity fair yet. It’s where you may meet future housemates, possibly a romantic partner or two and find out where your passion really lies: are you a rugby player, a cyclist, a footballer? Maybe you want to try something different; ever played Futsal, hung out with a mountaineering club, or bounced with trampolinists? Whatever it is that really interests you the Athletic Union can probably cater for it, even if you’re only reading this in an attempt to distract yourself from a boring lecture. How about a campus walk at lunchtime as a break from the library or taking a class in

pilates to tone up? Manchester is a great location for sport. Having hosted the Commonwealth Games in 2002, the city has been left with a legacy of world class facilities, many of which are used by our clubs as playing and training facilities (e.g. Manchester Aquatics Centre, Sport City, Manchester Velodrome). Manchester is also the home of several famous sports teams (some more famous than others), so there are plenty of opportunities to be inspired- by going to watch Premiership footballers, first-class cricketers and international basketball players. Not only this, you can support the university sports clubs every Wednesday afternoon, so if getting sweaty isn’t your thing you could come

All our clubs in the Athletics Union cater for a range of standards from complete beginner to world class athlete,

and support one of our 42 clubs from the sidelines. You could also try out some community volunteering by joining the Sports Volunteer scheme and gain coaching or officiating qualifications. All our clubs in the Athletics Union cater for a range of standards from complete beginner to world class athlete so whatever your aims and ambitions we will look to support you and you will no doubt find a level that suits you. The AU

clubs compete regularly in the British Universities and Colleges Sport (BUCS) competitions, and the University is coming from another successful season in 2010/11 placing it 9th out of 153 universities in the country. Now you’re here there are a few events that you shouldn’t miss through the year, get your tickets NOW for the Ernst and Young Varsity Rugby Union match, £5 a ticket for two intense games on Wednesday 28th September at Heywood Road stadium to watch Manchester’s finest men’s and women’s rugby teams take on Manchester Metropolitan University. Also don’t miss the annual two cities boat race in March, Northern Thunder netball club warm up games and even a varsity boxing match as well. Finally the sportspeople of Manchester work exceptionally hard on pitch and they certainly know how to let off steam off pitch. The AU social at Tiger Tiger is without doubt one of the biggest and best student nights that the city has to offer and the only place to be on a Wednesday night. The tickets are sold by members of the sports clubs who will be around campus and at the Sport and Activity fair through for the first week you can get them through the Students’ Union ticket site, go to the general office for more information. So don’t forget the Sport and Activity fair, Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday in Academy 2 during welcome week and look out for the Purple bug, the sports’ mascot on Oxford Road this week. Any questions about sport email auchair@manchester.ac.uk


The Mancunion 19/09/11