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JULY 2018

HOW TO THROW A STYLISH

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C O NTENTS

62

July 2018 62 Designing the Perfect Dinner Party A design editor and food editor attend dinner at the home of two restaurateurs in Cape Neddick by Katy Kelleher Photography by Erin Little

78 An Element of Grandness A Canadian couple revive a historic home in Kennebunk by Debra Spark Photography by François Gagné

98 Refined Cottage Downsizing with style by Debra Spark Photography by Rob Karosis

ON THE COVER: The table setting for Mark Gaier & Clark Frasier’s dinner party boasts items collected from around the world. Calligaris created the Omnia table and Claire chairs, while the artwork Yellow Still Life by New York artist, Alvin Smith, hangs in the background. Cover photography by Erin Little Designing the Perfect Dinner Party, page 62

106


CONT ENT S

July 2018 34 TURNOUT

Going out, giving back: Supporting nonprofits and local businesses in the vital work they do year-round The 2018 Farnsworth Collective Bash; Toast on the Coast Benefit for Veterans Count Maine

38 STYLE ROOM Form and Function

42 SPACES

Robbi Woodburn of Woodburn and Company Landscape Architecture transforms a stone courtyard into a tropical oasis

46 PORTRAIT OF PLACE Rockland: An Artist's Tour

52 DESIGN LESSON

Harry Bertoia’s work remains influential 40 years after his death

54 PROFILE

Briburn Architects in Portland is seeking to save the planet, one thoughtfully designed building at a time

115 ART SPOTLIGHT

A preview of American Steel by John Bisbee

120 SHOP TALK

120

At Nicola's Home in Yarmouth, designer Nicola Manganello has created a suitably grand showroom for her thoughtfully eclectic designs

125 SHOWCASE

The Bates College Museum of Art features the best of artist Dahlov Ipcar’s long career

115 EDITOR’S NOTE 20 STAFF NOTES 22 CONTRIBUTORS 26 DESIGN WIRE 30 EVENTS 36 RESOURCES 128 REAL ESTATE 133 THE DRAWING BOARD 152


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E DITOR’S NO TE PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN THOMAS

MAINE MEDIA COLLECTIVE PUBLISHER & CEO | Andrea King DIRECTOR OF SALES | Jeffrey D’Amico DIRECTOR OF MARKETING | Scott Wentzell ADVERTISING ACCOUNT MANAGERS |

Karen Bowe, Ryan Hammond, Peter Heinz, Tom Urban DIRECTOR OF EVENTS & EXPERIENTIAL MARKETING |

Reven Oliver DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE GIVING & VISIBILITY |

Shelbi Wassick OFFICE MANAGER | Casey Lovejoy CONTROLLER| Melissa Olander CIRCULATION | Sarah Lynn

M

ost people will tell you Maine is at its peak in the summer. Last week I traveled up the coast to Damariscotta to look at some recent projects with an architect. It was one of those incredible sunny days when you roll down the windows and can smell hundreds of different species of flowers blooming. Driving on Route 1, I couldn’t help but reflect on the homes in this issue. Long winters here really make us appreciate the lushness of the state’s summers. When I told friends and family I was moving to Maine I would often hear “the summers will make you forget the frigid winters.” However, that’s not true for me; I never forget. As we all know, the past influences our future. In this issue Joanna Bennett and Brian Grassby (An Element of Grandness, page 78) were debating between two houses in Kennebunk: one that didn’t exist and one that did. In the end the one that did won the couple over because of the charming elements from the house’s past, such as an old iron lion’s-head knocker and tiny telephone room. And sometimes you take what you need from your past to create a better future. A York realtor (Refined Cottage, page 98) needed to downsize but didn’t want to give up what she loved about her previous home. With the help of architect Scott Fiorentino and interior designer Sarah Douquette she was able to transfer the design she appreciated from her old home to her new one. 20 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM

Sometimes you try to change the past. When I was younger I would force my older brother to attend my imaginary dinner parties. We moved a lot during my childhood, so we always had an excess of tall cardboard moving boxes. I would tape the boxes together on their sides to create a ranch-style home where I could host my soirées. The table was set using only my finest tin dinnerware, authentic paper napkins, and a medley of plastic and paper food. Some of my other guests included a variety of my brother’s Transformers and my imitation Barbies (my parents insisted they looked just like the real ones that were double the price). I did my best to ensure the temperature in my “house” was just right with my bubblegum-pink palm tree fan placed strategically at the corner of the table. Our cover story takes our readers over to dinner at Clark Frasier and Mark Gaier’s (Designing the Perfect Dinner Party, page 62) chic modern home in Cape Neddick. The cuisine and décor for the night is a nod to their recent travels to Japan, Thailand, and Vietnam. I still haven’t moved beyond my cardboard box dinner parties but it just might be time. At least now I have some good ideas for my tablescapes!

Danielle Devine Managing Editor ddevine@mainehomedesign.com

ART COLLECTOR MAINE |

Ann Caudle, Taylor McCafferty, Kendra McDonald, Emma Wilson THE BRAND COMPANY |

Taylor Adams, Chris Kast, Maureen Littlefield LOVE MAINE RADIO WITH DR. LISA BELISLE |

Sean Slaughter, Dr. Lisa Belisle, Kate Gardner, Paul Koenig, Casey Lovejoy, Shelbi Wassick MAINE MAGAZINE |

Paul Koenig, Joel Kuschke OLD PORT MAGAZINE |

Susan Axelrod, Sarah Prak AGELESS MAINE MAGAZINE |

Susan Axelrod, Sarah Prak

SUBSCRIBE | mainehomedesign.com Maine Home+Design is published twelve times each year by Maine Media Collective LLC Editorial and subscription information: phone 207.772.3373 | fax 888.836.6715 16 Middle Street | Suite 501 | Portland | Maine | 04101 Opinions expressed in articles or advertisements, unless otherwise noted, do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher, staff, or advisory board. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information presented in this issue is accurate, and neither Maine Home+Design nor any of its staff is responsible for omissions or information that has been misrepresented to the magazine. Copyright © 2018, Maine Media Collective LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission, in writing, from the publisher. Printed in the U.S.A. mainehomedesign.com


where color lives

A MAINE MEDIA COLLECTIVE PUBLICATION

MANAGING EDITOR | Danielle Devine ART DIRECTOR | Joel Kuschke PRODUCTION MANAGER | Nichole Heady EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS | Kate Gardner,

Emma Simard COPY EDITOR | Leah Whalen PROOFREADER | Amy Chamberlain STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER | Sean Thomas VIDEO PRODUCER | Lamia Lazrak WRITERS |

Susan Axelrod, Katy Kelleher, Debra Spark PHOTOGRAPHERS |

Myriam Babin, Trent Bell, Dave Dostie, François Gagné, Jonathan Reece, Jeff Roberts, Irvin Serrano, Christina Wnek

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Dr. Lisa Belisle

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S TA F F N O T E S oriental | contemporary | vintage

What is your favorite piece of furniture? “My most cherished piece of furniture was a thrift shop find that initiated my obsession with midcentury modern design. It was the first item my boyfriend and I purchased for our very empty apartment we had just moved into. It is a midcentury modern Drexel Biscayne walnut dresser with eight drawers, which we discovered at Goodwill. It was clean and in excellent condition, and I still can’t believe we scored it for a mere $12. It currently holds our record player, which we use every day (music is life), and houses all of our art supplies, along with random tchotchkes we’ve collected over the years.” SARAH PRAK Art Director, Old Port magazine “My favorite piece of furniture is the dining room table my husband, Ted, built when we were living in an apartment in the West End. We were lucky to have a large dining room, and since we love to entertain, he made it big enough to seat ten and wide enough to accommodate serving dishes and place settings comfortably. He got the components of the table at Portland Architectural Salvage: the top is an old, wellscarred, gray-painted section of gym flooring, and the legs are porch-railing spindles that are also showing their age. He made the legs removable so that we would be able to get the table out of the apartment. When we found our house in Yarmouth, it had a formal living room that we turned into our dining room, and the table fit in with plenty of room to spare. Because Ted was sure to make it the same height as two farm tables we already had, we can bring those in and create a U-shaped table for Thanksgiving that seats up to 21.” SUSAN AXELROD Managing Editor, Old Port magazine

I have a Thos. Moser Eastward armchair that I received in trade for some copywriting I did for them back in the late '80s. It was my desk chair when I was a freelancer, became my office side chair when I had my agency, Crank, and then was my desk chair again when I started Kast, before we formed the Brand Company. Now the chair is part of the decor in our living room. It has a lot of sentimental value, but above all else, it’s an incredibly well-crafted piece of furniture that already has become, to me anyway, a family heirloom—plus it is comfortable as hell.

www.BradfordsRugGallery.com 297 Forest Avenue Portland, ME Mon - Sat 9am - 5pm | 207.772.3843

CHRIS KAST Brand Strategist, The Brand Company

22 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


HYGGE (/’hju:g /) e

WE LOVE MAINE.

We fill our work days creating Maine-centric media products— publishing magazines and guides, producing radio shows, managing social media sites, developing websites, filming videos, producing events—because of this simple tenet. Our staff have stayed here, come back here, or moved here because we love Maine’s rich history, its unique character, and the people who live here, and most important, because we believe in Maine’s potential. We simultaneously love the Maine we grew up in and fully embrace the reality that things change and evolve. And we bear witness to that happening here. We are cheerleaders for Maine as a place for people to live, stay, and thrive—a place for people from away to move to, a place for second homeowners to buy into, a place to raise children, a place to start and operate a business—as well as a place to visit and explore, a place to escape and heal. And, a place to be inspired.

FEELINGS OF WELLNESS AND CONTENTMENT

We cover Maine in a positive light. We intentionally leave the negativity and snark to other media outlets. There is a place for everything, and we honor that. But that place is not here.

Auburn | Augusta | Bailey Island | Bangor | Bar Harbor | Bass Harbor | Bath | Beaver Creek | Belfast | Bethel | Biddeford | Biddeford Pool | Blue Hill | Boothbay | Boothbay Harbor | Brewer | Bridgton | Bristol | Brooklin | Brownfield | Brunswick | Buxton | Camden | Cape Elizabeth | Cape Neddick | Cape Porpoise | Caribou | Carrabassett Valley | Castine | Chebeague Island | Chesterville | Cliff Island | Cornish | Cousins Island | Cumberland | Cushing | Damariscotta | Dayton | Dixfield | Eagle Lake | Eastport | Edgecomb | Ellsworth | Eustis | Fairfield | Falmouth | Fort Kent | Frankfurt | Freedom | Freeport | Frenchboro | Frenchville | Fryeburg | Gardiner | Gray | Great Cranberry Island | Greenville | Hallowell | Harpswell | Harrison | Hermit Island | Hope | Hurricane Island | Isle au Haut | Islesboro | Jewell Island | Kennebunk | Kennebunkport | Kezar Lake | Kingfield | Kittery | Lewiston | Liberty | Limerick | Lincoln | Lincolnville | Lovell | Lubec | Madawaska | Mars Hill | Matinicus Island | Millinocket | Monhegan Island | Monson | Moosehead Lake Region | Mount Desert Island | Newcastle | New Gloucester | Newry | North Haven | Northport | North Yarmouth | Norway | Oakland | Ogunquit | Old Orchard Beach | Oquossoc | Orland | Orono | Otter Creek | Owls Head | Oxford | Peaks Island | Phippsburg | Poland | Port Clyde | Porter | Portland | Pownal | Presque Isle | Prospect | Prospect Harbor | Rangeley | Rockland | Rockport | Rockwood | Rome | Roque Bluffs | Rumford | Saco | Scarborough | Seal Harbor | Searsport | Sebec | Sedgwick | Sinclair | Skowhegan | South Casco | South Freeport | South Portland | Southport | Southwest Harbor | Squirrel Island | St. George | Stockton Springs | Stonington | Stratton | Temple | Tenants Harbor | The Forks | Thomaston | Thorndike | Union | Unity | Veazie | Vinalhaven | Waterville | Wells | Westbrook | Westport Island | Wilton | Windsor | Winterport | Wiscasset | Woolwich | Yarmouth | York

PHOTO: DARREN SETLOW

So if you love Maine, please turn to us with your reading eyes, your listening ears, your follows and your likes, your attendance, and your advertising and sponsorships. Explore what we believe is the best Maine has to offer, on the pages of our magazines and guides, through the airwaves, at events, and via social media.

DESIGN. BUILD.

SUBSCRIBE | mainehomedesign.com

Maine Home+Design is published twelve times each year by Maine Media Collective LLC. Editorial and subscription information: phone 207.772.3373 | fax 888.836.6715 16 Middle Street | Suite 501 | Portland | Maine | 04101 Opinions expressed in articles or advertisements, unless otherwise noted, do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher, staff, or advisory board. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information presented in this issue is accurate, and neither Maine Home+Design nor any of its staff is responsible for omissions or information that has been misrepresented to the magazine. Copyright © 2018, Maine Media Collective LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission, in writing, from the publisher. Printed in the U.S.A. mainehomedesign.com

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Get beach ready with swimwear at Aristelle.


WE GIVE BACK. At Maine Media Collective our mission is to make a substantial and unique contribution to supporting Maine’s nonprofit community statewide, regionally, and at the town level. We believe that the work Maine’s nonprofit organizations do, individually and collectively, makes our lives better and Maine a better place to live. With limited budgets, Maine’s nonprofits need help boosting awareness of their specific causes and raising the funds they need. We have established long-term relationships with over 120 nonprofits and community-based organizations. We give to these organizations by providing, free of charge, services ranging from advertising to graphic design, brand development, marketing advice, online announcements, and social media engagement. We often include nonprofit organizations in our editorial coverage through feature articles and/or recaps of their events. You’ll find the latter in our “There + Then,” “Turnout,” and “Gather” sections. Over the past year, MMC has made cash and in-kind donations of more than:

REFRESH YOUR HOME WITH REPLACEMENT WINDOWS FROM RENEWAL

BY

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www.RbAGreaterMaine.com/Refresh

$1,930,463 WE ARE PROUD OF OUR AFFILIATION WITH THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATIONS: 317 Main Community Music Center | American Diabetes Association | Alfond Youth Center of Waterville | American Lung Association | Barbara Bush Children’s Hospital | Bayside Bowl | Bicycle Coalition of Maine | Biddeford Ball | Biddeford/Saco Rotary Club | Boothbay Harbor Fest | Boothbay Region Chamber of Commerce | Boothbay Region Land Trus | Boys & Girls Club of Southern Maine | Bowdoin International Music Festival | Camden Garden Club | Camden International Film Festiva | Camden Opera House | Camp Sunshine | Camp Susan Curtis | Cape Elizabeth Education Foundation | Cape Elizabeth Land Trust | Casco Bay Islands SwimRun | Castine Arts Association | CEI | Center for Furniture Craftsmanship | Center for Grieving Children | Colby Museum of Art | Cross Insurance Center | Dempsey Challenge | Easter Seals Maine | Elias Cup | Environmental Health Strategy Center | Faily Hope | Farnsworth Art Museum | Fort Williams Park Foundation | Frannie Peabody Center | Friends of Casco Bay | Friends of Windjammer Days | Full Plates Full Potential | Georges River Land Trust | Gulf of Maine Research Institute | Good Shepherd Food Bank | Goodwill of Northern New England | Greater Portland Land Marks | GrowSmart Maine | Harbor House | Immigrant Legal Advocacy Project | Institute for Family Owned Business | Junior Achievement of Maine | Junior League of Portland | Kennebunk Free Library | Kennebunkport Conservation Trust | Kennebunks Tour de Cure | Kittery Block Party | L/A Arts | Life Flight of Maine | Lift360 | Maine Academy of Modern Music | Maine Audubon | Maine Cancer Foundation | Maine Center for Creativity | Maine Children’s Cancer Program | Maine College of Art | Maine Crafts Association | Maine Development Foundation | Maine Discovery Museum | Maine Flower Shower | Maine Interior Design Association | Maine Island Trail Association | Maine Jewish Film Festival | Maine Lobster Festival | Maine Preservation | Maine Restaurant Association | Maine Science Festival | Maine Start Up and Create Week | Maine State Ballet | MakeA-Wish Foundation of Maine | March of Dimes | Mercy/Gary's House | MEREDA | Mitchell Institute | Museums of Old York | MyPlace Teen Center |Natural Resources Council of Maine | New England Craft Brew Summit | North Atlantic Blues festival | Ogunquit Museum of American Art | Ogunquit Playhouse | Osher Map Library | Passivhaus Maine | Portland Downtown | Portland Ovations | Portland Symphony Orchestra | Portland Trails | PORTopera | Portland Stage Education Programming | Ronald McDonald House Charities | Royal River Land Trust | SailMaine | Salt Bay Chamberfest | Scarborough Education Foundation | Share Our Strength | sheJAMS | Strive | Talking Art in Maine | TEDxDirigo/Treehouse | Teens to Trails | Travis Mills Foundation | The Strand Theatre | The Telling Room | United Way of Greater Portland | University of Maine Gardens | Viles Arboretum | Vinegar Hill Music Theater | Wayfinder Schools | Wells Reserve at Laudholm | Wendell Gilley Museum | WinterKids | Wolfe's Neck Farm | Woodlawn Museum | Yarmouth History Center

SUBSCRIBE | mainehomedesign.com

Maine Home+Design is published twelve times each year by Maine Media Collective LLC. Editorial and subscription information: phone 207.772.3373 | fax 888.836.6715 16 Middle Street | Suite 501 | Portland | Maine | 04101 Opinions expressed in articles or advertisements, unless otherwise noted, do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the publisher, staff, or advisory board. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information presented in this issue is accurate, and neither Maine Home+Design nor any of its staff is responsible for omissions or information that has been misrepresented to the magazine. Copyright © 2018, Maine Media Collective LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information storage and retrieval system, without permission, in writing, from the publisher. Printed in the U.S.A. mainehomedesign.com

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C ON T RI BU T O RS

CREATE BIGGER

BRAND

BRIAN BEAUDETTE grew up in Manchester, New Hampshire, and received a liberal arts degree from Boston College and his master of architecture degree from the University of Colorado. He founded Brian J. Beaudette Architect in 1995 after living in Colorado for almost eight years. Brian moved to Maine in 1996 and opened offices in Kennebunk and the Rangeley Lakes region. An Element of Grandness, page 78

SHAWN DOUSTON was born in the small northern Maine town of Benedicta, where he studied masonry and related construction at Northern Maine Vocational School. Shortly after, he moved to Portland and joined a residential building company. In 1985 he and his wife, Gail, established Douston Construction. The Arundelbased company is a full-service construction business with 25 employees who build beautifully crafted homes throughout southern Maine and along the coastline. An Element of Grandness, page 78

BONNIE WEEMAN, a Cape Porpoise native, is lead designer at Hurlbutt Designs. Weeman has been a small business owner, an advertising manager, an appliance salesperson, and a kitchen design associate, but when the opportunity arose to work alongside owner Louise Hurlbutt, she leapt at the chance, fulfilling her dream to be an interior designer. Since 2007 Bonnie has helped clients design their dream homes, balancing coastal charm with modern trends. An Element of Grandness, page 78

It’s about a new direction. thebrandcompany.me 207.772.3373 26 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


ERIN LITTLE photographs interiors and people around the world. She has recently worked with Domino, Remodelista, American Way magazine, the Maine Office of Tourism, People magazine, and GQ. Designing the Perfect Dinner Party, 62

Editorial assistant EMMA SIMARD grew up around houses being built and designed. Her family instilled a love for interior design and houses at a young age: her father owns a local construction company, and her mother holds a strong passion for interior design. Having moved every few years, she is no stranger to creating new living spaces and turning houses into homes. Style Room, 38

Art director JOEL KUSCHKE is a lifelong resident of southern Maine. Joel grew up in Buxton and relocated to Portland after earning his BFA in art and design from Alfred University in New York. He makes his way to the far-flung woods and waters of the state as often as possible for hiking, camping, and fishing. He hopes to one day find a home surrounded by trees in one of these regions.

FOUND AT SEA

Buoy Lamps Starting at $275 Designed + Built in Portland, Maine

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DE S I GN W I RE

HOME ACCESSORIES

INTERIOR DESIGN

FINE GIFTS

BY EMMA SIMARD

NEMO TILE AND STONE recently introduced two new styles to their tile collection. The first style, Aster, is a Moroccaninspired line. These square tiles are covered with bold, geometric patterns in muted, washed-out tones to give a sense of aged elegance to any space. The other is Gramercy, inspired by the elegant Manhattan neighborhood. The hexagonal tiles come in a variety of solid and graphic patterns. Both collections are made of porcelain, which is an economical and easy-to-maintain alternative to cement tiles. They are resistant to humidity and difficult to scratch or break, making them perfect for flooring, kitchens, and bathrooms.

A Family-Owned Design Firm & Retail Boutique Designing for New England & Beyond 74 Elm St., Rt. 1 | Camden | 207.236.4596 | margomoore.com

Furniture company LEXINGTON HOME recently collaborated with designer BARCLAY BUTERA INTERIORS to create a brand-new furniture collection, now available at HURLBUTT DESIGNS in Kennebunk. This collection is perfect for coastal Maine, thanks to textures like raffia and wood-finish options such as Sailcloth—a light, whitewashed finish that shows wood grain. With over 35 pieces in stock, including wing chairs, consoles, cocktail tables, sideboards, sofas, lamps, and ottomans, Hurlbutt Designs is one of the first retailers in the country to offer this seaside collection.

C U S TO M H O M E S, R E N OVAT I O N S, C A B I N E T RY & M I L LWO R K

VIVISPECTRA ZOOM is a versatile architectural glass that uses high-resolution photography to create large-scale features. A decorative interlayer is placed between two transparent lites of glass, or in between one lite of glass and a reflective background. Transform a space with an interlayer of nature and wildlife or a favorite high-resolution image. Each piece is manufactured to specification, cut to size, and ready to install. Available through FORMS AND SURFACES, the architectural glass is suitable for interior or exterior use.

419 Ellsworth Road • Blue Hill, Maine • 207-374-2275 • info@hewesco.com • hewesco.com 30 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


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SHIPYARD BREWING COMPANY has announced plans to build Portland’s very first “brewtel”—a beer-themed hotel. Although not the first of its kind, the concept is still being shaped as Shipyard moves ahead with their proposal. The $65 million redevelopment plan includes a full-service brewery and pub within the 105-room hotel, a closed-circuit television station dedicated to beer and brewing, a parking garage, and an office building adjacent to it all. The existing brewery and tasting room will be renovated, but the remainder of Shipyard’s property will need to be demolished and rebuilt. Licensing for the building needs to be changed in order to set the plans in motion, but the company plans to capitalize fully on their two-acre India Street lot.

Westbrook and Portland are set to expand with a new development called ROCK ROW. The 100 acres off Larrabee Road and Main Street have been empty for years but are now being given new life. Originally, the land belonged to BLUE ROCK INDUSTRIES, a company that has provided stone for the Maine Turnpike, Interstate 295, the Seabrook Station Nuclear Power Plant, and the main Portland Jetport runway. One hundred years ago, the quarry was just a gravel pit; in the plans, the quarry will be restructured as a pond for recreational use, and walking paths will line the perimeter. The development site will have three parts: residential, medical, and retail as the anchor for the space. The primary goal of the development is to meet the specific needs of the community in a sustainable way. In the next year, MARKET BASKET will be the first retailer to open its doors in the new complex.

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A new kind of delivery service, ROADIE utilizes extra space in passenger vehicles to assist people packing up their homes. This allows fast, flexible, low-cost delivery for those that are moving, especially to a new state or across the country. Drivers who participate are rewarded with discounts at several businesses for a trip they were already planning to take. Roadie has recruited retailers, airlines, and grocers to make their goal of flexible delivery even more achievable. Since 2015 Roadie has delivered to customers in more than 9,000 cities across the United States. Since then an estimated 250 million vehicles have joined the cause, with over 4 billion cubic feet of available storage.

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D E S I G N W I RE ZOOTILITY has created the world’s first utility necklace, TÜLRY, made with fashion and functionality in mind. Created in Portland, TÜLRY is great for those who need small tools on a regular basis but can’t carry them in pockets or bags. The use of geometry and gravity ensure that each piece stays on the necklace, even when in motion, and each tool is removable without taking the necklace off. TÜLRY is offered in four styles—14k plated gold, gold and stainless steel, rhodium, and rhodium and stainless steel—with the choice of up to 16 tool tips. Some of the tool tip options include a box cutter, a Phillips-head screwdriver, a flathead screwdriver, a bottle opener, a variety of different-sized hex keys, a micro screwdriver, and more. TÜLRY’s innovative and convenient design is customizable to fit individual needs.

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WATERVILLE CREATES! has received a $75,000 grant to redesign the community’s central green space, Castonguay Square, located in the heart of Waterville’s historic district. The process of redesigning the space will begin in the fall of this year, with plans to complete the project by early 2019. A number of community workshops will be held to gain an understanding of how the park is currently being used and to determine what the collective vision for the park’s future may be. The grant comes from the NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS through the “Our Town” program, which supports communities across the country by providing funding and helping people celebrate the arts wherever they are. WATERVILLE CREATES! is a leading arts and cultural organization, with a mission to support enhanced programming and operations for its community and bring awareness to cultural events and opportunities in surrounding areas. MH+D

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Get to know your neighbors. EMILY SHAROOD AND JOHNNY DICKINSON

PODCAST

#348

Emily Sharood is the sales and marketing director at Mousam Valley Mushrooms, a certified organic mushroom farm she started with her father and brother in 2012. The farm, located in Springvale, sells oyster and shiitake mushrooms throughout New England. Johnny Dickinson runs his own woodworking business, Winter Hill Design, located in Kennebunkport, and designed and built the wooden structures that hold the mushroom blocks at the farm, where he works on the weekends.

MATT CHAPPELL

PODCAST

#349

Matt Chappell owns and operates Gather restaurant, a neighborhood eatery in the heart of Yarmouth's village. As a proud native Mainer, Chappell has intentionally pursued ways to make Maine the focus of his restaurant. Whether it's the food he procures from area farms, the musicians he books, the art he displays, or the vendors he chooses - all of it is meant to celebrate the bounty of the state.

CHRISTY GARDNER

PODCAST

#350

Christy Gardner is a retired Army veteran who was injured overseas in 2006. Due to her brain injury, she started back over at the third grade level to re-learn English, grammar, and math. After being discharged from rehab programs, she was able to live on her own again and started participating in adaptive sports. She is now co-captain of the U.S. Women's Para Ice Hockey team and director of the New England Warriors Sled Hockey Program.

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In each episode, Dr. BelisleÑEditor-in-Chief at Maine Media CollectiveÑintroduces you to our neighbors, one conversation at a time. Hear what they have to say. Welcome to our community.

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TU R N OU T PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVE DOSTIE

THE 2018 FARNSWORTH COLLECTIVE BASH : ZODIAC PROM In April, inspired by the Farnsworth’s 2018 Ai Weiwei exhibition Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads: Gold, the Farnsworth Collective’s network of makers put on the dopest, hand-jiviest, Bash yet: the Zodiac Prom. Boston’s Jittery Jack and Miss Amy performed live in a pop-up art environment at the Winter Street Barn in downtown Rockland. Over 200 members and guests danced to the band's East Coast rockabilly and '50s inspired rock ‘n’ roll. Jittery Jack and Miss Amy have headlined at the Viva Las Vegas festival numerous times, and toured internationally headlining many festivals, including UK’s the Rockabilly Rave and Australia’s Camperdown Cruise.

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Contact us today to schedule a complimentary site assessment.

1. Kay Stephens, freelance writer at Creative Content and Social Media; Stephanie Herrick; Melissa Dalinis, customer solutions credit analyst at Camden National Bank 2. Willow Hall, health coach and yoga instructor, and Christopher Sewall, scientist at Ocean Organics 3. Anna Witholt Abaldo, gallery curator at Maine Farmland Trust, and Mark DiGirolamo, owner and guide at Breakwater Kayak 4. Alexandra Gillian Martin and Todd Martin, lower school director at the Riley School 5. Amy Williams Beers, vice president of cyber services at PSB Exero, and Kevin Beers, artist 6. Kathryn Williams Alex and Brooke Chase, owner and photographer at Brooke Chase Photography 7. Jittery Jack and Miss Amy

(207) 864-2787 www.PowrPoint.com 34 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM

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T U RN OU T PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAVE DOSTIE

TOAST ON THE COAST BENEFIT FOR VETERANS COUNT MAINE Toast on the Coast is an elegant evening on Casco Bay featuring the finest gourmet food and wine from some of Maine’s best restaurants. Benefit for Veterans Count Maine, an annual program of Easterseals Maine, seeks to provide emergency assistance to veterans when often no other services are available to them. The 2018 event featured Dandelion Catering (recent Chopped winner), Primo, Nonantum Resort, Silvery Moon Creamery, Sur Lie, the Inn on Peaks Island, the Regency, Hannaford’s certified cheese expert, Coffee by Design, and wines from Bow Street Distributing and Central Distributors. The event was held at Portland’s Ocean Gateway in April MH+D

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“Annually Toast on the Coast continues to be one of our largest and favorite events for Veterans Count Maine. It is always8humbling to share the stories of those we serve and share the impact of what a donation of any size can do to make a measurable difference in the lives of those we serve. Our veterans, our military members, and their families deserve this support, and we are proud to localize our funding so that every dollar donated remains in Maine to support our neighbors.” —Joseph Reagan, development director at Veterans Count Maine 1. Emil M. Rivera Gonzalez, executive chef at Sur Lie 2. Kate Cadena, office manager at Easterseals Maine; Laura Kelly-Hartery, case coordinator at Easterseals Maine; Meredith Perkins, care coordinator at Easterseals Maine 3. Christian Hayes, chef-owner at Dandelion Catering Company 4. Amie Marzen, communications consultant and events coordinator at Easterseals Maine, and Marina Gray, Miss Maine USA 2018 5. Chris Kast, brand strategist at the Brand Company, and Byron Bartlett, school administrator at Wayfinder Schools 6. Cupcakes by pastry chef Amanda Beun at 95 Ocean Restaurant 7. Hugh Wilkinson, consultant at Coral Hill, and Andrea King, publisher and CEO at Maine Media Collective MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM 35

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E VE N T S

7.11–7.12 MAINE CELEBRITIES CLASSIC Alfond Youth Center Sugarloaf Mountain 5092 Access Rd. | Carrabassett Valley mainecelebrityclassic.org

7.14–7.15 NORTH ATLANTIC BLUES FESTIVAL Various locations in Rockland northatlanticbluesfestival.com

7.14–1.13 SELF & SOCIETY: THE NORMA BOOM MARIN COLLECTION OF GERMAN EXPRESSIONIST PRINTS Colby College Museum of Art 5600 Mayflower Hill | Waterville colby.edu/museum

7.15 CAPE ELIZABETH GARDEN TOUR Fort Williams Park Foundation 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Various private homes in Cape Elizabeth & South Portland fortwilliams.org

WARM SHAKER MODERN. Chilton’s Classic Shaker Bed, shown with our Sunday River Dresser and Nightstand. Built in Maine.

LI UTI

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7.19 CAMDEN GARDEN TOUR Camden Garden Club 9:30 a.m.–4 p.m. Various locations camdengardenclub.org

7.19–7.21 CASTINE PLEIN AIR FESTIVAL Castine Arts Association Various locations castinearts.org

7.20 THE FARNSWORTH 2018 SUMMER GALA 6 p.m.–9 p.m. Strand Theatre 345 Main St. | Rockland farnsworthmuseum.org

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BREWS & VIEWS 4 p.m.–10 p.m. Maine Huts & Trails 496C Main St. | Kingfield mainehuts.org

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Photo: Heidi Kirn

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he particular relationships of ceiling, wall, and floor; of door and passageway, of window and roof; and of the furnishings within the built frame—all factor into the physical and emotional impact of a given place,” explains designer and architect Ray Booth in Evocative Interiors (Rizzoli, 2018). Open up a small space by keeping the majority of the room white and add in pops of color like turquoise and fuchsia. Low ceilings

38 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM

can become playful with adjustable architectural lighting. Create an intimate conversation area by using curved seating like these velvet club chairs and sectional sofa. Don’t let unused space go to waste— have fun with small side tables in various sizes and media; they not only make perfect spots to showcase your pottery collection but also provide guests with a place to put down their drinks. MH+D

In Ray Booth’s living room in New York, shown in Evocative Interiors, the painting over the sofa works its wonders in three ways: as a pop of color, as inspiration for the room’s palette, and as a point of interest to draw the eye.


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Robbi Woodburn of Woodburn and Company Landscape Architecture transforms a stone courtyard into a tropical oasis

“I

met with Tom Dunn from Stoney Brook Landscaping and Masonry and the owners, and they described what they were looking for. We really like to listen carefully to our clients’ visions as we design. They usually have an idea of what they want, but they don’t know how to get there. So I sketch with them, and you can see from their faces whether the ideas register. The whole collaboration among owners, builder, and designer is something I really enjoy, and it results in very successful designs. “The owners had a vision of an intimate courtyard for entertaining and outdoor living with a plunge pool, spa, and garage. The existing space lent itself really well to this concept. It used to be a paved courtyard with a fireplace and stone wall at one end and a fabulous katsura tree in the center. Plus, there are existing trees on two sides of the space that created a structural green wall, providing a great framework in which to add the pool, spa, and pool deck. Once the hardscape was constructed, Stoney Brook brought in perennials and annual plantings for the lush, textured, tropical character that owners envisioned. Banana, ginger, and canna alongside nicotiana added to the feeling. “The spa spills into the pool. Tom Dunn and his masonry crew are excellent and did a great job matching the stone work on the spa to the existing stone on the fireplace. The pool is a midrange gray color, which makes it look dark and deep, and we used a native mystic stone around the pool. It’s warmer and softer. “In the very small area, we packed a lot in. The owners entertain a lot in this space. They’re right near the beach in Ogunquit, and this is a great place to have people over at the end of the day to relax and cool off. It’s very secluded. It turned out that the walls of the house, the fireplace, and the garage closed off the area and made it quite intimate. The garage, which was built off to the right, helps separate the space from the street. Our job at the time was to create that fourth wall for the space, and the garage really sealed the deal and contained it.” —Robbi Woodburn, principal of Woodburn and Company Landscape Architecture MH+D


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ROCKLAND Artists, fishermen, and a steady stream of visitors keep this midcoast city buzzing

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P ORT RA I T OF P LA C E | ROC K LAND BY SUSAN AXELROD | PHOTOGRAPHY BY SEAN THOMAS

Culture and commerce meet in the midcoast cit y of Rockland, which boasts an active working waterfront, world-class art museums, and annual festivals celebrating both lobster and the blues.

In Rockland’s broad harbor, protected from Penobscot Bay by a granite breakwater nearly a mile long, Maine’s largest schooner fleet shares space with fishing boats, pleasure craft, and ferries that service the islands of North Haven, Vinalhaven, and Matinicus. Just a few blocks away from the water, the campus of the Farnsworth Art Museum includes the Wyeth Center, which is devoted to the work of three generations of the famous Wyeth family of Maine artists. Nearby, the Center for Maine Contemporary Art made a major impact on the city when it relocated here from its original home in Rockport in the summer of 2016. Its striking new building, designed by New

York–based architect Toshiko Mori, a North Haven summer resident, became an instant landmark and community hub. “It’s not just this quaint little place; we’re global,” says artist Eric Hopkins, who lives and works on North Haven, where he grew up. “Rockland was always connected with the world through the granite industry, boatbuilding, and fishing. The lime that holds a lot of the East Coast together was shipped from here—it became the mortar between the bricks in Boston, Philadelphia, and New York City.” Today, the world comes to Rockland via car, train, cruise ship, and the Knox County Regional Airport, where regular flights connect to Boston.

View of the Breakwater Lighthouse in Rockland (left) and Rockland Harbor (above).

MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM 47


From middle school through high school, Hopkins lived in Rockland during the academic year, and today he still shuttles between his island home and the city, where he has a gallery near the waterfront. When he was a boy, it wasn’t unusual for him to encounter well-known artists such as “Blackie” (Bernard) Langlais and Andrew Wyeth. He also recalls seeing the work of sculptor Louise Nevelson, whose father emigrated from Ukraine and founded a successful lumber business in Rockland. “I was a little kid waiting in the old Thorndike Hotel for the North Haven ferry boat, and I remember looking at these black boxes that looked like they

were filled with old junk—it was Louise Nevelson’s work,” says Hopkins. “I didn’t know exactly what it was, but I could tell it was important and significant.” Rockland’s city seal features a beehive—an apt image, Hopkins says, because “it’s a real creative, working town.” In Rockland’s compact downtown, he finds friendly faces at local institutions such as Huston-Tuttle, Rock City Cafe, and E.L. Spear Inc. Lumber and Hardware. “One of the big things about Rockland and the area is the people—they make it what it is,” says Hopkins. “It’s an e pluribus unum town—out of many there is one.” MH+D

(Opposite, clockwise from top left) Lobster traps and a dory are signs of a prominent local industry; A classic Maine farmhouse; The modern 250 Main Hotel, which opened in May 2016, has 26 rooms and offers views of the harbor; A Robert Indiana LOVE sculpture outside the Farnsworth Art Museum. Iconic signs on either side of Rockland’s Main Street (above) offer evidence that the city is the cultural hub of the midcoast. Artist Robert Indiana’s The Electric EAT was originally commissioned for the 1964 New York World’s Fair and was installed on the roof of Farnsworth Art Museum in 2009. The Strand Theatre presents film, music, and theater.

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DE S IGN LESSO N BY DANIELLE DEVINE

H A R R Y B E R TO I A

V

ersions of designer Harry Bertoia’s (1915–1978) welded wire chairs are found throughout many midcentury modern design enthusiasts’ homes. The most famous of these is the Diamond chair series that was introduced in 1950s. The centennial anniversary of Harry Bertoia’s birth was in 2015. Design institutions worldwide celebrated the work of this iconic architect, sculptor, jeweler, and furniture maker. Bertoia was born in Italy. In 1937 he moved to Michigan to attended Cranbrook Academy of Art. While at Cranbrook, he learned to make jewelry, and soon after he transitioned to sculpture. In 1950 Bertoia was invited by Florence and Hans

Knoll to design furniture for Knoll Furniture Company. Like every other designer for Knoll, he would be given complete recognition for his work. The Bertoia Diamond chair series was introduced in 1952. The chair was designed to be viewed from all sides like a piece of sculpture. To make the chairs, Bertoia bent individual pieces of wire on a jig he designed. The series included the Diamond chair in two sizes as well as one with an extended back, a foot stool, a children’s chair, and a bar stool. The furniture was suited for both indoor and outdoor use. It was initially made of black-painted metal, then later with metal with a black or white plastic coating, then in chrome. There were also removable pads. MH+D

Diamond Lounge chair (top) manufactured by Knoll and designed by Bertoia in 1952. Kenetic brooch (far left) in silver designed by Bertoia in 1949 (sold at a Wright auction in 2013 for $22,500). A welded copper and bronze sculpture with applied patina (left) designed by Bertoia around1970 (sold at Wright in 2017 for $32,500). Photography credits: Design Within Reach (top), Wright (bottom).

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PR OF ILE BRIB U R N AR C H I TE C TS


BY KATY KELLEHER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY CHRISTINA WNEK

Designing for Change B R I B U R N A R CH I T EC T S I N P O R T L A N D I S S EEK I N G TO S AV E T H E P L A N E T, O N E T H O U G H T F U L LY D E S I G N ED B U I L D I N G AT A T I M E

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he idea for Briburn Architects began on a boat. Harry Hepburn and Christopher Briley had begun sailing together as acquaintances during the summer of 2012. Briley wanted to get out on the water more often; Hepburn owned a 30-foot C&C sailboat and was looking for a crew to help with his Thursday-night racing habit. At the time, Briley was flying solo as the head architect and founder of Green Design Studio, and Hepburn was working at Scott Simons Architects in Portland. “Chris [Briley] was busy as hell, and he would rush down to the dock exhausted,” remembers Hepburn. “When he mentioned that he was going crazy and thought he needed a partner, I realized I was ready to make my next step, too. It was really good timing.” The two architects joined together to form Briburn, a moniker that borrows syllables from their last names. “We joke sometimes that we all work for a character named James Briburn,” Hepburn says. “When someone calls who we don’t want to talk to, we just tell them James isn’t here.” The levity of this statement slightly obscures the significance of their company’s name. The idea is that “Briburn” isn’t just about Chris and Harry— in this case, the sum is worth more than its individual parts. “Briburn refers not just to us, but our whole office. It’s our future office. It’s all our work that we do together,” says Hepburn. “We believe that ideas come more quickly and flow better when people collaborate.” Hepburn and Briley see eye to eye on many things, not just the uplifting value of teamwork. Their firm

(which now counts seven people on its staff) specializes in green building and eco-friendly design. This, Briley explains, has been an interest of his since he was an intern, pestering his bosses to consider the carbon footprint of each design. “I know it sounds clichéd, and it really does, but we’re trying to save the world, one building at a time,” says Briley. Two types of building that Briburn works on frequently are the passive solar model and net-zero buildings. “If every home were a passive house, our global climate change issues would be nearly solved. Obviously that won’t happen—there are too many existing structures, for one—but we believe that everyone should design and build responsibly, as though we were going to live forever.” (Next, Briley said something a bit heated about the dire environmental situation, and Hepburn smiled, waiting a beat before adding his thoughts—in this moment, between Briley expressing his frustration and Hepburn tempering it, I saw how they might work well together, on a boat and off.) Hepburn explains that the core tenet of their work is that good design is about more than just aesthetics. It’s about having a building that can be easily maintained, a space that is durable, long-lasting, healthy, and comfortable. Briburn Architects has created several LEED-certified buildings in Maine and consulted on LEED-certified projects out of state, but they’ve recently begun taking it a step further, seeking WELL certification for an office located within the Fort Andross building in Brunswick. WELL, they explain, has even more stringent requirements than LEED, and their client—the Nature Conservancy of Maine—wanted to meet the health-oriented standards of WELL. Launched in 2014, WELL focuses on similar aspects as LEED (air quality, accessibility of natural light, etc.) but with a

Harry Hepburn (left) and Christopher Briley (right) standing on the scaffolding at a job site in downtown Portland.

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PR OF ILE BRIB U R N AR C H I TE C TS

greater emphasis on promoting the physical health and mental well-being of the building’s occupants. In 2018 the Nature Conservatory’s Maine office became the first space in Maine—and one of the first in New England—to receive the WELL certification. The organic-feeling and light-filled space features locally harvested birch that has been milled into 3/8-inch strips and bent, creating graceful curves that mimic the shape of the adjacent Androscoggin River and gently lead visitors to the office through the space, from entryway to mezzanine. Although the building’s function necessitates cubicles and divided work spaces, each has access to natural light. “We decided who would get the most natural light based on who spends the most time at their desk,” explains Maggie Stone, director of operations at the Nature Conservatory of Maine. “But even though I’m at the middle of the office, I can see natural light in two different directions—it’s everywhere.” For the employees who use their office space less frequently (and thus are situated away from the views), Hepburn and Briley sourced bulbs from Lighting Science, a company that creates LED lights that replicate the feel of natural light. “They made the lights for NASA’s space shuttles,” Hepburn points out. “In our office, we get a sense of both community and nature,” says Stone. “We get to see eagles out the

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windows, and we can see our neighbors in Brunswick. With any change, you’ll hear a lot of discontent, but I have heard nothing but good things (even from our staff members who have been here for 20 years or more) about this office.” While much of Briburn Architects’ work is residential (created for private clients interested in efficient, cleanenergy homes), they have also designed spaces for restaurants (such as Gather in Yarmouth), the Cumberland Animal Clinic, the Spring Point Marina restaurant and office, and the Maine Coast Waldorf School high school. “We’re super jazzed about how the school came out,” Briley says. “It’s the best feeling ever, to walk into that school and see kids and teachers using it. It’s their everyday building.” Instead of going to school in a cramped rectangular brick building, Waldorf high school students in Freeport get to learn beside airy windows and under solar panels. “They didn’t want something that would feel institutional,” says Hepburn. “It was a lot of fun to play with shape, color, and material, while making sure it was up to our standards.” Briley, I learn, has a saying that he likes to tell workers on the jobsite. “This building is a ship,” he says. “If it leaks, we all die.” It may sound over the top, but this metaphor ensures that everyone is on the same page and applies the same stringent standards to their piece of the puzzle, whether they’re drawing up plans or pouring concrete.


“Good design is about having a building that can be easily maintained, a space that is durable, longlasting, healthy, and comfortable.” Meeting standards such as LEED, WELL, and the Living Building Challenge (“one of the hardest sustainability metrics out there,” according to Briley) requires this kind of focused intensity. “We’re going to work toward the Living Building Challenge with a new project,” Briley reveals. Designs for the Ecology School in Saco are currently sitting on Briley’s desk. “It’s going to be an incredible challenge, but we’re also teaming up with two other firms, including Scott Simons Architects and Kaplan Thompson Architects,” he notes.

“Too often, and for a long time, the architecture community has been very inward focused, and there wasn’t enough collaboration,” Hepburn adds. “But Portland has opened up, and there are new friendships being formed and buildings being built.” It makes perfect sense for these sailors: teamwork and lasting change go hand in hand. After all, when your goal is to save the world through better design, it helps to cast a wide net. MH+D

View of the inside of the historic building on Exchange Street that Briburn is currently renovating (opposite) and architectural drawings’ of the space (above).

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DESIGNING THE PERFECT

DINNER PA R T Y A design editor and food editor attend dinner at the home of two restaurateurs in Cape Neddick by KATY KELLEHER // Photography by ERIN LITTLE

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ccording to Clark Frasier, a successful dinner party has several elements: good food, good people, and good ambiance. The chef and his partner, fellow restaurateur Mark Gaier, have internalized this formula (and of course, given their backgrounds, the good food part is never an issue). Although the assembly of the satay skewers and the preparation of complexly layered sauces began days ago, my experience of their dinner party starts the moment I glimpse the dining table. It is dressed up with two table runners—one is a brilliant fuchsia cloth from Thailand, the other a soft blue linen piece from Denmark. Silver candlesticks rise from the orderly tablescape, and dishes from Japan, Thailand, Vietnam, and Italy sit waiting for the guests to take their seats and begin the feast. The table setting, it turns out, is a characteristic element of the couples’ entertaining philosophy. “If you’re going to go bold,” Frasier says, “go bold.” He adds, “It’s not something people do that much anymore, but if you want your meal to be festive, it’s worth going over the top.” Table settings, he explains, set the tone for the evening. “As soon as your guests see the place you’ve set for them, they begin to wonder: What will we eat? What is coming next?”

Clark Frasier adds final touches to the perfectly eclectic table setting before the dinner party he is hosting with his partner, Mark Gaier. The table runners are from Thailand and Denmark, and the glassware originates from Florence, Myanmar, and Saigon.

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On the night I visit Frasier and Gaier’s home in Cape Neddick, I don’t have time to wonder what we will be eating. The company, which includes educators, performers, and philanthropists, is too scintillating. “The guest list is important because you don’t want people from the same group,” Frasier will tell me later. “It’s more fun to have people from all walks of life—men and women, straight and gay, younger and older.” But even while I am getting caught up in conversation about a recent backyard theater performance staged for charity, my eyes begin to wander around the room. As a design writer, I’m easily seduced by eclectic decor, and this couple has a global collection of art and artifacts that requires immediate attention. “We share a predilection for beautiful things,” Gaier explains as he walks me through the couple’s two-story home. Built in 1983, the house was in bad shape when the couple purchased it, but they quickly tore out the

awkwardly placed fireplace, painted over the matte, chalky white walls, and installed large French doors that open outward to the wooden deck and the blooming gardens beyond. “In the summertime, it’s like we have double the space,” Gaier says. Frasier adds, “We put in these doors to broaden the deck, to make you want to walk into the garden and make that a part of your day.” In the back garden, a South Asian spirit house peeks out from among the black-eyed Susans and puffy white hydrangeas. Inside, the couple has offset the bright chaos of their global art collection (including pieces by preeminent California artists Miguel Dominguez and Donal Hord, among others) with midcentury modern furniture in soothing shades of gray. The living room walls glow with a soft sheen from their grasscloth wallpaper. Sanded white oak floors have been treated with whitewash to avoid yellowing, and in the kitchen Spanish quartz

Spanish quartz countertops rest on simple maple cabinets in Frasier and Gaier’s kitchen (above). Large French doors give the small deck (opposite) a roomier feel, welcoming guests to sit and enjoy a cocktail while surrounded by blooming gardens.

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Pieces from Frasier and Gaier’s extensive art collection line their stairway. The wood covering the stair wall dates back to the 1770s. It was taken from the couple’s former restaurant, Arrows, and is a conversation piece for their living room. The deck outback is perfect for some peaceful conversation by the garden.

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countertops sit above simply designed maple cabinets. High on the walls of the kitchen hang two oversized art prints depicting rosy-faced chefs and cartoon livestock. Turns out, these funky pieces were moved here from Arrows, the couple’s famed restaurant in Ogunquit (now sold). “Our space is pretty small, and we didn’t want our kitchen to be some übermodern, all-white space” Gaier says. “That’s just not us.” Instead, they’ve created a house filled with furniture made by family members (Frasier’s dad was a talented amateur carpenter) and pieces collected abroad during their travels. China in particular has long fascinated both chefs—Frasier speaks Mandarin and has been known to write ingredient lists in Chinese characters—but they own artworks

representing nearly every continent, and from locales as diverse as Syria and San Diego. Upstairs in their bedroom, a collection of ceramic and metal tortoises adds a quirky touch to the bedside tables, which Frasier and Gaier have also stacked high with books, ready to read on their nights off from running their nearby upscale eatery, M.C. Perkins Cove. As our house tour winds down and we walk back downstairs to rejoin the rest of the guests, I pass my hands along a wooden wall. Between the living room and the dining room, Frasier and Gaier installed this wall of old wood planks that they had removed from Arrows during a remodel. “They were original to the building, which dates back to the 1770s,” Gaier explains. He adds, “They’re a piece of our history, too.”

Frasier and Gaier have collected many interesting items (above) from their travels around the world. Clark Frasier and Mark Gaier (opposite) are relaxed but enthusiastic dinner-party hosts.

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Dinner Fit for an Emperor BY KAREN WATTERSON

“Is this the tea from that little shop in Old Delhi?” asks Clark Frasier, as Mark Gaier sets down a tray of iced chai masala. On a sweltering summer afternoon, we’re grateful for the cool drinks served on the front deck of their home. Frasier and Gaier, known colloquially as Mark and Clark, are relaxed hosts, experienced in the art of entertaining. The former owners of the renowned Ogunquit restaurant Arrows, James Beard–award winners, and current chef-owners of M.C. Perkins Cove, the couple are also world travelers. They’ve spent time in Thailand and Cambodia, Myanmar, China, and India, where they purchased the tea in question. While we sit in the shade sipping the fragrant iced tea and admiring the home’s spectacular garden, Gaier and Frasier seem unruffled by the fact that several guests will soon be arriving for dinner. “The secret is to start as early as possible,” says Frasier, “then you’re not madly dashing around any more than necessary. Pretty much everything is already prepped. It’s just about putting it together. That’s how we like to do dinner

parties.” A peek into the kitchen reveals his organizational skills, honed over many years. In one corner, neatly labeled plastic containers hold prepped ingredients and sauces. There’s an impressive collection of knives carefully laid out on the quartz countertop, each one with a story of how and where it was obtained. Whenever Gaier or Frasier mentions one of their far-flung adventures, it is free of pretense, simply a part of their shared experience. “Travel is our favorite thing,” says Gaier. The dining area doors are open wide to the back deck, letting in the faintest whisper of a breeze. Friends of the couple have joined us: Kate, Kathy, Beverly, and Steve, all people they’ve known for years in various ways. We gather on the deck for cocktails and Pemaquid oysters served with a subtly spicy sauce that Frasier made days ago. Norman Dufour, manager at M.C. Perkins Cove, mixes and pours the refreshing drinks, a blend of watermelon puree, Cointreau, and vodka topped with soda, while Frasier grills ground pork satays skewered on pieces of raw sugarcane. “The first time

Ground pork satay skewers (above, left) seasoned with herbs, ginger, Indonesian soy sauce, and galangal: a black pepper–caraway sauce tops it all off. Watermelon-infused vodka cocktails expertly made by Norman Dufour, manager at Frasier and Gaier’s restaurant, M.C. Perkins Cove. This cognac-colored Wassily chair (opposite) by Marcel Breuer is functional art in Frasier and Gaier’s home. 70 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


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we tried this was in Bali,” Gaier comments. The pork is blended with herbs, ginger, Indonesian soy sauce, and galangal, which they bought from an Asian market in Portsmouth where they’ve been purchasing ingredients “for decades.” The black pepper–caraway sauce for the skewers is a delightful accompaniment. Inside, the table is beautifully set with jewel-toned linens, simple silver candlesticks, and several types of glassware, every item a reflection of the couple’s foreign adventures. The fuchsia silk runner is overlaid with a cobalt and green one from Denmark, along with turquoise napkins and coral-colored coasters from Saigon. Chinese red-lacquered square plates run down the center, and the white dinner plates are from Florence. It’s an eclectic mix of cultures, just like this evening’s menu. The first course of clams and cod is roasted in cellophane-like fata paper bags that allow all the flavors and juices to cook together. It also makes a dramatic presentation as Frasier cuts into each one for guests,

releasing a heavenly aroma and golden liquid of ginger, turmeric, and tomato. “It was inspired by our trip to India this year,” explains Frasier. “It’s also on the menu at M.C. Perkins Cove.” The Burmese salad is a bright mix of greens and herbs with soba noodles, crispy lotus root, and heirloom tomatoes with peanuts and a tangy dressing. The main course is a Frasier specialty: duck leg confit with a cherry–rhubarb sauce and cinnamon walnuts, perfectly paired with a Château Lamothe Saint-Germain Bordeaux. And dessert is smooth coconut panna cotta accented with mango puree. Throughout the meal, Frasier and Gaier are relaxed and hospitable, making sure every guest is comfortable and happy. They tell funny stories about restaurant life and traveling, also reminiscing with friends about previous dinner parties. To spend time with this couple in the informal surroundings of their fascinating home is a memorable occasion. “It’s just a typical Tuesday night at Mark and Clark’s,” jokes guest Kathy Hurley. MH+D

Guests explore the lush garden at Frasier and Gaier’s home in Cape Neddick. A plate of Pemaquid oysters (opposite) is the first course of many at Frasier and Gaier's dinner party.

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AN ELEMENT OF

GRANDNESS A Canadian couple revive a historic home in Kennebunk

BY DEBRA SPARK // PHOTOGRAPHY BY FRANÇOIS GAGNÉ STYLING BY BONNIE WEEMAN, HURLBUTT DESIGNS

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Once called the Pink House for its exterior and interior hues, this 1928 home has been added on to multiple times through the years. In its most recent incarnation, and to make the house consistent with the neighborhood aesthetic, Louise Hurlbutt of Hurlbutt Designs suggested a seacoast gray lightened with white trim for the exterior. Kevin Allen of Ambidextrous is responsible for the landscaping, which includes a new bluestone floor and fire pit at the back of the house. MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM 79


J

oanna Bennett and Brian Grassby were debating between two houses in Kennebunk: one that didn’t exist and one that did. Architect Brian Beaudette had designed the house that didn’t yet exist, and Crystal Wilson and Shawn Douston at Douston Construction had priced out the building costs. Even so, Beaudette and Wilson were rooting for the house that did exist—the “Pink House,” nicknamed for the pink of its interior furnishings and the pinkybrown paint and rosy trim of its exterior. When Bennett and Grassby first visited it, the Pink House had been on the market for some time. It most likely was remaining unsold due to low ceilings and a somewhat confusing layout, a result of multiple additions to the house, which was first built in 1928. Grassby’s initial thought on purchasing it: “Not a chance.” Aspects of the house seemed odd to him. There were four discrete sitting areas, for example, and part of the living room had a cathedral ceiling that opened to the owners’ bedroom upstairs, hardly conducive to privacy. And yet the empty lot that Beaudette had designed a new house for had a difficult grade. Even though the lot was adjacent to the Pink House—both properties are located between Webhannet Golf Club and Mother’s Beach—it did not have the same good views. “Where are we going to play football?” Grassby wondered about the steep lot. In the end, Bennett found she couldn’t get the Pink House out of her head. It had the kind of charm and character that you can’t easily create anew. She admired things like the dining room’s stone fireplace, the beautiful wood built-ins, and the glass-paned wood closet doors throughout the house. Even the entry was unusual. It had a lion’s-head knocker on a Dutch door that opened into a wood-paneled foyer. There, an arch framed by a double row of glass panes led into the dining room. A tiny telephone room, with the original wood bench and shelf, was off the foyer, as was a wooden liquor closet. Bennett had a vision for what the place could be. There was “an element of grandness to the house,” says Beaudette. Wilson adds, “Brian and I were definitely proponents of preserving it.”

New Roman shades (opposite) made of a white sheer with navy embroidery and white lining are the perfect touch for this nautical-themed room with a model sailboat. The four cane-back chairs at the game table were upholstered by Hurlbutt Designs with indigo ticking. 80 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


A thoroughly redesigned kitchen by Nancy Bither of Atlantic Design Center shows blue velvet chairs around a quartz kitchen island, gray Cabico cabinets with a recessed panel and bead frame, Top Knob hardware, and Lunada Bay glass tiles in a wave pattern for the backsplash. Nickel-gap was used for the ceiling. The light gray brick wall at the left was once a tea rose color. A nearby powder room was converted into a pantry for extra storage.


There was a lot to do to lighten up, modernize, and reconfigure the house, however, and Bennett, Wilson, and Beaudette actively collaborated on design decisions that Douston then executed. Spaces were gutted, and the overall floor plan was simplified, though it still remains unusual. Now, the center of the first floor is a sunny great room with a white and neutral palette accented with aquas and navys. The kitchen was completely redone with gray bead-frame cabinets, wavepattern sparkly glass backsplash tile, a white nickel-gap ceiling, and a quartz-topped kitchen island surrounded by upholstered royal-blue velvet stools. Nancy Bither at Atlantic Design Center designed both kitchen and bathroom, while Hurlbutt Designs assisted with tile and other selections. A second living room and the formal dining room retain more of their old-world feel. The formal dining room had an existing fireplace wall with wood shelving and cabinetry, and Douston Construction built a similar fireplace wall for the living room. To add height to the formal dining room, the ceiling was removed, leaving the upstairs floor joists exposed. These joists were painted linen white, and the walls were covered in new striped wallpaper. The living room’s cathedral ceiling was closed off from the owners’ bedroom. In what was once a sitting room by the living room, an en suite bedroom was added.

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A tournament backgammon table (above) sits underneath art by Frank Lipari. Original watered silk French chairs have decorative pillows from Hurlbutt Designs. Homeowners Joanna Bennett and Brian Grassby (opposite) stand at the front door, once hidden inside a narrow alcove with an applied exterior trellis. The trellis was removed to showcase the original Dutch door with lion’s-head brass knocker.


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NO MAT T E R W HERE I N T HE WO RLD T HE Y A RE LI V I NG—BEN N ET T AND GRASSBY C URRE NT LY RESI DE I N ALBE RTA , C ANA DA—T HE Y A N D THEIR FAMI LY ME MBERS A LWAYS CO NGREGAT E I N MAI NE. Shawn Douston, the owners, and others had heard that the house’s original owner had run a sawmill, and the house’s abundant use of wood gives credence to the rumor. The house is clad in live-edge boards and roofed in wood shingles. Originally, the entire interior— floors, walls, and even ceiling—was wood. Much had been covered over with drywall over the years and could not safely be reexposed, but Douston did reveal and restore some wood, including the 12-inch-wide pine boards with beautiful patina that he found under the upstairs carpet. Beaudette redesigned the upstairs owners’ bedroom so it now consists of two sitting areas, a small office area, and a closet. Bennett and Grassby wanted to keep an existing whirlpool-tub room but also had an entirely new owners’ bath added. Elsewhere in the house, the bathrooms have white cabinetry with wall colors dictated by the light yellows, greens, and blues of the marble used as an accent in the floor and shower tile. For the owners’ bath, Bennett and Grassby went with a bolder teal custom paint for the beadboard cabinets and a built-in bench. The large steam shower has glass tiles, a marble-topped seat, and pebble-tile flooring.

The owners’ bedroom was once open to the downstairs living room. Now closed off, the bedroom makes use of the previous owners’ furniture (including reupholstered wingback chairs in a soft beige fabric). The homeowners found the painting of boats and the light fixture in the bay window. Bonnie Weeman of Hurlbutt Designs installed the wood blinds and selected the wall color.

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Bennett and Grassby had bought the Pink House furnished. They kept many pieces, including a sleigh bed, wicker furniture, cabinets, sofas, and chairs; they discarded some colonial pieces that were not quite the look they wanted; and they refreshed still other wood pieces with chalk paint. Although Bennett did a great deal of the interior design herself, including selecting lighting and some of the bedding, she and Grassby turned to Bonnie Weeman of Hurlbutt Designs to, as Weeman says, “transform the interior without doing a whole house full of new furniture.” This involved coordinating many aspects of the rooms—slipcovering and upholstering the furniture, selecting paint colors, providing custom-made cushions for built-in benches and other seating, and purchasing new rugs and bedding. New pieces were also added to complement the existing design. Weeman made white sheers for the interior side of the many French doors, a particularly lovely feature against the dark wood frames. Taken as a whole, the rooms have a light, beachy feel from materials like sisal in living room rugs and two staircase runners, rope on a mirror and a chandelier, and glass fishing bobbers on a console table. One powder room has fish-pattern wallpaper. Pillow fabric features seahorses and fish. New starfish pulls adorn old closet doors painted white.

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Because contiguous his-and-hers sinks would not fit in the owners’ bathroom, the cabinetry was designed in a wraparound U. The beadboard cabinetry is painted in a custom teal and incorporates a built-in seat and marble countertops. The bathroom also includes an oversized steam shower. A new laundry room (opposite) intended for beach towels, has a starfish mosaic incorporated into the floor tile.


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To give the low formal dining room ceiling some height, the floor joists were exposed and painted white. The original built-ins (right) were preserved, but the space was lightened with Antique White Benjamin Moore paint on the woodwork and beige striped wallpaper by Thibault. Hurlbutt Designs added chairs hand painted with blue stars to a custom extension table with a medium cherry stain and accented it with glass hurricanes and blue candles. The Kona chambray rug has slate blue binding. 90 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


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The renovated house has six bedrooms, a few with their own sinks, since that is how Bennett and Grassby found the rooms. Each room is distinguished by its bedding—one room is white and red with lobster pillows; another is aqua and coral and has a built-in daybed in a new window alcove. Still another is light blue with pillows in varying shades of blue. This latter room had once been the owners’ bedroom closet: when Douston went in under the drywall to frame out a new door, he found there was a door there already. So likely the “new” bedroom was actually an old bedroom that had been turned into a closet and was now being turned back into a bedroom. Bennett first started coming to the Kennebunks as a child. She is from Montreal and says Maine is “a huge destination for Montrealers, because it has the closest beach.” When Bennett married, she introduced her husband to the state, and their now-grown children are also fans. No matter where in the world they are living—Bennett and Grassby currently reside in Alberta, Canada—they and their family members always congregate in Maine. For 60 summers in a row, Bennett’s father swam at Mother’s or neighboring Gooch’s Beach. His last swim was in 2016, a year before he died at age 88, and two years after Bennett and Grassby bought their house. In addition to the pleasure of gathering the family they created and the families they came from, Bennett and Grassby have the additional pleasure of knowing Bennett’s father got to see the house. “He said many times how he couldn’t believe we had this place,” says Bennett. For all the previous decades of visiting, the generations had always rented. “We are so happy he was part of it for a little while.” MH+D

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A guest room (above) received a new shed dormer for egress purposes. The built-in by the window, and the two iron beds have Serena and Lilly bedding and custom pillows by Hurlbutt Designs. The rug is Dash and Albert. The star light is from Pottery Barn. The original house had pine on all the floors, walls, and ceilings, and there is still pine under the drywall in this room. Slipcovers were made for the existing sofas in the living room (opposite) and the decorative pillows are from Hurlbutt Designs. A Curacao dune carpet with a diamond pattern and navy twill binding softens the space. Crystal Wilson of Douston Construction designed the living room fireplace wall to mimic the original fireplace wall in the formal dining room.


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From the kitchen to the dining room. Old Port magazine’s managing editor and food editor Susan Axelrod combines two of her greatest passions—the written word and amazing meals— to let you know where to eat. And why. @eatmaine + themainemag.com

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ho doesn’t want to know which doctors other doctors see for care? Or which lawyers other lawyers consult? Who do the experts choose, when the experts are the customers? And what do they prefer when style, not just quality and budget, is part of the decision? I wondered what home a particular longtime York realtor would pick when she decided to downsize, given she knew her region so well. The big surprise was that, after a lengthy search, she picked a home not to live in but to (more or less) knock down. Why not just buy an empty lot? I wondered. Because, as her architect, Scott Fiorentino of Fiorentino Group Architects in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, observes, there are no empty lots on the ocean. The realtor wanted to create her own home from the ground up, and this was the best way to do it. The good news about this property, from this realtor’s point of view, was that the existing house would allow her to build on the most scenic part of its lot. Given current setback rules, if the lot had been empty, she would have had to site the house farther back on her half acre. Instead, Fiorentino was able to produce a design that allows the homeowner views of the open ocean and Nubble Lighthouse from virtually every room. There wasn’t any corresponding bad news, but there was a puzzle: How would she fit all she wanted on the available lot? A minor expansion for a dining room was allowable, and some house volume could be added over the garage. In all other ways, the footprint had to be adhered to. Before she moved in, the realtor was living in a sizable house in Cape Neddick. Her husband had passed away, and her two children had grown, which was part of why she wanted a smaller place. However, she did not want to abandon much of what she valued about her house, which was just about everything: a blue, yellow, and white palette; nautical decorative details; an in-ground pool; Stark carpets; the furnishings; and treasured possessions, including her collections of Waterford crystal, Simon Pearce glass Christmas trees, ginger jars, and white Belleek porcelain inherited from her mother. Although the homemaker’s tastes tend to the formal, she wanted her two grandchildren to feel comfortable running from room to room when they visit. She also wanted a few things she hadn’t had before—like single-floor living and features (including no door thresholds) to facilitate aging in place. To meet these desires, Fiorentino and interior designer Sarah Duquette of Duquette and Company in Kennebunk aimed to create a refined house with five major rooms downstairs: an en suite owners’ bedroom, a living room with

A view of Cape Neddick’s Nubble Lighthouse (opening spread) from an ironwood deck with a bluestone terrace and pool. The sunroom’s dining room has coffers and a beadboard ceiling that are part of a decorative refrain repeated throughout the house. The chandelier is a polished-nickel armillary sphere surrounded by lamp shades.

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A view from the dining room into the kitchen reveals elaborate trim work and a yellow, mahogany-topped kitchen island with a stove hood. A Waterford crystal chandelier that was a birthday gift from the homeowner’s late husband hangs over the dining room table. The white lattice ginger jars by the columns are just one of the many items that the homeowner collects..

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panoramic views of the ocean, a kitchen with a buttercream yellow island as its focal point, a formal dining room, and an enclosed summer room surrounded by six-foot French doors. The homeowner would largely live in these rooms, but there would also be a partial second floor with two bedrooms and an exercise room for company. Tom Howarth of Howarth Builders in South Berwick built the shell of the house, then Glenn Farrell of YFI Custom Homes in Cape Neddick took over, finishing the project and attending to the detailing. All of the cabinetry, built-ins, and vanities were built by YFI’s sister company, YFI Millworks. The interior has a solidity and stability that one might associate with the Old World, an effect enhanced by elaborate trim work—cornices, coffer ceilings, paneling, interior arches, and Tuscan columns—but offset by light walls and the bright colors of the upholstery and pillows, which lend a more relaxed feel to the whole interior. Fiorentino explains that what makes the substantial trim work successful has to do with the decorative refrains that are established on entry and then continued through the design. A paneled archway with built-in glass cabinetry separates the foyer from the living room. A similar but more elaborate archway (with half-columns and additional cabinetry) divides the kitchen and dining room. There is a simpler arch over the owners’ bathroom’s sink. The living room ceiling has a shadow line, cornice, and coffer—a profile that is used in the kitchen as well. In the living room, a subtle off-white ceiling paint allows the white coffers to register. In the kitchen, beadboard runs between the

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The house’s exterior (above) is a gray, predipped white cedar shingle, chosen to give the home a cottage feel. Builder Glenn Farrell notes that the V-match soffit and knee braces “are part of what makes the house look older,” even as the crisp white trim around the black Marvin windows make the house feel fresh. The outdoor furniture is from Lloyd Flanders and is covered with a custom navy Sunbrella fabric. The mullion pattern on the upper windows is repeated on some of the interior glass cabinetry. Columns at a recessed doorway (opposite) introduce the extensive trim work that is inside, while an eyebrow window lets additional light into the front entry. Landscaping is by Rosemary Whitney of Focal Point Landscaping. Whitney used the blues, yellows, and whites that the homeowner favors for the general landscape, though pinks and whites frame the door.


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coffers. Interior transom windows and the glass on upper cabinets match the squares of the six-over-one exterior windows on the ground floor. Some of the glass cabinets and the upstairs exterior windows have a diamond pattern that echoes the diamond shingles under the gable roof. (Fiorentino says that the diamond pattern is something one sees on the second floor of coastal homes from the nineteenth century; he theorizes that, besides style preference, it may have something to do with the historic need for smaller pieces of glass at the higher elevations to withstand wind gusts.) Interior designer Sarah Duquette of Duquette Designs similarly builds and varies refrains, using the homeowner’s favorite blue, white, and yellow palette in different combinations throughout the house. In the living room, blue and white or yellow and white fabrics cover sofas and chairs that Duquette reupholstered and then piled with pillows in an array of fabrics, including one depicting seahorses. In the dining room, which has a French country

Fiorentino says that part of the strength of the project came from the “unity” of the homeowner’s vision. dining table and a Waterford crystal chandelier (a birthday gift from the homeowner’s late husband), the curtain panels incorporate some green for variety. The sunroom is largely yellow and blue. The painted wicker furniture (including two antique chaises inherited by the homeowner from her aunt), tongue-and-groove ceiling, and walls provide white accents. Every other window in this room can be removed to make a screened porch, but in-floor radiant heat makes it a year-round room as well. A soothing

A view from the kitchen to the dining room shows more of the display-and-storage space that is abundant in the house. The house’s blue-and-white palette gets some variation with the addition of yellow for this space. The engineered wood floor is a tinted reddish-brown white oak, intended to suggest mahogany. Focal Point Landscaping planted pine trees outside of the dining room window.

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The owners’ bedroom’s shower forms a small room with its own window through which one can peer out at the ocean. A belljar pendant lamp etched with compass roses hangs above the soaking tub. The floor is a basket weave of Ming green and Thassos white marble, while the shower walls have a green marble subway tile with an embedded marble mosaic.

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The house sits on a half-acre lot facing the sea with neighbors on all sides. The fireplace wall (opposite, top) preserves privacy in one direction, while windows access the view in another. There is a partial second floor with three rooms over the garage. One of the bedrooms with a curved, built-in bench and balcony (opposite, bottom) introduces coral to the home’s palette with Serena and Lily bedding. The second bedroom has bold navy and white-stripe bedding. The third room holds exercise equipment. When not in use, the second floor can be closed off entirely. The living room (above) features a fireplace that has an indigenous stone surround and a black slate hearth; a built-in bench that serves as reading nook; and a wet bar that also functions as a display area for collectibles.

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sea mist color was used for the owners’ bedroom’s linens, and the room was painted with the identical Palladian Blue paint by Benjamin Moore that the homeowner had used for her bedroom in her previous house. Special spots in the house include two built-in living room benches that allow one to cozy up with a book and feel surrounded by the ocean and a mahogany-topped builtin bar in the living room, which has a sink and wine refrigerator but also serves as an additional display area. The grandchildren have a particular fondness for the television that can rise from the kitchen counter at the touch of a button. They also love the separate area where their toys are, but their favorite space is the owners’ bathroom. It has a shower that forms a small room with its own window, through which one can peer out at the ocean. A soaking tub sits just under another window and can be illuminated by a bell-jar pendant lamp etched with compass roses. The floor here is a basketweave of Ming green and Thassos white marble, while the shower walls have a green marble subway tile with an embedded marble mosaic. Fiorentino says that part of the strength of the project came from the “unity” of the homeowner’s vision. Despite the many items she owns, her taste is very particular. This, too, can be seen in her custom closet with its shoe racks, purse cubbies, and clothes racks (which have pull-down bars so higher rods can be lowered). There’s abundance here but focus as well. (She is clearly a lover of basic black with bright colors.) The first thing Fiorentino told me about the homeowner was that she is always immaculately turned out. The same might be said about her house. On the day I visit, it’s put together, sophisticated, vibrant, and full of beautiful arrangements of fresh flowers, as if the house, like its owner, takes every day as a good reason to dress up. MH+D

The house is full of nods to its location with a rope handrail to the second floor, and a port hole window painted blue. The sunroom (opposite) provides a second dining and living room space. The French window panels open to create a porch in the summer, while in-floor heating keeps the space toasty in winter. 112 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


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Bedrooms Fitness Room Deck Mechanical Room Storage Closet

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4 B AC K S H O R E R OA D

R O U N D P O U N D, M A I N E

2 0 7. 5 2 9. 5 3 0 0

THEARTOFANTIQUING.COM

PETREA NOYES 154 Middle Street, Portland, Maine 207.956.7105 artcollectormaine.com petreanoyes.com TH E BEST LA ID P LA NS | 4 0 ” X 4 0 ” | MIX ED MED IA ON C ANVAS


A RT S P O T LI GH T | A S H OW P R EVI EW

JOHN BISBEE | AMERICAN STEEL CENTER FOR MAINE CONTEMPORARY ART J U NE 30 – OC TOB ER 14

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or my upcoming show, American Steel, at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art, I find myself for the first time being dragged simultaneously across four forbidden borders, giggling as I go. They are humor, text, realism, and, oh my god, politics. These are places I’ve never allowed my work to venture, because I was so sealed in my own abstract juices that the world was never able to penetrate. Well, that bubble’s been burst. I did not see any of this coming, but I couldn’t escape the gravity of this national moment. It has made me dwell intensely on our past, while clinging even tighter to a shiny future. The only hope is empathy and love, and above all, we need to strengthen and maintain our unwavering faith in the Almighty Bright Common Spike.

Sculptor John Bisbee, a resident of Brunswick, is celebrated for his masterful work created exclusively from forged and welded nails. American Steel is his first solo exhibition in Maine in nearly a decade. His work is in collections all over the country. MH+D

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A RT SPOT LIGH T|A S HO W P R E V I E W

American Steel, 2018 exhibition made from nails

American Steel, basket detail

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American Steel, stool detail


FRANCES HYNES

ELIZ ABETHMOSSGALLERIES.COM

WATERFRONT, 2017, 30” X 40”, OIL ON CANVAS

P H OTO BY EMI LI E I NC.

P R E S E RV I N G Y O U R A R T F O R O V E R 3 0 Y E A R S B AC K C O V E - H A N N A F O R D P L A Z A - P O R T L A N D | 2 0 7 . 7 7 4 . 1 2 6 0 | W W W. C A S C O B AY F R A M E S . C O M


B u oy 2 S B I 30" x 40" I o i l o n c a n va s B u oy 2 S B I 30" x 40" I o i l o n c a n va s

caroline caroline lode lode rr gallery + studIo gallery + studIo

I I

445 s o u t h r oa d, C h e b e ag u e I s l a n d 445 s o u t h r oa d, C h e b e ag u e I s l a n d

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207.607.0822 207.607.0822


S HOP T ALK|NI C O L A'S HO M E BY KATY KELLEHER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY JEFF ROBERTS

SOFT TOUCH At Nicola’s Home in Yarmouth, designer Nicola Manganello has created a suitably grand showroom for her thoughtfully eclectic designs

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icola’s Home is a place of subtle contrasts. When I pull in to the driveway, I'm greeted by two sights: to the left, a grand stone staircase that leads to modern glass doors, and to the right, a modest chicken coop populated by blowsy white hens and proud roosters. This is indicative of the goods you’ll find inside the restored barn, a stately postand-beam structure that dates back to 1917. Designer Nicola Manganello, founder of Nicola’s Home, has created a space that functions as a showroom for her style as well as an office for her design-build business, complete with a conference room in the basement. “While people can come in and shop, it is better to make an appointment,” Manganello reveals. “We’re just so busy, and if you plan ahead, we have more time to work with you one-onone.” Unlike her previous stores, which were more traditional retail spaces, Nicola’s Home isn’t really a place to go to buy things off the shelves. “People come to me because they like my style, and they know I can guarantee both quality and design,” Manganello says. “Our firm is small but mighty, and I touch everything that goes through our doors.” Manganello has worked on houses throughout Maine and New England, but you can also get a glimpse of her style at the Royal River Grill House in Yarmouth, the Tuscan Brick Oven Bistro in Freeport, the Tuscan Table in South Portland, and Bei Capelli Salon in Scarborough. Although her style has changed over the years—“In college, my look was totally tribal, then I had a phase where I just loved Indian textiles,” she says—she’s stayed true to her core design philosophy. Manganello believes in mixing textures, blending old and new pieces, and creating spaces that feel warm, homey, and visually engaging. When she’s working with a client, she’ll pull out all the stops to create something truly unique. She has used stickers to mimic etched glass on a refinished pine cabinet, and she has been


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4 1. Nicola Manganello sits in her Yarmouth workshop and storefront surrounded by a range of home fixtures and fabric samples. The lighting samples show the range of styles available at Nicola’s Home—there are basket pendants for a soft, bohemian look and industrial fixtures for a sleeker, more urban vibe. 2. The contemporary farmhouse speaks to Manganello’s design sense while providing plenty of space for her epic library of fabric samples and antique finds. 3. While it’s best to make an appointment, visitors can come in to browse the wares. 4. Two racks of Dash and Albert rug samples sit in front of rows of organic cotton fabric from India. Also shown are upholstery samples sourced from a vendor in South Carolina.


S HOP T ALK|NI C O L A'S HO M E

known to restyle antique rugs as global-chic throw pillows. “Recently, we upholstered chairs with this amazing antique Chinese tapestry,” she says. “They were faded and covered in patches. We had to buy a lot of tapestries to cover the whole chair, but when a client really loves a specific look, I’ll make sure they get it.” While Manganello’s own house utilizes a neutral-rich color palette of beige, eggshell, and linen, she’s happy to work with clients to create something brighter, and she has the tools at her fingertips to achieve any look. There are thousands upon thousands of fabric samples at Nicola’s Home, from brilliant royal red jacquard to soft embroidered ivory linens. Many of these fabrics come from custom lines sourced overseas. There are also samples of hand-painted clay tiles, sleek flooring materials, and rustic lighting. The wares inside her cavernous shoreside shop run the gamut from vintage-inspired to contemporary. “It’s hard to pinpoint my style,” Manganello admits. She stays current with the trends and times. “But if there’s one thread that runs through all my work, it’s this: I create spaces where you want to relax and linger. Where you can feel right at home.” MH+D

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Ikea tables are paired with lacquer storage consoles to create a sleek work space for the crew at Nicola’s Home. The daybed was purchased at the Brimfield Antique Fair, as was the dough trough located under the bed and the vintage grain-sack pillows.


NICOLA’S TIPS FOR WARMING UP YOUR SPACE uStart slow. Manganello loves a

good collection, but she notes that the most interesting arrangements are the result of years of thoughtful purchasing. “Avoid adding too many things at once,” she says. “You want it to feel curated, not cluttered.” She suggests choosing a color palette and then gathering pieces from a variety of sources and influences. “Mix countries and cultures, and find items that speak to you.”

uEmbrace texture. Even if you

prefer a contemporary look, you can still bring in loads of texture to keep it visually interesting, Manganello advises. “Before you even bring in furniture, you can add texture on walls and ceilings with thoughtful paint colors—ceilings don’t have to be flat white—wood treatments, wallpaper, and tile,” she says. Grasscloth adds “instant texture“ and looks “timeless,” Manganello adds.

uSet a strong foundation.

Manganello says it’s a good idea to purchase quality sofas and rugs in neutral colors and then “take risks” with items like pillows and accessories. “Cheap furniture shows,” she says. “If you keep it neutral and invest in good quality items, they can evolve with your lifestyle.”

uStay true to yourself.

Manganello’s favorite spaces reflect the owner’s lifestyle. “I like to see someone with a well-traveled life and an eclectic mix of things from all over the world,” she says. But if you don’t have time to source side tables from Morocco or linens from Paris, know that Manganello and her team are happy to fill in.

KC K I T C H E N C OV E C A B I N E T RY & D E S I G N featuring crystal cabinet works

www.kitchencovecabinetry.com

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F R I D AY, J U LY 2 0 , 2 0 1 8 MAINE IN AMERICA AWARDEE : TOSHIKO MORI

Sponsorships currently available, tickets available June 1. For more information, visit farnsworthmuseum.org


SHOWCASE BY KATE GARDNER

INTO THE

WILD

The Bates College Museum of Art’s Dahlov Ipcar show features the best of the artist’s long career

Blue Moon Square, 2007, oil on linen, 30” x 30” Private collection

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SHOWCASE

St. George and the Dragon, 1970, soft sculpture, 15” x 32” x 7” Courtesy Rachel Walls Fine Art

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year after the passing of artist Dahlov Ipcar, the Bates College Museum of Art is exhibiting her work throughout the summer and early fall. The show, Dahlov Ipcar: Blue Moons and Menageries, will feature works spanning the mid-1960s to 2014. The exhibition opened with a public reception on June 8, followed the next day by a gallery talk. The talk, called “Into the Menagerie,” was given by Bates alum Rachel Walls, who owns Rachel Walls Fine Art in Cape Elizabeth. Walls represented Ipcar and had a long friendship with the artist. The works in the exhibition include a variety of styles and media, including oil on canvas, oil on linen, soft sculpture, needlepoint, and illustration. The pieces, most of which depict animals, are bright and colorful. Many of them were featured in Ipcar’s children’s books.

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In addition to the exhibition of works, there is a reading area where visiting children (and adults) can peruse copies of Ipcar’s books. During the run of the exhibition, Bates will offer a variety of activities, including animal-spotting for families and public panel discussions. Following the exhibition, an illustrated catalog of Ipcar’s work will be released. It will include an essay by Sara Torres, an education researcher from the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, where Ipcar was the youngest artist yet to be featured in a solo exhibition: at the time of her MoMA exhibition in 1939 she was 21 years old. Dahlov Ipcar: Blue Moons and Menageries will be on display at the Bates College Museum of Art in Lewiston from June 8 to October 6. On the following pages, Maine Home+Design provides a preview of the exhibition. MH+D


Blue Moon Night, 1990, oil on linen, 26” x 30”

Valley of Tishnar, 1966, oil on canvas, 23” x 35”

Private collection

Private collection

Blue Moon Dance, 2014, oil on linen, 30” x 30” Jaguar Family, 1973, oil on linen, 14” x 36” Private collection Courtesy Rachel Walls Fine Art

Golden Jungle, 1982, needlepoint, 30” x 40”

Dark of the Sun, 1965, oil on linen, 32” x 40”

Courtesy Rachel Walls Fine Art

Courtesy Rachel Walls Fine Art

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R E S O U RC E S AN ELEMENT OF GRANDNESS PAGE 78 Architect: Brian J. Beaudette Architect bjbarchitect.com Builder: Douston Construction douston.com Interior Designer: Hurlbutt Designs hurlbuttdesigns.com Appliances: Central Furniture & Appliance shopatcentral.com Artist, Artworks & Gallery Info: Hurlbutt designs hurlbuttdesigns.com Bathroom Designer: Atlantic Design Center Nancy Bither atlanticdesignctr.com Bathroom Fixtures: The Portland Group theportlandgroup.com Building Supplies: Eldredge Lumber & Hardware eldredgelumber.com

Creating Maine's outdoor lifestyle

Cabinetry: Cabico via Atlantic Design Center cabico.com/en Countertops: Atlantic Design Center atlanticdesignctr.com Dining Room Table: Rustique antiquewoodcreations.com Drywall: Pelletier Drywall 207.294.2937 Electrical: Plamondon Electric plamondonelectric.com

organicslawnandlandscape.com

Engineer: Shelley Engineering

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Patrick Jordan shelleyengineering.com Flooring: Wood Floors by JBW woodfloorsbyjbw.com Floor Installation: Josh Wagner 207.831.4545 Garage Doors: Door Services dsidoors.com Glass: The Glass Guy meglassguy.com Insulation: Builders Installed Products buildersinstalledproducts.net Kitchen Designer: Atlantic Design Center Nancy Bither atlanticdesignctr.com Landscape Design & Installation: Ambidextrous ambi-inc.com Lighting: Wayfair wayfair.com Masonry: Raymond Dussault, Inc. 207.282.9393 Millwork: Douston Construction douston.com Paint: Maibec maibec.com Painting by Northeast paintingbynortheast.com Thibaut thibautdesign.com Plumbing: SPB Plumbing & Heating spbplumbingandheating.com Roofing: Lowery & Sons Roofing 207.698.1708


Tile: Atlantic Design Center Nancy Bither atlanticdesignctr.com Distinctive Tile & Design distinctivetileanddesign.com

Countertops: Cambria cambriausa.com Doors: Marvin Windows & Doors marvin.com

Southern Maine Tile & Stone 207.590.3788

Drywall: Bucco & Sons Plastering 978.922.1477

Window Manufacturer: Andersen andersenwindows.com

Electrical: Bridges Electric bridgeselec.com

Window Supplier: Eldredge Lumber & Hardware eldredgelumber.com

Engineering: Becker Structural Engineers beckerstructural.com

Woodstove: Embers Stoves & Fireplaces embersstoveshop.com

Excavation: Howarth Builders 207.252.0773

REFINED COTTAGE

Floors: Higgins Wood Floors higginswoodfloors.com

PAGE 98 Architect: Fiorentino Group Architects fiorentinogroup.com Builders: Howarth Builders 207.252.0773 YFI Custom Homes yficustomhomes.com Interior Designer: Duquette & Company 207.475.8656 Appliances: Wolf subzero-wolf.com Bathroom Designer: Duquette & Company 207.475.8656 Fiorentino Group Architects fiorentinogroup.com Boiler: Performance Plumbing & Heating 207.363.1770 Building Supplies: Eldredge Lumber & Hardware eldredgelumber.com Cabinetry: YFI Millworks yfimillworks.com

Framing: Howarth Builders 207.252.0773

2 0 7.3 2 6 .9 3 3 9

E ACa rc h it e c t u re. co m

Furniture: Duquette & Company 207.475.8656 Lloyd Flanders lloydflanders.com

Huffard House INTERIOR DESIGN

Garage Doors: Clopay Building Products clopaydoor.com Hardware: Emtek Products emtek.com

207.747.5956 huffardhouse.com

Top Knobs topknobs.com HVAC: Performance Plumbing & Heating 207.363.1770 Insulation: Quality Insulation 207.847.7745 Kitchen Designer: Fiorentino Group Architects fiorentinogroup.com

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Join the Farnsworth [Collective]! A dynamic group of art lovers and makers in the heart of Rockland, Maine. farnsworthmuseum.org/collective


RE S OU RC E S

Landscape Design & Installation: Focal Point Contracting focalpointmaine.com Lighting: Visual Comfort & Co. visualcomfort.com Masonry: S. Donaldson Masonry 603.661.5633 Millwork: YFI Millworks yfimillworks.com

THIS IS SO PORTLAND.

Paint: Benjamin Moore benjaminmoore.com Drobish Brothers Painting 207.752.2962 Duquette & Company 207.475.8656 Plumbing: Performance Plumbing & Heating 207.363.1770 Roofing: Howarth Builders. 207.252.0773 Rugs: Stark Carpet starkcarpet.com Sitework: Howarth Builders 207.252.0773 Tile: Duquette & Company 207.475.8656 Window Manufacturer: Marvin Windows & Doors marvin.com

JIM BRADY THINKS AHEAD

CREW CONVENES ON CASCO BAY

Window Supplier: Eldredge Lumber & Hardware eldredgelumber.com

SPACE TO CREATE AT EAST END LOFTS

PORTLAND'S

CITY MAGAZINE JUNE 2017

Dockside Dining SCALES DISHES THE FRESH FLAVORS OF THE SEA

+

WE DELIVER.

Rum Runners

THE CITY’S COCKTAIL CULTURE COMES OF AGE

PORTLAND + ART GALLERY

HITS ITS STRIDE INSIDER PICKS:

10

LOCAL FAVES OF THE SEA DOGS

Window Treatments: Duquette & Company 207.475.8656

Subscribe 207 772 3373 themainemag.com/subscribe 130 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM


EPIC RACES IN EPIC PLACES

SUNDAY AUG 12, 2018

@ swimrunusa

@ usaswimrun

SUNDAY SEPT. 23, 2018

swimrunusa.com

NEW IN 2019

Event Proceeds will benefit the Travis Mills Foundation. $25,000 + Raised to date.


Overlooking Port Clyde harbor, my summer art gallery features the Wyeths, living and painting in this island-dotted midcoast region since 1920. Original art, rare signed & limited edition collector prints and books, a frame shop, raven sculpture, Wyeth illustrated children’s books, cards, gifts, and ticketing for Wyeths by Water excursions, all combine to make this a unique destination in Maine, not to be found anywhere else.

Open daily from 10am-6pm Memorial Day thru Columbus Day. 207.372.6543 ext. 3 Jamie Wyeth, Red Tailed Hawk, mixed media, 15” x 15,” original, signed lower left

Andrew Wyeth, Jamie Wyeth, and N.C. Wyeth famous painting locations can be seen on your choice of three art tours aboard the Maine lobsterboat “Linderin Losh.” A Coast Guard licensed captain and tour guide will also tell you about local lobstering during each 2.5-hour excursion. 2.5 Hours - $42 per person Departs Port Clyde General Store Dock 2pm, Monday–Friday Book online, get tickets at the dock, or in the Wyeth Gallery! wyethtours@lindabeansperfectmaine.com

wyethgallery@lindabeansperfectmaine.com


RE A L ESTATE

18 Kimball Road

Photo: Mike Perlman

Northeast Harbor

The Swan Agency Sotheby's International Realty Linda Jonas $1,995,000 207.276.5080 xt 13 swanagency.com

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l e g acysi r.co m

Camden

Like no other. An artfully expanded single-family Cape potentially transitioning into two private living quarters. Finest craftsmanship inclusive of cherry floors and fireplace mantels. Exceptional full length deck leading to expansive manicured lawn bordered by professionally designed plantings. Understated elegance. MLS 1341775

Peter van der Kieft 207.592.9366 | $947,000

Connect with LegacySIR:

Cape eLIzabeth

Stunning shingle-style home on a private lot. This Fitzpatrick-built home has it all: large chef ’s kitchen with new appliances, family room with stacked-stone fireplace. 5+ spacious BRs, a huge finished lower level with full-bath, a wine cellar & an oversized heated garage. MLS 1347535 Andrea Pellechia 207.831.0447 or Anne Bosworth 207.233.3175 | $935,000

bRunSwICk wateRfRont vILLage SCaRboRough CondomInIum Eleven individual buildings from small to large at the Gurnet Bridge. Use the buildings as you like, all while enjoying a deep-water commercial-caliber dock, a lovely area in which to kayak, and the stunning views of a Maine coastal setting. MLS 1346762

Patricia Lawson 207.798.1828 | $750,000

Excellent opportunity to purchase at the Atlantic House which is one of the most unique communities in southern Maine. This 2BR, 2BA home offers one level living and a one-car garage with direct entry into the unit. Lovely water views through the wall of windows and atrium door which opens onto the expansive covered porch. Mary Jo Cross 207.671.4006 | $750,000

Ro C k po Rt haRboR

I S L e S b o Ro b u I L da b L e L ot

Traditional village house overlooking Rockport Harbor. 3BR and 3.5BA. Second floor master suite with sitting level and access to deck. Immaculately maintained grounds, interior and exterior. Remodeled kitchen. Perfect retirement or second home. Walk to harbor, village amenities and Beauchamp Point Trail. MLS 1328675 Peter van der Kieft 207.592.9366 | $650,000

11 acre waterfront building opportunities are uncommon on Islesboro however 13 Hermit’s Point presents a wonderful 1000' of frontage overlooking Penobscot Bay to site your island get-a-way. MLS 1341707 Donald Pendleton 207.462.9000 Kate Jackson 207.691.3684 Peter van der Kieft 207.592.9366 | $599,000

L I n C o L n v I L L e - S h ag Ro C k

Reminiscent of the romantic turn-of-the-century Shingle-style Cottages of that era. The home is sited to capture the views of Penobscot Bay and the Ensign Islands. Steps descend to the beach from this masterfully designed 4-bedroom beach house with 3 baths & a large deck overlooking the ocean. MLS 1337299 Kate Jackson 207.691.3684 | $895,000

haRpSweLL oCeanSIde Cottage

This 2013 custom designed home provides 2,400sf of finished living space, 3BRs, 3BAs, and a full walk-out basement that doubles as an oversized garage. 2.61 acres provide a pastoral setting for your new home. 108' of tidal water frontage with dock & float. MLS 1345001 Dennis Duggan 207.522.3747 or Ian Duggan 207.522.8090 | $725,000

L I t C h f I e L d wat e R f Ro n t

This 8.9-acre waterfront property on Pleasant Pond is an opportunity to live a vacation every day. Outdoor recreation in all seasons will delight every member of the family. Return to an inviting home with a chef ’s kitchen, large sunroom, and sunlit living room with gas fireplace to welcome you. MLS 1340176 Patricia Lawson 207.798.1828 | $450,000


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We keep gRoWIng… ConStRuCtIon haS begun on ouR next phaSe. CuRRentLy SeLLIng unItS foR SpRIng 2019 oCCupanCy. Bath RiverWalk Residences are committed to the ar t and the ease of living well. Feel relaxed with a proper ty that is professionally managed, energy efficient, and offers fine craftmanship inside and out. Located just a stones throw to historic downtown Bath, residents experience gracious single floor living and comfor t as well as the convenient location offering easy access to cafes, fine dining, farmers market, ar t galleries, exceptional beaches, and maritime pursuits. Custom layouts offering 2 bedrooms, 2 bedrooms plus office, or 3 bedrooms, 2-car heated garage, private storage, on-site dog wash and fabulous water views. Prices star ting in the $500’s to the low $700’s.

sandRa WendLand bathRIveRWaLk.Com | 207.233.7788 | SWendLand@LegaCySIR.Com Call to schedule an appointment in our model home or for more information.

sandRa WendLand

5 Fieldstone Lane, Falmouth

207.233.7788 swendland@legacysir.com

mLS 1351792 | offered at $815,000

s e R v i n g B u y e R s a n d s e L L e R s i n g R e at e R C u m B e R L a n d C o u n t y a n d B e y o n d .


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Lois Lengyel eXtraordinary ServiCe For eXtraordinary CuStomerS representing buyers and Sellers in greater Cumberland County & beyond.

7 inverness road, Falmouth - this is the ultimate family/entertainment home located on the 8th hole of the Falmouth Country Club. Offered at $1,199,999

drea m - e xplore - dis cove r m 207.233.2820 | o 207.770.2246 | llengyel@legacysir.com

207.838.1050 elise@elisekiely.com Featured Listing - 156 Sheridan Street #2C, Portland | Offered at $739,000

beautiful contemporar y condo in the hear t of munjoy Hill offering breathtaking views, walkability, energy efficiency & garage parking. With panoramic views from the mbr, lr and walk out balcony to the back Cove, distant nH mountains to vir tually all of the Peninsula from Hadlock Field and Hospital to the edge of munjoy Hill. Walk to a variety of restaurants, breweries and boutiques or stroll up to the eastern Promenade and east end beach. this unit offers the ideal lifestyle.

S e r v i n g b u y e r S a n d S e l l e r S i n g r e at e r C u m b e r l a n d C o u n t y a n d b e y o n d .


(Back Row): Mark Fortier, Brenda Cerino-Galli, Bob Knecht, Lucy Foster-Flight, Joi Kressbach, Whitney Harvey, Gail Landry, Tish Whipple, Susan Lamb, Pete Molloy, Sue Lessard, Jeff Davis (Front Row): Sandy Johnson, William Davisson, Dianne Maskewitz, Steve Parkhurst, Lynn Hallett.

more than 60 years of industry experience

DISTINCTIVE REAL ESTATE

coastal living recognized leaders

desiraBle elizaBeth Farms neiGhBorhood

local expertise

international exposure

Beckett’s castle in cape elizaBeth

one union wharf | portland | 207.773.0262

www.townandshore.com

historic GeorGe atwood house c.1899


LUXURY PROPERTIES | TIMBERLAND | CONSULTING

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Journey’s End Northeast Harbor, ME | $4,900,000 | .81± Acres Story Litchfield | slitchfield@landvest.com| 207-276-3840

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Crescent Point on Long Lake Harrison, ME | $5,900,000 | 51± Acres Karen N. Reiche | kreiche@landvest.com| 207-874-6159

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Undercliff Co�age Camden, ME | $1,575,000 | 4.06± Acres Terry Sortwell | tsortwell@landvest.com| 207-236-3543

We’ve traveled the back roads, we’ve navigated the waters and we know Maine. Celebrating 50 Years of knowledge, service and results. HQ: Ten Post Office Square | Suite 1125 South | Boston, MA 02109 | www.landvest.com Maine: 23 Main Street, Camden • 207-236-3543 | 4A Tracy Road, Northeast Harbor • 207-276-3840 | 36 Danforth Street, Portland • 207-774-8508


Distinctive properties. Legendary service.

Real Estate Sales • Luxury Properties • Vacation Rentals Since 1898

COVE’S END

LAND AT THOMAS BAY

WOODLAWN

Seal Cove - Waterfront cottage. Perfect vacation or year-round 3-bedroom home. $365,000

Bar Harbor - 2.3+/- acres with 250+/- feet of tidal shore frontage. $350,000

Little Cranberry Island - Former historic Inn idyllically set above Bunker’s Cove. $1,295,000

LEDGELAWN

EDGEWOOD

124 COTTAGE STREET LAND

Little Cranberry Island - Restored fourbedroom home with historic views. $1,225,000

Seal Harbor - Ever-changing views across the Harbor, this 4BR offers a rich history. $1,100,000

Bar Harbor - Bring your passion to this clean slate and community! $325,000

PINE NUT

THE SPRING

POPPLESTONE

Southwest Harbor - Renovated 4BR, 3BA cottage. In-town w/strong rental history. $799,000

Mount Desert - Direct deeded access to the Park from this 3 +/- acre lot with a spring. $189,000

Northeast Harbor - Harbor views throughout this spacious 2-bedroom condo. $470,000

www.KnowlesCo.com

One Summit Road, Northeast Harbor, ME 04662 info@KnowlesCo.com 207-276-3322

Follow us on Facebook, Pinterest, Google+, Instagram & our blog at www.KnowlesCo.com


Blue Is Our Favorite Color, Too. If you’re looking to list or buy an exceptional property on the Maine coast, let us help you chart your course. Our local agents have strong ties to their communities and an unparalleled knowledge of the market. And William Raveis Real Estate has been named Top Luxury Brokerage in the USA by Leading Real Estate Companies of the World.

B at h | B run swic k (207) 443-3388 | (207) 729-1863

RaveisME.com

Independently Owned and Operated

Official REALTOR ÂŽ of the Boston Red Sox


MLS-1348277 Every component of this light-illed home demonstrates a successful marriage of form and function. Featured in the newly released book Northern Exposure.

MLS-1344634 Amazing hand crafted mortise and tenon timber frame home offering captivating eastern views of the Sheepscot River, built for you to soak in the breathtaking scenery.

MLS-1350011 Immaculately maintained and updated, quiet and serene with a 180° unobstructed westerly water view. Deep water dock. Water views from every room!

MLS-1346660 Welcome to MacMahan Island! This comfortable 3 bedroom cottage is nestled among the tall pines with fantastic westerly sunset views toward the mainland.

MLS-1350246 On Bath’s beloved Green Street in the heart of the North-end, this home is one of the rare, turn-key historic properties, an elegant blend of historic and contemporary.

MLS-1345142 “The Seagull” perched high on the banks of the Damariscotta River is a gleaming 3 bedroom contemporary celebrating a commanding view to the south, southeast.

| RAVEIS.COM | 129 FRONT STREET | BATH, ME | 04530 | 207.443.3388 INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED


WELCOME TO

TIDEWATER LANDING A PREMIER PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT FROM FATHER AND SON BUILDERS INC. IN WELLS, MAINE

Dramatic views of Wells Harbor and the Atlantic Ocean are just the beginning at Tidewater Landing. Set in one of New England’s most picturesque and historic coastal communities, Tidewater Landing offers a rare opportunity to own a new home in one of the most desirable locations in Wells, Maine.

LOTS STARTING AT $150,000

|

TIDE WATERLANDING.COM

|

207.646.6466

|

FSBHOMES.COM


A

M Aine

T rAdiTion

t ru s t . i n t e g r i t y . e x p e r i e n c e . a f t e r a l mo s t 20 0 y e a r s i n t h e r e a l e s tat e i n du s t ry i n m a i n e , w e ’ v e l e a r n e d t h e p ow e r o f t ho s e t h r e e s i m p l e wo r d s . wo r k w i t h u s .

r e ac h ou t t o u s t o day . 183 US r oUTe o ne , F AlMoUTh , M Aine 04105 | 207-781-1111 | FoB Ailey r eAl e STATe . coM


saturday july 14th 2018

Cape Elizabeth

Garden Tour

presented by the Fort Williams park Foundation

9am to 4pm

tickets:

watercolor by devan newell, cehs student

8th annual

$30 in advance $40 at event purchase online:

http://cegardentour.com

or call:

(207) 767-3707

Fmi:

gardentour@fortwilliams.org

proceeds For t h e 2018 Cape G a r d e n tour beneFit

beautiFul

sponsors

summertime

blooms and

blue Water: in the

gardens

FortWilliams.orG


LI S A D IBIASE BROKER/OWN ER | 207.653.0823 | L I SA@L A ND I NG HO M E S M A I N E.CO M

Lisa DiBiase, Broker and Co-Owner of Landing Real Estate, offers a unique perspective that is unmatched in the industry. She has developed an extensive clientele and a flawless reputation. Since starting her career 17 years ago, Lisa has worked with leading real estate companies around the country, held a position as a coach with a nationally recognized real estate training program and now owns her own real estate company with two locations; Portland and Windham, focusing on real estate marketing, advertising, and design. With multi-faceted experience in real estate, Lisa leverages her creativity and knowledge of the national real estate market to provide a unique and effective level of service to her clients.

LET US GUIDE YOU HOME

JENNIFER F ROST C ARON S A L E S AG E N T | 207.523.9789 | J E N N IFE R@L A N D I N G HO M E S MA I NE.CO M

Jennifer’s goal with Landing Real Estate is to provide exceptional personal experience, to exceed the expectations of her clients, and to ensure her knowledge, integrity, and expertise will help deliver the absolute highest results. Jennifer’s passion for building long-lasting relationships, as well as understanding the needs of both the buyer and seller, are what drive her to deliver on her firm commitments to her clients, who feel at ease and well-cared-for through this life-changing process. Her friendly style of communicating, attention to detail, and strong negotiating skills set her apart from other Brokers. Whether you’re a first time or seasoned home buyer or selling your beloved home, Jennifer has the resources, knowledge, latest technology and experience to assist you with all of or your real estate needs.

BE SEEN. BE DISTINCT. BE MORE. 44 EXCHANGE STREET, SUITE 200 PORTL AND | 79 TANDBERG TRAIL, WINDHAM, ME 207-775-7653 | L ANDINGHOMESMAINE.COM /landingrealestate

/landingrealestate


A PEEK AT THE SEA

1BR/1BA condo at Ocean Ridge on Ocean Point. Distant views of Card Cove & walking distance to Grimes Cove. Private patio, updated kitchen appliances, recently installed carpeting. Most furnishings included. $225,000

EAST BOOTHBAY VILLAGE

3 BR/2.5 BA farmhouse still boasts a double parlor, front & back stairways, pine floors & summer kitchen. With oval windows, spacious rooms & outbuildings. Corner lot is sunny & minutes from the village market, marina & restaurants. $369,000

STAY CONNECTED

DAMARISCOTTA RIVER WATERFRONT

3BR/2BA home located close to East Boothbay Village. The warmth of wood is prevalent in the open kitchen, dining & living areas. Enjoy 1 floor living with views of the river, waterside deck & association deep water dock. $475,000

NEWAGEN COLONY WATER ACCESS

Contemporary cape located in Newagen Colony with access to all resort amenities. One floor living with 6BR/3BA & 2 half baths. Custom kitchen, wood floors & stone fireplace. Attached 2 car garage, generator & new carriage house with fireplace. $875,000

EAST BOOTHBAY WATERVIEW HOME

Capture Linekin Bay sunsets from this 1860s 3BR/2.5BA residence. Kitchen, den/office & master suite on 1st floor, 2BR & full bath upstairs. Garage with great storage & a studio/office with balcony. Near Ocean Point, Linekin Preserve & East Boothbay Village. $369,000

SOUTHPORT SUMMER COTTAGE

2BR/2BA summer cottage on Southport Island offers comfortable living w/ many nearby attractions. Fully furnished & ready for its new owners to call it theirs. Great space for relaxing & entertaining on the screened porch & in the open living space. $160,000

32 Oak Street, Boothbay Harbor, ME • 207-633-6711 • www.tindalandcallahan.com

15 Woodbine Ave. | Eliot | $1,150,000 Renovated 3BR/3BA house with 2BR guest

house on peninsula with 300+ feet of waterfront and a deep water dock.

131 Shore Road| Cape Neddick | $979,000 Walk to Cape Neddick from this 4BR/3.

5BA stately colonial with stunning chef’s kitchen.

25 Grover Ave. | Eliot | $1,125,000 Pristine waterfront property with deep water dock, mooring, boat house, bunk house and in-law apartment.

37 Horn Road| York Beach | $425,000 Custom 3BR/2BA home with loads of character minutes from both Long Sands and Short Sands Beaches.

Williams Realty Partners 4 MARKET PLACE DRIVE, #2 | YORK, MAINE

WilliamsRealtyPartners.com

207.351.8188 | 603.610.8500


C A LL: 207. 415. 5175

S ANDRA MU RRAY @KW.C OM

303 SEASIDE AVE, SACO | $2,200,000

Stunning Inside and Out! If you are searching for an extraordinary, private, Saco oceanfront retreat, you will want to tour this beautiful beach front home! With almost an acre of land, and 135 feet of oceanfront with new steel pipe retaining wall, this oceanfront estate is only 5 steps down to miles of white, sandy beach. This custom home was built in 2007 with panoramic ocean views from most of the 4,000 square feet of living space. This home boasts 4 oceanfront bedrooms, 3.5 baths, a chef inspired kitchen, an oceanfront breakfast and dining area, formal living room, coffered ceilings, a master suite with gas fireplace, Jacuzzi, walk in glass shower and walk in closets. Additional amenities include a large covered oceanfront deck with automatic electronic screen, a heated 2 car garage, dual heating systems, and central air conditioning for optimal comfort. Designed with expansion in mind, the second story can be easily finished to include a second master suite, or an additional 2 bedrooms and bath.

M a in e C o asta lP rop erties.c om

215 TUTTLE ROAD, CUMBERLAND I $1,495,000

BREATHTAKING ten acre estate offering unparalleled craftsmanship and exceptional amenities. A perfect blend of comfort and refinement in a timeless Colonial set on an estate-like lot with two-story post and beam barn, dramatic stone walls, patios, mature gardens and a delightful pond with fountain.

DAVA DAVIN, Broker/Owner dava@portsidereg.com 207.217.2051

BOUTIQUES IN: PORTLAND I FALMOUTH I YARMOUTH www.portsiderealestategroup.com


A PEAKS ISL AND TREASURE... PEAKS ISL AND, MAINE

HO

Arguably, this home is in one of the best spots on the Island. Sitting 50’ from the rocky shore with a Cat Bird’s Seat to watch all the ocean has to offer – from the moon and sun rising over its’ horizon to crashing surf to the islands that dot its’ surface – it’s a spectacular spot. The home, in good condition, offers 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, a great covered porch and could be lived in year-round. It’s the last of two houses on a no exit dirt lane with conservation lands beyond so privacy, peace and quiet is the tone of the day – every day. $729,000.00

PORT ISLAND REALTY | 14 WELCH STREET, PEAKS ISLAND | 207 766 5966

Your best life begins with a home that inspires you.

CAPE NEDDICK – This contemporary styled home features a newly updated kitchen, dining area & family room w/ cathedral ceilings, a 1st level master suite w/ laundry & a private entry 1 bdrm ADU. $685,000

KITTERY WATERFRONT – Walk half a mile to the Foreside or over the bridge to Portsmouth from this 2 bdrm condo boasting a private deep water dock, countless modern amenities & low HOA fees. $674,900

CAPE NEDDICK OCEAN VIEW – High above Cape Neddick Harbor and a quick walk to a sandy beach, this remodeled 4 BR home features an updated kitchen, baths, electric & heating systems. $899,000

KITTERY WATERFRONT – Overlooking Portsmouth, up river to Eliot & Dover Point, this open concept 3 bdrm home features a private deep-water dock offering ocean access within minutes. $1,450,000

CAPE NEDDICK – New Construction! This 3 bedroom Cape is located off scenic Shore Road on a 2.37 acre lot abutting hundreds of acres of undeveloped land, offering plenty of privacy. $659,700

YORK HARBOR – One of the few buildable lots remaining in York Harbor, this level land with newly drilled well is ready for your year-round or vacation home! Walk to sandy York Harbor Beach. $399,500

31 Long Sands Road, York, Maine | 207.363.6640

AnneErwin.com Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated

19 Beach Street, Ogunquit, Maine | 207.646.8802


RE/MAX RIVERSIDE

1 Bowdoin Mill Island, Ste. 101, Topsham, ME 04086 Office: (207) 725- 8505 Ext. 111 Cell: (207) 751- 9701 agaluza@remax.net ~ www.galuzahomes.com

“Award Winning Broker” Andrea Galuza Broker/Realtor

S C E N I C V I E W S + P R I VAT E D O C K

WATERFRONT

CONTEMPORARY

ARROWSIC | Stunning Waterfront Contemporary Home with dramatic views overlooking one of the widest parts of Back River. This custom home built by Robert Stevens boasts an open concept. A generous sized living room with built- ins, a large expanse of windows, and a wood fireplace. The first floor also incorporates the master bedroom suite on the waterside of the home, an office, a workshop, and a screened porch. There are 2 bedrooms on the second floor with private baths. The upper level also has a large office overlooking the water with built-ins, a large storage area and/or expansion space over the attached 2 car garage. One of the nicest amenities is the gentle path to your own private dock where you will find a pink granite shoreline. The common area also has a large dock and mooring. $1,395,000

107 NEW GORHAM ROAD WESTBROOK

INFO@KINGMILLERREALESTATE.COM WWW.KINGMILLERREALESTATE.COM 417 US ROUTE ONE, FALMOUTH | 207.619.7571

Rich history and hidden “treasures” abound at this c. 1761 farmhouse, a home well loved for over 2 centuries. A picket fence, stone pillars and towering ancient trees watch over the 4 bedroom, 3 bath home. The small outbuilding once served as a school house for 5 families. The home features 3 fireplaces, interior wooden shutters, antique rim locks, and 2 claw foot tubs. Truly a must see! MLS#1342340


From the kitchen to the dining room. Old Port magazine’s managing editor and food editor Susan Axelrod combines two of her greatest passions—the written word and amazing meals— to let you know where to eat. And why. @eatmaine + themainemag.com

Salt Pine Social | Bath


Historic Home Experts

735Stevens.com

PortlandKidsDuathlon.com Pedals & Medals Sponsors

Full sponsor list at portlandkidsduathlon.com

2018 Beneficiary


DR AWING BOAR D

A Simple Sustainable Studio

A

new art studio replaces a rundown shed in a garden, adjacent to a tidal marsh in southern Maine. The design approach marries the shared simplicity of Shaker and Japanese design. Window openings are selectively incorporated to take advantage of specific views of the garden and the tidal marsh beyond. The sketch reveals an updated design that finds a use for the multitude of rocks and ledge pieces found during the excavation process. The rocks will be set into new stone walls with a stone garden to be added to the existing garden filled with native pines and Japanese maples, further unifying the structure and garden. Where possible, components from the existing shed structure, primarily wood 152 MAINEHOMEDESIGN.COM

sheathing and beam structure, have been salvaged and reused. New construction follows the Passive House approach of air tightness and a highly insulated envelope, avoiding the need for a heating system beyond one small electric wall heater. The wall, roof, and foundation assemblies adhere to a “foam-free” philosophy, avoiding the use of products made with fossil fuels. These assemblies are vapor open, featuring wood-fiber continuous exterior insulation, mineral wool board at interior wall cavities and foundation, and the reclaimed wood sheathing. Photovoltaic panels hidden from primary view provide power for the studio and the adjacent house. The studio design incorporates all of the elements of the firm’s simple, smart, and sustainable approach. MH+D

Location: Kittery Point Architect: ARQ Architects Construction start: April 2018 Construction complete: August 2018


| custom builders of finely crafted homes and commercial properties | 207.536.0235 | SYLVAINSEVIGNY.COM

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Profile for Maine Magazine

Maine Home+Design magazine July 2018  

Maine Home+Design magazine July 2018  

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