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A weekly publication by Loras College students

Vol. 90, Issue 17

May 10, 2012

my lorian.com

Last, but certainly not least The vocal and instrumental ensembles perform at the First Annual Last Concert of the Year by Andrea Berns staff writer

Last Saturday night, the Fieldhouse was filled with the music of the First Annual Last Concert of the Year. This fun, laid-back concert consisted of both vocal and instrumental ensembles such as the Wind Ensemble, Bella Voce, Con Brio, Chamber Singers, the Jazz Ensemble, and the Concert Choir. There was even a special duet played by Dr. Roy Carroll and Dr. David Pitt. The concert opened with the Wind Ensemble, performing music by PDQ Bach such as “March of the Cute Little Woodsprites” and “Grand Serenade.” Included with the music were quirky elements of humor and physical comedy that could be mistaken as unscripted. The composer, PDQ Bach, actually is fictional, one concocted by Peter Schickele, a musician who combines classical music and slapstick comedy through his satirical works. The last PDQ Bach supposedensemble of ly was born in 1807 as the 21st of the 20 chilthe evening dren of Johann Sebastian Bach. His parents was the never blessed him with Concert Choir, a real name, settling who performed on PDQ as his full first name. He supposedly the beautiful passed away in 1742, 65 years before he was chant, born. In addition to instru“Adiemus,” a mental music by PDQ collection of Bach, the choirs perrepeated vocal formed beautiful and refreshing music. Belsounds ... la Voce performed two songs: the title song from the musical Anything Goes, and “The Seal Lullaby” by Eric Whitacre. Con Brio sang a Doo-Wop medley and Chamber Singers sang two songs: the popular “What a Wonderful World” with Megan Moore as a soloist and “Light of a Clear Blue Morning” with soloist Alexa Tuescher. After the Chamber Singers performed the Jazz Ensemble with “Chameleon,” “Hickory and Twine” with soloists Melissa Kula and Blake Neebel, and the ever-popular “I’m So Excited,” by the Pointer Sisters. The last ensemble of the evening was the Concert Choir, who performed the beautiful chant, “Adiemus,” a collection of repeated vocal sounds; the title finale from The Gondoliers; and the last song of the night, Offenbach’s “Neighbor’s Chorus.” The Loras ensembles viewed the concert as a way to end the year on a strong note and give the seniors one last hurrah. The combined elements of PDQ Bach, well-known music, as well as some music many might never have heard before, suggest that the First Annual Last Concert won’t be the last.

illustration by AYUSH SUBEDI

Technically Teaching

Professors share their approaches to technology in the classroom by COLIN HALBMAIER

assistant features editor

It’s a common occurrence here at Loras: minutes before class starts, there is a room filled with students gazing at their laptop screens. Some are on Facebook, some are sending an e-mail, and some are catching up on a little work. The minute hand on the clock stands up straight and the professor strides in. “Close your laptops!” they announce as they set their belongings down. The students grumble a little at having their activities halted and they return their beloved laptops to their bags. The common sentiment among students at Loras is that, because they are paying a recurring technology fee for laptops they won’t be allowed to keep, they should have the right to use their laptops in class at their own will. Professors have a more diversified opinion of the subject, some agreeing and other disagreeing with the students. One common approach for professors is to give direction as to when laptop usage is or is not appropriate. Professor Breyan Strickler, Associate Professor of English, is one such person. Her policy is simply, “Use it, but don’t abuse it.” As an educator at Loras, Professor Strickler values participation in the learning community, particularly within the classroom. Her approach to settling the problem is a simple one. “They aren’t participating in the learning community, which is a big component of the Loras experience, so they don’t receive credit for being engaged in class.” Professor Strickler is not the only one with a stance on the usage of laptops in the classroom. Dr. Sharron Hope, assistant professor of Communication Arts, also values the power of laptops in the learning environment. Her opinion has evolved over her time teaching, changing from “laptops are fine under all circumstances” to “laptops are acceptable under certain circumstances.”

“To me, using a laptop for solitaire or Facebook in class is a waste.” That isn’t to say that laptops have no place in education, of course. From a teaching perspective, she appreciates the power of services such as eLearn. She also understands that they’re necessary for writing papers and doing research. However, there are some habits she doesn’t want her students falling into. As one of the professors teaching a course in Public Speaking, which first-year students are required to take, Dr. Hope knows first-hand the kind of distraction the internet can be to incoming students. She prefers her students in that class not use their laptop, even for note-taking. “I don’t want the first-years to get into the habit of paying attention to the diversions on the laptop rather than what’s going on in class.” Some professors find themselves in a more difficult position when it comes to laptop standards. Professor William Hitchcock teaches Computing and Information Technology at Loras, which makes putting laptops away a difficult decision. He requires his students to bring their laptops to class every day for purposes such as working on applications and searching for information in real-time, as well as quizzes, tests, and feedback online. “Students need to be mature and professional enough to manage their own activities in class. If they choose to do something non-class related, it’s their choice, but they shouldn’t waste their professor’s nor their classmate’s time asking a question about something that was covered when they weren’t paying attention.” Dr. Marcie Hinton, assistant professor in Communication Arts, feels similarly. From the front of her classroom, she sees many things that students believe they are getting away with.

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graphic by Emily Full

Senior Edition: Pages 12-24, in particular, are dedicated to members of the Class of 2012, some of whom will be looking for jobs


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May 10, 2012

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Classroom tech: Debate is evolving continued from page 1

Images of Facebook reflecting off of students’ glasses, the silent smirk, and eyes wandering to other people’s computers are a few of many indications noticable from her point of view at the front of the room. While the distraction is evident, she understands that people tend to take little breaks, and as long as they come back quickly enough, she doesn’t take action. If it becomes repetitive, however, she’ll begin teaching from the back of the room or talk to the student directly about the problem. If even that is not enough, she’ll begin revoking the policies she lays out in her syllabus, which all students are made aware of from the beginning of the semester. “It’s not my responsibility to be the thought police or control everything a student is doing in my classroom,” she said. While some students would argue that their payment to the college in return for their laptops should justify their usage in class, Dr. Hinton and several other like-minded professors would disagree. While one of the purposes of the laptops is to serve as an educational tool in the classroom, that is neither the only purpose nor illustration by EMILY FULL is it the most important one. Their opinion is that they have a right to control laptop usage in their own classrooms, and students can use the laptops for a variety of other educational purposes outside of class. The usage of laptops in the education environment is a fairly recent one, and its purpose is still evolving. Dr. Hinton has expressed an interest in taking their purposes to greater levels, such as using Twitter to ask questions both in and out of class, as well as teaching additional classes focused on the evolution of technology in today’s rapidly expanding online world. Classes such as Professor Hitchcock’s Computing and Info Tech Basics class rely heavily on the capabilities for laptops for hands-on experience. Many more educators, not only at Loras, are looking for more ways to use technology for education. While technology in the classrooms may still be finding its wings in the eyes of students and faculty, the future looks brighter for the system with every passing day. No doubt there will be a system developed in coming years that addresses the problems students and faculty have experienced, improving our laptop campus in more ways than one.

illustration by EMILY FULL

Loras now a Fair Trade Campus President Collins signs a resolution that says the college will pursue fair trade items whenever possible by DAVID MCDERMOTT for the Lorian

Loras College President Jim Collins was scheduled to sign a resolution earlier this morning that officially designates Loras as a Fair Trade College. The resolution comes as the last stage of an application process that is governed by the certifying organization, Fair Trade Colleges and Universities. The college has worked toward this goal as a sign of its commitment to respect all human life and the work people perform. Currently, Loras serves fair trade coffee in the Café, Pub, Duhawk Market , P.O.D., and Thursdays at the library. For example, the college has been committed to pursuing as much fair trade coffee as possible in places where coffee is ordinarily served. With this resolution, Loras will look to add fair trade items wherever and whenever possible. Two years ago, two Loras students, Kate Russell and Yvette Anderson, applied for and received a Catholic Relief Services grant of $5,000. They were instrumental in spearheading Loras’ push toward fair trade status. They were able to meet with key constituents and put together a plan of action. “Catholic Relief Services (CRS)

congratulates Loras College on its trade. They found it immensely helpachievement of Fair Trade College ful to link their fair-trade goals with status,” said Jessica Howell, CRS our Catholic faith tradition’s strong program officer. “It’s inspiring to wit- stance toward protecting the digniness Loras’ deepening commitment to ty of work. In most cases, the argufair trade principles, and we at CRS ments that were most successful on are grateful for the ongoing collabora- Loras’ campus revolved around the tions between our two institutions. moral stakes involved in the fair trade “Through the steadfast work of stu- movement. dents and staff to build awareness on As these students worked to heightcampus and to commit to en awareness of the need procurement policies that for a fair trade resolution, focus on farmers, Loras they found that informal has distinguished itself It’s inspiring to witness gatherings based around both as a Catholic educaLoras’ deepening music and fair trade prodtional institution and as an commitment to Fair ucts had the desired reimportant CRS ally. sults. Usually 50-70 stutrade principles. Loras’ decision to purdents throughout an evechase from Pura Vida, one Jessica Howell ning would stop by the of CRS’ Fair Trade cofCRS Program fair trade coffeehouses fee partners, translates Officer and be exposed to both into regular contributions passive and active awareto CRS’ Fair Trade Fund. ness-raising. The Fund invests in projThe challenge for Loects that strengthen economic justice ras continues to be that there are not initiatives both overseas and in the enough fair trade products available U.S. marketplace, meaning that Lo- and some are prohibitively expensive ras’ institutional commitment to fair compared to their non-fair-trade countrade has even greater impact.” terparts. However, significant strides Fair trade is a term of which most have been made and will continue to people are only vaguely aware, and be made. At any rate, a major goal has Russell and Anderson found that the been realized for the Loras communicampus needed a good deal of educa- ty at the resolution signing by Presition on the benefits and details of fair dent Collins earlier this morning.

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Generating more hope for Africa ... 1 student at a time by BECKY SUCKOW for the Lorian

Hope 4 Africa at Loras College is now one of the most successful “rookie” chapters of a non-profit organization called Hope 4 Africa. They provide “hope” by creating solutions to the long-term problems in Africa. The organization fundraises throughout the year to give one culminating donation each year to schools in Kenya. Relationships with these schools are maintained in order to help them benefit in whatever way they ask, so that their students can spend less time worrying about the problems around them, and more time learning. This year, four projects are in place: a water project, to build wells for one school; a scholarship project, so that high school aged students, who demonstrate academic success in the roughest of conditions receive funds to continue their education; an electricity project so that a school can

have working electricity; and a music project so young students can develop their skills as musicians. Hope 4 Africa at Loras became a club at the start of this spring semester. In only one semester we’ve raised $675, directly for the children in Africa. A big thanks goes out to the students, faculty, and their friends and family. Our most recent fundraiser was our first annual 3x3 basketball tournament, which successfully raised more than $100 for H4A. At Loras, we’re looking forward to the possibilities next year, hosting events to spread awareness and fundraise money in creative, fun ways. At the end of the year, there’s also the possibility of traveling to Kenya with other students in the organization to meet the children benefiting from our fundraising. If you want to get involved there are many opportunities. We’re just students (in America) helping students (in Africa).


news

May 10, 2012

The Finals Countdown

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Be it independent research projects in the labs of the science hall, film projects in the studio of Hoffmann, field research by students in psychology and sociology or a thesis by English majors, senior students get involved in annual projects that serve as partial fulfillment towards their respective degrees. Here we feature some of the significant senior projects from the fields of Engineering, Math and Media Studies.

Engineering

Project: 3D printer Participants: Nick Burek, Omraj Gurung, Gautam Lageju, Kyle Riegel Mentor: Dr. Dan Neeble

How do you describe the project in layman’s terms? This device allows a user to print a three-dimensional object. They are becoming very popular in industry, especially as costs continue to drop on the machines. The basic idea behind the mechanism of the project is that it melts plastic and lays it down where it needs to be, then the plastic hardens at room temperature, producing a 3D object. How did you manage the funding? It was a very difficult task. Our budget was $1500 (provided by MECS (Math, Engineering, Computer Science) department) and we came in just under. The key is to leave money for the unknown expenses and set aside money early for the known expenses. The luxury expenses are then debated. How did the idea originate? “If you ever watch one of these things work, they’re pretty cool. As soon as we started watching videos of what we could do with something like this, it was history. How long have you been working on it? All of senior year. Last semester we spent a month deciding the project but from there out we designed the project last semester and then are putting it together and programming the generators this semester. What was the most challenging part of the project? Planning for the unknown. A project this big will encounter lots of problems and even the best engineers can’t foresee all of them. What was the most exciting part of the project? It will be exciting if/when it’s working properly and we’re able to print some neat things. Any funny/interesting incidents during the project? No, all business

What did you learn from this project? Just the general ups and downs of project management. Things won’t go as planned, so plan for the unexpected. What’s the future of this project/where do you want to take this project in the future? Hopefully students get good use out of it. I might come back and print some things if I’m in the area also. Unlimited potential.

Math

Project: Monomial Ideals Participant: Katie Burke Mentor: Dr. Angela Kohlhaas

How do you describe the project in layman’s terms? The project essentially focuses on monomial ideals and the various concepts that arise from their construction, such as exponent sets, integral closures, and reduction numbers. Monomial ideals are essentially ideals of polynomial rings which are generated by monomial elements, or, in more general terms, they are simply a specific type of algebraic structure. In math, the term algebraic structure generally refers to any sort of arbitrary set with one or more mathematical operations defined on it. Monomial ideals fall under the more general algebraic research field of commutative ring theory, which in turn falls under the much larger field of abstract algebra, which studies all forms of algebraic structure, such as groups, rings, and vector spaces. How did the idea originate? It originated from Dr. Kohlhaas’s Ph.D. dissertation. It explored further some of her dissertation’s more basic and preliminary findings. How long have you been working on it? Since last semester. And as a senior who is actually graduating a semester late in December, I’ll be continuing my work on it next semester. What was the most challenging part of the project? Though the topic itself is difficult, I often found the most difficult aspect of the project to be the self-discipline it takes to get the work done. I enjoy working on the project, but with no concrete research deadlines until the end of the semester and work and other classes vying for more immediate attention, it’s easy to push research to the wayside. What’s the most exciting part? It’s the subject of the project itself. The project is an algebraically inclined topic and I like algebra; I’ve certainly enjoyed a lot of the research and mathematical proof work that have gone into this project. Additionally, what makes this project interesting is its uniqueness in terms of typical undergraduate research; algebraic research projects tend to be rare at the undergraduate level in comparison to other more commonly explored topics, such as applications of game theory or mathematical modeling. Any funny/interesting incidents? Besides unexpected proof results, or proofs which quickly morph from something seemingly simple to something much more complicated (an incident very typical in math research), I haven’t encountered many other funny/interesting incidents. What did you learn from your involvement in this project? I’ve learned a lot of new mathematical concepts from doing this project, as well as deepened my understanding of other concepts I may have known already. I also feel I’ve learned a lot more about the mathematical research process in general, which has helped me to more tangibly recognize math

as an exploration-based discipline. What’s the future of this project? Where do you want to take this project in the future? Since the project actually still has at least one more semester, I certainly plan to continue my current work, which primarily revolves around logically proving various conjectures regarding monomial ideals and their reductions that I’ve come up with this semester. Whether or not I will continue with the project after I’ve graduated largely depends on where it ends up at the end of next semester. However, it certainly has helped cultivate my enjoyment of algebraic research, which I hope to be able to continue exploring in graduate school.

Media Studies

Project: A Quest for Ansors Participants: This project was created between co-producers Michael Lawrence and Felicia Carner and stars Loras’ own Bobby Bauch. Alongside Bobby’s comedic character are a few of Dubuque’s best child actors.

How do you describe the project in layman’s terms? This project is a compilation of two educational videos based on the Iowa Core’s academic benchmarks. One video focuses on the changing of the seasons and the other on animals and their needed environments. The goal for these videos is to take K-2 children on an adventure with Detective Ansors, to find the answers to their questions. Therefore the team titled the videos as “A Quest for Ansors.” How did you manage the funding, if any? The funding? We’ll lets say that we are both a little bit poorer than we were at the beginning of the semester. We funded everything from props to costuming to the food services on the shoots. How did the idea originate? Both Michael and Felicia wanted to take on a project that stretched their skills into areas of production and post-production that they’ve never done. These videos incorporate the use of motion graphics, sound effects, goofy props, and even a green screen scene that flies Ansors into space to observe the sun. How long have you been working on it? The duo started the project at the beginning of the semester with research and story development. Currently the work is in the final stages of post-production. What was the most challenging part of the project? There is a whole lot of things that go on in a production, and it is hard to keep track of everything that is involved in this process whether it be looking for the right props, directing our talent, or make sure the lighting and camera equipment is where it needs to be. What was the most exciting part of the project? One of the most exciting things is finally being able to see production come together from the script that we both wrote. Any funny/interesting incidents during the project? It was pretty funny seeing our actor, Bobby Bauch, interact with farm animals for the first time in his life when we went to a goat farm to shoot one of our scenes. What did you learn from your involvement? The best place to find cheap props is Goodwill. I swear I probably made about ten different trips, and went to 3 different ones looking for the right prop. What’s the future of this project? Where do you want to take this project in the future? Since these are educational videos, then the next step would be showing elementary teachers to see if they would be interested in showing them to their classes. The biggest thing for this project is that I want to use the skills that I learned for this production and then apply them to future ones that I may be involved with.


special

May 10, 2012

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His door is always open in Hoffmann fifth floor, and he is the last to close at night. As a professor of economics, he has taught at Loras for decades. Dr. Laddie Joseph Sula, the Lorian Person of the Year 2012 said, “Teaching is like coaching. Throughout my career, I hope I provided my students valuable insight about their lives by teaching them differently.” He says bright students ask bright questions. As Dr. Sula retires this year from Loras after teaching here since 1969 on and off, he says he finds satisfaction when students grasp concepts of economic theory, policy and institutions. He says he derives his gratification from students’ success as they get accepted to graduate schools of their choice. In the past year, he has taught numerous classes and served in various committees inside and outside of Loras. He also gave alumni talks in Chicago, organized by the Loras Alumni group, Chicago. “I write a number of letters of recommendations,” he said proudly. Last year, Dr. Sula also arranged to meet three former students who graduated from Loras about fifteen years ago. “It was great to see the culmination of Loras students being able to achieve something like that,” he added. Sula mentioned that Loras students don’t realize the fortunate backgrounds they have. He finds remorse in seeing some students waste their time. When he came to Loras in the 60s as a student, he

was probably the only non-Catholic student here. Coming to Loras on a basketball scholarship from western suburb of Chicago, Sula was a sporty guy. “My economics teachers were able to make the subject interesting for me to understand the world and to make an impact,” he recollected. Some of the professors who influenced him were Frank Noonan, Dr. Tom Auge (father of Dr. Andrew Auge), Dr. Jim White, Frank Lenard, and Fr. Bill Wilkie, among others. Some of his professors later became his co-workers as he started working at Loras from 1969 to 1972 as an assistant professor of economics. He taught principles of economics, intermediate economic theory, public finance, money, and banking. “Loras was like a family where everybody was working for the common good of students. Everyone helped each other and not just read and teach classes.” Dr. Sula later also taught at Boise State University in Boise, Idaho, as associate professor of economics. In 1983, he came to loras and has been teaching eversince. He served as the chair of economics department from 1983 to 1989 and also from 2001 to 2004. Similarly, he was the chair of the division of social and cultural studies from 2006 to 2007. He considers economics to be a great subject. “It teaches us to think rationally,” he said. “Some are at-

tached with production and some with distribution. Some are rich and some are poor in this process, but we have to find a balance in between them,” he added. “It is also about choices you make in your own life.” Sula shows concerns about the evolution of moral values and ethics brought about by the advancement in technology. “Students are using technology more and more but are connecting less and less. As they exit the classes, they are either texting or on the phones. I don’t think they are discussing what’s taught in class.” Sula has also been involved in professional associations like American Economics Association, Midwest Economics Association, Omicron Delta Epsilon, and Delta Epsilon Sigma. He has been commended for his work with numerous awards including John Henry Cardinal Newman Teaching Excellence and Campus leadership Award (1993), Joseph J. Malone Faculty Fellowship, National Council on U.S. Arab relations, Jordan (Spring 1988), and Boise State University Association Outstanding Teacher Award (1979), among others. Sula is retiring from Loras this year and plans to read books and travel with his wife. He also wants to write a short history of the economics program at Loras. If I get bored, you might see me sitting up in the snack bar with a sign that says “economics tutor,” he joked.

Dr. Sula talking during a sports Hall of Fame event in 2001. He came to Loras on a basketball scholarship.

Dr. Sula with an MOI class in 1996. He shows remorse that technology has made communication different than in the past.


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duhawk.com

So much for maintaining a low profile

May 10,3,2012 Nov. 2011

— A little over the top — plenty of ‘debt’ to go around

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n my final Lorian article, I would like to take the opportunity to highlight the opportunities to get involved at Loras. I transferred here last year, as a junior, after attending a community college for two years. I sought to attain my bachelor’s degree with a major in politics. At the end of the day, the purpose of college is to ach ittle gain an education. We seek to become better prepared to go out into the world and market ourselves, and hopefully out-perform and out-qualify others. That’s what we put on our resume — our educational attainment. As President Obama recently said, the single-best predictor of a person’s success and income is his or her educational attainment. But in the educational process, something unexpectedly wondrous occurs. Starting at Loras in the fall of 2010, I thought I would face an uphill battle. I feared that as a transfer, I could never fit in. Groups of friends had long since been formed and I would forever be known as the outsider or the “new kid that was sort of weird.” Who is this guy and where did he come from? I thought if I just kept my head low to the ground and focused on my studies, I would be in and out of here in two short years and be on my way to a career, possibly and hopefully in the nation’s capital. I made a few friends early on, just by chatting in the lunch line, waiting to swipe my card and gorging myself on the endless buffet of food. Over time, these friends became like family. And I know that I could not have made it through my time here without them. I soon started to be restless and I wanted to branch out and make a difference on campus. Through my classes and friends, I started to discover more opportunities than I even thought possible. With so many clubs and so little time, I quickly found that my biggest problem was sorting out which commitments I most wanted to keep and which ones I would have to put on the backburner. By the end of my first year, I had been elected a Student Union Senator for the senior class, participated in DuTalk, took part in a Marathon of Dancing, dipped my feet in some of the many opportunities of Campus Ministry, and worked with Aramark as a student worker. President Collins even knew my name! My perspective since day one had completely been transformed and I felt that it was critical I get involved with the heartbeat of Loras College if my time here was going to be worthwhile. Getting an education is important, but the friendships and memories made along the way are what make our time in college unforgettable. With my second and final year at Loras, I knew that, like Jack Bauer, I would be racing against the clock to make the most of my limited time. Having many opportunities while at Loras has made me a better person, especially writing a column each week opposite the very talented, passionate Patrick O’Grady. While we may not agree on political ideology, I know we both have endeavored to provide Lorian readers with an informed and thoughtful take on the issues of the day, rather than jumping at the emotions of the moment. We may belong to separate parties but I know we both strive to set the bar higher than Congress. I am honored to have had the opportunity to appear opposite such a gentleman and a scholar.

Little to the left

duhawk.com

Seniors, become the ‘1% of 1%’ To the professors: As the seniors complete their capstone projects, the comments you give and the feedback you provide might stick with them for the rest of their lives. We hope you will appreciate the graduates’ strengths. The graduates might need this if they are to reach their potential. You have a crucial role in what the students do in the “real world.” To the seniors: It’s the time of the year when the brain cells of graduates start to hurt. Along with the approaching bright day, black clouds have started to descend with ugly reminders, “Where is your job? What are you going to do?” It is a matter of pride when years of hard work has paid off. But deep down in the heart, it is the fear that reigns. You saw the same fear when you were graduating from high school, when you got your first part time job, when you first broke up with your significant other, when you first got your car, when you first left your home, but little do we realize that such a fear can be damage. It can’t water down your confidence, the ability that you have. Only 1 percent of the world population has a college degree. So that day when you stand with others, you become the 1 percent who brings with him or the power to create and make an impact. That power doesn’t come from the mere paper certificate that you receive, but comes from the confidence you gained from your hard work and achievement from college. Each paper you wrote, each project you completed as a part of an organization, and each person you met at a volunteer opportunity injected confidence in you, consciously or unconsciously. Now the only tough thing to do is to keep this feeling alive and keep working towards

your passion. Some will pack up and head to promising jobs the morning after graduation. Some will take some time to wait for employment opportunities. This waiting game could tap some of your energy. Those who understand this, keep peace within themselves, and not get derailed from their passion and perseverance are the ones who will become the 1 percent of that 1 percent to turn the world upside-down. Success and failure are all in your mind. Go chase your dreams. To the parents: Congratulations. — The Lorian staff

Editorial staff co-executive editors Nick JOOs and rajendra thakurathi news editor MARY AGNOLI features editor SURYA PANDEY sports editor JACK METZ photo editor KeLSEY BERGAN illustrator AYUSH SUBEDI advertising manager Mike Broton assistant features editor

COLIN HALBMAIER copy editors Laura Hebbeln K.T. Heidorn Hannah way

MATT KOCH moderator TIM MANNING

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he full, two party, presidential election cycle is dawning. The smoke clears on the GOP primary battlefield revealing Mitt Romney as the nomineeto-be. Only the convention in Tampa Bay stands between him and his rightful place as the party’s figurehead. On the other side, President Obama prepares his well-oiled (or atrick rady some form of alternative energy) political machine for what will surely be a memorable race as he seeks a second term. As the two political titans prepare for battle, two defining events rest on the not-so-distant horizon. First, on June 5, Wisconsin votes in a recall election for controversial Republican Govenor Scott Walker. More or less, this vote symbolizes a nationwide mandate. The recall will check just how far the Republican license extends in the Obama era. Then, in late June, the Supreme Court will deliver their decision on the Affordable Care Act. Whether the health-care reform act stands or is struck down, partially or completely, also will frame the election for the months to come. June’s political events will surely impact the American people’s understanding of the political climate, but the actual outcomes mean little to the Obama and Romney campaigns. What matters to the candidates is how each respective camp will spin the events to the general public. If Walker is retained or if the Affordable Care Act is struck down, expect Obama to blame “do-nothing” Republicans for impeding progress. Conversely, expect Romney to perceive a rising Republican tide, ready to lift all boats, state and federal alike. However, if the opposite should happen, expect Obama to see his agenda as justified with his newfound wealth of political capital. On the other hand, expect Romney to highlight Obama’s “destructive and culture-changing policies” to push back against the validated wave of progressivism. Ultimately, the camp that best frames June’s events will gain the initial edge in campaign 2012. The next agenda item rests entirely with Mitt Romney: his running mate. Romney’s decision will impact the election more than anything else. Will he choose Marco Rubio in a bid lock up Florida? Will he pick a white male, like every Republican nominee before John McCain? In which sphere will his running mate have experience? Will his choice be one to promote economic conservatism, foreign policy or traditional values? Will he risk everything on a Tea Party “all-in”? Regardless of the choice, expect a media firestorm and immediate response from the Obama camp. Romney’s selection will set the tone for the homestretch. Indeed, the next four months will be exciting political times. Reader, please stay engaged. Think critically, discuss boldly, and join me next academic year with something to say. Find your principles, examine the candidates, and use their platforms as a means to achieve your ends. Public servants are just that, servants. Put aside everything but your principles and make Barack Obama and Mitt Romney work for you. We’ll pick up again next September. At the end of another year at The Lorian, I must recognize my editorial counterpart Zachary Little. Respectful, intelligent and a darn good writer, Little has represented has served The Lorian, the Democratic Party and his country well. Week after week, “A Little to the Left” has been a fair articulation of Democratic views and values.

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The political plots thicken Read and Right

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opinion

May 10, 2012

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letter to the editor

Religion far from a cult

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submitted by SENIOR PHILOSOPHY MAJORS his article is a response to Mr. Robbins’ article entitled “Religions versus Cults” published in the April 26th edition of the Lorian. Mr. Robbins asserted that religions and cults are the same thing, and since cults are viewed as dangerous religions should be viewed similarly. In fact, Mr. Robbins’ assertion that religions and cults are related is historically accurate, though his articulation of cults is incorrect. Merriam-Webster dictionary defines religion as “the service and worship of God or of the supernatural” and cults as “formal religious veneration, a system of religious beliefs and ritual as well as its body of adherents.” Indeed, the role of cults in the history of the Roman Catholic Church is central to the canonization of saints and has been for centuries. To start the process of canonization there must be a “cult” or group of peo,ple that venerate the individual as a truly holy person. To equate religion with a cult in the sense that Mr. Robbins does is a modern misappropriation of the word and unjustly casts a negative light, such as the “cult” of Charles Manson, on religion. Secondly, religion is not absent of logic or rationality, but rather much of the philosophical works in logic and reason owe their existence to religious thinkers. To say that religious practice is a suspension of reason is clearly unfounded, as there are great philosophers such as St. Anselm and St. Thomas Aquinas who not only use logic, but offer logical proofs for the existence of God. In fact, if you want to “apply some logic to your faith,” one need go no further than St. Anselm who offers a proof for God’s existence using the ontological argument, which is purely based in logic. Religion has a history of the use of reason and logic to support itself that dates back thousands of years. Faith and reason are not enemies, but work together to arrive at truth. As Pope John Paul II said in his letter Fides et Ratio, “The Church considers philosophy an indispensable help for a deeper understanding of faith and for communicating the truth of the Gospel to those who do not know it”. In fact, the Bible contains certain fundamental truths, which are often expressed through allegory. One such example can be found in the Genesis account, which is not taken literally as Mr. Robbins asserted, but is used to communicate the fundamental truth that evil exists in the world through humanity’s rejection of God’s law. Philosophy can not only help uncover truth in conformity with faith, but can also justify that there is rational reason to believe. Pascal’s wager is a famous example of this. It states that we can either choose to believe in God and possibly gain eternal reward if He does exists, choose to believe in God and not really lose anything if he doesn’t exist, or we can choose not to believe in God and risk losing everything if he does exist. This wager sounds like a rational starting point for belief. William James, a 19th-century American philosopher, argued that since religion can neither be proven empirically true or false, it is just as rational to believe in religion as to dismiss it. Faith is at least as rational as the rejection of God, and probably more so. Ultimately, it is up to the individual to choose to believe or not, but it is certainly not irrational or illogical to believe in God and religion.

If prostitution was legal ... P

rostitution is a practice as old as going to the bathroom, and it has been present in the majority of nations and societies since the beginning of civilization. Today it remains an illegal practice, isolated to the red-light district or other less than desirable rett obbins neighborhoods. The illegality of prostitution raises some interesting questions.   Why do we as a society define the sale of one’s body for sex as an illegal act, yet stripping, exhibitionism, pornography, and all other forms of artificial sex are all legal?  What could happen if the selling of the actual sex was legal? It’s understandable to find the selling of one’s body for sex immoral, and if prostitution was legalized there would probably be an increase in the number

Rockin’ RObbins

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of people seeking out hookers on Friday nights.  But for those who don’t see prostitution as an immoral act, or people like me who think it’s none of our business what people do with their bodies, making prostitution into a legal commercial business could have a number of positive effects.   Firstly, the legality of something immediately leaves it available to taxation, and if hookers are raking in the big bucks, so is the debt-ridden government. Second, commercialization of prostitution would create a system of legal responsibility for those commercial enterprises that sell it.  Red Light Inc. won’t dish out diseaseridden hookers to the public if lawsuits are on the table, as opposed to today’s criminalized, independent hookers roaming in the trashy parts of town, who have more STDs than fingers.   Hate and look down on them all you want, STD prevention and accountability would be highly beneficial to the health of prostitutes and their clients, and assuming

those clients return home and have sex with others, the general public. The probable downside of course is that legalizing prostitution will lead to an increase in the number of people hiring prostitutes, as well as normalizing it into society.  Renting out a person for sex certainly shouldn’t be as casual as getting a Diet Coke, so perhaps stricter restraints should be applied. There is also the valid point that society should focus on preventing people from becoming prostitutes, which I wholeheartedly agree with, but the reality is that it’s going to happen, which has been the reoccurring theme for thousands of years. Perhaps legalizing prostitution will bring more benefit than harm and, by bringing it out of the shadows, give society a better opportunity to curtail its negative effects. I don’t know if this answer is correct, but it’s food for thought when looking at sexual liberation and how we apply it to our society.

Have you ever felt ‘used’? H

by KATE MANTYH for the Lorian

ow much are you worth? Value. We all think about value from time to time. We think about the ever rising cost of gas. We all know the value of a good study session. Or how having a lot of energy can be very valuable. However, how often do we think about the value of our own bodies? Perhaps we all think, well yes, I have value. But do we really believe that? Now, I think we can all admit we want to be loved. We want to be loved by our families, friends, boyfriends or girlfriends. We want to be appreciated and valued by others, as we should be. Now, here comes the uncomfortable question: How many times in your life have you felt used? Have you ever wondered, “Have I gone too far?” or “Do they really love me?” Okay, so what does that have to do with value? I’m just going to cut to the chase. I’m writing this article because I want you to see that you are priceless. It does not matter how many times you’ve been called ugly, fat, stupid, useless or any other horrible name. I want you to put those things out of your mind. I want you to take these three words to heart: You are priceless.

I am not going to try to convince you to be pure because it’s wrong not to be. Or because it’s dangerous not to be or because you could get pregnant or because you may think I’m a prude. I’m writing this because throughout my life I have seen people hurt, used, degraded, valued only for what they can do, and lives lost because people did not recognize their priceless value. When you let others use you and when you use others, you’re disregarding their value as a human being. Your own value is being disregarded. Here’s another question: Are you truly happy? If we all are truly happy then why do we find it necessary to justify our actions? Ask yourself this: is your body only worth a one night stand? Do you want your relationship to be only about the physical stuff? Do you really want to have to worry about STDs, pregnancy, breakups that feel like divorces or how far someone might pressure you to go? I think we could all honestly answer no. There’s a reason for that. We do not exist to worry about or experience those things. I have good news, those things are also avoidable. They can be avoided when we recognize our own, and each other’s, dignity. When we recognize this dignity, we can see that if we love and care about someone, we will do what is best for them.

Little: Senior ‘blessed,’ grateful continued from page 5

In examining the importance of legacy, I am so blessed to be a part of the Loras family. It’s something a student loan can’t buy. There are so many opportunities to get involved at Loras and I would encourage everyone to make the most of every moment. Whether you have two years or four, when these last few weeks creep up on you, you’ll feel like you just did not have enough time. I would like to say thank-you to the staff of the Lorian for their hard work. I also want to thank everyone I’ve met and grown close to in the last two years. Your impact on me is treasured in ways I could never fully express in words alone. Too little time has been given, but a wise old wizard said “all we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us.” Pulled from my portfolio, which was created per Loras’ request, comes this fitting quote from Winston Churchill: “Now this is not the end. It is not even the beginning of the end. But it is, perhaps, the end of the beginning.” It’s not “goodbye,” but it’s “see you later!”

In this point in our life, what would be best? That’s a good question. Here’s my answer: Ask yourself this, will it help me and them? Will I regret this tomorrow? Will this cause me or them to worry? Am I recognizing my own value or am I being used? Why am I doing this? Who will I be to this person in 10 years? Finally, ask yourself this, do I want to be an object to this person? Or do I want my value to be recognized? I am not accusing anyone of objectifying another, but if we really want to see the value of ourselves and others, we have to be honest. Here’s the honest truth: If you are meant to be with that person in 10 or 20 years, then waiting for two or three will not ruin anything. It will only make your relationship stronger and you will grow to value each other even more. Loras College is an amazing place. I think one of the best things about Loras is the friendliness and care of the Duhawks. However, I still see so many sad faces around campus. I’m not saying we are going to find a cure for sadness or loneliness but I do believe if we only saw the value of a person, if you saw the value of yourself, we could eliminate or avoid at least some of that sadness. I’ve said it once, but I’ll say it again: You are priceless and exceedingly valuable …And that’s what makes you beautiful.

O’Grady: Stay engaged; politics shapes our lives continued from page 5

He challenged me week after week to make “Read and Right” meet out common standard of civil and intellectual political dialogue. Political differences aside, the past few months have taught me that Little and I share a common sense of patriotism and genuine love for the United States. It has been an honor to write alongside him and I am proud to call him “colleague” and “friend.” Little is graduating this May and is pursuing work on the Obama campaign. They will be lucky to have him. Finally, thank you, the reader, for another great year of “Read and Right.” It has been a privilege to write for such a reputable

publication as The Lorain. Furthermore, it has been an honor to write for such an intelligent audience as that of the Loras College student body. I hope to continue bringing you mild-mannered and well-humored conservatism in the academic year to come. You and I will be witnesses to history in November’s presidential election. I sincerely hope you will make The Lorian and “Read and Right” part of your electoral decision making process. To channel William F. Buckley, Jr.,“The best defense against usurpatory government is an assertive citizenry.” Thank you for letting me play my part. Have a blissful and blessed summer. See you next year.


spirituality/opinion

May 10, 2012

The decade the music died

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by DANNY READY for the Lorian

istory in America over the past halfcentury can be traced through the evolution of music, starting with the roots of rock and roll of the ’50s. Each decade saw its own complete redesign of music overall. The Beatles nearly defined the ’60s, then there were all those amazing concerts, starting with Woodstock. The ’70s had the rise of glam rock, disco and other various splinters of rock music. The ’80s saw the rise of synthesizers, bringing pop into a new light, and New Age rock began. It was the root for house, trance and techno styles. The ’90s were the last years of good, timeless music. There were many classic acoustic guitar songs, dance pop started, and ska rock saw some of the limelight (shout out to Reel Big Fish coming to Loras on May 12). What will the 2000s and 2010s be remembered for? Metal. Emo rock. And worst of all, Auto-tune. While there are many of these types of songs that I enjoy (and many more that I hate), I have a serious problem with my generation being remembered for them. The advent of online music downloads have caused record companies to try and produce quantity over quality. When’s the last time you were excited for an actual

album release? Those used to be a big deal. The emphasis on the “artist” instead of the actual music has destroyed music. The 2010s have been even worse. The rise of auto-tune, terrible lyrics and even worse computer-generated beats have been the hallmark of Billboard-topping songs. It has gotten to the point where anyone can pump out these “popular” songs that just get remade, revamped and re-released with different sounds. Don’t believe me? Compare “California Girls” by Katy Perry to “Tik Tok” by Ke$ha. There actually are people who claim online that they have laid the two over top of each other and discovered that they are almost the same song. I don’t make this stuff up, folks. Both were produced by Dr. Luke and Benny Blanco, who notoriously have several other “hits.” Secondly, a group of two teenagers set out to show everyone how blatantly easy it is to produce this musical kerfuffle. It’s called “Creating a Hit: The 8-Hour Challenge” on Youtube. They set out to create a “top-40-style hit” within eight hours. They had a Macbook and some basic recording equipment. It was an easy-enough task that the group even took more than an hour off those eight to go get food. In the end, they pumped out the song “Lights, Camera, Action.” This song is

painfully similar to “professionally produced” music. It isn’t perfect, but remember: two teenagers, eight hours in a basement. My favorite part is how the lyrics only reflect modern-day happenings, and in years, will be completely irrelevant, just like the top songs today. “You be Ross and I’ll be Rachel” is barely applicable today, and in 10 years will be meaningless. Lastly, the artists of today don’t even like their own music. They realize that they are just trolling the music industry and making loads of money. They listen to music producers, telling them how to pump out easy-to-create songs and make themselves and the record company a ton of money. Hopefully this musical disaster will be overshadowed by the rising trend of artists releasing their own albums without record companies because of the ease of access through technology. In 15 to 20 years, when I have kids, and I have to listen to the “oldies” station on the radio from our generation, I’m going to facepalm as I explain to them how terrifying it was watching the denigration of musical talent while growing up. Ke$ha was quoted by New York Magazine in June when asked if she likes listening to your own music. She replied with “No, it’s kind of d****ey.” Case closed.

At the gate ... my little revolution

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by SURYA PANDEY features editor

still can’t get the vision of that gate out of my mind. If you cross that gate, you likely are headed to prison. The street leading to the gate of Fort Benning was closed, but we had special permission. A stage was being set up 100 meters outside from the military base’s gate. For the past 10 years, a group of Loras students helped take turns throughout the night “guarding” the stage during the weekend of the annual protest of the School of the Americas. When my turn came at 5 a.m., I spent the majority of the time staring at the far end of the street that looked endless in the dark, wondering what transpires behind those gates. But as my shift ended and the sun slowly rose behind the trees, people from various organizations, colleges and universities, clubs and social groups began to fill the street. Each showcased their agendas in the form of posters, pamphlets, magazines and newsletters. And there were stations that sold artworks, books, handy-crafts, drinks, food and even clothes. The empty street turned into a carnival. Thousands of people young and old, of all colors and style, hugging, dancing and mesmerized by the music, lost in the energy. “Welcome peacemakers …” a man addressed the crowd from the stage. People roared and applauded as he spoke of oppression, injustice and mass murder as well as resistance, justice and freedom. Other speakers promoted social justice or shared stories about innocent prisoners or family members and relatives who had been killed. Messages of peace, non-violence and

solidarity resonated in the crowd. Meanwhile, a rather annoying announcement — a warning of some sort — was played repeatedly behind the stage, seemingly originating from behind the gate, perhaps attempting to interrupt the speakers. But the sounds from the stage mostly won out, and the crowd ignored it. For me, a speaker from Ghana was the most memorable. He shared his experiences, and the crowd carefully listened as he recited his poem about peace and justice. A native of Ghana, David had come to the U.S. as a student, and it was his third year partaking in the SOA Watch vigil. The previous year, he had crossed over the gate and was imprisoned for 6 months. He said he thought he was going to be deported. “I wanted to live in solidarity with the prisoners held for advocating peace,” he said. He illuminated me on matters of oppressoroppressed subtleties, the bourgeoisieproletariat dynamics, imperialism. An amateur in politics and world affairs, I was invested in him. He said he is volunteering at a Catholic workers farm in California and wishes to establish a similar organization in Ghana. As we chatted, a voice from the stage hollered my group’s name, “Thank you, Loras College.” We were being commended for guarding the stage and all other help facilitating the event. I felt as though I was a significant figure. That night, as we sat for reflection, it occurred to me that I had been part of a small revolution. The SOA (School of Americas) in Fort Benning had been notorious for training foreign military officials, especially Latin American officials, many of whom allegedly

A heck of a Portfolio by KEITH FLINN

features editor

With so many of my peers graduating, I came to ponder the value of the Loras experience. Hearing from classmates in Portfolio helped me appreciate how well Loras tailors education to the student’s desires. For instance, a woman in my class spoke of being able to study abroad in Spain,working in genetics lab with graduate students in her second-language. Considering her interests were in both disciplines, it seems perfect. Or the two men are writing code for senior class gift. They are de-

veloping an application for smartphones geared towards prospective students. A challenging process, their professors learned right along with them during the process. My own experiences have been closely intertwined with my aspirations, even though Loras has no pre-law major. I’ve competed in London for our school and country in mock mediation against law students from around the world. I’ve held an internship at the Dubuque County Courthouse. Even though my major is English, I’ve been able to work quite closely with the law. I’d do it again — pick Loras.

brought violence and terror to their home countries. The army officials trained at this school have been implicated mass murder, massacres and torture in Latin American countries. The SOA Watch is an attempt to peacefully protest against the school for their indirect role in these atrocities. Among other things, the Watch has been demanding the closure of the school. My decision to take part in the protest had come from an urge to experience a social action first hand. In 2006, I had witnessed the People’s Revolution in Nepal that overthrew the monarchy and later established democratic republic of Nepal; thousands of people had rallied in the streets and I could hear gunshots right from my house. It was terrifying. War of any sort always comes with a sudden terror no matter how close or far you are from it. But here I was witnessing a social action from so close. I felt like I was part of history in the making. Later that night, it occurred to me that David wasn’t any ordinary stranger that I had conversation with; I had spoken to a fearless warrior of freedom and justice. That night, we again guarded the stage. Everyone looked tired. As the sounds of the rain lulled me to sleep, my thoughts again took me behind the gate. The Loras SOA (School of the Americas) Watch trip to Fort Benning in Columbus, GA, is an annual trip coordinated by Fr. Ray Herman Center, of Peace and Justice, and Campus Ministry in an effort to support the nationwide SOA Watch. This year, more than 20 students, led by couple faculty and staff, spent a weekend in November at the vigil. Loras has been part of this social action since

lorian.com

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from the seminary

The only true Light by COLIN PRIEST

seminarian of the St. Pius X Seminary at Loras

Everyone knows that the sun is an extremely powerful and indispensable force that commands the attention of all life on Earth. A person is intrigued by its majesty, appreciates its life-giving heat, and averts his or her eyes in respectful fear of its power. The early Church acknowledged these things about the sun, and then put it in its place; the sun in all its majesty and power is itself subservient to Someone even more majestic and mighty. Throughout the Scriptures, the Sun is given as a sign of God’s presence and sovereignty. In the 130th Psalm, the longing that the Jewish people have for the long-awaited Messiah is described in terms of a nightwatchman waiting for the sun’s rising: “my soul is longing for the Lord, more than watchmen for daybreak” (v. 6). When the priest Zechariah saw his son, the future John the Baptist, he cried “in the tender compassion of our God, the dawn from on high shall break upon us, to shine on those who dwell in darkness!” (Lk. 1:78-79). He said this because he knew that his son, John, would herald the coming of God into the world – the God who rises to free the human race from its blindness in sin and give life to the soul, as the sun rises to give life to the body. And so, in the Catholic tradition, the sun is a sign of God Himself; even so, the sun is temporary while God’s eternal reign will never end. This is seen in the Book of Revelation, when John proclaims that in the end of time, the Saints in heaven have “no need of sun or moon to shine on [them] for the glory of God [gives them] light” (21:23). Christianity has the boldness to proclaim that the sun is only a bitplayer in an eternity, Divine comedy. In Jesus, the Dawn from on High, the souls of Christians are redeemed. In icons of our saints, we often draw a halo around the sanctified head – as a sign of the enlightenment of Christ. With the coming of Christ, the Light that the watchman of Psalm 130 was anxiously waiting for has risen, and those who were blind now have light to see by. And we believe that one day His Light will come again; as Pope Benedict XVI says “this is why the Mass originally was celebrated facing east, toward the returning Lord, who is symbolized in the rising sun” (Light of the World, 180). Come, Lord Jesus, and enlighten our souls!

Knights in shining armor, for sure

The Knights of Columbus have been hard at work, and serving as Grand Knight over the past year has been a life-changing education. When in charge of an organization, you see everything from a slightly different perspective. I was always concerned about functionality, about whether an event would go off right or not. I needn’t worry. The Knights show me that when you trust, in both God and man, great things can happen. A prime example of this during the past year was the Night with a Knight Auction. Our council raised nearly $700 to donate to the Hope Houses. If it hadn’t been for my brother Knights, I probably would have lost my mind. Their ability to band together and solve problems. The commitment I see in these men is something I hope to see in years to come. Under the direction

of Jacob Clay, the Grand Knight for next year, these men will proudly continue to serve both Loras and the greater Dubuque community, but the most important part is that they will never lose faith. The Catholic faith is lucky to have men of such high caliber. By forming a fraternal bond with each other, we become men of faith and role models for each other. It is something I want everyone to have. The Knights are always looking for a few good men. It doesn’t matter where you are in your life. If you are searching for that community and are willing to put yourself out there with these men, consider joining the Knights. Become a part of something that will help you keep your sanity during finals week because you know there are people praying for you and ready to catch you when you fall. Join the family of the Knights today.


features

May 10, 2012

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duhawk.com

An arrangement made in heaven? by SURYA PANDEY

I

features editor

magine you are a single man or woman in your early 20s, either still attending college or a recent graduate. Virtually all of your thoughts are focused on your future, mostly in terms of work and career. In the meantime, however, imagine that your parents are preoccupied with just one issue —your “singleness.” Without your knowledge and for some time, your parents have been talking to relatives and acquaintances as they strive to find you the “right” partner. They are busy “arranging” your marriage. Where I come from, Nepal, this is how marriage comes about. Parents’ definition of the person “right for you” entails among other things, whether they are from your caste, educated, of good character, come from a flawless family, employed and reasonably attractive. If you are a man, you must be at least slightly older than her, and preferably taller. Depending on whether you are from a city or village and the kind of opportunities you are exposed to, the requirements for candidacy will differ. But it’s their job to find the perfect match. When it’s time you “check out” your partner-to-be, your parents reveal their scheme. You are appalled and fearful (or at least you pretend to be) or shy and confused. “Is it really about that time?” you ask. You are not the first one in this conundrum. You think about your parents’ desperation and realize the urgency. You also can hear your grandparents’ familiar mantra: “We are getting old; I’d die happy if I see your marriage (and your children).” Before you can think any further, you are checking out your potential future partner.

This turn of events can be complicated doesn’t really count much. After all, it’s by any secret “affairs” you have going you who is being “checked out.” So, on — your parents don’t know because all you do is hope that the groom that you are not supposed to engage in that picked you is the one you like. kind of behavior or talk about it. And if “How strange, scary and stupid,” you you bring it up at this hour, depending may think. But this is the tradition of upon the people involved (especially arranged marriages in many parts of what caste), the consequences could India and Nepal. In some places, there range from reassessment of the situation is greater freedom in terms of choosing to total disaster. In any case, you would a partner. We have started to see a shift have to make some hard choices and big in the perception of marriage from the sacrifices. traditional to a more Western approach, Let’s say, for the moment, you’re not especially in big cities and in liberal and involved in any affair. In that case, if educated families. you are a potential groom, you go with Marriages in which the bride and your parents to see the potential the groom bride at her house. You meet the choose one bride’s family, you drink some tea another are I’m sorry, and chit-chat. Then the two of you getting more are left alone to talk in private. In acceptable, what did you say about half-hour to an hour, you try especially if to “know” the person by gleaning the parents your name is? all that there is to know about her. are OK with Then you go home and talk it. Instances to your parents. If you liked the where the woman, your couples parents pick a marry against date for wedding. their parents’ If you are will are not hesitant, but your uncommon either. parents like the Nonetheless, a vast woman and the majority still follows family, they try to the same traditional convince you and, system of arranged most of the time, marriage. you will give in. In a culture If you absolutely where dating before do NOT like her, marriage is the norm, you give your the very idea of parents the trouble marrying a stranger of Round 2. must seem antiquated Now if you and perhaps bizarre. are the to-beBut before judging bride, you check it, consider the long your groom out, success history of but your opinion arranged marriage, as

it boasts of very low divorce rate of 1.1 percent. Could it be a more appealing alternative than the Western culture of “self-choice” marriages (or love marriages) that reveal a staggering number of divorce rates (about 50 percent of all marriages in U.S.)? Obviously, considering that divorce rate is just one indicator (although the strongest one) of a “good” marriage and given that the attitude towards divorce is different in these two cultures, the conclusions drawn from these statistics become muddled. It can be argued that “love marriages” are more appealing than arranged marriages in terms of freedom, trust, understanding and compromise in the relationship. To be sure, an arranged marriage must seem like a scary proposition, especially for women who do not have any say. However, the divorce numbers should prevent us from making any bold statements against arranged marriages. But the idea of marrying a person that you know you would like to spend your life with and that you think will be a good company is preferable. In that regard, the Western tradition is something one would normally choose. Unfortunately, it is entirely possible that one could be unsuccessful in finding a partner and crave the happiness brought by a significant other. In such cases, the Eastern tradition of arranged marriage, where a larger community helps form a couple, might prove conducive. Perhaps, a blend of two traditions, where either love of the young couple is supported by the family and society, or where the arrangement made by the parents is first followed by a longer “dating” period before the decision of marriage is made, would be a healthy approach to being happily married.

Teaching in a foreign land by SURYA PANDEY features editor

Dr. Lee Zhu, China Journey to the U.S/Loras… I came to the U.S. in the end of 1987 to pursue a Ph.D. program at State University of New York. I was a faculty member at a major university in Shanghai. I came to Loras in 2000 to teach East Asian history and Russian history. Fears/excitements coming to a new land... I knew the start would be intense, managing everything. When you are studying history, the language becomes a barrier. Science, math and technology is much easier for us because language isn’t a barrier. Challenges... As a student it wasn’t difficult to adjust to the culture but when you enter the professional world it’s different. As a native speaker it is not difficult to be a competent teacher but it is difficult to be an excellent teacher but when English is not your native language, it is a different story. Likes/Dislikes... In China, social skills are very important in order to succeed. Making connections is not my strength. One thing I like about the U.S. is that it gives least importance to personal connections; as long as you are a capable person and work hard you can have good life. There is competition but it’s fair. Yes, you have to maintain good relations even here but important thing is you work hard and do your job well. About Dubuque, I like it when trees are green, winter is a bit harsh. Dubuque is a small city but a cosmopolitan in a small way and I like that. I miss... Music Loras Experience... Loras has a friendly working environment; good colleagues and respectful students. It’s a small institution which makes it easier to get things done. One drawback about a small institution like Loras is that teaching load is heavy and you don’t have time to do research. Inside the classroom… Teaching in China emphasizes knowledge, here emphasis is on skills. I emphasize understanding because I found that it’s not easy for American students to understand the foreign culture. I value creative thinking but I also value good understanding and informed opinion. About the job I do... Watching the students grow in four years is always gratifying. It’s not about money as much as it is about making positive impact on people.

Dr. Aditi Sinha, India

Journey to the U.S. and Loras… I came to the US to pursue a Ph.D in Environmental Biology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. I first came to Loras College when I was offered a position as a visiting professor in the Biology program. I then returned three years later for family reasons. Fears/excitements coming to a new land... It was very exciting coming to a new place and starting a new chapter in my life. I was very excited about being in Boston too, having heard so many nice things about it. The fears were usual, those associated with going to a new country: Is it going to be a big culture shock? Was life going to be like I had envisioned based on the media, movies and all that I had heard? How would I fit in? Would people be welcoming? Challenges... Snow. Cold. Likes/Dislikes... I like how the U.S. is a melting pot of cultures and cuisines. I don’t like that it is so far away from India. About Dubuque, I like how there are many natural areas such as the Mines of Spain and Swiss Valley. There aren’t very many ethnic restaurants here, but it is getting better. Life is pleasant in Dubuque. The bluff and the river add to the beauty of the city. The city of Dubuque is making concerted efforts to be sustainable, and that has tremendous appeal for me given my interests. I miss... Mostly my family. Indian mangoes and other tropical fruits & vegetables. Traffic, and the honking horns too :) Loras Experience... It’s been a very positive experience. I enjoy the interaction with students and my colleagues, and the congenial work atmosphere. Our small size enables us to get to know our students well, and help them enhance their strengths and improve their weaknesses. At Loras, one is part of not just the program and division but also of a larger community. About the job I do... It is very exciting exposing science and non-science majors to what I really love and feel passionate about, Biology. It is extremely rewarding, either during the semester or long after, to be told by a student how much they enjoyed a course they had with me. Another very rewarding aspect of this job is seeing students grow and develop during their four years at Loras.


features

May 10, 2012

Advice from the Newest Alums 1. Dana Disteldorf Life is all about perspective and taking the time to try to understand others’ points of view. Even if it is one you might disagree with, take the time to understand before judging. See the potential in every day. Make it a point to see every day as an opportunity for a new experience. You bring a lot to the table, don’t forget it!

5. Kelsey Hlavin

Where did the last four years go? I am sure that is what the entire class of 2012 is thinking! Looking back at my years as a Loras student, one of the biggest pieces of advice I’d give is: take advantage of your time here, utilize the resources that are available to you to study abroad or do internships. Remember that your major doesn’t really matter when it comes to finding a job. The experience you have gained is what really matters. I feel so blessed to become a graduate of such a great institution. Thank you to my friends and family for supporting me and making my Loras experience so memorable. GO DUHAWKS!

6. Zach Little

2.Patrick J. Sperfslage Most of us have been here four years.We have shared education.We have shared laughter and tears.We gave time to better one another. and patience to help one another find peace.We gave love.We thank you for a great education. We thank you for great memories. We thank you for a great big hug in times of desperation. We hope to leave you with no fears or tears. Whenever one door closes another door opens. Another chapter in this book called Life. We challenge you now to learn with all your might and to discern what is right. We challenge you now to hold love tight. We challenge you now to help make the dark of night bright.

3. Stephen Brandt Perhaps the most important thing I will take from my time at Loras will be experiences. In a way, we all enter college as little explorers, leaving the shell of our high school habitats to discover what the heck’s out there. Through exposure to new people, ideas, cultures, and course material, our worlds suddenly become a whole lot bigger. So do your best to leave no stone unturned, no path neglected, because it is these experiences—from the very profound to downright silly—that will show you the many faces of life, and you just might catch a glimpse of yourself in the journey.

4. Callie Krummel I am so thankful for the friends I made at Loras. They have made my time here worth every second. From my roommates to my SI students to my professors and everyone in between, THANK YOU for providing me with the best undergraduate experience I could have hoped for. I am so grateful for my Loras education and the skills I learned here I will miss my Loras family as I continue on at the University of Minnesota for Pharmacy School. I know I will have good times as I continue, but I will always remember my time at Loras THANK YOU! Love Always.

From the lunch line to the finish line, if it weren’t for my friends, I would not have enjoyed my time as a Duhawk. I recognize that being a Duhawk means that I’m part of a larger community, and that Duhawks never fly alone. I’m reminded of a little story: A man goes to the grocery store and fills his cart with all sorts of good stuff. He makes his way to the checkout. The cashier rings up all his groceries. The man hands the cashier the money and he walks out, leaving the groceries on the checkout line. Silly, right? Coming to Loras, I’ve received so much more than groceries. An excellent education, a stronger faith, and friendships that I hope last a lifetime. And I’m not leaving it at the checkout. I’m taking all of it with me as I move on from Loras, and I’ll never forget where I received these treasures.

7. Trav Ayers “The Last Door Dec” There comes a day in every Resident Advisor’s (RA) career. When you have to put up the last door decoration. For some it is a joyous occasion, for others it is a sad milestone, a symbol that the end is near. For me I get a chance to reflect on three awesome years as an RA in Beckman Hall; a chance to remember all the fire alarms and late night conversations with my boys and playing liars’ dice; a chance to remember all the amazing relationships that I have had here; a chance to remember watching everyone see Narnia for the first time; and a chance to remember a job that changed my life forever. If I could only keep one part of my four years at Loras, it would undoubtedly be my time here in Beckman. So I write this for three reasons. The first is an undeniable thank you to all of you. You might not realize it but you have all been a part of the most amazing experience of my life. The second is a challenge to all of you. Non seniors--you all have at least one, if not more years left here, make them count no matter what; they will be gone before you know it. Remember that college is so much more than just classes (despite what some professors might think). Try new things and experience it all! Seniors-take your gifts out into the world and use them for good! The third is to say goodbye. All good things must come to an end. And although I loved my time here, it too must come to an end. I love all of you and wish you the best in the future. Stay in touch and don’t forget me, because I am not about to forget any of this or any of you.

my lorian.com

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8. Daniel Burchardt Someone once said that college is about three things: friends, grades, and sleep. You only get to pick two. I could not decide which two to focus on and I switched every week. It did not work very well. If there is one piece of wisdom that I may share, it is that life is about seeking balance. If you dedicate yourself to only one goal, then other areas of your life will suffer. It is the easy path to specialize in one thing only, be it a career, taking time for yourself or being dedicated to extra curricular activities. There is some security in having that one track mind. But you can have a rich life, full of variety and new experiences, if you choose to accept the challenge of embracing all areas of your life and seeking balance between multiple demands. Life is a search for balance. You may not find it but the fact that you’re trying is what matters.

9. Cameilla Mukherjee Loras is definitely a “home away from home.” It has been a splendid journey learning about different things and different people. People are so warm and welcoming here. The English faculty have been very helpful, understanding and affectionate towards me. I can’t express in words how thankful I am to my advisor and the English department, for motivating me and cheering me on at every step in the last four years. I will miss the fried unhealthy cafeteria food. I’ll miss rushing to my classes from Science Hall all the way to Hoffman in the harsh winters. I’ll miss the fire alarms in Beckman at ungodly hours. Most of all, I’ll miss the people. Loras was my first stepping stone towards a better future and I will always carry the last four years of laughter and delight wherever I go.

10. Carolyn Windberg When I look back on past four years of my Loras experience, there has been one constant component through the ups and downs and that is the roommates I have today. I cannot imagine what Loras would have been like without my three beautiful roommates. They have inspired me to be a better person, all in their own unique ways. They have always challenged me to go above and beyond and are always there to support me in every endeavor. They have been in the Keane parking lot at 6am to see me off for service trips, they have listened to story after story about Dance Marathon, and they have helped me get back on my feet when I didn’t want to. But none of these compare to the times that they made me smile, laugh, and believe in myself. They have made Loras a home for me.


sports

May 10, 2012

10

my lorian.com

sports editorial

Welcome to the big leagues

Apparently the “old school” image has a different meaning around the league to former players and current players

Jack’s Smack

If you lie to the NFL, you get a year suspension, but if you tell the truth in the MLB, apparently that is on grounds for a suspension too. At least that is what happened to Cole Hamels, pitcher for the Philadelphia Phillies, when he “welcomed” Bryce Harper to the league’ earlier this week. For the most part, what happened in that game against the Nationals went just as it should have. Hamels hit Harper with the first pitch and Harper just jogged to first base, extracting his revenge by stealing home plate when Hamels threw the ball over to first base. Harper was the first teenager to steal home plate since the early 60’s, but his team still wanted to get a message across to Hamels, so when Hamels came up to bat, the Nationals threw at his legs and hit him and Hamels took his base. That is where the old school, chippy play ended, and where my issues arose with how the MLB handled the matter. Does a five game suspension (Hamels will miss one start) justify anything Hamels did? He came out in the media and told the reporters that he meant to throw at Harper, who has been known to be pretty arrogant, but then again what baseball player isn’t. Plus, Harper’s track record of being a 19-year old already in the major leagues gives him the ability to act the way he does. The point trying to be made here, though, is the example the MLB is trying to drive into its players. Should players lie to the media instead of answering a question truthfully. Yes, Hamels could have went about answering the question differently and just let the media believe what they want, since most would believe it was on purpose. However, I just cannot believe the route the MLB went with discipline here. The NFL is currently suspending players, who were associated in bounties. Apparently, Bud Selig was jealous of his buddy Roger Goodell having all the fun and joined in by suspending Hamels for his actions in purposely hitting a player. Cole Hamels will have to fork over 409 thousand in fines during suspension, which is a lot considering Bryce Harper, alone, is making only 500 thousand this season. I seem to be in the minority in thinking that Cole Hamels should not have been suspended, but he’s only missing one game anyway so the people, like Jim Leyland, who thinks he should have been suspended 15 games might be the people who have the bigger issues here. The MLB should have suspended Hamels for more games if this was the outcry that was going to be received by Leyland and with Cal Ripken Jr.. coming out following the incident explaining that there is usually a spark plug in these situations and that no spark plug started this situation. Well Cal, it probably had something to do with all the media attention that Bryce Harper has been receiving, which is why Cole Hamels was welcoming him to the league with a fastball to the back. I do not condone necessarily the action he took in hitting Harper, I just enjoyed that a baseball player would come out and tell the truth instead of beating around the bush. So with the way this situation has played out for Hamels, should players now be cautious when answering questions from reporters after games? Despite what people think, the suspension will not harm the Phillies at all. They have an off day on Thursday, which means Roy Halladay will be pitched on regular rest and Hamels will be back on the mound by Sunday, and maybe we’ll be lucky enough to see him go old school again and send a message to the MLB by hitting another player on purpose. But then again, that’s just the old school in me.

Jack Metz

photo by JIM NAPRSTEK

Todd Whited stares down a pitch from first-year Adam Schwoebel in the first game of a doubleheader on April 24, 2012. The Duhawks took both games, 1-0 & 2-1.

Duhawks sweep Rams, but UD loss dooms tourney bid Loras’ season ends after sweeping Cornell, but it also needed the Spartans to defeat Simpson by JULIAN GALLO sports writer

This past weekend, the Loras baseball team finished their season with a bang. The Duhawks faced Cornell at home on Senior Day, and they performed splendidly. The team was able to sweep Cornell in a bid to reach the Iowa Conference Tournament. However, in the end it was not to be. The team did get its sweep over Cornell, but it also needed the University of Dubuque to defeat Simpson, which unfortunately did not happen. With the sweep against Cornell, the team’s overall record improved to 22-18 which pushed them above .500 on the season. Much of the success came from the bats. There were 29 hits in the second game where Loras won 110. Nothing, however, could take out the bittersweet taste of that elusive tournament entry. “This weekend was very bittersweet for me and the players,” said Coach Tebon. “We all wanted it, and the players especially wanted it very badly. Their expectation of themselves was to get there and they were right to think that of themselves. Hopefully after this season the underclassmen will realize just how much work it takes to get there and do even more next year.” Before the team can move on to next year, they must say good-bye to a very experienced and talented senior class. The season may be over, but they won’t be likely to forget their last year and all its crazy ups and downs. There are six seniors on this team currently: Kyle Barton, Travis Olson, Clay Henricksen, Spencer Radabaugh, BJ Juergens, and Logan Potter. They were all recognized Satur-

‘‘

We had a lot of close games, that were sometimes lost and sometimes won, but that shows that we were consistent throughout the season. You can’t count on one thing every game, everything needs to be working in order to ensure a team victory. That being said, I thought that it was a very good thing to see that we were in every game and had a shot to win almost any game.

,,

Carl Tebon, baseball head coach

photo by JIM NAPRSTEK

First-year Adam Schwoebel fields a ground ball hit by Todd Whited of University of Dubuque and shuffles it to first base to make the out. day and will all be missed. “The leadership this year was excellent,” said coach Tebon. “These guys brought great poise to the team and were great role models for the underclassmen. When you lose some close games in a row, it can take a toll on the team, but they always kept their heads on straight

and set the example for the young guys. Even when we got down they battled back harder than ever and that’s great to see.” The stat that was both good and bad was the number of one run games that were lost this year. The team didn’t lose, but participated in 24, three run games, and 14 of those were one run games. That’s how close they were at all times this season. “The thing about this week was that we needed to make sure that we had the mentality that we are a successful team,” said coach Tebon. “We had a lot of close games that were sometimes lost and sometimes won, but that shows that we were consistent throughout the season. You can’t count on one thing every game, everything needs to be working in order to ensure a team victory. That being said, I thought that it was a very good thing to see that we were in every game and had a shot to win almost any game.” Top performances this season came from junior outfielder Billy Kass, who led the team with a .291 batting average and eight home runs with with 69 runs batted in. Sophomore Jeremy Gerardy led the team with a 2.34 ERA while appearing in 16 games out of the bullpen. Will Petrosky and Ben Cottrell each tied with 4 wins in starts this season, with Cottrell leading the team with three complete games.


sports

May 10, 2012

11

Softball looks to rebound with youth

my lorian.com

Seniors saving best results for last meet

Following a quick exit in IIAC tournament, team’s core is still in tact and hope to build on success from by JACK METZ

sports editor

After notching their 20th victory of the season against Central almost two weeks ago, the Duhawks would not taste victory for the rest of the season as they closed their season dropping both games in the Iowa Conference Tournament. Loras finished the season with a 2018 record overall, and a 7-9 record in the IIAC, finishing fifth in the conference. “It is great to see the program moving in a direction where the team is playing well and getting victories as a result of it,” said coach Ashley Rogers. “This year we played well in a majority of games and it gave us chances to win games. I thought the players did a great job of coming up big with wins when they needed to, such as the Central one; that was huge for us to get into the conference tournament.” When the Duhawks entered the conference tournament they had to face the number four seed, Coe, and the game would come down to defensive errors in extra innings, with a final of 3-2. The Duhawks were looking to defeat the Kohawks for the third time of the season. Each team would collect three hits, but the main difference would be the crooked number three in the error column for Loras. In the Coe half of the eighth, a leadoff walk turned into a runner on second following a sacrifice bunt. Relief pitcher Holly Klein tried to correct her leadoff mistake after a come-backer, and she turned to throw back to second base, but her throw sailed off and resulted in the Kohawks’ victory. “The game was very disappointing; I thought we had played very well. In the 7th inning we had some defensive struggles as well. We got out of it, but in the 8th inning the defensive struggles continued. Overall we played well enough to win up to that point.” The Duhawks came back the next day, but five runs in four innings by the Simpson Storm closed the book on the Loras season with the Storm winning 5-0, with eight total hits compared to the Duhawks two. With the Loras season officially closed, having collected its first 20-win season since 2005, the Duhawks were able to do it with a team that suffered many different types of injuries to key players. “I think overall we had a real great season. We dealt with a lot of adversity this year with players going down, whether it was season-ending injuries or day-to-day injuries,” said Rogers. “I think our players responded well, and we had different players who stepped up each game. It was not always the same player; first-years to seniors made an impact.” Top performers on the team this season included first-year Katie Serpico who led the team with a .371 batting average and 39 total hits, while junior Kellie Klein followed Serpico with a .309 average and led the team with seven home runs. The Duhawks will enter the 2013 campaign without three familiar players, as the end of the season marked the end of the careers of seniors Katelyn Jones, Leanne Szela, and Cassie Maniatis.

by JEFF SCHMIDT sportswriter

photo by A2Z SPORTS PHOTOGRAPHY

Junior Sam Herrmann loads up in his backswing as his drives would power his way to the top of the leaderboard against IIAC competition.

Herrmann captures IIAC title on the links by RYAN BINSFIELD sportswriter

The men’s golf team finished 7th overall in the 2012 IIAC Men’s Golf Championship this past weekend. Individually, junior Sam Herrmann took home conference champion honors by a three stroke margin. Heading into the final two rounds of tournament play, Herrmann was in a three-way tie for first place with Garrett Cross of Coe and Justin Livingston of Central. Following a round of 74 on Friday, Herrmann found himself two shots off the lead heading into the final day of play. “I knew I needed to post a good score, especially since I was one of the first groups teeing off,” said Herrmann “I needed to get going early in order to post a good score.” Herrmann did just that, carding the second lowest score of all golfers in the final round, a 73, to win the tournament by three strokes over Luther’s Tobias Kohl. “I didn’t find out I won until I checked the scores myself, but what gave it away was the Luther coach coming up to me and congratulating me. It didn’t really hit me at first, but as far as emotions go, I was extremely happy and relieved after waiting for two hours to see what Kohl (Luther) shot,” said Herrmann. As a team, the Duhawks entered the final two rounds of play in 7th place and 7 strokes away from moving ahead of the University of Dubuque. The team shot a total score of 644 in the final two rounds of play, a 28 stroke improvement, but were unable to move up any spots on the leader-

board and finished the tournament 7th overall. Following Herrmann on the leaderboard was: sophomore James Komorowski who finished 31st overall, first-year Drew Massey finished two strokes behind Komorowski, placing 32nd overall, first-year Alex Beck, and sophomore Bubba Carter finished 37th and 38th overall respectively. Last year the Duhawks finished 3rd overall in the Conference Championship with two strokes separating them from a second place. Herrmann placed third overall last season with a score of 306. He shot 5 strokes better this time around to claim the leaderboard. “Last season, I was the lone leader after the first 36 holes. I had never been in that position and put too much pressure on myself. I was in a similar position this year and was able to build off last years’ experience and not put as much pressure on myself. Coach also helped calm me down and keep me in the moment throughout the tournament,” said Herrmann. Herrmann also grabbed IIAC Male Athlete of the Week for his performance on the links to card a total of 301. The young Duhawk squad will be graduating one senior this year, Aaron Dunn. Herrmann will continue to lead the team into next season which has been the case for the past two years. Massey and Beck posted several solid finishes this season and with one season under their belt will be relied on heavily next season.

The Iowa Intercollegiate Athletic Conference championship meet is finally here. After a successful and exciting season, the Loras track team will wait no more. On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, the Duhawks will be competing in their most important meet of the year. For a few of these dedicated athletes, this will be the last time they compete in college track. Steph Schadl, Meg Elsen, Dan McDermott, Chris Miller, Sean Campbell, Ryan Seymour, and Mike Roth are all seniors, and will all be hanging it up once the season is over. For many, it is a bittersweet experience. There is excitement and joy to join the “real world,” but also a sadness and nostalgia for the college experience they are leaving behind. Track and field takes an immense toll on one’s time and energy, but almost everyone who looks back found it to be an extremely worthwhile endeavor. All of the seniors had positive things to say about Loras and their track and field memories. “My most favorable memory from my time here at Loras would be the indoor conference meet last year when our 4x200 won conference,” said senior sprinter Ryan Seymour. “It was an amazing feeling to be standing on the top of the podium with some of my best friends,” said Seymour. “The friends I have made, on my team and on other teams, have made the last four years enjoyable.” At this weekend’s conference meet, Seymour will be running the open 100, open 200, 4x100, and also the 4x400. A similar enthusiastic response came from senior throwing standout Meg Elsen. “My experience on the track team has been great. Last weekend at Monmouth, I threw my personal best, which may allow me to go to the national meet, a dream I’ve had since my first year on the track team. However, conference is the place for personal bests, and I believe that everyone will accomplish that this weekend.” Elsen, a key component for the women’s team, plans to place very high in the upcoming conference meet in the hammer events. A key point reiterated among the seniors on the team is the role of teammates. Senior Mike Roth, an all-around field and running weapon will likely be participating in the pole vault, long jump, and 4x400 relay this weekend. “It’s been a great four years and I would like to thank my teammates for not only pushing me to be better but also for making this team a family. Thank you to the coaches for believing in me even when I didn’t believe in myself,” said Roth. The upcoming meet this weekend is the biggest meet of the year for the Duhawks. Even for a few select individuals possibly going on to Nationals, the IAAC Championship meet is still their Pièce de résistance. Every workout, meet, and sacrifice made is for this one meet. The support of fellow teammates, family, and Duhawks can be the difference between victory and defeat.


Senior Superlatives

May 10, 2012

12

my lorian.com

May 10, 2012

Here are the results of a survey that most of the seniors filled out at the beginning of May:

Who are the most likely to succeed?

Who are the nicest seniors?

Aaron junge liz kottkamp Who was your favorite professor?

Dr. auge 2. Dr. marzofka 3. dr. Cooper

When you look at the Class of 2012 as a whole, how will you think of your peers?

1. A Fun-Loving Bunch of CHaracters 2. A Spirit of Giving 3. Academic Excellence 4. Athletic Prowess

Tim kelly Heather Jackson

Where are the best hangouts in Dubuque?

Gin rickeys 2. Fat Tuesdays 3. Mines of spain 4. the riverwalk 5. the lounge

How Do You rate dubuque as a good place to live?

Good 2. Excellent 3. Indifferent 4. Bad 5. Horrible

Who are the class clowns?

Dan mcdermott felicia carner

Do you wish the Loras campus was on flat ground?

No.

my lorian.com

13

Which Iowa Conference rival do you hate the most?

University of Dubuque 2. Wartburg 3. Luther 4. Coe 5. Central 6. Cornell / Buena Vista 7. Simpson

How much weight did you put on during college?

0-10 Pounds 2. I Lost Weight 3. 11-20 Pounds 4. 21-30 Pounds 5. 31+ Pounds


sports

May 10, 2012

14

Men’s & Women’s Soccer

duhawk.com

Kate Young

3 2010 3rd-Team All-

Men’s & Women’s Basketball

American & IIAC MVP 3 ’09, ’10, & ’11 1stTeam All-Conference 3 ’10, & ’11 1st-Team All-Region

Tim Kelly

Jessica Kern

3 2010 2nd-Team

3 ’09, ’10, & ’11

All-Iowa Conference

1st-Team All-IIAC 3 ’09 & ’10 2nd-Team All-Region

Lindsey LaBadie 3 1st-Team

Tonya Lohmeyer

All-Conference in 2011 & 2012

Dan Pawelski 3 2011 2nd-Team All-Conference

Volleyball

All-Iowa Conference

Cross Country/Track & Field Daniel McDermott 3 2-Time All-IIAC (’10 & ’11) 3 ’11 & ’12 IIAC All-Academic n

3 All-Conference

3 ’11 All-IIAC (7th place) 3 ’11 & ’12 IIAC All-Academic n

runner in ’10 (13th place) n

Bridget McQuillan

3 All-Conference in

3 Top-3 Finishes in 4x100

pole vault in ’10 & ’11 n

in 2011 (3rd) & 2010 (2nd) n

3 ’11 & ’10 2nd-Team

All-Conference 3 Career: 126 solo tackles

Gavin Kaiser 3 2011 All-IIAC

Honor Mention 3 Career: 90 rec, 10 TD

Donald St. George

3 ’11 1st-Team All-IIAC 3 ’09 All-IIAC

Ali Schmitt Honorable Mention 3 ’12 All-IIAC Academic

Katie Hemesath

Genna Kinley

Zach Myers

& 2nd-Team All-Region 3 ’10 2nd-Team All-IIAC

Outsta nding Senior Athlet es

3 11 1st Team All-IIAC

3 2010 2nd-Team

Team All-IIAC

3 ’11 1st-Team All-IIAC

3 ’10 & 11 All-IIAC

Julie Rogers

3 2011 2nd-

Katie Chambers

Chris Comstock

All-Conference

Eric Meyer

Region & All-Conference 3 ’08, & ’11 2nd-Team All-Conference

Honorable Mention

3 2011 2nd-Team

Football

3 2007 1st-Team All-

3 ’10 2nd-Team All-IIAC 3 ’11 All-IIAC Mention

Kaity Frost

Ryan Seymour

Nate DuBois

n Editor’s note: As of publication, the 2012 All-Conference teams for baseball and softball have not been announced and Iowa Conference and NCAA Division III outdoor trackand-field meets have yet to be held.

Baseball B.J. Juergens

3 ’11 2nd-Team

Vaughn Gesing 3 Most Passing Yards in

a season as a first-year: 1,355 (5,197 total) 3 Four-Year starter: 37 games, 36 TDs, 469 completions

All-Conference n

Spencer Radabaugh 3 ’11 All-Conference Honorable Mention n

Men’s and Women’s Swimming Andy Pape 3 Six 2nd-place

finishes at 2011 IIAC Championships

Alex Proctor

3 Six 2nd-place finishes in 2011 IIAC 3 2012 placed 2nd in 100-yard freestyle

Integrity. Integration. Achievement. Character.


foto finish

May 10, 2012

How did we miss these? Pantless on the Pitch

my lorian.com

“Look at my feet move!”

Mime Games

Tongue Tired

Flash Photography

We dug up some candids from this year’s archives. Here are a few Duhawks getting the exposure they deserve.

I know something you don’t know

Rock Bowl Witty Rapier Something

15


grads

May 10, 2012

16

Graduation list:

my lorian.com

Bachelor’s degrees

Graduate names are followed by hometowns and their degree/s. Bachelor of Arts degrees are identified by l Bachelor of Science degrees are signified by n

IAN R. ABRAHAMSEN Streamwood, Illinois

l

SAMANTHA J. BACON Hopkinton, Iowa

Criminal Justice

ZACHARY J. ABRAHAM Mount Prospect, Illinois l

l

VICTORIA L. BARKER l

Accounting l Finance

SANDRA G. ANAYA

Wheeling, Illinois

l

History

CAROL E. ANDERSON

Elkader, Iowa

MATTHEW S. ANDERSON

KILE F. BEAVER* North Liberty, Iowa l

Biochemistry Cum Laude

DANIEL J. ANSANI Chicago, Illinois

Accounting l Marketing

l

Wainscott, New York

l

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

EMILY C. BEREITER Crystal Lake, Illinois

l

WHITNEY L. ARNOLD Mount Vernon, Iowa

Music

MARA K. BEST l History International Studies Cum Laude

l

MARY B. BOHLKE Chicago, Illinois

Blue Mounds, Wisconsin

n

Biological Research Magna Cum Laude

n

Mathematics Cum Laude

Honors Program

DANA K. DISTELDORF

In addition to earning their bachelor’s degrees, the following graduates are recognized for participation in the Honors Program throughout the course of their college studies.

Freeport, Illinois

KRITI ACHARYA Kathmandu, Nepal n

Biochemistry Cum Laude

PATRICK J. BRANSON Mason City, Iowa

Accounting l English Literature Magna Cum Laude l

Oak Forest, Illinois

l

Elementary Education Magna Cum Laude

KATHLEEN M. EHLBECK Biological Research Maxima Cum Laude

Sugar Grove, Illinois

l

Elementary Education l Spanish Magna Cum Laude

DAVID M. KULA Circle Pines, Minnesota

l

Kathmandu, Nepal

n Engineering Magna Cum Laude

Cum Laude: Grade-point average of 3.50 and higher. Magna Cum Laude: Grade-point average of 3.70 and higher. Maxima Cum Laude: Grade-point average of 3.90 and higher.

MAXWELL J. BRUNCLIK Hartland, Wisconsin

Bloomington, Illinois

Psychology Maxima Cum Laude

l

ELIZABETH M. BRANNON

MARGARET H. BURBACH Dubuque, Iowa l

La Crosse, Wisconsin l

Marketing

HANNAH M. BREHM Peosta, Iowa

l

English Literature

DEVIN R. BROCKWELL Polo, Illinois

Indiv-Human Services

l

MICHAEL F. BROTON Darien, Illinois

l

Public Relations

ANDREW J. BROWN Iowa City, Iowa

l

Management l Marketing

JAMES S. BROWN Dubuque, Iowa

l

Marketing Finance

l

l

Marketing

DANIEL J. BURCHARDT Rockford, Illinois

l

English Literature

NICHOLAS J. BUREK Peoria, Illinois

Engineering Computer Science Magna Cum Laude n

n

SIMON S. BURKE Madrid, Iowa

l

Athletic Training

CHRISTOPHER K. BUSKER Rockford, Illinois

Marketing Psychology

l l

MICHAEL S. CALAFIORE New Port Richey, Florida

Integrated Visual Arts

l

History

MEGAN C. MOORE

BRENNAN A. TESDAHL

Religious Studies Magna Cum Laude

Biochemistry Maxima Cum Laude

SURYA PANDEY

RAJENDRA THAKURATHI

Waterloo, Iowa

l

Kathmandu, Nepal

Biology Cum Laude n

ALEJANDRA RUALES ALMEIDA Bogota, Colombia

Economics l International Studies Magna Cum Laude l

MARK E. SEDA Traer, Iowa

International Studies l Politics Cum Laude

GAUTAM LAGEJU

English Literature

STEPHEN J. BRANDT

n

TRACI L. EVERS

Those who either have graduated in December or are on pace to graduate within a semester’s time have the option of walking with the May 2012 graduates, and are included in the list.

Rockford, Illinois

l

Arlington Heights, Illinois

Bachelor of Music

TRAVIS R. AYERS

English Literature l English Writing

Criminal Justice

COURTNEY L. BRANDT

Elementary Education

l

Skokie, Illinois

Politics

Dixon, Illinois

l

Criminal Justice

MEGAN M. BEER

SEAN P. ARDEN l

MACKENZIE L. BRADY

Management

ALASSANDRA C. BEEMAN

Rockford, Illinois

n

n Biology Cum Laude

Athletic Training

l

Rochelle, Illinois

l Public Relations Magna Cum Laude

Fort Atkinson, Iowa

Sport Management

KATE A. BAUDER

Chicago, Illinois l

JESSICA M. BOYER

Psychology

KYLE T. BARTON

Dubuque, Iowa

l

Lynn Center, Illinois

Elementary Education

l

Dike, Iowa

Accounting l Finance

MEGAN N. AMBROSY

Media Studies

CHELSEA L. BOLLINGER

History Politics Cum Laude l

l

KELSEY F. SMITH Gurnee, Illinois

l

Sport Management Business

Dubuque, Iowa

n

Mahendranagar, Nepal

Politics l Media Studies l

NITIJA TIWARI Kathmandu, Nepal

n Biochemistry Magna Cum Laude

ANDREA TOBON ACOSTA Bogota, Colombia

Finance Economics Magna Cum Laude l

l

ALEXA M. TUESCHER Clinton, Iowa

l Music Psychology Cum Laude

l


grads ASHLEY A. CALDWELL Dubuque, Iowa

l

DENNIS C. CONWAY

Physical Education

TERRENCE M. CAMPBELL Criminal Justice

CELINA N. CANTU

l

MEGAN E. CULLIGAN

l

l

FELICIA J. CARNER Maquoketa, Iowa

Media Studies Magna Cum Laude l

THOMAS S. CASTLE Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Music l Public Relations

KATELYN M. CHAMBERS Sleepy Hollow, Illinois

l

Physical Education

TIMOTHY D. COBB Willowbrook, Illinois l

Management Marketing

l

BRIAN J. COCKROFT Dubuque, Iowa

l English Literature Maxima Cum Laude

RYAN P. COLLINS Cedar Rapids, Iowa l

Marketing

CHRISTOPHER M. COMSTOCK Biology

KIMBERLY A. CONNOR Farmersburg, Iowa

l

Elementary Education Magna Cum Laude

Criminal Justice

Peosta, Iowa

n

Management Information Systems

BLAKE J. ELLINOR Freeport, Illinois l

Physical Education

l

Nekoosa, Wisconsin

Park Ridge, Illinois

n

Instr Strategist I 7-12

l

KELLY M. DIETZENBACH Fort Atkinson, Iowa

Accounting l Finance Maxima Cum Laude

l Psychology Criminal Justice

Freeport, Illinois

International Studies

CAITLIN M. DOLAN Dubuque, Iowa

l

Psychology

NICHOLAS P. DONATO Des Moines, Iowa l

Marketing

LIAM M. DOYLE Hawthorn Woods, Illinois l

Sport Science

BENJAMIN A. DRISCOLL Robins, Iowa

l

Sport Management l Management

NATHAN J. DUBOIS I Lemont, Illinois

l

Public Relations

l

Accounting l Marketing

GREGORY M. FARREY

Plainfield, Illinois

l

Public Relations

KAITLIN M. FROST Waterloo, Iowa

l

Alton, Iowa

l

Integrated Visual Arts

ANTHONY J. FURY l

Crystal Lake, Illinois

l

Elementary Education Magna Cum Laude

CATHERINE J. FOLSOM Waukon, Iowa

l

Social Work-CSWE Accredited

ASHLEY N. FORD Woodridge, Illinois

l

Integrated Visual Arts

Finance

Dubuque, Iowa

MITCHELL J. GANSEN l

Finance

Farley, Iowa

CAMILO GARCES SANINT Cali, Colombia

l

Management l Finance

BRIAN W. GAUGHAN Naperville, Illinois

l

Elementary Education

CHRISTINE M. FISCHER

Sport Science

EMILY K. FULL

Dubuque, Iowa

l

Psychology

BETHANY E. FRIED

l

HOPE M. N. DOBSON l

St. Donatus, Iowa

New Vienna, Iowa

Northbrook, Illinois

l

Biological Research Magna Cum Laude

KRISTIE M. ENGELKEN

l

ANNA DI PASQUALE

MOLLY J. FRANTZEN

Accounting

MEGGEN M. ELSEN

MATTHEW E. DICKMAN

Jacksonville, Illinois n

RYAN J. EBY

Galena, Illinois

Plymouth, Minnesota

Psychology l Business

Philosophy Maxima Cum Laude l

MICHAEL D. DECKER

CHRISTINE M. CHAMPEAU l

Brodhead, Wisconsin

Public Relations Politics

Muscatine, Iowa

Elementary Education

KEVIN R. EARLEYWINE

LAURA A. DANAY

Marshalltown, Iowa

English Literature l English Writing Cum Laude

Monona, Iowa

l

Orland Park, Illinois

l

Marketing

RYAN M. EADES

Peoria, Illinois

l

ANDERS J. CARLSON

l

JANET R. CRONE Marketing

Sport Management

Dubuque, Iowa

Social Work-CSWE Accredited

l

my lorian.com

17

AARON J. DUNN

Ogden, Iowa

Chicago Heights, Illinois

Spanish l Social Work-CSWE Accredited

l

JAMIE L. COVELL

Dubuque, Iowa

l

Tinley Park, Illinois

l Philosophy Magna Cum Laude

SEAN T. CAMPBELL l

DAVID G. DUDEK

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Social Work-CSWE Accredited l Psychology Magna Cum Laude

Victor, Iowa

May 10, 2012

Sport Management l Business

CHRISTINE A. GEES Onalaska, Wisconsin

l

Public Relations

KATHERINE A. GEES Onalaska, Wisconsin

l

Elementary Education Cum Laude

TIFFANY L. GEORGE Peosta, Iowa

l

Sport Science


grads

May 10, 2012

18

Graduation list:

my lorian.com

Bachelor’s degrees MICHAEL P. GERKEN Cedar Rapids, Iowa

l

JONATHAN D. HARTLEY

Engineering n Mathematics

Economics Magna Cum Laude

Tanahun, Gandaki, Nepal

Media Studies

VAUGHN G. GESING Waukon, Iowa

Sport Management

l

OM R. GURUNG

GEOFFREY L. GUSTITUS

Public Relations

SARAH L. GOTTO l

Marketing

Bellevue, Iowa

Computer Science Magna Cum Laude

n

SAMANTHA L. GRIFFITH Newton, Iowa

l

Athletic Training Cum Laude

ALICE A. GUNS Dubuque, Iowa

Psychology l Spanish Magna Cum Laude l

Byron, Illinois

n

Mathematics Marketing Magna Cum Laude n

HILLARY A. HEIAR Dubuque, Iowa

ERIKA F. HANSEN l

Elementary Education Magna Cum Laude

Biological Research n History Magna Cum Laude

n

Accounting l Finance

Dixon, Illinois

Marketing

l

ALLISON M. HEISSEL Arlington Heights, Illinois

Marketing

l

FAUN K. HAPP Stockton, Illinois l

ELIZABETH J. HELMOLD Chicago, Illinois

Sociology

MICHAEL I. HARLOVIC

l

Elementary Education Dubuque, Iowa

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

l

Criminal Justice l Psychology

Psychology Sport Science

l

Media Studies

JORDAN J. HARRELSON

DANIEL K. HOLZ Dubuque, Iowa

Criminal Justice

l

ANN M. HORST Blairstown, Iowa

l

English Literature

TESSA M. HURLBERT Swisher, Iowa

l

Public Relations l Spanish

MICHAEL G. HUTCHINS Evansville, Wisconsin l

l

CLAYTON B. HENRICKSEN Grayslake, Illinois

History Cum Laude l

NICHOLAS C. HERRIG Sarasota, Florida l

Business

SHANNA A. HIGGINS Remsen, Iowa

l

Marketing

KELSEY L. HLAVIN Rockford, Illinois

l

Public Relations Cum Laude

EMILY M. HOCHHAUSEN Hazel Green, Wisconsin

l

Social Work-CSWE Accredited

Marketing

RYAN M. IRWIN Des Plaines, Illinois l

Marketing

JEFFREY C. ISAAK Mason City, Iowa l

Politics

HEATHER G. JACKSON Dubuque, Iowa l Politics Cum Laude

KATHERINE C. HEMESATH

Lemont, Illinois

l

l Politics International Studies

Shullsburg, Wisconsin

Cedar Rapids, Iowa l

l

LISA M. HEFEL

ANDREW J. HALL

Calcutta, India

THOMAS R. GRIEBEL

LINDSEY M. HEFEL

Finance Magna Cum Laude

Dyersville, Iowa

l

Business Politics

l

Integrated Visual Arts

BHAVNA GREWAL

Psychology Maxima Cum Laude

Stillman Valley, Illinois

New Lenox, Illinois

Alameda, California

l

BRENNAN A. HAILEY

MICHAEL J. GOSSEN l

Bellevue, Iowa

l

Manhattan, Illinois

Finance l Marketing

BRYNNE A. HARTVIGSEN

West Dundee, Illinois l

LEAH M. HOCKING

l

n

MORGAN M. GOOD l

Waukee, Iowa

EMILY L. JAHNKE Cedar Falls, Iowa

l

English Writing

CHRISTOPHER P. JANECKE Scales Mound, Illinois l

History

REECE B. JEDLICKA Solon, Iowa

l

Physical Education

NICOLE R. JESS Bellevue, Iowa

n

Mathematics Psychology

n

LUISA C. JIMENEZOROSTEGUI Bogota, Colombia

Music Bachelor of Music Magna Cum Laude


grads DANIEL A. JOHNSON

AMRIT KHADKA

Harvard, Illinois

Kathmandu, Nepal

Marketing Management

l l

n

NANG T. KHAI

WHITNEY A. JOHNSON

Mandalay, Myanmar

Barneveld, Wisconsin

Politics l International Studies

l

l

JARED A. JOINER

Computer Science

International Studies l Politics

ALEXANDER N. KIMBRO Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Bartlett, Illinois

l

Physical Education

l

Milford, Iowa

l

l

WILLIAM O. JUERGENS Criminal Justice Magna Cum Laude

AARON R. JUNGE

ANDREA J. KALUZNY l

l

North Aurora, Illinois

History Politics Magna Cum Laude l

KELLI M. KRAMER

Social Work-CSWE Accredited l Criminal Justice

l

CALLIE A. KRUMMEL

Rush City, Minnesota

New Brighton, Minnesota

Sport Management

Biology Cum Laude n

JOHN P. KEANE

KELSEY M. KRUSE

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Politics l International Studies

Dubuque, Iowa

l

n Biology Cum Laude

KEVIN M. KELCHEN

LINDSAY A. KURT

Dubuque, Iowa

Eagan, Minnesota

n

TIMOTHY R. KELLY Cedar Falls, Iowa

l

Sport Management l Public Relations

JESSICA M. KERN Elmhurst, Illinois

l

Public Relations

KATELYN M. KEYES Corona, California

l

Media Studies

Accounting

n

Management Information Systems

LINDSEY A. LABADIE Burlington, Wisconsin

l

Athletic Training

MICHAEL L. LAWRENCE Monticello, Iowa

l

Media Studies Cum Laude

JOSEPH R. LEIBFRIED Dubuque, Iowa

l

Accounting

Floyd, Iowa

NICHOLAS J. LLOYD

l l

Harpers Ferry, Iowa

l

Sport Management

Freeport, Illinois l

l

KATHLEEN E. LOFTUS Chicago, Illinois

l

Sport Management l Accounting

Bettendorf, Iowa l

History

SARA E. LONGHURST Muscatine, Iowa

l

Elementary Education

UTSHAHA MAHARJAN Kathmandu, Nepal n

Johnsburg, Illinois

l

Integrated Visual Arts

ALEXANDER M. MCCARTHY Dubuque, Iowa

l

Chicago, Illinois

l

Criminal Justice l Sociology

English Writing

DANIEL B. MCDERMOTT Cedar Rapids, Iowa l

Management l Finance Cum Laude

DANIEL D. MCELROY Winthrop, Iowa

Criminal Justice l Social Work-CSWE Accredited Magna Cum Laude l

BRIAN J. MCGEE Cresco, Iowa

Biochemistry

CASSANDRA R. MANIATIS

Philosophy Economics

TERRANCE A. MAULE

STEVEN J. LONERGAN

Bellevue, Iowa

SEAN C. KARVONEN

Computer Science Maxima Cum Laude

ANDREW D. MARR

l

History

Denver, Colorado

l

Spanish

ELIZABETH C. KOTTKAMP

SARA E. KARCICH l

l Politics Cum Laude

l

Aurora, Illinois

Business

Crystal Lake, Illinois

Dubuque, Iowa

Psychology Maxima Cum Laude

Marketing Accounting Magna Cum Laude

MATTHEW J. KOTARSKI

LAURA M. MANOS

ZACHARY J. LITTLE

Religious Studies l Music Magna Cum Laude

l

Morris, Illinois

Spanish

CASSANDRA M. KOETZ

Tinley Park, Illinois

Galena, Illinois

Physical Education

l

ROBERT E. LLOYD II

l

l

Crystal Lake, Illinois

Social Work-CSWE Accredited

MARIE J. KONIECZNY

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Sport Science

ERIN M. LIGHTFOOT

l

l

GAVIN R. KAISER

l

Peosta, Iowa

Dubuque, Iowa

my lorian.com

19

Oxford, Iowa

Manchester, Iowa

Social Work-CSWE Accredited Cum Laude

Philosophy Maxima Cum Laude

DANIELLE J. LEWIS

Psychology

KATHERINE M. KLOSTERMANN

KATELYN J. JONES

May 10, 2012

l

Philosophy

MARY C. MCHUGH Oak Forest, Illinois

l

Athletic Training


20

my lorian.com

BRIDGET R. MCQUILLAN West Saint Paul, Minnesota l

Graduation list:

Bachelor’s degrees

CAMELLIA MUKHERJEE Calcutta, India

Sport Science

NICHOLAS J. MERLINO Iowa City, Iowa

l

Management l Marketing

MATTHEW A. MESCHER Edgewood, Iowa

l

grads

May 10, 2012

Sport Management l Marketing

ERIC J. MEYER

English Writing l English Literature

KELSEY E. MULLEN

Waukon, Iowa

n

Mathematics

ALYSSA A. MICEK Wauconda, Illinois

l

l

l

l

l

Des Moines, Iowa

l

NICOLE A. MYERS Cedar Rapids, Iowa

l

Chicago, Illinois

l

English Writing

Public Relations

ZACHARY W. MYERS l

Dubuque, Iowa

l

Elementary Education

PATRICK J. PFANTZ State Center, Iowa

l

Sport Science

Dubuque, Iowa

n

Chicago, Illinois

l

Social Work-CSWE Accredited

Rockford, Illinois

l

Bernard, Iowa

Elmwood Park, Illinois

MEREDITH M. PATT

l

DANIEL P. PAWELSKI Naperville, Illinois

Finance l Marketing

North Liberty, Iowa

n

Management Information Systems n Sport Management

ALEXANDRIA J. PROCTOR Tipton, Iowa

l

COLIN R. PEKOVITCH Lake Zurich, Illinois

l

Sport Management

AMANDA R. PELKEY Winfield, Illinois

l

Criminal Justice

History

LOGAN A. POTTER

St. Paul, Minnesota

Elementary Education Cum Laude

Sport Science

JAMES P. PLATT

Accounting Finance

l

l

Computer Science

ZACHARY J. PFUNDSTEIN

PAUL A. OTRUBA l

Sport Science

JACOB A. PFOHL

DANA M. O’NEILL

Criminal Justice

KRISTINA I. NEMMERS

Algonquin, Illinois

Elementary Education

l

Hiawatha, Iowa

Dubuque, Iowa

Elementary Education

MEGHAN L. MORGAN

Elementary Education Cum Laude

ZACHARY C. PETERSON

Public Relations

l

Finance Economics

l l

TRAVIS M. OLSON

Dubuque, Iowa

English Writing

ABIGAIL M. MOORE

Criminal Justice

Orland Park, Illinois

Niles, Illinois

Finance

MACKENZIE R. MURRAY

Evanston, Illinois

l

English Literature

l

La Grange, Illinois

Wheaton, Illinois

FRANK G. PEREIRO

Business

JENNIFER M. OKUN

SHANE P. MURPHY

History

MAUREEN H. MINOR

l

History

DILLON M. MURRAY

Philosophy Cum Laude

Roscoe, Illinois

International Studies l History

l

Earlville, Iowa

l

JENNIFER D. NUGENT

Bloomington, Minnesota

l

Des Moines, Iowa

l

MORGAN E. MURPHY l

Social Work-CSWE Accredited l International Studies Magna Cum Laude

MICHAEL S. PENNINGTON

Springfield, Illinois

Tinley Park, Illinois l

La Crosse, Wisconsin

l

TREVOR R. NOONAN

Finance

KELLY T. MURPHY

West Chicago, Illinois

CHRISTOPHER D. MILLER

Athletic Training

Sport Management

Frankfort, Illinois

Psychology l Sociology

Psychology Cum Laude

Crystal Lake, Illinois

l

SARA A. PENNEBECKER

English Literature

PATRICK L. NOONAN

BRENDAN J. MURPHY

l

ALEXIS N. MILLER

l

Oak Park, Illinois

Computer & Info Tech-Mgt Track

STEVEN R. MEYER

Roscoe, Illinois

l

Bernard, Iowa

n

ANNIE F. NEWBERRY

l

Psychology

ROBERT G. PROVAX III Chicago, Illinois

l

Physical Education

LARYSSA A. PRUDISCH Verona, Wisconsin

l

Integrated Visual Arts


grads KYLE P. QUILLIN Onalaska, Wisconsin

Biological Research

n

Business l Sport Management l

BRETT A. RAUZI Indianola, Iowa

l

l Philosophy Religious Studies Cum Laude

CHRISTOPHER J. REED Northlake, Illinois

ELEISHA C. REEG Bellevue, Iowa

Psychology l Criminal Justice

St. Ansgar, Iowa

Elementary Education Magna Cum Laude

Computer Science

MARGARET R. RIEDL English Writing l Psychology

KYLE M. RIEGEL Newton, Iowa

Engineering n Mathematics n

LINDSEY E. ROBINSON Wheaton, Illinois

Elementary Education

l

JULIE M. ROGERS Psychology

BRITTAN A. ROONEY Biology

MICHAEL T. ROTH

NICHOLAS A. SATTERLEE

Integrated Visual Arts

DUSTIN L. RUMPLE Rockford, Illinois

l

Sport Management

ZACHARY J. RYAN Independence, Iowa l

Management

Dubuque, Iowa

History

KELSEY A. SKEMP

STEPHANIE A. SCHADL Dubuque, Iowa

l

Psychology

n

Management Information Systems Cum Laude

ANNE M. SKOTOWSKI

Cascade, Iowa

Dubuque, Iowa

Philosophy Magna Cum Laude

l

Aurora, Iowa

l

Robins, Iowa

l

Elementary Education Maxima Cum Laude

West Des Moines, Iowa

Oelwein, Iowa

Urbandale, Iowa

n

Biochemistry

ANDREW J. SCHROEDER Tipton, Iowa

l

Vernon Hills, Illinois l

Tetovo, Macedonia

Computer Science

RYAN J. SEYMOUR Dubuque, Iowa

l

Dubuque, Iowa

n

Management Information Systems n Finance

MICHAEL E. SPLITTGERBER Marshalltown, Iowa

l

Accounting

Media Studies

NICHOLAS R. STEALEY Cedar Rapids, Iowa

History

ALEKSANDAR SERAFIMOSKI

Public Relations

MANDY J. SPLINTER

Business

EDWARD Z. SCHWARTZ

n

l

Public Relations

ALEX L. SCHOENINGHUDSON

Media Studies Cum Laude

NICHOLAS C. SPIKE

ABIGAIL F. SCHMITZ l

Business

JACOB S. SPIEKERMEIER

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

l

l l

l

Sport Science

JUSTIN T. STEINES Dubuque, Iowa

Computer Science Magna Cum Laude

Aplington, Iowa

l

Dubuque, Iowa l

Finance

Public Relations Cum Laude

PAIGE C. SULLIVAN Dubuque, Iowa

l

Criminal Justice l Sociology

ANTHONY M. SWANSON McHenry, Illinois

l

Physical Education Cum Laude

LEANNE N. SZELA Downers Grove, Illinois

l

Sport Management Cum Laude

ANNEMARIE T. TOLDO Rockford, Illinois

l

Religious Studies

ANDREW T. TRANEL Cuba City, Wisconsin

l Finance Sport Management Magna Cum Laude

l

JODI A. TUCKER Hopkinton, Iowa

Accounting Finance Magna Cum Laude l

l

JOHN W. TYLER Cedar Rapids, Iowa l

n

BRITTANY A. STELKEN

Spanish Finance

JORDAN E. STUKENBERG

Spanish

PATRICK J. SPERFSLAGE

l

ALISON R. SCHMITT

Elm Grove, Wisconsin

Mount Vernon, Iowa

Spanish

BRANDON M. SCHETGEN

Management

DONALD A. ST. GEORGE, JR.

North Liberty, Iowa

SUSAN J. SCHELL l

Dubuque, Iowa

l

l

Rockford, Illinois

Bloomington, Minnesota

l

History

English Literature l English Writing Maxima Cum Laude

Peoria, Illinois n

l

Biochemistry

l

SARAH L. STENDER

Glenview, Illinois

JEREMY R. SIEGERT

Homer Glen, Illinois l

KATHERINE L. SHERIDAN

Dubuque, Iowa

McHenry, Illinois

l

Criminal Justice

Physical Education

l

MARY G. SANDERS n

my lorian.com

McHenry, Illinois

STEPHANIE J. SALINAS l

21

Cum Laude

KATHERINE M. SHARP

Marketing

l

Decorah, Iowa

n

l

Carol Stream, Illinois

l

JACOB T. REGAN

Des Plaines, Illinois

AUSTIN R. SAFRANSKI

Biochemistry

n

KEVIN T. SEYTER

Marketing

l

ROBERT S. RADABAUGH Dyersville, Iowa

May 10, 2012

Music

LUCAS R. VALENCIA Pingree Grove, Illinois l

Criminal Justice l Sociology


grads

May 10, 2012

22

Graduation list:

my lorian.com

Master’s of Arts degrees

Bachelor’s degrees English Literature

PATRICIA A. COOK Ministry

EMILY C. WATSON*

Educational Leadership

SANDRA M. REICKS

KATHLEEN M. GLATZ

Theology

Lawler, Iowa

Ames, Iowa

Dubuque, Iowa

Ministry

Social Work-CSWE Accredited

NICOLE M. SOER Psychology: General

NATHAN M. JENKINS

JOSHUA J. WERNIMONT

Dubuque, Iowa

Rickardsville, Iowa

Dubuque, Iowa

Education: Special Ed Emphasis

Accounting l Finance Magna Cum Laude l

PATRICK J. KELLY Manchester, Iowa

Ministry

ANDREW J. WHITE Des Moines, Iowa

ANDREA L. KIRBY

Athletic Training

Dubuque, Iowa

Mokena, Illinois

Religious Studies

JOHN M. WALSH Rock Island, Illinois

Psychology: Clinical

CASSANDRA A. WINTERS Volga, Iowa

Psychology: Clinical

Ministry

CAROLYN J. WINDBERG l

Theology

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Physical Education

Educational Leadership

Jefferson, Iowa

NICHOLAS P. DUFFY

Deerfield, Illinois

Manchester, Iowa

ANNE C. PHILLIPS

Marshalltown, Iowa

Marketing

LISA M. WALTZ

l

MICHAEL J. MCMAHON

Education: Special Ed Emphasis

Belvidere, Illinois

l

Theology

Dubuque, Iowa

Dubuque, Iowa

GEORGE P. WADDELL IV

l

Ministry

SARA M. BOLAND*

Rockton, Illinois

l

DAVID E. MCDERMOTT

Malta, Illinois

KATELYN E. VALENTI l

JOAN M. BIEBEL

BARBARA A. KLAWITER

VALORIE A. WOERDEHOFF

Theology

Theology

Toddville, Iowa

TONYA C. WITTMAN

Dubuque, Iowa

Dubuque, Iowa

l

Integrated Visual Arts

REBECCA L. WOLFE

KELSEY C. YERKES Palos Heights, Illinois

Mundelein, Illinois

Elementary Education

l

PATRICK J. WONDRAK l

n

KATHRYN E. YOUNG

North Aurora, Illinois

Roscoe, Illinois

Sport Management

l

ELISABETH A. WRIGHT Social Work-CSWE Accredited

MARGARET C. WRITT Carol Stream, Illinois

l

Instr Strategist I 7-12

BRIGETTE K. YANES Dubuque, Iowa

English Literature l English Writing Magna Cum Laude

l

Psychology

OLIVIA C. YOUNG Milwaukee, Wisconsin

St. Charles, Illinois

l

Biology

l

International Studies l Spanish Cum Laude

KEVIN M. ZACK North Branch, Minnesota

l

Sport Management

SARA L. ZIMMERMAN McFarland, Wisconsin l

English Writing

Ode to The Lorian Without Rajendra Thakurathi and Surya Pandey If I’ve ever had an ounce of luck, it was when you two guys Took a journey halfway around the world from Nepal to Loras. You’ve been such reliable workers over 4 years, it’s ridiculous. I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your selflessness. There was no task, big or small, that either of you would dodge. You jumped right in before I even learned how to say “Raj.” Surya, you must be the nicest guy I’ve ever known, And it was too easy to ask you for this and that, I must confess, But don’t let anyone tell you that being nice is a weakness. Raj, I’m still trying to find a task that will truly challenge you, As your talents guarantee you’ll never have to beg for food. At least someday, I can say, “Yeah, I knew that dude.” I know that the sky is the limit for both of you, And it has nothing at all to do with me or the Lorian work. Just please send more kids from Nepal or I’ll go berserk. — Tim Manning (Lorian moderator)


academic awards

May 10, 2012

my lorian.com

Monsignor Timothy J. Gannon Scholarship in Psychology

The Computer Science Alumni Award

Amrit Khadka

Stephen Brandt

John G. Heath Memorial Award in Psychology

Alice Guns

Jane Addams Senior Social Work Award

Jamie Covell

First Year Engineering Scholarship for 2011-2012

Dolina Maharjan

George Freund Engineering Scholarship for Juniors

McGladrey Accountancy Award

Kelly Dietzenbach

Jacob McGreal, Ryan Steckel

Iowa Society of CPAs Award for Excellence in Accounting

Senior Engineering Scholarship for 2011-2012

Joshua Wernimont

Prudential Scholarship in Business

Cassie Crabill, Timothy Derr, Erin Hoppman, Jodi Tucker

Om Gurung, Gautam Lageju

Father Louis Ernsdorff Senior Mathematics Award

Katie Burke

Finance Business Scholar

First Year Mathematics Award

Brennan Hailey

Paige Neebel

CIT-M Business Scholar

Droessler Mathematics Scholarship

Kelsey Skemp

Maria Kalb, Rabin Ranabhat

Marketing Business Scholar

Father John Friedell Award

Erin Hoppman

Patricia McCarthy

Stribling Theatre Arts Award

Outstanding Senior Biochemistry Major Award

Janet Crone

Management Business Scholar

Brennan Tesdahl

Daniel McDermott

Undergraduate Award for Achievement in Analytical Chemistry

Thomas J. and Peggy Gantz Accounting Scholarship

Michael Rubel

Jeffry Breitbach

Benda Business Award

CRC First Year Chemistry Achievement Award

Alex McCarthy

The Loras Players Award

Kristina Everding, Morgan Rea

Charlene Becicka, Steven Dobihal

All American for Mediation and Trial Advocacy

Elizabeth Brannon, Heather Jackson, Kyle Schaeffer, Kelsey Skemp All American for Mediation

Heather Jackson

American Mock Trial Assn. Regional Outstanding Attorney

Sarah Dickhut

Regional Civility Award Runner Up

Margaret Riedl

National Civility Award Runner-Up

Leah Hocking

Student of the Year 2011-2012: Elementary Education

The ACS Undergraduate Award in Organic Chemistry

Sondra Dean

Delta Epsilon Sigma, National Honors Society, National Award

Tyler Willman

Al Schramm Award in Physical Education

Travis Misner

Al Schramm Award in Sport Management

Tim Kelly

Al Schramm Award in Sport Science

Travis Olson

Student of the Year 2011-2012: Secondary Education

Rev. William E. Wilkie, Ph.D. Award for 2011-2012

Ruth Whaley

Slepicka Family Award

Cassie Koetz

Hemann Award for Christian Service

Maggie Writt

The Valder Social Justice Scholarship

Katelyn Eichorst, Nancy Pater, Morgan Washburn

Student Organization of the Year Award

Du-Buddies

Lead 4 Loras

Andrea Tobon Acosta, Catherine Bethka, Felizia Dambach, Molly Devine, Steven Dobihal, Kate Ehlbeck, Luisa Jimenez, Andrew Kelchen, Elizabeth Kellom, Mara Kelly, Darren Oakes, Breanna Oxley, Aleksandar Serafimoski, Rupesh Shrestha Breanna Oxley

All-Conference Academic Team (Fall)

Michael Bukszar, Michael Donnelly, Katie Flogel, Maria Kalb, Genna Kinley, Dan McDermott, Beth Miller, Chris Miller, Estherjoy Mungai, Jerry Olp, Alison R. Schmitt, Ashley Reimer, Ashley Rouse, Alejandra RualesAlmeida, Monica Shaffer, Austin Steil, Rachel Weglarz, Hillary Wilson All-Conference Academic Team (Winter)

Corrine Abele, Lauren Byrne, Brittney Cato, Ryan Coon, Stephanie Czarobski, Melissa Herrmann, Niki Rivera, Kelly Rogowski, Abbey Tjebkes USTFCCCA Academic All-American - Women’s Track & Field

Tara Kilburg, Danielle McNally, Heidi Tobin

Outstanding Sociology Student 2011-2012

USTFCCCA Academic All American— Men’s Cross Country

Genna Kinley, Mary Rector

Dan McDermott, Jerry Olp, Austin Steil

Lehner Award for Teachers of English

Professor Joan. S. Skurnowicz Endowed Scholarship for 2012-2013

Ruth Whaley

Women’s Cross Country Team and Women’s Track and Field Team

Bauerly-Roseliep Award

Monsignor Green Award for 2011-2012

Roger Rechenmacher Memorial Scholarship for Creativity

Alexander McCarthy, Katelyn Valenti Maureen Minor

Steven Dobihal

Provost’s Top 20

Student Leader of the Year Award

USTFCCCA Academic All-American - Women’s Cross Country

Mara Kelly

Ashley Reimer

Elizabeth Kottkamp

John “Doc” Kammer Award for Athletic Training

Ashley Robbins

Erika Hansen

Professor William Green Senior History Award for 2011-2012

Sophomore Engineering Scholarship from Thomas and Robert Mulgrew for 2011-2012

Tim McGreal

23

USTFCCCA All Academic Team

Felicia Carner

Carol Anderson Stephen Brandt Patrick Branson Felicia Carner Brian Cockroft Dennis Conway Kelly Dietzenbach Kevin Earleywine Kathleen Ehlbeck Traci Evers Erika Hansen Brynne Hartvigsen Lindsey Hefel Aaron Junge Kevin Kelchen Laura Manos Alison Schmitt Jeremy Siegert Brennan Tesdahl Joshua Wernimont

Academic Achievement-GPA 3.5 or Higher Kriti Acharya Carol Anderson Matthew Anderson Travis Ayers Mara Best Mary Bohlke Jessica Boyer Stephen Brandt Patrick Branson Nicholas Burek Ashley Caldwell Anders Carlson Felicia Carner Brian Cockroft Kimberly Connor Dennis Conway Kelly Dietzenbach

Kevin Earleywine Kathleen Ehlbeck Meggen Elsen Christine Fischer Katherine Gees Brock Gille Thomas Griebel Samantha Griffith Alice Guns Brennan Hailey Erika Hansen Jonathan Hartley Brynne Hartvigsen Lindsey Hefel Clayton Henricksen Kelsey Hlavin Erin Hoppman

Heather Jackson Luisa Jimenez Katelyn Jones William Juergens Aaron Junge Kevin Kelchen Genevieve Kinley Cassandra Koetz Elizabeth Kottkamp Callie Krummel David Kula Gautam Lageju Michael Lawrence Zachary Little Robert Lloyd II Laura Manos Daniel McDermott

Daniel McElroy Alexis Miller Megan Moore MacKenzie Murray Kristine Olberding Surya Pandey Meredith Patt Sara Pennebecker Michael Pennington Brett Rauzi Ashley Reimer Alejandra Ruales-Almeida Stephanie Salinas Brandon Schetgen Mark Seda Jeremy Siegert Kelsey Skemp

Jacob Spiekermeier Justin Steines Brittany Stelken Jordan Stukenberg Anthony Swanson Leanne Szela Brennan Tesdahl Nitija Tiwari Andrea Tobon Acosta Andrew Tranel Jodi Tucker Alexa Tuescher Joshua Wernimont Brigette Yanes Olivia Young


Musical Maturation I sing the notes on the page, my symphony barely beginning. A gust of wind blows and there go the notes, tumbling off the page like dancing flies, leaving the paper in my hands blank as my face. They twirl. They swirl. Little eighth and sixteenth notes jumbled in a nonsensical pattern, clash clash clashing around me as I swat at them, those annoying little flies. Then they place a tassel upon my head and a robe upon my shoulders, align in order, and nudge me across a stage in front of cheering acquaintances while performing a song about pomp and circumstance.

-Andrea Berns photo by Nick Joos


May 10, 2012, Lorian