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ISSUU

“WILDNERNESS IS NOT A LUXURY, BUT A NECESSITY OF THE HUMAN SPIRIT.” - EDWARD ABBEY

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DAVID STANSFIELD MARSHALL THOMPSON SUSAN TELLEM MARI STANLEY MARIE MANVEL LORY MAYOTTE GUS JOHANSON ANNEMARIE STEIN

Contributing Photographers LYON HERRON TIM HORTON NICK CALAFATI JEN BEL EMILY SCHER JEFF HERRERA

Recent heavy rains in drought stricken western Malibu have ignited some remote microclimates with a cornucopia of native flowers. Photo: Steve Woods

With a new administration in the White House, playing political hardball for the environment has become a matter of monumental importance. Our cover story, “Ocean Champions: The Political Voice of the Ocean” highlights the efforts of Ocean Champions, the 501(c)(4) organization with a connected political action committee focused solely on oceans and ocean wildlife. The first organization of it’s kind, their goal is to create a political environment where protecting and restoring the oceans is a national government priority. In 2016, Ocean Champions helped elect 51 pro-ocean candidates to Congress and in the current the political climate, this organization knows how to cross party lines to ensure Congress will be accountable for protecting our most valuable resource, the ocean and its inhabitants.

ISSUE 43

FEB./MARCH 2017 COVER PHOTO BY:

RICH GERMAN

On a local level, the environment has always been the first priority of Malibu residents as well as the newly elected pro-preservation majority on Malibu City Council. Council member Rick Mullen addresses the environmental impact of Sanctuary Cities, and the rule of law, with a little help from American author and essayist Edward Abbey, noted for his advocacy of environmental issues and criticism of public land policies. Should Malibu become a Sanctuary City, there will likely be an environmental cost to consider. There is already an environmental cost being paid for our immigration and population growth policies that have been in place since the 1960s. As we look to the future, from the perspective of a city, as well as a country, we should consider the long-term impact of the decisions we have made and those we might consider. -Cece Woods, Editor in Chief

Our cover photo is by Rich German, an entrepeneur, philanthropist and photographer garnered international media attention from his close encounter on his paddleboard with a pod of orcas off the coast of Laguna Beach. His story got the attention of some of the leading conservationist organizations in the world including Save The Whales, PETA, Blackfish and Sylvia Earle’s foundation.

Blue Laguna: A Paddleboarder’s Perspective is dedicated to Laguna Beach’s 7.2 miles of coastline that became a Marine Protected area in 2012. 100% of the proceeds from book sales will go to support the ocean through Project O. richgerman.com

This led German to start Project O whose mission is to help restore, protect and sustain the ocean, the life living in it and all of humankind, now and for generations to follow.


OPINION

R.I.P. BUSINESS AS USUAL

BUILDING IN MALIBU JUST GOT A WHOLE LOT TOUGHER BY CECE WOODS

NEWL BLOOD ON THE PLANNING COMMISSION SHOWED THAT THE TIDE HAS TURNED IN FAVOR OF SLOW GROWTH. New members of the City’s Planning Commission were sworn in on Tuesday, Feb. 7th giving the power back to the preservation majority. It’s about time. The Team Malibu slate of Skylar Peak, Rick Mullen and Jefferson Wagner, who won three seats in the city council race, put their money where their mouths are by picking an equally powerhouse pro-preservation trio for the Planning Commission. Chair John Mazza returned to the dias along with returning Vice Chair Mikke Pierson as they welcomed new faces Chris Marx (Ramirez Canyon resident and Rick Mullen’s pick) and long time Malibu local and slow growth advocate, Steve Uhring (Jefferson Wagner’s pick). This powerful shift in energy and priorities was demonstrated by the new commission as they rejected every project (but one) sending them back to City Staff. Commissioner Uhring was especially tough on the Planning Department, grueling them on each project asking: “Where’s the Planning?” It’s no secret that the City Planning Department needs a serious (power hungry, paper pushing) attitude adjustment and it looks like this new and improved commission showed them who’s boss - the residents of this community who pay their salaries - not City employees.

Chair John Mazza returns to the Plnning Commission along with new commissioners Chrsi Marx and Steve Uhring who were sworn in Feb. 6, 2017

Gone are the days when developers perks persuaded City staff to push through problematic projects and development that did not serve the community - and Chair Mazza made that loud and clear.

“ Come back when you have done your job.” - Chair John Mazza

COULD MALIBU LOSE THE

BY THE LOCAL MALIBU STAFF

FARMERS MARKET?

The best part of Malibu is our commitment to community, and nothing says community more than Sundays at the Malibu Farmers Market. Friends and neighbors gather at the market, located in the heart of town, to purchase organic produce, sample a variety of ethnic and specialty foods, and enjoy lively conversation.Unfortunately, this may come to an end rather quickly as the Cornucopia Foundation is in danger of losing their lease. Will the County of Los Angeles keep it’s word and allow the Cornucopia Malibu Farmers’ Market to operate in it’s full capacity during the construction of the Santa Monica College. Well, the co-founder/president Debra Bianco is concerned. Neither the Santa Monica College, or the County has gotten back to the Cornucopia Foundation. Their lease is up March 19th, 2017, as she explains to the City of Malibu Planning Commission. At the February 29th, 2016 hearing, the County reassured the Planning Commission that the Farmers Market would be able to continue with their lease. This was told to the Commission by County representative Maria Chong Castillo (see transcript below). However, the County now seems to be suffering from a case of memory loss.

THE LOSS OF THE MALIBU FARMERS MARKET WOULD HAVE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON THE COMMUNITY, INCLUDING THE FACT THAT IT SUPPORTS MANY SMALL AND MULTI-GENERATIONAL FAMILY-OWNED AND OPERATED BUSINESSES. The Cornucopia Foundation went through years of red tape to become established, and at Tuesday night’s Planning Commission meeting, Chair Mazza directed City staff to reach out to the County to come to a resolution. He asked City staff to report back to the Planning Commission by the next Commission meeting with updates on the outcome of their efforts to save the Farmers Market lease.


THE CITY OBSERVED BINGE WATCHING:

CITY HALL SERIAL TV BY SAM HALL KAPLAN

If you unfortunately didn’t have anything better to do on a recent Monday night, you might have inadvertently turned to public access Channel 3 and glimpsed the City Council follies, as I did. Talk about binge watching an amateur production of City Hall E.R., as staff and consultants in a discordant concert with a fractured City Council struggled to patch up an overblown proposal for single-family house on Wildlife Road. Starring in the pitiable production for the developer was Malibu’s star Mr. Fixer, Don Schmitz, and a scene-chewing, off script councilman, Skylar Peak in a role that sadly for him, and unfortunately for the audience, seemed beyond his skill set. In lesser Council roles was a confused Laura Rosenthal, who kept relatively quiet, a new role for the usually ‘don’t tell me, I know-it-all’ official, and neophyte Rick Mullen, who tried to lend some reasoned perspective to the proceedings, in a shining, but in vain monolgue. As mayor, Lou La Monte, not being able to steal a scene without some self promotions, he let the farce run into the late hours, as the audience drifted off. Most had been there for a Trancas Field item. There also were walk on roles for the developer himself, Richard Sperber, known locally for being one of the developers of the Lumber Yard project, and as a member of the Civic Center Design Standards Task Force, an appointment of Laura Rosenthal. His family also founded the Valley Crest Landscaping, which in the past has done business with the city If I am prejudiced it is because of the involvement of Schmitz, who seems to be everywhere when a developer needs a hired gun, such as for the commercial La Paz and U2’s Edge’s residential proposals. When he is for something, I tend to be against it.

The Malibu City Council meets twice a month at Malibu City Hall.

Then there was the protagonist, next door and former friendly neighbor Chris Farrar, whose objections prompted the tortured chronology of the Wildlife project and the latest City Council hearing. As for the back story, what had been a relatively routine proposal for a typically immodest Malibu residence of 6600 square feet, plus the usual pool and an unusual bocce court , turned from a drama into a farce when changes to the original plans were approved over-the-counter. The changes involving shifting the building site and extensive landscaping should have required a public hearing, a fact the City later admitted when pressed by neighbor Farrar, and tried to correct while ordering a construction stop. Too late, said Sperber. No, it’s not said the city. And that was just the overture to the first episode. It presumably ended Monday night when the Council voted 3 to 2 to approve, with a confusion of conditions added by Peak. Hearing him try to redesign the project from the dais was like following him trying to knot two live wires blindfolded in a hidden electrical outlet. My view is flavored by having been an adjunct in the UCLA graduate landscape program for several years, and where I continue to serve on juries.

VOTING AGAINST THE PROJECT WAS WAGNER AND MULLEN, AND ANOTHER INDICATION THAT THE SLATE THEY FORMED WITH PEAK IN THE PAST ELECTION IS NOT FUNCTIONING AS A REFORM BLOC AS PROMISED.

The Council voted 3 to 2 to approve, with a confusion of conditions added by Peak.

Ending the evening on another ominous note for those who had hoped the City be less pro development was the mumbled announcement by Mayor La Monte that his interim appointment to the Planning Commission would be long serving former mayor, Jeff Jennings. Jennings is known for his articulate support for development, however it might compromise the city’s code and mission statement. Paramount is property rights. I expect we can expect some more heated debates on an enlivened city’s public access channel. Better set my VCR to record.

NEWS FLASH: TEAM MALIBU IS NOT LAURA ROSENTHAL, SKYLAR PEAK AND LOU LAMONTE.

MALIBU STRONG!

Wishtoyo Chumash Village Ceremonial Elder Mati Waiya continues to inspire the world of local and state politics. Waiya, our cover feature for issue 42 of The Local, performed a blessing at the LA Board of Supervisors on . “A message to the people, a word of inspiration.”

Voting against the project was Wagner and Mullen, and another indication that the slate they formed with Peak in the past election is not functioning as a reform bloc as promised.

This is just days after doing the opening ceremony for CA. State Senator Henry Stern, The recent trend to incorporate California’s Chumash heritage into these important, official ceremonies began and it all started in Dec. 2016 when Malibu City Council Member Rick Mullen picked Waiya to swear him in to City Council.

PHOTO BY RICH GERMAN

WHALE TALES

On February 1st, with the precision of seasonal clockwork, I saw my first gray whale spout of the year just past the steely gray surf at Zuma Beach. Then, several more blasts of whale breath lifted from the others surfacing in the pod as they headed South to the warm water lagoons in central Baja, one of the longest migrations of any mammal. In recent weeks, the staff of Ventura Harbor-based tour company Island Packers reported about 200 gray whale sightings and several humpback whales near the Channel Islands. Chumash Ceremonial elder Mati Waiya, his wife Luhui Isha and guests at the Henry Stern swearing in ceremony.

With this year’s cooler waters of La Nina, there is a good chance that the Gray Whale population of 20,000 will follow the nutrient rich currents closer to our shorelines, enabling whale watchers to see more whales just off our Malibu beaches. -Steve Woods


LOCAL

BANTHE

BY THE LOCAL MALIBU STAFF REPORTER

BY THE LOCAL STAFF

BAGS!

Council member Jefferson Wagner, a committed environmentalist, requested the City to bring back an ordinance banning the use of plastic sandbags in Malibu. The ban would only allow burlap or jute sandbags to be used within the City limits. Primarily used for flood or landslide protection and on construction sites, most sandbags are made of either burlap or jute, which are biodegradable, while other options are made of different types of plastics. Wagner’s desire to ban plastic sandbags stems largely from the effect these bags have on our environment overall, as well as the damage they do when they break down and end up in the ocean. “I too am very dismayed when I see walls of plastic, and during storms there is plastic in the ocean,” said Councilmember Laura Rosenthal, weighing in on the issue. However, her concern was short lived and she suggested that the ban only apply to oceanfront homes. Councilmembers Peak ,Mullen, and Wagner continue with their promise to the community by making preservation and the environment a priority. Last year Skylar Peak spearheaded the campaign to ban Styrofoam, which is a major pollution source on our beaches and ocean.

Recent storms led to the quick breakdown of these plastic sandbags at Trancas Beach. The plastic debris ends up in the ocean and threaten marine life.

THE PERILS OF PLASTIC According to a study from Plymouth University, plastic pollution affects at least 700 marine species, while some estimates suggest that at least 100 million marine mammals are killed each year from plastic pollution.

PHOTO: LIVE SCIENCE

Photo by Tim Horton

BY THE LOCAL MALIBU STAFF REPORTER

PHOTOS BY STEVE WOODS

CERT ALERT!

If the dedicated members of Malibu’s Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) did not have enough to worry about, what with the constant threat of natural disasters, there is what should be the simple matter of City support. After all, public safety matters should be the highest priority for City Hall. And what other volunteer group really has to maintain a constant sharp physical and organizational presence, while coordinating its efforts with a host of local first responders and the municipal staff? Fires and floods tend to hit Malibu fast, and are unforgiving. Every minute is vital. Thankfully, CERT and the City Manager seem to have aligned their efforts and will be holding joint meetings. However, it should be noted this is happening only in the wake of several months of confusion following the departure of Brad Davis as the city’s emergency service coordinator.

The CERT team is an important part of emergency preparedness and a vital resource for the Malibu community - especially during recent weather events that could have been catastrophic. The emergency response team was temporarily lost in the fray after Emergency Services Director Brad Davis left his City post on medical leave in October and permanently in December.

After some hemming and hawing, City Manager Reva Feldman reports that a new coordinator soon will be hired, and the job title will be raised to manager, indicating the importance of the position. And that CERT will have access to the room in City Hall its members had worried they had been locked out of, as Feldman fumbled with organizational concerns. But it should be noted that it took The Local, in its continuing public advocacy, to call attention to the impasse, and help rally a show of concern at a recent Council meeting. CERT spokesman Tim Horton declared, that with the hiring of a manager, the team was now looking forward to a smooth transition.

ADAMSON HOUSE

BY THE LOCAL MALIBU STAFF REPORTER

ANNOUNCES A RESTRUCTURING OF THEIR BOARD AND NEW PLANS FOR THE MALIBU LANDMARK

New things are on the horizon for The Adamson House Foundation, Malibu’s original beach house and now historical museum. Their Board of Directors announced a restructuring of the Executive Committee recently and plans to focus on the Adamson House Foundation marketing, social media reach, and parking, in hopes of bringing more revenue to the landmark property to continue to preserve the history of Malibu and the family that discovered it’s beauty. “The Board of Directors, along with members of the Adamson House Foundation, by majority vote, supported a restructuring of the Executive Committee which included removing Lance Simmens from the Board. His objectives were not congruent with the mission statement of the Adamson House Foundation. Martha Juede (the current Vice President) has become the President with Jules Herschfield as Vice President, and the Board has established SubCommittees to more efficiently distribute Member’s time and specialties. The Foundation believes these changes will bring a greater ability to fulfill its mission statement, progress the Adamson House, and continue a productive relationship with California State Parks.” -Adamson House Foundation


BY DAVID STANSFIELD


LOCAL

MAIL THEFT

RUNS RAMPANT IN MALIBU BY THE LOCAL MALIBU STAFF

IT’S BEEN AN ONGOING PROBLEM WITH NO END IN SIGHT. PROTECT YOURSELF AND YOUR IDENTITY. The rise in mail theft around Malibu have residents in an uproar. Multiple incidents were reported in the Big Rock area on Jan. 17th and, most recently, in Tivoli Cove on Jan. 26th as reported to The Local by a resident last week via Facebook. This crime is not new to Malibu, in fact, it continues to be a regular occurrence for free- standing USPS mailboxes, particularly the ones in the Civic Center. Post Office employees ask residents to exercise caution when depositing mail in those boxes after Post Office hours because of the high rate of thefts. In 2015, local resident and owner of Malibu Farm at the Malibu Pier, Helene Henderson, told The Local of the break-ins of freestanding U.S. Mailboxes in the Civic Center after a man, who appeared to be homeless, approached Henderson with opened mail that contained checks in the hopes of securing an award. The Post Office employees, seemingly unaffected and somewhat immune to what has been an ongoing problem, asked Henderson to call the U.S. Mail Fraud number - she did - with no real solution to a problem that has now grown to be more frequent in nature and targeting locals at their residences. What can you do to protect yourself if you are the victim of mail theft? Here are some important steps to take, that I can personally tell you from experience actually work having dealt with with the credit agencies removing fraudulent accounts due to identity theft, a very real potential problem for most people who are victims of mail theft. 1. File a police report. It is the single most important thing you can do to protect yourself once mail theft has occurred. This step is crucial in forcing credit card companies to remove negative credit due to fraud should the perpetrators decide to open accounts in your name. 2. Monitor Your Credit Report: Start monitoring your credit reports approximately every 90 days. Monitoring your credit on a regular basis can prevent damage caused by identity theft. 3. Fraud Alert. If you notice suspicious accounts showing up on your credit report, place a fraud alert in your files to prevent further accounts from being opened. Normally if you place an alert with a credit agency, they will notify the others but it is always best to play it safe and notify all three yourself. Because of the fraud alert, you would be entitled to a free credit report from each of the three credit reporting agencies. 4. Identity Theft Report. Upon noticing any suspicious activity on your credit report, contact The Federal Trade Commission which governs the Fair Credit Reporting Act. They will provide you with an Identity Theft Report form to fill out which can help you get the negative information removed from your credit reports. 5. Consider Freezing Credit Reports. This is a security freeze which will prevent the credit bureaus from providing your credit report to anyone without your approval. Contact the credit bureaus to find out whether your state allows you to use the credit freeze option. There may be a fee. Equifax or by phone at 1-866-349-5191, equifax.com Experian or by phone at 1-888-397-3742, experian.com TransUnion or by phone at 1-800-916-8800, transunion.com Some very important information to keep in mind when dealing with identity theft or any other credit related issue is that the credit reporting agencies are not operated by the government. They are privately and publically owned, profit-seeking enterprises. However, government agencies regulate and supervise the industry. If you have a complaint regarding a credit reporting agency that did not respond to a dispute or you were dissatisfied with the outcome of a dispute that was filed, you can file a complaint with the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau online or by phone at 1-855-411-2372.


6317 CAVALLERI RD.

This incredibly built single story masterpiece is located behind private gates on nearly 1.5 acres. This 5/Bed6 Bath estate utilizes indoor/outdoor living at its finest with vaulted ceilings sheathed in imported hardwood, an open floor plan, natural light from floor to ceiling windows and sliding doors accessing the beautiful outdoor patios. Ocean views can be enjoyed easily thanks to this excellent layout. The luxurious kitchen has granite counter tops, custom cherry wood cabinetry, top of the line stainless steel appliances and a chef’s island with a sink and room for additional seating. There is ample parking with a spacious 3 car garage with room for storage and access to a mirrored personal gym. The grand and romantic master bedroom has its own fireplace as well as a steam shower and oversized spa tub. The amenities are endless and the lot is large enough to incorporate the development of a pool, fruit orchard or more. This beautiful and private estate truly has it all.

$4,2,000,000


3052 ESCONDIDO CANYON RD.

25 ACRE PRIVATE RETREAT Once in a lifetime does such a rare and special property come to market. Located on Latigo Canyon down a 3000 foot private driveway, one is transported to a 25 acre magical oasis with a stream running through redwoods, ancient oaks and eucalyptus groves. The motor court can take you up to the modern self contained one bedroom guest house, with its own kitchen and parking surrounded by citrus trees overlooking rolling hills and families of deer. Below the motor court is a 2 bedroom 2 bath cottage that has been tastefully updated as well as a charming, covered outdoor dining area and spa. The outdoor workout activity options are endless with phenomenal trails surrounded by untouched, lush state land. The property has several large pads creating the opportunity to expand to this already magical retreat as well as its own well to help contribute to the customization of your dream garden. Perfect for someone who wants to feel like they are on a permanent vacation close to town and yet so far away.

$1,795,000


POLITICS THE

ENVIRONMENTALIST’S SOLUTION

TO A

SANCTUARY CITY BY RICK MULLEN

Thirty years ago, the great American environmentalist Edward Abbey was solicited by the New York Times to write an article about immigration. Abbey is a sort of modern era Thoreau in that he walked the walk as an environmentalist and spent long periods out in the embrace of the natural world. His book “Desert Solitaire” is a classic environmental work that may be the desert equivalent of Rachel Carson’s 1953 “The Sea Around Us.” He was an ardent advocate for protecting the natural world from what he saw as the biggest threat to it: the increasing pressure from human activity whether from resource exploiters, developers or tourists. Abbey wrote his article, but it was never published by The Times. The Times may have made the mistake in assuming that since Abbey was an environmentalist, he would share the same attitude towards the migration of humans into the United States as many of his peers. But Abbey’s loyalty was to the natural world and the protection of it. His article is straightforward, and bluntly honest, with equal disdain towards the cheap labor/growth economy advocates on the right, and the bleeding hearts on the left, who he felt were short-sighted about the long-term destructive effect on the environment of importing an ever-increasing amount of human beings into what was left of the beautiful natural world in the United States of America. He also had direct and harsh language that would be considered politically incorrect for the record of what Latin Americans had done to the lands entrusted to them in their own countries. You can find his article by googling “Edward Abbey on Immigration,” where it is located on the blog “The Compass Rose.” It is worth reading this straight talk from someone who put more importance on the natural world than on the world of humans. In his article, Abbey comments on how the nomenclature of the illegal alien had morphed over the years to be the more politically correct and acceptable reference as “undocumented worker.” After describing the lunacy of the “anchor baby” (not the expression he used) and chain migration policies, he lays blame on both ends of the political spectrum: “What of it? Say the documented liberals; ours is a rich and generous nation, we have room for all, let them come. And let them stay say the conservatives; a large, cheap, frightened, docile, surplus labor force is exactly what the economy needs. Put some fear into the unions; tighten discipline, spur productivity, whip up the competition for jobs. The conservatives are attracted to inexpensive labor; the liberals are drawn to causes (paraphrased). (Neither group, you will notice, ever invites the immigrants to move into their homes. Not into their homes!) Both factions are supported by the cornucopia economists of the ever-expanding economy, who actually continue to believe that our basic resource is not land, air, water, but human bodies, more and more of them, the more the better in hive upon hive, world without end – ignoring the clear fact that those nations which most avidly practice this belief, such as Haiti, Puerto Rico, Mexico, to name only three, don’t seem to be doing so well. They look more like explosive slow-motion disasters in fact, volcanic anthills, than functioning human societies. But that in which our academic economists will not see and will not acknowledge is painfully obvious to los latinos: they stream north in ever-increasing numbers.” Politics often makes for strange bedfellows: Unions leaders and environmentalists aligned with open-borders advocates for example. These would seem to be conflicting views. An endless influx of cheap labor certainly cannot help the cause of the union laborer in the long run. Likewise, the environmentalist must surely see clearly that more and more human pressure on the environment cannot be good for protecting the natural world. Yet these seeming conflicting groups are often aligned with the policies of large immigration.

“WILDNERNESS IS NOT A LUXURY BUT A NECESSITY OF THE HUMAN SPIRIT.” - EDWARD ABBEY Edward Abbey, author and defender of the wilderness. In the 1960s and 70s the environmental movement was concerned with over-population and its negative effect on the natural world. “The Population Bomb,” written by Paul Ehlich written in 1970, painted a doomsday scenario of over-population. It was the “global warming” of its day. Ironically, around the time that the United States got its population growth under control, the government decided to radically change its immigration policy to increase the importation of human beings into the United States. In 1965 the US changed the policy that had been in place from the 1920’s to the 1960’s (of keeping legal immigration to about 250K/year) and increasing it by a factor of 10, to over 2 million/year. So, from the point where we were on the brink of controlling population growth, we changed our long-standing policy with virtually no public discussion. Since that time, we have increased the population by 60%, from 200 million in 1965, to 321 million in 2015. That is an incredible trajectory of population growth directly resulting from immigration policies. The question is: What is the plan? What is the end-game? 600 million? 800 million? With all the talk about “sustainable” use of energy and impacts on the environment, is this rate of population increase sustainable? The environmentalists who shouted about the dire consequences of over-population are nowhere to be heard now. Just as Abbey’s warning about the impact on the environment of out of control population increase went unpublished, the environmental groups of today are silent on the issue. Maybe the United States can tolerate 1 billion people, but the impact on the environment will be significant and we should probably talk about what the plan is. From the time that Abbey penned his unpublished warning, 30 years ago, until now, the official population has increased by 80 million people. Being a Sanctuary City means, as I understand it, that you either officially direct your law enforcement not to inquire about the immigration status of an individual that might interface with the law or you simply don’t direct them to cooperate with the Federal Immigration Customs and Naturalization (ICE) agents regarding suspected immigration offenders. One is an official position and one is defacto. It appears to me that Malibu is already a defacto Sanctuary City. I see no evidence of any cooperation between law enforcement and ICE. I also see no evidence of anyone “hiding in the shadows.” We empathize with the plight of people in our country in violation of our immigration laws because they are, usually, simply looking for a better opportunity. But why is it that the opportunities in their home country are not as abundant? The primary answer to what is different about where they are leaving and where they are coming to is: the tradition of the rule of law. Former colonies of Great Britain have a strong tradition of the rule of law, which emanates from the Magna Carta. This is also true of many European Countries. In the United States, we drew upon the Magna Carta, and many other historical examples studied by the Founding Fathers, to develop the Constitution, our “rule of law” guiding document. So, unwittingly and ironically, by coming here in violation of our laws and by our tolerating their long-term presence we are both, host and visitor, corroding the very thing they sought and the thing that makes our country function so well: the rule of law. The other, less understood and appreciated, aspect of the differences between countries where Capitalism works and where it does not, or does not work as well, lies in what the renowned Peruvian Economist Hernando De Soto identified in his landmark book “The Mystery of Capital.” Under our system of the rule of law, the United States and European countries developed organized representational systems of legal rights to entities, such as titles to homes on clearly defined property, businesses that are clearly defined in ownership, and legal contracts that clearly define business relationships. Often in developing countries these systems are not as sophisticated. People live in homes on property that may not have clearly defined and documented ownership. There was a time in our country where our legal representational systems were not as sophisticated either, and for many countries, they are where we were in 1783 but they won’t have to take 200 years to get to move forward. The path ahead has already been defined and charted. Like countries that bypassed landline telephones in favor of cell phones, they can fast track their “leap forward” much more efficiently. Many of those countries are doing exactly that with astounding advances in emerging economies over the last 20 years.


POLITICS De Soto points out that for these developing countries that have problems with Capitalism gaining traction, that “These failures have nothing to do with deficiencies in cultural or genetic heritage.” Clearly, there is no lack of industry or ingenuity in all corners of the world. There is a lack of “representational systems integrity.” Just as the concept of time is more useful with a representational system, such as a clock and units of time, so too are proper representational systems of property rights, the integrity of legal contracts that enable “informal” cash-based economies to create and harness the power of Capital. Individual property rights were so important to the Founding Fathers that they even considered using the wording “Life, Liberty and Property Rights” in the Declaration of Independence before changing it to “Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness.”

GROWTH FOR THE SAKE OF GROWTH IS THE IDEOLOGY OF THE CANCER CELL. -EDWARD ABBEY

De Soto and his team spent years studying why Capitalism works in some countries and not in others. In his studies, he found that in these “poor” countries there was an astounding rate of savings amongst the people. But without the legal representational system as a foundation, the ability to harness this cash and create capital was stymied. Whereas a mortgage on a home enables Americans to “harness capital” as a small-scale example, the lack of a solid representational legal system hinders many countries from fully harnessing such capitalist systems. Fortunately for those countries, the roadmap exists, though the development of these systems and their importance in functioning Capitalist economies was not always clearly understood or taught. De Soto describes these as “informal economies” - primarily cash-based that are unable to generate capital because of their lack of a proper legal system of representation. Like time without units of measurement or a clock, they remained unharnessed. Ironically, the large presence of “undocumented workers” in our country creates something that is never talked about: a black market, an “informal” economy, a cash-based system. Workers receive cash for labor yet their families are supported by the “formal” economy which provides schooling, healthcare, and welfare. The cost to California for this support to “undocumented families” was estimated at 2.5 billion dollars a year by former LA County Supervisor Michael Antonovich. The “informal” economy is corroding the “formal” economy. Illegal immigration is related to, but not a subset of, legal immigration. Political talk of “comprehensive immigration reform” has never included comprehensive public discussion of the realities of our legal immigration system. So, how do we compare to other countries? Are people coming in violation of our laws because we are so restrictive that we let so few in legally? The reality is that the United States allows in more legal immigrants every year than all the rest of the countries of the world combined and we have done so for the last 50 years. That explains our astounding 60% population growth in my lifetime. This is never talked about publicly – the scale of our legal immigration program. What are the goals and objectives of our immigration system? Why is it so large compared to other countries? Why did we increase it by tenfold in the 1960s? Why has our country tolerated and facilitated the scale of illegal immigration that has gone on for so long? The answer lies, I believe, in what Edward Abbey alluded to in the quote I mentioned previously: the desire by the “moneyed interests” that control our government for a growth-based economy. By ever-increasing amounts of people, economic growth is facilitated and wages are kept down. More consumers, more buyers of houses, more and cheaper labor, etc. But what is the end-game? Abbey, ever the defender of Mother Nature, advocated: “…it occurs to some of us that perhaps the ever-continuing industrial and population growth is not the true road to human happiness, that simple gross quantitative increase of this kind creates only more pain, dislocation, confusion and misery. In which case, it might be wise for us American citizens to consider calling a halt to the mass influx of even more millions…” Immigration, both legal and illegal, should not be an emotional issue, not a political issue, not a racial issue, and probably not even an economic issue. At this point, it is most definitely an environmental and a numbers issue. We need to all start talking, calmly and unemotionally about what the country’s plan is on immigration and what our objectives are for the future of our country. What is sustainable? We are the stewards of this great land for our children. We need to have an honest and open and inclusive discussion, unemotionally, without racial or political accusations, about what our vision is for the future of America. We need to do it now, because we are presently on a trajectory to have an India-scale population problem which is completely self-induced by our government’s policies. Maybe that is what we want, but we should talk about it. We also need to consider how fortunate we are that we live under a sound “rule of law” system and that our predecessors developed the proper and robust representational system that enables us to harness capital and clearly define legal ownership. That durable document, the Constitution, on which our rule of law system is based, is what every public official and every member of the Armed Services swears to “support and defend against all enemies foreign and domestic.” It is not the flag or the President that the oath is made to; the oath we all take is to support and defend our system of “the rule of law.” Before we choose to corrode our rule of law system by declaring ourselves a Sanctuary City, we should take a moment and realize that we might be corroding or destroying the very thing to which these decent and hardworking migrants that we empathize with are seeking. We would be better off to uphold and support the integrity of our “system,” which has given our relatively young country one of the oldest and most durable forms of government on planet Earth. If we want to change our policies, we would be well-served to employ our system of representational government to change our laws instead of facilitating the breakdown of the rule of law.


OPINION

LAND

BY SAM HALL KAPLAN

BANKING

Land banking is the latest item the City has added to its plate, and on first bite it appears tasty. But let the buyer beware, in this case Malibu’s residents, for if we really needed to be reminded, real estate here is a blood sport. And to be sure with any property transaction, public as well as private, the devil is in the details. Blank checks as indicated by the city proposal should just not be issued any government entity, no matter how servile. Also worrisome is that the council ad hoc committee will be headed by Skylar Peak and Laura Rosenthal. The lame duck,wily Laura, seems to be looking beyond her term of office, and has been cozying up to local real estate interests and advertising herself for hire on LinkedIn as a political consultant. As for the amiable Skylar, frankly he has not demonstrated the aptitude for land use, and appears obsessed with finding a site for a questionable skateboard park. His resolve as the member of the slate elected on their pledge of reform also apparently wilted when he relented at the first council meeting and voted to allow Lou LaMonte to keep his seat on the city’s powerful subcommittee on finance and administration. This means that, despite being in the minority, Lou and Laura will have their fingers very much on the pulse of the city, gripping the elbow of the staff, and tampering with the recipe for the municipal pie. This should not be to the taste of councilpersons Mullen and Jefferson and their supporters. Indeed, this and other aspects of Malibu’s land banking program could well turn the most definitely well-intentioned effort into a land bungling program. But first, some background, that at first glance makes land banking appear like a good idea: Given the land use controversies that have roiled residents in recent years, resulting in costly contested propositions, the idea of snatching private property from the jaws of ever-avaricious developers for public use seems smart. Logically less land for commercial use would undoubtedly mean less rapacious development of high end stores catering to flush tourists and the increasing horde of deep pocketed part-time residents, resulting presumably in less traffic. That is the mantra of Malibu’s majority. And the same goes for multi-unit residential developments, such as had been proposed over the years for sprawling Trancas Field in West Malibu. It is a case in point. The law suits over that proposal only ended last year with the city’s purchasing the field for $11 million plus in what could be considered a harbinger of a municipal land banking program. The purchase went without a hitch, which was a pleasant surprise given that Christi Hogin, the city’s maladroit city attorney, was Involved. But the subsequent land use planning sessions by the city to determine what the 35-acre site should be used for also could be a harbinger, albeit a disquieting one. Proposed for consideration were the construction of centers for seniors, cultural and nature venues, a community garden, playing fields, and a ubiquitous skate board park. Also cited was the alternative of letting the fields remain as is. There was no workshop, other than asking an unvetted audience to arbitrarily pin green and red dots on a series of the proposed uses pictured on display boards, reminding some of a kindergarten project. Confusion ensued. No particulars were offered, such as cost benefits analyses for any of the wish list, design specifications, such as will the playing fields require stands, lighting and toilets; and for any use, parking, parking, parking. Talk about a pig in the poke. Talk about giving out your credit card number and security code to a robo caller. If doing nothing is proposed, or for that matter, too much, as it has for Bluffs Park, there is the concern the ensuing muddle would be a honey pot for the bureaucracy, and the planning could drag on for years, for City Hall’s favorite consultants. And as for doing nothing, the $11 million purchase paid for by all of Malibu then would be gift of sorts to the 30 or so properties overlooking the field. No doubt it would add to their property values, just as the very private access to the public beaches does for select Point Dune properties blessed by arbitrarily deeded beach keys. Interestingly, this raises the question of whether the land-banking program could be tweaked and tapped to buy beach access on the Point for all Malibu residents; in effect provide a free alternative to the pricey beach key conceit and questionable real estate construct. Now that could be an imaginative, if not, to say the least, controversial, application of land banking. Yes, the devil is in the details. That possible pig in the poke the land bank poses just may not be kosher.

GROWTH FOR THE SAKE OF GROWTH IS THE IDEOLOGY OF THE CANCER CELL. -EDWARD ABBEY POINT DUME THEN...

POINT DUME NOW.

Stage 4

“TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON, TO EVERY WAVE A LIMIT, TO EVERY RANGE AN OPTIMUM CAPACITY. THE UNITED STATES HAS BEEN FULLY SETTLED, AND MORE THAN FULL, FOR AT LEAST A CENTURY. WE HAVE NOTHING TO GAIN, AND EVERYTHING TO LOSE, BY ALLOWING THE OLD BOAT TO BE SWAMPED.” -EDWARD ABBEY


ENVIRONMENT

OCEANPOLI-SEA

BY ANDREW MCDONALD

PHOTOS BY DIPAN DESAI

Whether you’re an ocean lover, scientist, advocate, or other, it is clear that the State of our Ocean affects us all. In order to ensure healthy and thriving oceans and wildlife, we need well-informed leaders to create strong ocean policy at the local, state and federal level.

This January, just before the inauguration, Ocean Champions issued the “State of our Ocean” at the Long Beach Aquarium -- meant to be a celebration and a call to action, given that so many individuals, organizations and foundations in southern California have a relationship with our ocean, and knowing these individuals and groups are often searching to act in meaningful ways. Founded in 2003 by its President, Dr. David Wilmot, Ocean Champions is an Ocean Conservation PAC that shared analysis and insight into what the election means for creating strong ocean policy. Having spent more than a decade helping elect pro-­ocean conservation candidates to Congress, they discussed at the Gala event the impact of having the right people on Capitol Hill, the value of a pragmatic non-partisan approach to ocean policy, and actionable information that all of us working towards a healthy and sustainable ocean will need to know to be successful. The challenges facing the ocean and its wildlife have never been greater, and the support from the ocean conservation community, elected officials and the public continues to grow. Fortunately, progress has been made on many fronts including marine protected areas, plastics pollution, harmful algal blooms and water quality, overfishing and sustainable fisheries. Much attention has been given to issues such as ocean acidification and warming, coral reef health, and endangered species. However, many challenges remain.

Ocean Champions is the political voice of the ocean. #votetheocean

“The purpose behind our “#VoteTheOcean” messaging is to develop it as an action-oriented campaign designed to get coastal activists involved in the political process” said Vipe Desai, Ocean Champions Board Member. “We want to encourage people to think about the oceans when they vote, as raising awareness as a political issue is critical to the future of our oceans.” Given our increasing population and impact modern civilization is having on our resources, the need for lasting solutions is of paramount importance. Some promising new pro-ocean organizations and initiatives have been born, such as “Ocean Champions” Political Action Committee mentioned above, and “Alta Sea” located at the Port of Los Angeles where ocean innovators collaborate to generate innovative solutions to global challenges of human and environmental sustainability. Designed by Gensler, one of the world’s leading architecture and design firms, the 35-acre AltaSea campus is being called by Architectural Digest, “one of the most exciting new projects” in Los Angeles.

The Ocean Champions “State of our Ocean” event was held at the Long Beach Aquarium.

Through a bold plan conceived in concert with the community and stretching decades into the future, AltaSea is creating an urban, ocean-based campus at the Port of Los Angeles. From feeding the earth’s growing population to providing long-term employment and ocean-related careers, AltaSea is positioned to make an innovative mark on the future of Los Angeles and the planet. Their vision is based on the following major pillars: ● Economic opportunities for future generations must be created ● The ocean must be explored ● Future generations must be fed ● Future generations must have clean energy ● Future challenges must be met Each of us who has a relationship with the ocean and its wildlife understands the challenges before us. Together, we must all move forward with a sense of UrgentSEA, building on the progress that has been made and working together to achieve the victories that are essential in our battle for a healthy ocean. GET INVOLVED: oceanchampions.org, altasea.org

Philippe Cousteau, Social Entrepreneur, toasting to ocean stewardship, optimistic in the commitment to protect our oceans.

From left to Right: Vipe Desai, Evelina Christopherson, Andrew McDonald.

Nautilus Ocean Research and Education Vessel.

ISSUES / CHALLENGES / OPPORTUNITIES Critical issues facing the oceans and their wildlife include: 1. Achieving sustainable fisheries - ending overfishing, improving monitoring, reducing bycatch, eliminating seafood fraud 2. Clean water - understanding, reducing, and ultimately eliminating toxic and harmful algal blooms, including so-called “ dead zones” and other forms of water pollution 3. Plastic pollution including marine debris - understanding, reducing and ultimately eliminating 4. Establishment of marine protected areas 5. Raising awareness for reducing consumption excesses 6. Ocean acidification - understanding and mitigation.


OPINION

THE

HISTORYOF IN

HATE

AMERICA BY DAVID STANSFIELD


OPINION

MALIBU'S PREMIERE MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY


WELLNESS Most people assume that the proteins they require can only come from meat, chicken, fish, eggs, and milk. It’s a myth... In reality, plant-based diets can provide all the essential amino acids that comprise the building blocks of protein, less the saturated fats! Protein is basically 20 amino acids that provide our body with energy and sustenance; builds muscle, fuels the brain, maintains healthy skin and hair and keeps our organs running properly. It improves our moods, lowers our blood sugar and helps us focus. Of the 20 amino acids in your body’s proteins, 9 are essential to your diet because your cells cannot manufacture them. Here are the 9 essential plant-based sources of amino acids: 1. Leucine - seaweed, pumpkin leaves, watercress, horseradish tree (the leafy tips), alfalfa seeds, turnip greens, kidney beans, sesame seed, sunflower seeds, soy, peanuts, rice, bananas, apricots, peaches, guavas, avocados, figs, persimmons, raisins, pears, dates, apples, kiwi, olives, blueberries.

HOW TO EAT

A PROTEIN PACKED PLANT BASED BY DIANA NICHOLSON

DIET

2. Isoleucine - rye, soy, cashews, almonds, oats, lentils, beans, brown rice, cabbage, hemp seeds, chia seeds, spinach, pumpkin, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds, cranberries, quinoa, blueberries, apples, and kiwis. 3. Lysine - beans (the best), watercress, hemp seeds, chia seeds, spirulina, parsley, avocados, soy protein, almonds, cashews, and some legumes with lentils and chickpeas being two of the best. 4. Methionine - sunflower seed butter and sunflower seeds, hemp seeds, chia seeds, Brazil nuts, oats, seaweed, wheat, figs, whole grain rice, beans, legumes, onions, cacao, and raisins. 5. Phenylalanine - spirulina and other seaweed, pumpkin, beans, rice, avocado, almonds, peanuts, quinoa, figs, raisins, leafy greens, most berries, olives, and seeds. 6. Threonine - watercress and spirulina (which even exceed meat), pumpkin, leafy greens, hemp seeds, chia seeds, soybeans, sesame seeds, sunflower seeds and sunflower butter, almonds, avocados, figs, raisins, quinoa, and wheat. Sprouted grains are also excellent sources of this amino acid as well. 7. Tryptophan - oats and oat bran, seaweed, hemp seeds, chia seeds, spinach, watercress, soybeans, pumpkin, sweet potatoes, parsley, beans, beets, asparagus, mushrooms, all lettuces, leafy greens, avocado, figs, winter squash, celery, peppers, carrots, chickpeas, onions, apples, oranges, bananas, quinoa, lentils, and peas. 8. Valine - beans, spinach, legumes, broccoli, sesame seeds, hemp seeds, chia seeds, soy, peanuts, whole grains, figs, avocado, apples, sprouted grains and seeds, blueberries, cranberries, oranges, and apricots. 9. Histidine - rice, wheat, rye, seaweed, beans, legumes, cantaloupe, hemp seeds, chia seeds, buckwheat, potatoes, cauliflower and corn. So eat your plants... Mother Nature’s got you covered!

Diana Nicholson Health and Wellness Editor, Fitness Expert Dediicated to Educate Support and Empower www.malibubeachpilates.com 310.429.1513

Beyond beef. The ultimate burger does not have to contain meat. There are many plant based recipes that will make meat a thing of the past when you are looking for a protein packed option.

Protein Sources (in grams)

Rolled oats (1/2 cup cooked)....................7.0 Pumpkin seeds (1/4 cup)........................10.0 Sunflower seeds (1/4 cup)......................10.0 Maca (1 table spoon)...............................3.0 Chia seeds (2 table spoons)...................10.0 Almond butter (2 table spoons).................7.0 Kale (1 cup)...............................................5.0 Black Beans (1 cup).................................15.2 Broccoli (1 cup)..........................................4.6 Bulgur, cooked (1 cup)...............................5.6 Chickpeas, boiled (1 cup) ........................14.5 Lentils, boiled (1 cup)................................17.9 Peanut butter (2 tablespoons).....................8.0 Quinoa, cooked (1 cup)..............................11.0 Seitan* (4 ounces)......................................24.0 Spinach, boiled (1 cup).................................5.4 Tempeh (1/2 cup)........................................15.7 Tofu, firm (1/2 cup)......................................19.9 Whole-wheat bread (one slice)..................... 2.7


LIFESTYLE

GO WITHGREEN

The design gods have spoken.

Green is the go-to color inspiring interior design in 2017. Representing balance, harmony, growth and renewal, it is easy on the eyes with a peaceful vibe - the perfect color to create a peaceful retreat. Designer Janette Mallory gives us a peek at her favorite design inpirations in shades from Hunter Green to Green Bay with a dash of Emerald City in between. The answer to your design needs in 2017? “Go big or go green!” janettemalloryinteriors.com @janettemalloryinteriors

Soothing to the eye, green is a comforting color to incorporate in your bedroom. A myriad of green paint colors to choose from at Benjamin Moore.

“ FROM FRESH SPRING TONES TO DEEPER HUES, GREEN WILL BE EVERYWHERE THIS YEAR. YOU CAN INCORPORATE THIS NEW COLOR TREND INTO ANY PART OF YOUR HOME. ” - JANETTE MALLORY

Deep emerald green keeps the vibe classic yet maximizing this monochromatic color scheme.

A classic - Gucci does green like no other designer. This purse from their spring 2016 collection is a must have for seasons to come. Preppy goes glam with the combo of pink and green. Photo: thisisglamorous.com

PHOTO BY: LISA ROMEREIN

Go back to green from 2016 - Gucci’s green Marmont loafer.

“I THOUGHT IT WOULD BE A GREAT WAY TO START OFF THE NEW YEAR WITH AN INTRODUCTION OF NEW PAINT COLORS. IF YOU ARE THINKING ABOUT REMODELING YOUR HOME THIS COMING YEAR AND WANT TO INTRODUCE SOME COLOR HERE IS A CREATIVE JUMPSTART AND GUIDE TO DESIGNINIG FRESH NEW SPACES.”

Janette Mallory


LOCAL

FARMER’S MARKET THE CORNUCOPIA MALIBU FARMER’S MARKET IS THE ONE PLACE YOU CAN SHOP THAT ALWAYS GIVES BACK.

The Cornucopia Foundation is a non- profit getting ready to celebrate its 18th year. If you care about animal rescues (Sherman’s Place) ,keeping Malibu poison free, or keeping PCBs out of the schools (America Unites) ,be aware that these are some of the many organizations that Cornucopia Malibu Farmer’s Market contributes to. Every time you shop at Cornucopia Malibu Farmer’s Market, by buying an apple or groceries to cook dinner, you are giving back, which is a great way to serve your community and your family. What grocery store or farm can say the same? They really go above and beyond with their philanthropic efforts. Debra Bianco, co-founder and president of The Cornucopia Foundation, has been instrumental in planting the seed to lead the way for all Malibu schools to replace old drinking fountains with new ELKAY brand drinking fountains. These have a computerized, built-in filtration system, electric water cooler and water bottle filling station. It also has a GREEN TICKER ,which calculates how many water bottles are being saved from going into landfill. We do not want our children drinking hose- bib water. The only thing currently holding this up is awaiting district approval. Cornucopia also intends to put the new drinking fountains in the Malibu Library and City Hall. Cornucopia’s commitment to getting these fountains in Malibu schools has been the catalyst for the PTA’s efforts to raise money to replace old drinking fountains in all schools. “There are many cities that have already done this and Malibu should be leading the way,” says Debra Bianco. Kimberly Russell Bonewitz of The Cornucopia Foundation also shares with us that Malibu High School students held a fundraiser to pay for a trip that would broaden their horizons and inspire them to apply for colleges out of state. When the school’s fundraising efforts were not enough to fund the trip, Cornucopia stepped in to pay for the rest and awarded scholarships to juniors and seniors of Malibu High School. The students went on a week-long trip to Washington, where they visited many colleges, enjoyed the local food and activities ,and some of the students even applied to the Washington schools.

Debra Bianco, President and Co-Founder of the The Cornucopia Foundation.

Juan Cabrillo PTA was unable to raise enough money for the 5th graders to attend Wolf Camp. It’s an annual graduation tradition for these kids to attend this camp to help prepare them for middle school. Cornucopia stepped in once again and awarded scholarships. When the parents asked Debra Bianco how to thank her, she replied, “PLEASE SHOP AT THE MALIBU FARMER’S MARKET.” The PTA Council of the Santa Monica-Malibu Unified School system awarded Cornucopia Foundation the Award of Excellence for Outstanding Commitment to Education for Malibu students. To assist in bringing their mission to fruition, Cornucopia started the Malibu Farmer’s Market in 2000. It was the perfect vehicle to sustain themselves and not depend solely on donations. A place where small businesses serve local artisan food and gift items, a gathering place for the community and a perfect platform for environmental outreach. The Cornucopia Foundation invited the City of Malibu to co-host Earth Day at The Cornucopia’s Farmer’s Market. Cornucopia is currently negotiating with the city to make this a reality. Between the Cornucopia Foundation and the City of Malibu’s resources, Earth Day Malibu could easily be put on the map. In the past, the city has held their Earth Day at City Hall or Malibu Country Mart but Cornucopia hopes to have one location for Earth Day for all to participate in. There is no better location than the Cornucopia Foundation Malibu Farmer’s Market, which was coined “Malibu Towne Center” by former Malibu Mayor John Siebert. Cornucopia Farmer’s Market’s main passion is environmental outreach education and ,of course ,giving back to the community. We can all assist in this endeavor by shopping the Farmer’s Market every Sunday from 10-3.

Every time you shop at Cornucopia Malibu Farmer’s Market, you are giving back, which is a great way to serve your community and your family.

CHECK OUT OUR NEW WEBSITE!

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NEWS Local and breaking news relevant to the Malibu community is updated regularly on our Twitter platform @thelocalmalibu. Significant news stories are available on our website and on our via our newsletter.

LIFESTYLE Malibu’s unique coastal lifestyle is coveted worldwide. Step inside the homes and businesses of notable Malibu locals who share their inspirational stories and way of life in our seaside coastal utopia.

SAY HELLO

We’re always looking for new stories to inspire and be inspired by. Reach out to us if you have something compelling to share with the Malibu community.

thelocalmalibu.com T H E

V O I C E S

O F

M A L I B U


plain. shopplain.com


LIFESTYLE

SUCCESSFULLY

SUSTAINABLE

PLANNING A PARTY? A ZERO WASTE EVENT BY THIS LOW-CARBON FOOTPRINT, FEMALE RUN BUSINESS IS THE ONLY WAY TO ECO ENTERTAIN. Evelina Christopherson is on a (life’s) mission to elevate people, organizations and companies that affect positive change in Malibu, California and around the globe. Founder of Evelina Eco Events, a female-owned benefit corporation and certified B-corp that produces scalable sustainable eco-events, Evelina shares with The Local exactly what she does and what drives her to create successful sustainable events.

EVELINA CHRISTOPHERSON

THE LOCAL: What is a zero waste event? EC: An event that uses regenerative practice to divert more than 90% of waste generated from going into a landfill. THE LOCAL: What does it mean to be a certified B-corp or benefit corporation? EC: We keep the well being of the planet at the forefront of our service to people and profit. Our purpose is to use business as a force for social, environmental and economic benefit. THE LOCAL: Do you have any men-tors? EC: More like sis-tors! The sustainable sisterhood is strong and the list is long but to name a few that have directly inspired me and still do- Suzy Cameron (Malibu local and founder of the MUSE school), Ashlan Gorce Cousteau, Jaime Nack and my littlest, biggest inspiration, my sweet daughter, Coda Christopherson.

eee produced the first ever zero waste events for UNICEF as lead producer for the iconic UNICEF Masquerade Balls in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles three years in a row.

THE LOCAL: Most rewarding and challenging eco event to date EC: Producing the first ever zero waste events for UNICEF...in New York, Chicago and Los Angeles...on the same night! THE LOCAL: Which of your event services do you think Malibu residents will enjoy the most? EC: The Eco Bar, it is stunning! Organic liquors curated into custom cocktails by a cool cali crew. We also offer The Eco Bites Station, organic bite sized nibbles that are sustainably sourced and beautifully styled for that cool and conscious cali vibe.

A zero-waste event with eee is the only way to eco-entertain.

THE LOCAL: Call to Action EC: Hire eee for your next eco event and submit this hashtag for a special rate for Malibu residents #MadeForMalibu

eco bar and eco bites The eee signature eco bar exudes elegance and decadence. Featuring organic liquors and spirits made in the USA, biodynamic ingredients, beautiful glass straws in vintage glassware, this zero waste experience creates a whole new kind of buzz! The eco bar can be tailored for “little guests”; minus the booze but not the fun! The eco bites station is sustainably sourced and beautifully styled to create a palate of nibbles for your guests to enjoy. We serve no seafood and limited charcuterie from Niman's Ranch only. We aim to serve every dietary need and there is plenty for everyone. All serve ware is compostable. Truly compostable, not the fake cornstarch plastic imposter. We are plastic free and zero waste.


Love events

birthdays graduations engagements weddings baby showers anniversaries life celebrations FUNerals

Give events gala Events fund-raisers FUN-raisers friend-rasiers honoring ceremony dedications golf tournaments social events

conscious designs. unique experiences. zero waste.

Work events

Networking Fashion Shows Openings Music Events & Concerts Food & Wine CSR Events Business Retreats Company Picnics Corporate Events

evelinaecoevents.com


LIFESTYLE

LIFE AFTER PET WITH GUARDIAN ANIMAL AFTERCARE

ROBERT CABRAL INTERVIEWS STEVE MACCORKLE, OWNER OF GUARDIAN ANIMAL AFTERCARE RC: What made you choose this line of work? SM: For me, it was really being educated about the animals and what became of them once they came to the end of their life. And there was really no respectable option for the animals. So, we were able to put this together and make it all inclusive and offer each defined cremation that’s defined by the international pet cemetery of crematory association. RC:How long have you been involved in this process? SM: Since 2003, but started managing it in 2008. RC: What do you think is the most important process for a grieving family that has lost a pet that you provide to make the process soothing and easy? SM: A number of things. Our turn around speed. With animals that are going home, we try to take care of them as quickly as possible. We service all our hospitals twice a week, that way if an animal is picked up on a Monday, the animal is coming back to that hospital on Thursday the same week. Often, people who come and drop their animals off with us, we will look at our schedule and put them in the front of our line. The faster the owner can find closure, the easier the grieving process is. It’s harder if you drag it out. RC: I’ve personally had 2 animals cremated here ; I think the experience was very caring and it was very family oriented. Why do you go to such strides to take care of each animal individually like you do? SM: Every pet family is different. What makes sense for one family is completely different than what makes sense for another family. We want to be there for them and help them find their closure. We want to make sure we have an open place that can come and promote them celebrating the memories of the relationship they had. RC: What is the procedure once one loses a pet? SM: Whatever is best for you, is what we’ll do. We can pick the animal up (there’s a small pickup fee), come to your house, figure out exactly how you want to proceed and then bring your animal back here and move forward. Or, you can bring your animal to us; we can allow you to have some time with your pet…present him in our condolences rooms, and give you a chance to say your final goodbye before we move forward to the crematory. We’ve had clients who want to put the animal into the crematory, want to watch the whole time, want to watch us remove the cremains, we’ve had clients want to go through the bones and pick a special bone and keep it. It is their animal, it’s their memory, what suits them best is what is going to make us succeed as a company. RC: So, your goal is to celebrate the permanent memory of the pet and be a part of that with the owner, so they can leave the animal with you, and everything will be taken care of for them or they can do every step of the way with you and you’re there to hold their hand for this final memory? SM: Yes, and another thing we offer is free grief support with every cremation, with every service. We have Dr. Kathleen Ale on staff, so if someone’s having a hard time finding closure, we have a number for them to call, somebody for them to talk to. We also do 8 different locations of group grieving sessions from Santa Barbara to Culver City. It’s free of charge and included in your services RC: We went in back and I toured your new crematorium that you say is very different, can you tell me a little bit about that? SM: That is the 02 solution and it’s designed to burn less natural gas than the regular crematory process. We are in the process of switching all of our crematories to the 02 solution. The idea behind is once the machine is loaded, gas will come on to start the fire, then once the fire is started the computer will switch off the gas and blow air into the chamber. And that air is used to feed the fire. It’s a gas savings and cuts down on the carbon output. These machines are very clean; they’re designed to run clean. If the crematory is smoking it means the machine is malfunctioning. On a day to basis, we do not put out smoke. RC: So, you would say your carbon footprint is very low? SM: Yes, it’s lower than a lot of people would expect it to be. RC: So, there are different ways of dealing with the final memories of our pet. We can bury them, cremate them…I think what the pet owners are focused on are what’s the last memory of our pet, are there different options? What are the different services? SM: We were the first full service crematorium in Los Angeles. We offer all the services sanctioned by the international pet cemetery and pet crematory association. One is the low-cost service which is communal. It’s a mass cremation. We process those animals and then we scatter them at sea. The next, which is most eco-friendly, is the individual and that would be a number of animals in the same crematorium, but they’re all in numbered pans. So, you’re just getting your animals cremains back. RC: You have a system I saw that looks bulletproof to me, very detailed and there’s no chance I’m going to get someone else’s animal or my animals remains will be mixed with another animal. SM: Yes. We’ve gone to great lengths to put a computer tracking system in place; there’s a number of physical redundancies in place to make sure that the animal you’ve brought to us is the animal that’s going to come home to you. When we started, that was our top priority.

Paw prints and fur collected from the animal are some of the keepsakes services provided at Guardian Animal Aftercare.


LIFESTYLE RC: So, there are communal, individual and private services? SM: Private is one animal in the crematorium at a time. It’s more like a human cremation would be. You can be as involved or uninvolved in that process as you like. We’ve had clients who like to do a viewing, or put the animal into the crematorium; we have clients sit next to the machine for the whole process and help clean the machine out once thecremation is done. It’s different for everybody ;we want to give everyone the most options that make them feel the most comfortable after their loss. RC: Most of the animals that come through probably come from a Veterinary Hospital, after the animal has been put down…What’s your relationship with the veterinarians when they want to learn about or be a part of your services? SM: We have an open-door policy. We have always invited our vets to come down, tour our facility and better understand our process. For a veterinarian, this is a very important visit. Nothing can go wrong on this last visit with this client, so we want them to be secure in using our services. A lot of people think it’s going horror show of animals piled on top of each other, but we’ve really done our best to make it as welcoming and inviting and the respect and dignity that goes into each animal, we know we have nothing to hide. RC:How many various animal hospitals do you service in Southern California? SM: Right now, 85. From SB to OC.

Steve MacCorkle, owner of Guardian Animal Aftercare with his dog Jack.

RC: What are some things you have in place that assure the client’s mind they’ve made the right decision or if they change their mind, are their different options you have in place to cover that? SM: One safeguard we have is all communal animals, the ones that are not going home- we store them for at least 7 days. That way if the owner changes their mind, we still have that animal and will be able to accommodate the veterinary practice or the client. Recently we build an 800 sq. foot freezer/refrigerator so we can better house these animals on rolling racks and they’re handled a lot better. One of the things I noticed in the back, is the individual care that is given to the animals who are awaiting cremation; your staff really get hands on involved in the grieving process and in the final respect process. SM: and that needs to be respected. My staff understands that they’re not just handling corpses, they’re working with somebody’s loved one. I’ve really trained them to treat every animal is if it was their own. The quality my staff brings to the process is exceptional. RC: Is it a hard job to do this, is it emotionally taxing for you and your staff?

Every animal gets a flower because every animal here was loved by someone.

SM: There’s compassion fatigue but I think the animal hospitals have it a lot harder. The vet techs are seeing those animals alive and they know the families, it is hard to witness the struggle of loss. One of Dr. Kathleen Ale’s specialties is compassion fatigue in the veterinary industry. If there’s someone having trouble at a hospital, we will send her out right away to talk to the entire staff to train them in grieving and compassion fatigue. RC: Is there financial hardship people incur with this/ Or is it affordable through the ranges of services you offer? SM: We are very affordable. Because we are full service and offering the different types of cremation, most every is able to afford a cremation. There’s a service for everybody that will be economically suitable. RC: One of the things that would concern me if I was bringing my animal in for cremation is ,am I sure this is a really good place? What’s happening to my pet after I leave it? How do you assure the person coming to see that this is the right process? SM: We have an anytime open door policy. We will welcome anybody to tour the facility whenever. I am confident we are treating every animal with the dignity and respect they deserve. For more information go to guardianaftercare.com

Traditional standard urns available at Guardian Animal Aftercare.


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