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the LIST trondheim 2018

VOL.2

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THE LIST

12

Column

14

Creole in the Soul

18

MAKING OF A MAGAZINE

24

The New Trønders

Støkkoya

46

Making Conversation: The English or Norwegian Dilema

For Trondheim, by Trondheim. How we make this magazine.

33

Meet Ingvill Konradsen Ceide

The lives of first generation immigrants and their children, first generation natives

A new festival comes to the region

SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS APPS Face-to-face through digital device

MEET YOUR MAKERS

17

TINATING 50

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EASY INTERVALS

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FAT WHALES

WIRAL LITE

FAUST GUITARS

55

60

85

THE ART LIST

Stitching Together A Region

53

LISTINGS & PREVIEWS

FOOD & DRINK


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THE LIST

EDITORIAL

THE LIST LEADER MADE IN TRØNDELAG

T

o look at what a region makes, is to understand the very anatomy of a place. A region’s language is influenced by the industries of its people, its population is the result of its position and importance, the strains and pains on its infrastructure are like the wear on tear on a body’s organs. Even its topography is scarred and tattooed by what we have created, torn down and rebuilt. Historically, the relationship between our geography and what we chose to make was a marriage of convenience, or simple practicality. The natural circumstance of the land, the climate and the available resources affected the historical decisions of what people decided to create and produce. If you lived by the sea you fished, if you live on fertile land you farmed, if you had mineral wealth you mined. Today, however, the choice of what to make, our individual mission, and what to make a living from is much more fluid. Transport networks and information highways around the world have allowed us to specialise in fields unconstrained by our nearby natural resources. Any decision to move into a new area of specialisation will still retain some roots in the lay of the land: artisan food producers will need to work with products which they can access and for which there is an have a market for; hardware developers will be constrained by market economics of

IMPRINT The LIST thelist.no a division of The List Media AS Contacts and information Located at DIGS, 30 Olavtryggvasons gate 30 7011 Trondheim, Norway Business/Publishing: +47 472 76 680 Editorial: +47 451 35 877 Email: editorial@thelist.no Circulation (ave.): 8.500 thelist.no +47 969 12 901

2018 / VOLUME 2

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF & CO-FOUNDER Wil Lee-Wright wil@thelist.no CO-FOUNDER Jaya Thomlison jaya@thelist.no CREATIVE DIRECTOR & CO-FOUNDER Andrew Natt andy@thelist.no

Editor-in-Chief Wil Lee-Wright

For more information about distribution please contact editorial@thelist.no

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR Torleif Kvinnesland torleif@thelist.no ART EDITOR Laura-Ann Morrison Laura@thelist.no

DESIGN Lewis McGuffie, Gia Lam Nguyen, Andrew Natt

PREVIEWS & LISTINGS / SOCIAL MEDIA Bradley Kurtz bradley@thelist.no

CO-FOUNDER Ida Bondø Lee-Wright ida@thelist.no

HEAD OF SALES Matias Bretteville-Jensen +47 969 12 901 matias@thelist.no

PROJECT MANAGER Jennifer Wold jennifer@thelist.no

DISTRIBUTION Michał Więcyk, Dominika Gembiak

importing parts; and app developers will need to have the inspiration to pursue an idea, a problem to solve (see Stain’s moving inspiration for creating the Flare app on page 46, for instance). In short: what we make is integral to who we are, and vice versa. In this volume of The List we decided to take a closer look at what people in Trøndelag are making, and what this tells us about the region. In doing so we have travelled as far as the northern tip of Trøndelag, to look at the history of the fishing industry in Vikna (see page 42), and as far south as Berlin, Germany, to gain some international perspective on what the rest of Europe thinks about our thriving food scene (read some stats about what we make in ‘Matriket Midt’ on page 22). We have gone to the edge of the ocean to interview the makers of a new festival on Stokkøya, and kept on going, all the way to South by South West festival in Austin, Texas, where we witnessed Adressaparken win a coveted design competition (for the making of a public space that celebrates the intersection of art, technology, and design). We have interviewed several talented creators along the way, who are featured in our series Meet Your Makers, which you will find dotted through the magazine. And instead of just focussing on people who make things, we have also thought about people who make people, see our main feature on families who have made a life here in Trøndelag (page 24). And yes, we have also looked a little closer to home too, at our own product, The List, which is made and printed right here in Trøndelag. Don’t forget to make your plans for the spring and summer with our previews and listings section, make the most of Trondheim with our coverage of the excellent art scene (in Art List, pages 55), make time for charitable contribution (page 14), make yourself understood (column page 12) and, above all else, make yourself comfortable. We’re not here to harvest your details, we’re here to make you smile, make you cry, make you laugh, make you dance. And we’re just getting started. �

SUB-EDITING Wil Lee-Wright, Jennifer Wold, Monique Swanepoel ILLUSTRATION Rosanna D'Arpa THE BOARD The List is seeking new Board members! Contact wil@thelist.no

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CONTRIBUTORS Margret Naylor, Pamela Naylor, David Nikel, Linda Hogstad, Martha Skogen, Stian Sandø, Julie Refseth, Zane Datava, Anette Klakegg, Kyle McClenahan, Øystein Rambjør Holten COVER Photographer: Dev Dhunsi Models: Moha Mahdi, Joachim Vaagan Fromm, Ann Iren Folkestad, and Gabriella De Los Angeles Berge PRINTING Soporset 100g Skipnes, Travbaneveien 6, 7044 Trondheim Tel: 73 82 63 00 www.skipnes.no

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THE LIST

THIS ISSUE

CONTRIBUTORS 2018 / VOLUME 2

WRITER

Margaret Naylor

Studies philosophy at NTNU and has lived in Trondheim for the last eight years. She enjoys film, tarot reading, and of having an excess of opinions. She is a hobbyist author, artist, and serial volunteer at cultural events around the Trondheim area.

WRITER

WRITER

Is one of the co-founders of the safety app Flare. Before he started working full time on Flare, he worked as a TV-host for the science show Newton on NRK. He was a gnome warrior in World of Warcraft for big parts of his life, where he played with the CTO of Flare ( Jørgen) who was a female human warlock. He has an academic background from computer science at NTNU. His favorite animal is probably cuttlefish.

Works as a teacher at Birralee International School and is the artist owner of Ginger Swirl Studios here is snowy Trondheim. She is the mother of three teens, one dog and three cats and may be the only single person in Trondheim who owns two cars. A native of Bellingham, WA, USA, she has loved living in Trondheim for eight years.

Stian Sandø

Pamela Helder Naylor

WRITER

Martha Skogen

Is a designer and artist who recently completed a PhD in Design from NTNU. Hailing from the United States, she and her Norwegian husband live here in Trondheim with their 9-year old son. They can often be found enjoying nature, powdery snow in winter and all the charm that Trondheim has to offer. 2018 / VOLUME 2

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ILLUSTRATOR

PHOTOGRAPHER

Is an illustrator and digital artist based in Turin, Italy and shares her life with two wonderful little daughters and a devoted husband. Sketching and painting all of her life, she is eager to endeavour outside of her family life with her skills and projects. She loves comics and illustrations without words.

Is a freelance photographer living in Trondheim. She has always been passionate about telling stories through her photographs, and she draws inspiration from the sun rays on the ocean and the magic in everyday life.

Linda Kathrine Hogstad

Rossana D’Arpa

PHOTOGRAPHER

Dev Dhunsi Is working with fashion and art photography focused on people and their cultural and social character. His work takes a close look at human connection and identity questioning the generalization and labelling of sexuality and social origin. His project “Bhomi” (Land in Hindi) was born of loss of a friend and the personal journey that happened in the aftermath of. It tells of connection to nature, looking for what doesn’t exist and the concept of inaccessibility.

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我为此悔悔恨终⽣生 我当时⼼心理理出了了问题却不不⾃自知 请原谅我

复活节快乐, ⼩小薇

⼩小薇,你两次拯救了了我的⽣生命 我⽣生⽽而为你,对你⼼心怀感激 请相信我 与你分离使我的⼈人⽣生翻天覆地 之后的每天我都在成⻓长,从未放弃希望 请你,也别放弃我 你是我的⽣生命之光 你是我的挚爱 请给我⼀一次机会来证明我⾃自⼰己


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2018 / VOLUME 2

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THE LIST

COLUMN

Making Conversation Writer—Martha Skogen, PhD Illustrator— Rosanna D'Arpa

I wish that I could agree that my (in)ability to articulate myself in Norwegian is due to the subtle infusion of cultural and societal norms that one accepts when choosing to live here. However, after 20 years, my experience says… no, screams… otherwise. I profoundly miss the English language. Unfortunately, I find myself still speaking Norwegian (& using the continuous tense) at an advanced sixth-grade level. I manage, I get by, I even teach university courses in it, but I never really ‘wear’ the Norwegian language as a representation of myself. Since I moved here in 1997, I’ve said that speaking Norwegian feels like wearing a loose, odd-fitting jacket, whereas English is my skin—the very essence that contains me. English serves to carve me out of the universe while my prior fluency in American Sign Language allowed me to dance with it. Even though I have embraced Norwegian to my best ability, I continually surprise myself by living with a degree of linguistic muteness that I never thought possible. Perhaps this is a good thing. As a visual person, I speak in metaphors, analogies and illustrations and this often falls completely flat in Norwegian. I know myself well enough that I will keep trying regardless of how many more thousands of blank looks I’ll receive. Speaking this way formulates who I am; it’s how I interact with the world. Each non-English language simply becomes a crude filtration of the original. Good dialogue can be like a fast, smooth, light-hearted tennis match where each person brings out the best in the other. Very often when I speak Bokmål, I feel as if I’m shoving tennis balls through the net by hand, hoping they will land on the other side to be picked up and played eloquently by the other person. Another analogy in English means another instance when I will likely remain silent in Norwegian. I can delight in a clever English double-entendre for weeks. My dry wit, something I am known for in my native tongue, simply evaporates in Norwegian—this can cause me deep

anguish if I let it. Although I am often complimented for my vocabulary and flowing use of Norwegian, I won awards for my writing and poetry as a youth, something I doubt will ever occur outside of English. Unlike my son, who learned to separate the two languages from day one, I now straddle a kind of no-man’s land where the most relevant word (regardless of ANY language) flies into a sentence rather ad-hoc. Nowadays I speak in linguistic salad, yet I always come home to English… literally. It’s to the point where I insist on using it around our dining table. If nothing else, I must hear English at home. Still. I love English… and I’m losing it. Although this grieves me, I take comfort in knowing (i.e. praying) that I can bring it up to speed anytime. When we travel to a native-English speaking country, I relish the cacophony of talking voices around me—particularly when they are punctuated by the new savvy expressions, splendid street slang, and glorious curse words that I’ve missed up to that point. I wrote my PhD dissertation in English and yes: I wordsmithed every syllable of that thing. Doing so gave me immense joy. Norwegian is a tool that I use; English is an ever-changing tapestry of colours, sounds and verbal spices with which I play. My mind speaks Norwegian whereas my heart speaks English. When among my non-Anglophone friends, we use English exclusively because it’s a lingua franca for them and a safe space for me. I’ve long since given up my referential humour, word plays and corny bemusings being more than anything more than for myself because very often they go unnoticed, unregistered or worse, misunderstood. Even with all my unacknowledged witticisms and puns, I can finally 13

be ME. My friends accept my ramblings even when they don’t understand. As you might expect, I cherish them for it. Please know that I’m not disparaging or dismissing Norwegian. I accept full responsibility for adoring English the way that I do and hold no grudges towards any other language’s inability to compete with it. You never forget your first love, after all. I appreciate the Norwegian language(s) for their rich history, cultural importance and for what Bokmål has allowed me to personally accomplish here. Like so much else in Norway, I find it to be refreshingly practical and efficient. I enjoy the tribal factor that Bokmål brings in international contexts as well. English’s global dominance automatically eliminates this phenomenon. Numerous times I’ve witnessed how two Norwegians (or Scandinavians) almost instantly become friends when they hear each other out in the big, wide world. With the Scandinavian languages you even get a lot of bang for your buck: 3-4 for the price of one (well, if you can grasp them all, that is!). To me, some of the dialects in Norwegian sound like claws on a chalkboard while others emanate pure poetry and music (#lookingatyouSamispeakers). English dialects and accents, although charming and enjoyable, do not cause me to sit and listen all day as the northern Norwegian dialects do. Regardless, to really fit in here one must learn to speak Norwegian… end of story. It’s an efficient culture, after all, so it follows that their language must be too. I find that Bokmål functions much like a bullet train—it gets to the point, fast and well. Yet no matter how many decades quietly slide by, my heart will always take the path of the butterfly. � 2018 / VOLUME 2


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Creole in the Soul Ingvill Konradsen Ceide PROFILE

Writer—Jennifer Wold Photographers—Linda Kathrine Hogstad & Courtesy of Prosjekt Haiti

Norwegians, although perhaps not something they recognise themselves, have a mentality of ‘if there isn’t an apparent way through, let’s make one’. A great example of this is the number of tunnels found in Norway. With that in mind, how does one keep the dream of an untraditional non-profit relief organization alive in one of the most impoverished countries? For Ingvill Konradsen Ceide, co-founder and general manager of Prosjekt Haiti, it is a fusion of passion, progressive thinking, and the people she serves. Ceide is a sunny and warm woman with a welcoming smile. She is a mother, a traveller, adventurous and deeply motivated. There is a gentleness backed with rugged determination. In short, Ceide is quintessentially Norwegian. Having degrees in anthropology, public health and international politics and human rights, it is clear what her intentions are while out in the world. Who she is and what she does are a seamless merger. It’s rather beautiful and inspiring. Prosjekt Haiti was started 18 years ago by this intrepid woman, but it isn’t your typical relief aid organisation. Far from it actually, because of Ceide’s belief that people are more than capable to move past traditional aid if given the right tools. She has faith that empowering people through smart solutions, which are not short-term alleviation fixes but ones the locals can take ownership over, grow 2018 / VOLUME 2

and succeed at, is the way to deliver impoverished people to a more self-determined future. It’s clear that she knows all Haitians are capable and deserving of this. From her home city of Finnsnes, and later Tromsø, she started her journey of helping Haitians. But why is a woman from Finnsnes so dedicated to Haiti? For her, Haiti has been home off and on for decades. Her husband is Haitian, which brought her there in the first place and it wasn’t just one Haitian who found a place in her heart; it was all of them. She knows it takes a village to change things, but she needed a slightly bigger village to move into the next phase of the organisation’s life. Trondheim is a bit bigger than a village, but there is still a small town with big dreams feel to how people operate here. Innovation, social entrepreneurship, coworking and finding solutions is the backbone of this region. Norwegians are no strangers to living in a country of poverty. “The opportunity to balance inequity is worth fighting for,” says 14

Ceide. “We did it here. Haiti deserves the chance also.” The ethics and motivation to never return to that state of poverty are an unspoken cultural trait and underlying force here. Innovation and entrepreneurism is rather rampant in Trondheim. Whether it is just the nature of the people here or spurred on by the educational institutions here, Ceide has made Trondheim her home-base in Norway to tap into all that makes this town tick. Ceide genuinely believes in the power of education and teaching social entrepreneurship especially to women to change the economic future of Haitians. “I am very interested in the social entrepreneurship that seems to be very central here in Trondheim. The people here have a lot to share,” says Ceide. “And we need more expertise in this department for a lasting change.” Why is Haiti in need of so much help? What makes this so pressing? It is no big secret that Haiti is a deeply impoverished country, sitting at position 163 out of 169 countries listed on the UN Development Index. The statistics are shocking: 65 percent of the population is under 25, 56 percent of the nation is living in poverty and 25 percent in abject poverty. There is a 40 percent illiteracy rate and only one out of every four children attend school. Norway’s statistics couldn’t stand in greater contrast, and if history tells us anything, it is that what was done here can be done there. Oil is not needed; it is a matter of utilizing the resources that a place is rich in. But how has Ceide been changing the lives


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of Haitians now? Education. With two schools enrolling a total of 430 children, Prosjekt Haiti is combating one of its worst problems before it starts. This early life problem can clearly be seen in the need for adult education now. One of the projects that Ceide is most proud of is the Women’s Network, Manman Troll. She believes that if you provide basic education to women and then give them vocational training, they can radically change their family’s financial trajectory. “We train women from 18 to 65, which is our oldest, they learn to read and write, to sew, and we have a group learning hairdressing,” explains Ceide. “Really, it is training women to be able to create their own income. We teach them how to start a business, open a bank account, to make a budget and long-term planning.” The earthquake in 2010 left scars that have been long lasting on the land and the people. Despite these difficult situations, there are those who have found that new foundations can be built and have sought out the chance to do so. This can be seen in two young people who Ceide believes are excellent examples of what the future can be through opportunity, education and people being architects of their future. Jeff Anie Joseph and Sammuel Ambroise have similarities in their lives; their mothers have left for the United States to try and support the family from abroad, they live with their fathers and siblings on the island and, like most in Haiti, they were raised in poverty. “Anie had a dream to study medicine but due to financial restrictions she was not able 15

2018 / VOLUME 2


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The Haitians are more than willing and desiring to learn and would not take the help for granted.

to pursue that dream. However, she has been able to study marketing & PR over the last couple of years. Anie was very shy in the beginning, but we soon learned that she is a very bright and ambitious young woman,” recalls Ceide with pride. “She soon took responsibility and became a leader in the group. She was selected to travel to Tromsø on an exchange program financed by the Fredskorpset, where she spent 3 months at TVIBIT in Tromsø learning to make films and set up film festivals. On her return to Haiti she continued leading our youth group, and also had the chance to do an internship with LEAF community arts festival in Asheville, North Carolina.” The idea about creating long-term solutions that the Haitians can take ownership over is very clearly represented in this young woman. Anie is Ceide’s closet colleague as the leader of Manman Troll. 2018 / VOLUME 2

Another positive example of how Prosjekt Haiti, Ceide’s dream, has shown its worth to the people is in Sammuel Ambroise, who joined the youth club after the earthquake. Like many who cannot afford formal education or training, he turned to the wonderful resource of YouTube to educate himself in 3D modelling and animation. He was selected to travel with Anie to Tromsø for a threemonth exchange. After this period, he was offered a place to study for his International Baccalaureate at Senja Videregående Skole in Finnsnes for 2 years. He received his diploma and started studying data engineering at the University of Narvik. After a brief period of further studies his high level of self-education caught the attention of Gimpville animation studio, who offered him a job. Sammuel has worked on feature films like the 12th Man, 16

Along Gods and Skjelvet. Today, Sammuel is a freelancer living in Tromsø with his Norwegian wife, Ingunn, and their 2-year-old boy. Two lives were changed, and one created because this young man had a dream and was given the opportunity to act on it. Where does all that Trondheim has to offer fit in though? It is the institutions here that can have the greatest impact. “The most pressing needs which Trondheim can help with would be through the institutions here in Trondheim, such as St. Olav’s, NTNU, Sintef, and others, to lend their expertise.” She knows it is a big expectation, but the need is greater. How can the aforementioned institutions specifically help? Looking at NTNU, who has sent students before, there is immense potential for areas such as the civil engineering, the medical school and the entrepreneurial school to carry out projects in Haiti that would benefit both parties. One could receive data and other valuable education from participation and through the visiting experts. Dronning Mauds Minne could have students create an education plan to help train the future generations of children and study the after effects, and at the same time give Haiti a future filled with qualified teachers. There are endless possibilities in the private sector as well that Ceide has seen; she knows this is the right place. Now, she just needs the right people. If you sit with Ceide and listen to her even for a few minutes, you’ll see this is less about her and more about the people she serves. Until they no longer need her, she’ll be working away as their Norwegian Mary Poppins.�


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MEET YOUR MAKERS

TinaTing Tina Bugge

knit community of designers is something she finds very ‘inspiring and including’. In her estimation working in any other city would not have afforded her the same opportunities for exposure as an ‘introverted, creative exhibitionist’. Sukker, for instance, invited her to join the collective in 2015, which she was very honoured to be asked. The feedback from those who visit the actual store allows her to create according to their desires for colour or shape. It is the best place to see her work up-close and personal. To keep up-to-date on her most recent work follow her Instagram at @tinabugge, on Facebook at facebook.com/tinatingshop and at her online shop on epla.no/shops/tinating for art work and epla.no/shops/tinatingpaper for the best origami paper you can find here in Norway. To see the full interview, check our blog at thelist.no. �

Image courtesy Katie Kulseng

As a full-time engineer in the Faculty of Medicine and Science department at NTNU, Tina Bugge needed something a bit more colourful and a place to express her more creative side, but something that still draws inspiration from her engineering back ground. As a proud maker, she has found herself drawn in by the beauty of paper and what it can, unexpectedly to some, become. Originating in the sixth century in Japan, the art of origami has extended across the world. Here in Trondheim it manifests in the hands of Tina who creates beautiful artwork,

sculptural lamps and adorable little cards. “I think people can tell when it is a TinaTing. I am all about straight lines and edges. If it is not a right angle, it is a wrong angle. Sloppy origami is irritating”, says Tina, “The repetitive folding is like meditation. The joy of creating something beautiful from a flat sheet of paper is just awesome!” She can always be found with paper in her bag everywhere she goes. Her most popular, and synonymous with her work, is her PRSM-pictures. They are built of strong lines and gradient colour combinations that Tina often puts together with in a slightly unorthodox but playful manner. “Colour coordinating is also fun. When making the origami pictures I will sometimes throw the pieces around on the table, and then maybe an unlikely colour combo will appear.” As a native Trønder, the closeness here makes the area a perfect fit for her. The close-

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2018 / VOLUME 2


THE LIST

CUSTOM PRINT IS THRIVING At almost four years old, The List remains Trøndelag’s only cultural magazine in English. Why English? Trondheim is one of Norway’s leading international cities, with world-leading academic research and startups at the bleeding edge of future tech all calling the city their home. Trondheim and the Trøndelag region attract international talent in the thousands, and there was a disconnect between this group of people and the goings on in the city. From a few thousand copies of the first edition in selected places around Trondheim, The List’s distribution network has grown far and wide. With the support of Trondheim Kommune and Trondheimsregionen, 10,000 copies of each magazine are distributed to almost 350 points across the region, from Steinkjer to Oppdal. Every year, a partnership with NTNU sees all new arriving international students given a copy of the magazine in their welcome packs. What better way to introduce new arrivals to the city’s hidden delights? The international feel continues in the magazine’s offices, where 11 nationalities currently contribute to the words, photography and artwork in every issue. We’re always on the lookout for people with stories to tell, so hit us up at hello@thelist.no if you have something to offer!

2018 / VOLUME 2

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THE LIST

FEATURE

The Making of a Magazine: For Trondheim, by Trondheim

When we decided to dedicate an issue of The List to products made in Trøndelag, we found our first example a little closer to home than expected! We invited one of our original collaborators, David Nikel, to come back and have a look at what makes a print magazine tick in the digital age.  Writer—David Nikel Photographers —Wil LeeWright & Torleif Kvinnesland

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n a few short decades, the internet has changed the world in ways we could never have imagined. Funny cat memes, a piping hot pizza, or the latest gadget from China can all be yours in just a few quick clicks or taps, while digital currency and VR have jumped out of science fiction and into reality. Perhaps the most striking way our lives have changed as a result is the way we access and consume information. From making dinner plans on social media to browsing fake news and finding travel inspiration, the incentive to put down your digital device is becoming less and less. As the world has become ever more connected, it’s an undeniable fact that print has suffered. British newspaper The Independent has gone online only, while the curtain came down on classic consumer mags such as Company and FHM. And yet, print is far from obsolete. In fact, the custom publishing industry is thriving, and there’s no better example of that than right here in Trondheim. Rather than try to tell their story for themselves, The List turned to me to do it for them. Why me? The story began four years ago when a fresh-faced British photographer named Wil got in touch with me to ask if I was interested in teaming up to launch a print 19

Bradley Kurtz Social Media Manager

magazine. He wanted to create the ‘Time Out of Trondheim’. Instantly my curiosity was piqued, for I’d been thinking about a similar project along the lines of an English language news service. Wil’s passion for the concept soon won me over to his idea. Many conversations and many beers later, we’d assembled a team of interested people from all walks of life for a meeting at Digs. Ideas were shared, the team expanded, and the project was up and running Just as things started to get going, I had to pull out from the project as some issues in my own business had to take priority. Things kept going, and four of the core team – Wil, Ida, Jaya & Andy – founded a company and set to work. First on the agenda was to create a pilot issue that could be shown to potential contributors, advertisers, distribution points, and other partners. “The pilot issue was such a steep learning curve,” says co-founder Wil Lee-Wright. “We worked through the night two days in a row and learned then and there what was needed to pull a magazine together. There were mistakes and it was tough, but we were so emotionally involved in the product that we saw it through.” The first issue proper, containing such nuggets as How to Hug a Norwegian, hit the streets in November 2014. More than three years later, The List is bigger and better than ever, but is also so much more than just a magazine. The List has transformed into a successful media company, The List Media. But in a city so well-known for its technology focus, just how did they do it? On taking a closer look, I found that the magazine - somewhat ironically – has a lot more in common with the digital world than you might expect. A print magazine might seem like the exact opposite of a digital business, but the growth of The List has been exactly like that of a tech startup. The reason? The very definition of a startup is a group of people searching for a sustainable business model. Whether by design or not, that’s exactly what the team were doing in those early days. The ‘aha’ moment came when the team realised that the magazine itself wasn’t the business, but by having built an audience and 2018 / VOLUME 2


THE LIST

Matias Bretteville-Jensen Head of Sales

a set of core competencies, they’d created a platform on which they could build a sustainable business model. This audience-first model is fast becoming the norm for tech companies, large and small. Take Facebook, for example. They use content, albeit user-generated, to attract users onto what is nowadays the world’s most sophisticated advertising platform. Buzzfeed makes its money not so much from the millions of daily users addicted to their click-bait headlines, but from helping companies adapt their existing content into viral hits. Closer to home in Finland, it’s the creative agency Ink Tank Media that makes the profit even though their popular blog Ink Tank is the one that everyone in Finland knows. Meanwhile, the typical YouTuber earns only $2 per thousand views from YouTube ads, but uses their platform to sell anything from sponsored videos to training courses to, get this, print books. Creating content for others is something that Wil is increasingly passionate about. “We produce magazines and printed products for a range of professional customers already, but we aren’t really known for it. We are print enthusiasts, but we are not dinosaurs. People care about print, and companies that used to provide that service are closing down. We are ready and willing to fill that gap.” Finding a sustainable business model is one thing, but that doesn’t explain how the team has been able to consistently improve on their core product, this very magazine. The secret? Tapping into the undoubted strength of Trondheim: a willingness to collaborate. As a student city and a tech city, Trondheim has a diverse international population, and it seems everyone has several hobbies and at least one side project on the go. Pulling this community of people together has given The List not only a vibrant readership, but also access to a remarkable talent pool. It’s one of the reasons why the company has grown from a team of keen volunteers to one that now pays people for a job well done.

meant that they then took her on to write for another client, the Oi! Mat Trøndersk Food Festival and Brewing Festival, before finally hiring her as The List's Project Manager. It’s an environment in which she feels comfortable. “There’s never an end to the creativity working here,” she told me. “I grew up in a family of readers and storytellers, and I used to work for my school newspaper, so I believe heavily in strong journalism. But working here is more akin to life in a professional kitchen. Multiple things need to get done to meet hard deadlines.” She joined The List because she looked beyond the magazine and liked what she saw. “There’s so much more we can do in the community than a graphic design firm. Don’t get me wrong, we use graphic design. We dive deeply into our creative collaboration, and we can serve companies, conferences and festivals in a more comprehensive capacity because that’s how we work every day.” I don’t think the team will mind me saying that the early issues had some quality issues, which took time to overcome. The professionalization of the company including the hiring of a dedicated project manager has all but eliminated those problems and made The List much more attractive to commercial partners, who might have felt uncomfortable working with a team of volunteers. Another step towards moving from cool product to sustainable business was the hire

“Advertisers are much more likely to pay attention because it’s a different experience from the norm.”

Jennifer Wold was working with Technoport on the Starmus Festival when she wrote some content for The List’s festival magazine. Her background in the culinary arts 2018 / VOLUME 2

Wil Lee-Wright Editor-in-Chief

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A TASTY COMMERCIAL PARTNERSHIP

“Going forward, we want to use that experience to improve the communication experience in Norway through more custom media and collaborative projects.”

Jennifer Wold Project Manager

of a Head of Sales. “It’s about much more than just a job,” says Matias Bretteville-Jensen, who joined the team eighteen months ago. “We aren’t just stuck in an office all day. We’re getting out there, meeting people.” Matias terms the print-first approach ‘retro media’ when talking to potential partners, to signify that when someone reads a magazine these days, they’re much more likely to pay attention because it’s a different experience from the norm. That said, while the focus for the company remains squarely on print, the team can’t afford to ignore digital tools. As such, they’ve recently taken on Bradley Kurtz to help reinvigorate how the magazine uses social media to reach people in Trondheim, and beyond. A relaunched website is the first step in that process. Fast-forward another three years and I have no doubt that The List will still be around, but it will be just one publication of many. “We’ve built an enormous amount of competence over the last few years,” says Wil on the company’s prospects. “Going forward, we want to use that experience to improve the communication experience in Norway through more custom media and collaborative projects.” During my research for this article, I’ve heard whispers from more than one of the team members that they have their eyes on setting up shop in a second city. Stavanger? Stockholm? Perhaps even Syden! Watch this space. Before I leave you, I have one last story to share. Have you ever seen The Social Network, the movie about the early days of Facebook? If so, you’ll remember Justin Timberlake’s character advising the guys, “Drop the ‘The’. Just ‘Facebook.’ It’s cleaner.” Back in 2014, we had our own Timberlake moment at a conference. Will and I were throwing around potential names for the magazine, which all involved the word ‘list’ in various creative (and ridiculous) ways. We were within earshot of David Rowan, who at the time was the editor of Wired UK magazine. He walked over and shaped the magazine that you’re now holding in your hands with one simple sentence: “Guys, just call it The List.” And so, we did. � 21

Aslaug Rustad [pictured below] from Oi! Trøndersk Mat og Drikke, the organisation behind the Trøndersk Food Festival and Brewing Festival, is pleased with how her relationship with The List Media has grown organically over time. The List first came onto their radar when co-founder Wil was hired to take photographs at the festival. The festival started to advertise in the magazine, and then the next year approached The List Media to produce the bilingual festival brochure, which was distributed together with The List. “It’s been a real pleasure to work with such talented people who have brought energy to all of us at the festival,” she said. “We always enjoy working with The List because of the extra benefits: we meet new people and it’s always a fun process because the team is on top of what’s going on in and around Trondheim.”

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Matriket Midt: The MiddleEarth of Food and Drink

Writer—Wil Lee-Wright Photographer—Wil Lee-Wright

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n the middle of Norway lies an area enveloped by misty peaks, rugged coastline and icy plains. Warm ocean currents, cool dry mountains, fertile soils and long, bright summer nights – arise Trøndelag, the food kingdom of Norway. Generations have cultivated, gathered, fished and learned the land and sea. Their toil has turned the region into one of the world’s best locations for scallops, langoustine, mussels and crab; much sought after seafood which is sent all over the world. Trøndelag is also rich in diversity, with free range pigs, chickens, wild salmon and organic cattle, gorgeous vegetables, juicy berries and all types of game. In Matriket Midt (the ‘food realm of Norway’) world-class ingredients meet proud food traditions. Over 200 niche manufacturers of specialist food and beverage flourish side-by-side with large-scale processing. Trøndelag is referred to as a food centre, and 22

is a pioneer of organic dairy and meat in Norway. Restaurants are proud of the ingredients and don’t be surprised to see world-famous chefs promote Trøndersk products on their menus, both in the region and beyond. TASTE IT FOR YOURSELF! To explore the region of Trøndelag is to discover the importance of food. Take your pick from a table for two at an award-winning farm restaurant, a local food safari in Røros, complete with horse and sleigh ride to snowy cabin in the woods for dinner, a bike ride between the farm shops in Innherred (delightfully named ‘The Golden Detour’), a picnic with your own personal lighthouse or a visit to one of the many festivals: crab, cod, beer, Trøndersk food… the list goes on! For more information and inspiration for your next culinary adventure, check out x @matriketmidt �


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FOOD AND DRINK IN TRØNDELAG

RØRVIK

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Namsos

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HITRA OG FRØYA

SIX OF THE TEN BIGGEST NORWEGIAN FISH FARMING MUNICIPALITIES ARE IN TRØNDELAG. • Hitra/Frøya produces 3.6 million salmon dinners per day, every day of the year. • Grøntvedt Pelagic in Ørland, ferments over 90% of all pickled herring consumed in Scandinavia. • One of the world’s best locations for scallops, langoustine, mussels and crab.

Brekstad

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TRØNDELAG IS RESPONSIBLE FOR OVER 23% OF ALL AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION IN NORWAY.

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TRØNDELAG HAS OVER 200 SMALL FOOD PRODUCERS • Trøndelag’s Farmers Market has the highest turnover in the country: 24m NOK in 2016. • Strong culture of handcrafted beer: over 30 breweries in the Midt Norge region.

• Røros and Rørosmat (‘Røros Food’) is one of the country’s strongest local food brands.

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• One fifth of all milk production takes place in Trøndelag. • One of the biggest producers of cattle and swine in Norway. • Pioneer of organic meat and dairy production. • Strong process industries: Tine, Nortura, Norsk Kylling, Grilstad, Salmar, Marine Harvest, Lerøy Midt, Røros Meieri, Nidar.

62% OF ALL EXPORTS FROM TRØNDELAG ARE FOOD 64% OF ALL VISITORS TO TRØNDELAG TRY LOCAL FOOD AND DRINKS (AVERAGE FOR ALL OF NORWAY 31%)

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THE LIST

FEATURE

THE NEW TRØNDERS First generation immigrants and their children, making a life in Norway. Writers—Margaret Naylor & Pam Naylor Photographer—Torleif Kvinnesland

Facial features, names and accents might indicate a person is not a ‘native’, but it is our hearts which tells us where our home is. Daughter and Mother, Margaret and Pamela Naylor, spoke to four other pairs of ‘New Trønders’, about the theme of belonging and making Trondheim their home. In Trondheim of the 2000s, there are hundreds of Trønders who are raised by parents from different cultures. While these first-generation natives may look Sudanese, Italian, or Nepalese, they wax their skis the same as any other Norwegian. In every generation, in every country, there is a cultural gap between parents and their children. From mundane differences in styles of music to the way we interact with technology, children understand the world in a way disparate from their parents. This contrast is even more pronounced between immigrants and their children, first-generation natives to their parents’ adopted country. The parents grew to adulthood surrounded by their native culture, but their children learn to value their heritage through their parents, while thriving and belonging in Norway. In speaking to families that do bridge two worlds it is interesting to see what both sides feel, and clear that there is a mutual love of both Norway and their heritage. Norway’s status as a safe, wealthy country has attracted many immigrants and their children. About 725,000 immigrants live in Norway today, which makes up over 13% of Norway’s overall population. An additional 150,000 first-generation Norwegians 2018 / VOLUME 2

currently live in Norway. Trondheim Kommune has a particularly diverse make up, not least because of those attracted there by the university NTNU. Observe the people walking about Trondheim centre on any given Saturday, and you will see a varied, diverse population. Lifestyles and attitudes in Norway can feel dramatically different for those of us from different cultures. Adjusting isn’t always easy, but it is necessary. This immigrant story is one that we know intimately, as it is our story. Our family, the Naylors, has its origins in the United States of America. We joined the 11 thousand other Americans who live here, when we moved to Trondheim eight years ago. I was born in the US, my younger sister Rowan was born here (during an earlier stint in the country). We therefore have slightly different understandings of what it is to assimilate. My mother, Pamela, and I spoke to several other families in similar circumstances to see whether they had any shared perspectives about making a life in Trondheim. Krishna Panthi and his son Kritagya are from Nepal. Krishna came originally for work, but for Kritagya Trondheim is his home and where he wants to be. “I have lived in Trondheim for so long, I can’t imagine 24

THE PANTHI FAMILY STORY [NOT PICTURED] Krishna Panthi and his wife, Laximi, debated moving from Nepal to Trondheim for good in 2008. Krishna works in the hydropower field, and this was a place where the ability to work in a research friendly environment proved too great to ignore. Despite the fact that their warm and inclusive family would be thousands of kilometres away, they made the move. His two children, Kriti and Kritagya, live in both worlds, identifying with their Nepalese roots, but embracing Norway as their home.

living anywhere outside,” says Kritagya. For his father, it is the richness added to the city through the educational system and the security he has gained here over the years, which makes this feel like home. For another family, mother Dionne Kønig and daughter Zelica Nordstokke, it is more of a stark contrast. Dionne feels somewhat less connected than her daughter, as is the case with many first generation immigrants who pine for home and yet know that leaving Norway would also break their family’s heart. Zelica, on the other hand, straddles the divide well. “It’s cool to be a mixed. When I’m in Holland, I feel Norwegian. When I’m in Norway, I feel a little Dutch,” she says. “I’m proud of being Norwegian, especially when I’m in Holland. But where I feel more connected is for me kind of like if someone asked me ‘Hey, if you could choose the Netherlands or Norway?, what would you choose?’ I really wouldn’t know what to choose since I’m happy enough to be from both countries.” For the Bruno/Muellers, Evelina and daughter Sofia, the code hasn’t quite been cracked yet for feeling rooted here. The difference is that while Sofia is figuring out her place, Evelina has learned to appreciate what living in other countries can teach us. What she likes most about Trondheim is the following: “I appreciate that Trondheim is helping me to slow down. I have learned to be a little more aware of other people, because the Norwegians communicate differently than me. I have started to pay attention to how to handle people with care.”  For Sofia it is the culture and traditions that pull her in. She is fond of the snow and cold, but her Italian and Swiss/German roots call to her.


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THE KÖNIG FAMILY STORY [PICTURED ABOVE] Silja and Axel König having been making a home in Trondheim for the last 20 years. They did not expect to stay, having moved to England before coming here, but the draw of raising a family here and the work was just too strong. Today, they are raising three children and enjoying life Norwegian style and the abundant outdoors.

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Sofia feels similarly having spent a good part of her life in Connecticut. “There’s not really one place I feel more connected to. My mom is Italian, and my dad is Swiss-German, but I feel most like I come from America.” Trondheim is their home and, despite not being Norwegian by birth, when families like the Bruno/Muellers speak about ‘home’ they mean Trondheim. But sometimes we do also mean the country we come from, an interesting double entendre for first generation immigrants. Trondheim is an amazing environment in which to live. People from all corners of the world came to love this region for common reasons: satisfying jobs, safety, wild nature, and the independent environment it gave their children. Our family, and many others we spoke with, chose Trondheim because the city is an environment well-suited to raising children. Children walk for hours and are safe. With this safety comes an emphasis on independence that parents like for their children. It can be shocking for Americans to see children climbing trees at school and whittling alone in the forest. This is risk-taking that would never be seen in the US; here, is it not only normal, but also appreciated for the outdoorsy culture it nurtures. Norway’s socially liberal policies and attention to gender equality are also appealing to people of both generations. Progressive ideas about gun control, prisoner rehabilitation, gender equality and sexual orientation 26

permeate Norwegian politics. “Conservative Norwegian views on social issues are considered liberal by US standards,” says my mother Pam. “That makes Trondheim a sort of social utopia.” “It’s peaceful here,” agrees my sister Rowan, age 14. “Trondheim is the perfect size for a city. It is really woke – politically liberal and kind of hip.” That sentiment is often carried by others as well. “Being a Trønder means we are a little more conservative out in public. We go with the flow - not really breaking out of the norm or standing out in any way,” Rowan explains. “People in Trondheim also take skiing and handball very seriously.  They are very active people who really like hiking and exploring. And eating potatoes. That is very important.” In Kritagya Panthi’s aopinion Trondheim is actually a very diverse place. Though he agrees that he feel safe here, because Norway “takes care of her people”. Trønders stand out in any crowd. According to many immigrant families, the city’s traits extend to the people as well: social liberalism, independence, and a close and active relationship with nature are expected in a Trønder. The private, reserved attitude of Trønders is different from much of the rest of the world. It is something that Kritagya also recognizes: “Everyone in Trondheim is in their own bubble. Everyone will take up two seats on the bus – no one wants to be that close to another person. Most people here want to be private and keep to themselves. It’s not bad or good, it’s just how people are in Trondheim. Older generations are much more talkative.” Even after eight years living in Trondheim, Pam Naylor still feels deeply connected to America.  “I think I will always be American at my core,” she laughs. “Laughing too loud, looking everyone in the eye, and wearing bright colours. I love life here - the moon reflecting on the still sea, the warmth of candles in the darkest of winter, my amazing colleagues. But I miss genuinely belonging.” According to Rowan, “My mom, Pam, is very American.  She is very out-there - loud and social and not as conservative as others who are in Trondheim. She’s also very expressive – in behaviour, speech, clothing style. By Norwegian standards, she’s eccentric. She has this really loud laughter that fills up any


THE LIST

THE KØNIGS FAMILY STORY [NOT PICTURED] After coming to Norway from the Netherlands as an Erasmus exchange student at the University of Stavanger in 1995, it only took eight weeks for Dionne Kønigs to know that Norway was the place she wanted to make a career and raise her children. Ten years later, son Xavier and daughter Zelica were living in Trondheim, enjoying the nature and social progressiveness which pulled the family from the Netherlands to Norway a decade earlier.

This is our home, and despite not being Norwegian by birth, when we speak of home, we speak of Trondheim.

THE BRUNO/MUELLER FAMILY STORY [PICTURED BELOW] Evelina Bruno was born in Palermo, Italy, to an authentically Italian family full of pasta and passion. In 2008, she and her nuclear family moved from the hustle and bustle of urban New Haven, Connecticut in the US to the calm of Trondheim. She and her daughter Sofia are true children of the world, nesting here in Trondheim.

space. She is more social than anyone else Norwegian I know and says hi to random people on the street. She makes conversation with anyone, too. People are not used to that, so it is weird when such an eccentric woman comes up to them and starts talking about what a wonderful day it is, or how she loves their beard. It’s just awkward.” Such things as wanting to be outside in all seasons, valuing privacy, feeling as though there is a deep connection to the history here with the city - and when giving tours to visitors where each historical landmark is discussed in detail – are done with the pride of being Trønder. And yet, most children raised in Trondheim still identify with their ancestral country, as well as Trondheim. It is the details in daily interactions and habits which can expose the ‘other culture’ which came before. For some it is a seamless blend. For others, there’s always the aspect of being just that bit too loud or making Trønders uncomfortable by randomly speaking to them in the store. First-generation immigrants have been embarrassing their first-generation native children for years. However, this outward way of being is the charm of many immigrants to their Norwegian counter-parts; the ability to be barrier-breakers and extend, naturally, gestures of unexpected kindness, even if they don’t quite know how to respond in-kind. Our father experiences Trondheim with a little more ease. Michael, is a mix of Trønder and American. He really likes Norway and 27

2018 / VOLUME 2


THE LIST

THE NAYLOR FAMILY STORY [PICTURED ABOVE] Pam and Mike decided to move their family to Trondheim in 2008 because of work opportunities and as a place they saw as a wonderful environment to raise their children. Their slice of Trønder heaven is a red house, part Norwegian and part American, and is a taste of both worlds. Trondheim fits this family in ways that were unexpected and fully welcomed.

2018 / VOLUME 2

he is settled here. He has accepted that this is where he is in life and this is where he is going to be. He’s not trying to make Norway more American. My sister Rowan retains a connection to America and holds an American passport, but feels at home in Trondheim. “I plan on becoming a Norwegian citizen as soon as possible, because I am Norwegian. I am more familiar with the culture here than in America. I grew up here. My friends are here. I feel like I belong here. Home is Norway.” Despite not being as decided as Rowan is, for Sofia there is a thought of permanency here lurking. “I like Norwegians and maybe I would like to be one, one day,” she says. Krishna’s experience echoes these but for a different reason. It is clear his childhood and adulthood stand opposite each other. “My life is in two parts. One is among the poorest, one among the richest. The contrast is huge. But the way people think are very similar, we are all much the same at our root.” Perhaps that is what makes his feeling about Trondheim being home clearer, “I have a home in Nepal, where my parents live, and I was born. My own home is here, because I have my own home.” The new population of Trondheim is one that feels at home in a variety of cultures and settings, as well as one that feels confident in their place in the world. According to Rowan, living in Trondheim has helped her understand that she can be successful no matter where she goes in life. “I see myself settled 28

- not necessarily in a relationship - but happy pursuing a career in the sciences. NTNU is the perfect place to spend my student years because studying there offers so many opportunities in the sciences. Afterwards, I will probably move to Oslo, because there are more job opportunities there. But, really, I could go anywhere in the world and live. Being part of Trondheim and all of the different people here has shown me that.” If people from any culture can become a part of Norway, she thinks, then she can become a part of any culture. Unlike many adults and parents born in the 1970s or 1980s, which had the expectation of living near home and those who moved far away were more an exception to cultural norms, the younger generations have been far more adventurous in seeking out their place in the world. Although more common today, the parents of these teens realise that while they built a home for them here, being part of two worlds means that the lure of the ‘old country’ may call to them at some point, or maybe they too will chose to make a life elsewhere. Much as they have. Zelica and Sofia also realise they are children of the world and understand that life may take them away from Trondheim, but that is okay because coming back is always an option. While many first-generation kids may travel the world, part of us will always be connected to Trondheim. No matter where we were born or where our parents come from, we are all Trønder. �


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Stein, Bock and Harnick’s “Fiddler on the Roof”

Directed by Ronny Danielsson Musical director Åsmund Flaten Choreography Roger Lybeck Set design Martin Chocholousek Costume design Annsofi Nyberg Lightening design Mikael Kratt Cast: Trond-Ove Skrødal / André Søfteland, Silje Lundblad, Mari Hauge Einbu, Siri Schnell Juvik, Maria Omarsdottir Austgulen, Marianne Meløy, Jon Lockert Rohde, Mads Bones / Ole Christian Gullvåg, Hallbjørn Rønning, Ragne Grande / Ida Göransson, Per Bogstad Gulliksen, Hans Petter Nilsen, Olve Løseth / Jon Vegard Hovdal, Per-Theodor Paulsen, Martha Standal, Maria Wulcan, Gard Hjertaas Bjørnson, Sivert Hauge, Mikael Rønne, Nils Sundberg, Frida Line Rørtveit / Kristine Sølvberg Hagen, Erle Kulset Merakerås / Sofie Winterbottom and Johannes Green Baadsvik / Thomas Green Baadsvik

UNTIL 23 JUNE AT HOVEDSCENEN Tickets: 73 80 50 00 Groups: 73 80 50 50 trondelagteater.no


THE LIST

GALLERY

Trønder-scapes Øystein Rambjør Holten, videographer and photographer, captured this photo in the area of Skansen in Trondheim

2018 / VOLUME 2

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THE LIST

MEET YOUR MAKERS

Exero / Spike Solveig Christensen, Bendik Fon, Nicoline S. Bergh, Mathias Berg and Andre Haig Johnsen.

Exercising is a common activity in Norway. A Norwegian summer has many sounds and heralding in warmer weather are the sounds of running, bicycling and the clack of roller ski poles. For many, the sight of disabled athletes on any kind of summer training apparatus is seldom, if at all, despite the abundance of their counterparts. Exero is a start-up company from NTNU which was created around an innovative and highly collaborative product called Spike. The origin of Spike started as part of a bachelor’s degree thesis at NTNU in 2016 which was seeking to address the lack of summer training equipment for people with disabilities. Spike focuses on safety, comfort and a cool design. The latter is often missing in the current apparatus. Currently, cross-country sit-ski sleds are being retrofitted for bare ground and wheelchairs are given additional wheels. Sadly, this is not serving the community needing adaptive equipment. It falls short of keeping in mind the mechanics needed for summer surface conditions, not to mention the physical needs of the athletes themselves. Cosmetically speaking, adaptive technology has an outward appearance which leaves much to be desired visually and Spike is having none of that. Before this project the five-person team, with vastly different backgrounds, would not have considered themselves makers. This eye-opening project has brought them into the local community of physical problem solvers. “Trøndelag has been important for us because of NTNU, because of its research and knowledge on all the aspects of Spike. We are talking to great minds within engineering, design, business and especially in physiotherapy. These connections have been very important to us during the development of Spike,” says team member Nicoline S. Bergh. The Exero team feels lucky to be part of the revolution in assistive sporting equipment, especially considering how important being out enjoying the world is for everyone. Norway is proving a very supportive and positive environment that allows for constant user feedback. Refining what must be a stable, yet diverse, product come to life to meet the needs of its users. To learn more about them, you can find them at exerotech.com, on Facebook and on Instagram at exero_technologies. To read the more in-depth interview with Nicoline S. Bergh, visit our blog at thelist.no. � 2018 / VOLUME 2

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THE LIST X STOKKØYA FESTIVAL

29. ~ 30.

www.stokkoyafestival.no

June 2018

2-day festival by the sea. Dig in to the culinary revoultion, listen to good music and enjoy the great outdoors.

Fold a boat!


THE LIST

× STOKKØYA FESTIVAL

STOKKØYA FESTIVAL Written by

BRADLEY KURTZ

At the very edge of Trøndelag, just a

hard right turn out of Trondheimsfjorden lies the little island of Stokkøya. Already well known as a travel destination, Stokkøya will play host to one of the region’s most exciting new festivals this summer. With its long, sandy beach and breath-taking, panoramic views of the mountains running up the coast, you would be hard-pressed to find a better location to spend a weekend or a lifetime. More than just another music festival, Stokkøya Festival will have several components to make it a unique and exciting experience: music, food, and literature will come together in perfect symmetry with the surrounding nature to produce an unbelievable experience. “The main reason we wanted to start Stokkøya Festival is that it is so unlike anything else we have been to in Norway,” said Wenche Sundt Bendixvold-Ryjord, one of seven festival creators behind the festival. “But it wouldn’t be possible without the location. It is beautiful out there.” The music programme for this year is comprised entirely of artists from the Nordic region; there is a mix of both established and up-and-coming artists from almost every genre under the sun. Rumour has it that some of the local inhabitants of the island, the sheep, are most looking forward to the line-up of country artists!

Illustration (previous) by Mustasj Photos by Kristin Slotterøy

Some highlights to look forward to include the local hard-rock legend Motorpsycho, Swedish legend Ebbot Lundberg with a new band, The Indigo Children, Haunted Mansions, Pom Poko and so much more. 34

When talking about food, it is no secret that the mussels from Stokkøya are considered some of the best in the world and will be occupying centre stage at the festival. If seafood isn’t your thing, fear not, there will be plenty more food options and beverages on tap to suit every taste. Everything served up will be done with sustainability and locally sourced products at the forefront. Food, awesomely enough, will not just be on plates and in bellies. On stage, there will be chefs to discuss the region’s finest food and teaching courses that will inspire your meals beyond your time on Stokkøya. “The food is not just something you’re going to eat, but something you’re hopefully going to experience as well,” says Bendixvold-Ryjord. Food isn’t the only thing Stokkøya Festival will be serving up for guests to chew on. There will also be conversations with authors like Morten Strøksnes (Havboka), Eskil Engdal (Jakten på Thunder), and a chance to view Marianne Meløy’s critically acclaimed performance Bunnlinja, a followup to her previous performance, Stemt, that showed ways in which people use their voice. Bunnlinja is an exploration of the opposite, in which people do not use their voice. Topics of discussion will focus on the ocean and using it for food, recreation, and whatever else floats your boat in a sustainable fashion. Many of the discussions will also focus on the theme of living life outside of the city, what the challenges and benefits are, and much more.


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Stokkøya Festival will give people a weekend to make their senses come back to life.

Stokkøya Festival will also be a throwback to the traditional music festival experience. “It’s been a few years now, and we have seen more festivals pop up in the city centres. I really miss those days you took the bus out to the countryside with your tent, made a camp with all your friends and just stayed the weekend - that’s the kind of experience we hope to create out on Stokkøya, where people will kind of lose track of time,” says Bendixvold-Ryjord. Indoor accommodations are limited, and already fully booked for the weekend, but Stokkøya will be offering several ways to camp out and enjoy the festival feel. Whether you want to kick it old-school in a tent at the festival campground, live in the lap of luxury in the caravan park, or give in to pier pressure and park your boat at the docks, Stokkøya has it all. Above all, the creators of the festival want Stokkøya to be a place where you can unplug and enjoy nature in a variety of different ways. Whether that means living up to everyone’s favourite cliché of loving to take

leisurely strolls down the beach or running back and forth between all the events and activities scattered across the island, you’ll have ample opportunity to do so. If you need some help deciding what to do, there will be all kinds of activities to join. Perhaps a morning yoga session to get your day started or a guided walk around the island. Alternatively, you are welcome to just hang out on your own, dip a toe or two in the ocean, and take in the festivities. This is a chance to make the experience your own. “People are so busy. Getting a cup of coffee with a friend is almost impossible because everyone is so busy. Stokkøya Festival will give people a weekend to make their senses come back to life,” says Bendixvold-Ryjord. “Stokkøya is a place to relax, but also a place to seek action, cultural experiences, and culinary experiences.” Besides creating a fantastic experience, a big focus during the festival – if it isn’t apparent by now - is to run it in a way that is both enjoyable for the festivalgoers and is environmentally conscious. Everything, 35

from where and how people will be camping, what to do with food and its packaging, and even how to set up the stages and other festival necessities, is being done under the gaze of an environmentally friendly eye. “I hope we can contribute to people’s awareness of the environment, how fragile the ocean is in particular,” Bendixvold-Ryjord emphasises, “We don’t want any trash to get into the ocean, we want to reduce the amount of trash, we want everything possible that we use to be compostable or reusable, reduce the amount of plastic we use, and try to not leave any traces behind”. Festivalgoers will just about have free reign of the island - just be mindful of the local farm and animal life. Take advantage of the opportunity to feel like a castaway as you explore the beaches, woods, caves, and trails around Stokkøya. Stokkøya Festival 2018 will be the start of something incredible. With the mix of good music, good food, good people, and the jaw-dropping Norwegian nature, this festival will not be one to miss out on.


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Stokkøya Festival 2018 is the start of something excellent: both in terms of a fresh new festival for the region, and for the development of the island itself. The festival is put together as a collaborative effort between locals from the island, such as the purveyors of Bygda 2.0, Bygdeboksen, Strandbaren, and Stokkøya Sjøsenter; as well as some of the city-folk behind the Trondheim Calling music festival, which just wrapped up its eighth edition. This is a way to ensure the needs and wants of the island natives are not over run by the festival and for the seasoned festival organisers to think more creatively about the beautiful natural backdrop.

Rural communities are always looking to put themselves more on the map as migration to the cities often leaves them as little more than a name on a map. Here in Trøndelag, however, there are a number of organisations working hard to bring the outlying areas, which are some of the most stunning and culturally rich hidden gems, to everyone’s attention. This is not just for those living in the region either. During this, the first incarnation of the Stokkøya Festival, the activities will be focused around Bygdeboksen; with one main stage outdoors, and other areas for more intimate concerts and discussions taking place inside Bygdeboksen. This little city-inside-a-city, is

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a fascinating concept. They have a co-working space, a bakery run by Syrian refugees, and a wood shop as permanent installations. Plans for the future development of the festival area are already in progress, with a plan to build a permanent stage that will serve the community the other 363 days of the year that the festival isn’t happening. Expansions to the areas around Strandbaren and Bygdeboksen will bring a modern feel to the beautiful countryside found at Stokkøya. It is all being done so the rural areas can feel less ‘touristy’ with consciously designed modern spaces that are useful and nice to look at.

“We have a huge plan regarding the future. We want it to be sustainable, but also to make a positive contribution to the local community,” said Wenche Sundt Bendixvold-Ryjord.

Stokkøya is innovative, it’s quality, it’s really pretty, and also the people are incredibly welcoming.

Stokkøya Festival, 10 year perspective Illustration by Samskape Arkitekter

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This is one of the most unique aspects of the collaboration between the locals and the festival: sustainable and intelligent change. The festivalgoers will be there for a short time, but the locals have to live with what is to come. In working to bring the proper elements out to Stokkøya, the festivalgoers will hopefully become more than just passers-by and, instead, become ambassadors of the island.

“I hope we are able to fulfill our guests’ and our own expectations, and I hope that our guests also learn something new, get new ideas, and meet interesting people. For the future I hope we are able to make a difference in how the rural areas can collaborate more with the cities, and take part in the challenges we see from urbanization all over the world,” Torild Langklopp of Stokkøya Sjøsenter, and one of the organisers of the festival had to say.

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With an ethos of sustainability the guys and gals behind Stokkøya are looking at a different way to take their unique festival, their desire to create more than just a crowd and stages, and keep it going long into the future. Come for the music, stay for the island.


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Nothing but the horizon

7178 STOKKØY

Stokkøya is an island in Åfjord Commune, with a

connection to the mainland and is home to about 300 residents. Lying on the west side of the island is Hosnavika, with its long, sandy beach that is often regarded as the finest beach in the region. Stokkøya has become an internationally known destination over the last decade due to the development of Stokkøya Sjøsenter and Strandbaren. 900 meters from Hosnasand is an area built for the future. Bygda 2.0 is a micro-city project with sustainability and attractive, urban architecture in mind. There are plans to expand the development with eight new dwellings down by the sea in the coming years. Bygdeboksen, which was completed in 2015 and is made up of co-working spaces, a bakery, wood shop, and concert stage, is what will make up the primary festival area for the Stokkøya Festival 2018. Food for the mind, body, and soul Stokkøya Festival hopes to create a unique and complete festival experience, with concerts, literary discussions, and food-related activities making up the programme.

Musically, the festival will comprise of artists from the Nordic regions during a weekend where outdoor life, good food, and good company are central to the festival’s philosophy. The festival programme consists of more than 40 concerts, discussions, and activities that will be released closer to the dates of the festival. On the music side of Stokkøya, one can find legendary rock artists such as Motorphsycho and Ebbot Lundberg, but also some of the country’s most exciting up-and-coming artists like Pom Poko, Haunted Mansions, and Jon Olav – who won this year’s NRK P3 Urørtfinale. There will also be conversations with authors like Morten Strøksnes (Havboka), Eskil Engdal (Jakten på Thunder), and a chance to view Marianne Meløy’s critically acclaimed exhibition Bunnlinja. Plus some of the region’s best chefs taking the stage to speak about and spread their love of good food. Get your tickets Stokkøya Festival 2018 will put out only 1500 tickets per day, and when this magazine 38

goes to print there will only be 400 festival passes left! You can buy either a two-day festival pass that gives access to the festival on both Friday and Saturday. Or you can go with a day ticket for the particular day you want to check out the island and its activities. Reserving a camping spot at one of the different areas (tent, RV, or boat), is done at the same time as booking a festival pass. Tickets can be bought via ticketmaster.no. The festival has an 18 years age requirement. Camp by the sea Stokkøya Festival offers a great range of ways to spend the night, for different needs and different prices. As of now, there is plenty of space left in the tent camp, boat camp and a few lots for RV’s are still up for grabs. Inside the festival camp, we offer free coffee, access to amenities such as proper showers and toilets, a dedicated barbecue area, as well as an information stand with phone chargers and freshly baked bread. The camping options are for guests with festival passes and can be booked with your


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tickets. The camping, as with the festival itself, has a minimum age requirement of 18. Take the narrow road Stokkøya is located 12 miles northwest of Trondheim and 15 miles from Værnes Airport. From the north and south there are frequently planes, trains and buses that will bring you all the way, or close to, the festival. The experience of the Stokkøya Festival starts as soon as you leave town, and we facilitate access to the island with different modes of public transportation. There will be a festival ferry from Brattøra, festival busses and if you feel like riding a bike, we offer transport for your luggage and tents. There is a limited amount of parking spots on site available over the weekend that require a fee.

Our best Stokkøya Festival tips

Read more about ways to get to Stokkøya on stokkoyafestival.no World-renowned mussels The mussels from Åfjord are known around the world, and several hundred tonnes are exported yearly. If you have never tasted the mussels served in Strandbaren, you are in for a treat! Mussels will take center stage on the festivals food menu, and is a locally sourced product, and top-shelf quality. Daytime activities With Stokkøya as our playground, we have plenty of space. The daytime programme includes exploring the island, with hiking trips from sea level to mountain tops. There will be a range of courses and workshops, with food and environment being the central topics. Each day starts with yoga and coffee. Full activities programme to be released closer to the festival.

• Hike to Vassheia and take a swim in the lake. • Catch the sunset at Svenningsneset while you listen to the silence. • Eat the untraveled mussels served everywhere. • Travel light, but bring good shoes and a warm sweater and jacket. • Be nice to the sheep wandering around. They like country more than electronica by the way.

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GET YOUR TICKETS 2-day festival ticket: 1500NOK (+ 50NOK ticket fee) Single day ticket: 900 (+ 35NOK ticket fee) Tickets can be bought via ticketmaster.no. Stokkøya Festival has an 18 years age requirement.

CAMP BY THE SEA Stokkøya Festival offers several different options for staying overnight on the island to fit any need and price. Reserving a spot at one of the three camping areas is done at the same time as booking your 2-day festival pass.

BOAT CAMP For all the boat people out on the water! Cruise over and dock your boat at the marina, which offers good shielding from wind and weather. Plus, it’s only 200m from the festival area. Price: from 450NOK

THE PROGRAMME

CARAVAN CAMP

The festival programme is full of Nordic artists representing a wide variety of genres. Throughout the weekend you can participate in outdoor activities, workshops related to food, literature and our environment, and dig in to tasty culinary experiences. Feel free to also take that time to explore the island, or just sit on the beach and enjoy the motion of the ocean.

Want to bring your second home to the festival? Park it right by the seaside and enjoy the spectacular view of the island of Linesøya while being only 300m away from the festival area. Price: 850NOK per caravan/motorhome

THE MAIN CAMP The festival’s largest camp lies close to Stokkøya Sjøsenter and offers a sweeping view of the beach. For those staying at this campground, the festival will have coffee in the morning, drinking water, a barbeque area, proper toilets and showers, all free of charge. This camp lies about 900m from the festival area and offers plenty of space. Price: from 800NOK per tent

The festival programme consists of more than 40 concerts, discussions and activites. See the lineup at www.stokkoyafestival.no. More artists will be released closer to the festival.

FOLLOW US

Read more about our camp options at www.stokkoyafestival.no

Make sure to get the news first.

All indoor accommodation and the beach camp is already sold out.

www.stokkoyafestival.no /stokkoyafestival Stokkoya_festival 40


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MEET YOUR MAKERS

Easy Intervals Erik Hjertholm

What if someone told you interval training could be fun? What if they told you that it was possible to start at the right place, hit your target heart rate and not over-do it, and that the training would grow with your increased fitness? You’d probably think it was laughable, but the founder of Easy Intervals has cracked the code to make this a real thing. Erik Hjertholm, founder and CEO of Easy Intervals, has always been a maker. Taking things apart and figuring out how they tick has been a long-standing hobby. “When I was a kid, my older brother didn’t wake up from

his alarm, but I did. I took some parts from the garage and an electric motor and made a contraption that shook his whole bed in the morning. It worked like a charm,” Hjertholm says. This spirit and the need for efficient training during his master’s degree was the genesis of his company and the Easy Intervals system. Through some in-depth research he found that High Intensity Interval Training, or HIIT, was the answer. It isn’t a gimmicky way of exercising, but well-researched and with the documented results to prove it. The basic idea of HIIT is that you go as intense as is correct for your heart rate, which can be incredibly different person to person, for four minutes and then four minutes of low intensity. You do this a total of four times, or

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you can put it as your workout is done in 32 minutes. To figure out how hard you have to work requires some math, but the system does it all for you. Easy Intervals is one part exercise bike, one part programming and one part circuitry that meshes to utilise the best anti-aging exercise style that cardiac exercise researchers know of. Through many prototypes, lots of 3D printing and consulting with the Cardiac Exercise Research Group (CERG) at St. Olav’s Hospital, they have created a way to make even the most die-hard interval haters convert to this intelligent method. To find out more, visit easy-intervals.com and to hear the story direct from Erik, visit our blog thelist.no for the in-depth story. �

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SPONSORED CONTENT

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IMAGE CAPTIONS 1. Sør-Gjæslingan, Frank Walaunet 2. Norveg Coast Museum in Rørvik, Steinar Johansen 3. Rørvik Fish at Skrei Festival 2018, Wil Lee-Wright 4. Andre Vågø pictured at the Skrei Festival 2018, Wil Lee-Wright 5. Island hopping by kayak, Martin Jehnicken

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SPONSORED

Vikna: The Crown of Trøndelag

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Writer—Wil Lee-Wright

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he archipelago of Vikna is perched at the northern tip of Trøndelag, a seemingly never-ending chain of islands, bursting with history and adventure. Rørvik, a traditional fishing town and the administrative centre of the region, is now connected by direct flights from Oslo (and Trondheim), and is the perfect launchpad for exploring the Namdal coastline. While many rural areas in Norway are suffering from dwindling populations, Rørvik has bucked the trend with young people moving back in search of opportunity and quality of life. The result is a destination where tradition meets innovation, a place full of authentic experiences, culinary delights and warm hospitality.

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SPONSORED CONTENT

VIKNA RESOURCES • kysthotellet.no • en.trondelag.com • kystmuseetnorveg.no • kystriksveien.no • visitnamdalen.com • norway-nature.com • rorvikdagan.no • skreifestivalen.no • wideroe.no • vikna.kommune.no

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coast is something quite unique, but the island of Leka is the jewel in the crown. It is a geological wonder, with Norway’s second biggest Viking burial mound. Herlaugsløypa on Leka island is one of the most beautiful walking trips in all of Scandinavia. Side trips to Vattind, Kolsettuva and Hundøyrån are also recommended.

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The Namdal coast has several industries, but is most famous for its seafood. Islands like Sør-Gjæslingan once housed the biggest fishing community this side of Lofoten, and continues to preserve maritime heritage to this day. Fish farming is a growing industry, with salmon and cod products sent all over the world. Dip your rod into the calm, clear waters outside Rørvik and you will soon find out why. The Namdal coast has been referred to as one of the three most stunning journeys in Scandinavia. It is a route which meanders from island to island, encouraging a slower pace of life. Travellers come in search of the tranquillity of the ocean, but leave with much more than a net full of fish. Accessible by plane, overnight ferry or five hour drive, Rørvik is a surprisingly long way from Trondheim for a town within the same county. But the journey is a spectacular adventure in its own right - after all, any method of travel which offers the possibility of a jacuzzi under the Northern Lights has to be worth the wait! Invest your time in the Namdal Coastline and you will be heartily rewarded. Here a few of the region’s highlights; experiences which will capture your heart hook, line and sinker. Fishing There is an incredible range of fish available in these waters, everything from monstrous halibut to the elusive catfish. Fishing is a way

of life for people here: stop and ask anyone in the street and you will be sure to receive a tsunami of advice about everything from shore fishing spots to skippered boat tours (or check out the Tourist information at Norveg Museum). Stay at Kysthotellet in Rørvik, who can also help book equipment, boats and guides. Sør-Gjæslingan The old fishing village of Sør-Gjæslingan is a protected cultural heritage site located on an island about an hour out of Rørvik (also accessible from Namsos). It is spellbinding to learn that this small cluster of rocks was once the seasonal home for thousands of fishermen. Combine your trip with a visit to the imposing Norveg Coast Museum in Rørvik, which ‘floats’ upon the very sea. You can also eat at the Restaurant Norveg, which offers spectacular food based on products from local fishermen and farmers. Arctic cod served with liver and roe is a must. Hike, bike and climb Landlubbers will find satisfaction in a wide range of waterless activities. Spring and summer are the perfect time to explore, with extra ferry routes opening up countless possibilities. The land here is relatively flat so it is perfect for families and leisurely trips, but the sky is the limit for the more adventurous, quite literally in the case of the enormous natural climbing wall at Hanshelleren, down the coast in Flatanger. The landscape along the Namdal 43

Kayaking and camping There is no better way to consider the clear waters and tranquility of the Namdal coastline than by kayak. Ytre Namdal in particular is made up of a myriad of islands that offer natural protection and harbour pristine white sand beaches. Island hopping with overnight sleeps under the sun, the odd whale sighting, and food prepared by local chefs over crackling fire: pure bliss! Book guided tours from Rørvik with Explore Ytre Namdal or look out for the kayak rental at newly-opened Sørensen Brygge this summer, which will also be a centre for buying locally-sourced food direct from the suppliers. And if you cannot decide between cycling, walking, climbing and kayaking, contact Kystriksveien Reiseliv for a customised tour. Wildlife Ever-present in Namdal is the wide array of wildlife. The region has the densest population of elk, so be careful when you drive at dusk as you are almost guaranteed a sighting! Small and large game hunting can be organised (with the right permits) or you can take a more live-and-let-live approach with the Eagle Man himself, Ole Martin Dahle, among the isles and skerries of Flatanger. Festivals No trip up to this northern kingdom would be complete without a celebratory tipple under the late-night sun. Rørvik’s summer festival, Rørvikdagan, serving up a must-attend programme, is one to plan ahead for. For the most authentic of experiences however, where the old meets the new, join the town’s Skreifestivalen, celebrating a Norwegian variety of cod which is fished each March – a wonderful celebration which weaves together all the great elements of this traditional yet vibrant corner of Trøndelag. � 2018 / VOLUME 2


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2018 / VOLUME 2

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MEET YOUR MAKERS

Fat Whales Surfboards Luka Petric

Norway has begun to attract attention from surfers from all corners of the world, seeking out tranquil, empty beaches. Trøndelag, however, has few breaks of any note. But that is no deterrent for one local, Luka Petric, who is so passionate about Nordic surfing that he shapes his own boards, right here in Trondheim. “The waves are not always consistent and not super big all the time. Waves often get mushy and conditions are changing quickly. So it’s good to have a quiver with a few boards that have different characteristics. I make boards that you can enjoy surfing in any given condition.” There are no established surfboard shapers in Norway and stringent taxes on imports, making surfing an expensive hobby. When Luka and his girlfriend bought a flat and started doing it up a few years ago (another expensive Norwegian ‘hobby’) they had to put their dream holiday to Bali on hold. So, Luka decided to bring a bit of Bali to Trondheim instead. Luka is applying the finishing touches to a shaped ‘blank’ as he talks. “This one you can surf from two foot waves to head height. If you shape your own boards you get to make them based on performance you want to have. Different design features that you pack in your board, allow you to surf different styles, different conditions and give you different performances.” The surfboards, made under the name Fat Whales, are boards for surfers who appreciate a bit more foam under their chest for “cosier cruising and maximum joy”, explains Luka, who works as an art director at Headspin. Fat Whales are made with the circumstances of the region built into their very frame, and tinted with Luka’s characteristic colourful swashes. He makes a few on order, for people starting or getting back into surfing in Norway, but overall he just takes pleasure in doing something creative, away from the screen. “Surf shaping is a similar design process to my everyday job, good blend of handcraft, functionality and aesthetics. It’s addictive, and I love it.” � #fatwhalessurfboards 45

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FEATURE

Socially Conscious App Development Face-to-face through digital devices

Writer—Stian Sandø Photographer—Torleif Kvinnesland

What would happen if an app could, instead of just providing entertainment, become the starting point for social safety? What would happen if an app could, conversely, bring us out of our ‘face-in-screen’ bubble, while still keeping us digitally connected? Welcome to the realm of Socially Conscious App Development, powered by a new wave of ‘not-for-the-riches’ people, who are taking apps to the next level of social utility. What if... It was two days before my 12th birthday. I had just come back home from football practice and was on my way into the bathroom. My dad stopped me and told me that Shila, a 13-year-old friend, had been sexually assaulted and killed. Shila was on her way to the school bus when two men assaulted her. This happened in a family neighbourhood where other people were nearby, but they had no idea what was happening. I kept thinking, and I still think, that if someone nearby knew, Shila may have still been alive today. Ten years later, a friend of mine (and future cofounder of Flare), was one of those nearby. During UKA, a student festival in Trondheim, 2018 / VOLUME 2

two girls were sexually assaulted just a hundred meters away from a venue with 6,000 revellers. No one did anything, because no one knew what was happening. What if there was a way to alert people nearby digitally, like a digital shout? The idea of Flare was born. Press the button and get help. Flare is a button on your phone. When you’re in danger, press it. Nearby Flare users will be notified of your location and can come and help you. It is a free, crowdsourced safety app that will be available in Trondheim at the end of March. Although sexual assault was the problem that motivated us to make Flare, I think there are many different situations 46

where people will push the button – for example, when someone is following you, threatening you or harassing you. Perhaps you have fallen down and injured yourself. Or been robbed. You’ve become too drunk. Or you really need someone to talk to. Our aim is to let people know when someone needs help and give those around them a chance to intervene. It is our attempt at inducing some much-needed human compassion into the world. Emergency services have limited resources and they have to evaluate and prioritise. If the danger threshold is too low they won’t always be able to come and check if everything is alright. The police in Norway offer a number to call in non-emergency enquiries (02800), but our natural threshold for calling the emergency services is very high. Most situations start long before they escalate into an emergency. Also, shouldn’t we look out for each other anyway? And what do the emergency services think of such initiatives? “The criticism of an app like Flare is that people in need ought to call the police or ambulance,” wrote Eirik Husby Sæther, a police officer in Oslo, in a recent newspaper article. “People who come to help can suddenly end up in a dangerous situation themselves. Some will try to take the law into their own hands, to assert vigilante action.” “I am a policeman, and I am not against apps like Flare. I have seen many situations where normal people have prevented serious crimes. Often it has been enough that somebody has been standing at a distance and shouting. Often it is this person who have called the police. It is easier for a bystander to assess what should be done, than it is for the victim. This kind of compassion and support can lead to more professional help, not less. Maybe the helper will ask the victim how they are doing a couple of days later. That would be good trauma treatment.” Modern society has lost something The police protect us and keeps us safe, ambulances help the injured or sick, social workers help the vulnerable. Everything is a paid job. All responsibility is on paid professionals. A common trait of our modern society is that we have a tendency to hire someone to do work previously associated with human compassion, so we can focus our own lives. We increasingly live separated and have less and less responsibilities towards each other. Professional services and skilled help are obviously a positive contribution to society, but we’re losing something. The Harvard Study of Adult Development is one of the longest research projects ever conducted: the study has been following the lives of people over a period of 80 years. The results are akin to a song written by John Lennon, as it turns out that embracing community is scientifically proven to helps us live longer and be happier. The report stated:


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Shila third from left, and Stian second from right, pictured together at a birthday party. Shila's life ended tragically when she was attacked at the age of 13. Photo from personal collection. 47

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“When we gathered together everything we knew about them at age 50, it wasn’t their middle-age cholesterol levels that predicted how they were going to grow old, it was how satisfied they were in their relationships. The people who were the most satisfied in their relationships at age 50 were the healthiest at age 80.” With this knowledge, shouldn’t we work towards being a society that is tailored to embrace community? Which kind of society are we? Can we use technology to win back what we seem to be losing? Socially-conscious apps inspire two-way assistance: you use them to request help, but you are also aware of other human beings in need nearby. In a way, these apps are experiments to see what kind of society we are in today’s world. Do we care? Do we want to help? The broad majority of people really do want to be there for others. Most people are very kind, but we just don’t see it. If we make technology that encourages and facilitates compassion, we’ll see compassion. Several real and pressing issues are today largely untouched by technological innovation. Billions live in hunger and poverty. Large areas of the world are affected by war and conflict. Climate change is threatening our very existence. Depression and mental illness is at an all-time high. The advantages of having an increased emotionally connected society could be the key to solving some of the 2018 / VOLUME 2

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In Norway in 2015 there were 1142 rapes reported. The incidence of rape increased 12 percent from 2014 to 2015. In Trøndelag there were a total of 85 rapes in 2015. (Norwegian Police Reporting, 2015) In 2012, it is estimated that globally half of all women killed in homicides were killed by intimate partners, compared to 6% of men. (UN Women, 2017) 40% of women across the world do not seek out the police or health services when they have experienced violence. Most turn to family and friends. (UN, 2015) 1 in 33 of American men have experienced attempted or completed rape in their lifetime (RAINN, 2015) 35% of women worldwide have experienced either physical and/or sexual intimate partner violence or non-partner sexual violence in their lifetime. (WHO, 2017) Globally, as many as 38% of murders of women are committed by a male intimate partner. (WHO, 2017)

biggest problems of the modern world. In recent years, there have been several Trondheim-based projects attempting to address some of these global problems. Ducky, a progressive web app that allows individuals and businesses to measure their carbon footprint, has taken an innovative approach to inspire sustainable development. Creating a community where the common goal is reduction of carbon footprint can be both effective and shed light on simple measures we can all incorporate in our daily lives to help save the planet. “We want to live in a world without a climate in crisis, and Ducky’s role is to amplify the positive impact we as individuals have. To reach this goal, we have to foster local solutions that solve global problems. Our approach is to eliminate unnecessary complexity and make it both easier and fun to reach climate goals,” says Brand Guru, Astrid Norum. Power Up, another Trondheim-based startup, enables anyone to easily invest in solar energy for off-grid villages in Africa. 1.1 billion people currently live without access to electricity. The investor money is used to buy and install solar panels in the villages. The villagers pay a monthly subscription and the investors get a monthly payout. Compared to the non-electrical solutions currently used, the solar panels are actually cheaper for the villagers. Thus, investors can earn money doing good while the villagers get a better deal than before. Essentially, it’s a win-win situation. 49

A common trait with the modern society is that we have a tendency to hire someone to do work previously associated with human compassion

“PowerUp started with the idea of how we could find a sustainable way to end energy poverty. Our vision is to one day offer access to clean energy to people all over the world. We are a social enterprise that believes in the power of improving our planet,” says co-founder Espen Sandø. Projects like these make me optimistic about the future. Over the next couple of years I am absolutely certain that we will see more of technology that aims to fix important problems and bring us closer as a community. We will be alright.� 2018 / VOLUME 2


THE LIST

REGIONAL SPOTLIGHT

In this issue, we are casting out spotlight on a product which is unique to this region: the Trønder Bunad. The 17th of May will be here before we know it. The air will be filled with music corps, the smell of hotdogs and the visuals of brightly coloured bunads. These are often a curiosity to newcomers, so

we thought it would be nice to give a more in-depth look at these amazing garments. We would like to thank the talented folks at Husfliden for giving us such great access to their work, workspaces and expertise.

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Stitching Together a Region: The Trønder Bunad Did you know? The first 17th of May parade was started right here in Trondheim. It took place in Ilevollen in 1827 with a little over 1,000 participants.

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T Writer—Jennifer Wold

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Photographer—Linda Kathrine Hogstad

he word bunad most frequently conjures up images of women and men seen in their national dress at confirmations, parades and events on the 17th of May. The lively colours of embroidered hems, men’s vests tucked under darker jackets and gleaming silver, are hard to miss. It doesn’t take more than a glance to see that they are beautiful and come in many styles. But from the exterior one may never guess, unless one knows, just how complex each is or how much work goes into them.


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The concept of bunads is much like one’s hands; we all have them, although each a bit different. But when you really look into each individual bunad you realise they are more like fingerprints; unique to the wearer in every way. They are custom fit and, at Husfliden, completely hand-sewn. Each region is responsible for producing their particular bunad. You will not find a bunad from Oppland made here, as much as you would not find a Trønder bunad made there. In Trøndelag way back in 1920, Ragna

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IMAGES 1. Trønder bodice fabric colours 2. Cap with Singsås embroidery 3. Fine cloak pleating 4. Details of the silver neck brooch 5. Unique inner seam detail of Trønder bodices 6. Inner workings of the bodice 7. Men's vest adorned with silver buttons 8. Men's handknit stockings and hat 9. Traditional bunad shoe buckles 10. Waist purse with Gauldal embroidery

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Rytter, Kaspara Kyllingstad and Ingebord Krokstad set out to create a unified Trønder bunad. They drew inspiration from various artcile from existing traditional clothing from all over the region. They used drawings and paintings by Norwegian artist, Dreyer from 1775, to gain a better understanding of the materials and styles they would need. They gathered samples of embroidery, linen shirts, trousers and skirts, and the fabrics common to the area of the time and those inherited over the years. These pieces of local folk costumes were the starting points. Traditions in wool, weaving and embroidery were carefully considered. Three years after starting their project they sewed the first example Trønder bunad, but it wasn’t until the 1960s that the Rococo- and Trøndelag-inspired garment we know today emerged. One of the biggest trademarks of the women’s bunad is the rose-patterned, damask brocade bodice. The layers are carefully pressed, pinned and stitched by the hands of skilled 52

artisans. They are trained in their craft and when watching their nimble fingers create delicate inner seams, with a peek of brocade or taking a close look at the cuff of a shirt to see tiny pleats and fine embroidery, quietly reveals this is more than making a garment. The construction of this bodice is nothing short of spectacular and all hand sewn, be it the panels of the peplum or the cording into the contrasting wool edging. In quick passing one might never see the details on the white undershirt or white linen headscarf. Stitch placement is carefully counted to form the intricate patterns that one could mistake for being woven. Particularly on the skaut (head scarf ) the border is intricately done to create an open lacework. In contrast to the tight and fine stitches gracing the crisp linen shirts, bold and richly dyed wool make up the embroidery that embosses the black silk bonnets, waist purses and shawl. Patterns from Kosberg, Selbu and Singsås grace the bonnets. Gauldal, Soknedal and Tydal are on show on the waist purses. Men’s bunads are no less intricate than their female counterparts. Just on the inside of the jacket you can see a perfectly spaced whip stitch, a strip of soft leather supporting the buttons and button holes both strengthened and embellished by stitches wrapping tight the edges of the fine wool. The waistcoat is bold with woven details in contrasting colours and gleaming buttons bearing the Trøndersk rose. At the neck, a silk scarf with bright colours shows off its damask pattern.One might think that black nikkers (knee length trousers) would be a rather simple garment, but again the same details of fine stitching lead down to hand-knit wool socks deftly held up by woven garters. Even the knitted hat has a tradition all its own. The young should only be seen in all red, the young man in a red hat with a black cuff and the married man in a black hat with a red cuff. Also, these hats should only be combined with a dark outer jacket. Every piece is carefully considered to give a dapper and polished air. In contrast to the rich wools, silks and fine linen is the shining polish of crisp silver. Adorning the collars, waist coasts, bodices, ears and purses are locally made symbols of Trøndelag. Engraving and styles speak more to north or south, as do the rings, the spoked wheel effect and the intricate clasps. The slightest movement causes a little tinkle as the delicate components touch. In the sun, they glimmer and sparkle to make their presence known. Often these are handed down, but whether a family heirloom or a newer piece, these pieces of jewellery are closely looked after. Whether you are a curious visitor or transplant to Norway, or as Norwegian as the day is long, find the time to closely examine these perfect examples of what it truly means to be ‘Made in Trøndelag'. �


MEET YOUR MAKERS

Wiral LITE Eivind Sæter

When it comes to the most important moments in life, or the just pure awesome ones, photography is what most people turn use to capture those moments. Considering how far we have come in photography and filming, even the hobbyist is upping their game. This is where Eivind Sæter of Wiralcam and their creation Wiral LITE comes in. “Almost three years ago I was going to get married. I wanted to document the wedding in the same way as my vacations and started to look for tool to do this in a good way,” says Sæter. Interested in having the photos come out like he imagined required a cable cam, but the market either prices out the amateur or lacking in performance. Holding a master’s degree in industrial design, Sæter is a maker. He believes that you don’t have to be an expert to solve a problem. For Wiral LITE they do have a bunch of experts, however. This is, partly, due to being based here in Trondheim and having the ability to pull the best engineers from NTNU. “Wiral was founded in 2016 by four outdoor and filming enthusiasts who saw the need for adding a new perspective while capturing our own adventures,” Sæter says. “The team has now expanded to nine people, and most of the product development is happening in-house in the offices in Trondheim.” Trondheim not only provides the technical resources, but the start-up scene has been a great resource to the company. What makes Wiral LITE so exciting is that it is for anyone. It is easy to pop it in your backpack, and takes less than three minutes set up with an intuitive attachment system that, as Sæter puts it, "even a five-year-old can operate". Most cable cams work on steel wires and need multiple people to run. However, using experience from Wiral members' other hobbies like kitesurfing, climbing and downhill biking, the team has found another solution which is a thin static rope. Perfect for pack and go. If you want to capture from another angle, want epic shots or perhaps you are a professional looking for an alternative to what you lug around now, check out Wiral LITE. To learn more about Wiral LITE and to pre-order go to wiralcam.com and to see the complete interview with Eivind Sæter, visit our blog at thelist.no. �


THE LIST

MEET YOUR MAKERS

Faust Guitars Raymond Eide

“When scholars study a thing, they strive to kill it first, if it’s alive; then they have the parts and the’be lost the whole, for the link that’s missing was the living soul.” Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Faust, Part One Raymond Eide, the sole creator behind Faust Guitars, sheepishly admits feeling something in common with the product’s namesake, from German literature. “Faust (the protagonist) is a charlatan,” explains Raymond. “I am not an instrument builder. I take parts and make guitars out of them. I’m not trying to trick people, but the first guitar I made felt a little like I was tricking them!” Raymond uses leftover electric guitar parts from dealerships and repair shops to make fully functional, unique instruments, combing the core elements with weird and wonderful knick-knacks. These may be the cogs of a victorian timepiece picked up at a flea market, or an American thermometer dial bought online, or a piece of electrical piping found rusting in the garage since the 50s. There is no particular vision for each piece when Raymond sets out: they are the three dimensional realisations of the maker’s fantastical mind. Guitars (and foot pedals) are either auctioned off or commissioned by guitar enthusiasts from around the world, and no two are the same. Some of the elements are purely design, but others are functional: old transistor radio dials controlling the bass and volume for instance. There is typically little acoustic function in an electric guitar, apart from on the pick up. But even the non-functional design elements lend something to the playing sound; the delicate ping of a bicycle bell or at the whir of the cogs when you turn it on. “If you buy a ‘unique’ guitar in a shop, a limited edition, there are still many hundreds delivered to Norway,” says Raymond, whose has experience of carpentry, metalwork and boat building under his belt. “I take old products and make something new out of them. It’s a little charlatan, a little alchemy. It’s fantasy.” �

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Oddvar I.N Daren in collaboration with Terje Munthe and Lars Paalgard Kile (Wedge), 1998 image taken at the exhibition lokalt land oddvar i.n daren

ART LIST A BEAUTIFUL SPRING curated by Laura-Ann Morrison

How beautiful it was to see the impact Killi Olsen’s latest exhibition had on its crowd. Movement, excitement and an uplifting atmosphere lie in the depths of his work. In the following months, we will have more inspiring exhibitions to look at such as Augmented Scops by Melanie Windl at BABEL on the 6th of April. Additionally, Dora Garcia’s grand entrance at Trondheim Art Museum will be happening on the 26th of May. In the following pages we have interviewed the director who

invites us all to the Love Comes From The Most Unexpected Places exhibition by Dora Garcia, as well as a fantastic display by Lotte Konow Lund at Kunsthall Trondheim on the 31st of May, and the prominent Bachelor Graduate of Fine Art Exhibition on the 27th of April at gallery KIT. For more listings and information about the following exhibitions in the city, please have a look at the final pages of the magazine. Wishing you all a beautifully colourful and art-inspired spring! �

COMING UP 6 April 15 March - 22 April 20 April 27 April 4 May 7 May 15 May 26 May 31 May 31 May 6 June

Augmented Scops by Melanie Windl at Babel Joakim Blattmann Treverk(8) at Trondhjems Kunstforening Sounds on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown by Kim Hankyul at Galleri Blunk Graduation Exhibition Bachelor of Fine Art at Galleri Blunk (Dead) Lesbian Poets Society by Vilda Kvist at Galleri Blunk Ocean Week, Art and Ocean at Rake Visningsrom Graduating Exhibition, Masters of Fine Art Ntnu at Tkm Gråmølna Love Comes From the Most Unexpected Places by Dora Garcia at Trondheim Art Museum Lotte Konow Lund at Kunsthall Trondheim We’re Here for a Good Time (Not a Long Time) by Hertling and Andreassen at Tssk. Emner, Tresnitt Og Skulptur - Per Kristian Nygård, Hanne Christiansen, Erlend Leirdal and Morten Allan Egstad at Dropsfabrikken. 55

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SPONSORED CONTENT

Dora Garcia From the performance “Two planets” image courtesy of dora garcia

LOVE COMES FROM THE MOST UNEXPECTED PLACES DORA GARCIA AT TRONDHEIM ART MUSEUM

INTERVIEWING JOHAN BÖRJESSON, DIRECTOR AT TRONDHEIM ART MUSEUM by Laura-Ann Morrison

https://trondheimkunstmuseum.no/

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How are you feeling? Good. Excited about this spring’s programme, and especially Dora Garcia’s exhibition that’s coming up in May. It’s called Love Comes From the Most Unexpected Places. Tell me about “Love Comes From the Most Unexpected Places”? It is an exhibition that brings together several important films, performances and other works by Spanish artist Dora Garcia. The title Love Comes From The Most Unexpected 56

Places is taken from a 1970s pop song that appears in one of the films. The notion of love, in a broad sense, ties together the works in the exhibition. They actually address a wide disparity of themes, from James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake to a survey of the doors of religious and spiritual societies in Trondheim, to totalitarian regimes’ strategies for control. The idea is that the forms, needs and strategies of love have a lot in common with art and the search for meaning. The film The Joycean


SPONSORED CONTENT

Dora Garcia Segunda Vez (2017) image courtesy of dora garcia

Society records a meeting of an amateur group that has met regularly since the 1980s to interpret and discuss James Joyce’s Finnegan’s Wake, page by page. But there are also those who pervert the strategies of love for other ends. For example, the film Zimmer Gespräche (2007) begins with a black screen and we hear a dialogue about uncertainty, betrayal and loss of self. It seems like the man and woman who are speaking are involved in some kind of love tryst. Later in the film the dialogue is repeated, and we see that it is actually a dialogue between a Stasi informant and her 'handler'. What relation has Dora Garcia to Trondheim? Dora Garcia is an artist I have wanted to work with for a long time. When I started at the museum in 2014 I contacted her about an exhibition based on some of her films. At that point she had just begun work on a new film and research project Segunda Vez, which centres around a very interesting, and somewhat forgotten, person in the history of contemporary art, Oscar Masotta. Masotta introduced ‘happenings’ in Argentina in the 1960s and wrote some interesting texts about the dematerialization of art after Pop Art, and then became important in introducing Lacanian psychoanalysis in the Spanishspeaking world. Since one of the focus areas in our exhibition programme has been the history of the period in art over the last fifty years that we for lack of a better word call Contemporary Art, this seemed to fit in well. So, Trondheim Kunstmuseum contributed to the funding of the film Segunda Vez (2018), and last year we hosted one part of the research seminar Segunda Vez (the other part was at the Art Academy in Oslo). For this exhibition, Dora Garcia has also made some adaptations to works and versions of earlier works specifically for Trondheim. One is a documentation and guide book to the spiritual communities in Trondheim, called Thresholds, that contains a map, short texts about the communities and pictures of their doors. Another is the Trondheim version of a performance called Los Romeos. The work again refers to Stasi methods. Romeos were good-looking and pleasant men who seduced or befriended lonely secretaries, archivists and others who could have access to information at western embassies and companies. For the

exhibition we have hired four 'Romeos' to be pleasant, attentive and kind to manipulate members of the Trondheim public to the artist’s ends. Dora Garcia works with many different medias and expressions. I’m interested in her performance work and the history that it enhances… could you tell us more about that? Los Romeos also consists of posters with a photo of the Trondheim Romeos and a short text informing the audience about their presence, which will be exhibited alongside earlier protagonists from London, Paris and other places where the work has been. The Romeos will sometimes be present at the museum and sometimes not, but have been commissioned to be in character for the whole period, wherever they are. Another performance that will be more obviously present is called Two Planets, where there will be two performers present in the main room for the whole of the exhibition. We have been happily surprised at how relatively easy it has been to recruit both 'planets' and 'Romeos'. This is an advantage (one of many) of working in a university town. Tell me about Segunda Vez ('The Second Time') The title is taken from a short story by Julio

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Cortazar set during the Argentine military’s “dirty war” against dissenters and left sympathisers during the 1970s. There is a shorter film in the exhibition, also called Segunda Vez, which is more or less a film of the short story. In the long version, scenes from this appear together with re-enactments of two of Oscar Masotta’s ‘happenings’ and other material. I actually haven’t seen the finished version of the film since the final edit is being made right now. It will premiere at Dora Garcia’s mid-career retrospective at Museu Reina Sofía in Madrid in April. What is essential about this exhibition? It is an opportunity to see new and older work by a truly important international artist in Trondheim. I encourage everyone to stay throughout both of the films and other work in order to give themselves processing time. The works offer great opportunities for reflection about art, literature and love, and how we relate to each other in society. Since there are many longish films in the exhibition the entry ticket will be valid for the whole exhibition period (16 May - 16 September). So, come by, see a film and enjoy the opportunity to spend a few minutes in contemplation with the 'planets'. �

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THE LIST

Joakim Blattmann Treverk (8) // Meta.Morf 2018 (15.03 - 22.04) image courtesy of joakim blattmann

TRONDHJEMS KUNSTFORENING INTERVIEWING Rebeka Blikstad ARTISTIC LEADER at TKF

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Joakim Blattmann Treverk (8) // Meta.Morf 2018 (15.03 - 22.04) image courtesy of joakim blattmann

interview by Laura-Ann Morrison

How are you feeling? Excited and busy. We are already now preparing for our exhibitions in 2019 and 2020. More than 260 artists have applied for gallery space. So many great artists have applied! We are very satisfied with the quality, but more than 200 will unfortunately be disappointed. We cannot invite them all. Tell me about the start of Trondhjems Kunstforening? Trondhjems Kunstforening was established in 1845 by the painters Lars Hansen and Johan Christian Dahl. J. C. Dahl was born in Bergen and was the founder of the Golden Age of Norwegian painting. He is also described as the father of Norwegian landscape painting. He was very much influenced by the art societies being established in Europe. He was working as a Professor of Art at the academy in Dresden, Germany, and wanted very much also to contribute to cultural development in his old country. Also, Norwegians should be able to share the joy of visual art. Lars Hansen became one of the founders of Trondheim Art Society. He was on the board for some years and was indeed one of the people who got the organisation going. He had a background as

a painter specializing in portrait painting. He wanted to continue his study in Dresden, but J. C. Dahl found his talent insufficient. On his journey in Germany he came into contact with several other Norwegian painters, including Adolph Tidemand, Fritz Jensen and Bernt Lund. Despite all his efforts, he did not make enough money as a painter, but had to feed himself as a soap producer. Trondhjems Kunstforening was the northernmost art institution when it was founded. What is the main goal and vision for the association? The association’s goal is to support Norwegian contemporary art, inspire, and contribute to creating a diverse artistic community - at different levels and with different intensities - and to be a place where the audience with different backgrounds can meet, discuss and develop art and art interest. The art society is a non-profit, member-based organisation. Our vision is, in line with the spirit of the art association, to create community through art. We understand ‘art’ as a broad term that includes both artistic practice and art-related activities driven by amateurs as well as professional artists. The association has existed for 175 years. Throughout these years and history, which piece or moment was significant for the association during these times? Definitely 1997 when we created a new foundation, Trondheim Kunstmuseum. We gave the new organization our collection and our property. In return we got the former residence and office of the bishop in Trøndelag from the municipality, Bispegata 9A. This house has a beautiful architecture and interesting history. It had been used for different activities before we took over and now includes Dronning Mauds Minne school for kindergarten teachers and the public music school in Trondheim. So many people have a relationship to the house that merges with the experience they get from the art exhibitions. We also see that the house inspires the artists exhibiting here, as well as posing a challenge. The members remained in the association in 1997, and are still an important asset, but the activities of the association need to be developed again. Personally, what is one of your favourite art pieces? Oh, I don’t think I have a favourite art 59

piece. What I do experience is that the artworks that mostly challenge me and the way I perceive the world are usually the ones that mark me best. For example, the photo series Pictures of Garbage (2008) from the Brazilian artist Vik Muniz. They surprise and make me aware of myself and society. These are my favourite art pieces, and I usually actually do not like them so much at the beginning. Tell me abut your current exhibition? Our current exhibition on the second floor is Treverk (8), with Joakim Blattmann, that presents sculptural works based on audio recordings of the minuscule movements inside trees. In this way, his work brings to the foreground the “beautiful accidents” of nature that would otherwise remain hidden. This exhibition is open from 15 March to 22 April. On the first floor you can see Bjørn Bratsberg’s recent work of painting and collage, executed in an abstract style. For many, Bratsberg is best known for his motifs derived from the demolition of houses, cars and waste disposal sites. In these places where one often finds breakdown and decay, Bratsberg is looking for beauty. Having worked figuratively for years with graphics and drawing in various techniques, Bratsberg now finds it liberating to play with colours in an abstract visual language. This exhibition is open from 17 March to 29 April. Upcoming exhibitions? Tian Miller’s exhibition Horse is the Best will open the 3 May on the first floor. The exhibition will present her drawings made today, based on drawings she made when she was a child. They merge into each other and create poetic works. On the second floor we will show the exhibition Open House, curated by ourselves, from the end of May. We will open the whole house to the audience, including the rooms that are far from white gallery walls. The idea of this exhibition came after we had to clean up the house for safety reasons and we ended up finding many exciting things, stored for many years. We found furniture and music instruments from the time the house was used as schools, and also a lot of artwork. All the things that we found witness about past activities and have a historical and aesthetic value. They tell stories that we want to share through the exhibition. � 2018 / VOLUME 2


THE LIST

THIS ISSUE

Jentebølgen

Previews & Listings

—Julie Refseth

Preview Editor—Bradley P. Kurtz

Team Verksted World RX

Spring is here and the sun is finally starting to feel warm, the birds are singing and there are hints of green starting to show outside. You might feel you have more energy and finally, you can get rid of that big, warm winter jacket you have used for months. Wonderful isn’t it? Do you have a pair of barely used trainers, dusted away in your wardrobe just screaming to be used, or are you running all year around? Well, that does not matter because this event is for everyone. You can run at your own pace, or even walk if you prefer that. Grab your friend, colleagues, or even your neighbour and join for an evening 5 kilometre run, or walk, along Nidelven with many other sporty women. This year Jentebølgen is celebrating its 25th anniversary, and Strindheim Friidrett IL is

—Kyle Havlicek-McClenahan

IMAGE COURTESY Erling Skjervold

What happens when highspeed rubber meets the road and the asphalt bakes with the heat of a dozen roaring engines? The world’s top RX racers are coming to Lånkebanen in Hell outside of Trondheim to leave it all on the raceway during the Team Verksted / FIA World Rallycross Championship on June 8-10. If you have never been to a race, or think that driving cars can’t be exciting, think again. Few events are as adrenaline inducing as when the thunderous gallop of raw horsepower screams around the track, and those lucky enough to secure tickets to this Rallycross will feel their heart beating in their throats weeks after the 2018 / VOLUME 2

the club hosting the event. The event starts with entertainment at Solsiden at 5.30 pm. There will also be a warm-up session, and the race starts at 7 p.m. Would you like to participate? I think so! There are no excuses for not enjoying Trondheim at night together with many other sporty women of all shapes, sizes, and ages! �

SPORT DATE

5 June PLACE

Solsiden PRICE

100- 250 NOK TIME 19:00 INFO

www.jentebolgentrondheim.no/

SPORT DATE

9-11 June PLACE

Lånkebanen, Hell TIME

15:00 PRICE

250-2700 NOK INFO

https://hellrx.com/

checkered flag has waved on the final lap. If there is one not-tomiss sporting event this summer, this is it. So buckle your seatbelts and reserve your tickets early, because these babies are going to go – and go fast. �

IMAGE COURTESY Roger Midtstraum

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IMAGE COURTESY GeirMogen / Rockheim

Rockheim Hall of Fame Ceremony 2018 —Jennifer Wold

It is no surprise that music is a huge part of the Norwegian culture. Just look around every summer at all the festivals celebrating music and Norwegian musicians. Rockheim, being Norway’s national music celebration centre, is hosting their annual induction into the Hall of Fame for three artists who have contributed to the Norwegian music scene. This is the highest prize an artist can receive and joins the ranks with their fellow artists who have been inducted since the first ceremony in 2011. This year’s nominees are Kari Bremnes, Stage Dolls and Morten Abel. Bremnes, known for her singing, song writing and

Morten Abel has been a long-standing member of the music community and the 21 albums he has been a part of have sold over one million albums, with a little over half the sales being his solo projects, a rather prolific one. Tulipz and Be My Lover have been his most popular singles. Abel was also a performer at the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize concert. Rockheim also recognises those who are not at the forefront as a musician would be, with the Rockheim Honorary Award. The staff of Rockheim make up the committee who choose the winner of this. It isn’t always awarded every year but is always a welcome

musical ability, has released 15 albums and alongside those she has recorded with many other artists. Bremnes is also the recipient three times of the Spellemen Prize, the NOPA prize, Gammeleng Prize and the Edvard Prize. Stage Dolls, a Trondheim home-grown group, got their start in 1982 and are still currently together. Their album Commandos was their most popular out of their seven, hitting number eight on the charts in 1985. Two of the original three artists are still with the band, Torstein Flakne and Terje Storli. Morten Skogstad, who joined the band in 1993, is still with them. 61

addition to the ceremony. Join the evenings host Jon Niklas Rønning, comedian and writer, to celebrate these artists, their achievements and their induction into the Rockheim Hall of Fame. �

FESTIVAL DATE

27 March PLACE

Olavshallen TIME

20:00 – 22:00 PRICE

390 NOK

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THE LIST

IMAGE COURTESY Susann Jamtøy

Killi-Olsen New York, 1983 —Kyle Havlicek-McClenahan

2018 / VOLUME 2

THE ONE TOUT LOOKRO! FO

Imagine an anteater; no, a dog. Or maybe it’s a hyena. Are those nipples? Tumors? What in the world is riding on the back of that creature? Is that just a head sticking out? The mind that manifested these and other works is none other than KilliOlsen, one of Norway’s most acclaimed artists and a singular force of creativity in Trondheim. Through May 6th, Trondheim Kunstmuseum is hosting the works of this Trønder-native and his show

from “New York 1983” in all of its imagination and absurdity. While so much modern art is bizarre or hard to relate to, Killi-Olsen’s work is at once both fantastical and intimate. His imagination spans different media and his subjects provoke a curiosity rarely matched in the art world. But let’s be honest with ourselves… human-like figures riding bizarre, nipple-studded dog-creatures. Was there really any way you weren’t going to go to this? Nope. � 62

ARTS DATE

17 Feb - 6 May PLACE

Møllenberg PRICE

60-120 NOK TIME 12:00 INFO

www.trondheimkunstmuseum.no/ killi-olsen-new-york-1983


THE LIST

IMAGE COURTESY Torleif Kvinnesland

FESTIVAL DATE

5 May PLACE

Møllenberg TIME

10:00 PRICE

449 NOK INFO

www.bakkefestivalen.no

Bakkefestivalen

If nothing else, Trondheim plays host to an incredible music scene year-round, so much so that sometimes it’s difficult to know what to prioritize. But let’s be honest, that last festival you went to lacked something: intimacy. Too often, we have to enjoy music from the nosebleed section of a stadium or behind a tree up on the hillside. If this sounds familiar, Bakkefestivalen is your salve.

—Kyle Havlicek-McClenahan

IMAGE COURTESY Spire Trondheim

On the 5th of May, the streets of Bakkegata in Møllenberg will be turned into what will undoubtedly be the most unique musical experience of the year. While the artists have yet to be announced (but check again soon!), there is no doubt that the ‘stemning’ will be off the charts as you and your friends feel that jamming spirit move you in the early summer air. Did we mention that Bakkefestivalen is also dedicated to improving the environment and sustainability? Rock ON! �

FESTIVAL DATE

21 April PLACE

Verkstedhallen and Lobbyen PRICE

Free

TIME 11:00

Vegan Fair

“Taste the World”, is the name of the game for this year’s Trondheim Vegan Fair. As you may be able to guess from the title, the Vegan Fair is all about celebrating, promoting, and of course eating, vegan-friendly food. Beyond being able to bite into delicious foods there are all kinds of activities on offer

—Bradley Kurtz

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on the Trondheim Vegan Fair. Cookery classes, delicious new takes on international cuisine, cruelty free knick-knacks, fun activities for the whole family, and plenty of freebies are promised for this year’s edition of the fair. “It provides an easy platform to teach and learn about veganism – helping people to think about how they can cook a meal differently or just enjoy different kinds of food”, Emma Jarvis, creator of Trondheim Vegan Fair, had to say. The Trondheim Vegan fair is not a Vegan only affair. Stop in to sample new foods, listen to fantastic discussions, and take part in a fun day of activities for the whole family. � 2018 / VOLUME 2


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THE LIST

A M R K A E E L F IN KONGENS GATE T ALLMENNING

IMAGE COURTESY Aage Asphaug

Svartlamodagen 2018 —Bradley Kurtz

EVERY SUNDAY MAY 27TH - SEPT 9TH 10:00 - 16:00 GOT SOMETHING TO SELL? Sign up here: www.midtbyen.no/bruktmarked Price: KR 400,- (one salestable included)

en blå tråd

On the Northwest side of town is a little neighborhood called Svartlamon. At the end of May residence of Svartlamon are opening up their doors, yards, workshops, and whatever else to the people of Trondheim. This festival offers a little bit of everything: from live music and a film screenings, to clothing and art markets, numerous exhibitions, video game and skate sessions, the list could go on, and on…and on! There will also be plenty of opportunities to shop for organic foods and fill up on waffles during the festival. Svartlamon is an alternative and cultural centre in Trondheim. It describes itself as “a gathering of houses in a little place called Lademoen”, and is the result of many years of political struggle, culminating in 2001 when Trondheim’s city parliament decided to

rehabilitate the area and develop it as an ecological city experiment. The place has a unique feel, with architecture from the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries Svartlamon wants to show everyone what it is like to live and work in this neck of the woods, so make sure to stop by. Organizers of the festival and residents of Svartlamon encourage festivalgoers to walk, bike, or take a bus to their pocket of Trondheim. �

FESTIVAL DATE

26-27 May PLACE

Svartlamon TIME

11:00 PRICE

Free


THE LIST

Ladehammer/ Barnahammer

CONCERTS DATE

8-9 June

—Bradley Kurtz

PLACE

Ladehammer PRICE

Free

TIME 18:00 for Ladehammer 12:00 for Barnehammern INFO www.ladehammerfestivalen.no/

IMAGE COURTESY Sturle Dagsland

Ladehammerfestivalen: a music festival for a good cause, held at the best venue in Trondheim. Ladehammerfestivalen is held at, well, the Ladehammer – complete with spectacular views of the city and Trondheimsfjorden to the West. This unique and fun festival prides itself on being put on for no other reason than to

of punk, reggae, surf-rock, stoner-core, and of course, Trøndersk rock, take the stage below the Ladehammer. Every year Ladehammerfestivalen works to promote some of the up-and-coming bands in the region via Ladehammerslag, a battle of the band’s style event. Stop by to discover and cheer on your new favourite. Kids are welcome to

give the people of Trondheim a good time and give voice to a good cause. This year the festival is in cooperation with Sjiraffen Kultursenter, which offers cultural, and leisure activities for children, adolescents, and adults with mental and physical disabilities. Each year the lineup of bands playing at the festival becomes more and more varied. 2018 will see an eclectic group

Ladehammerfestivalen as well! Starting at noon on Saturday there will be kid-friendly programs and a picnic – aptly dubbed Barnehammern. Don’t worry about trying to scramble to buy tickets to Ladehammerfestivalen, as it is free to attend. Everyone from the bands to the festival manager volunteers their time to put on a great show. �

Swing’it

IMAGE COURTESY Habitat Cafe

—Anette Klakegg

CONCERTS DATE

7 April PLACE

Habitat Cafe PRICE

Free

TIME 21:00-00:00

65

Swing’it returns to take Trondheim by storm! Join them at Habitat for a journey across the Atlantic, and back to 1920’s New Orleans. There will be awesome horn lines, awkward jokes, juicy harmonies, straw hats and crossover bows, three buckets of charm and an atmosphere you can’t find any other place. Swing’it has recently returned from London, where they have performed at speakeasies, cocktail bars, and jazz clubs. They were also busy performing at various festivals this past summer, both international and local. Swing’it will soon be releasing a new single and can also be seen on the TV program Norwegian Talents which you can check out on TV2’s website! Don’t miss this special performance, good beer and pizza! � 2018 / VOLUME 2


THE LIST

IMAGE COURTESY Yaniv Cohen

ARTS DATE

10-14 April PLACE

Kunsthall Trondheim / Teaterhuset Avant Garden / Olavshallen / Verkstedhallen & Lobbyen / Cinemateket / Litteraturhuset / DansiT PRICE

Varied INFO

www.dansit.no/events/multiplie/

Multiplié Dansefestival —Zane Datava

The Multiplié dance festival was established in 2004 and has continuously grown in size and content, it is now one of Norway’s biggest dance festivals. “The name Multiplié points to one of the most common dance terms - plié, which means “to bend”. The name reflects a festival that seeks to bend and twist one’s expectations and views on what dance can be, and for whom”, explains Hilde Domaas, one of the organizers of the festival. With “relocation” as this year’s festival theme, Multiplié opens up to discuss and problematize present times through the art of dance. The festival program contains a wide array of dance performances, by

local, national and international dance artists. Multiplié seeks to be an including festival, and “there is bound to be something to enjoy for everyone”, says Hilde. The program is full of performances, workshops, seminars, dance film, concerts, open stages, exhibitions, dance films, and parties. Organizers recommended some of the highlights of the festival for those ones who will have a hard time to choose: AGAIN, by zero visibility corp. in collaboration with Trondheim Symphony Orchestra. Choreographer Ina Christel Johannessen has created a beautiful piece for a strong ensemble of seven dancers. Marcus Fjellström has

composed the music that will be performed by the musicians of TSO. Additional sound by noise artist Tommy Jansen, and the very visual scenography by “grab hverdag AS” The project “Where have you been?” by the UK based company The Urban Playground Team. They are creating a site-specific performance rooted in a performative language of Parkour-movements. The company is working together with local youngsters from different cultural backgrounds here in Trondheim. The result will be an outdoor performance based on the performers own background stories. There is also a couple of world premieres to present

at the festival. For example, “Flakkande røynd” by Rannei Grenne and Solveig Styve Holte, where they immerse themselves in the works of Merce Cunningham and other “oldschool ghosts” of art-history, and transforms it to their own contemporary esthetic regimes There are also performances for children, as “Sans og Samling” by Ingri Fiksdal which plays with imagination, the absurd, and the senses. You can send the slightly older kids to see “Oxytrain” by Biong/Schia. What could be better than to finally enjoy spring in Trondheim as to dance, explore dancing and see others dance? Grab your festival pass and enjoy a dance! �


THE LIST

Trøndelag Kaffefestival

IMAGE COURTESY Wil Lee-Wright

—Bradley Kurtz

FESTIVAL DATE

9-10 June PLACE

Hjelseng Gård, Stjørdal TIME

TBA

PRICE

TBA

INFO

www.trondelagkaffefestival.com/

Every day more than 12 million cups of coffee are consumed in Norway. During this weekend in June that number is sure to increase drastically as Trøndelag hosts its own coffee festival and the World Kokekaffe Championships. Believe it or not, the Trøndelag Kaffefestival is a celebration of coffee. There will be ample opportunities to sample some of the best hot bean water found in Norway and outside it. And don’t forget about the competitions! Like finding out

who brews the best steeped-coffee (kokekaffe), in the world, who makes the prettiest cup of coffee, and whatever the ‘Totally Awesome and Arbitrary Roaster and Barista Team Challenge’, is supposed to be. There will be a latte stuff to do and see at the Trøndelag Kaffefestival.

A full program for the festival will be released closer to the dates, stay tuned to find out more! A haven for coffee experts, Langøra Kaffebrenneri situated on Hjelseng Gård a few minutes drive from Stjørdal is the venue for this eye-opening festival. �

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THE LIST

APRIL Exhibitions and Regular events Art and Exhibitions

every Thursday APRIL

SuperThursday at Rockheim! Every Thursday between 4 PM and 8 PM you can visit Rockheim’s exhibitions, join different types of special curated tours, drop-in courses and musical lectures! The restaurant will also offer good prices on food and beverage. NB/ every Thursday except 29.03 Rockheim 16:00-20:00, Included in entry ticket.

Art and Exhibitions 10 MARCH 30 DECEMBER

Tegneklubben Tegneklubben was formed in 2004 and is an artist group consisting of Paul Dring, Terje Nicolaisen, Ulf Carlsson, Martin Skauen and Bjørn Bjarre. They meet on a regular basis eat, drink and draw together. Through their drawings, they comment on contemporary themes, art, or whatever else. Trondheim Kunstmuseum 12:00, 60-120 NOK

Art and Exhibitions

Workshops

Concerts

Fotoutstilling ‘A Jungle Out There’

Allmenquiz

Lørdag på Søndag

Quiz with varied and exciting themes. Bring 25 NOK in cash.

Open mic-night at Antikvariatet.

15 MARCH - 15 APRIL

Photography exhibition from photographer Helge Skodvin. Modul 35 12:00, Free

Art and Exhibitions

22 MARCH - 15 APRIL

Bull.Miletic: Zoom Blue Dot (1990-2018) As part of Meta.Morf 2018 – Biennale for art and technology, the art centre presents the exhibition Zoom Blue Dot (1990-2018) by artist duo Bull. Miletic. Organized as a kinetic video installation, the focus of this project is the representation of Earth as a scalable interface facilitated through a combination of remote sensing technologies and data analysis software. Trøndelag Senter for Samtidskunst 12:00, Free

Art and Exhibitions

23 MARCH - 06 MAY

Jakob Kudsk Steensen The exhibition is part of Meta. Morf 2018

every Monday APRIL - JUNE

Antikvariatet 19:30, 25 NOK

Theatre and Comedy every Thursday APRIL - JUNE

Supertorsdag Improv theatre every single Thursday! Antikvariatet 20:00, 100 NOK

Nightlife

every Sunday APRIL - JUNE

Langhelg på Løkka Who does not like the weekend and wants to make each one as long as possible? Every Sunday we make a small party at Løkka with good prices for food and drinks. Every now and then there is also a DJ who gives us extra weekend vibes. Café Løkka 20:00, Free

RAKE Visningsrom 19:00, Free

every Sunday 08 APRIL - JUNE

Antikvariatet 21:30, Free

Sports

01 APRIL - 31 AUGUST

Kayak Trip Down Nidelven This is an experience for those who want to see the city from another angle, from the water! See the mighty Nidarosdomen from the riverside and perhapsdiscovering new secrets along the quay. The trip goes along the river, through the canal, and on to Skansen. Tempe Idrettsanlegg 09:00, 12:00, 15:00, 18:00 350 NOK

Sports

01 APRIL - 31 AUGUST

SUP Tour Down Nidelven This is an experience for those who want to see the city from another angle, from the water! See the mighty Nidarosdomen from the riverside and perhapsdiscovering new secrets along the quay. The trip goes along the river, through the canal, and on to Skansen. Tempe Idrettsanlegg 09:00, 12:00, 15:00, 18:00 400 NOK

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For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

APRIL Workshops

Art and Exhibitions

Språkkafé

WHAT IF // HVA OM

Want to practice language and exchange experiences over a cup of coffee with people from all over the world? Every Thursday!

An exhibition with works of Bastiaan Buijs and Marta Giralt. Part of Meta.morf 2018

05 APRIL - 30 JUNE

Ila Brainnstasjon 18:00, Free

Art and Exhibitions

05 APRIL - 06 MAY

“What If?” A part of Meta.Morf

Film

Theatre and Comedy

Filmvisning: Monty Python and the Holy Grail

All Borders are Temporary

Most have probably not seen Monty Python on the big screen, come to Cinemateket Olavshallen for a great laugh watching the classic Holy Grail on 7th April at 1800! 18 years age requirement.

Collaboration between TrAP, Cinemateket and RAKE, part of Meta.Morf 2018. Including the films THE LEBANESE ROCKET SOCIETY, THE INTERNATIONAL SPACE ORCHESTRA, NOSTALGIA FOR THE LIGHT, and METEORS.

01 APRIL

05 APRIL - 06 MAY

Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum 80-100 NOK, 10:00, 12:00

Art and Exhibitions

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-100 NOK

125

Sports

26 APRIL - 28 AUGUST

02 APRIL

Rosenborg v. Molde

What happens to our sexuality when we are surrounded by digital offers and robotics? With VR and social networks, our interaction has shifted from intimate to digital. This compact exhibition presents Bastiaan Buijs’s design project “Satyr” and Marta Giralt’s “Virtual X”. The opening of the exhibition is free!

The museum celebrates its’ 125 years anniversary with an exhibition of 125 objects from the collection chosen by 125 persons outside the museum. This great crowd-curated project is both an exhibition and a catalog with texts written by the 125 curators. The exhibition presents the variety and quality of the collection in a fresh way. The opening of the exhibition is free!

Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum 18:00, 0-110 NOK

Nordenfjeldske Kunstindustrimuseum 10:00, 0-110 NOK

Eliteserien league match.

Eliteserien League Match Lerkendal Stadion 20:00, 150-370 NOK

Sports

02 APRIL

Ranheim TF v. Stabæk EXTRA Arena 18:00, 150-295 NOK

03 APRIL - 04 APRIL

Cinemateket 18:00, TBA

Concerts

03 APRIL

CunninLynguist There has never been an irregularity in hip-hop like the southern trio CunninLynguists. They have sampled everything from psych rock to polka and been compared to UGK and Atmosphere in the same breath. They have shared a scene with artists from Kanye West to Aesop Rock. Verkstadhallen 20:00, 275 NOK

EVERY MONDAY: DINNER FOR KR 150

2018 / VOL.2

Alma Mater • Alma’s Bar og Kjøkken • Ai Suma • Døgnvill Egon Søndre • Egon Prinsen • Frati • Le Bistro • Røft Rotisseri Sabrura Byhaven • Sabrura Lounge • San Sebastian • Sushi Bar Torvet For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no 70 TAG • To Rom og Kjøkken • Troll Restaurant • Tulla Fischer ADVERTISEMENT


THE LIST

APRIL Workshops

03 APRIL

Launchpad Day One on one meetings with representatives from companies within design, patents, accounting, law, and funding. DIGS 13:00, Free

Film

03 APRIL

The International Space Orchestra Cinemateket, TrAP and RAKE present this documentary film by the remarkable artist and filmmaker Nelly Ben Hayoun as part of Meta.morf 2018. English language, no subtitles. Age Limit: 15 Cinemateket 18:00, 60-90 NOK

Art and Exhibitions 04 APRIL

Workshops

04 APRIL - 08 APRIL

A retreat in a beautiful mountain setting - for harmony in body, mind, and soul. With soothing yoga asana classes and mantra meditation where we use breathing techniques, guided deep relaxation, and live music. Including full vegetarian menu & accommodation. Info & sign-up on www.tmy.no

Jazz, Blues and Classical 04 APRIL

Akustisk Nakenhet When four musical universes melt together, one witnesses something unique. For the first time, and only once, these four artists stand on the same scene and deeply dive into each other’s song catalog.

The story of our most popular marching bands, with museum director and marcher Ivar Roger Hansen.

Workshops

Ringve Musikkmuseum 13:00, 50 NOK

Film

04 APRIL

Meteors Cinemateket, TrAP and RAKE present this brand new Turkish documentary film, as part of Meta.morf 2018. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15

Nostalgia for the Light

Bottle Rocket

Cinemateket, TrAP, and RAKE present a modern documentary classic by Chilean master Patricio Guzmán, as part of Meta. morf 2018. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15

Wes Anderson’s debut feature from 1996, starring Luke and Owen Wilson in their first film roles. English language, no subtitles. Age Limit: 15

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-90 NOK

Cinemateket 20:30, 60-90 NOK

Concerts

Concerts

Marcello Valerio

Biru Baby

Marcello Valerio is a Trondheim-based artist with roots in Scotland. His music has influence from the American 70s singer/songwriter tradition but contains inspiration from many different styles.

Biru Baby comes from the cold, hard north. This Sami puck band has its very own style and sound. The group has been called “inconceivable”, “brilliantly unique” and “Baby metal on acid”.

Antikvariatet 20:00, 50 NOK

Verkstadhallen 21:00, 200 NOK

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Concerts

Jam På Stasjonen

Mallemuk

Jazz and Blues jam at Ila Brainnstasjon!

People from 0-99 years of age will enjoy Mallemuk’s folk music as it is welded with contemporary stories and captivating melodies,

04 APRIL

Storbuan Økosamfunn 18:00, 1400-1800 NOK

Olavshallen 20:00, 450 NOK

Film

04 APRIL

Retreat with Meditation & Yoga

Fremad Marsj

Film

05 APRIL

04 APRIL

Temakveld med Gengangere: Språk i forfall?

Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

06 APRIL

06 APRIL

Film

Antikvariatet 20:00, Free

Western

Concerts

05 APRIL

Throughout this evening we want to challenge people’s attitudes to language, reject some myths, encourage discussion and reflection

05 APRIL

06 APRIL

Ila Brainnstasjon 19:00, Free

Cinemateket 20:00, 60-90 NOK 71

Brand new prize-winning drama by German director Valeska Grisebach. German and Bulgarian language, Norwegian subtitles. Age Limit: 15

Band of Gold

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-90 NOK

Byscenen 22:00, 250 NOK

Band of Gold is back, continuing where their debut album left off.

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

APRIL Theatre and Comedy

Concerts

Concerts

Art and Exhibitions

Kveli Rånes Bremseth Shoq

DJ Jernverket

Terje Tysland

Escape the Universe

Meet when Helle Stenkløv from Jernverket spins plates at Fru Lundgreen. Age Limit: 20

Tysland brings along a full band, choir and plenty of brass and in addition, there will also be some guest artists.

Fru Lundgreen 21:00, Free

Olavshallen 19:00, 445-550 NOK

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Concerts

The performance tries to suspend the laws of gravity and invite to a celebration of the universe. Escape the Universe is an artistic thought experiment, driven by the urge to create a poetic escape room, a space in which science, fantasy, and fiction merge and collide.

06 APRIL

After a small detour to commemorate Rosenborg Ballklubb with the jubilee show Totally in 100, and appearing now together with Roar Strand, Charlotte Audestad and Trine Lise Olsen, Harald Morten Bremseth, Arnt Egil Roben and Sigmund Kveli are back on the road in their traditional trio edition. Olavshallen 18:30, 21:00, 475 NOK

Film

06 APRIL

Jeanne Dielman, 23, quai du commerce, 1080 Bruxelles Chantal Akerman’s landmark feminist drama from 1975, lasting 3 hours and 21 minutes, shown for the very first time in Trondheim. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15 Cinemateket 18:00, 60-90 NOK

Concerts

06 APRIL

Tons of Sobs Tons of Sobs is a heavy bluesrock band from Trondheim who makes their own interpretations of British Paul Rodgers and the band Free. The band has been playing together since the summer of 2017, but are by no means beginners. Age Limit: 20 Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 150 NOK

2018 / VOL.2

07 APRIL

07 APRIL

07 APRIL

07 APRIL

Dockery Dawgs

Live at Habitat: Swing’it

Dockery Dawgs is a blues duo based in the Trondheim area. After a few years, they have now reverted to their roots and will play more in the original duo format.

Journey across the Atlantic, and back to 1920’s New Orleans for some awesome horn lines, awkward jokes, juicy harmonies, straw hats and crossover bows, three buckets of charm and an atmosphere you can’t find any other place

Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

Habitat 21:00, Free

Concerts

07 APRIL

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Gerald Ofori

07 APRIL

Petter Dalane Sextet

Local legend in the making plays at Knaus. Knaus, Samfundet 11:59, 50-90 NOK

Petter Dalane Sextet plays original music inspired by Thelonious Monk and Sun Ra.

Concerts

Antikvariatet 20:00, Free

Revolver

Sports

07 APRIL

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

72

Jazz, Blues and Classical 08 APRIL

Jubileumskonsert - 70 år Byåsen school marching band turns 70! Last year took third place in the Norwegian Championships and this year were Trønder champions for the tenth time. Now, they are inviting everyone to a party concert in Olavshallen’s main hall. Olavshallen 17:00, 145-245 NOK

Film

08 APRIL

En pasjon / The Passion of Anna

Camp Nidaros is a co-ed roller derby boot camp. Trondheim Spektrum 10:00, 800-1000 NOK

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-90 NOK

Camp Nidaros

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 325 NOK

Teaterhuset Avant Garden 19:00, 16:00, 120-220 NOK

Cinemateket is celebrating the Ingmar Bergman 100-year anniversary with screenings through the year. The Passion of Anna (1969) has Liv Ullmann and Max von Sydow in the leading roles. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15

07 APRIL - 08 APRIL This band interprets Beatles songs in an amazing way, with high emotion and outstanding vocal performances - with a couple of Trondheim’s best musicians in the band. Age Limit: 20

07 APRIL - 08 APRIL


THE LIST

APRIL Sports

Film

Concerts

Theatre and Comedy

Pokemon Championships: 2018 Premier Challenge

Filmvisning: Y tu mamá también

Cecilie Eide

Hyperfruit - Ludvig Daae og Joanna Nordahl

08 APRIL

Do you want to be the very best? Then bring your stack of Pokemon cards down to Outland and battle other trainers to be crowned the best.

Trondheim Film Club are showing the Mexican modern classic Y tu mamá también (Cuarón, 2001). Norwegian subtitles. 18 years age requirement.

Outland Trondheim 11:00, TBA

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-100 NOK

Concerts

Theatre and Comedy

Live at Habitat: Linda’s Residence O3

Ben Toscher & Friends

10 APRIL

Music inspired by the cultural landscapes of Trondheim, Oslo and New York City consisting of self-composed material by the guitarist Aleksander Lindås. With arc, saw, and sinter, LRO3 takes us from traditional jazz into the unknown. Habitat 20:00, 100 NOK

Theatre and Comedy

10 APRIL - 11 APRIL

Ravemachine

11 APRIL

11 APRIL

Cecilie has gathered some of her previous releases, some new songs, and some favorite covers for a “downstairs” and atmospheric concert! Antikvariatet 20:00, 150 NOK

HYPERFRUIT is a dance show about how we interact and communicate with each other, with the internet as an opportunity, distraction and as entertainment, and how we play our online emotions.

Film

Verkstadhallen 20:30, TBA

Nattsvermeren / The Silence of the Lambs

Concerts

12 APRIL

11 APRIL

13 APRIL

13 APRIL

Svein Ivar Skjevdal

He’s back for another round of improvised music and poems at Ila Brainnstasjon! From the electric-light concrete jungle of Los Angeles to the oh so koselig Trondheim comes Ben Toscher, an improvisational poet-comedian improvising songs and poems in the moment to make you laugh and feel inspired.

Classic 90’s thriller with Anthony Hopkins as the iconic Dr. Hannibal Lecter, having an old friend for dinner and preferring a nice Chianti and some fava beans when eating liver. English language, no subtitles.Age Limit: 18

Ila Brainnstasjon 20:00, Free

Film

Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

Workshops

Letters

Concerts

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-90 NOK

12 APRIL

13 APRIL

11 APRIL

Startup Grind TRD

Ravemachine is a high-powered, entertaining, and intriguing dance performance that challenges our prevailing associations linked to people with physical impairments. Part of Multiplié Dansefestival.

Startup Grind is the largest independent startup community, actively educating, inspiring, and connecting more than 1,000,000 entrepreneurs in over 365 cities.

Verkstadhallen 21:00, Free

DIGS 17:00, Free

Svein Ivar Skjevdal has finally started sharing his poetry and music with others after much pressure from his friends. The lyrics and melodies he makes have come through the many areas of life, both sunny places, and darker scenes.

Personal, poetic and touching documentary essay, made in collaboration with Norwegian Marte Vold and South Korean Jero Yun. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15 Cinemateket 20:30, 60-90 NOK

Festivals, Fairs and Markets 13 APRIL - 14 APRIL

Concert and interview with Claudia Scott A special evening dedicated to the Norwegian Americana artist Claudia Scott. The evening will start with an interview and end with a concert. Rockheim 20:00, 300 NOK

Feelgood Festival Fashion and music meet in two days of fun. Mercursenteret 14:00, Free 73

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

APRIL Concerts

Film

Sports

Concerts

Livid + LEIF

Solan og Ludvig Herfra til Flåklypa

Ranheim TF v. Haugesund

Frode Thorjussen & Per Jynge

14 APRIL

LEIF’s solo debut is full of longing with stories of lost dreams, intimacy, conservative Christianity, and bi-sexuality. Livid Trondheim 20:00, 140 NOK

Brilliantly funny Norwegian stop-motion animation film from the well known Kjell Aukrust universe of Flåklypa. Norwegian language, no subtitles Cinemateket 14:00, 60-90 NOK

The Norwegian Creedence

Nightlife

14 APRIL

A Norwegian tribute band to Creedence Clearwater Revival. Age Limit: 20 Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 200 NOK

Concerts

14 APRIL

Jugs of Mirjam Jugs of Mirjam is a local band who has taken the stage with a sweet new feature genre! Skillingsrock as they call it is their new groundbreaking concept. Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

Theatre and Comedy 14 APRIL

Blanks

Teaterhuset Avant Garden 20:00, Free

Petter’s JazzJam

Ila Brainnstasjon 20:00, Free

Jamvert Petter Dalane brings along two of the city’s premier musicians to give you a fantastic concert set before it breaks out with jamming and good vibes.

Film

17 APRIL

14 APRIL

Freek I Natt #8

Antikvariatet 20:30, Free

FREEK-I-NATT is a club concept that came into being when Freek, a Dutch-born composer, was able to tell a keen and local DJ crew about how clubbing is done in the “Amsterdam” way.

Sports

18 APRIL

Introduksjonskurs i Havpadling

Habitat 21:00, 135 NOK

Learn tricks and tips how to paddle in the sea! It is a 3 hours course where you will get understanding what sea kayaking is about, all equipment is included in the price, After the course, you will get a certification.

Concerts

15 APRIL

Darling West Darling West is a Norwegian trio that plays folk music with elements of bluegrass, old-time, show and rock.

Trondheimkajakk 17:00, 900 NOK

Dokkhuset 19:00, 100-250 NOK

Concerts

18 APRIL

John Balke: Warp

15 APRIL

En mann ved navn Ove

Music that places the grand piano in an environment of manipulated sound that surrounds the artist and the audience. Warp has been performed at a number of festivals in Europe

Sven Nordin in a performance about love, proper tools and the importance of driving a Saab. Olavshallen 19:00, 500 NOK

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

Jazz, Blues and Classical

In this project, Per and Frode associate text and music with a whole new format in a balance between finished texts and improvisation.

EXTRA Arena 18:00, 150-295 NOK

Theatre and Comedy

A dance performance read between the lines; a cheeky take on the way we read and project meaning onto things, situations or people through subtle plot twists that leave us to fill in the blanks.

18 APRIL

Eliteserien league match.

Concerts

2018 / VOL.2

15 APRIL

14 APRIL

Dokkhuset 20:00, 100-220 NOK 74

18 APRIL

Filmvisning: Den grønne sykkelen Trondheim Film Club shows the first Saudi Arabian film and the first made by a woman, Wadjda (Al-Mansour, 2012). Norwegian subtitles. 18 years age requirement. Cinemateket 18:00, 60-100 NOK

Theatre and Comedy 18 APRIL

Jimmy Carr: The Best Of, Ultimate Jimmy is gathering a selection of his very best jokes along with brand new material for the ultimate comedy show. Olavshallen 19:00, 535 NOK

Workshops 18 APRIL

Eat & Quiz Habitat Join a fun quiz with prizes. Habitat 19:00, Free


THE LIST

APRIL Theatre and Comedy 18 APRIL

Christian Wedøy

Workshops 19 APRIL

Music Quiz

Byscenen 18:00, 194-300 NOK

18 APRIL

Trønderjogg A fun walk/run for everyone at the sports arena at Øya. Trønderjogg starts with children’s race then a 5km race for all competitors. Øys Stadion 18:00, 140-265 NOK

Kids and Family

Adjø Montebello

Verken Fugl eller Fisk

Last year’s big sensation, the Karpe Diem feature film/concert doc hybrid Adjø Montebello, is back on the big screen! For three days only, only at Cinemateket. English subtitles. Age Limit: 12

Welcome to a playful and inquisitive performance, created by some of our favorite children’s theatre creators and musicians, along with the children who join in on the curiosity and wonder.

Cinemateket 19:30, 60-90 NOK

Teaterhuset Avant Garden 11:00, 12:30, 75-170 NOK

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Concerts

Jam På Stasjonen

Boogie Nights

Jazz and Blues jam at the Brainnstasjon!

Boogie Nights deliver disco, soul and funk music with steadfast conviction. Age Limit: 20

20 APRIL

The premiere of the Illusionist, a magic show at Byscenen. This will be Christian Wedøy’s first solo show.

Sports

Film

How much do you know about popular music? Try your luck at the national museum of popular music! Sign up with your quiz team by contacting kristian.krokfoss@ rockheim.no!

20 APRIL

Rockheim 19:00, Free

Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

Concerts

20 APRIL

Concerts

19 APRIL

Moten Bach & The Random Boost Unit Morten Bach & the Random Boost Unit is a band that moves in between several styles. The band consists of musicians with a long history in Trondheim’s jazz environment.

Live at Habitat: Bright Young Things

Concerts

21 APRIL

Trøndersk Mimrekonsert

Bright young things prove that a symbiosis between a variety of skills and diverse genres is possible. Influenced by British and Indie garbage rock, blues and punk. It is then formed together to create the best sounds, called “Sørpe-pop” in Norwegian.

Join a nostalgic journey back to the 70s and 80s and experience the artists who played around the city in Trøndelag. Olavshallen 19:00, 455-555 NOK

21 APRIL

21 APRIL

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 150 NOK

Concerts

21 APRIL

Little Wing Little Wing invites you again for a fun and soul-filled evening. The band has begun the premiere of its 30th anniversary and will offer both new and old songs from their repertoire.

Habitat 20:00, Free

Concerts

Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

Workshops

Concerts

Johannes Holtmon

Concerts

IxDA Meetup

Moon Hooch

Ila Brainnstasjon 20:00, Free

19 APRIL

IxDA Trondheim is an informal professional gathering point for anyone who enjoys a user experience, regardless of the background.

21 APRIL

20 APRIL

21 APRIL

‘We don’t try to play jazz - this is our take on playing acoustic techno’. Dokkhuset 21:00, 150-295 NOK

DIGS 18:00, Free 75

Johannes writes subtle and catchy pop music with inspirational sources ranging from the Norwegian classics to the present Indian rock. He has always been noted with his clever and humorous texts, usually with a so-called oblique view of society.

Few Dollars More

Antikvariatet 20:00, 140-170 NOK

Fru Lundgreen 20:00, TBA

Few Dollars More brings inspiration from 70’s blues guitar rock. They are often compared to Rival Sons, Blackberry Smoke, and other bands.

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

APRIL Workshops

Film

Workshops

Concerts

Mantra Party

Persona

Film Quiz

Kristin Minde

With an enlivening Mantra concert followed by a delicious vegan potluck. You will experience the most powerful and enjoyable form of meditation, taking you to a state far beyond the stress and worries of life. More info on www.tmy.no

Cinemateket is celebrating the Ingmar Bergman 100-year anniversary with screenings through the year. Persona (1966) was Liv Ullmann’s debut for Bergman, and it’s a milestone in modernist cinema. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15

Norwegian pop-artist playing songs full of emotion and with varied themes.

Kjøpmannsgata 12 17:00, Free

Cinemateket 20:30, 60-90 NOK

Do you love Japanese movies from the 50’s? Do you know which film Claire Denis made in 2009? Then you will be at home in Trondheim Film Club’s film quiz. Set up your own team and find out who can claim the title “film expert”! 18 years age requirement. Cinemateket 20:00, 10 NOK

Kids and Family

Concerts

The Earrings of Madame De...

Family Day at Rockheim

Stephen Sunshine

22 APRIL

24 APRIL

22 APRIL

22 APRIL

Film

22 APRIL

25 APRIL

RocKabul

Singer-songwriter Stephen Sunshine from New York City is coming to visit in connection with his European character! There will be Americana, there will be Roots, there will be a mood on the drive. Welcome to a fun family day at the museum – free entry the entire day! The programme includes special guided tours, a disco in the concert hall, face painting, impro theatre etc. Check out the details at www. rockheim.no! Rockheim 10:00, Free

Australian journalist Travis Beard dives into the unknown depths of underground metal music in Afghanistan! A new documentary co-produced by Trondheim’s UpNorth Films. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15

Ila Brainnstasjon 18:00, TBA

Cinemateket 20:30, 60-90 NOK

Festivals, Fairs and Markets 23 APRIL

Film

Vintage Marked with Prisløs & DJ!

25 APRIL

Filmvisning: Battle Royale

Join Prisløs and Habitat for an evening of awesome vintage, bargains and beers whilst the DJ play some good vibes.

Sports

22 APRIL

Rosenborg v. Start

Trondheim Film Club shows the cult classic Battle Royale (Fukasaku, 2000), on 35mm! Norwegian subtitles. 18 years age requirement.

Habitat 18:00, Free

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-100 NOK

Eliteserien League Match

25 APRIL

Antikvariatet 20:00, 160-200 NOK

Film

26 APRIL

Elegant, stylish, witty; everything that a Max Ophüls film should be! A real French classic from ‘53, from a director who inspired Kubrick, P.T. Anderson and many more. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15 Cinemateket 20:30, 60-90 NOK

Workshops

26 APRIL

TAF-Forelesning Guest lecture from Arenas Basabe Palacios Luis Basabe Montalvo, Madrid. DIGS 19:00, Free

Workshops

27 APRIL

Startup Friday Open hangout for everyone who wants to get to know the startup scene in Trondheim.

Lerkendal Stadion 18:00, 150-370 NOK

Habitat 19:00, Free

2018 / VOL.2

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

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THE LIST

APRIL - MAY Film

Film

27 APRIL

28 APRIL

Western

The Earrings of Madame De...

Brand new prize-winning drama by German director Valeska Grisebach. German and Bulgarian language, Norwegian subtitles. Age Limit: 15 Cinemateket 20:00, 60-90 NOK

Elegant, stylish, witty; everything that a Max Ophüls film should be! A real French classic from ‘53, from a director who inspired Kubrick, P.T. Anderson and many more. English subtitles. Age Limit: 15

Concerts

Cinemateket 16:30, 60-90 NOK

The 60’s were dominated by British bands; Three of them became very big in the United States - The Beatles, The Rolling Stones and Herman’s Hermits, which became one of the most successful groups around the world. Age Limit: 20 Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 400 NOK

Indian Vegan Cooking Class

Love Your Spine Workshop

This is: Robyn!

This 1.5 workshop will help you be more productive in daily movement patterns without soreness or stiffness in your back. Learn how to make quick and easy corrections to yourself, knowing more about your postural alignment. You can look forward to a combination Pilates, Restorative Stretch and Trigger points that you can take away and use at home. To book please email sarah@pilatestrondheim.com.

Festivals, Fairs and Markets 28 APRIL - 29 APRIL

På kloss hold 2018

Pilates Trondheim 13:00, 320-350 NOK

Are you 3 or 30 years old? Or 7 or 70 years? Then this is something for you: LEGO enthusiasts from Norway and abroad gather in Trondheim for a massive show of creations and collections at Charlottenlund videregående skole.

Kids and Family 29 APRIL

Familiesøndag på Trondheim kunstmuseum Family Sunday gives children and adults the opportunity to experience art and create things from their own imagination.

Charlottenlund videregående skole. 11:00, 50 NOK

Workshops

27 APRIL

Concerts

28 APRIL

27 APRIL

Herman’s Hermits

Workshops

Concerts

Trondheim Kunstmuseum 12:00, 50-250 NOK

28 APRIL

Hand of Doom

Concerts Join our popular cooking classes to learn the simple way to turn fresh produce into a delicious and filling vegan meal - this time focused on the Indian cuisine. An evening with an inspiring interactive lecture, warm atmosphere, and a tasty dinner at the end. Info & signup on www.tmy.no Trondheim Meditasjon & Yoga 17:00, 300 NOK

30 APRIL

Trondheim number one Black Sabbath tribute band. Age Limit: 20

Snak The Ripper

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 200 NOK

Eliteserien league match.

For five years, Snak The Ripper has gone from being unknown to an underground cult phenomenon throughout the world. He has been nominated for this year’s Hip Hop artist at the Western Canadian Music Awards twice in a row (2016-2017). Age Limit: 20

EXTRA Arena 18:00, 150-295 NOK

Kafé Skuret 21:00, 249 NOK

Sports

28 APRIL

Ranheim TF v. Vålerenga

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01 MAY

Gives the jazz and improvisational music a new meeting place, making it urban, dance-friendly and full of glamour! Ila Brainnstasjon 20:00, Free

Film

02 MAY

Filmvisning: Under Kirsebærtrærne Naomi Kawase’s Sweet Bean was one of the highlights of 2015-6, if you missed it in the cinemas you have an additional chance to catch it with Trondheim Film Club at Cinemateket Olavshallen. 18 years age requirement. Cinemateket 18:00, 60-100 NOK

Concerts

02 MAY

Anders Lillebo Trio Anders Lillebo is one of Norway’s foremost performers in Irish folk music. He started his musical track with studying the jazz piano, but in recent years he has increasingly adapted to different types of folk music. Antikvariatet 20:00, 100 NOK

Workshops 02 MAY

Eat & Quiz Habitat Join a fun quiz with prizes. Habitat 19:00, Free

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

MAY Exhibitions and Regular events Art and Exhibitions

26 APRIL - 20 MAY

Baklengs inn i Okularet

Baklengs inn i Okularet is a multi-dimensional installation that consists of, among other things, optical elements. Using these objects, the artists raise questions in relation to what mankind is able to see – both when we look inwards and outwards. Trøndelag Senter for Samtidskunst 12:00, Free

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Workshops

Jam På Stasjonen

Post humanism and art for kindergarten children

03 MAY

Art and Exhibitions

26 MAY - 16 SEPTEMBER

Love Comes From the Most Unexpected Places. Dora Garcia

Jazz and Blues jam at Brainnstasjon! Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

One of Spain’s most renowned contemporary artists. Garcia draws on interactivity, performance and investigates the relationship between artwork, audience, and place in her works.

Concerts

04 MAY

Kent Aune This man has played all his life, counting more than 200 concerts filled with pop music. You do not play 2000 concerts if you do not go on that stage and deliver, no matter what you have to do. Age Limit: 20

TKM Bispegata 12:00, 60-120 NOK

Art and Exhibitions

31 MAY - 01 JULY

We Are Here For A Good Time (Not A Long Time)

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 150 NOK

Theatre and Comedy 04 MAY

Art and Exhibitions

Dag Sørås - Emokrati

15 MAY - 03 JUNE

KiT Masterutstillingen 2018

Dag brings his stand-up routine about varied, and sometimes emotional topics to Trondheim.

Graduation exhibition for NTNU Kunstakademiet i Trondheim.

Olavshallen 19:30, 21:30, 270-345 NOK

TKM Gråmølna 12:00, 60-120

Kids and Family

Art and Exhibitions

25 MAY - 10 JUNE

Erin Sexton Art exhibition.

05 MAY

Verken Fugl eller Fisk

Through their archive of memories, the artist duo Hertling & Andreassen explores aspects of Trondheim that otherwise would remain hidden for the city’s inhabitants.

Welcome to a playful and inquisitive performance, created by some of our favorite children’s theatre creators and musicians, along with the children who join in on the curiosity and wonder.

Trøndelag Senter for Samtidskunst 12:00, Free

RAKE Visningsrom 12:00, Free

2018 / VOL.2

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

Teaterhuset Avant Garden 11:00, 12:30, 75-170 NOK

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05 MAY

In conjunction with the viewing of Teater Fot’s children’s performance Verken Fugl eller Fisk (Neither Fish nor Fowl), we invite you to a seminar on post humanism and art for kindergarten children. The seminar is open to all those interested and will be held in Norwegian. Teaterhuset Avant Garden 14:00, Free

Concerts

05 MAY

Chicks on Speed Chicks on Speed is a feminist music and fine art ensemble, formed in Munich in 1997 when members Australian Alex Murray-Leslie and New Yorker Melissa Logan met at the Munich Academy of Fine Arts. Dokkhuset 21:30, 100-200 NOK

Concerts

05 MAY

El Brote Tango El Brote Tango is a music duet by Natalia Cesari and Luis della Mea from Argentina.They perform a selection of tangos and folklore from Argentina that will let you capture the nostalgic feeling and the passion for their homeland music. Antikvariatet 20:00, Free


THE LIST

MAY Concerts

05 MAY

Harry & The Andersens

Art and Exhibitions 06 MAY

Open Justice Museum

08 MAY

Concerts

Thomas Taylor

Justismuseet 12:00, Free

The Trønder Derby! Eliteserien League Match Lerkendal Stadion 18:00, 150-370 NOK

05 MAY

Introduksjonskurs i Havpadling

RAKE Visningsrom 12:00, FreeWorkshops

On the first Sunday of the month, The Norwegian National Museum of Justice invites you into the old Criminal Asylum. Here you can learn about old methods of punishment and executions, biological warfare from WW1, the infamous Rinnan-gang’s torture methods during WW2, the Enigma machine, police history, and much more.

Rosenborg v. Ranheim TF

Art & Ocean In collaboration with the Art Academy in Trondheim, view works of art with an ocean theme.

Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

05 MAY

Sports

07 MAY - 13 MAY

Rock & Roll trio, inspired by many of the bands from Austin Texas, from the 1980’s and early 90s.

Sports

Art and Exhibitions

Startup Grind TRD Startup Grind is the largest independent startup community, actively educating, inspiring, and connecting more than 1,000,000 entrepreneurs in over 365 cities. DIGS 17:00, Free

Workshops 08 MAY

Launchpad Day Thomas Taylor is a young and talented country artist from Norway. Age Limit: 20

08 MAY

Learn tricks and tips how to paddle in the sea! It is a 3 hours course where you will get understanding what sea kayaking is about, all equipment is included in the price, After the course, you will get a certification. Trondheimkajakk 17:00, 900 NOK

Jazz, Blues and Classical 08 MAY

Gregory Porter With his silky voice, Gregory Porter plays timeless music with soul and credibility - and with great respect for jazz history. Olavshallen 19:00, 635 NOK

One on one meetings with representatives from companies within design, patents, accounting, law, and funding.

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 150 NOK

DIGS 13:00, Free

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For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

MAY Workshops

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Sports

12 MAY

Workshops

09 MAY

PechaKucha Trondheim

As We Fade Out Into The Sweet Stream Of Oblivion

SUP Introduction Course

Beginners Pilates Course

Wanna learn something new? And stay fit? Stand Up paddle could be exactly what you are looking for! Come and have lots of fun with us!

Be good to yourself this Spring and enroll in our New Beginner Pilates Course! This weekend course will guide you through correct postural alignment and awareness, how to connect and engage your core and overall introduce you to having a more flexible and toned body. Whats not to love! To book please email sarah@pilatestrondheim.com

09 MAY

An academic vorspiel about what interests us. Every speaker gets 20 slides, lasting 20 seconds each - a compact and engaging talk of an exciting subject or a different project. DIGS 20:00, Free

Welcome to a one-of-a-kind performance-concert! Everything unfolds at the moment, when renowned local jazz musicians, contemporary dancers, and light artists gather for a mutual dialogue on stage.

Concerts

Verkstedhallen 19:00, 190-290 NOK

Festivals, Fairs and Markets

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Flea Market & Vegetarian Café

Teisendamen 13:00, 600 NOK

12 MAY

09 MAY

Marie Løvås Marie Løvås is an Oslo-based vocalist and songwriter who, together with her band, creates an exciting melancholy melodious pop sound. Antikvariatet 20:00, 100 NOK

Jazz, Blues and Classical 09 MAY

Donny McCaslin Donny McCaslin is a Grammy award-winning American saxophonist, composer, and musical pioneer. He got his biggest international breakthrough as a bandleader on David Bowie’s swing song ‘Blackstar’. Olavshallen 21:00, 220-320 NOK

10 MAY

Trondheim Jazz Orchestra & Chick Corea

12 MAY

Pilates Trondheim 13:00, 700 NOK

Sports

13 MAY

Ranheim TF v. Odd

Trondheim Jazz Orchestra with special guest Chick Corea stepping in on the piano.

Eliteserien league match. EXTRA Arena 18:00, 150-295 NOK

Olavshallen 19:00, 500-605 NOK

Concerts

Nightlife

13 MAY

11 MAY

A truly green flea market with a diverse offer of clothes, kitchen utensils, outdoor gear, and much more. You can also grab some tasty snacks & food at our pop-up vegetarian café. More info on www.tmy.no

Welcome to the Jungle Birthday Bash! Can you hear the wild calling? Are you brave enough to enter the maze of vines and serpentines? If so, welcome to the jungle!

Trondheim Meditasjon & Yoga 11:00, Free

Josefin Winther Since 2006, Josefin Winther has gained a great deal of recognition for her live performances. She is known for her gripping presence and power on stage, where she can capture each room alone with the guitar. Antikvariatet 20:00, 100 NOK

Habitat 19:00, Free

Concerts

15 MAY - 16 MAY

Susanne Sundfør Norwegian pop-star brings her new music to Trondheim for two concerts. Olavshallen 21:00, 630 NOK 2018 / VOL.2

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

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THE LIST

MAY Art and Exhibitions

Sports

Concerts 19 MAY

Concerts

16 MAY

Mørkerommet #2

Rosenborg v. Lillestrøm

Nidaros Rockorkester

Bøgdabråk

Mørkerommet (The Darkroom), is Teaterhuset Avant Garden’s arena for experiments, interdisciplinary artistic meetings and works in progress. The aim is to open a discussion about what performative art really is and ought to be. We want to challenge and inspire artists, the audience and our own boundaries as an institution.

Eliteserien League Match

If you get the cream of Trondheim musicians you get the crew in Nidaros Rock Orchestra. The band consists of five of the city’s most experienced and best players. Age Limit: 20

Bøgdabråk is based on Fosen in Trøndelag and operates mainly within the country-rock genre. The band builds up during the traditional Trønderfest culture and has gained a very good live reputation. Age Limit: 20

15 MAY

Teaterhuset Avant Garden 00:00, Free

Sports

15 MAY

Introduksjonskurs i havpadling Learn tricks and tips how to paddle in the sea! It is a 3 hours course where you will get understanding what sea kayaking is about, all equipment is included in the price, After the course, you will get a certification. Trondheimkajakk 17:00, 900 NOK

Concerts 16 MAY

Sunk Cost Sunk Cost is one of Trondheim’s foremost garage funk bands. Sunk Cost likes strange instruments, strange people, and strange dance movements.

Lerkendal Stadion 18:00, 150-370 NOK

Workshops 16 MAY

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 150 NOK

Eat & Quiz Habitat

Sports

Join a fun quiz with prizes.

21 MAY

Habitat 19:00, Free

Ranheim TF v. Molde

Concerts

Eliteserien league match.

18 MAY

EXTRA Arena 18:00, 150-295 NOK

Motorpsykkel

Film

Once cited as the world’s best band in Aftenposten, this Trio returns to Trondheim for an evening of good tunes. Age Limit: 20

23 MAY

Filmvisning: Right Now, Wrong Then

25 MAY

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 150 NOK

Concerts

25 MAY

Tommy Tokyo Basically Rock, but also something else that is hard to classify. Stop by Kafé Skuret and discover Tommy Tokyo’s delicious sound. Kafé Skuret 21:00, 295 NOK

Concerts

25 MAY

Kafé Skuret 21:00, 300 NOK

Trondheim Film Club is excited to present Right Now, Wrong Then (2015) by the currently very prolific director Hong Sang-soo. 18 years age requirement.

Jazz, Blues and Classical 18 MAY

Jam På Stasjonen

Cinemateket 18:00, 60-100 NOK

Cockroach Clan + Faensmakt Often described as Whether the Cockroach Clan is a street-punk with a twist of humour. Fru Lundgreen 22:00, 150 NOK

Jazz and Blues jam at the Brainnstasjon!

Jazz, Blues and Classical

Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

24 MAY

TSO Samtidsfest Concert with a wide range of contemporary music in collaboration with Trondheim Sinfonietta, NTNU Department of Music, and New Music Trondheim.

Antikvariatet 20:00, 70 NOK

Olavshallen 19:00, 85-270 NOK 81

Art and Exhibitions 26 MAY

Open Day at Rockheim Rockheim, amongst several museums in Trondheim, are opening our doors and offering free entry all day long. Rockheim 10:00, Free

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

MAY Concerts

Kids and Family

Workshops

Workshops

So Are We

Familiesøndag på Trondheim Kunstmuseum

Film Quiz

Eat & Quiz Habitat

Do you love Japanese movies from the 50’s? Do you know which film Claire Denis made in 2009? Then you will be at home in Trondheim Film Club’s film quiz. Set up your own team and find out who can claim the title “film expert”! 18 years age requirement.

Join a fun quiz with prizes.

26 MAY

29 MAY

27 MAY

So Are We is a duo consisting of Guro Vikingstad on vocals and Stian Haslie on guitar. The music of the duo is in a landscape of pop, people, roots, and country with inspiration from artists such as Ryan Adams, Norah Jones, and Melody Gardot. Antikvariatet 20:00, Free

Family Sunday gives children and adults the opportunity to experience art and create things from their own imagination. Trondheim Kunstmuseum 12:00, 50-250 NOK

Sports

Cinemateket 20:00, 10 NOK

27 MAY

Nightlife

Rosenborg v. Brann

Rockheim Hall of Fame Ceremony

Eliteserien League Match

27 MAY

Join us as we celebrate the inductees of this years Rockheim Hall of Fame; Kari Bremnes, Morten Abel, and Stage Dolls. Olavshallen 19:00, 390 NOK

Sports

30 MAY

Introduksjonskurs i havpadling

Lerkendal Stadion 20:00, 150-370 NOK

Concerts

Learn tricks and tips how to paddle in the sea! It is a 3 hours course where you will get understanding what sea kayaking is about, all equipment is included in the price, After the course, you will get a certification.

27 MAY

Kåre Indrehus Kåre is a Norwegian performer who combines humor and the melancholy. He is inspired by American folk rock, country, and blues.

Trondheimkajakk 17:00, 900 NOK

Antikvariatet 20:00, 200 NOK

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2018 / VOL.2

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

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30 MAY

Habitat 19:00, Free

Film

30 MAY

Filmvisning: Man Bites Dog Trondheim Film Club end sits semester with the very controversial and disturbing Man Bites Dog (1992), on 35mm. Norwegian subtitles. 18 years age requirement. Cinemateket 18:00, 60-100 NOK


THE LIST

JUNE Exhibitions and Regular events Art and Exhibitions

Art and Exhibitions

Magnhild Kennedy

Reopening the Manor House

29 JUNE - 05 AUGUST

Co-Curator Maja Nilsen and RAKE present this art exhibition. RAKE Visningsrom 19:00, Free

Art and Exhibitions

16 JUNE - 12 AUGUST

Jon-Arne Mogstad Artist and professor Jon-Arne Mogstad has been a teacher at Kunstakademiet i Trondheim for many years. This exhibition shows works from his own artistic production. TKM Gråmølna 12:00, 60-120 NOK

Concerts

`Festivals, Fairs and Markets

Rebels & Angels Preparty

Juba Juba 2018

For the first time in history, we have the pleasure of presenting the Danish Motorbilly band Grumpynators on Norwegian soil. Rebels & Angels Norway and Nidelven Bar & Scene will arrange a solid Preparty.

Juba Juba is Central Norway’s biggest children’s festival. Join a wonderful weekend full of music, theater, dance, literature, and activities for the whole family!

01 JUNE

02 JUNE - 03 JUNE

16 JUNE - 31 AUGUST

Ringve Music Museum is Norway’s national music museum with a collection of over 2000 instruments. On 16 June the exhibition in the Manor Building at Ringve Music Museum reopens with renovated splendor and feature a new, exciting exhibition.

Nidelven Bar & Scene 21:00, 220 NOK

Workshops 02 JUNE

Pilates Trondheim Open Day!

The exhibition will convey the social role of music during a period that was crucial in the formation of Norway as an independent nation. Join us on a journey to Norway in the 1880s! Ringve Musikkmuseum 11:00, 110-130 NOK

Curious about Pilates and want to learn more about its benefits and what it is? Join the team for Open Day where we invite everyone to come by and meet us, ask questions and also experience what we have to offer at the studio. Not only will Pilates classes be on the line-up but also Animal Flow and Barre! To book your spot on a free trial class please visit the website (www.pilatestrondheim.com) and book online!

Art and Exhibitions

16 JUNE - 16 DECEMBER

Drumroll and Fanfare This exhibition is a celebration of the Norwegian professional military bands’ 200-year-long history. The visitors will encounter both changing instrumentation and resounding performances.

Pilates Trondheim 12:00, Free

Festningsparken 11:00, 315-490 NOK

Art and Exhibitions 03 JUNE

Open Justice Museum

On the first Sunday of the month, The Norwegian National Museum of Justice invites you into the old Criminal Asylum. Here you can learn about old methods of punishment and executions, biological warfare from WW1, the infamous Rinnan-gang’s torture methods during WW2, the Enigma machine, police history, and much more. Justismuseet 12:00, Free

Ringve Musikkmuseum 11:00, 110-130 NOK

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For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

2018 / VOL.2


THE LIST

JUNE Sports

Workshops

Concerts

Concerts

Grunnkurs i Havpadling

Startup Grind TRD

Revolver

Conor Patrick

Learn tricks and tips how to paddle in the sea! It is 2 days course 16hours in total, all equipment is included in the price. After the course, you will get a certification (Våtkort)

Startup Grind is the largest independent startup community, actively educating, inspiring, and connecting more than 1,000,000 entrepreneurs in over 365 cities.

Conor Patrick is considered one of Trondheim’s most promising artists. He is an impressive songwriter and producer with great radio success in Norway and abroad.

Trondheimkajakk 09:00, 2900 NOK

DIGS 17:00, Free

Revolver is a literary Beatles band, you could call them fundamentalists. The band’s goal is to reproduce the songs as close to the original as possible, not just note for note but also in spirit. Age Limit: 20

Workshops

Concerts

02 JUNE - 03 JUNE

05 JUNE

08 JUNE

06 JUNE

Kafé Skuret 21:00, 300 NOK

Festivals, Fairs and Markets

07 JUNE

Launchpad Day

Peter Stokstad Trio

One on one meetings with representatives from companies within design, patents, accounting, law, and funding.

Prepare for astounding covers of Jeff Beck, Jimi Hendrix, Prince, and so much more.

DIGS 13:00, Free

09 JUNE

Barnehammern 2018 There would be no Ladehammer festival on the adults without the Barnehammern for the little ones. We welcome the summer with lots of exciting activities and top class entertainment for young and old.

Ila Brainnstasjon 20:30, Free

Workshops

Sports

07 JUNE

06 JUNE

Introduksjonskurs i havpadling Learn tricks and tips how to paddle in the sea! It is a 3 hours course where you will get understanding what sea kayaking is about, all equipment is included in the price, After the course, you will get a certification.

Ladehammerveien 12:00, Free

IxDA Meetup

Sports

IxDA Trondheim is an informal professional gathering point for anyone who enjoys a user experience, regardless of the background.

10 JUNE

Ranheim TF v. Sarpsborg 08

DIGS 18:00, Free

Eliteserien league match. EXTRA Arena 18:00, 150-295 NOK

Trondheimkajakk 17:00, 900 NOK

Concerts

13 JUNE

Audun Haukvik Audun Haukvik has lived a life full ups and downs, and he puts all his experiences into his music. Ila Brainnstasjon 20:00, Free

2018 / VOL.2

For more listings and up-to-date info please visit thelist.no

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16 JUNE

Kafé Skuret 21:00, 295 NOK

Concerts

16 JUNE

Cecilie Haukland The concert will be a walk through an exciting musical landscape, with the artists own material as well as atmospheric interpretations of other songs within pop/show genre. Ila Brainnstasjon 21:00, Free

Sports

24 JUNE

Rosenborg v. Vålerenga Eliteserien League Match Lerkendal Stadion 20:00, 150-370 NOK


THE LIST

FOOD & DRINK Feeling hungry? 01

JACOBSEN OG SVART

02

BROR

03

KAFÉ SOIL

04

73 SØTTITRE

09

07

06

08

05

04

02

05

HABITAT

06

RØFT RÔTISSERI

07

TROLL RESTUARANT

08

TO ROM OG KJØKKEN

09

E.C. DAHLS

01

03

LOCATION Ferjemannsveien 8, Adressabygget

Bror

CONTACT www.jacobsensvart.no +47 902 44 226

Find perfection in a burger

HOURS Mon-Fri 7 - 18, Sat 9 - 18, Sun 11 – 18

Jacobsen og Svart Coffee, the right way

LOCATION Olav Tryggvassons gate 29, 7011 Trondheim

If you´re looking for a different kind of coffee shop you’ll find it at Jacobsen og Svart. In their trendy venue in the new Adressa building they’ve combined a relaxed atmosphere with friendly service, funky playlists and awe-inspiring coffee. To top it off, everything at Jacobsen is home made, from their famously fresh cinnamon rolls to the coffee roasted on site. But be warned, once you’ve tried their coffee nothing else quite compares!

CONTACT Brorbar.no x @bror_bar +47 458 31 526 HOURS Mon-Thur 11:00-00:30, Fri-Sat 11:00-02:30, Sun 13:00-02:30 SUN 13:00-02:30

85

Bror is a bar and BBQ-hotspot located in Nordre Gate, right in the heart of Trondheim. They specialise in craft beers and rum, served alongside burgers and southern California-style tacos. Burgers are cooked on a charcoal-fired grill, and a range of sides including delicious sweet potato fries. Go as you are - be it a quick drink, a full meal or a night out. Bror offers a warm welcome!

2018 / VOLUME 2


THE LIST

Kafé Soil

Something for everyone in the heart of Bakklandet

LOCATION Nedre Bakklandet 20d, 7014 Trondheim CONTACT b/Kafé-Soil HOURS Wed-Sat 10-17 Sun 11:00-17:00

The recently remodelled Kafé Soil, sitting in charming Bakklandet, serves up delicious, homemade, organic baked goods. Visitors can quench their thirst with juice, soda, and locally-roasted coffee. A number of vegan and raw food options ensure that there is something for everyone. Be sure to check out their selection of eco beers and wines too!

Habitat

Evolution of craft Habitat is Trondheim's oasis for experimental craft beer and delicious pizza. Their 24 taps are consistently pouring the best selection of craft beer, cider, and kombucha, both from Norway and abroad. Habitat is especially proud of their in-house brewery, operated by Monkey Brew, who concoct all kinds of awesomeness in their basement ”Monkey Lab”. The pizza bases are sourdough, the toppings fresh, and the oven hot! And if beer and pizza aren’t your thing, you can always hang out in their toilets and listen to David Attenborough’s soothing voice. Welcome to your new favorite Habitat!

73 Søttitre Fine dining by the river

LOCATION Kjøpmannsgata 73 CONTACT +47 73 80 33 33 restaurant73.trondheim @radissonblu.com HOURS Mon-Sat 17.00-22.30

2018 / VOLUME 2

Bar & Restaurant 73 has devoted professionals doing their best to make your dining experience as great as possible. Trained chefs, waiters, bartenders and sommeliers strive to create exciting and tasteful dishes for their guests. The produce is fresh and local, as the staff cares about animals and farmers’ happiness. Delicious flavours, combined with great beverages in a comfortable setting, overlooking the Nidelva river. Welcome to 73. 86

LOCATION Olav Tryggvasons gate 30 CONTACT b/habitattrondheim HOURS Monday-Thurs 11-23 Fri & Sat 11-02


SPONSORED CONTENT

Røft Rôtisseri Above the beaten tracks

On the modern pedestrian bridge connecting the city with the seaside footpath, speedboat and cruise ship terminals, above the dynamic transport hub of Brattøra, with great views overlooking the canal and its traditional buildings, RØFT serves customers of all ages and all walks of life. Enjoy your cowboy breakfast, seafood salad, grilled chicken or crispy vegetarian dish with the whole region at your feet. Come here, go anywhere.

LOCATION Sjøgangen 6. (Above Trondheim Central Station) CONTACT www.roft.no +47 731 88 100 HOURS Sun-Thu 10-22 Fri-Sat 10-23

To Rom og Kjøkken

World class ingredients for food aficionados

Run by Roar Hildonen and Alexander Skjefte – both with a great passion for food and drink – To Rom og Kjøkken focuses on the best produce from Trøndelag, the largest food region in Norway with a wide variety of seafood and other delicious local, smallscale products. To Rom og Kjøkken takes inspiration from Mediterranean cuisine and uses world class ingredients in a unique way with no compromise. The restaurant also boasts an extensive selection of 500 wines and 120 beers. To Rom og Kjøkken has a White Guide recommendation, tops Trip Advisor’s charts, is repeatedly given six out of six by national newspapers and was personally endorsed by chef Gordon Ramsey on his visit to Trondheim. This formal yet cosy restaurant, nestled in the centre of town, is where food lovers return to time and time again. Try their famous shellfish, they are always on the menu.

Troll Restaurant

Norwegian food prepared in a helluva’ way!

Troll Restaurant is located in Fosenkaia , overlooking the river. In a rustic and almost fairytale like environment, Troll serve traditional Norwegian dishes with a different spin. All the menu items are based on local ingredients, like whale beef from Smøla and deer from the Trøndelag region. Head Chef Lars composes three or five course meals that will impress and surprise.

LOCATION Fosenkaia 4 A, 7010 Trondheim CONTACT www.trollrestaurant.no +47 734 87 990

LOCATION Carl Johans Gate 5 7010 Trondheim CONTACT Toromogkjokken.no +47 735 68 900 HOURS Mon-Sat 16:00-24:00

E.C. Dahls

HOURS Mon-Sat: 15:00-23:00

Brewed to perfection

LOCATION Strandveien 71 CONTACT www.ecdahls.no HOURS Tue-Sat 16:00-24:00

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E.C. Dahls Pub og Kjøkken is located at the northern end of Lademoen. Both the pub and the restaurant are inspired by American cuisine, placing a heavy focus on great grilling and, of course, the beer garden. With the E.C. Dahls name you know the beer will be plentiful, and delicious. Make sure to swing by this summer to taste their selection of craft beers. 2018 / VOLUME 1


Trøndersk Food and Brewers Festival 2.-4. August 2018 oimat.no

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Photo: Nikol Herec / Oi! Trøndersk Mat og Drikke AS

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The List Magazine - Vol. 2 2018  
The List Magazine - Vol. 2 2018  
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