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MAY 2014 ISSUE 8 CULTURE

MEMOIRS OF FRENCH INDOCHINA NEDERLANDS

AMSTERDAM: THE CITY OF COLOURS

日本語

HARAJUKU FASHION YEAR ABROAD SPECIAL

TOP TIPS ON STUDYING ABROAD IN SPAIN

ITALIANO

STEREOTIPI ITALIANI: FATTO O FINZIONE

WINNER OF

OUTSTANDING SOCIETY


May 2014 Issue 8 FEATURED ARTICLES .

GRAD BALL SPECIAL Don’t know what to wear to Grad Ball yet? Don’t panic! The Linguist has found the best dresses for you.

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TOP 5 REASONS TO VISIT CYPRUS Love to travel? The Linguist has the top 5 reasons why you should visit Cyprus this summer!

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EDITOR’S NOTE by Julie Ledesma And so I introduce to you our third and final issue of this academic year. I am sad to be leaving behind the role of Chair of such an amazing society, but I am also excited and very happy for newly elected committee and editors of 2014/15. I know how great they are going to be and know they are going to do so much for the magazine. As you all probably know we were shortlisted this year for the Guild Awards but unfortunately did not win. However we are thankful for the nomination and had an amazing time celebrating all the amazing talent the Guild has to offer. I can't believe how fast this year has gone and I am extremely thankful to everyone who has been part of the society this year. Especially those who have really made an effort to make the Linguist grow and flourish in the last couple of months. Our membership has increased and I

hope this continues next year and whilst we printed less issues we made more space for our writers to publish more of their articles. We have added new language sections which we hope continue and inspire more languages to do the same. So let me get onto this issue. Having visited one of my friends who is on her year abroad in Spain, I recommend you read the Year Abroad Special if you are lucky enough to be jetting off next year. Also make sure you have a look at our Italian section which is a great article on Italian stereotypes and for all the third and final years who are still not sure on what to wear for Gradball I recommend having a look at our Life & Style section where our editor Hannah has made sure to pick some of the best dresses out there for you to choose from. Again thank you ever so much if you have followed our work this year, I feel very proud to have spent my time with this society and would not have had it any other way. Whatever you're plans are for summer or for next year I wish you all the best of luck!

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IN THIS ISSUE 3 Current Affairs 5 Life & Style 6 Food & Drink 7 Travel 9 Culture 10 Español 11 РУССКИЙ 312 Current DeutschAffairs 13 Nederlands 14 Italiano 15 ελληνικά 16 Chinese 汉语 17 Japanese 日本語 18 Year Abroad Special 19 Announcement

THE LINGUIST TEAM 13-14 Committee

Editors

Japanese: Arisa Lee

Chair: Julie Ledesma

Chinese: Chloe Saunders

Secretary: Jessica Brand

Culture: Stephanie White Current Affairs: Saul Shimmin

Life & Style: Hannah Cluley Polish: Pawel Pokorski & Agnieszka Rzésniowiecka

Creative Design: Adele May Treasurer: Sam Lowe Proof Reader: Sam Lowe

Front Cover Picture: taken in Valletta, Malta by Adele May

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Dutch: Ed Vos French: Phillippa Gent and Emily Deacock

Russian: Naomi Betteley Portuguese: Matthew Norley Spanish: Rachel Bliss

Travel: Robyn Adam Other Roles German: Naomi Betteley Deputy Proof Reader: Rachel Greek: Susanna Georgiou and Bliss Myrto Bartatila Design Team: Fariha Nawaz Italian: Chanika Hikkaduwage

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CURRENT AFFAIRS THE BREAKDOWN OF THE NATION-STATE by Saul Shimmin The nation-state is the predominant form of statehood in the world. Yet in its birthplace, Europe, events are taking place that may mean the end of the nation-state. Over the last thirty years there has been a return across Europe to the older parochial identities that existed before the creation of nation-states during the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. The Scottish and the Catalonians are no longer alone in their demand for independence, new secession movements have emerged, such as the Bretons in France, the Flemish in Belgium and the Venetians in Italy. Europe seems to be fracturing, splintering into smaller and older polities. Where it will end is unclear, and that is a fear held by the national leaders, of an inexorable cracking of nation-states into an anarchic jumble of small polities.

SCOTTISH AND THE CATALONIANS ARE NO LONGER ALONE IN THEIR DEMAND FOR INDEPENDENCE

Two reasons are propelling this reversal in statehood. Firstly, the principles that forged the nation-state have gone full circle. The idea of self-determination has been harnessed by secession groups to state that they are a unique people with a shared culture, language and identity, and should therefore have the right to break away from the bigger state and govern themselves. Last month the Venetians voted for independence in a non-binding poll. Venice’s governor Luca Zaia defended the decision with the principle of self-determination. It would be hard for the Italian government to stop the secession, as the Venetians had exercised their right to self-determination, which is enshrined in modern international law. The secession groups are right, many modern European identities did not exist a hundred years ago or more and were created by the capital government. For example France’s Third Republic attempted to instil a French identity across the regions of the country through education and military service. Economic reasons also lie behind the drive for independence. The global financial crisis has aggravated a sense in certain local regions that they are paying for the poorer and less fiscally responsible areas of their country. The secession groups believe that they would be more prosperous if they were independent of these other regions. This idea drives the Flanders independence movement in Belgium. The movement’s leader, Bart de Wever, perceives the Belgian government and the rest of the country as welfare spongers. During the current recession many in the European provinces have become disillusioned with their central government, believing that the capital does not represent their interests or care about their problems. Secession movements are in some ways a local response to the recession, a belief among the local people that they can deal with their issues better than the national government. An example of this is the red bonnets movement in Brittany which started in 2013 over an Ecotax introduced by the Parisian government. This angered the local Bretons as their economy is founded on agriculture, and the new transport levies introduced by the tax would have driven up cost, causing their major agricultural businesses to fail. Across the region, the call for autonomy has shown that the government’s Ecotax is failing to represent Brittany’s interests and Bretons should govern their own affairs. A number of European countries seem poised to split into smaller political communities, yet this phenomenon is spreading beyond Europe. China is also dealing with various secession movements within its borders, and the current state of Ukraine with Pro-Russian movements in its eastern half are examples of local people reasserting their identity. The ink lines of the world map may be very different in the future if this continues.

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DIEUDONNÉ, A SIGN OF THE TIMES IN FRANCE by Saul Shimmin Way back during the blustery days of December, West Bromwich Albion striker Nicolas Anelka, made a certain gesture after scoring a goal. To most of us here in England, we were oblivious to what Anelka had just done. The gesture is called a Quenelle, and is claimed to be an inverted Nazi salute that holds an anti-Semitic meaning. You may be wondering where the Quenelle came from. Quenelle has a bit of a French ring doesn’t it? Well, that is exactly where it came from, from a Black French comedian called Dieudonné M-bala M-bala. You may be taken aback by all of this; I know I was. Dieudonné, currently being investigated for fraud by the French authorities, has been an acolyte of controversy throughout his comedic career. A self-proclaimed anti-Zionist, Dieudonné has tapped into a burgeoning sentiment of antiSemitism within France. According to figures published by the SPCJ, The Service for the Protection of the Jewish Community, anti-Semitic acts have been rising since the 1990’s in France. Roger Cukierman, President of the Representative Council of Jewish Institutions in France (CRIF), declared in a ‘Le Point’ article that the environment towards the Jewish people in France had become ‘Putrid’. Dieudonné once condemned the late head of the right-wing group, le Front National, Jean Marie le Pen, as a ‘big blind Marabout’ (Holy Man). Ironically, similar accusations are now laid before himself, in particular for whipping up anti-Jewish feelings within the country. It is true that Dieudonné has repeatedly broken French law and denied the Holocaust on stage. The whole question of whether he is an anti-Semite leads to the more contentious issue of French politics.

WHETHER HE IS AN ANTI-SEMITE LEADS TO THE MORE CONTENTIOUS ISSUE OF FRENCH POLITICS

Since the King’s blood splattered upon the Guillotine, France has veered between the political left and right. From Dreyfus, to Vichy, to the Generals’ Putsch, this fight over France’s soul has never truly relented. Dieudonné and his supporters are a sign that France is becoming polarised once again.

Amongst the ranks of Dieudonné’s avid fans are those you would not expect to see clapping at his jokes. A large number are young men from ethnic backgrounds, who believe that Dieudonné’s words are the untold truth within France. Disaffected men who live in the Banlieues, the deprived suburbs of France. The sons and grandsons of immigrants, devoid of even meagre opportunities, they feel shunned by society. Many of them believe that Jews run France, and consequently blame the Jewish for their sorrows. The miasma of disillusionment has dissipated beyond the Banlieues and across the country. 2014 may mark the Great War’s opening salvo one hundred years ago, but France’s political state is almost symmetrical to what it was once the war ended. Many Frenchmen are dissatisfied with the government, believing that it has not eased their economic woes. Some amongst them see in Dieudonné, with his gesture and insinuated rhetoric, a sympathetic figure standing up against the establishment. Brittany, a French province that voted for Francois Hollande in protest against Sarkozy in the 2012 elections, now condemns him. Despite Hollande’s electoral success, Brittany continues to suffer hardship and toil. It took the creation of an Ecotax for the predominantly rural province to become enraged with Hollande and the government. In their anger, Bretons have rekindled the red cap movement (les Bonnets Rouges), an anti-tax revolt across Brittany during the 17th century. This new revolt is more than taxes, it is a revolt against the centralised government of Paris, unaware of the average Breton’s needs and wants. Leader of the movement, Christain Trodac, ultimately wants devolution for the region.

In the winter of their discontent, many are turning to the Far Right, to the benefit of le Front National. The party, under the leadership of Marie le Pen, daughter of Jean Marie le Pen, has undergone a supposed metamorphosis. Support for the party has been inexorably rising as of late. In a French survey taken in November 2013, 42% of participants stated that they would not dismiss voting for the Front National. If France is not already in troubled times, it may be very soon. Whether the centrist parties are able to regain the public mandate will be proven in the polls.

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LIFE & STYLE GRAD BALL SPECIAL by Hannah Cluley 4

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So it may currently be creeping up to exam season, but after that it will be time for lots of relaxation, summery celebrations and… Grad Ball! If you’re panicking about what dress to get, then panic no more! Because I have trawled through a lot of them for you and picked out some of my favourites!

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WHERE TO BUY 1) Maxi bright pink dress – River Island - £60 2) Pink heels – River Island - £45 3) Paisley white dress – Topshop - £48 4) Black maxi lace dress – TFNC - £60 5) Black heels – KG by Kurt Geiger - £130 6) Pink feather trim dress – Missguided - £39.99 7) White bag – ASOS - £25

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8) Jewel embellished bag – Mango - £59.99 9) Light blue dress – Missguided - £39.99 10) Mint dress – ASOS - £42 11) Floral strapless dress – ASOS - £55 12) Mint heels – Faith - £50 13) Purple box clutch – River Island - £30 14) Nude heels – Mango - £49.99 15) Pale lilac maxi dress – Coast - £295

Guild of Students ‘Outstanding Society 2013’!


FOOD & DRINK PAKORA CURRY by Hafsah Tahir INGREDIENTS FOR PAKORAS:         

METHOD FOR PAKORAS:

1. ½ kilogram Gram flour 3 medium size potatoes chopped 2 onions sliced 2 table spoons of dried crushed coriander (Can 2. buy separately) 3. 1 table spoon of crushed chilli 1 teaspoon of salt 2 small tomatoes 1 table spoon of Fenugreek leaves (can buy separately) 1 teaspoon of turmeric powder

Put all ingredients in a bowl and add water whilst mixing, the paste should be quite thick so don’t add too much water Leave for 30/40 minutes outside (not in the fridge) You will notice that the paste has become more watery

INGREDIENTS FOR CURRY:

METHOD FOR CURRY:

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¼ cup of oil 6/7 cloves of crushed garlic 2 green chillies chopped 1 teaspoon of salt ½ teaspoon of red chilli powder ½ teaspoon of turmeric powder ½ teaspoon of coriander powder ½ teaspoon of Garam Masala 1 small cup of yoghurt 1 ½ glass of water Handful leaves of fresh coriander 1 tomato chopped

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Pour the oil in the pan and add garlic, green chillies and let them brown Then add the tomatoes and cook for 2 minutes and then add Garam masala, red chilli powder, turmeric powder and coriander powder Whisk yoghurt and water in a separate bowl and then add this mixture to the pan- this is now called buttermilk Place the gas on high and keep mixing fast, don’t stop until it starts boiling (as it will start to clump) Add the fresh coriander leaves Cook for another 5 minutes and then turn off the gas Now we need to fry the Pakoras so put oil into a deep frying pan and add tablespoons of the Pakora mixture into the oil. Turn them over after 2 minutes each time. Let them fry until they are brown. Fry as many as you like Then place the Pakoras in the curry before serving River Island £15

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TRAVEL TO A RAIN-DRENCHED BRIT by Maddie Kilminster To a Brit fluent in estuary English and trained in rain tolerance, skiing may seem like a far, exclusive world of sandy, swash-buckling Swiss beauties swanning down the slopes in and out of après-ski lounges. But the reality is that you hardly have time to feel intimidated by impossibly smooth pros or pesky, fearless kids. The priority is rather the safe engineering of your own controlled fall. Exhaustion, laughter, sweat and the sheer beauty of the summit tend to blind-out any awareness of others. There is a blanketing effect: studded into the wash of white silence are people of all ages and sizes and nationalities who, when wedged into the same bulk and armed with the same clobber, all become a generic, faceless ‘Skier’ swooping by in a gasp of snow. Anyone can join this mountain world (she says, recalling her own regrettably Bambi-like countenance on skis!). It is an adults’ playground where one is permitted to revert back to the impish childhood glee of slides and swings. The thrill everyone seeks is the same. It is that momentary, short-lived high you queue up for at the fairground. Only on the slopes these short bursts of gliding elation are mere punctuation for an otherwise free hurtle down the side of a mountain. You grasp desperately, not onto the tried and tested safety-harness of a rollercoaster, but onto the faint, garbled words of your old skiing instructor rattling around in your brain and the two wooden planks underfoot as you attempt to dodge down the motorway of skiers and boarders, utilising any last strength left in the ends of your muscle fibres to reach the bottom. And go up again. However, a long ordeal of shuffling and schlepping it may be, but there is something magical about the ownership you feel as you slice into untouched snow, the novelty of reclining jacketless in the sun at 2000m, and the freedom of a wall-less panorama that overwhelms you with a life-affirming sense of the infinitely possible. The exact manner in which you make it down the hill becomes irrelevant. You are there, you are going for it. Who’s going to stop you?

A MEANINGLESS MINEFIELD OF NOTHINGNESS by Maddie Kilminster Encased in the middle of a square in Berlin are the spirits of the lost Jews of Europe. There they sit, petrified in regal rows and columns sprouting uniformly out of the cobbles on the ground. At first glance the varied topography of the site is not apparent. A visual deceit; the grey blocks appear like a bleak yet calm sea of stones that, through some sort of underground quake, have been thrust up and displaced to form a steroid-infused pavement. It is only as you drift between the blocks, further into its majestic maze, striving towards an imaginary centre, that the lurking depths and craters within its folds claim you their prisoner. You squeeze down the channels and corridors with no clear way out. Sudden inclines and foxing drops are inflicted upon you. Paranoia sends in foot-soldiers in the form of fellow lost souls who flash past a few rows down like spirits in the corners of your eyes. You are robbed of all sense of orientation, of clarity, of yourself. A prison, a metropolis, a graveyard – this is a nowhere place. This is nothing. This place is, like the universe, a random unintelligible mass of rock which, when subjected to logical interpretation, only tiptoes further and further from your grasp. The search for meaning sends you off on its wily path of trickery bearing many a baffled victim at its release. Like genocide itself, it is an arrogant riddle which belies explanation, empathy or understanding. You sink, you fall, you disappear. You become an arbitrary fleck of flesh drifting in between a monotony of blocks. Genderless, identity-less. A meaningless minefield of cold nothingness. A graveyard for baffled minds to which the cruel world makes no longer sense.

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UN ÉTÉ INVINCIBLE by Robyn Adam Have you already booked your holiday this summer? Maybe you’re graduating and want to head off somewhere exotic, or maybe you just want to fill your time so you don’t have to spend summer with your parents? Whichever, here are some holiday spots to whet your appetite for summer. ISLAND HOPPING IN CROATIA With over 1000 islands in Croatia, there’s sure to be an island for everyone. From Hvar, the trendy celebrity favourite, to Makarska, which boasts amazing nightlife, including an old WW2-weapons-base-turned-club, and Mljet, which has some of the best views on the whole Dalmatian Coast. There are plenty of companies offering organised trips on budget or luxury yachts, providing the trip of lifetime spent partying the night away with like-minded people from all over the world. If you want to push your independence to the limit, however, island hopping independently is affordable and easy in Croatia; ferries and catamarans run daily between most islands and there are plenty of hostels to suit every budget. Make sure to spend a few days visiting the capital Zagreb and the beautiful walled city of Dubrovnik RELAXING IN LAOS If you’ve just experienced the most stressful year of your life (final years, I’m looking at you), how better to relax and recuperate after it all than in peaceful Laos? After the twelve hour flight to Bangkok and the transfer to the capital Vientiane of course… If you can squeeze in time between lounging by the banks of the Mekong River and indulging in herbal saunas, make sure to visit Xieng Khuan, a riverside meadow filled with giant religious statues. For an action packed holiday head to the North, where kayaking, rock climbing and tubing are popular and where most tourists gather in Laos to party. In the misty mountains of the far northeast you’ll find Hua Phan province, the centre of communist Laos and the place to get your brain working again (if you can handle it). One of the main attractions of Laos is of course the delicious food; a little like Thai food and incredibly cheap, the tradition is to serve all the food at once, rather than in courses so you can enjoy the whole variety of tastes straight away. A LITTLE CLOSER TO HOME If you’re just way too knackered after all the exams, or way too unorganised to plan going away anywhere exotic, there are plenty of ways to enjoy what’s on offer a little closer to home. An often overlooked place of outstanding natural beauty, Wales offers a great choice for anyone looking to exercise their body after so many months of exercising their mind. The first attraction to mention is, of course, Snowdon; the highest mountain in Wales, located in Snowdonia National Park. With one of the most stunning views in the whole of Britain it is well worth a climb to the top along one of the many paths, or if you didn’t manage to resist the revision snacks, there’s a train to the top as well. Climbing is also so good on Snowdon that the north flank is affectionately known as ‘Cloggy’. For those who want to try climbing in a more controlled environment, Merthyr Tydfil offers the international climbing centre. Another activity that you can take as fast or slow as you like is kayaking. There are mountain lakes, rivers and canals all over Wales but one of the must-sees for any kayaker is the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct at Llangollen, which features a 40ft drop on one side down to the River Dee! And if you still haven’t had enough of the views, make sure to head up Pen-Y-Fan in the Brecon Beacons. On a clear day you can look out over most of South Wales.

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CULTURE MEMOIRS OF FRENCH INDOCHINA by Emily Stacey If you study French you may know that you can speak French in various parts of Africa and the Caribbean, but what you may not know is that there are many French speakers in South East Asia. When I went travelling last summer to Vietnam, Cambodia and Laos, I discovered that there was a lot of French history in these places, which I never knew about. French Indochina was formed back in 1887, and started out with Vietnam and Cambodia, with Laos joining in 1893 with all three countries becoming independent by 1954. In Vietnam’s Capital Ho Chi Minh City (formerly Saigon), the French built a replica of their famous cathedral, Notre Dame, called Saigon Notre-Dame Basilica. Building started in 1863, and all the building materials were imported from France, with the noticeable red bricks for the outside coming from Marseille. The ancient temple Angkor Wat and the surrounding temple complexes are one of the main tourist attractions in Cambodia. Watching a sunrise or sunset there is a truly unforgettable experience, not to mention it was also featured in Angelina Jolie’s hit film Tomb Raider. It is thanks to a French explorer, Henri Mouhot, that Angkor Wat is so well-known in the Western world. His detailed drawings and descriptions of the temples made them into a source of wonder for us Westerners.

THE FRENCH BUILT A REPLICA OF THEIR FAMOUS CATHEDRAL, NOTRE DAME CALLED SAIGON NOTREDAME BASILICA

Sadly in Cambodia many of the older generation, who spoke French, were killed in the brutal Khmer Rouge regime in the 1970s. If you ever take a trip to Cambodia, you must take the half hour drive from the capital, Phnom Penh, to visit the Killing Fields site; it is an incredibly moving experience, which will completely alter your views of the country and the struggles faced by its people. The other lasting reminder of the French presence in South East Asia is the presence of really good French bread…. everywhere!

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ESPAÑOL MI PRIMERA HOMOFOBIA by Jake Hyslop El año pasado, estuve en Granada, la ciudad con más erasmus en todo el mundo. La vida granadina fue la caña. Lo que más deseaba hacer en mi estancia en España era ir a Marruecos, dado que estaba tan cerca. Siempre he querido ver las maravillas árabes como la torre Hasan de Rabat, los mercados de Marraquech y el ajetreo de Casablanca, y mirando la alhambra en todo su esplendor solo me enamoré aún más y reforcé mis deseos de sumergirme en la culture magrebí. Cogí un avión desde Málaga, y menos de dos horas, ya estuve en África. Atravesé el largo y el ancho del reino encantador por los viejos trenes que son de su propio mundo, estaba como si no solo me había trasladado en otro continente, sino también a otra época. Aunque Marruecos es un país más desarrollado y seguro que sus países vecinos, antes de que llegara tuve algunas preocupaciones, porque nunca había visitado un país pobre antes, pero estaba sorprendido agradablemente por la hospitalidad y amabilidad del pueblo marroquí en mayor parte. Conocí a unas personas muy interesantes en los compartimientos de los trenes, unos me contaron historias fascinantes, hablando en una mezcla de francés, inglés, español y hasta un poco de árabe; otros me compartieron galletas.suyas. En el último tramo del viaje, de Casablanca hasta el puerto de Tánger, desde donde navegaría de una columna de Hércules a la otra, me encontré en un compartimiento tan diverso como la nación. Dentro era una vieja mujer tunecina judía, que parecía como un protagonista de Harry Potter, regresando hasta su país después de haber hecho m ás investigaciones sobre todos los pueblos de las montañas marroquíes, una joven a la moda volviendo a Tánger tras un fin de semana de compras en el París del Magreb, y un viejo que encantaría que había encontrado alguien con quien pudo practicar su inglés. Me contó toda su vida, incluyendo unas mentiras, a menos que de verdad voló en un globo aerostático con Richard Branson, y fuera el fundador original de Club Med pero lo dejó todo a su amigo, el dueño actual, y al final, a cinco minutos de nuestro destino, me dijo que sus hijos ahora viven en Australia, y él también vivió allí unos años, pero que regresó a Marruecos porque el país estaba yéndose al garete; porque hay demasiados homosexuales. No supe que responder, mi pequeña burbuja de paz mundial, ese compartimiento con musulmanes, judíos, cristianos, mujeres, hombres, viejos, jóvenes todos amigos durante esas cuatro horas, se explotó. Y repentinamente Marruecos no parecía tanto de bienvenida, y estaba alegre de estar atracando en Algeciras unas horas después. Nunca había sido testigo de la homofobia antes, y estaba tocando el cielo sobre la alhambra con las manos cuando llegué de nuevo a Granada. Y fue en ese momento que mi nueva ciudad me pareció como mi casa, y siempre aprecio la tolerancia que existe en Inglaterra y en España.

ME ENCONTRÉ EN UN COMPARTIMENTO TAN DIVERSO COMO LA NACIÓN

Lo que más que destacó de esa experiencia fue que, aunque de vez en cuando el año erasmus puede parecer difícil e incómodo, y por más que surjan problemas y dificultades en los otros países de Europa, no debemos olvidar los derechos, las comodidades y las libertades de los que disfrutamos. Así que cuando estés tirándose de los pelos en Madrid, Lyon o Viena, acuérdate que al menos eres afortunado que estás en Europa, continente libre.

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РУССКИЙ BEATLES IN RUSSIAN CHURCHES by Natalia Alyukova In one of the Russian cities, Vologda, the citizens can now hear the new music coming from the bells of Saint Sophia Cathedral. The traditional melodies are sometimes replaced by the tune that some recognize as the classics of British rock – ‘Yesterday’ and ‘The Yellow Submarine’ performed with around 26 bells. Gregory Pavlov, who is in charge of the ensemble, introduced the idea because he believes he should use any opportunity to widen the range of what can be played on bells. He has been a fan of The Beatles since childhood and is trying to adapt their legendary songs to the bell ringing. The belfry of the Saint Sophia Cathedral is 80 m tall and is the biggest one in Vologda, which means that everyone in the city can hear the bell rock concert. Right now they can hear only the rehearsals though; the official concert is scheduled for May when the weather is better. The ensemble is planning to adopt and perform the ‘The White Album’ if they manage to find the right sound of the bells for each note.

BEATLES в русских церквях В одном из русских городов Вологде жители могут услышать новую музыку, исходящую от колоколов Софийского собора. Традиционные мелодии иногда заменяются мотивами, которые некоторые могут узнать как классику британского рока – 'Yesterday' и 'The Yellow Submarine', исполненные на примерно 26-ти колоколах. Григорий Павлов, руководитель ансамбля, ввел эту идею, поскольку считает, что нужно использовать любую возможность, чтобы расширить диапазон того, что можно сыграть на колоколах. Он был фанатом The Beatles с раннего детства и пытается адаптировать их легендарные песни на колокольный звон. Колокольня Софийского собора, высотой в 80 метров, является самой большой в Вологде, что означает, что все в городе могут услышать колокольный рокконцерт. Правда, прямо сейчас можно услышать лишь репетиции, официальный концерт запланирован на май, когда погода будет получше. Ансамбль собирается адаптировать и сыграть ‘The White Album’, если им удастся найти правильное звучание колоколов для каждой ноты.

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Guild of Students ‘Outstanding Society 2013’!


DEUTSCH DER MYTHOS DES AUSLANDSJAHRS by Maddie Kilminster Nach fünf Monaten in alter Germania ist mir viel beigebracht worden; unter anderem wie man sich mit Recycling und Pfand umgeht, und geduldig für die Ampel wartet (von gröβter Wichtigkeit!) Aber das, was meinetwegen am wichtigsten gewesen ist, ist die Entwicklung meiner Deutschkompetenz. In dem Tratsch der Fremdsprachstudenten hört man oft das Versprechen beziehungsweise die Prahlerei, dass ein Auslandsjahr einem automatisch die Fähigkeit gibt, flüβig in einer Fremdsprache zu reden. Aber in der Wirklichkeit fördert deises Versprechen leider falschgeleitete Hoffnung. Es geht überhaupt nicht um Zauberei sondern um regelmäβiger Schuffterrei. Ich musste irgendwie genug selbstdisziplin aufbauen, um jede neue gehörte Redewendung aufzuschreiben, und zwar zu lernen! Dank dieser Methode (egal wie zeitraubend und oft mühsam) habe ich Tag für Tag Verbesserung beobachten können. Nach einem Paar Wochen, begann ich ein Muster in meiner Sprache zu entdecken. Für jeden Anlass hatte ich kurze Ausdrücke gesammelt, die am besten zu der Situation passten und Fremden den allerdings kurzzeitigen Eindruck gaben, als sei ich Einheimische! Solche häufig verwendete Ausdrücke sind folgendes. Im Supermarkt: “Zettel bräuchte ich nicht”, im Restaurant beim Bezahlen: “stimmt so”, wenn man Andere essen sieht: “Mahlzeit”, am Ende eines Gesprächs “schönen Tag noch”, und “gleichfalls”, um seinem Gesprächspartner auch etwas Schönes zu wünschen. Am kurzsten aber auch am aussagekräftigsten kommt zuletzt mein Lieblingswort: “Na”. Mit oder ohne Fragezeichen kann diese kleines süβes Wort so viel andeuten (“so”, “yep”, “well”, “well then”, “right”, “OK?”, “fine”, “sure thing”, “of course” und sogar “how’s it going?”) wofür die tollpatschigen und entschlusslosen Briten eher zehn verschiedene Worte brauchen! Wenn ich sage, dass mein Vokabularschatz gewachsen ist, übertreibe ich nicht. Das Gefühl, mit echten Bürgern flieβend und ohne Miβverständnisse reden zu können ist etwas Besonderes. Man empfindet eine einzigartige Verbindung zu Menschen anderer Herkunften und anderer Kulturen, die nur wenige Leute erleben. Mit denjenigen, die auch versuchen, Englisch zu können, teilt man zusammen die gleichen Kämpfe und Freuden und hilft einander mit ‘Insider-Tipps’. Die deutschen Jugendliche haben mir auch in die Welt der Umgangsprache gebracht. Mit Hilfe von solchen Ausdrücken wie “voll geil” (awesome), “abgefahren” (crazy), “krass” (sick/wicked), “spinnst du?” (are you crazy?), “dein Ernst?” (are you serious?), “naja”/“wie auch immer” (whatever), “geht” (it’s alright) und “was geht ab?” (what’s up?) kann ich mich jetzt als deutsche Gangsterin äuβern! OK, ich gebe zu, jetzt übertreibe ich ein wenig! Aber wie alle leidenden Fremdsprachstudenten es kennen, fühle ich mich nie mit meinem Kompetenz zufrieden. Nach einem Gespräch hätte ich immer etwas besser oder anders sagen können. Mir zufolge, egal wie viel Lob ich bekomme, kann ich mich immer verbessern. So ist das Leben eben, eh?

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NEDERLANDS AMSTERDAM: THE CITY OF COLOURS by Susanna Georgiou and Myrto Bartatila We just got back from four amazing days in Amsterdam, and it made us realise even more how much we love travelling. When travelling to another country, even for a couple of days, it is always a challenge. And we love challenges. The biggest concern sometimes though is the language. So we – a group of four friends – arrived at Amsterdam Airport, took the train and finally arrived at our destination, Amsterdam city centre. Everybody there speaks perfect, fluent English (seriously!) so we didn’t face any difficulties in communication which is something very important when travelling. We have asked a friend who has visited Amsterdam a couple of times in the past to give us tips on places we should visit while in the city. He just told us: “just go there, take a stroll, enjoy each and every step and view and then just lose yourselves around the city.” And so we did. We were actually walking for four days; we walked all around the city and we really enjoyed it. Amsterdam is known as one of the most progressive and cosmopolitan cities in Europe and it is, without a doubt, one of the most charming and beautiful cities we have visited so far. Bicycles everywhere, canals, and fantastic, narrow, coloured houses are the main characteristics of this amazing city. There are a lot of ways you can explore the city, either on foot or by bike but another great way of doing this is by canal boat. The trip on the boat was relaxing and incredible and we would definitely recommend it to anyone who wants to go sightseeing in the famous Dutch capital. There are cafés with tables on the pavement and by the canals, where you can sit, enjoy the amazing Dutch beer or coffee, relax and observe what is going around you: birds flying and landing at the trees nearby, bikers everywhere, boats in the canals, people walking or even groups of people dancing and singing in the streets. So Amsterdam has a combination of natural, cultural and urban elements and it is wonderful. Amsterdam is steeped in culture and its variety of museums such as Anne Frank’s house, Van Gogh, Rembrandt or Rijkmuseum are a must for someone who loves art. However, although not everybody 'loves' art, some things go beyond art itself and touch the sphere of the aesthetically beautiful and of education. The Van Gogh museum, for instance, impressed us. Van Gogh is one of the most famous and unique artists. The vivid colours of his painting capture your attention and the landscape or nature-related paintings are more than great. For those who get to see it, art in that form resembles travelling, and in the same way that travelling makes you a more open-minded person and broadens your view of the world, so does art. It is only after you pay a visit to a museum that you realise how art can touch your soul and broaden your mind. From the vivid colours of Van Gogh's painting we went on to see another vividly coloured part of this amazing city, the widely known Red-Light District. For those not familiar with this particular part of Amsterdam, for the present article, it is enough to say that it is an odd place for someone to visit, but nonetheless a unique place, and maybe even one of a kind. Lastly, the most beautiful part of the city was Jordaan. Such a beautiful area! Whoever visits Amsterdam must go there. The little shops, the cafés, the cheese shops! And the locals' houses! One of us was constantly saying "I would love to live in such a house! How beautiful!" All of us, each for a different reason, fell in love with Amsterdam. The ‘vibe’ of the city is amazing! It makes you feel welcome. It is a very strange city in the sense that whatever kind of person you are, you will find something there that will attract you and in the end you will say that it was an amazing city… All you have to do is get a map and start wandering!

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Guild of Students ‘Outstanding Society 2013’!


ITALIANO POLSKI STEREOTIPI ITALIANI: FATTO O FINZIONE by Denise Vitali Spesso il mio essere italiana in un altro paese mi porta a confrontarmi con gli stereotipi che da questo nascono, come il classico “oh italiana, pasta, piazza, ciao bella!” (è successo spesso, credetemi). Ma stavo pensando se ci siano degli stereotipi magari non troppo conosciuti, qualcosa che, se proprio devo sentirmela dire, mi porti un po’ di “freschezza”. E quindi me ne sono uscita con questa piccola lista. 1.

2.

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5. 6.

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8. 9. 10.

Gli italiani sono rumorosi, parlano un sacco e per farlo usano molte le mani? Vero. Noi italiani tendiamo ad essere logorroici, ma a nostra discolpa voglio giustificare tutto ciò dicendo che è solo perché siamo molto amichevoli! E' anche poi vero che siamo rumorosi, ma questa nostra rumorosità sta in quella che gli stranieri spesso tanto apprezzano e definiscono musicalità della nostra lingua. E che dire del nostro continuo usare le mani mentre parliamo? E' solo un modo per enfatizzare ciò che stiamo dicendo e che le semplici parole non potrebbero esprimere. Le persone sono accoglienti e calorose. Non importa cosa stia succedendo, la tipica famiglia italiana ti riempirebbe il piatto più e più volte (soprattutto se hai a che fare con una nonna!). Darti da mangiare è il modo degli italiani per farti sentire a tuo agio e dirti che gli piaci. Il calcio. Oh sì, il calcio è come un Dio per gli italiani, soprattutto per i ragazzi. Domenica mi dici? Si guarda la partita ovviamente. Il pranzo è un vero e proprio pasto. Panino o insalatina al volo? in rare occasioni, a pranzo si ci siede giù a tavola e si magia propriamente (e probabilmente è questa la ragione per cui i negozi sono chiusi tra le 12.30 e le 15.30/16. Ci dispiace lavoratori infaticabili, ma il pranzo non si tocca!) A scuola si sta sempre e solo nella stessa aula. Ogni giorno passi il tuo tempo a scuola con lo stesso gruppo di persone e sono i professori a cambiare in base alle diverse materie. Storia, arte e tradizioni? Niente di più vero. Insomma, avete visto le nostre città e tutti i bellissimi monumenti lì presenti? E se quelli non urlano arte da ogni singolo loro vecchio poro, non so cos'altro possa farlo. Le tradizioni poi sono qualcosa di cui spesso andiamo fieri. Un esempio? Le signore anziane del sud Italia che nei mesi caldi si siedono sull'uscio di casa a sgusciare legumi o che fanno ogni tipo di conserva possibile ed immaginabile tutta da sé (la mia dolce nonnina ne è un esempio). In Italia sono tutti cattolici e si va a messa tutte le domeniche? Da smentire. E’ vero che la maggior parte della popolazione italiana è cattolica, ma è anche vero che non andiamo a messa tutte le domeniche. Il fatto che il Vaticano sia in Italia e che il Papa stia lì non ci rende automaticamente dei perfetti cattolici! Sì, la famiglia ha un ruolo molto importante. E no, non siamo abbronzati tutto l’anno. Se poteste vedermi, senz’altro sareste d’accordo con la mia affermazione. I ragazzi italiani sono romantici e Casanova? Falso! Ci sono parecchi bei ragazzi, ma questo non implica che siano anche romantici! Non sto dicendo che non ci siano ragazzi romantici, ma ragazze badate ben che non sono tutti così! Quanto all’essere Casanova e al loro infallibile successo con le donne, avrei da ridire anche a riguardo. Tutti gli uomini, indipendentemente dalla loro origine, pensano di conoscere il segreto per conquistare una donna. La mia domanda è, lo sanno davvero? Ah, e per chi non lo sapesse ho letto da qualche parte che Casanova è il nome attribuito a una neurosi maschile che descrive un’incurabile patologia di narcisismo. Se sia vero o meno non lo so, ma so senza dubbio che secondo quest’ultimo punto di vista molti uomini italiani potrebbero essere chiamati Casanova.

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ελληνικά TOP 5 REASONS TO VISIT CYPRUS by Susanna Georgiou BEAUTIFUL NATURE: Cyprus is blessed with sunshine all year long and with beautiful beaches with clear blue water and glittering sand. The Akamas peninsula, Limassol, Paphos, Protaras and Ayia Napa are home to exotic and amazing beaches and are definitely worth exploring. In Cyprus you will find great places in the mountains and small picturesque villages such as Lemythou and Troodos Mountain. The beauty of Caledonia Falls, a waterfall in Platres, will definitely amaze you. LOCAL CUISINE: Cypriot cuisine is based on Mediterranean and Middle Eastern style due to the fact that the island was colonised from time to time by different countries. Plenty of seafood, fresh fruit, vegetables, olive oil and meat are a characteristic of Cypriot cuisine. Halloumi, the famous cheese of Cyprus, is amazing! If you have a sweet tooth then you should try the delicious, hot loukoumades (mini-doughnuts dripping in honey syrup). LOCAL WINE: Cyprus is also home to the oldest wine in the world, Commandaria. This sweet, red wine has a rich flavour which will make you want to drink it all the time. You can also enjoy the wine festival in Limassol that takes place every year in late August. WONDERFUL TOURIST ATTRACTIONS: Cyprus is full of history and in every city you will witness parts of the ancient mysteries of the island. It also holds three UNESCO Heritage sites: Paphos, Choirokoitia and Painted Churches in the Troodos Region NIGHTLIFE: Restaurants, clubs, bars, and cafés for all tastes can be found everywhere. Ayia Napa is a must if you like clubbing, with a lot of nightclubs ready to welcome you with different sounds and rhythms and will make you dance until the morning hours. In Limassol you will definitely have a great time in the Old City. This part was renovated recently and it is now full of stylish cafés, bars, shops and restaurants around the Old Fishing Harbour.

GREEK CUISINE—”AN AFFAIR TO REMEMBER” by Myrto Bartatila I do not know if it is only me, but whenever Greece is mentioned there are a couple of things that instantly come to mind. Well, yes, sunshine, the beautiful landscapes and the beaches are amongst them. Greece is (rightfully, if I may say so) famous for all of the above. But there is another thing known to only those who have had the chance to visit Greece and literally ‘taste’ it. I am referring to food, of course. Greece is one of those countries that has a variety of products made only in Greece and many others produced by other Mediterranean countries too, but that still preserve their unique flavour. Let’s start with the one and only feta. You need Greek milk and the specific procedure to make this kind of cheese. You can eat it alone or you can use it in a lovely Greek country salad or in a pie with spinach or in other foods. One can only know what I am talking about if one tastes it. Other kinds of cheese, equally tasty but less well-known are anthotyros, kefalotyri, mizithra and metsovone.

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Along with cheese one must mention Greek-style yogurt (widely called in UK), the basic ingredient of the famous tzatziki. Its texture and flavour are one of a kind and its benefit to wellbeing is also one of its attributes. Then there is this product called mastic of Chios. It is produced by trees in Chios and before cutting them they resemble ‘tears’. It is used as a flavour in chewing gums, in liqueurs and in a delightful spoon sweet called vanillia. Besides its use in food, mastic is also used to make soap and cosmetics, among others. Also, there are ouzo, tsipouro, and raki. I am sure most people have at least heard of ouzo. Their strong and unique taste is hard to forget. They are traditional drinks and if prepared by experts the quality and taste of the drink can send you on an amazing tasting adventure. Ouzo is more widely known and most people prefer it, but I think it is because of its milder flavour only.

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Guild of Students ‘Outstanding Society 2013’!


CHINESE 汉语 BRITISH INVASION by Chloe Saunders ‘Brit style is the thing for the cool young Chinese’, we take a look at why British style is invading China. ‘The super luxury brands are out mate’ says Gibson Wu, a 28 year old events manager, in an accent that is both cockney-esque and might feature in Downton Abbey. “Classic Englishness, that’s in”. What he means when he talks about Classic Englishness is a subset of ying lun (English style), which in its simplest form, is characterised by the Union Jack and can be spotted these days on hipsters in many Beijing and Shanghai shopping complexes. The Chinese are getting good at copying styles and making them their own. A recent dip in the sales of global luxury brands in China has been accompanied by a rise in popularity of smaller British labels such as Mulberry, Ted Baker and All Saints. But where does this inspiration come from? “Like the pirate radio stations that helped the sexual revolution of the sixties in the UK, pirated versions of British pop culture have revolutionised the lives of young people in China” says Wu. At the same time, an estimated 80,000 16-34 yr old Chinese visited the UK last year, including a large number of students. And 56,000 Chinese children now attend British schools, two and a half times the number of five years ago. It seems overseas study is the hidden reason for British style takeover.

BRITISH STYLE HAS BEEN FULLY EMBRACED BY THE CHINESE

There are some unchanging aspects of British culture that get lost in translation. Dressing in a waistcoat and flat cap, has nothing to do with class, for example. China is still a predominantly pluralistic country, a benefit that Victoria Beckham will have noticed when she realised her vast Chinese fanbase would not know the difference between ‘posh’ and ‘Posh’. So it seems British style has been fully embraced by the Chinese, while we cannot guess the longevity of this fad in China, ying lun continues to reign in the Chinese mode de la vie. What else is there left to say but Rule Britannia!

CHINESE STREET STYLE Shamate – a Chinese fusion of goth and post-punk based on Japanese rockers. Essential accessory: Black eyeliner. Tu Hao – Meaning ‘local tyrant’ it refers to the nouveau riche who dress ostentatiously but without much style. Essential accessory: Gold iPhone 5s.

Wenqing – Like hipsters but without the alternative lifestyles or beards. Essential accessory: a long dress. Gongti Fan – Named after a Beijing nightclub area, they could have taken their style cues from Geordie shore with plenty of makeup and lots of flesh. Essential accessory: a very very short skirt.

Ming Yuan – Favoured by Shanghai trendsetters, it’s a metropolitan look to the point of being fey. Essential accessory : a mink coat.

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JAPANESE 日本語 HARAJUKU FASHION by Grace St John Lolita is the most popular Harajuku street style in the world, with one of the largest events ‘Frock On’ taking place in the UK last year. Unlike the novel, Lolita fashion is not about being promiscuous and dressing childlike, but takes its inspiration from Rococo and Victorian fashion and has a variety of sub-styles, the most popular of which are Classic, Sweet and Gothic, ranging to Sailor and Guro. The fashion is typically dresses or skirts with lots of lace and frills, however there is a boy style (Ouji) which is unisex and has a gothic feel, featuring trousers and braces etcetera. Usually there are a lot of rules to Lolita such as petticoats and wearing blouses under certain types of dresses. Famous Lolita brands include Baby the Stars Shine Bright, Angelic Pretty, Innocent World, Alice and the Pirates and Moi-Meme-Moite. Fairy Kei as the name suggests incorporates girly and fairy-type styles; it is a fantasy style and sometimes inspired by ‘Magical Girls’. The colour palette is pastels (pinks, blues, purples etc.) and is often multi-layered and very cute. Motifs can include unicorns, Carebears, My Little Pony, stars and other cute things. Whilst Lolita has strict rules, Fairy Kei has much more freedom to experiment and create DIY items, and rather than wearing wigs girls are more likely to dye their hair bright colours to match their style. Brands include Spank!, Swimmer and 6% Doki Doki. Cult Party Kei; the name originates from a shop in Harajuku called ‘Cult Party’ which has now been renamed. It mixes vintage styles with modern elements to create a multi-layered look usually topped off with a vintage nightgown. Colours tend to be muted but once again there are no real ‘rules’ to the style and you can have ‘Cult Fairy Kei’ or even dark styles. Often girls make their own accessories to go with their outfits – as long as it’s layered, anything goes. Brands include Tokyo Bopper and The Virgin Mary. Shironuri meaning Painted in White, has recently become more popular due to the artist Minori wearing her version of Shironuri. Once again the only ‘rule’ to Shironuri is that your face is painted white – usually with similar make-up to geishas and some Japanese stage actors. Minori’s Shironuri style is Mori/Cult Party Kei inspired, and featured a lot of layers with forest elements – she will often have flowers on her face or leaves in her hair. Dark Shironuri styles are very popular, ranging from demon inspired horns and monster make-up with dark wigs and hand-crafted accessories to black school uniforms with a more plain white face. Other famous Shironuri artists include Tsunoshi, N.96 and Kaze Taka. There are online communities and meets for all of these fashion styles!

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Guild of Students ‘Outstanding Society 2013’!


YEAR ABROAD SPECIAL TOP TIPS ON STUDYING ABROAD IN SPAIN by Olivia Doyle Hi, I’m Olivia and I’m currently on my year abroad in Madrid. For those of you who already know their placements for Erasmus year and are preparing to embark upon the year of a lifetime, here are some things you may not already know about Spanish culture (at University) and my top tips to maximize your year abroad experience.

GET INVOLVED Spanish students are rarely at home, from morning until night they are out studying, having relaxing long lunches and generally socialising and being out on the scene. In order to ‘aprovechar’ your experience you should act the same! Do anything that anyone ever invites you to; this is your time to try things you never could back at home.

DAILY ROUTINE If you want to adapt to the Spanish lifestyle and time schedule you should eat dinner between 8 and 11 o’clock..

TALK TO YOUR PROFESSORS AFTER CLASS In Spain the exam papers and essays are not anonymous, so a bit of conversation to get the professor to remember you is a way of ensuring that you get good marks. Although it may not be a particularly fair method of guaranteeing yourself the best grades, when in Rome...… . .

FASHION No Spanish student would go to Uni in a hoody wearing their hair scraped back and tracksuit bottoms, nor with the traces of last nights’ makeup lingering on their face or stinking of alcohol. No, if you want to blend in with the locals here get yourself down to the nearest Zara or Mango and go to University well dressed..

CREATE A CV AIMED AT PRIVATE TEACHING There is a huge demand for English teachers in Spain at the moment, and you can take advantage of this situation whilst making a bit of extra money to help fund all that sangria and tapas. For private lessons you can charge anywhere between 10 and 20 Euros, not bad for an hours’ work.!

TRY TO ORGANIZE YOUR TIMETABLE SO THAT YOU HAVE FRIDAYS AND/OR MONDAYS OFF You will need the long weekends to recover from hangovers after leaving clubs at 6 am and of course for seeing all of the sights this beautiful and culturally rich country has to offer!

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ANNOUNCEMENT THE LINGUIST TEAM 2014-15 So another year is over and we are saying goodbye to our 2013-14 team! We’ve had a great year with 3 issues of the magazine being published and being shortlisted for the ‘Engaging Hard to Reach Students’ category at the Guild awards. For those of our team leaving us this year, we wish you the very best for the future! However we are happy to announce a wonderful new team for The Linguist Magazine 2014/15: COMMITTEE Chair: Maddie Kilminster Secretary: Susanne Hartmann Treasurer: Joel Mitchell Social Secretary: Kirsten Peters Roebuck Publicity: Natalia Alyukova Creative Design: Adele May

German: Catherine Dawkins Greek: Susanna Georgiou and Myrto Bartatila Italian: Ciaran Cresswell Japanese: Arisa Lee Life and Style: Daisy Lindlar Polish: Pawel Pokorski Russian: Natalia Alyukova Spanish: Olivia Doyle Travel: Yashi Banymadhub

EDITORS Chinese: Nick Lanigan Culture: Clare O’Driscoll Current Affairs: Susanne Hartmann Food and Drink: Dom Phipp French: Pierre Greenhalgh

OTHER ROLES

Some of our team at the Guild Awards 2014

Design Assistant: Dom Phipp Proof Reader: Yashi Banymadhub Deputy Proof Reader: Clare O’Driscoll

CONTACT US If you would like to know more about our magazine, our writers or have comments to make about our articles then feel free to check out our Facebook and Twitter pages or email us. If you wish to read more articles check out our website. We’re always looking for new writers and contributors, so don’t hesitate to get in touch. Unless specified, photos do not belong to The Linguist Magazine (UOB)

THE LINGUIST MAGAZINE LINGUIST_MAG THELINGUISTMAGAZINE LINGUIST@GUILD.BHAM.AC.UK THELINGUISTMAGAZINE.ORG


Issue 8  

May 2014's issue of The UoB Linguist Magazine

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