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STORY TELLING SINCE 1992

The Lexis Observer Autumn 2013

A collection of stories we have crafted for our clients mixed in with some of our own views

DIET COKE AND FASHION

ARTISTIC WAVE

WE ARE NOT THE STARS

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What’s the big idea? ACTIVE SEX LIVES OF WOMEN OVER 50 WOMEN OVER 50 ARE HAVING SEX AS REGULARLY AS THOSE IN THEIR 20S, AND ONE IN FOUR SAY THAT THEY ARE ENJOYING IT MORE THAN EVER, ACCORDING TO NEW RESEARCH. By Sam Marsden The idea that women swap passion for peace and quiet as they get older is dispelled by a survey that found over-50s in the 21stcentury to be happier and more adventurous than previous generations. One in five older women in Britain said they had sex at least once a week, the same proportion as their 20-something counterparts. They were also nearly as likely to use dating websites, with 11 per cent

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going online to meet a new partner compared to 15 per cent of women in their 20s. Turning 50 was found to be a positive landmark for most women questioned. Half said they felt happier with their lives and the same proportion reported that they got more enjoyment out of spending time with their partners. Far from slowing down, older women are staying more active than those in their 20s, with two in five having started the Zumba fitness programme in the past year. Nearly a

quarter of over-50s are hoping to try a new sport in 2013, compared to just one in six of their younger counterparts, the online survey of 1,500 women aged between 20 and 65 found. Marica Carleschi, marketing manager for lingerie brand Playtex, which commissioned the research, said: “It is fantastic to see so many women in their 50s enjoying life more than ever.

This year at the Cannes Lions, the f lagship ma rketing and creativDan Leach Creative Director ity festival, 19 Gold Lions (and one Grand Prix) were handed out within the PR category. How many of those were given to PR agencies? Less than half! Is this because advertising and integrated marketing agencies have suddenly overtaken PR agencies in terms of creativity? Have they cracked the code to what makes a great PR idea? In my opinion, no. But, what is happening is we are seeing the rise of a new type of idea – the BIG earned media idea. Traditionally when brands think of PR their mind instantly goes to press coverage. And why not? For years column inches and AVE have been the lifeblood of PR agencies. However, the way consumers now engage with brands has shifted to such a degree that we now have multiple channels through which to communicate to, affect behaviour of and prompt action from our audiences. This is why the concept of the earned media idea is

so powerful. It’s not about what idea will generate lots of press coverage, but what idea will generate lots of press coverage, social media conversation, word-of-mouth, online content, footfall, trial and sales. Two examples of great earned media ideas include Red Bull Stratos; and the Pope’s Harley-Davidson blessing (managed by Lexis). Both delivered a unique experience for their audience that generated unprecedented levels of content, coverage and conversation for both brands respectively. Agencies with a background in PR, such as Lexis, have the ideal skill-set to transition to delivering on earned media ideas because at the heart of what we do is fantastic creative storytelling. We’ve been crafting stories that interest the media for years, now we are crafting brand stories that consumers can directly engage with and respond to. If brands continue to ask for a PR idea, they are limiting the creative response to a set of very traditional parameters. For those that want to think big, they should be asking, “What’s the BIG earned media idea?”

FEATURE 02 NEWS 02—03 LIFESTYLE 04 DIGITAL 05 TRAVEL 06 FOOD & DRINK 06—07 FASHION 08—09 SPECIAL FEATURE 10 SPORT 11—12

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Which one stop shop does what? After twenty years in marketing I have seen several “ages” : The Uber Ad Jason Gallucci CEO Fame Game, The Dot Com Bubble, The WAPP Wave, The Lifetime Value Phase and now we are well and truly in The Digital Age. During that time every type of marketing agency has had to continuously change and update themselves to try to meet clients needs. Some times minor surgery is required, other times a complete identity transplant is in order. We are no different and several years ago began a brand review of what we do and where we are going to ensure that we can offer our clients the best consultancy and services for the next fifteen years (as part of the Next Fifteen Group it seemed appropriate!) What we saw when we looked at the marketing landscape was that the rise of digital to mass market consumption levels had changed life for ever for everyone. This is not a fad and there is no going back. We also realised that unless agencies evolved, they would eventually risk becoming extinct. We knew that, enabled by smart phone penetration, consumers want 24/7 immediacy in everything, and have constant connectivity to their social circles for advice, information and status building. Trust had eroded with advertising and people are turning to their ‘5,000 closest friends’ for the truth. Brands realise that if they can somehow tap into this socially powered word of mouth ripple, they can potentially reach audiences for a fraction of the cost with far greater engagement. Added to that, digital means data and data

means proof so the idea of message or content “trackability” means that one can show sensible spending in a recessionary economy – which keeps the boss happy. Yes, Content is king and Shares and Likes rule but it is the Influencers – whoever they are – who steer the masses. The real crown jewel however is content that carries a call to action. If 1 Direction tweets that they love brand x and that their fans should try it, brand x can expect an avalanche of orders from their 10 million “Directioners”. Yet CMO’s did / do not know which agency to turn to for help. There was and is a critical question being asked up and down the land: Which type of agency is the right one to advise our brand on Earned Media Marketing? The advertising agency has also been the lead agency for 50 years. 90% of spend went on TV (so along with media buyers they were naturally very important) and they provide/d marketing strategy as well as film creation & production. However, they are experts on bought media – not earned. Choosing a digital agency as lead seems like a sensible option. But most are really build specialists stuffed with people that can program in many languages and build fantastic digital destinations, but can they be trusted with an integrated marketing strategy? Then there are the PR Agencies who either manage a brand’s corporate reputation, relationship with various publics or are press office or publicists depending how you define PR. (The industry itself is still arguing over it!). However, the enlightened know that good PR agencies create the story – not just promote it and that it can be as big or small as the budget dictates.

Coca-Cola are a great example of a brand that knows how to use PR to create ‘engaging experiences’, along with most of our other clients. So the market has gone through a period of a few years when CMO’s knew what they wanted but didn’t really know which agency had the right skills to lead. And this is still the case today. We are now seeing a convergence of agency skills into one-stop-shops. Ad agencies are buying digital and PR shops. Digital agencies are buying in ad people. PR agencies are doing “Social Media” too etc. We have been moving towards this ‘hybrid collective’ structure too. Over the last few years we have been strengthening our content, social and experiential divisions to try to offer more joined up solutions. We have produced our first TV ad, created virtual reality polar bears, locked a famous band into a studio for 24 hours, projected onto a naked celebrity and even got the Pope to bless a product. However, the point of this ramble is to pose a deeper question. When CMO’s are faced with a choice of onestop-shops, which one will be the right one to choose? Each cluster will have a heart and a core skill that will drive everything that they do. So, Advertising lead, Digital lead or PR lead? Consider this, earned media is about creating a brand story – whether a film, game, stunt, sponsorship or partnership - that is designed in such a way and with the right ingredients, that it will be shared by the right influencers to their followers along with a resounding personal endorsement - and all without payment. I know what type of core skill I would recommend!

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Seabass to win grand National By Andy James A University of Cambridge maths whizz is backing Seabass in Saturday’s Grand National - after creating a formula that predicts the winning horse. William Hartston, 65, forensically examined the names and ages of all victorious nags from the event’s 174 year history. And he discovered winners are most likely to have names that are just one word, and begin with S, R, M, or C.

Furthermore, the names usually consist of eight or ten letters - closely followed by seven or 11 - and the horses are typically nine or ten years old. Mr Hartston used these results to develop a scoring system, which allowed him to rate the 40 horses that will line-up at Aintree Racecourse on Saturday. He will now back the bookies’ 9/1 second favourite Seabass after it scored an impressive 13 points out of a maximum 16 on his scale.

Racing ahead: Seabass, with Katie Walsh on board.

Harley-Davidson fans from across the world gather in Rome to celebrate the brand’s 110th anniversary with a blessing by Pope Francis


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Lexis bolsters CR and sustainability offer with two senior hires Lexis announces two new senior appointments to its multi award winning CSR and Sustainability practice, Glasshouse Partnership. Sophie Brooks joins as Consultant Director to develop the Glasshouse proposition, grow the business and take a lead role across the existing client portfolio and integrate the division more closely into

the Lexis core offering. Sophie has 20 years in the corporate communications and CSR field having been MD of AugustOne Communications and having held various senior international positions at Text 100. On leaving AugustOne, Sophie specialised in consulting and undertook CSR and sustainability projects across a

number of businesses including Coca-Cola Enterprises, Microsoft, Jordans Cereals and Conservation Grade Farming. Prior to joining Glasshouse, Sophie completed an MSc in Climate Change and Development from University of Reading. Appointed as Senior Associate Director in Glasshouse is Eleanor Turner.

Eleanor joins Glasshouse from Tesco where she held the position of Group Corporate Sustainability Manager, following a period spent in Thailand, heading up the corporate affairs team at Tesco Lotus. After beginning her career in politics, working in the European Parliament and House of Commons, Eleanor moved

into consultancy, joining the corporate and public affairs team at Mandate (now MHP) working for clients including Cadbury, and EDF Energy. Eleanor will be leading the Glasshouse team on a day-to-day basis and delivering multi-channel campaigns across all clients.


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Lifestyle

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Lifestyle Feature

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The ageless generation About five years ago, I remember watching Arrabella Weir and Marilyn Wicks Director her contemporaries on the TV show ‘Grumpy old Women’ and wondered why such spunky, funny and glamorous women were bemoaning how being over 50 suddenly meant they had become invisible. Whilst they made light of their laughter lines, the odd grey hair and their drooping figures, it seemed that being overlooked by society was their most bitter pill to swallow. In the intervening years, influential women in the media, including newspaper columnists, newsreaders and broadcasters have all railed against the lack of focus on what 50+

women really want. Retail guru Mary Portas was so incensed by the lack of inspiring fashion for the stylish older woman, that she went as far as creating her own collection for ‘Grown up Women’ – now available in House of Fraser. Scroll forward to today and it’s beginning to look like a very different picture. Images of older women are now commonplace on our screens and billboards, with marketers on fashion and beauty brands such as M&S, Dove, American Apparel and Nars leading the way by featuring beautiful, confident older women in a way we’d never seen before. Only this month, we read that after three years of relentless and focussed marketing to a 50+ audience, iconic lingerie brand Playtex has been applauded by Marketing magazine for their “fantastically upbeat and positive

approach to an audience that many brands talk to in a less than vital way”. Playtex’s ballsy approach, spearheaded by a campaign devised and activated by Lexis, tackled the myths of the 50+ women head on. Findings from new research were deliberately provocative, revealing that Britain’s 50+ women are more happy, vivacious and adventurous than ever before with one in five women over 50 having sex at least once a week (the same amount as women in their 20s). Being a 50+ woman myself, I obviously delight in this mind set shift. Many of us are at the peak of our careers, with grown up children at home and parents still around and active. For many years, marketers were youth obsessed, but in the next 20 years, 50% of the UK population will be over 50 and marketers would be crazy to miss the business opportunity that this savvy and adventurous ‘ageless generation’ can offer.

Grumpy Old Women: Television series


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Digital Feature

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What caught our eye Mentos the Freshmaker: Makes Facebook news about you.

It is always interesting to see how brands are finding new ways of utiOlivia McMonagle lising soSenior Account cial media Executive as part of their brand strategy and this month, Mentos’ “Fresh News” campaign has really caught our eye for doing just that. As part of their wider “Stay Fresh” campaign, Mentos have created a personalised news bulletin based on consumers’ Facebook data. It comes in the form of an app that accesses your Facebook to see what you’ve been posting about lately – status updates, relationship statuses, photos and people’s comments on your wall – and then three news anchors present comical news items

personal to you. The bulletins make up a 24-hour news channel that serves up a constant stream of humorous news reports by pulling in material from users’ updates on Facebook and connected social media accounts, including Foursquare. Two news anchors present a satirical show highlighting a user’s recent escapades, and emphasizing how “fresh” the subject may or may not be, depending on what he or she has been posting lately. With Mentos’ core audience being heavy Facebook users and part of a generation that are very interested in using social media to project their sense of self, it is good to see brands acknowledging this and incorporating it into their digital strategy.

Content is king, but fans hold the power – the rise of the influencer According to a recent Nielson study, and rather unsurprisingly, social media is currently the most common use of smartphones and tablets. Tied nicely into this is a piece Lucy KenyonJones of research from Cisco that Account Director found that by 2017, YouTube video usage will be even more popular than Facebook and Twitter. This data pushes the trend for consumers no longer being a just passive audience but passionate influencers actively participating in driving value for brands – especially in a mobile format. No doubt, this already supports the point that fan-created content is vital to brands. The rise of user generated video content has been recently bolstered by the launch of Instagram Video, going head to head with its 6-second Twitter-owned competitor, Vine. Vine

footage has overtaken total Instagram shares on Twitter, but the race for branded content across these channels is still to be played for. With more and more brands dipping their toe in the branded content waters, the need to target a brand’s key influencers is becoming quite the hot topic. Lexis is forging ahead with some considerable momentum in this field since the launch of NOD3X™, a unique influencer listening tool that identifies key influencers for brands in real-time. Fuelling services such as video seeding, NOD3X™ is opening up exciting new opportunities for brands in both consumer and corporate sectors, introducing elements such as influencer programmes and highly targeted content placement whereby a video can be seeded directly to interested and influential, demographically and geographically targeted people who are likely to then re-share and act on the content.


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The Lexis Observer | Autumn 2013

Travel

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Food & Drink

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Edited by Stacey Jaffe, Associate Director


The Lexis Observer | Autumn 2013

Food & Drink

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Fashion

The Lexis Observer | Autumn 2013

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The Lexis Observer | Autumn 2013

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Fashion Feature

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Diet Coke and fashion

Diet Coke Limited Edition: Karl Lagerfeld.

For many, designer fashion is perceived as something spectacular, Xenia Xenophontos lu xur ious Associate and aspiraDirector tional but unattainable to those below a certain salary bracket. So what of the fashion designers that have collaborated with high street brands, immediately making their products accessible and affordable to all? Brand collaboration has become a popular way to bolster brand innovation, drive incremental sales of a product and generate widespread media coverage and word of mouth.

It has also allowed brands to align themselves strongly with the world of fashion whilst tapping into its core audience’s passion points and aspirations. Diet Coke has been collaborating with high-end fashion designers for over ten years. The catwalk-to-shop strategy that had been popularised by mid-market retail brands such as H&M and Topshop was first adopted by Coca-Cola back in 2003 when it collaborated with Matthew Williamson. This was a highly innovative collaboration in that many people didn’t expect a soft drink to become so fashionable. By giving an everyday item such aspirational style credentials, Diet Coke ensured its heightened

Image source: Viva Sofia

appeal amongst its core female audience. Designer collaborations have truly paved the way for fashion democracy and have lifted the velvet rope on the elite fashion club, providing access to consumers who aspire to buy into designer brands. There are cynics out there, many of whom believe that the era of designer collaborations has almost reached saturation point. But when a brand such as Diet Coke completely sells out of its new designer product within the first week of launch, there is something to be said of its clever marketing strategy and choice of designers with which to collaborate with. Lexis has been working with Diet Coke for over ten

years, helping the brand to build its ‘Lighter Approach to Fashion’ creative platform. Matthew Wiliamson was superseded by Patricia Field at the height of Sex and the City fame, Karl Lagerfeld, Jean-Paul Gaultier and most recently, Marc Jacobs all of which have been hugely successful for the brand. Together, we have helped to market Diet Coke with a fashionable twist and developed high impact campaigns that have built a cult following of fashion-loving female consumers. The designer collaborations we have worked on have helped to keep the brand relevant and drive deeper consumer engagement. So, do we believe that the notion of designer partner-

ships is tired and out-ofdate? Absolutely not. On the contrary, they have helped to offer Diet Coke’s core audience access to some of the most talented and well-respected designers of the fashion world. Lexis believes that the formula for Diet Coke’s success is rooted in a true symbiosis of its understanding its core audience’s passion points and by aligning them with its own brand values – both of which are fashionable but with a lighter and more accessible approach. It is this like-for-like approach to collaborations that continues to ensure the ongoing success of one of the world’s most iconic brands.


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Special Feature

Jack Schilling Account Manager

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One of the objectives for Harley-Davidson is to connect with new audiences and showcase the brand through the lense of urban culture. We helped develop the Art of Custom campaign to highlight Harley’s impressive heritage in customisation and individuality, which was an ideal parallel with the vibrant street art scene in Miami. Art of Custom took the Harley-Davidson brand into modern, artistic, urban territory and as shown by the coverage and sales impact of the campaign, we certainly took the first steps in delivering this.


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Sport Feature

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Influential role models to get women fit Brands have been using ambassadors for years to engage an audience, Rebecca Hargreaves penetrate the Account Director media and deliver brand messages. Last month’s Sunday Times #FitNotThin campaign to inspire more women to get active was no different, however I thought it was particularly clever in it’s choice of ambassadors. Ambassadors are chosen because of their influence and this is down to media profile, relevance to brand and topic, and celebrity status. The topic that The Sunday Times was addressing is getting women active; therefore the obvious choice to address this are the heroes from London 2012 such as Jessica Ennis-Hill and Victoria Pendleton. However, the initiative launched with Daisy Lowe on

the front cover of Style magazine looking gorgeous, healthy and confident and this was followed up with contributions from Laura Bailey, Jade Parfitt positioning exercise as cool and aspirational. A clear shift from who you’d imagine to be fronting an exercise campaign. I think The Sunday Times really understood the audience and who influences them. The target audience is inactive women who don’t exercise, are not interested in sport and are unlikely to aspire to be the next Rebecca Adlington. These women look up to celebrities and fashion icons that are glamorised across the myriad of channels. So using the likes of Daisy Lowe to talk about her exercise regime will change the audiences opinions to working for a healthy body as she has the right reach, resonance and relevance. In the sports team we know our sector and audience inside out, however, we are also scientific in our approach. Lexis

owns a unique platform called Nodex that allows us to identify the individuals across all online platforms, including media, blogs and social channels, who are influencing discussions on a topic in real time. So in the case of #FitNotThin once we know the calibre and shortlist of ambassadors that we want to work with, it would give us intelligence on their reach, relevance and resonance to the target audience, ensuring that the campaign delivers behaviour changing results. Getting more women active and excited about exercise is such an important issue so it was great to see The Sunday Times take a fresh approach and I think their choice of ambassadors was spot on. Using icons that women admire and read about in style magazines to discuss how they get fit, will encourage women to take on board these messages and make important changes to their lives.


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The Lexis Observer  

A collection of stories we have crafted for our clients mixed in with some of our own views

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