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September 6, 2013

(800) 657-4665 www.TheLandOnline.com theland@TheLandOnline.com P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002

NORTHERN EDITION

High temps are tough on us, but the corn is soaking up the heat Stories on Page 1B


Guest commentary

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Red-headed woodpecker recovery P.O. Box 3169 418 South Second St. Mankato, MN 56002 (800) 657-4665 Vol. XXXII ❖ No. XVIII 48 pages, 2 sections, plus supplement

OPINION

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COLUMNS Opinion Farm and Food File The Outdoors Table Talk Pet Talk BBQMyWay Bookworm Sez Calendar Back Roads Marketing Mielke Market Weekly Auctions/Classifieds Advertiser Listing

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STAFF

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

By RICHARD SIEMERS The Land Correspondent From out of the past comes a fiery red-head with the speed of light, a flash of black and white, and a hearty “rat-a-tat-tat.” The red-headed woodpecker. I apologize for that dramatic outburst, but sighting a red-headed woodpecker as a farm boy was as exciting as it was to hear the Lone Ranger come on the radio years ago. It is even more exciting these days. The excitement is intensified because it is such a rare occurrence. There has been a precipitous decline in the number of red-headed woodpeckers over the past 40 years. There are states in the eastern United States where the bird is listed as “threatened” and even “endangered.” In the Midwest, numbers have declined close to 50 percent during those 40 years. These facts are among the information Red-headed Woodpecker Recovery has on its website, www.redheadrecovery.org. Red-headed Woodpecker Recovery is a project of the Audubon Chapter of Minneapolis and was initiated by two members with a background in bluebird recovery. Jerry Bahls, who is now president of the Audubon Club, was the first coordinator, a position currently filled by Chet Meyers. The loss of such a flashy bird would be sad, but the project is about more than saving a colorful creature. “The loss of any species impacts on the health of the environment,” Meyers said in an e-mail interview. “We are just too ignorant to appreciate all the implications.” But we aren’t ignorant of the causes behind the drop in numbers. It is loss of habitat. As the website explains, red-headed woodpeckers need a specific habitat — oak savanna with snags. Oak savanna has mature trees with an open understory where red-headed woodpeckers can catch the beetles, grasshoppers and other insects of their diet. Snags are dead trees with large limbs to accommodate cavities for nesting. The Audubon Club of Minneapolis is working with Minnesota Department of Natural Resources NonGame Division and the University of Minnesota’s Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve on Redheaded Woodpecker Recovery. Efforts at Cedar Creek have shown that if habitat is provided, the redheaded woodpecker will come. But even there the numbers fluctuate. According to Mary Spivey, education coordinator at

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: Special feature, 6A-10A — Farm Stress: Agriculture is a dangerous industry, and some of that danger is psychological

Cedar Creek, spotters located 32 nests in their 2013 annual count, down from 50 nests last year. Jim Howitz is a researcher in the red-headed woodpecker study at Cedar Creek, and shared his experience in e-mail correspondence. He told how by placing a feeding platform near a nest, they were able to trap and band 50 birds with a unique combination of colored bands so individual birds could be recognized, helpful since “males and females look just alike.” Males and females also share duties equally — excavating the nest, incubating eggs and feeding the babies. “One of the dangers red-headed woodpeckers face is vehicle traffic,” Howitz said. “We found three woodpeckers killed by collisions with vehicles along the county road that adjoins the study area. One of the birds killed was a female who had babies in the nest. See WOODPECKER, pg. 3A

14A — Ugandan visitors wowed by scale of U.S. agriculture 15A — Controlled tile drainage garners interest at Farmfest 2013 9B — Technological advancements continue to meet production demands


Fighting over what’s COOL; shut up, butt out, get lost

OPINION

Well, says the multi-national Meat Gang, shut up, butt out and get lost. Moreover, the NPPC and NCBA said the exact same thing to every American cattleman and hog farmer when the groups joined the lawsuit: We know what’s best for American cowboys and hog farmers, so just shut up, butt out and get lost. Here’s a better suggestion: U.S. cattlemen and hog farmers should give the narrow-based, meatpackerallied NPPC and NCBA the heave-ho. COOL is a huge winner for U.S. farmers and ranchers; that’s why our competitors and packers hate it. Besides, when did it become not COOL to be an American farmer and rancher? Alan Guebert’s “Farm and Food File” is published weekly in more than 70 newspapers in North America. Contact him at agcomm@farmandfoodfile.com. ❖

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encourage recovery. Red-headed Woodpecker Recovery has found nesting pairs on small abandoned farmsteads, so stopping their removal and maintaining other wooded spots is a first step. Other areas such as parks, cemeteries and golf courses can provide habitat — if they will tolerate some dead trees, which Meyers admits is not an easy sell. If golfers and others sight a red-headed woodpecker occasionally, perhaps a few dead trees would not seem unsightly. As for the safety issue, the website advises how to trim trees so they are not so likely to blow down yet maintain the large branches in which the woodpeckers like to nest. The loss of wildlife can be caused by human activity, so human activity can also aid its recovery. Redheaded Woodpecker Recovery needs the public’s participation to be successful From out of the past come memories of a striking red, white and black creature flashing through the air. The red-headed woodpecker flies again! With our help. Log on to www.redheadrecovery.org for more information about the group’s mission. ❖

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”

WOODPECKER, from pg. 2A The male took over all the parental duties and fed the nestlings for another 20 days until they left the nest and then until they could fend for themselves.” Several of the birds would come when they spotted the researchers, hoping for the treats they put on the feeding platforms. “Some even follow us around, expecting a handout,” Howitz said. “The birds are a challenge but also a delight to work with.” Real recovery, however, must go beyond the Reserve into the general countryside. What Redheaded Woodpecker Recovery looks for are clusters, defined as three nesting pairs within a quarter-mile radius. In the past, clusters have been recorded at golf courses, Camp Ripley and other private areas. (There’s a location map at their website.) Private landowners will play a big role in the bird’s recovery. Loss of habitat due to urban sprawl and intensive agriculture is the primary reason for the decline in numbers, Meyers said, though there may be other factors we don’t understand. What is understood is that providing habitat will

And what of advancing the interest of American consumers who like knowing that their ground chuck came from New Mexico, not Old Mexico, or the pot roast on tonight’s menu was raised somewhere in South Dakota, not somewhere in South America?

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Recovery needs public participation

Curiously, the lawsuit’s key argument is as American as a Nebraska-raised steer. The COOL rule, it suggests, “... violates the U.S. Constitution by compelling speech in the form of costly and detailed labels on meat products that do not directly advance a government interest.”

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

On Aug. 27, the late-summer heat of who, too, say the USDA labeling rules Washington, D.C., was spit-roasting locals must be dumped. and tourists alike up and down PennsylIn effect, these groups, the National vania Avenue. Pork Producers Council and the National Inside the U.S. District Courthouse, a Cattlemen’s Beef Association, are telling half-block off the main thoroughfare and American consumers, who favor COOL by just three blocks from the U.S. Capitol, a 4-to-1 margin, and American red meat however, all anyone from Mexico to producers, who stand to gain huge leverCanada could talk about was COOL, the age in the U.S. retail meat market, to shut American law that requires U.S. food sellup, butt out and get lost. ers to reveal — label — the country of ori- FARM & FOOD FILE Nuts, right? gin of the meat they sell. By Alan Guebert You’d think these self-crowned leaders The courthouse crowd argued over of American hog and cattle producers COOL because earlier this year, in would actually stand with American response to a World Trade Organization hog and cattle producers on labeling ruling, the U.S. Department of AgriculAmerican pork and beef in America. ture rewrote the labeling law to be, it says, more After all, it is the law; Congress approved COOL in WTO-compliant. 2002. Not so, claimed some of COOL’s chief opponents, The hitch, however, lies with the groups’ big budlike the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association, the dies, the Big Meatpackers. The packers hate COOL Canadian Pork Council and Mexico’s National Conbecause it prevents them from commingling foreign federation of Livestock Organizations, who, in July, and domestic animals in feeding operations and at filed a federal lawsuit to stop it. slaughtering plants which, when killed, chilled and It’s not surprising that Canada and Mexico, and boxed, can then be peddled as U.S.-sourced no matter their respective livestock organizations, would fight the origin. labeling laws that tell Americans what they put in That opaqueness is willful, profitable and — to their roasters, skillets and grills may not be Amerimost consumers — deceitful. can-bred, fed or butchered. Not to Big Meat and its Washington, D.C., lobbyIndeed, both nations are sovereign powers whose duty is to protect the interests of their citizens by all ists, the American Meat Institute, American Associalegal means. If that includes suing the USDA in U.S. tion of Meat Processors, North American Meat Association and the Southwest Meat Association. All federal court over meat labeling rules that almost joined the American livestock groups and Canada certainly will affect sales of Canadian and Mexican and Mexico to sue the USDA in an effort to kill beef, pork and poultry here, well, game on. COOL. The entire lawsuit is posted at What is surprising, however, is that the foreigners www.meatami.com/ht/a/GetDocumentAction/i/92223. have as co-plaintiffs two American livestock groups

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Commentary: State farmers are national champions The following op-ed, written come all kinds of obstacles by Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayand survive serious setbacks. ton, appeared in the Redwood Last year, hot, dry weather Falls (Minn.) Gazette on Aug. 8. caused severe drought condiWhen I was growing up, I tions, which damaged some heard a story about how the farmers’ crops and destroyed legendary University of Minothers throughout our nesota football coach, Bernie nation’s farm belt. This year, Bierman, recruited big, Mark Dayton cold, wet weather ruined strong players for his hay crops and delayed national championship other plantings. teams. And when it’s not the Reportedly, he drove through Min- weather, it’s Washington. The continunesota farm country in the spring- ing failure of Congress to pass a new time. When he saw a young man farm bill, almost a year after the old one walking behind a plow, he stopped ended, prolongs the uncertainties for and asked for directions to a nearby everyone whose livelihoods are affected town. If the young man pointed with by those policies and programs. his finger, the coach drove on. If, howNevertheless, throughout Minever, the farm boy lifted the plow to nesota’s 155 years of statehood, point the direction, Bernie recruited through all kinds of weather and polihim to play football at the U! tics, two things have remained Whether or not that story is true, it unchanged. tells the truth about the strength and First, agriculture has remained the spirit of Minnesota farmers. Today’s life-giving bedrock of our state’s econagriculture requires not only physical omy — supporting more than 340,000 strength but also many other skills, to people and delivering over $7 billion in manage complex businesses, over- high-quality agricultural and food

OPINION

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I’m pleased to say that strong support for Minnesota’s farmers is not a partisan issue at our state capitol. In the three legislative sessions since I became governor, agriculture bills and budgets have passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. exports last year alone. When farmers do well, businesses on Minnesota’s Main Streets do well; and our entire state economy grows stronger. Second, farmers remain among Minnesota’s great heroes — for their willingness to plow through adversity, for their endurance of Mother Nature’s misfortunes, and for their faith and courage to do it all again next spring. Farmers have been essential to our state’s past success, and they will be even more crucial in the future. That is why the triumph of American agriculture in today’s competitive, cut-throat world economy has been so extraordinary — and so important. Farmers’ costs-of-production continue to rise,

from wages, to machinery, to energy. Yet, through their quality, innovation and plain hard work, they continue to outperform the rest of the world. I’m pleased to say that strong support for Minnesota’s farmers is not a partisan issue at our state capitol. In the three legislative sessions since I became governor, agriculture bills and budgets have passed with overwhelming bipartisan support. Last spring, we agreed to invest an additional $18.5 million in the Agricultural Growth, Research and Innovation Fund — a fund dedicated to keeping Minnesota farm production on the leading edge in an ever-changing world. Our investments will aid farmers in developing new methods of production, support research on the next generation of biofuels and help our schools to purchase more high-quality food from local farmers. We also passed a first-in-the-nation voluntary Ag Water Quality Certification Program to partner with farmers to improve our state’s water resources. Farmers are our first and foremost stewards of the land. Here in Minnesota, we are working together to keep our agricultural production the world’s best, while also protecting and enhancing our environment. That kind of cooperation and innovation is the Minnesota way. It’s why our farmers are National Champions! ❖

MPCA water management plan open for public comment The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency announced a public comment period, from Aug. 19 through Sept. 17, on proposed changes to the Minnesota Nonpoint Source Management Program Plan. The NPSMPP contains strategies that help protect and improve the quality of Minnesota’s water resources by identifying activities to reduce nonpoint sources of water pollution, such as runoff from agricultural lands and unregulated urban areas. The MPCA is implementing a fouryear, phased approach for revisions to the 2008 NPSMPP. The following are highlights from the phase currently open for public comment. • Watershed Planning and Management Framework, • Overall Strategy for Each Water Resource, • Monitoring,

• Nine Key Elements of a Successful Nonpoint Source Management Program, and • Needs, priorities and milestones, action plan tables for several areas. Updating the NPSMPP every five years is a requirement for Minnesota to remain eligible to receive federal Clean Water Act funds. For more information and copies of these documents, log on to the MPCA’s Nonpoint Source Management Plan webpage, www.pca.state.mn.us/tchyb3c. All comments must be received in writing at the MPCA’s St. Paul office by close of business on Sept. 17. Comments should be sent to Denise Leezer, MPCA, 520 Lafayette Road North, St. Paul MN 55155-4194 or to denise.leezer@state.mn.us. Questions may be directed to Leezer at (651) 7572523. ❖


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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Farmers have hard time recognizing own limitations By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Veteran farm therapist Ted Matthews has shared time with many farmers. He knows the quirks that often typify a farmer’s action. When talking about the stresses of modern day farming he shared a most common observation. “Most farmers, especially during the planting and harvesting seasons, tend to overestimate their durability. They simply do need more sleep.” Conversely, Matthews said, farmers who don’t need as much sleep think extra sleep is being lazy. They then push themselves harder and that is a setup for potential disaster.

So who’s most guilty of pushing the envelope and not knowing — or acknowledging — their own limitations? Matthews’ consulting experience with the Farm Business Management Program tells him that older farmers tend to push harder. Yet because of better equipment and much more technology he contends there isn’t the need to crank up like there used to be. “Admittedly those old habits die hard,” he said. Matthews said another social change going on in rural Minnesota is “Kids used to take over the farm when Dad got into his late-50s, early 60s. And that was basically because Dad’s body was wrecked by that age, especially if he was a dairy

farmer. But now thanks to technology both in farming and medicine, Dad can farm ’til he’s 85 if he wants to. A lot of them want to do just that and that conundrum is creating some social or transitional changes which is putting new stresses on both Dad and the family.” What’s the impact of education in this era of agricultural stress? Does the “better-educated” farmer push harder because he thinks he can, and should? Farm consultants hesitate to make a call on that issue, but Matthews suggested the value of sons going off to college before returning to the farm because “if they listen to their father, and father listens to them, between the two of them they can come up with some pretty good ideas.” The readily identifiable problem in many farm family relationships, however, is that most young people today

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don’t have the patience to listen, and many older folks tend to think the youngsters aren’t old enough to have opinions on these issues. “Both sides have some work to do in this area of mutual respect and understanding,” he said. Will a farmer voluntarily bring up stress issues, whether that be mental, financial, even family and marital concerns? Not likely. But because Matthews functions as a “third party” in these disagreements he’s the unbiased listener with which a father or son can discuss issues in confidence. “The father will listen to me even when I’m quoting to him directly the very comments of his son, and vice versa. That also relates to wives and daughters who often are now part of this total team partnership.” See LIMITATIONS, pg. 7A

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It’s difficult to admit that you can’t do it all by yourself Most farmers, especially during the planting and harvesting seasons, tend to overestimate their durability.

— Ted Matthews

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the land chasing seems almost reckless and greedy, farmers have the biggest hearts,” Matthews said. He’s still somewhat amazed at agriculture’s predictable transition of sons taking over the farming business from their fathers. Matthews noted this tradition rarely happens in most other businesses. Even though this transition is often a stress-inducing environment, it is the very process that continues the tradition of family farming in Minnesota and rural America. “It is often easier to have a hired employee come to your farm for eight hours of daily labor than it is for father and son or father and daughter to comfortably work together because you have much higher expectations of your kids,” he said. So when a farmer realizes he’s in a “critical situation” whatever the issue, what’s the next move? How does he access a Ted Matthews or anyone else who’s gifted in listening before suggesting advice? Matthews said many, in fact most of his “counseling hookups,” happen because Minnesota farm business managers, or a rural banker or even a local Extension educator gets that farmer in touch with Matthews. “The reality is that it’s easier for a farmer to look at his neighbor and say ‘He needs help’ than it is for a farmer to look at himself and say ‘I need help’,” Matthews said. The other reality is that Matthews is indeed one of a kind. He is the Minnesota FBM program director of mental health, officed at the Morris office with

Ridgewater Community and Technical College. He’s been at this task since 1996 so probably can read the troubled minds of Minnesota farmers better than anyone. He prefers to be a ‘‘man on wheels” to visit farmers in their locale. “I prefer a neutral location ... and that isn’t in the farmer’s office. Nor is it the local coffee shop where most farmers seem to know every other farmer. We need some distance from the farm itself so the farmer has to drive to meet me. That sort of puts us both in a neutral environment. And that’s when a farmer is most honest with himself, and his conversations with me,” Matthews said. Summing up, he makes these observations: • The work ethic of older farmers seems stronger than that of younger farmers, perhaps because most farms used to have livestock. • Younger family members don’t realize when you quit you can’t just live on social security. • Retiring farmers often are willing to lend a hand to family members taking over the farm, but too often that “lending a hand” is like full time so the younger family members think they need only an eight-hour day on the farm. • Farmers have an incredible amount of pride. Their farm is their achievement which generates a tremendous focus on leaving it even better. • That pride also keeps them from saying “Good for me. We’re heading to the Bahamas this winter.” • It also keeps them from saying “I’ve got nothing to do. I guess we’ll take a vacation.” Matthews doesn’t charge for these discussion sessions. Call him at (320) 585-5671 or e-mail tdmatt@info-link.net. For more information log on to www.mda.state.mn.us/mfan or www.extension.iastate.edu/iowaconcern. ❖

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

LIMITATIONS, from pg. 6A Matthews noted that often the wife is more ready to retire from the farm than is the husband. “The reality is that it’s harder for the older farmer to slow down, than his wife. Let’s face the other reality of crop farming these days is that farmers are employed only for a part of the year. And what to do with this amazing amount of so-called free time is indeed a mental challenge.” What’s making this retirement issue more difficult? One reality is that often the wife is now the chief bookkeeper of the farming operation. She knows she has opinions and that generates controversy, Matthews said. “Men for a thousand years never had to argue with their women about what equipment to buy, but not so anymore,” he chuckled, adding, “make too many wrong decisions on equipment and you lose the farm. Yes, there’s lots more give and take on farm decisions than there used to be.” He advises his male customers that if their wife is doing the books how can you possibly not expect that she would have, and should have, an opinion since she is doing the numbers. He’s concerned about the aggressive attitudes of farmers when it comes to buying land. “Even though they all say that prices are getting out of hand yet as soon as that neighboring quarter comes up, they’re bidding,” Matthew said. He asks what happens when some bubbles start occurring? Also what happens if injury or illness or death suddenly occurs? Yet he marvels at the uniqueness of agriculture where if a farmer suddenly needs help, for whatever reason, almost as suddenly 10 tractors or 10 combines show up. “Neighbors show up, usually without even being called. They do what needs to be done for that farmer, that family. They don’t charge a dime. If you try to pay they would be offended. So even though

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“Where Farm and Family Meet”


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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Stress: Farming represents psychological hazard By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Could the growing stress of farming today be mostly of social origin? Mike Rosmann, well-known clinical psychologist living at Harlan, Iowa, points out farmers today work much more in isolation than previous generations. This lack of social interaction with neighboring farmers stymies their opportunity to “unload” thoughts and feelings. He said that farming has one of the highest injury-related rates for any occupation in America, annually ranking in the top 3. And if we include fishing and forestry as agricultural occupations, as the U.S. Department of Agriculture does, then farming is the most hazardous occupation. “But what most people don’t understand is that farming is also a psychological hazard because the suicide rate for farmers is higher than most any other work group. The suicide rate correlates directly with economic stress,” Rosmann said.

He points out a farmer’s among farmers has remained stable since behavioral health is linked the farm crisis era of the 1980s. with their economic success. Back in the 1960s and 1970s about 25 perBehavioral issues includes cent of farm couple marriages ended in things such as substance divorce, Rosmann said. But when the farm abuse, arguing and fighting crisis occurred, the divorce rate among farm among family members, as couples increased to about 40 percent, well as mental health diffimatching the rate of the general public. culties such as depression. Mike Rosmann Today’s rate is 44 to 45 percent but that also Substance abuse has always includes some second and third marriages. existed in farm living, however today So does this directly relate to economic concerns? He that abuse has worsened more indicated sociologists aren’t in full agreement about among younger farmers and primary cause factors of farm divorce rates. It likely teenagers in rural communities. does have something to do with the economic turmoil “The substance misuse rate among of family living these days. “Perhaps it also reflects farmers is about the same as for non- the changing structure of farm families,” he said. farmers after they reach their midDuring the farm crisis many farm wives started 30s,” Rosmann said. But alcohol has always been an issue with many farmers. They drink working off the farm, sometimes husbands also, and to numb pain and to lessen psychological stress. “If the farm population became more like the rest of you drink enough you don’t think about bothersome society. issues such as getting bills paid, crop losses, or bad “There’s a lot more similarity today in the social decisions about marketing.” structure of farm families and non-farm families,” he Perhaps surprising in view of the stress-related said. Plus, the “decision-making” process on many environment of modern farming, the divorce rate farms today now involves both husband and wives, and younger members of the family if they are transitioning into “membership responsibilities” in the operation of the farm. “We don’t have a shortage of farmers who want to ‘begin’, but we do have a shortage of farmers wanting to quit,” Rosmann said. He pointed out that farmers today farm into their 70s, even into their 80s, thanks to technology and enterprise opportunities that have substantially reduced the physical work load. Obviously these changes are causing some issues. “It’s human nature that children and parents see things differently, perhaps even more so among farm families, because farming is such a “hands-on” vocation. This strife often accelerates when someone who doesn’t have a country background marries into the family. Rosmann also pointed out that women today are entering into farming at much higher rates than formerly. “About 17 percent of all U.S. farmers today are now women and they are getting into farming at a rate twice as fast as men,” he said. The average farm size for women is about 220 acres nationally versus about 440 acres for farming operations owned/operated by men. Also women farmers are more likely to specialize in organic crops, specialized animal production (long-haired sheep, for example), or direct farm to consumer programs. He said that about two-thirds of women farmers are married. He also said about 40 percent of farm women are “secondary operators” such as going to the local Farm Service Agency office as needed, providing additional help hauling grain and fetching parts, etc. Seeking outside counsel How does a farmer find help? “More services are being offered through Extension; through Beginning Farmers programs; even through local churches in some situations. Minnesota has a Sustainable Farming Association directed by John Mesko. The number See HAZARD, pg. 9A


Stay open-minded, seek help of people who undertake transition planning is slowly increasing,” Rosmann said.

optimistic position. But agriculture could fall apart rapidly if grain prices decline considerably. My summary advice to farmers is that they need to stay ‘open minded’ about seeking outside counsel, preferably before the ‘stress syndrome’ starts ripping at their personal health, their family environment and their marriage.

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HAZARD, from pg. 8A

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Somewhat shocking is that about 40 percent of farmers have neither a will nor a transition plan, Rosmann said. The tax consequences alone can be huge for the Behavioral issues may, heirs. Rosmann suggested that getin fact, be related to a ting a will or transifarmer’s DNA, which tion plan in writing programs their ability, or should be an immelack thereof, to reach diate priority.

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“Feelings of success and coping are tied to the financial success of the farm operation. Behavioral issues may, in fact, out for assistance. be related to a Rosmann compliDNA, ments farmers on — Mike Rosmann farmer’s which programs their social awaretheir ability, or ness today. Obvilack thereof, to ously the explosion of social media via e-mail, Facebook, reach out for assistance. We now have Twitter and Smart Phones has speeded located on the human genome the site the entire process. So, too, has educa- which impacts depression, anxiety and tion, for most younger farmers have the struggles when things don’t go right. This bit of DNA helps us to be advanced training beyond high school. successful but it also has a cutting side “Beginning farmers today average that hurts us when we get to be over3.2 years of college. College-educated whelmed with difficulties.” farmers are more likely to develop a Rosmann is working on a text book business plan that does a systematic analysis of their operation. In a sense, that explains the new knowledge of they take advantage of the resources human genomics and the implications available better. Farmers without that of choosing a farming vocation. He has extra education might have a few more popularized the term, Agrarian Imperative, as genetically programmed hurdles,” he said. instincts which may be driving the Are we seeing more “behavioral decision-making processes of farmers health” issues among farmers because and would-be farmers. The objective is of the high stakes of today’s farming? to better understand the psychological “Yes, behavioral health of farmers is factors that affect the well-being of ❖ linked with their economic success. At people engaged in farming. present, U.S. agriculture is in a fairly

Vermeer named in Department of Energy grant award harvesting and collection equipment in the field, and improved biomass handling and processing equipment for biorefineries. The 16-member team named in the project represents industry, national laboratories, original equipment manufacturers and consulting companies who have established international reputations in the field of bioenergy and biomass production. Participants named along with Vermeer include Poet, ADM, Clariant USA, Monsanto, Pellet Technology USA, FDC Enterprises, Antares Group, Idaho National Lab, Virginia Tech, MacDon, Kelderman Manufacturing, Feedstox, Analytical Spectral Devices and B. Hames Consulting. A broader group of collaborators will also participate in the project’s activities. ❖

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Vermeer Corp. is announcing its involvement in a nearly $6 million grant award by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Department is making the investment to reduce costs associated with harvesting, handling and preprocessing biomass feedstocks. “This commitment gives Vermeer the opportunity to pull product development forward,” said Jay Van Roekel, Strategic Business Unit manager at Vermeer. “It gives focus to a developing product line, which will get the right solutions to a new market much faster.” The investment will focus on getting high impact, high quality feedstocks — such as corn stover and switchgrass — from field to biorefinery more efficiently and effectively. In total, it will build efforts to create more advanced


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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Q&A: One farmer’s viewpoint on farming stress farmers? By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Meyer: I don’t see indicaSac county, Iowa, farmer tions of increased behavioral Jim Meyer speaks from expeissues among farmers. High rience on the issue of farm land prices and higher cash stress. rent are causing some stress. However increased cash flow After graduating from Iowa from higher corn and bean State University, Meyer prices have caused over-optitaught vocational agriculture Jim Meyer mistic commitments. Farmers for a few years, then went into ag banking, before returning to the have been very successful at bidding home farm of pork production and up input costs until profit is non-existent. I am not hearing about threatgrain. He also served two terms as a state ened suicides like we had in the early representative in the Iowa Legisla- ’80s. Q: Are increasing debt loads a ture. The following is a Question & Answer session with Meyer on the contributing factor to increasing divorce rates within rural famitopic of stress. Q: Because of the high stakes of lies? Meyer: Marital disharmony comes farming today, are we seeing more behavioral issues among from two major causes: financial prob-

lems and lack of sexual compatibility. Successful farming operations include a business plan that involves all members of the management team. Farmers that do not involve their spouse are missing the boat. Not only are the spouse inputs valuable, but they are going to provide muchneeded support. This harmony will be there if everyone knows what is going on and why. The same is true of children and their spouses. Lack of transparency is like playing basketball with only one hand. You can do it, but it works a whole lot better with two. Most spouses have off-farm jobs or careers and the juggling of schedules and support for each other, as well as the kids, is so important. Q: Due to technology in both farm equipment and medicine, farmers stay healthy longer and farm longer. Is this causing strife with sons and daughters wanting to become farming partners? Meyer: The problem of fathers using sons and daughters as hired hands has been around since the sod was broken. This happens because Dad is insecure. He can’t stand to be challenged or have his judgment questioned. Thus those around him are not encouraged to share their management skills. Technology has been a real plus in involving the younger generation. Dad simply has to depend on the younger, brighter tech minds to make the equipment work correctly. One of the smartest plans I know is allowing young people to own and raise livestock and crops to earn money for more education or to buy into the operation. It always seemed to me it was easier to give up a little income over a 10-year period as the young people grow up, rather than come up with $20,000 to $30,000 the year a child wants to go to college, buy a house, or start a business. Q: Should outside counsel be a first step when farm families sit down to discuss a transition of the farm? Meyer: Another opinion is always good if you are secure enough to handle the comments. Most successful business operations use paid consult-

ants. These are doctors, dentists, tax preparers, crop consultants. We are also good at collecting as many pointers as we can for no pay. The role of consulting is very clear. If you are going to pay someone for advice, either pay attention and use the information as best you can, or fire the consultant. Q: Can farmers start with a visit to their county Extension office when they want advice on how to avoid a potential financial crisis? Meyer: Because of media, social and educational change, the county Extension office help has diminished. Extension still has some value, but requires a cell phone number of the specialist you need. As is the case with crop and livestock production, financial management help now comes from the private sector. It costs more, but the ones that are in business for three to five years or more are worth it. Q: Is there a substantial difference between the stress load of farming today versus 30 years ago? Meyer: Thirty years ago would be the 1980s. Except for the 1930s, farmers have never experienced more stress than the period 1975-85. We have a similar situation now with commodity prices, land prices and cash rent at a high level. I am sensing that there are enough of us who experienced firsthand that earlier stress period and are going to be more reserved. The stakes in production agriculture have never been higher. But ag loans are down, ag equity is high, machinery has been updated, mostly to excess. Homes have been built new or seriously remodeled, and bankers have basically lost control of farmer borrowing, because the equity is so great. All this “new equity” has allowed more land to be bought and rented, thus operations are getting larger. With good management, farm operations with 1,500 acres or more have a considerable net profit advantage. It is a different stress. We are stressed to stay on top, versus 30 years ago we were stressed to get off the bottom to stay in business. ❖


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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Ugandan visitors wowed by scale of U.S. farming By TIM KROHN Mankato Free Press LAKE CRYSTAL, Minn. — When Ssebaakijje Isaac Mukisa asked farmer Brad Leiding how many soybeans he produced on an acre of land, Leiding said he averaged about 50 bushels. The amount meant nothing to the Ugandan soy distributor until he and Leiding figured out a conversion of bushels to pounds and then kilos. “Wow,” Mukisa said. Mukisa and more than a dozen other bakers and food distributors were a bit overwhelmed by the scale and production of American farms. “In our country you grow maybe 10 acres for yourself, here you have thousands of acres,” Mukisa said.

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The group stopped by Leiding’s Lake Crystal, Minn., farm the evening of Aug. 11, after spending a week taking classes about baking with soy flour at the Northern Crops Institute in Fargo, N.D. The visit is aimed at encouraging the use of soy flour, which has a higher protein level and other benefits over wheat flour. Isaac Njoroge, a baker from Uganda, said farming there is only about 5 percent mechanized with most work done by hand. “The farms here are so much advanced, 100 times.” Dutliff Snyman, who owns a food consulting and distribution firm in South Africa, has been to America before but hadn’t before been immersed in farm country.

baked goods at markets, to large baking companies that buy soy flour by the shipping container. The use of soy flour has increased in recent years, in part because of a push to bring more protein-rich soy to developing countries by the World Initiative for Soy in Human Health. Josh Neiderman, of the Initiative, said the goal of the local two-day tour is to build relationships between those selling and using soy in Africa with those who are producing soybeans. “They just want to get experience on how soybeans are grown here.” The tour, co-sponsored by the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association, continued the next day with a tour of the Perry and Lou Ann Meyer and Tim Krohn/Mankato Free Press Justin and Jody Enter farms near A delegation of Ugandan bakers and food distributors hoped to build rela- New Ulm, Minn. There were also vistionships with U.S. soybean growers. its scheduled at the Klossner Feed Mill and a tour of CHS soy processing “For us, it’s amazing about the scope of your pro- plant in Mankato, Minn. duction. We’ve never seen this scale of farming.” Besides being a major producer of soybeans, the Yemisi Janet Enirayetan, a Nigerian food mar- Mankato area is one of the world leaders in soy proketer, said her company already sells a lot of soy cessing, with ADM, Cargill and CHS processing milflour. “Most of our bakers use soy, but they need to lions of bushels of soybeans into oils, flour and meal use wheat flour, too.” Those bakers she said, range for human and animal feed. from one-person operations that sell bread and other Leiding, who is on the Soybean Growers board of directors, said about half of Minnesota soybeans are exported, including a large amount of soy meal going to China for animal feed. The Mankato Free Press is a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖

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Controlled drainage aims to make big impact In a normal weather season, it might be difficult to measure yield benefits. But in a low-rainfall season yield advantages of 5 to 7 percent on corn and 2 to 3 percent on soybeans are likely.

— Phil Algreen

Rewind

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Obviously as slope increases, acreage controlled with a single unit tends to decrease. “The 2012 drought jumped interest in controlled drainage considerably,” Algreen said. “We’re seeing land owners install systems to fill a pond, develop a wetland area for duck habitat, but land prices and commodity prices are definitely putting drainage management systems into more and more crop land.” He said that cost-share money is available. He also said that producers are becoming more tuned into controlled water management because if something isn’t done voluntarily, it may become mandated by government agencies. This could happen because of unwanted byproducts of field drainage, specifically excess nitrates and phosphorous that ultimately enter creeks and streams, and negatively impact the environment. “You can measure a 30-percent to 60-percent reduction in nitrogen leaving crop fields once a drainage water management system is in place,” Algreen said. He said that between 12 million and 15 million acres of 1-percent-slope “flat land” exist in the Midwest, suitable for drainage water management. Working through your local Natural Resources Conservation Service is the starting point for receiving technical and financial assistance. The Environmental Quality Incentives Program, funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is the source of money for controlled water management projects. “Developing a plan through NRCS might cost $1,800 to $2,000. But EQIP covers about 75 percent of that cost and will also pay about $600 per structure, so financial assistance is significant,” said

Algreen, who noted that a drainage water management system would likely change the pattern of your new tile lines. Operating instructions spell out: • Before tillage, remove riser boards to drop water table levels about 10 days prior to planting fieldwork. • During the growing season, stack riser boards to raise the water table high enough to provide capillary water to the crop root zone. • Before harvest, remove boards to lower water table. • After harvest install boards to raise water table to hold nutrients in the soil over winter. Talk of the Gulf of Mexico’s “Dead Zone” continues to pin a large portion of ecological blame on Midwest farmers, but drainage water management offers farmers a way to control water; to fine-tune water delivery on a farmer’s terms. The objective is simple — Make drainage tiles work both ways: Take excess water off, or hold it back when needed. According to Algreen, the “Golden Rule of Drainage” is to drain only that which is necessary to ensure traffic ability and crop production, and not a drop more. For more information, contact the Agricultural Drainage Management Coalition. ADMC consultant Leonard Binstock of Waseca, Minn., can be contacted at lbinstock@admcoalition.com or (507) 4568872. The ADMC website is www.admcoalition.com. ❖

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Drainage Water Management is retrofitting an existing tile system with a water control structure which makes it possible for operators to directly manage water table levels. Thanks to some unseasonable dry seasons across portions of Phil Algreen the Corn Belt the past couple of years, drainage management is picking up interest. At Farmfest, Phil Algreen, representing the Agri Drain Corp. of Adair, Iowa, was talking controlled tile drainage. He said more research is now proving the merits of controlling the water table in your cropland, especially as it relates to better yields in a moisture-deficient season. But he cautioned, “there are a lot of variables when you start talking about controlled drainage. The weather is always changing and weather is the single biggest determiner of potential increases in crop performance because of managing the flow of water through your tile system. “In a normal weather season, it might be difficult to measure yield benefits. But in a low-rainfall season yield advantages of 5 to 7 percent on corn and 2 to 3 percent on soybeans are likely.” More water available to your crops when they need it is the thrust of controlled drainage. Initially recommended on soils of one-degree slope or less, systems are now being installed in fields of 2 percent. “Timing is critical in drainage water management,” Algreen said. “If you don’t save the water when it’s available, it’s simply too late. So you’ve got to have some anticipation, listen to local weather, and then react accordingly.” The number of acres a given flow control structure can handle depends upon the slope of your particular field, but the goal is to maximize that number. “And that’s why flatter is better,” he said, noting that if one structure can do 80 acres the cost is insignificant. A water level control structure costs on average about $700, Algreen said. The water gate, the buried unit that responds to the control structure, costs $600. He said 20 acres per system is doable in most situations but 40 acres is often a starting point.

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Know your Minnesota migratory bird hunting seasons Blue-winged teal, duck hunters will agree, are fair weather fowl. Come fall, the slightest frosty morning can be cause for the diminutive waterfowl to pack up and head for warmer climes. Indeed, some states hold THE OUTDOORS special teal-only seasons as early as mid-September to By John Cross allow hunters to target birds that otherwise might have migrated from the area only a few weeks later. In years past, when the Minnesota waterfowl opener was set at the Saturday closest to Oct. 1, many of Minnesota’s resident blue-winged teal already had flown the coop by the time opening day rolled around.

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Nevertheless, blue-winged teal, along with wood ducks — another early migrator — still comprise a good percentage of Minnesota duck hunters’ opening day bags.

migratory bird species.

While a special goose management hunt has been under way in parts of west-central Minnesota since Aug. 10, the special early September Canada goose season gets under way statewide on Sept. 1, continuThis should be particularly true for the 2013 MinThat means the duck season will run for 60 days in ing through Sept. 21. nesota waterfowl opener which has been set for north, central and southern zones, all of them openBag limits are 10 per day in the Intensive Harvest Sept. 21, less than a month away. ing on Sept. 21. Zone and five per day in the remainder of the state. The last time the duck hunting season opened so In the North Duck Zone, north of Highway 210, the Hunters should note that there are restrictions early was way back in 1945. Last year, the season duck season will run continuously through Nov. 19. about hunting within 100 yards of surface water in opened nearly as early — Sept. 22. While Minseveral locations including Swan Lake and surnesota’s duck season traditionally had been tied to In the Central Duck Zone, it will remain open an Oct. 1 reference, federal framework guidelines through Sept. 29. The season will resume Oct. 5 and rounding area. allowed for a season tied to the Saturday nearest to run through Nov. 24. The regular goose season will open with the duck Sept. 24. Shooting hours are a half-hour before sunrise until season statewide on Sept. 21. Bag limits are three per day. 4 p.m., through Oct. 5 and until sunset for the remainder of the seasons. The goose seasons will be closed in the Central and

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The season and structure which was announced earlier this month will remain essentially the same as last year.

The South Duck Zone, south of Highway 212, the duck season will also remain open through Sept. 29, before closing. It will resume Oct. 12 and then continue through Dec. 1.

South Duck Hunting Zones at those times when the duck season is closed.

Another change this year is that possession limits, which for years have been set by federal regulations to twice the daily limit, have been increased to three times the daily limit. The increase applies to all

John Cross is a Mankato (Minn.) Free Press staff writer. Contact him at jcross@mankatofreepress.com or (507) 344-6376 or follow him on Twitter @jcross_photo. ❖

In the North Zone, geese can be hunted through Dec. 16. In the Central and South Duck Zones, goose Daily bag limits remain at six ducks daily. Species can be hunted through Dec. 21, and Dec. 28, respeclimits remain the same as last year with the exception tively. of scaup where the limit has dropped from four to More details on all migratory bird hunting seasons three birds and the canvasback limit which increases are available online at www.dnr.state.mn.us. from one to two birds daily.

Waterfowl numbers up according to Minnesota DNR Hunters should find improved numbers of most waterfowl species for the 2013 hunting season, based on spring waterfowl surveys conducted by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The breeding duck population in Minnesota was estimated at 683,000, compared to last year’s figure of 469,000. Mallard numbers were 293,000, up 30 percent from 225,000 in 2012. That’s 10 percent above the long-term average.

Blue-winged teal population was 144,000, up from the 109,000 estimated last year but down a third from the long-term average. All other duck species combined were up 82 percent from 2012 levels and 39 percent above the long-term average. Canada goose numbers were estimated at 250,000 this past spring, down from a 2012 estimate of 416,000. ❖


Why does the farmer farm? It’s in their heart and blood

TABLE TALK Our family arrived about the same time as the local By Karen Schwaller rescue unit, followed by the quickly-arriving ambulance. Rescue personnel hovered over him, and our friend was swooped away in the ambulance. He was then air-lifted out. We watched the helicopter take off from the hospital and fly away until we couldn’t see it anymore, our hearts heavy in the darkness of that late night, hoping and praying for the best for our good friend and neighbor.

must always be on top of his game.

They work against all odds — weather, markets, government regulations, finances, fatigue, frustration and dangerous machinery and situations. And sometimes those things come down on the farmer all at once. There are probably people who need more coping skills than farmers, but at the moment, I don’t know who it would be.

esty, loyalty, work ethic and passion needed by anyone who is driven to be good at what they do. And it takes all of him to get that job done — especially when farm help is scarce, and the work is piled up.

Yet he dreams for his children to love this lifestyle as well. With all of the good and bad that comes with choosing life on the farm, he takes it in stride and mixes them both together gently. Most importantly, he not only tells his children, but shows them with his own example and sweat equity that without agriculture, our world has nothing.

As we watched our 75-year-old neighbor being air-lifted away, we talked about the fact that he had been doing the work he loved doing all of his life. Whether or not we understand why farmers choose this life, we know for certain that they would rather have their hands in the soil until their last breath, than spend time in a rocking chair.

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He loves it, he hates it. He’s too busy for his own It’s in their hearts and in their blood. It’s their will good. He has to learn to do everything himself in and their purpose in this life. order to afford it. He has to learn to fix machinery so it will last another year. He has to be on top of aniWe had done what we could do for him, and for And that’s why the farmer farms ... until the last them; the rest wasn’t up to us. mal health issues. He has to know his cost of produc- gate has been closed behind him. tion and be a good business thinker. He has to run It got me to thinking about why farmers do what “My grandfather used to say that once in your life long days on little sleep. He has to know and teach they do — and for so long. you will need a doctor, lawyer, policeman or a safety around machinery and livestock. preacher. But everyday, three times a day, you need a And the truth is, I don’t know if anyone knows the farmer.” ~ Brenda Schoepp An unprotected and running PTO shaft — or an answer to that question. angry sow or a protective cow who has just given Karen Schwaller brings “Table Talk” to The Land There are a lot of occupations that are all-consum- birth — can wreak massive havoc on a farmer’s body from her home near Milford, Iowa. She can be ing. But farmers take that to a whole new level. in short order. He must be determined to never give reached at kschwaller@evertek.net. ❖ Often times it’s out of necessity. After all, unless they up no matter what kind of bad things happen. He have your same last name, it’s difficult to find people who want to work on the farm. And having the same last name doesn’t always guarantee the help. There is a lot to do — especially for livestock farmers — and not a lot of help is readily available.

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

Recently we received a phone call from a panicked farm wife just up the road. Her husband had been seriously injured while working on the farm and she needed someone to call for help and be with her as she fearfully watched it all unfold before her.

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They work against all odds — weather, markets, government regulations, finances, fatigue, frustration and dangerous machinery and situations. And sometimes those things come down on the farmer all at once. There are probably people who need more coping skills than farmers, but at the moment, I don’t know who it would be. We recalled this neighbor of ours who, many years ago when cattle prices were very low, approached his banker to secure a loan to get more cattle. After a lengthy discussion between the two, the cattle trucks made their way to his yard and the four-legged cargo was unloaded. Asked why he wanted more cows when the cattle market blood bath raged on, he said, “Because it’s what I know how to do.”

My father, who worked as hard as anyone I know, was committed to this life. My mother, a city girl who said she never really adjusted to life on the farm in the 50-plus years she lived on one, once heard the farm described as “the farmer’s mistress.” I know there are many who feel that way, and it’s not because the farmer husband doesn’t care. It’s because he loves what he does with the kind of hon-

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Simply put, that’s just the way it is with farmers. They don’t do it for the money. They don’t do it because it’s easy. They don’t even do it because it’s great for marriages.


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Modern-day orthopedics for animals improving Strong bones, joints, ligaments and muscles are vital to healthy movement and a healthy lifestyle in animals. Now, when these functions go awry in a pet due to unhealthy habits or unfortunate circumstances, a pet’s quality of life can still be sustained due to the modernday procedures of orthopedics in veterinary medicine. Sharon Kerwin, professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences and a specialist in orthopedics and neurosurgery, said that orthopedics is the treatment or prevention of conditions affecting the bones, joints, ligaments and muscles. Kerwin said that orthopedic procedures in animals are much more advanced than most people are aware. “We perform many of the same types of procedures that are available for treatment of similar problems in humans, with the goal of getting the

injured animal back to normal activities as quickly and comfortably as possible,” Kerwin said. Kerwin said that two of the most common problems she sees in dogs and cats are cranial cruciate ligament disease (similar to an ACL tear in humans) and hip dysplasia. Twenty years ago, affected patients of these problems would have resulted in cases of crippling osteoarthritis. Fortunately, with today’s modern conveniences and knowledgeable specialists, these patients may enjoy full recoveries. “On the large animal side, there is an active sports medicine, lameness and trauma service that provides arthroscopy (minimally invasive surgery using an arthroscope to treat damage in the interior of the joint) and fracture repair for horses and other large animal species,” Kerwin said.

“Our exotic and zoo animal service often sees birds, pocket pets and exotic animals with bone and joint problems, many of which can be treated successfully.” Orthopedic diseases have not yet been confirmed to be related to just hereditary or environmental conditions. A lot of research has been targeted toward the inherited basis of the more common orthopedic diseases. Kerwin suggests that orthopedic problems can spur from both aspects. “There is definitely a hereditary basis for hip dysplasia, with multiple genes involved,” Kerwin said. “Environment plays a big role as well, with diet and exercise as key factors involved in the development of signs of problems in affected animals. Preventive measures are always important for owners to keep in mind, and there are many preventive measures that may help alleviate future orthopedic diseases.

Kerwin suggests that the best thing you can do to prevent many diseases is to keep your pet healthy and in-shape. This will not only help to ease orthopedic diseases, but it will help in all aspects of your pet’s livelihood. Kerwin explains that, “research in dogs indicates that dogs kept in an appropriate body condition will live two years longer than their overweight counterparts, which is a very long time in dog years. In addition, their risk for osteoarthritis is much lower.” Kerwin is enthusiastic about where veterinary orthopedics has come. But, she also understands what is possible in the future and that there are a couple of challenges to face. Pet Talk is a service of the College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, Texas A&M University. More information is available at http://tamunews.tamu.edu. This column is distributed by CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company to The Land. ❖


Two great Cajun tastes — grilled shrimp ’n grits

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

There are many foods that naturally go together: Steak and baked potato, cereal and milk, pretzels and beer ... and in the South, shrimp and grits. Today’s column is devoted to my version of shrimp and grits. If you get a chance to eat at Jack Fry’s in Louisville, Ky., their take on shrimp and grits is a classic. The shrimp are panseared and the cheesy grits are served with a delicious red-eye gravy. In fact, you can Google it and find the full recipe online. My version is outdoorsy by utilizing hot coals, and a bit spicy with the addition of Cajun seasoning and a tomato-based barbecue sauce. First, buy nice shrimp. I like to use 10-15 count, meaning there are roughly 10 to 15 shrimp per pound. These are the perfect size for skewering. In my area, they are typically frozen. If you can get them fresh, more power to you. We used 2 pounds for this dinner, and we had leftovers. Let the shrimp

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thaw (unless fresh) and then take the shell off and Cheesy Grits remove the mud vein. Skewer the shrimp with 1 cup instant grits wooden skewers that have been soaked. Pierce 3 cups whole milk through the meaty part and then through the tail so 1 cup shredded sharp white cheddar cheese they resemble a “C” shape. The shrimp can touch but Salt and pepper to taste should not be crammed together. See BBQ, pg. 21A << www.TheLandOnline.com >> “Where Farm and Family Meet”


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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 20 A


Memoir of the grave digger’s daughter won’t let you down

BBQ, from pg. 19A Warm the milk over medium heat to the point where you start to see some bubbling at the sides. You have to stir the milk the entire time to keep it from burning on the bottom. Slowly stir in the grits. Stir until you have the creamy consistency of cooked grits. Add salt and pepper to taste. Now, stir in the cheese. Continue stirring until it is melted into the grits, and that’s all there is to it. Create a sauce by placing 1 cup of your favorite barbecue sauce (we used “Sweet Baby Rae” for this dish) in a small pot. Bring to a simmer while stirring. Now, add 1/2 cup of your favorite beer. Stir until fully mixed. The beer helps cut the sweetness of the BBQ sauce. Sprinkle your favorite Cajun seasoning on both

sides of the skewered shrimp. Now apply the sauce liberally to both sides of the shrimp. Place shrimp over hot coals. This can be done on a gas grill, too. The shrimp won’t take long, maybe three minutes on one side and two minutes on the other side. Don’t overcook the shrimp as they will turn to rubber. They will be done when they have a pink color to them. To serve, place a helping of grits on the plate. Now put three to four grilled shrimp on the grits. Drizzle with the BBQ-beer sauce. Quick, easy, Southern and delicious. Enjoy! BBQMyWay is written by Dave Lobeck, a barbecue chef from Sellersburg, Ind. Log on to his website at www.BBQ-My-Way.com. He writes the column for CNHI News Service. CNHI is parent company of The Land. ❖

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At first blush, “We’ll Be the Last Ones to Let You Down” seemed to me to be an odd little collection of “so what” anecdotes. Most readers won’t know many (if any) of the people that Hanel writes about. Most readers won’t care which highway borders whose farm. But watch: Hanel’s words sneak up and poke us. Quiet stories of neighbors and friends cause little gasps when she abruptly reveals why she’s telling us about them. She sets up possibilities and hits us with realities — which is never clearer than in her chapter about the summer she was just 15. There, Hanel offers her memories like broken toys, asking us to somehow make order of what happened, as if she’s indignant and wants us to feel the senseless outrageousness of it all. Right there is where this book and its stories about small towns, neighbors, family, life and death, make sense. It’s where I fell in love with it and I think you will, too, because “We’ll Be the Last Ones to Let You Down” ... ultimately won’t. Editor’s note: Rachael Hanel spent some time working at The Land early in her writing career. Look for the reviewed book at a bookstore or a library near you. You may also find the book at online book retailers. The Bookworm is Terri Schlichenmeyer. Terri has been reading since she was 3 years old and never goes anywhere without a book. She lives in Wisconsin with three dogs and 10,000 books. ❖

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

When anybody wants the real story, you’ve got it. “We’ll Be the Last Ones Yep, you’ve got your ear to the ground to Let You Down” and that scanner you bought. Or maybe By Rachael Hanel you’ve got good connections to bring c.2013, University of you the juiciest gossip, scandals and Minnesota Press troubles, births and moves, and the real $17.95 dirt on who’s died and why. However it 196 pages happens, you’ve got the scuttlebutt and you never disappoint your audience — THE BOOKWORM although, once you’ve read “We’ll Be SEZ the Last Ones to Let You Down” by Rachael Hanel, you’ll hope it’s a friend By Terri Schlichenmeyer with your final scoop. two baby daughters. KnowIf you lived in Waseca County, Minn., a couple ing too much about death, decades ago, you may have known Paul “Digger Hanel obsessed about it. O’Dell” Hager. If someone you loved died in Waseca County, you surely knew him because he “made a liv“It takes a village to raise ing from people’s inability to keep on living,” says his a child,” she says, “and my daughter. Digger made graves for “farmers and village was the graveyard.” accountants, teachers and mechanics, teenagers and Still, hers was not a parents, babies and grandparents.” macabre childhood. In small For Hanel, being the grave digger’s daughter was prairie towns like Waseca, everybody tends to know just like being anybody’s kid — with a twist. She everybody else and, chances are, they’re also related. grew up riding her bike along cemetery roads, mow- Hanel was drawn to her grandfather like a magnet. ing graveyard lawns and playing among tombstones. She spent summers playing with cousins. The small Her imagination took her, not to magical places but church she attended was filled with family, and to a time when the dead were alive. Hanel envinearby farms were worked by relatives, just as her sioned life for her great-grandparents, both victims father worked in “his” cemetery. of influenza. She wondered how her grandmother, Just as he eventually was laid there to rest. who bore 16 children, coped with the losses of her

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Now is the ideal time to tackle dandelions, creeping charlie Many homeowners start forgetting about their lawn this time of year. However, this is the ideal time for using post-emergence chemical applications for weed control. According to the University of Minnesota Extension, post-emergence herbicides may be applied any time the weeds are actively growing, the air temperature is 60 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit, there are no winds, and there is no rain in the forecast for 48 hours. Most effective control of perennial broadleaf weeds is obtained when applied in early fall (Aug. 15-Oct. 15) or in spring (May 1June 1). For some weeds, repeated application at 20to 30-day intervals may be required for control. For dandelions, use 2, 4-D or a combination of 2, 4D, MCPP (Mecoprop) and dicamba can also be utilized. The ideal timing for applying these products for dandelion control is September. The non-chemical option is to manually dig out the plants. A weeding fork and dandelion diggers may be a couple of options for that task. Get as much of the dandelion root as you can so the dandelion does not start growing again. For creeping charlie, use a combination of 2, 4-D and MCPP or a combination of 2, 4-D, MCPP and dicamba. The ideal timing for applying these products to creeping charlie is in September or autumn once temperatures have cooled to the 60s and 70s. The non-chemical approaches are to pull the plant out or utilize a dethatching rake. It may be necessary to start over with the lawn if the creeping charlie gets out of control. Most other broadleaf weeds can be controlled by herbicide applications of 2, 4-D and/or a combination of 2,4-D, MCPP and dicamba. It is always a good idea to know what you are spraying to be sure that the herbicide will control the desired pest. The herbicide label should list the weeds it will control. Another option is to utilize a non-selective herbicide like glyphosate. Use of these types of products

34th Annual Northern Minnesota

DRAFT HORSE FIELD DAYS Saturday, September 28th • 10 a.m.

(Inclement Weather: Sunday, September 29, 2013 ON THE PROPERTY OF: Hilary Brunner Jr. 40083 County Rd. 175 • Belgrade, MN 56312 Phone: 320-254-3230 DIRECTIONS: 15 miles south of Sauk Centre on Highway 71, then 1/2 mile east on Cty. Rd. 175, or 5 miles north of Belgrade on Highway 71, then 1/2 mile east on Cty. Rd. 175. • Watch for signs.

75 - 100 Draft Horses & Mules Events Planned for the Day:

• Corn Binder • Sorghum Press • Corn Shredder • Plowing • Threshing Oats • Silage Cutter • Potato Digging • Tillage • Horse Powered Baler • Side Rake and Dump Rake • Drawing for Draft Horse Foal at 4:00 p.m.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

• Parade at 3:30 p.m. •

Wagon Rides • Elderly & Handicapped Accessible Yard, Craft Sales & Some Miscellaneous Items For Sale (Crafters Welcome - $5.00 for space • Call 320-293-8594) Admission: $4 Per Person • Children Under 12 Free

No Dogs, ATV’s or Carts Allowed on the Grounds • Not Responsible For Accidents Lunch & Refreshments served by: Greenwald Catholic School

For further information, call Directors:

Barb Schloemer (President), 320-293-8279 or • Mel Klein, 320-250-0946 • Harold Pramann, 320-236-2302 • Mike Berthiaume, 763-458-4136 • Phil Frericks, 320-290-1441 • Pam Barthel (Historian), 763-274-2488 • JoAnn Holthaus (Treasurer), 320-293-8594 Linette Blondell (Secretary), 320-224-7398 • Karen Hermann, 651-436-7119 and Richard Hicks (Webmaster), 612-823-8221 or visit www.NMDHA.com

should only be used when spot spraying targeted weed pests. Drift on to lawns and ornamental plants will injure or kill the desired plants as well as the targeted weed pests. A healthy lawn is important to limit the competition of lawn weeds. Work on improving the lawn while trying to slow down and eliminate weed competition. Try to seed grass into bare areas of the

lawn, fertilize and aerate your lawn this fall to help it compete against the weeds. When using herbicides, read and follow all of the directions for using the specific product. This article was submitted by Nathan Winter, University of Minnesota Extension agricultural productions systems educator for McLeod and Meeker (Minn.) counties. ❖

Send us your events by e-mail to editor@TheLandOnline.com Log on to www.TheLandOnline.com for our all-new events calendar Beginning Hop Grower Workshop — A Walk-nTalk Field Day Sept. 7, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Southern Research and Outreach Center, Waseca, Minn. Info: Call (507) 238-5449

Training Sept. 12, 8:30 a.m. New Ulm, Minn. Info: See Sept. 11 event

Cultivating Conservation in the Cannon River Watershed Grape-Breeding Project Sept. 12, 11:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Open House Mike and July Daly Farm, Sept. 7, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Northfield, Minn. Horticultural Research Cen- Info: Farm is located at ter, Victoria, Minn. 10163 Cates Avenue; RSVP Info: Free; located at the cor- requested by contacting Karl, ner of Minnesota State High- (507) 786-3912 or karl@crwp.com by Sept. 9 way 5 and Rolling Acres Road, about 1 1/2 miles west of the Minnesota Landscape You Can Become a Arboretum entrance; address Vintner: Introduction to Winemaking Class is 600 Arboretum Blvd., Excelsior, Minn. Sept. 14, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Minnesota Landscape Arboretum Learning Center, Fall Fair Sept. 7-8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Chaska, Minn. Farmamerica, Waseca, Minn. Info: Katie Cook, University of Info: Meriden Day is Sept. 7, Minnesota enologist, will share with Hiram Drache speaking techniques based on proven and signing copies of his new university research; $70/membook, “Where’s Meriden? The ber, $80/non-member; log on to Demise of Small Town www.arboretum.umn.edu/learn U.S.A.”; $10/adult, $7/senior, .aspx or call (952) 443-1422 to $5/child 13 or younger; log on register to www.farmamerica.org or call (507) 835-2052 Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan Livestock Truck Rollover Listening Session Sept. 16, 6-8 p.m. Training Sept. 11, 8:30 a.m. University of Minnesota StuWindom, Minn. dent Center Bede Ballroom, Info: $10/person; register by Crookston, Minn. contacting the Minnesota Info: Hosted by the MinPork Board Office, (507) 345- nesota Department of Agri8814; classroom in the morn- culture for public input on ing, hands-on demonstration the draft revision of the in afternoon; more informaNFMP; comments accepted tion can be found at through Nov. 1 www.mnpork.com U.S. Soy Global Trade Minnesota Crop Exchange Insurance Conference Sept. 16-18 Sept. 11-12 Davenport, Iowa Info: Log on to Verizon Wireless Center, Mankato, Minn. www.grainconference.org or Info: Advanced registration contact the Midwest Shippers required at www.cffm.umn.edu/ Association, (952) 253-6231 events/CropInsConf.aspx, no or staff@mnshippers.com registrations taken at the door; conference begins 1 p.m. Sept. Minnesota Pork Board Workforce Conference — 11, concludes at noon Sept. 12 People: Our Most Valuable Livestock Truck Rollover Asset

Sept. 17, 8:30 a.m. Country Inn and Suites, Mankato, Minn. Info: Deadline for advanced registration is Sept. 11; $20/person; log on to mnpork.com or call (800) 5377675 to register Agroforestry — A Walk-nTalk Field Day Sept. 17, 1-3 p.m. Empire Wastewater Treatment, Farmington, Minn. Info: Located at 2540 W. 197th St.; call (507) 238-5449

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan Listening Session Sept. 25, 1-3 p.m. Public Library Community Program room, Roseville, Minn. Info: See Sept. 16 event AgCatalyst: Inspired Conversations about Food and Agriculture Sept. 26-27 Minneapolis Info: Log on to http://agcatalyst.com

14th Annual Corn Shredding Autumn Harvest Days Sept. 28-29 Dwain Gerken Farm, Oak Center, Minn. Info: 64245 355th Ave., Lake City, Minn.; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sept. 29; $5 collector button good Minnesota Nutrition for both days; hosting MinConference nesota State Corn Husking Sept. 17-18 Contest morning of Sept. 28; Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel, contact Dwain Gerken, (507) Prior Lake, Minn. 753-2543, for show info, Info: Log on to Kathy Ofstie, (651) 923-4835, www.mnnutritionconf.umn.edu for husking information Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan Listening Session Sept. 17, 6-8 p.m. Deer Creek High School Robertson Theatre, Wadena, Minn. Info: See Sept. 16 event

Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan Listening Session Sept. 18, 1-3 p.m. Great River Regional Library, St. Cloud, Minn. Info: See Sept. 16 event Wood Lake Battlefield Symposium Sept. 21, 10 a.m.-3:45 p.m. Kilowatt Community Center, Granite Falls, Minn. Info: $30/person, $20/student; contact Tom Hosier, (507) 2809970 or woodlakebattlefield@yahoo.com ; register by Sept. 13 Nitrogen Fertilizer Management Plan Listening Session Sept. 23, 6-8 p.m. Cascade Meadow Wetlands & Environmental Science Center, Rochester, Minn. Info: See Sept. 16 event

4X4 Culinary Minnesota Wine Series Oct. 3, Nov. 7, Dec. 12, Jan. 9, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Minn. Landscape Arboretum Learning Center, Chaska, Minn. Info: $55/member/session, $65/non-member/session; call (952) 443-1422 or log on to www.arboretum.umn.edu/ learn.aspx Minnesota Governor’s Pheasant Hunting Opener Oct. 11-12 Madelia, Minn. Info: www.mnpheasant.com Pork Quality Assurance Training Nov. 13 Minnesota Pork Board Office, Mankato, Minn. Info: Registration requested to colleen@mnpork.com or (800) 537-7675 or log on to www.mnpork.com


Dornink named MAELC executive director

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Dornink most recently served as program manager of the Extension Center for Food, Agricultural and Natural Resource Sciences. In this role she operated as chief of staff, coordinating resource units in finance, evaluation and communication. Prior to Extension, Dornink was the community program assistant for MAELC. During that time she helped lead many significant initiatives for MAELC including the Agricultural, Food and Natural Resource Blueprint that created a five-year, statewide plan for agricultural education. She has also played a substantial role in the development of teacher licensure candidates in the University of Minnesota Agricultural Education program by advising the student organization. “I am excited for the opportunity to serve in this capacity to promote, improve and enhance the effectiveness of agricultural education in Minnesota. There are many opportunities for agricultural education to expand and grow, and I look forward to building partnerships to accomplish this task,” Dornink said. ❖

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

The Minnesota Agricultural Education Leadership Council named Sarah Dornink as its new executive director. Dornink is in charge of providing leadership to MAELC in order to energize, enliven and support the development of agricultural education in the state. She also manages the organization’s legislative board. “Sarah brings unrivaled passion and enthusiasm for the broad goals of agricultural education. She clearly demonstrates the leadership and managerial skills needed to make MAELC a vibrant organization to lead agricultural education into the future and lead that process immediately,” said Brian Buhr, head of Applied Economics and Agricultural Education. Dornink’s educational background includes a masters of education and bachelor of science degree in agricultural education, with a certificate in adult education all from the University of Minnesota. She holds a current license to teach agriculture in grades 512, providing her with extensive knowledge of Minnesota’s teacher education program.

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This week’s Back Roads is the work of The Land Correspondent Richard Siemers

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Church of the Visitation, Danvers, Minn.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

I

n an area of Minnesota that was settled by German and Irish immigrants, it is striking to see a church building that suggests you are in northern France. But the Catholic Church of the Visitation in Danvers offers that refreshing sight. Rosemary Barth’s great-greatgrandparents are buried in the cemetery and she grew up in the congregation. She researched old newspaper articles and put together a scrapbook. According to the articles, a grass fire got out of control in April of 1931 and

got sucked into the original woodframe building through a coal chute. The structure burned to the ground. The congregation immediately started plans to rebuild. The cornerstone was laid in August, and before the year was over, the first service was held in the new building on Christmas Eve. The handsome structure is built of brick and stone in French Normandy style, with a Norman spire topping the tower. Decorative dormers and buttresses, and symmetry in the roofline and windows, pleasantly draw the eye

to this hilltop house of worship. The 90-foot by 40-foot structure, with heating plant and all, cost about $36,000. The congregation saved $600 when the excavation was done voluntarily by members of the parish. According to the articles, the architect was Cyril P. Pesek of Minneapolis. The design was probably the work of Pesek’s new partner in 1931, Glynne Shifflet. Shifflet had studied at the Fontainebleau School of Fine Arts in France the previous year. Barth’s collection includes programs from Fall Festivals and other activi-

ties when it was a thriving congregation. The decline in the rural population led to a decline in membership, and it ceased to be a parish some years ago. Church of the Visitation is now an Oratory. Mass is held weekly on Tuesday nights, attended by local residents, and it is open for weddings, funerals and special events. Or you could just stop by and imagine you are visiting France. The church building is on the east end of Danvers, about a block south of Highway 12. ❖

Do you have a Back Roads story suggestion? E-mail editor@TheLandOnline.com or write to Editor, The Land, P.O. Box 3169, Mankato, MN 56002.


THE LAND

S E C T I O N

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September 6, 2013

the combine’s yearly checkup.” While harvest planning and preparations are under way, Messner is in no hurry to jump in the combine. An early frost is “everybody’s fear,” he said; a mid-September frost “would be a disaster” and even a mid-October frost could be detrimental to the crop. “All we can do is hope that it holds off.” For now, the focus remains on unwanted house guests in the soybean fields.

By KRISTIN KVENO The Land Correspondent

The Brandts Ada, Minn.

Going out in the fields with the crop insurance adjuster to look at the aftermath of the hail storm that hit Scott

Johnson’s farm on Aug. 6, he was “surprised at all the different stages the corn fields are in.” The Johnson farm hasn’t received any rain since that early Scott Johnson August storm, and rain is needed, but the current heat wave in the area is also needed. When The Land spoke to Johnson on Aug. 19, he reported that “some of the ears were a lot further along.” Two of his fields were hit hard by the hail, with beans taking the brunt of the damage. Those that weren’t hit by hail still look “pretty good.” Still uncertain is how the crops will tolerate the hail damage; the full extent of the hail damage won’t be known until harvest. Johnson is spraying for aphids as they seem to be enjoying his later-planted bean fields. Johnson is keeping his eye on his fields to see if they can continue to grow after the hail, while also working on “getting fertilizer plans together.” Johnson knows that “harvest will be here before you know it.” Farming is a never-ending game of pool, where the farmer is always lining up the next shot (harvest) and sometimes several shots ahead (fall and spring fertilizer). With a little luck, the late planting and the summer hail storm hasn’t tilted the pool table for a fair shot at a winning harvest on the Johnson farm.

The Messners Northfield, Minn.

Chris Messner has lots of new little “friends” in his fields and he would like them to take the hint that they aren’t welcome on any of his Chris Messner soybeans plants. Aphids in and around the Messner farm “are pretty bad,” Messner told The Land on Aug. 19. Many lateseeded Minnesota soybean fields are quickly accumulating treatable populations of aphids. The beans should be OK, he said, but they do have a long ways to go until they are ready to combine. “We could use a shot of rain,” Messner said. The beans are “not dry, but a lot of nodes are showing a little bit of stress.” Messner believes that most farmers in the area will not be expecting 60 bushel beans; rather 40 bushel beans may be the reality. The corn is “coming along,” he said, although he drove by some fields on Aug. 19 and saw corn that wasn’t even tasseled. In Messner’s fields the “pollination looks pretty decent,” but he predicted that “yields are going to be all over the board.” Corn will be in the denting stage by next week, he said, and the crop is “not too far off from normal.” Thoughts of harvest have begun on the Messner farm. “We’ve got all the bins cleaned out (and we’re) getting

The heat is on in northern Iowa. “It’s supposed to get to 90 tomorrow,” Charlie Laubenthal said. When The Land spoke with him on Charlie Laubenthal Aug. 20 he was thrilled that the weather had turned from mid-70s and no rain, to high-humidity 90 F days with a chance of rain. The “corn is tasseled” and “looks OK,” Laubenthal said, but it’s still behind. The soybeans are setting pods and “look decent ... I haven’t heard a lot of talk of aphids.” While aphids aren’t a problem in his fields, a lack of rain is; there hadn’t been rain in two weeks. Laubenthal is getting updated and educated on the new corn hybrids and soybean varieties, as well as important program information from Mycogen Seeds. He is ready to put on his seed-selling hat as “seed sales will start again soon.” He is also working on finishing hauling corn and cleaning out the bottoms of bins. “If we get some 90-degree days, that will progress the crop,” Laubenthal said. Warmer temperatures are keeping concerns about an early frost at bay. “As long as we don’t get a frost we’ll be average at best.” Let’s hope this tropical weather sticks around for a while. ❖

Look for the next ‘From the Fields’ update in your Sept. 20 issue of The Land

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

The Johnsons Starbuck, Minn.

The Laubenthals Swea City, Iowa

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The Brandt farm finally received rain in the early morning of Aug. 21 though it was “just enough rain to settle the dust.” Danny Brandt The Land spoke with Danny Brandt later that day, and he reported that the weather was much cooler — 86 F — than it was just the day before. You know that you’re in a hot streak when 86 feels cool. Brandt just finished walking beet fields on the lookout for bolters, or beets that have prematurely gone to seed. He reported that one field had 20 bolters, and that the beets are “wilting and dry.” Brandt expects the crop will stay the same, or at best add a little more sugar. Crystal Sugar is estimating that around the Ada area there will be a 24- to 25-ton crop. Brandt isn’t as optimistic. Beet pre-haul is scheduled for Sept. 11-13 and will be quite an adventure for Brandt as “Highway 9 is all torn up from Ada to Polk County 9.” His piling site is right on Highway 9 so he may have to take the beets to another receiving station. Meanwhile, the beans are “starting to really suffer,” Brandt said. Leaves on the plants are already starting to turn due to the lack of moisture. He’s predicting that he’ll be in the field combining beans in just a few weeks, “a little earlier than usual.” All the crops are feeling the effects of lack of rain. Corn, Brandt said, is “dry and starting to cannibalize on the stalk.” On the bright side, he finished combining wheat on Aug. 21 and it was a “better crop than we thought.” Brandt reports that the “bins are filled up and everyone’s happy.” While he knows that he’s not going to get the big crop like last year, his “glass half-full” personality shines through — he says the lack of rain is going to let him “get the crop off easily.”

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

From the Fields: Corn looks to soak up the heat

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Local Corn and Soybean Price Index

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Cash Grain Markets Sauk Rapids Madison Redwood Falls Fergus Falls Morris Tracy Average: Year Ago Average:

corn/change* soybeans/change* $5.60 $5.80 $6.04 $5.22 $5.57 $5.82

+.11 -.03 +.18 -.21 -.10 -.07

$13.62 $14.17 $14.42 $12.98 $13.97 $14.37

+.77 +.50 +.47 -.27 +.35 +.42

$5.68

$13.92

$7.60

$17.04

SEP’12

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN ‘13

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

JUN

JUL

AUG

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Grain prices are effective cash close on Aug. 30. The price index chart compares an average of most recently reported local cash prices with the same average for a year ago. *Cash grain price change represents a two-week period.

Grain Outlook The word today is: weather

Livestock Angles Cash steady, futures drifting

Grain Angles Your pre-harvest checklist

The following market analysis is for the week ending Aug. 30. CORN — Corn blew through resistance as traders came back from the weekend with stifling heat seen across the Midwest. The balance of the week was spent retracing those gains as traders adjusted to the weather and determined what affect it would have on the corn yield. While late-planted corn will see a definite yield decline from the lack of rain and high heat, corn did need heating degree days to push it toward maturity. PHYLLIS NYSTROM The transition from old crop CHS Hedging Inc. supplies to new crop is a tricky St. Paul job this year and early corn is needed in the pipeline. Funds were net buyers during the week, cutting back on their overall net short corn positions. Corn harvest is progressing in the South with good yields being reported. One area in western Kentucky reported 241 bushels per acre, their best ever. Barges are being loaded to move north to satisfy demand. Overall crop conditions dropped 2 percent to 59 percent good/excellent as of Aug. 25, with additional declines anticipated. Iowa, Minnesota and Indiana were all down 4 percent, Illinois fell 5 percent and North Dakota was 10 percent lower. Only 23 percent of the crop was dented versus 45 percent on average. Weekly export sales were routine with old crop showing small net cancellations of 600,000 bushels and decent new crop sales of 31 million bushels. Total export commitments for 2013-14 are nearly 42

The livestock markets have had some interesting weeks in August. The cattle market has been unusually quiet and firm, while the hog market has what appears to be a seasonal top. The cash cattle market has been grinding away at near-steady to slightly better prices, while at the same time the cattle futures have been slowly drifting lower. The beef cutouts have seen improvement over the past several weeks and appear to have bottomed, presenting the packers with better margins. This has allowed the bidding for live animals more flexibility JOE TEALE Broker and thus improving prices in the cash market. The futures, on the Great Plains Commodity Afton, Minn. other hand, have seen the positive basis shrink away and close in on the current live price. On Aug. 23, the U.S. Department of Agriculture released the Monthly Cattle on Feed Report. The results are as follows: on-feed Aug. 1, 94 percent; placements in July, 90 percent; and marketed in July, 105 percent. The report was seen as friendly primarily due to the placement number and the better marketed number. This obviously suggests that from the supply standpoint, cattle numbers will be tight. However, from the demand side of the equation, domestic demand has continued to be poor and has slowed over the past year. If it weren’t for the export demand, the overall demand for beef would completely offset the supply of cattle. With economic conditions not improving, it will be

So far, this year has been anything but ordinary, especially for folks with a significant amount of prevented-plant acres. As I’ve been meeting with clients the past few weeks, it has become clear that planning for this fall may require looking at things a bit differently. Here are a few suggested items to add to your pre-harvest checklist. Double-check your coverage If you are an owner of a multiperil crop insurance policy, your schedule of insurance should be arriving from your agent soon. If there was ever a year to put reviewing acres and coverage high on your priority list, this is it. Making changes to your policy DAREL NESS later this fall may prove to be difAgStar Assistant VP Financial Services ficult or near impossible. There is Rochester, Minn. certainly a higher likelihood of having a payable loss this fall, especially on corn revenue policies. If the December corn contract continues to trade at current levels through October, producers who have purchased higher levels of revenue insurance, like 80 to 85 percent, will have a bushel guarantee per acre that is close to their actual production history. Although we are hearing about the great potential yields of this corn crop nationally, many in our area are not expecting an above-average crop. Stress test your marketing plan for volatility Whether a grain producer or an end-user, make sure your marketing plan is ready for the volatility we could potentially experience this fall. We have a lot of acres nationally that need a favorable fall to mature. An early frost could be devastating to our

See NYSTROM, pg. 3B

See TEALE, pg. 3B

See NESS, pg. 3B

Information in the above columns is the writer’s opinion. It is no way guaranteed and should not be interpreted as buy/sell advice. Futures trading always involves a certain degree of risk.


Everyone agrees weather drives yield potential down

Your taxable income may surprise We also have had unusual events impacting taxable incomes — like prevent-plant crop insurance payments and reimbursements back to producers for unused seed and fertilizer on prevent-plant acres — that need to be considered. The earlier you get a handle on your income and where you want to be, the more options you will have to get yourself there. As we close the door on summer and look ahead to fall, we are facing a lot of uncertainty in the grain industry. We all know that there is nothing we can do to impact the weather, the markets or the national harvest, but planning ahead and being prepared can make a big difference in the success of your operation. One can only hope that the weather will cooperate more this fall than it did this spring. AgStar Financial Services is a cooperative owned by client stockholders. As part of the Farm Credit System, AgStar has served 69 counties in Minnesota and northwest Wisconsin with a wide range of financial products and services for more than 95 years. ❖

OUTLOOK: How many ways can you say that it’s all about the weather? Weather is king for shortterm direction as everyone looks to their favorite meteorologist for guidance. When we return from the Labor Day weekend, prices are expected to swing hard in whichever direction weekend weather favored: hot and dry equals sharply higher; cooler and/or wetter, sharply lower. For soybeans, current weather conditions can have a lingering effect longer term on prices since next year’s carryout was only pegged at 220 million bushels on the August USDA balance sheets. The majority of the trade is already beginning to predict how much the yield will decline on the Sept. 12 report. For August, nearby beans were up 3.6 percent and are up 0.4 percent year-to-date. Nystrom’s notes: Contract changes for the week ended Aug. 30: December Minneapolis wheat was up 5 1/4 cents, Chicago up 8 cents and Kansas City 6 1/4 cent higher. October crude oil jumped up $1.23 to $107.65 as the situation in Syria worsened and Libya production continues to be curtailed due to armed protester attacks closing ports. October ultra-low-sulfur diesel surged 3 3/4 cents higher and gasoline gained nearly 2 cents. Natural gas rose 6 cents on higher cooling demand. The September USDA crop will be released Sept. 12 at 11 a.m. CT. This material has been prepared by a sales or trading employee or agent of CHS Hedging Inc. and should be considered a solicitation. ❖

Hog market following a pattern TEALE, from pg. 2B hard for the cattle market to make a long-term sustained rally without some improvement in the economic picture. Producers should be aware of market conditions and protect inventories on any sharp rallies. The hog market has shown that the normal seasonal top that comes nearly every summer did not miss a beat again this year. Cash hog prices have been on the decline since the middle of August reflecting the chance that that high is now in place. The futures market had already anticipated this topping event and remains a deep discount to the current cash price. In addition, the pork cutout has declined from its high made in early

August and appears to be in retreat for the near future. Because of the competitive nature of the consumer to the prices in the meats, one would suspect if the disparity between the retail price of beef exceeds the retail price of pork, there will be a switch to the lesser expensive pork. This could help hold hog prices from any real sharp declines if beef prices hold current levels or rise much further. The demand for pork has remained fairly good throughout the year and could end up being the supportive factor that slows the downward move in hog prices. Producers should be cognizant of the market conditions and protect inventories when necessary. ❖

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NESS, from pg. 2B production numbers and grain quality, and would result in price movement on the Chicago Board of Trade and basis level changes that could be extreme. Proactively communicate with your marketing advisers and grain merchandiser to discuss how different scenarios may impact your operation. Don’t forget to consider the part that basis may play in our price changes this fall; it is a price risk not covered by multi-peril crop insurance revenue policies. Start your income tax planning earlier than usual Have you looked at your taxable income year-to-date? It may surprise you. Many of my grain clients are sitting on the largest taxable income levels they have had in their careers. At the same time, they are anticipating lower income in 2014 because of lower prices and fewer bushels. Getting a plan in place before harvest to target your fall income and expenses just makes sense.

beans to a weekly high of $14.09 1/2 on Tuesday. There is a gap from $13.31 1/2 to $13.46 remaining on the November chart as August ended. Soybeans closed out the week well off the weekly high at $13.57 1/2, up 29 1/2 cents for the week. November beans are up 98 1/4 cents in the last two weeks. Bean conditions fell 4 percent as of Aug. 25 to 58 percent good/excellent and are anticipated show a 4 percent to 6 percent decline as of Sept. 2. By state last week, Illinois, South Dakota and Minnesota were all down 5 percent, North Dakota fell 10 percent, Indiana lost 7 percent, and Iowa and Wisconsin dropped 2 percent. In spite of surging prices, China stepped in and bought 230,000 mt of U.S. beans this week. Old crop weekly export sales showed minuscule cancellations and new crop sales were in line with expectations at 32 million bushels. Total 2013-14 sales of 724 million bushels are 12.2 percent higher than last year. The USDA is predicting exports to be 5.3 percent higher year on year. We begin a new crop year Sept. 1.

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SOYBEANS — Soybeans displayed “gap and go higher” action to begin the week when little to no rain was seen across the Corn Belt in combination with yielddamaging heat. November beans galloped to within 1/4cent of the contract high set last September. Some forecasts are calling this the driest July-August in Illinois, Iowa and Indiana since 1936. August weather makes the bean yield and recent weather has driven the yield potential lower, that’s something everyone can agree on. The variable is to what degree has the yield has been hurt. If the bean yield falls to 41 bu./acre from the USDA’s August 42.6 bu./acre figure, carryout for 2013-14 could be less than 100 million if the loss is carried directly to the bottom line. Scorching heat without rain pushed November

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

NYSTROM, from pg. 2B percent ahead of last year at 447 million bushels. The U.S. Department of Agriculture is projecting export sales to increase 71 percent year-on-year. U.S. corn is uncompetitive in most world markets, accounting for South Korea buying 60,000 metric tons of Brazilian corn this week for November shipment. U.S. ethanol production dropped by 24,000 barrels per day to 820,000 barrels/day this week. Stocks were off slightly at 16.3 million barrels. OUTLOOK: December corn was up 12 cents for the week at $4.82 per bushel. It is up 33 3/4 cents over the last two weeks on hot, dry conditions. For the month, nearby corn was down 0.8 percent and is 29 percent lower year-to-date. Weather should impact corn prices to a lesser extent than soybeans, and price action should reflect it. Look for corn to be dragged along in whichever direction soybeans flow. Last week’s high in the December corn of $5.08 1/4 will act as resistance if conditions remain unfavorable. First support is the bottom of the gap at $4.74 1/2 per bushel, then the August low at $4.45 3/4 per bushel. Any sustained rally in corn will have to be led by beans. If you need to play catch-up on sales, use opportunities as they are presented.

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Will drought return to New Zealand and what would that mean? This column was written for the marond half of 2013. She believes most producers will “lean toward havketing week ending Aug. 30. ing more forage and not be so concerned with the World dairy buyers may be looking to quality issue given their experience of last year’s A lot of eyes are and will be on the situthe United States, The Milkweed warns, drought.” ation in Oceania, particularly on New but, “in this nation, Mother Nature has Zealand which suffered through a severe been darn tough on crops (especially vital When asked what this means for international and drought earlier this year. forages) here in 2013 following 2012’s U.S. dairy markets, Sharp said that New Zealand’s drought.” two largest cooperatives, Fonterra and Westlynn, and Things appear to have turned around significantly, according to Jerry Dryer’s Milk production was way down in June Murray Goulburn in Australia, have increased their price forecasts to historically high levels. She said Dairy and Food Market Analyst. His Aug. and July because it is the tail end of the “that sends a clear signal to dairy producers to proMIELKE MARKET 23 edition reports, “New Zealand milk drought-impacted lactation, Dryer said. duce as much milk as possible.” Lower feed costs will WEEKLY producers are contending with too much “Cows freshen in late-August and Sepalso encourage larger milk production in Europe and grass after the back of last summer’s tember and it is a whole new ball game.” By Lee Mielke the United States, she said, “so we have the tension drought was broken during the winter. Dryer also expects a huge pull-down of very firm global demand and already high dairy Forecasters generally agree that the of butter stocks during August, product prices and the possibility that global milk new season will get off to a robust because plants have switched to 82 production could increase in the months to come.” start this year and likely earlier than percent (butterfat) production and usual.” ■ began filling more domestic orders out of existing He adds that “output has, however, remained ‘sub- inventories rather than current production. A quick update on a story a couple weeks ago. After dued’ through the winter lull,” and reports that extensive testing, New Zealand’s Ministry for PriThe Aug. 28 Daily Dairy Report says “Rising farm Fonterra milk collections were down 10.4 percent mary Industries announced this week that the adulgate milk prices have done little so far to increase during June and July. In 2012, the combined promilk production in Oceania.” It reports that the Aus- terated whey produced by Fonterra did not contain duction of June and July accounted for just 1.5 per- tralian season got off to an unremarkable start with clostridium botulinum, a bacteria that can produce cent of the annual total. Australian milk output was output totaling 1.45 billion pounds in July, a drop of botulism. A recall was announced as a precaution down just 3.5 percent during July after being as but the whey in question contained a different strain 3.5 percent from July 2012 but slightly higher than much as 9.5 percent lower during April. of bacteria which poses no health risk to consumers. July 2011. European production was down several percent■ New Zealand milk production totaled nearly 269 age points earlier in the year, but was just 0.6 permillion pounds in June, Speaking of drought on cent lower in May, the latest data available, Dryer which is 6.9 percent the home front, FC Stone said. lower than the first dairy broker Dave KurzaRight now New Zealand dairy proA footnote on New Zealand, however; the London- month of the 2012-13 wski, wrote in his Aug. 27 based Global Drought Monitor projects that drought season and down 3.9 ducers need to make the decision to eDairy Insider Opening conditions will “dramatically worsen from midpercent from June Bell that “hot, dry take steps to slow down grass August to mid-October,” reports The Milkweed, and 2011. However, New weather that carried soygrowth. If they have too much grass, terms “extreme” and exceptional” are being used. Zealand production was bean and corn prices they could face some quality issues The Milkweed adds that the Global Drought Moni- exceptionally strong in higher Monday will affect and have lower quality forage from tor projects serious dry conditions for much of the both the 2011-12 and 2012cows regardless of feed cows trampling through very tall agricultural United States, except for the Deep 13 seasons. While lower prices. This heat dome South and New York/New England during the secthan the past two years, over the Midwest is putgrass. ... That could reduce per-cow June’s milk production was ting people on guard a litproduction at the peak of their milk higher than historical tle on cow comfort and production season later this year. norms but the DDR warned milk production.” that “early-season milk pro— Sarina Sharp, Daily Dairy Report ■ duction in June and July in Meanwhile, milk supboth New Zealand and Australia is an unreliable indicator of production trends plies in the Northeast and Midwest have kept cheese plants busy, while production was reduced somewhat in Oceania.” in the West, according to the U.S. Department of “Right now New Zealand dairy producers need to Agriculture’s Dairy Market News. make the decision to take steps to slow down grass Cheese inventories are adequate to service current growth,” said the DDR’s Sarina Sharp in Friday’s needs with buyers looking to see if the market is DairyLine broadcast. “If they have too much grass, becoming oversupplied. Retail sales are mostly they could face some quality issues and have lower quality forage from cows trampling through very tall steady. Large buyers are said to be well supplied at grass. ... That could reduce per-cow production at the current prices and are waiting for price breaks to peak of their milk production season later this year.” add to inventories. Export sales are good as U.S. prices continue to be Steps to slow grass growth include pulling pasture out of the grazing rotation and harvesting silage off favorable versus international prices. Lower milk volumes are available for cheese plants to increase of that pasture, according to Sharp, reducing fertilproduction as milk begins to fill the Class I demands izer use or speeding up grazing rotation to keep of bottlers for school openings in the South. grass at a lower level in all pastures. ■ The other factor, Sharp warned, “if there is a drought later this year, then those producers who Cooperatives Working Together accepted nine took steps to reduce grass growth would be even requests for export assistance this week to sell 3.296 more short of pasture and high-quality forage so it’s a real gamble as to what to do right now.” See MIELKE, pg. 5B

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Summer heat taking its toll on dairy production MARKETING

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above the previous week but still 3.75 cents below a year ago. Barrel finished at $1.77, up 12.75 cents on the week and three quarter-cents below a year ago. Eleven cars of block and only one of barrel traded hands on the week. The Agricultural Marketing Service-surveyed U.S. average block price hit $1.7769, up 1.4 cents. Barrel averaged $1.7972, down 0.7 cent. Keep in mind, a penny movement on the cheese price equates to about a dime on the milk price. Butter got caught in the updraft and closed Friday at $1.4375, up 4.25 cents on the week but 40.25 cents below a year ago. A whopping 35 carloads found new homes on the week. AMS butter averaged $1.3577, down 7.9 cents. The butter market was unsettled due to an undefined price See MIELKE, pg. 6B

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

MIELKE, from pg. 4B million pounds of Cheddar, Gouda and Monterey Jack cheese and 493,284 pounds of butter to customers in Asia and Europe. The product will be delivered through February 2014 and raised the CWT’s assisted member cooperative cheese sales to 85.237 million pounds, plus 65.440 million pounds of butter, 44,092 pounds of anhydrous milk fat and 218,258 pounds of whole milk powder to 35 countries on six continents. ■ Cash cheese prices sustained last Friday’s rebound and then some, but roller coasters do go down from time to time and that’s what happened Thursday, (dropping 2.25 cents) but then jumped 5.5 cents Friday to close the last week of August at $1.7825 per pound, 11.25 cents

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U.S. butter priced favorably for clearance overseas MIELKE, from pg. 5B trend and ample inventories, according to the DMN. Butter production is increasing at many churns as cream demand slackens from frozen dessert facilities. Higher bottling interest is also sending more cream into the marketplace, and butter churn operators report cream multiples were declining. Despite these cream market conditions, some butter manufacturers are reluctant to add to already hefty butter inventories. Although butter stocks are above year-ago holdings nationally, there are some butter/powder producers who cleared all their butter. With cream multiples decreasing and butter prices at low ebb, some manufacturers are anxious to rebuild their inventories for fall commitments. Other manufacturers are turning to print manufacturing for fourth quarter orders. Internationally, U.S. butter is priced favorably for clearance to overseas markets, according to the DMN. Cash powder was steady on the

week, with Grade A holding at $1.80 and Extra Grade at $1.78. AMS powder averaged $1.7741, up 0.3 cent, and dry whey averaged 58.29 cents/lb., up 0.7 cent. ■ California milk production was trending lower last week, resulting from a spell of hot weather. Some processors saw a quick 2- to 4-percent drop in receipts from the previous week earlier. Arizona output was also lower. Hot weather advisories were being issued for man and beast. Production in the Pacific Northwest continues to decline along expected seasonal lines. Utah and Idaho supplies were restricted by continued hot weather. Wildfires in the region have caused transportation issues as trucks were rerouted. The number of milk loads leaving the Central region heading to the Southeast to fill Class I demand is increasing from week to week. Handlers expect weekly milk load increases will continue until all schools are back in session and the pipeline is completely

filled. Manufacturing milk spot loads are scarce within the Central region as a result of increasing Class I demand and seasonally decreasing farm milk intakes. Milk production remains above seasonal levels and adding to manufacturing milk supplies in the Northeast. Manufacturing milk supplies in the Mid-Atlantic are being reduced as increased Class I demand in the Southeast is pulling supplies out of the region. Milk production in Florida continues to decline with the typical seasonal low point still a few weeks out. Florida imported 212 spot loads of milk the week of Aug. 12 which was the highest number since August 2006. ■ Looking “back to the futures,” second half federal order 2013 Class III contracts portended an $18.48 per hundredweight average on June 14. That figure slipped to $18.34 June 21; $17.87 on June 28; $18.02 on July 5; $17.91 on July 12; $18.33 on July 19;

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$17.88 on July 26; $17.84 on Aug. 2; $17.66 on Aug. 9; $17.74 on Aug. 16; $17.45 on Aug. 23; and was trading around $17.63 late-morning Aug. 30, including the announced July Class III price. ■ The World Forage Analysis Superbowl Dairy Forage Seminars will be held Oct. 2-5 at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, Wis. A World Dairy Expo press release stated that industry experts will present a series of educational programs geared toward assisting farmers with improved forage growing, storage and feeding techniques. The seminars are included with World Dairy Expo admission and will take place on the Dairy Forage Stage, in the Arena Building, near the World Analysis Forage Superbowl displays. Lee Mielke is a syndicated columnist who resides in Everson, Wash. His weekly column is featured in newspapers across the country and he may be reached at lkmielke@juno.com. ❖


Minnesota dairy industry crowns 60th Princess Kay of the Milky Way

Princess Kay candidates are judged on their general knowledge of the dairy industry, communication skills, personality and enthusiasm for dairy promo-

tion. The Midwest Dairy Association sponsors the Princess Kay program with funds provided by dairy farmers. This article is courtesy of the Midwest Dairy Association, a non-profit organization that provides consumers with information about the nutrition and wholesomeness of dairy foods, and conducts research and promotional programs. ❖

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Throughout her year-long reign as Princess Kay of the Milky Way, McWilliam will make public appearances helping consumers make a connection with Minnesota dairy farm families who are dedicated to producing wholesome milk while caring for their animals and natural resources.

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

MarJenna McWilliam, a 20-year-old college student from Winger, Minn., representing Polk County, was crowned the 60th Princess Kay of the Milky Way in an evening ceremony at the Minnesota State Fairgrounds Aug. 21. McWilliam, who will serve as the official goodwill ambassador for nearly 4,000 Minnesota dairy farmers, is the 60th woman to hold the honor. McWilliam is the daughter of Bruce and LaVonne McWilliam of Winger, and attends North Dakota State University, majoring in English education with a Norwegian language emphasis. County dairy princesses from throughout Minnesota competed for the Princess Kay of the Milky Way title. Rachael Photo courtesy of Midwest Dairy Association Rostad of Wanamingo, rep- MarJenna McWilliam, from resenting Good- Winger, Minn., will represent hue County, and Minnesota dairy producers as Katie Schmitt of the 60th Princess Kay of the Rice, representing Milky Way. Benton County, were selected as runners-up. Alydia Lee of Lake City, representing Wabasha County, was named Miss Congeniality. Scholarships were awarded to Johanna Knorr of Pelican Rapids, representing West Otter Tail County; Libby Mills of Lake City, representing Goodhue County; and Schmitt. McWilliam’s first official duty as Princess Kay was to sit in a rotating cooler in the Dairy Building for about six hours on the opening day of the Minnesota State Fair to have her likeness sculpted in a 90pound block of butter. Each of the other finalists will have her likeness carved in butter during the fair, as well. This year marks butter sculptor Linda Christensen’s 42nd year carving the Princess Kay of the Milky Way winner and finalists at the Minnesota State Fair.

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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SROC celebrates 100 years A century ago, legislative appropriations allowed for the purchase of 246 acres near Waseca, Minn., for the establishment of the Southeast Demonstration Farm and Experiment Station. The goal of this new facility was to demonstrate the value of good management and serve as a center for dissemination of knowledge. Over the years, development of new tech-

nologies and innovative production practices has made positive impacts on food production systems, human health, renewable energy and the environment. Currently, there are seven academic research programs at the Southern Research and Outreach Center with supported outreach components that integrate all aspects of agriculture in a forward-

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MANURE HANDLING AND MUCH MORE

Men harvest small grain variety trials in 1938 at what is now the Southern Research and Outreach Center at Waseca, Minn.

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That century of research and education is being celebrated 3-8 p.m. Sept. 19 at the SROC on the west edge of Waseca, with a wide variety of informative displays, door prizes, games and fun events. There will also be a free picnic meal from 4:30-7 p.m. Although significant changes have occurred over the past 100 years, the goal continues to be focused on serving the people of southern Minnesota through world-class research and

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outreach programs. Needless to say, it is not all about the facility — it is about people. The SROC would not be where it is today without talented staff, supportive communities and industry partners. Visitors to the celebration are guaranteed to leave with lasting memories as they walk through the commemorative display of historical photos that reflect on 100 years of service to agriculture. For more information, log on to http://sroc.cfans.umn.edu. ❖

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Hefty: Technology to tackle production demands Farmer, agronomist and media personality Brian Hefty thinks that as we keep pushing for more production from each acre of land, ag technology will continue to ramp up — including in the biological arena. Speaking at the Case IH tent at Farmfest, the co-host of RFDTV’s “Ag PhD” program mentioned micro nutrients, sulfur and other elements are often now showing up as a factor in yield limits. “We’ve addressed the N, P and K issues for many years. Now as an agronomist I’m trying to figure out what is the limiting yield factor on this guy’s farm, even down to these last two acres,” Hefty said.

Rewind problems as rows get narrower. So that means breeding hybrids that work better in this environment. We’re seeing 40,000-, even 45,000-plant-per-acre research projects so breeders are expecting narrower rows going forward.”

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At Farmfest, Hefty questioned the earlier U.S. Department of Agriculture projection of 155 bushel average yields and he also doubted the accuracy of 97 million acres of corn getting planted this spring. The Aug. 12 USDA projection was 13.763 billion bushel corn crop, a 28percent increase from droughthit 2012 but 2 percent smaller Down the road he sees biologithan traders expected. He’s cal products becoming a big part optimistic about grain prices Dick Hagen of agriculture as we go forward. going forward but said the flip “That’s why many companies Agronomist and radio/TV personality Brian Hefty puts his knowledge to work on his own farm. side is a better opportunity for have invested tens of millions of livestock producers, ethanol dollars in buying biological comgood, too. plants and other end-users of corn to lock-in prices panies and are stepping up the pace on introduction “... there are a lot of exciting things in both plant significantly cheaper than a year ago. of new bio products into the ag market,” he said. growth hormones and biological products that I The USDA estimated this year’s corn crop will sell Hefty added that he asked a CEO of a major ag think will be the next step in ramping up productiv- for an average of $4.80 a bushel at the farm gate, chemical manufacturing company about biological ity. There will be other tools out there that will help down $2 a bushel from 2012. Soybeans are pegged products. “He told me, ‘Brian, here’s the main reason us go further in this feeding-the-world challenge.” at $11.35 a bushel, down $3 from the record seasonwhy we’re getting involved. Yes, there is some yield When farmers ask Hefty what single thing they average price for the 2012 crop. gain but Europe is trying to eliminate ag chem can do to gain 25 bushels yield, he said that anymore Hefty said that with the “Ag PhD” program, their usage, even with our safe products. So what are they there doesn’t appear to be a single new input that mission is simply to help farmers wherever they going to be down to? They’ll be moving to biological will do that job. “But if I can suggest a few five- may be. “We just have a passion for agriculture, a products.’ bushel ideas he can do, then we can get that extra 25 passion for farming. We want to help farmers make “This gentleman continued, ‘Do I think these bio- bushels he’s pushing for.” farming work better regardless of where they live,” logicals will be as good as our synthetic products? How about cover crops? Are they the next trick to he said. No, but it’s at least an option for the European farmmaximizing crop yields and reducing soil erosion? For more information, log on to www.agphd.com.❖ ers. If we can combine the biologicals with our synthetics we’re going to gain more yield, more total “That’s another tool waiting to be looked at,” Hefty production from each acre.’” said. “On our own farm I don’t think we’ve done a Hefty suggested that when Monsanto, Pioneer and good enough job on the erosion side. We’ve made $9,250 Completely Erected! other major seed outfits started talking about dou- good progress but there’s more we can do. Cover crops aren’t exactly new but we haven’t been using r e bling yields they didn’t foresee this happening just Oth ng i Build On because of improved genetics. “That’s why they’ve them. Case IH surveyed their farmer customers about the No. 1 new technology they were going to izes al! S been cranking hard on traits, and I see biological i Spec products being next in their tool boxes. And that also use in 2014. Cover crops ranked first. includes seed treatments, equipment and all aspects “So apparently the strategy thinking of farmers is of farming to make this hurdle.” that cover crops are something worth considering,” Hefty said they have been using biological prod- he said. “I think we’ll be doing more on cover crops in ucts for quite a few years in their own farming oper- our own program and the Extension world is defiation at Baltic, S.D. He also indicated most soybean nitely providing farmers more inputs on crops that producers have been into biologicals on a small scale work, how they work, when to seed, and how to using inoculation products. He said they’ve looked at seed.” quite a few products, with some showing real promHefty said 22-inch and 30-inch are now the norm Livestock, Hay, Machinery & Grain Storage, etc. ise. His company is also getting into plant growth but he added, “when we go to narrow rows we have Pete Schilling hormones and did say one product they used on corn other issues. The equipment costs more. It’s very this year “looks like a winner. Also a product that we heavy equipment so we have soil compaction. Plant 507-241-0174 used with our early fertilizer applications looks real populations go up and that leads to more disease Gaylord, MN

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

By DICK HAGEN The Land Staff Writer Is microbiology next on your farming agenda?

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

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Corn maturity delayed; soybean aphids still need to be scouted Warmer than normal temperatures and sunny days led to 6.6 days suitable for field work in Minnesota for the week ending Aug. 25, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Statistics Service. Eighty-five percent of Minnesota’s corn was at or beyond the milk stage. Corn is 5 percent dented, about two weeks behind normal. Corn conditions were rated at 46 percent good and 10 percent excellent. In many fields the calendar dates of silking and pollination occurred later than normal. A rule of thumb is that field grain corn requires 55 to 60 days from the time of pollination until physiological maturity of the corn plant as indicated by the presence of a “black layer” of dead plant cells at the corn

kernel point of attachment on the corn cob. This would translate this year to around Oct. 1 or the first week of October for many area fields. Thus there is a chance of an earlier-than-normal (Oct. 1-10) killing frost which could affect final yield, maturity and test weight of grain corn. Field grain corn will still need time after that to dry to a combine/grain storage moisture for the year as physiological maturity moisture is typically from 30- to 35-percent moisture content. Hybrid maturity differences in development time occur primarily from emergence to silking, not from silking to maturity. To predict whether corn will mature before frost note the hybrid maturity, planting date and tasseling (silking) date of the field. For silage, add 42 to

47 days on to this date to predict 50 percent kernel milk, while for grain, add 55 to 60 days to predict maturity. These dates are guidelines which will require further in-season decisions as the season unfolds. Another way to look at this is that when corn begins the “dent stage” there are still 27 to 32 days required until maturity for grain corn and silage corn is still just 75 to 85 percent of maximum silage yield. Eighty-five percent of soybeans were setting pods, lagging behind last year’s 100 percent and the normal 95 percent. Soybean conditions declined slightly to 54 percent good or excellent. In addition nearly all of the spring wheat crop had ripened. Spring wheat harvest was 65 percent complete, nearly catching up to the normal harvesting pace of 66 percent. Spring wheat conditions improved to 66 percent good or excellent. Minnesota’s oat harvest advanced 18 percentage points to 80 percent complete, five points behind normal. Soybean aphid alert from Bruce Potter, University of Minnesota integrated pest management specialist at Lamberton Do not assume 2013 soybean aphid problems are nearly over. In portions of Minnesota, an increasing proportion

of fields are projected to reach economic threshold the week of Aug. 11. The large number of late-planted fields may mean risk from soybean aphids will be later in the season than usual. The economic threshold is 250 aphids per plant, 80 percent of the plants with aphids present, aphid populations increasing and soybeans are less than R6. Unlike the spotty, early-season infestations created by aphids from moving from buckthorn and colonizing soybeans, current infestations are now much more widespread. Over the past couple of weeks, migrating winged aphids have created relatively uniform infestations in many fields. Recent weather had been almost ideal for aphid population increases. As usual, the extent and level of infestations varies by geography, soybean maturity and other factors but in some areas of Minnesota, many fields are now approaching economic threshold. Over the next week or so, it is important that Minnesota soybean producers assess aphid populations in their fields. This article was submitted by Dave Nicolai, University of Minnesota Extension educator specializing in crops at the regional center in Farmington, Minn. He may be reached at (651) 480-7706 or nico0071@umn.edu. ❖

MANKATO, Minn. — DuPont Pioneer celebrated the opening of its new $2.5 million corn research center midAugust. “This expansion is a direct result of our commitment to helping Minnesota growers place the right products on their farms,” Steve Reno, vice president, regional business director-U.S., said in a statement. “Testing products in the environment in which they will be grown is essential to helping growers get the most out of their seed investment as they strive to help meet the growing global demand for food.” The new facility provides space to accommodate the continued growth of the corn program within the company including supporting the IMPACT plot product advancement program, which selects the best Pioneer brand products to fit the local growing environment. This expansion includes renovation of

existing office space and development of a new site plan designed to increase safety and efficiency.

Pioneer opens expanded research center near Mankato Pioneer first established a research station in Mankato in 1958 and built a center in the current location in 1966. It was last remodeled and expanded in 1998. Since then, the center has experienced substantial growth in the number and size of its research programs, which develop corn hybrids, commercialize new technologies and test nextgeneration products for growers in southern Minnesota. DuPont Pioneer — www.pioneer.com — is the world’s leading developer and supplier of advanced plant genetics, providing seeds to farmers in more than 90 countries. This article was published in August in the Mankato Free Press, a sister publication to The Land under The Free Press Media. ❖


010 Employment

Employment

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020 Real Estate Wanted

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For grain and livestock Sell your land or real estate WANTED: Land & farms. I have clients looking for in 30 days for 0% commisfarm. Part-time or Fulldairy, & cash grain operasion. Call Ray 507-339-1272 time. Person must be detions, as well as bare land pendable and able to work parcels from 40-1000 acres. Selling or Buying Farms long hours during harvest. Both for relocation & inor 1031 Exchange! Farm experience and CDL vestments. If you have preferred. Located in St. Private Sale or even thought about selling James area. 507-920-8217 Sealed Bid Auction! contact: Paul Krueger, Call “The Land Specialists!” Farm & Land Specialist, Northland Real Estate Edina Realty, SW Suburban Real Estate 020 612-756-1899 or 320-894-7337 Office, 14198 Commerce www.farms1031.com Ave NE, Prior Lake, MN Farm For Sale: 476.38 55372. acres, woods-136 acres, We have extensive lists of paulkrueger@edinarealty.com pasture-55, crop-275 acres. Land Investors & farm buy(952)447-4700 2 story home & barn w/73 ers throughout MN. We alstalls + pens. Other storways have interested buyage buildings. Clark Co. ers. For top prices, go with Colby, WI. 715-387-5511 our proven methods over thousands of acres. ★★★★★★★★★★★★★ House & Acreage For Sale. Serving Minnesota 22 acres, 15 prime tillable. Mages Land Co & Auc Serv House with 2+ bdrm, 1 www.magesland.com bath, 1 1/2 car garage, Fall 800-803-8761 Creek School district. S6470 Every Wednesday Green Meadow Rd, Fall Creek. (715)832-7192 5:00 PM - Farm Misc. Ladysmith, WI. 3 BR 2 BA home on 80 wooded acres about 1600 sq. ft., heated garage. Easy access to ATV & snowmobile trails. 715-532-0310 after 5 p.m.

LAND FOR SALE 230 Ac Maple Lake, MN, good rental Income, Investor Wanted! 140 Ac JorFASTRACK Distributors dan MN, can be divided, Wanted for the #1 Equine Rental Income + Developand Dairy probiotic. ment Potential! 11 Ac HobCall 1-888-266-0014 Ext. 8663 by Farm; Excellent for Horses or Beef Cattle, Jordan, MN, additional Land Available. Call Northland RE for details! 612-756-1899

WEEKLY AUCTION

6:00 PM - Hay & Straw 7:00 PM - Livestock 8:00 PM - Sheep & Goats 1st. Wed. of Month

HOTOVEC AUCTION CENTER N. Hwy. 15 Hutchinson, MN

320-587-3347

www.hotovecauctions.com

★★★★★★★★★★★★★

ADVERTISER LISTING Abrahams Farm Repair........17B Adrian Mfg Inc......................4A Ag Power ............................20B Ag Systems Inc......................8B Agrisystems/Systems West....6A Agro-Culture Liquid Fertilizers ........................20A Brokaw Supply Co ................5B Country Cat............................6B Courtland Waste Handling ....8B Cyrilla Beach Homes inc ....17A Dan Pike Clerking ......13B, 14B DeKalb ................................11A Diers Ag Supply ..................21A Double B Manufacturing ......3A Duncan Trailers....................22B Emerson Kalis......................16B Excelsior Homes West Inc ..14A Farm Drainage Plows Inc ....18B Greenwald Farm Center ......17B Grizzly Buildings Inc ..........10A Haas Equipment ..................15B Henslin Auctions..................11B Hewitt Drainage Equipment ..7B Holland Auction Co ............14B Holt Truck Center................23A Hotovec Auction Center Inc 11B Hughes Auction Service LLC11B Keith Bode ..........................16B Keltgens Inc ........................15A Kerkhoff Auction & Real Estate................................13B Kibble Equipment Inc 19B, 24B

Kiester Implement ..............16B L & M Rentals LLC ............19B Lano Equipment - Norwood16B Larson Brothers Impl ..19B, 21B Lundeen Auction & Appraisers ........................12B Luther Honda of St Cloud ..23A Mages Auction Service12B, 15B Massop Electric ..................18B Matejcek Implement ............23B MN Used Truck Sales..........21B Monson Motors ..................14A Mycogen ....................12A, 13A New Holland..........................9A Northern Ag Service ............21B Northern MN Draft Horse ..22A Nutra Flo Co ................6A, 15B Pete Schilling ........................9B Pioneer ..................................5A Pruess Elevator Inc ..............15B Rabe International Inc ........15B Ram Buildings ......................4B Schweiss Inc ........................18B Smiths Mill Implement Inc..21B Sorensen Sales & Rentals....19B Syngenta ..............7A, 18A, 19A Tjosvold Equipment ............18B Vermeer..................................8A Wayne Pike Auction Co LLC12B Wearda Implement ..............22B Willmar Farm Center ..........22B Willmar Precast ..................16A Woodford Ag LLC ..............17B

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• PO Box 3169 • 418 S 2nd Street • Mankato, MN 56001 • theland@thelandonline.com

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Be An Auctioneer & Personal Property Appraiser Continental Auction Schools Mankato, MN & Ames, IA 507-625-5595 www.auctioneerschool.com

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ADVERTISING NOTICE: Please check your ad the first week it runs. We make every effort to avoid errors by checking all copy, but sometimes errors are missed. Therefore, we ask that you review your ad for correctness. If you find a mistake, please call (507) 345-4523 immediately so that the error can be corrected. We regret that we cannot be responsible for more than one week's insertion if the error is not called to our attention. We cannot be liable for an amount greater than the cost of the ad. THE LAND has the right to edit, reject or properly classify any ad. Each classified line ad is separately copyrighted to THE LAND. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited.

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Announcements

September 6, 2013

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AUCTIONS & CLASSIFIEDS


Merchandise

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Antiques & Collectibles

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Bins & Buildings

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Silo demolition, we buy Harvestor silos, we charge for staves, taking bookings now. 507-995-2331 Stormor Bins & EZ-Drys. 100% financing w/no liens or red tape, call Steve at Fairfax Ag for an appointment. 888-830-7757 Grain Handling Equip

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3500 bu hopper bin, like new cond, $4,500; 30' drying bin, complete, 15HP fan & burner, full floor, 4 auger stirator, 8” unload. New 8” power sweep for 18' bin, $1,500. 507-697-6133 FOR SALE: Hesston 4790 FOR SALE: 10,000 bu grain www.usedbinsales.com bin, $3,900. (715)792-2267 3x4 big square baler, exc condition. 440-812-8446 750 Bu Unverferth/Brent SILO DOORS Grain Cart (2004) w/ Scale Wood or steel doors shipped Shedded Real Nice. Glenpromptly to your farm coe 9 Shank #7400 (Auto restainless fasteners set Shanks) Very Good. hardware available. Rhino 8 Ft 3 Pt Cutter w/ (800)222-5726 Stump Jumper. 319-347-6138 Landwood Sales LLC

32 Acres Farm, Tractor, Guns, Tools and Collectables

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Real Estate Auction

Saturday, Sept. 14th • 10:00 AM 71831 Co. Rd. #21, Fairfax, MN 55332

FROM FAIRFAX: SOUTH

UPCOMING! Farmer - Dealer - Recreation

AUCTION Thursday, September 12th at 4:00 p.m.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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Buying/Selling Gold & Silver FOR SALE: '36 John Deere FOR SALE: JD 5400-5830 & 6000 & 7000 series forage A, still in it's work clothes, bars, coins, rings, diaharvesters. Used kernel runs great, shedded for monds, pocket watches, silprocessors, also, used JD 20+ yrs. 507-831-1308 ver dollars, rare coins, cur40 knife Dura-Drums, & rency, $5.00, $10.00, $20.00 drum conversions for 5400 Gold coins, Krugerands, 031 & 5460. Call (507)427-3520 sterling silver sets, any- Hay & Forage Equip www.ok-enterprise.com thing marked 10-K, 14-K, FOR SALE: Gehl 1400 baler, 18-K, .925. Any gold or silFOR SALE: NH 489 haybine new crowder wheels, new ver item. Compare prices $4,500. 515-827-5162 belts, platform belts, pick before you sell. 32 years at up belts, gone through by NH 790 chopper, NH 824 the same retail location, dealer. Really great macornhead, 1-owner, always Fairmont, Minnesota, chine to add to your line! shedded, $6,000. 952-292-6870 Kuehls, 507-235-3886 320-286-2926 Small bale conveyors, 36', 15' w/ electric motors, one is FOR SALE: Gehl 800 forage on transport. 320-563-8453 harvester w/ 3038 head, 30” rows, shedded, clean. 507Bins & Buildings 033 828-1036

Location: Wright County Fairgrounds • 1010 1st. St., Howard Lake, MN Items Already Consigned: Ford 8600 diesel; JD 730 diesel, WF, (nice); MM 335 (nice); MM 4 star; MM 670LP; MM U standard; IH Super M; Case 930; Ford 701; Massey 265 diesel w/loader; IH H; Ford 9N; JD A; Belarus 250; AC D17; Massey 44; Bobcat 732; Nice Ferguson spreader; Schweiss 1850 zero turn lawn mower; ARPS 3 point backhoe; Melroe multi-weeder; Mohawk chisel plow; IH 45 20’ cultivator; 12’ chisel plow; 1983 Fleetwood 5th wheel camper; IH 5 bottom plow; Oliver 575 plow; Allied 794 hyd. loader; Ford 151 4-16 plow; New Idea 324 corn picker; Massey hay rake; Large belt conveyor; Small pulltype disc; Parker 2600 gravity box; 3 point & skid loader equipment; Tools; Shop items, Antiques & More!

ON

ST. HWY. 4,

TAKE

CO. RD. #21

Auctioneer’s Note: Due to health Issues, Jerry & Sue will be selling their beautiful Farm and all of their well maintained personal property at auction. Address: 71831 Co Rd #21, Fairfax, MN 55332 32.35 Acres w/10 acres tillable. Parcel: # 11.105.0300 Nicollet Co. This Hobby Farm is a chance of a lifetime to make your dreams come true! 32.35 Acre hobby Farm w/approx. 10 acres tillable - Mature wooded hunting grounds--Trout Creek. Call to Mages Land Co to get a complete info packet, or set time to come see all this kingdom for yourself. Tractor, Lawn Mowers & Machinery: ‘08 Case IH 40, MFW, 260 hrs., w/C3XL50 quick tach loader, rear wgts., 2 hyd.; King Kutter 3 pt. tiller; Bush Hog 6’ mower; JD 12’ 2-bar digger; Case 11’ digger; IH 12.5’ disk; 2 steel tooth drag sections; JD L111 Garden Trak 42” cut; Dixon Zero turn 48”; Simplicity 38” mower/bagger; Poulon Pro frt. tined tiller, 8.25 hp. Guns & Ammo: Pistols include-Fireball 221 w/scope, bolt; Para Hi Cap “34th Div Red Bull” edition 40 S&W cal, semi w/5 mags & case; Ruger 22 cal w/scope, 2 mags, semi; 22 cal rifle; Savege bolt & auto 742 w/scope 30-06; SKS 7.62x39 mm w/bayonet & tool pack; asst ammo; lg asst of reloadable brass & reload supplies Household Items: 50” flatscreen TV; Elec. fireplace; Full & Queen bed set; Couch; Chairs; Recliner;

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MILE,

1ST PLACE

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Glassware; Oak desk; Book shelves; File cabinets; Office supplies; Canning jars; Assorted decor items; Misc. sporting items; Wicker couch & chair; Patio furniture; Gas grill; Cast iron bear/piggy bank; Treadmill; Nice selection of household items. Shop & Tool Items: MTD 21 tn V-H wood splitter; Jonsered & Echo chainsaws; ‘12 Sanborn air comp., 110V; 2 x adj. stilts; 8’ & 6’ 2-sided step ladders; Fuel barrel on stand; Sledge hammer; sprayer; ATV sprayer; 8’ lawn wagon; 6 rolls of barbwire fencing; Water pumps; Large assortment of shop & hand tools. Vehicles & Recreational: ‘04 Ford XLT 4x4 extended cab, 240k miles; Spectrum 18.5’ boat, alum.-console-livewell-2 depth finder w/trailer; Johnson VRO 40H 16’ console steer w/trailer; Evinrude Tri-Hull console, 60H w/trailer; 2-wheel trailer; Nylon minnow seine, 6’x150” w/1⁄4” mesh. Antiques & Misc. Items: 3’x5’ Schmidt beer sign; Bicycles; Pop bottles; RW crocks; RW chicken feeder; Egg basket; Barrel shaped pop dispenser; Cast iron kettle w/stand; SS milk buckets; Cream Cans, and lots of farm collectibles.

For Terms & Information Packet or to Schedule an Appointment - Call Matt Mages at 507-276-7002 or mattm@magesland.com

OWNERS : JERRY AND SUE MEIDL Listing Auctioneer: Matt Mages Lic # 08-13-006, 507-276-7002

Derek Lundeen #86-86 (612) 280-1725 • Dan Fogarty #86-35 (320) 543-2504

Auctioneers: Larry Mages, Lafayette • Joe Maidl, Lafayette • Joe Wersal, Winthrop • John Goelz, Franklin Preview 1 hour before auction, Everthing sold “AS IS”, Everything to be paid for immediately after the auction. Broker & Clerk: Mages Land Co. & Auction Service LLC • Not Responsible for Accidents Lunch & restroom on grounds Fire Arms buyrs must have valid drivers license, pistol buyers must have valid “permit to purchase” permit

All items sold As-Is. Not responsible for items that do not show

magesland.com

Lundeen Auction & Appraisers Inc. & Fogarty Auction


Grain Handling Equip

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Grain Handling Equip

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Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

035 Farm Implements

Brillion Seeder, $2,000; Hiniker 28' field cultivator w/drag, $2,000. 651-380-6921 FOR SALE: JD 4420 combine, 2500 hrs., CAH, 315 flex head, 2-212 pickup headers, 1-6 belt, 1-5 belt; JD 3155 FWA, CAH, 3450 hrs., stored inside. 701-3672772 or 218-937-5673 FOR SALE: PTO shaft, big thousand to implement & small thousand to tractor, like new (10 hrs of use) $1,000 firm. Call 507-8400483 Jackson MN FOR SALE: Super B AS600 grain dryer, AB, LP, sgl ph, good cond., $6,000 OBO; DL1060 silage chopper w/2RN CH, good cond., knives 90%, $4,500 OBO. 507-224-2176 or 507-829-2245

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Ford 4500 backhoe, works Hydrostatic & Hydraulic Regood, $4,850/OBO. BALZER pair Repair-Troubleshoot2000 20' stalk chopper, 3pt ing Sales-Design Custom hookup, very recent knives hydraulic hose-making up & hangers, $4,500. 507-525to 2” Service calls made. 0682 Winnebago STOEN'S Hydrostatic Service 16084 State Hwy 29 N Ford 600 Loader w/trip buckGlenwood, MN 56334 320et & 7' back blade. Exc 634-4360 cond, $2,200. (715) 743-4583 JD 46A ldr; JD 148 & 158 Glencoe 7400 7 shank soil ldrs; JD 45 ldr; Case IH saver w/ auto resets, level2255 ldr; Paulson ldr off ing bar, like new cond, D15 Allis; 10' pole box $8,950. Case IH 4800 field scraper; 2 barn cupolas, cultivator 26 ½' w/ walking good cond; 3pt 5 whl hay tandems all around w/ harrake; (2) Donahue trailers, row, $7,250. JD 630 disc, 26' 28'; Kewannee 8' blade, like hyd wings, very nice new. 507-399-3006 Koestler $14,500. JD 620, power Equipment steering, like new tires, runs perfect, $4,950. FarWe buy mall M, new rubber, set up Salvage Equipment for antique pulling, nice Parts Available running tractor, $2,250. Bill Hammell Equip., Inc. (320) 221-0319 (507)867-4910

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- - - Consignments will be accepted until NOON September 10th! - - wheel trailer, 10.00x20 truck tires; 2-8x16 hay racks, 6 ton gear; Hydraulic barge box & gear; EZ Flow 300 gravity box with 10 ton gear; 1974 Ditch Witch trailer; 1993 Star 16ft tandem axle flatbed trailer; Unverferth 10 ton running gear, 10.00x20 tires; 300 bu gravity box w/running gear. TOOLS: DeWalt table saw w/stand; New 10” compound mitre saw; Sears scroll saw; Skil saws and blades; Navigator saw; Electric sanders; Paint sprayers; Bolt cutter; Collection of crescent, diamond, & sears crescent wrenches; Pipe wrenches; 12” Sears planer on stand; Garden tools; Small tool cabinet; Cement tools; B&D drill set; Winpower Model 610 PTO generator; Electric winch - 2,000# pull; 6ft aluminum ladder; Wood extension ladder. MISCELLANEOUS: Hub duals (off 806) 9 hole, 18.4x38; Northern leader woodburning furnace; Goodman house furnace; 80 sheets of tan color steel, 8ft long; Light truck tires; 200 bu Parker gravity box, box only; Pair large gauge wheels & brackets; Burr mill; Blue Ox tow bar; Intertek corn/pellet stove; Kewanee roller mill; 5corral gates; 10 ft square bale feeder; Cattle head gate; Trailer hitches; Lumber; Car ramps; Ice auger; Ice chisels; Car stands; Spare car & pickup tires; 5-tubular cattle gates; Cattle oiler/scratcher on stand; 3-16ft metal gates;

IH steel wheel gear; 2-hole suitcase portable fish house; AC D17 heat houser, NIB; 5 ring x 24’ bin w/o roof (for inside building). MACHINERY 2700 JD 7 shank disc chisel, new chisels, exc. cond.; Int. grain drill w/grass seeder, mechanical lift; 20ft drag w/adjustment wheels; 28ft spring tine drag; Wilrich chisel plow, 13 shanks; IH tandem disc, 18ft, drag; IH 710 plow, 5x18s, coulters; Pull type road grader on rubber; Kasco 10’ chisel plow; JD 3 point 8’ blade; IH Model 10 hyd grain drill, grass seeder; Meyers Model 225 manure spreader, 2 beaters; Melroe 8 section hyd drag; Ford Model 241 tandem disc, 20’, 22” blades; Broyhill sprayer; Glencoe 12’ field cultivator w/drag; NH Model 1499 swather w/cab & air; NH Model 270 square baler; OMC 595 round baler; Ford haybine, 9 feet; H&S Y10-13 wheel rake, 13 wheels; JD 350 PTO hay rake. COLLECTIBLE: Antique 5 gal Standard Oil oil can; Antique garden cultivator; 5 gal Standard Oil measuring can; Antique tools; 6-Standard Oil decals; 1/16 JD toys; JD pictures; Antique cast iron wood splitter. MOWERS: Dyna Mark 32”, 10hp rear engine riding mower, 5 speed; JD 212 Riding mower, above avg cond, 38” JD snowblower, 42” mower deck, chains, Kohler engine, and cab.

PRINT: Prairie Pintails - R.U. McDonald. RECREATIONAL: 1994 Polaris 400 ARV, liquid cooled, 4x4; 2007 Kawasaki ZX-6R Ninja motorcycle; 1968 Buzz Buggy dune buggy go cart, made in Milbank, SD; 1969 Crestliner boat w/70hp Johnson motor; 16’ fishing boat, 1990 homemade boat trailer; Force 25hp motor; 1984 Alumacraft 14ft boat, Johnson 9.9hp motor, factory trailer, depth finder, oars; 1997 FLSTC Heritage motorcycle, 127 cu. in. Ultima motor, 145hp, 6 spd. trans.; 1996 Pro1 Quad Link Custom motorcycle, 80 cu. in. Harley motor, dual carbs, 5 spd. trans.; 2009 KLX 110 Monster Edition dirt bike; 2 Reaper Choppers - new demo’s, 7.5ft. long, 6.5hp Subaru motor. FIREARMS & AMMO: EIG-Eibar-Spain black powder pistol; Davenport 1895 12 ga shotgun; Russian Model 1942 bolt action rifle, 7.62x39; Stevens 94C 20 ga. shotgun; Winchester Model 12, 12ga shotgun; Winchester 1300 12ga shotgun; Maverick by Mossberg Model 88 12ga pump shotgun; Winchester Model 20, 12 ga pump shotgun; K-Mart, made in Brazil, Model 151, 12 ga single shot shotgun; 10-AR magazines; 4-9mm magazines; Misc shotgun shells; Gun cleaning kits; .308 ammunition.

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

CABIN: 16’x14’ Cabin/Room w/6’ veranda on 2 sides, wired w/circuit breakers, heated ceiling fan, cedar line inside, cedar laminate flooring, bay window w/carpet bottom - can be used as a bench. TRACTORS: 706 International gas tractor, WF, loader w/2 buckets; 4640 JD tractor, 9700 hrs, new battery & drive tires; Steiger Bearcat 225, 4WD tractor, 5600 hrs, 95% tires, 3306 CAT, Series IV; Melroe Bobcat 500 skidloader, 24hp Honda engine. AUGERS: Koyker S1ooo-10” auger w/swing hopper, hyd lift; 6” 45’ PTO auger; Mayrath 8x55 auger; 6x15 discharge auger, 2hp, 3 phase; 4x14 sweep, 1hp, 3 phase. VEHICLES: 1994 Lincoln Mark VIII, 2dr, new tires; 2002 Saturn L20 4 dr car, AT, cloth intererior; 1994 Oldsmobile 3800 mini van; 1988 Chevrolet pickup; 1997 Chevrolet Lumina, 4 dr; 2002 Ford Explorer XLT, 193,675 miles. JD HEADS: JD 218 Flex Bean Head; JD 643 High Tin Corn Head; JD 843 (1992 model) Contour Master, all new JD poly in 2010, ear savers; 2006 JD 630 Flex Bean Head, exc. condition; Road Runner tandem axle 30’ head trailer. TRAILERS: 2005 Cargo Mate 6x8 enclosed trailer, V-front, single rear door; 2-wheel tilt bed trailer; StanHoist trailer, steel box & hoist; 2

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(2) Parker 2600 gravity box- FOR SALE: '04 Gehl CTL70 track skid steer, $23,000; es on 12T trailers w. truck Gehl 4625SX skid steer, tires, $2,450/ea; (2) Parker $9,000. 507-276-3289 2500 gravity boxes on 12T trailers, 16.1x16.5 tires, FOR SALE: 18.4-42 duals, $2,650/ea; '02 JD 930F full ladder & axle extensions finger flex head, PTO from Case-IH 5088 combine, drives, $7,450; Case IH 700 used one year. WANTED: 8x18 pull type plow, black Large singles for same. springs w/ coulters, $7,900; 507-829-7906 or 507-828-8951 JD 3020 D tractor, WF, 3pt, 2 hyds, $6,950; 21 suitcase FOR SALE: Case IH 6500 wgts & brackets, was on Conserva-till, 11 shank disk 9280 Case IH, $1,800. 320chisel, good cond, $6,500; 769-2756 MF 9120 bean head, 20' w/ SCH sickle used one yr, exc 20 Ft RHINO Model SR20 cond, $3,750. Also, MF 1163 Heavy Duty Cutter 6R CH, $2,500. 507-340-1001 (4 Gear Boxes) (2007. SUNFLOWER 7 Shank #4311 Disc Ripper w/ SUMMERS Heavy Harrow. Both Real Good. 319-347-2349 Can Del For Sale: Cleveland Model 95 Tiling Machine Wheel 3970 JD chopper, exc. shape, machine on tracks, digs 3RNcornhead, 7 1/2' hay at least 15" wide X 6' head, tandems, new deep. Good overall concrossover pan, ready to go. dition, ready to work. (715)556-0677 May consider trade of JD 4020 or similar $7,500 FOR SALE: '07 JD 635F poly OBO (or best offer) (507) fingers, single point 920-2803 hookup, very good poly; JD 980 27' chisel plow, truSALE: Gehl 100 depth standards w/ anhy- FOR grinder/mixer, MM 320 2R drous & harrow; 25' bean corn picker; Clockwise head trailer. 507-360-9800 Berg barn cleaner w/ chain. 763-295-2813 FOR SALE: '84 8820 JD combine, 8R CH & 25' bean FOR SALE: JD 100 big square baler, completely head, 4760 hrs, $20,000 comrecond, like new, 2 new plete; Balzer stalk chopper, preservative tanks, rear 1400, $3,500; J&M 350-20-12T hitch for towing, exc cond, gravity wagon, $2,800; $28,900; L&D 1000 sprayer Hutchinson 8”x53' auger, w/ 3pt hitch, 18.4x38 tires, $600; Kewannee 8”x36' 60' x-fold boom, new hoses, auger, $400. 507-829-6885 controls, pump, etc, exc cond, $18,900. 507-649-0963

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

FOR SALE: 18” 3hp fans, 3 phase w/ controls, also 18” For Sale: Scale Truck Scale 6.5 ft by 10 ft, 50k 3hp fans single phase & 5hp cap. auto printer, $3000 motors, 3 phase. All 2 yrs $3,000 (507) 456-2516 old. 6” air pipes & cyclones for air system; 500 gal fuel barrel w/ pump. 320-269- For Sale: Super B AS-8 Corn Dryer Electric single 8719 or 320-226-0296 phase, 1000 bu. holding bin, Electric 8"x24' fill auger. FOR SALE: Behlen 380 corn Call after 6:00 PM (952) dryer w/ heat savers, 500-3867 Feterl rotary grain screener, $2,500/ea. 507-276-3289 FOR SALE: Westfield 10”x91' auger w/ swing hopper, exc cond. 507-461-2736 FOR SALE: Feterl 10”x34' grain auger, like new, Hutchinson 8”x41' grain FOR SALE:Used grain bins, floors unload systems, stiauger w/ 5hp motor, good rators, fans & heaters, aercondition; DMC 8x8 jump ation fans, buying or sellauger w/ 1 1/2hp motor, ing, try me first and also good cond. 320-212-2579 call for very competitive contract rates! Office FOR SALE: Feterl 12x72 hours 8am-5pm Monday – white non swing hopper Friday Saturday 9am - 12 auger, good cond, $4,200. noon or call 507-697-6133 Feterl 10x66 white auger, Ask for Gary good cond, $2,200. 952-240JUST IN! Brent 544 gravity 2193 wagon w/ curved frame; Westendorf ldr, IH mnts; FOR SALE: Feterl auger (2) Demco 365s, red & 8”x60' w/ 10hp motor, real green. Plus More! Peterson good. $1,500. 952-955-3233 or Equipment New Ulm 612-360-1235 507-276-6957 or 507-276-6958 FOR SALE: Hutchinson auger, 10”x66' PTO drive, Farm Implements 035 good shape, $775. 320-2203114 '09 JD 635 hydra flex head, single pt hookup, $15,750; FOR SALE: Kan-Sun Model JD 637 35' rock flex disk, 10-21-210 continuos flow black land special, hyd levgrain dryer, single phase, eling w/ JD harrow, propane, good working con$31,750; JD 4960 MFW tracdition. 320-221-0484 tor, 4 hyds, 18.4x42 duals, fresh motor OH, 8300 hrs, $42,500; set of 320-90 triples FOR SALE: NECO 2 stage for JD combines 50-70 segrain screener, model 51A, ries, complete set on 20” used last season, clean. 507rows, $6,500. 320-769-2756 828-1036


THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

14 B

Tractors

036 Tractors

036 Tractors

036 Tractors

036 Tractors

036 Harvesting Equip

037 Harvesting Equip

'98 JD 9400, 24spd, 4900 hrs, '07 JD 7730, low hrs, 96" wide '79 White 2-155, duals, wgts., FOR SALE: '06 JD 7520, 1959 MF model 65 utility, hyd '99 JD 9510, 1506/2186 hrs, one wgts, 710/38 tires @ 65%, 4 owner, always shedded, put when duals off, good tires, good cond., $11,250 OBO. ldr, 540 PTO, good tires, MFWD, w/ 741 ldr, joystick. hyds, has been JD inspectthrough dealer shop every IVT transmission, very 320-523-2480 $4,500/OBO. 515-314-5951 PQ plus trans w/ LH reed every year, $92,500. 507year, 18.4x38 duals, grain nice, $94,500. (715)223-3664 verser, new front tires, exc Late MF 35K utility, good 530-4228 tank ext, 240HP, GreenStar Case IH 8910, MFD, 3 recondition. 507-789-6049 rubber/paint, LPTO, PS, 3 Case IH 8910, 2WD, 3 reY&M monitor; '99 930 platmotes, dual PTO, 2480 actupt, w/Davis ldr 68” hyd bkt, motes, dual PTO, 18.4-42 form, bought new w/ comal hrs, 18.4-42 duals, all FOR SALE: '52 Model ZA front pump, $4,850. 320-274duals @ 65%, 7500 hrs, new bine, also avail. 320-221-3042 MM, power steering, nice, tires are new, serviced, su3007 automotive paint, serviced $3,500/OBO. Set of JD 10 per sharp mint condition & field ready, $47,500. 507bolt spacers, 19 1/2” wide, NEW AND USED TRACTOR (2) EZ Flow running gear & unit, $79,500. 507-234-5679 234-5679 PARTS JD 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, $500. 320-212-3201 wagon, trail model 500, 55, 50 Series & newer tractires 425-65R22.5, like new, “YOUR #1 AUCTION PROFESSIONALS” FOR SALE: '79 JD 2840 tractors, AC-all models, Large 5 years old. 507-220-6810 tor w/ 148 ldr, 5300 hrs, roll Inventory, We ship! Mark bar w/ canopy. $12,000/OBO. Heitman Tractor Salvage 1989 Case IH 1660 combine Call 507-537-1815 715-673-4829 Specialty rotor, CumWANTED TO BUY: WD 45 mins engine, MicroTrak FOR SALE: '94 Cas2 IH diesel, need not run, comyield & moisture, chop9270, 5,565 hrs, frt & rear Location: From the west side of Albert Lea, MN at the intersection of Highway 13 and 1 plete tractor, for project. per, spreader, header redifferentials, Michelin Freeborn Cty. 46, go 2 miles west on Freeborn Cty. 46, then 1 ⁄2 miles south on Freeborn 320-630-4060 verser, good condition, 520/85R42 triples @95%, serCty. 71 (or 720th Ave.), then 1 mile west on 190th St. • Watch for auction signs!!! 507-469-0534 $28,500 OBO vice records, field ready, Harvesting Equip 037 (or best offer) (507) 469good condition, $68,000. 3200534 808-5973 '00 Intl 1020, 20' bean hd, 3”

• JD 8420 • 2 - JD 4020s • CAT DOZER • 13 - COLLECTOR TRACTORS • TRUCKS • JD PAYLOADER • TRAILERS • FARM EQUIPMENT

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2013 AUCTION STARTS AT 10:00 A.M.

AUCTIONEER'S NOTE: The Krueger family has decided to hold a farm and construction equipment and collector tractor reduction auction. If you’re in the market for some good clean well maintained farm equipment and collector tractors, you’ll want to be sure to attend this auction. Tracy Holland

CAN'T MAKE IT TO THE AUCTION?

Live online bidding available at www.proxibid.com/holland

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Please Note: Approx. 1 hour of small items. Machinery buyers please be on time.

FARM AND COLLECTOR TRACTORS • John Deere 4020 gas, W.F., side council, 2 hyd., shows 7109 hrs., front weights, canopy roll guard, like new 18.434” tires, SN 224059 • 1956 John Deere 80 diesel, like new 18.4-34” tires, professionally restored, dual hyd., SN 8001804 • 1960 John Deere 730 diesel standard, P.S., like new 18.4-30” tires, 7.50-18” fronts, SN 7323696 • 1957 John Deere 520, P.S. livepower, like new 12.4-36” tires, SN 5208820 • 1950 John Deere AR standard, like new 14.926” tires, SN 273338 • 1936 John Deere B, rear steel, round spokes front w/new rubber, SN 21851 • 1936 John Deere D Junior built from a 1936 J.D. B, fenders, like new 11.2-24” tires, SN 18563 • 1955 Ford 801 Power Master, P.S., 117 hrs. on rebuilt engine, like new 13.6-28” tires & rims on rear, SN 68242 • 1952 Allis Chalmers CA, livepower, W.F. SN 13867 • 1950 Case DC, wide front & narrow front, 12.4-38” tires, SN 5417274 • 1951 Case D standard, W.F., fenders, SN 5508519 • 1934 Farmall F-12, tricycle, SN FS5750 • Farmall MD, diesel, like new 13.638” tires, SN FDBK248030 • John Deere 8420, MFWD, 4992 hrs., front weights, inside rear weights, 18.4R-46” rears w/duals, 380/35R-34” fronts, front duals sold separately, SN 8420P023251 • John Deere 4020 diesel, W.F., side council, 2 hyd., shows 7776 hrs., front weights, 18.4-34” tires, SN 220987R • 1957 John Deere 820 diesel, like new 18.4-34” tires, professionally restored, SN 8201338 • 1936 John Deere A, factory round spokes, like new 11/236” tires, SN 430442 DOZER • PAYLOADER • TRUCKS • TRAILERS • TILE PLOW • BOAT • 1965 Caterpillar D6B w/12’ angle blade, 4278 hrs. • Henke 12’ two-way dozer blade, fits payloader • Heavy duty forks, fits payloader • 2004 Sterling grain truck, Cat engine, 10 speed, twin screw, 414,064 miles, like new 295/75.R22.5 tires w/new Scott 22’ box, 3-piece end gate • 2003 Sterling grain truck, Cat engine, twin screw w/steerable pusher, 10 speed, 295,000 miles, like new 295/75.R 22.5 tires, w/new Scott 24’ box, 3-piece end gate • 2003 International 4200 dump truck, VT 365 engine, 245,415 miles, auto, air ride w/electric brakes, like new 245/70R19.5 tires w/36” tool box w/Crysteel 11’ dump box, folding sides • 2004 International 4200, VT 365 engine, auto, 141,500 miles, single axle, like new 11R-22.5 tires & 1600-gal. stainless tank and 30-gal. inductor tank • 2002 Ford F-250 Super Duty, 4x4, 216,500 miles, auto, gas, w/Astoria service box • 2000 GMC C6500 truck, diesel, auto, 242,394 miles, w/24’ van body • 2001 Ford F-450 Super Duty, 135,210 miles, V-10 gas, dually, w/11’ flatbed, hideaway fifth wheel ball • 2004 Chevy Duramax 2500 HD, diesel, 4x4, 4-door, leather seats, auto, 251,949 miles • 1999 International 4900, 7.3 diesel, 7 speed, 326,461 miles, dually w/10’ dump box • 1976 Chevy C-65 grain truck, 24,000 actual miles, V-8 engine, 5x2 trans., single axle, 9.00-20” tires, two-way hoist w/16’ steel box wood floor (one owner) • 2011 PJ 8’x33’ bumper hitch trailer, tandem axle, 24,000 lbs., 3 ramps • Starlite 14,000 lb. tandem trailer, 20’ ramps • 2003 John Deere 54H payloader, 7600 hrs., 3 yard bucket, like new tires FARM EQUIPMENT • WAGONS • BOAT • John Deere 980 field cultivator, 32’, walking tandems, 3-bar harrow • John Deere 680 chisel plow, 28’, walking tandems • DMI 4200 anhydrous bar, 52’, 19 shank, cold flow, Raven monitor • 12 row x 30” side dresser, 3 pt. w/J.D. 856 bar & 500-gal. tank • John Deere 275 side mount 3 pt. disc mower • DMI Coulter Champ II disc ripper, 9 shank • Brent 744 grain wagon, fenders, lights, brakes, 1 year old • I.H. 800 11 bottom x 18” plow, recently reconditioned • J.D. 400 rotary hoe, 30’ • J.D. 856 single sweep cultivator, 8 row x 30” • Case I.H. 900 12 row x 30” planter w/monitor • 2 - J&M gravity wagons, Model 350, J&M gears, truck tires • Parker 2000 gravity wagon w/gear, approx. 200 bu. • 20’ homemade head trailer, 4 wheels • Speed King 2 box seed tender belt conveyor, 12 volt electric motor, used 1 season • Land Pride 14’ bat wing finishing mower • 2 - Sullair 185 portable air compressors w/J.D. diesel engines • 1000-gal. poly horizontal tank • 2 - 1600-gal. poly tanks • 200-gal. poly saddle tanks • J.D. No. 5 sickle mower • J.D. 555 plow, 3-bottom slate • 2 - J.D. 3-bottom pull type plows • Don Wurdinger tile plow, pull type up to 6” • 2008 Alumacraft Trophy 175 boat, Yamaha 115 hp, 4-stroke engine, trolling motor w/co-pilot, onboard 24 volt charger system, 3 swivel seats, Shorelander roller trailer, fitted cover LIQUID MANURE EQUIPMENT • Houle 9500-gal. manure tank, 4 axles, flow meter, Raven monitor, 5 covering disc • 2 - Lano 9000-gal. liquid manure trailers, custom built • Doda 8’ manure pit dump • Houle transfer pump, 8’ • 2 - Balzer load stands, 32’x42’

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

MANY ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION!!! FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL HOLLAND AUCTION AT (507) 684-2955 OR (507) 456-5128 Terms: Cash or Good Check, Picture ID Required. No property removed until fully settled for. Sales Staff and Owners Not Responsible for accidents. Any verbal announcement made day of auction takes precedence over print. Lunch and restroom services available on site. Clerk: Holland Auction Company

KRUEGER FAMILY - OWNERS 70993 190th St. • Albert Lea, MN

507-383-7473 (Rick) • 507-383-8844 (Nordean)

HOLLAND AUCTION & REAL ESTATE (507) 684-2955

FOR FULL COLOR PICTURES & LISTING Visit Our Website www.holland auction.com • A Professional Full Service Auction Company • Member of State & National Auctioneer’s Association

Auctioneers:

Tracy Holland & Associates #7405002 • Ellendale, MN (507) 684-2955 or (507) 456-5128 (cell)

FOR SALE: Case IH 9330 Steiger, PTO & 3 pt, low hrs, excellent rubber, 715896-0828 FOR SALE: Intl 4186, 4WD tractor, w/radio, air, roll bars, 2 hyd ports, very low hrs., exc. shape, retired; JD 1100, 24½' field cult. w/3 bar harrow. 507-334-8538 For Sale: JD 4440 Powershift, 3 point, 2 remotes. May consider trade of JD 4230 $18,500 OBO (or best offer) (507) 920-2803 FOR SALE: JD 6430 & JD 7230, both are premiums, have MFWD, new rubber, around 3200 hrs. 507-7896049 FOR SALE: JD 9230 '11, 1350 hrs, auto track ready, PS, PTO, 4 hyds, 620/70R42 tires at 90%, excellent cond, $179,500. 507-530-4229 JD 4560, PS, 3 hyds, 4200 hrs., 14x46 tires & duals, very sharp, $48,000; '87 JD 4650, 6400 hrs., QR, 3 hyds, 14x46 tires & duals, 2nd owner, very nice, $30,000 OBO. 952-240-2193

cut, $9,000; early '90's Intl 1020, 20', 1½” cut, $5,500, 2005 Drago 8R cornhead, w/choppers, steel, nice both have before & after, head, $19,000. 515-351-1054 exc. cond.; '84 Lahman skidloader, nearly new tires & 2 bkts, $4,000. 507-237-2644 3 – 2600 Parker gravity wagons w/cement truck tires, 1 '01 JD 9650STS, duals, Conw/seed divider on, estate. tour Master, 2400 sep hrs, 507-220-6810 $74,500; '07 JD 635 hydra Case IH 2166 combine, 3600 flex, $16,500. 507-461-1364 eng hrs, chopper, rock trap, '07 Case IH 2588 combine, specialty rotor, hopper ext, AFX rotor, Pro 600 moniyield monitor, good shape, tor, rock trap, chopper, 12R $39,500. 507-234-5679 ready, metric tires, 1700 Case IH 963 cornhead w/ 1063 hrs, $117,000; '03 Case IH updates, less than 500 acres 1020 flex head, 3” cut, nice, on complete renew kit, $10,900; Case IH 1083 corn good sheet metal, new style head, $6,750; Case IH 1020 drive for field tracker, 30' flex head, 3” cut, new $7,500. 763-227-3037 oil bath gear box, $3,900; 35' tandem axle head trailFOR SALE: '00 JD 9550 comer, $4,750. 320-769-2756 bine, CM, 60 Series hookup, '81 JD 6620 Sidehill combine. GreenStar, extra clean, 4 parts, good engine and field ready, 2020 hrs, 4WD axle. (715)667-5353 $78,000/OBO. JD 925 flex head, poly snouts, fore & '88 JD 7720 Titan II combineaft, new skid plastic, Crary w/chopper etc. 3320 hrs, JD air reel, field ready, 444 cornhead, 36R, $19,500. $8,000/OBO. 218-756-2220 920-987-5276 '89 JD 5730 self-propelled FOR SALE: '02 JD 9550 comHarvester. 2WD, iron bine, 2602 sep hrs, big enguard, rebuilt motor, 4R30" gine, chaff spreader, 20' uncornhead, 3935 hrs, $32,500 load. Call 507-383-8274 or 715-667-5353 507-391-4381

Forenoon Outstanding Estate Auction Saturday, September 14 • 9:30 AM

037

Case IH 1660 Combine w/1083 cornhead, $29,500. Will separate & other heads avail. 715-792-2267 FOR SALE: '04 9860 JD combine, new power rear wheel drive, 1402 sep hrs, excellent condition. $89,500. Can Deliver. 507-964-5548 or 507327-1903 FOR SALE: '05 Case IH 2388 combine, 12R ready, field tracker, rock trap, chopper, duals, hyd. reverser & more, clean, sharp combine, $99,500 OBO. 507-3838030 FOR SALE: '07 30' High Speed Loftness stalk chopper & transport, $14,000; 10,000 gal fuel barrel, $2,800. 320-583-5895 FOR SALE: '09 JD 9770, high cap unload, grain tank ext, grain loss monitor, Y&M display, hyd fore & aft, auto header hgt sensor, 2290 eng/1560 sep hrs, $147,500. '07 JD 635 bean head, $19,500. Both in good cond. 507-530-4228 FOR SALE: '79 JD 4400 diesel combine w/ updated A/C & 2568 hrs & 213 bean head in field ready condition, $8,500. 507-645-4028 FOR SALE: '83 JD 8820 w/ duals, RWD, hopper extension, field ready. Also, 843 cornhead, 925 flex head, 213 pickup head, $29,500 package price. Call 320-226-5952 FOR SALE: '91 CIH 1680 combine, specialty rotor, lots of new parts, $30,000/OBO. '97 CIH 102025' bean head, excellent, $8,000/OBO. CIH 983 8RN cornhead, converted to CIH 1083, $8,000/OBO. See pics on Craigslist/MankatoRochester. 507-383-4992 FOR SALE: '91 JD 9500, 2825 sep hrs, 18-4-42 duals, through shop every 3 years, $31,500/OBO. 952-217-9907

SALE LOCATION: The auction will be held at the J. Vernon Iverson farm at 37703 240th St, Lamberton, MN. which is located from Lamberton - the Jct of Hwy 14 & Co Rd 6 on the west edge of Lamberton, 6 miles south to 240th St, then 2 3/4 miles west OR from Storden, MN, approx. 6 miles north on Co Rd #5 to the Jct of Co Rd #5, #10 & 54, continue north 1 mile on Co Rd 54 (380th Ave), then west 1/2 mile on 240th St. Watch for auction signs the day of the auction.

FEATURE ITEMS: ‘08 IHC model #15 tractor on steel w/gas 15 hp sgl cyl engine, friction drive, make & brake ignition, open tower cooling, canopy, SN#1402, tractor has been restored & is in running condition. It has been in the Iverson family for many years & has been shown at the Butterfield Threshing Bee and it will be shown again this year and then moved back to the Iverson farm for the auction. Make sure to check this very unique tractor. ’07 IHC High Wheeled Auto Buggy w/Phare model 24A brass head lamp, brass horn, 2 seats & gas engine. This auto buggy was purchased new by the Iverson family & has been restored. This is certainly a very unique collectors item. TRACTOR & LAWNMOWER: Ford 1720 MFD utility tractor w/ 2,013 act. hrs, 3 pt, ROPS, 4 frt wgts, purchased new, SN#UL31103, very nice tractor; JD 455 dsl riding mower w/hydrostatic drive, 60” deck, 1,520 hrs, pwr steering, 22 hp, SN#M00455C021097, nice clean unit. Many other items including: Antique Gas Engines & Farm Related Items - Antiques & Collectables - Antique Equipment - Antique Furniture - Books & Paper Goods - Tools & Shop Equipment - Household - Appliances & Miscellaneous Items. For a more complete listing & photos go to www.danpikeauction.com SALE CONDUCTED BY:

410 Springfield Pkwy Jackson, MN 56143 507-847-3468 www.danpikeauction.com

Owner: J. Vernon Iverson Estate

Ronald Schneider & Ralph Iverson Trustee’s


Harvesting Equip

037 Harvesting Equip

037 Harvesting Equip

037 Harvesting Equip

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FOR SALE: '96 JD 9400 combine, 1600 sep/2600 eng hrs, $47,500. 507-263-3276 or 507298-0120 FOR SALE: (4) 18.4x42 tires & rims, off 9760 combine, 90-95%, $7,500. 320-212-3201 FOR SALE: 1480 combine, exc cond, $5,800; 220 JD stalk chopper, 20'; $4,400; JD 250 skid ldr, 1700 hrs, $9,995; 820 bean head, 23', $500; JD 2800 5 btm plow, $1,500. 507-236-4925 FOR SALE: 1978 JD 6600 combine, good condition, $1,900. 515-832-5677

For Sale: 6620 JD Combine 4235 hrs always stored inside serviced every year by local shop around 300 hrs on new rasp bars front tires 50% rear tires 75+% greased and blown off daily good machine! $10,900 OBO (or best offer) (507) 8300633 FOR SALE: 9700 White rotor combine, 3300 hrs, 30.5x32 tires, 25' 9750 flex head w/ U-2 reel, 12R22 MF cornhead, 1163 MF cornhead, 859 MF 12' oats head w/ Melroe pickup - 507-669-2905 For Sale: Brady Stalk Chopper Six row, 15ft. Chopped about 1000 acres since cover was replaced and repainted. Knives are slightly used. $4,500 (507) 461-2085 FOR SALE: C-IH '91 1680 combine, 2900 hrs, rock trap, chopper, just through shop, very nice, $25,000/OBO. 952-240-2193

FOR SALE: Geringhoff 8R30” Rota Disc cornhead, '06, head sight, CIH 8010 hookups, nice. 218-948-2982 or 218-230-3340 For Sale: Gleaner F diesel 15' bean head always shedded $1,200; also black A438 cornhead F mount $900 OBO (952) 466-5842

HELD

AT

CAMBRIA TOWN HALL, 310 MAIN ST. E, CAMBRIA, MN

Land Info: Wonderful opportunity to purchase a buildable acreage. property features a storage shed with electrical service, abundant wild life & borders 81 acres of wooded state land. Septic bores have been done for buildable site. Your kingdom awaits to simply enjoy nature or build your dream! Land: 21.77 acres, Cambria Twp, Blue Earth Co. *According to assessors office: Will be surveyed. Parcel: #’s R32.0122.300.007 & R32.0122.400.004/Sold as one parcel/Buildable. Location: From New Ulm, MN, take MN Hwy. 68 approx. 7 miles to 239th St., turn East, 1/2 mile, watch for signs.

OWNER: STEVE AKRE

For complete packet, Auctioneer: Matt Mages 507-276-7002, Lic # 08-13-006 Auctioneers: Larry Mages, Lafayette • Joe Maidl, Lafayette • John Goelz, Franklin • Joe Wersal, Winthrop Broker: Mages Land Co. & Auction Service LLC • Not Responsible for Accidents or During Inspection

magesland.com

HAAS EQUIP., LLC

• 320-598-7604 •

Madison, MN From Hwy. 75 & 212 Jct., 3.5 mi. W., 2.5 mi. S.

‘12 CIH 5088 combine, 182 sep. hrs., 255 eng. hrs., RT, 2-spd. hydr., HID, Pro 700 ......................................$185,000 ‘05 CIH 2388 loader, Titan inspect.$110,000 CIH 1660 combine ..........................$12,500 Many Head trailers ................................Call IH 1020 30’ flex head ........................$6,500 CIH 2208 8RN cornhead ..................$21,000 IH 1083, 8RN cornheads ......$5,500/$7,500 CIH 12R30 cornhead ......................$37,500 JD 230 disk, 22’ ................................$3,000 IH 475 disc, hydraulic fold ................$3,500 Hesston 6450 18’ swather, Sharp ......$4,500 IH 4000 15’ swather, Sharp ..............$3,500 NH 56 rake, dolly; NH 258 rake $850/$1,500 NH 617 disk mower, 7 pod ................$5,500 NH BR 780 round baler......................$8,500 NH 7060 round baler, 4’, Demo ......$12,500 JD 566 round baler, mega pu ................Call IH SMTA ............................................$3,900 JD 2510, gas, WF, 3 pt., Nice ............$6,500 (2) JD 3010, gas ..................$4,500/$5,250 JD 4020, PS; JD 4020, synchro ..........................................$6,500/$7,000 JD 4230, Quad..................................Coming (2) JD 4320, 5500 hrs./8500 hrs. ........................................$11,500/$9,000 (3) JD 4430, Quad ............$12,500-$15,000 (2) JD 4440, PS, JD 4440, Quad ..............................................Both Coming ‘88 JD 4450, FWA ..........................$39,000 (2) JD 4455, PS, FWA ......$39,000/$42,500 JD 4455, PS; JD 4450, PS$36,000/$28,500 JD 7810, FWA, 740 loader, reverser$72,500

JD 280 loader ....................................$6,500 JD 840 loader, JD 8000 mts. ............$9,500 (2) JD 740 loaders, Nice ......$7,500/$8,500 JD 640 loader ....................................$6,500 NEW JD 740 Legend loader ..................Call JD 260 loader, self-leveling................$4,250 JD 741 loader, Sharp, hardly used ..$11,500 (2) JD 158, (4) JD 148 loaders ..........................................$2,500/$4,500 CIH 520 loader ..................................$3,750 Farmhand F11, w/pump....................$1,500 Farmhand 1140, grapple ..................$7,500 Farmhand F358 loader, (IH mts.) ......$3,250 Westendorf WL-40, WL-42 ..$2,250/$3,500 New Box Scrapers, 10’/12’ ..$1,850/$1,950 New & Used Skidsteer Attachments ....Call Pallet Forks, Grapples, Rock Buckets ..Call Bobcat T300 ....................................$28,500 Donahue 32’ trailer............................$1,750 New & Used Batco & Conveyall belt conveyors ............................................Call Wheatheart 13x91 auger, Like New $12,900 Westfield 13x81 auger ......................$7,900 Westfield MK 13x71, swing hopper ..$9,900 Westfield 10x71, swing hopper ........$5,500 Many Other Augers ................................Call JD 3710, 8 btm plow, AR, Nice ......$18,750 JD 1209, 9’ haybine ..........................$2,000 JD 2700, 7 shank ripper ..................$16,500 Alloway 2000, 20’ shredder ..............$4,000 4 Pull Scrapers, 1 yd, 3-5 yd, 15 yd......Call Bobcat skidsteer backhoe ..................$4,000 Grizzley 3 pt backhoe ........................$3,500

STATE-WIDE

We pay top dollar for your damaged grain. We are experienced handlers of your wet, dry, burnt and mixed grains. Trucks and Vacs available. Immediate response anywhere. CALL FOR A QUOTE TODAY

PRUESS ELEV., INC.

LOCAL TRADES TRACTORS 1-800-828-6642

‘92 CIH 5240, 2WD, PS - $26,500 CIH 5250, 2WD, cab w/loader - $32,500 ‘09 CIH 385, 4 wheel - Nice ‘11 CIH Farmall 35, MFD w/loader, 50 hrs. - $21,000 New Farmall 31, MFD w/60” ‘11 CIH 550 Quad - Call ‘01 CIH 7120 - Call

JD 2200, 33.5’, 3 bar - $28,500 ‘11 CIH 870, 9-shk. w/reel - Call CIH 2500, 7-shk. ripper w/leveler - $9,500 CIH 530C w/leads - Call

COMBINES

‘90 1680, duals, - $28,500 ‘93 1666 - $32,500 ‘03 CIH 2388, duals, 2000 eng. hrs. - Call PLANTERS & ‘07 CIH 2588 - Call TILLAGE ‘08 1200, 16-30 pivot, bulk fill, ‘09 CIH 6088 - Call ‘96 CIH 2166, 35Lx32 tires 2500 acres - $79,500 - Call ‘07 CIH 1200, 12-30 pivot ‘06 CIH 1020, 30’ - Call planter w/bulk fill & insecticide ‘03 CIH 1020, 30’ - Call - $58,500 ‘99 DMI, 32’, 3 bar - $16,500 ‘98 CIH 1020, 25’ - $7,950 ‘06 JD 1760, 12-30 - $41,500 ‘92 CIH 1083, 8-30 - $8,500 ‘03 CIH Tigermate II 40’, 4 bar ‘08 CIH 2608, 8-30 - Call ‘09 CIH 2608, 8-30 - Call - $34,500 JD 893, 8-30 - $17,500

RABE INTERNATIONAL, INC.

1205 Bixby Road (across from fairgrounds), Fairmont, MN 507-235-3358 or 800-813-8300 • Get the Rabe Advantage

Case IH and CNH Capital are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC

Visit our Web Site at http://www.caseih.com

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

FOR SALE: Case IH 2166 combine, RWD, CM, chopper, Hi Proformance rotor, 2366 sep hrs, comes w/ a 1020 bean head. JD 8410 w/ 20.4x42 tires, 4 valves, very clean tractor. 507-380-3158

LAND AUCTION

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17 • 6:30 PM

DAMAGED GRAIN

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

For Sale: 1981 International 1480 well maintained, always shedded and in very nice condition. standard rotor, chopper. many new parts over past few seasons. has a pf advantage yield monitor. also for sale is a 983 8 row corn head. converted over to the 10 series, about 600 acres on new row units. $10,000 each o.b.o (320) 226-4116

22 ACRES, CAMBRIA TWP., BLUE EARTH CO.

WANTED

15 B THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

FOR SALE: '95 Case 2188 FOR SALE: 20' JD bean FOR SALE: 24' Loftness 2pt FOR SALE: Case IH 1063 FOR SALE: Case IH 2020, 30' platform head w/ air combine, rock trap, chopcornhead, good condition. head, fore & aft, very good stalk chopper, $5,000; Balzreel, $16,900. (715)495-4467 per, bin ext, 4x4, Ag Leader 507-249-3227 cond, $7,900. 507-276-2998 er 1500 2pt stalk chopper, monitor, 2spd hydro, 3965 $1,300. 507-276-3289 eng hrs, 2630 sep hrs, good cond, many recent parts, $35,000/OBO. 507-427-3070 or 507-427-3561


THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

16 B

USED EQUIPMENT FROM A NAME YOU CAN TRUST! ‘08 T-320, glass cab w/AC, 1600 hrs. ............................$34,900 ‘12 S-770, glass cab w/AC ....$43,500 (3) S-250, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 1950 hrs. & up ..Starting at $22,500 (2) 873G, glass cab w/AC, 1578 hrs. & up ..Starting at $16,900 (2) S-220, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd. ..............Starting at $23,900 ‘11 S-650, A71 Package, joystick controls................................$32,500 (6) ‘12 S-205, glass cab & heater, 1000 hrs. ..........Starting at $19,750 ‘07 S-185, glass cab w/AC ....$18,000 (3) S-175, glass cab & heater, 2-spd., 3875 hrs. & up......Starting at $9,950 ‘10 S-160, glass cab w/AC, 2-spd., 2850 hrs. ............................$21,500 ‘11 S-150, glass cab & heater, 2-spd., 2500 hrs. ................$20,250

(2) S-130, glass cab & heater, 1600 hrs. & up ....................$16,900 ‘91 753, 6500 hrs. ..................$9,000 ‘08 NH L-180, glass cab w/AC ............................................$24,000 ‘12 NH L-218, glass cab & heater, 3950 hrs. ............................$19,250 ‘10 Cat 257B2, glass cab w/AC, 1025 hrs. ............................$33,400 ‘98 Gehl 5635SXT, glass cab & heater, 1020 hrs. ................$16,500 ‘04 Gehl 4640, glass cab & heater, 2350 hrs. ............................$11,500 ‘05 JD 317, glass cab & heater, 2800 hrs. ............................$14,000 Bobcat 8A Chipper, used very little ..............................................$6,250 ‘10 Bobcat 60” V snow blade ..$3,250 Loegering LVP90, 90” V snow blade ..............................................$1,995 Bobcat 72” sweeper................$2,850

Lano Equipment of Norwood Inc.

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Norwood Young America • 952-467-2181

www.bobcat.com

USED TRACTORS

‘01 NH 9684, 710/70R38 duals, 4430 hrs. ........$79,500 ‘12 NH T7.270, MFD, duals, 453 hrs. ..............$149,500 ‘69 Ford 5000 ....................................................$6,500 ‘56 Ford 640 ......................................................$3,750 ‘77 White 2-70, gas ............................................$5,750 ‘80 JD 4640, 14.9x46 duals ..............................$21,500 ‘86 CDS 710C, Industrial Tractor Loader, 3 pt., PTO, cab ..........................................................$6,500 IH 686, Hiniker cab..............................................$8,450

USED COMBINES

‘92 Gleaner R-72, duals, 3568 hrs. ..................$35,500 ‘05 JD 630F, 30’ bean head ..............................$22,500

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

USED TILLAGE

Harvesting Equip

037 Harvesting Equip

If you’re having a Farm Auction, let other Farmers know it! Upcoming Issues of THE LAND

Southern MNNorthern IA September 13 September 27 October 11 October 25 November 8 November 22

USED HAY EQUIPMENT

‘10 NH H-8060, 16’ header, 754 hrs. ................$77,500 ‘13 NH H-7450, 13’ discbine ............................$28,000 (3) NH 1431, 13’ discbine ..............Starting at $15,000 (2) NH 1411, 10’ discbine ..............Starting at $10,000 (3) NH 499, 12’ haybine....................Starting at $6,000 ‘97 NH 1465, 9’ haybine......................................$8,500 NH 492, 9’ haybine..............................................$5,500 ‘93 JD 1600, 12’ MoCo ......................................$4,750 NH 489, 9’ haybine..............................................$3,750 Hesston 1365, 16’ discbine ..............................$10,900 ‘05 Hesston 1120, 9’ haybine ............................$7,950 ‘89 Hesston 1130, 9’ haybine ............................$3,750 Ford 535, 9’ haybine ..........................................$1,350 ‘91 NH 900 chopper, 2 heads ............................$10,250 Gehl 980 forage box............................................$5,950 CIH 600 forage blower ........................................$3,950 ‘08 NH BR-7080 rnd. baler, netwrap & twine ....$21,900 ‘05 NH BR-780 round baler ..............................$16,100 ‘07 NH BR-770A round baler, twine only ..........$15,900 ‘06 NH BR-750A round baler, twine only ..........$18,250 ‘06 NH BR-740A round baler, twine & netwrap $18,900 ‘90 NH 855 round baler ......................................$4,500 ‘03 CIH RBX-462 round baler............................$13,500 ‘91 Hesston 514 round baler ..............................$4,950 ‘10 Vermeer 604 small round baler, twine & netwrap..........................................................$23,000 ‘99 CIH 8575 large square baler........................$31,500 (6) Cond. Rolls for 2300-HS14 NH headers, New ..............................................................Ea. $800

‘12 Wilrich XL2, 60’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$62,500 ‘09 Wilrich XL2, 42’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$43,700 ‘07 Wilrich Quad X, 55’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$49,000 ‘09 Wilrich Quad X, 54’, 3 bar harrow w/rolling basket ............................................................$52,900 ‘97 Wilrich Quad 5, 37’, 5 bar spike harrow ....$18,500 Wilrich 2500, 30’, 3 bar harrow ..........................$2,750 ‘96 JD 980, 44.5’, 3 bar harrow ........................$18,500 ‘94 JD 980, 38.5’, 3 bar harrow ........................$16,500 ‘10 Wishek 862NT, 26’ disc ..............................$50,900 ‘07 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper ........................$22,500 ‘03 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ripper ........................$16,500 ‘08 CIH 730C, 7-shank ripper ............................$36,500 ‘00 DMI 530B, lead shanks, hyd. levelers..........$19,500 ‘93 DMI Ecolo Tiger 530, 5-shank ripper..........$11,900 Brillion Soil Commander, 7-shanks ..................$6,950 ‘99 Blue Jet 220, 7-shank disc ripper ................$8,500 ‘05 JD 512, 7-shank disc ripper........................$22,500 ‘00 JD 512, 7-shank disc ripper........................$13,700 JD 2700, 7-shank disc ripper ............................$17,500 JD 915, 7-shank ripper, w/pull cart ....................$5,900 USED MISCELLANEOUS IH 700 plow, 7 bottom, pull type hitch ................$5,500 ‘10 H&S 270 spreader ........................................$7,250 Bobcat 8’ 3 pt. disk ............................................$1,250 NI 3743 spreader ................................................$8,500 Flexi Coil S75, 38’ coil packer ..........................$10,000 NI 3626 spreader ................................................$5,250 ‘05 Feterl 10x66 auger........................................$3,950

✔ Check us out at: www.lanoequipofnorwood.com

Norwood Young America 952-467-2181

A family business since 1946 with the Lanos: Jack, Paul, Bob and Andy

Northern MN September 20 October 4 October 18 November 1 November 15 November 29 December 6

Deadlines are 1 week prior to publication with Holiday deadlines 1 day earlier ** Indicates Early Deadline

USED PLANTERS

‘07 White 8202, 12x30 built to twin row, liq. fert. ......................................................................$60,000 White 5100, 4x38, dry fert. ....................................CALL ‘98 Kinze 2600, 16x30......................................$34,900 JD 7000, 4x36, dry fert. ......................................$2,950 Great Plains 15’ no till drill, pull cart ................$10,900

037 Harvesting Equip

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FOR SALE: Case IH 810 FOR SALE: JD 212 pickup FOR SALE: JD 443 high tin FOR SALE: Parker 725 gravity wagon, cement corn head, good condition, head w/6 belt pickup, $4,000. Grain Pickup Head, exc. truck tires, exc cond, $2,100. 515-832-5677 515-460-0658 shape, $2,500. (715)792-2267 $9,750. 507-220-6450 FOR SALE: Int'l 1420 com- FOR SALE: JD 4400 com- FOR SALE: New Idea 325 2RN corn picker, 8R huskbine w/bean header, exc. Gleaner L2, gear shift, w/20' bine, elec header controls, ing bed, shedded, used last cond.; Gehl 99 hi-throw bean head, exc. cond., pkg. chopper, 3400 hrs, good season, $1,250. 507-279-0292 blower, exc. cond. 320-841price, $8,000 OBO. 320-523tires, good cond; also, 843 0398 2480 cornhead. 507-877-2036 Geringhoff Cornheads FOR SALE: JD 6600 comGleaner M2 dsl, 18', black FOR SALE: Int'l 1460 com'07 630RD, red, $34,900; bine, 404 cu. in. diesel enplatform, black 6-30” cornbine, new tires, new hydro, '08 830RD, red, $51,900; gine, hydro, $2,000 507-835head, black 4-38” cornhead, chaff spreader, $8,500. 507'06 830RD, green, $49,500. 4724 always shedded. Make of456-9187 Free del within 75 miles fer. 507-375-3194 of Clinton, MN. Serviced, ready to go, 1 yr warranJD 3800 chopper 2R30'' head ty on gearbox hay pick up, used very little Call Todd at 320-760-7750 $3,500. (815)543-1890

PO Box 3169 Mankato, MN 56002 Phone: 507-345-4523 or 800-657-4665 Fax: 507-345-1027

Ask Your Auctioneer to Place Your Auction in The Land!

Website: www.TheLandOnline.com e-mail: theland@TheLandOnline.com

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE

‘11 NH B95B tractor/loader/backhoe, 4WD, cab, air, extendahoe, pilot controls, 24” hoe bucket, 235 hrs. $65,000 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, 380/90R54 duals, 380/80R38 front duals, high capacity hyd. pump, 23-spd. creeper trans., 5 remotes, wgts., 1425 hrs. ....................................$148,500 ‘03 JD 9420, PS, 710/70R42 duals, 4 remotes, active seat, diff. locks, HID lights, 4600 hrs., 300 hrs. on new tires, Nice Tractor ..............................................................$125,000 ‘08 JD 8330, MFWD, PS, 380/90R54 duals, 1300 front axle, 380/80R38 single front tires, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 4 remotes, 1850 hrs. ..................................................................$149,000 ‘10 JD 8270R, MFWD, PS, 1300 front axle, 380/90R50 duals, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 4 remotes, wgts., 3500 hrs. ....$138,000 ‘10 JD 8270R, MFWD, PS, 1300 front axle, 380/90R50 duals, new 380/85R34 single fronts, 60 GPM hyd. pump, 4 remotes, front & rear wgts., 4400 hrs., just through service program ................................................................................$125,000 ‘10 JD 608C, 8x30 chopping cornhead ......................$49,500 ‘08 JD 512, 9 shank, 22’6” disc ripper, Nice Cond. ....$28,000 ‘05 JD 9760STS, 2WD, CM, 710/70R42 duals, touchset, high capacity unload, 2115 sep. hrs., Nice Combine $98,000 ‘11 JD 630F flexible platform, Nice Condition ............$24,500 ‘11 JD 635F flexible platform......................................$23,000 ‘01 CIH 2388 combine, field tracker, rock trap, chopper, 20.8x38 duals, 2200 sep. hrs. ....................................$62,500

Keith Bode Fairfax, MN 55332 507-381-1291

Midwest Ag Equip Farm Equipment For Sale ‘13 Challenger MT755D, loaded ..............................$229,500 ‘08 Cat 965B, 1300 hrs. ..$190,000 ‘04 Cat 855, 3000 hrs. ....$185,000 ‘07 JD 9860STS, 800 hrs., loaded w/all options........$160,000 ‘07 JD 8230, 2000 hrs.....$145,000 ‘03 JD 8520, 4000 hrs.....$142,500 ‘08 Lexion 595R, 650 hrs. ............................$225,000 ‘12 Krause Dominator, 18’, Demo ..................................$58,500 ‘10 JD 8345RT, 1600 hrs...225,000

Financing Available

Emerson Kalis Easton, MN 56025 • 507-381-9675

EQUIPMENT

CIH 8950, MFD ................................$59,900 CIH 7130 ..........................................$34,900 CIH 7120, 4900 hrs...........................$39,900 CIH MX270, MFD ............................$64,900 (3) IH 1026, hydro ..................From $14,900 JD 4230, w/720 loader ....................$18,900 JD 4040 Quad ..................................$22,900 ‘77 JD 4630, P.S. ..............................$15,900 IH 460, 560, 560D ............................“CALL” Gehl 4635 skid loader......................$12,900 IH 826, 856, 1256, 1456 ....................“SAVE” (2) JD 4030, open station ................$14,900 JD 3020D, P.S...................................$11,900 JD 720, diesel ....................................$6,900

LOADERS

JD loaders, many to choose from ........................................Starting At $2,495 New Koyker loaders ........................“CALL” JD 48, 58, 146, 148, 158; Koyker 510, K5 JD Soundguard Cabs, Call for info

KIESTER IMPLEMENT, INC. 110 S. Main, P.O. Box 249 • Kiester, MN

507-294-3387

www.midwestfarmsales.com


Harvesting Equip

037 Tillage Equip

039

H 13-62, 72, 82, 92, 102, 112 H 10-62, 72, 82 T 10-32, 42, 52, 62 Auger Joggers - on hand ........$1,950

WHEATHEART AUGERS All Sizes

16-82 and 16-112 ..........................Call

COMBINE HEAD MOVERS

Renegade 25’ & 30’ - 4 Wheel Harvest International 35’, 40’ & 45’

KOYKER LOADERS & AUGERS

510 - on hand ............................$5,895 585 - on hand ............................$6,995 1050 Grain Bagger 210 Gran Vac

WHEEL RAKES - High Capacity

12 Wheel ....................................$8,500 14 Wheel ....................................$8,900

WOODFORD WELDING BALE RACKS

18’ - 23’ - 28’

Machinery Wanted

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All kinds of New & Used farm equipment – disc chisels, field cults, planters, soil finishers, cornheads, feed mills, discs, balers, haybines, etc. 507-438-9782

Machinery Wanted

040

Machinery Wanted

040

Machinery Wanted

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Feed Seed Hay

050

WANTED: Laser system for Dairy Quality Alfalfa a “Gold Digger” tile plow. Tested big squares & round 320-223-4110 Leave message bales, delivered from South Dakota John Haensel (605) 351-5760 WANTED: Vermeer PT18 or PT12 tiling machine. 507340-2892 Dairy quality western alfalfa, big squares or small squares, delivered in semi Spraying Equip 041 loads. Clint Haensel (605) 310-6653 AG CHEM SPRAYER 750 GAL, TA, 60' HYD FOLD BOOM, FOAM MARKER, RINSE TANK, HYPRO SM 1000 PTO PUMP, SPRAY MATE II-3 SEC. CONWANTED TO BUY: 20' WANTED: Buster bar atTROLLER, VERY GOOD roller, may be homemade. tachment for behind chisel COND. $8,750. 507-340-2820 507-834-6490 plow. 507-364-5363 or 612(507) 340-2820 756-3172 Wanted To Buy: JD 4120, 4320, 4520 or 4720 compact tractor or NH Boomer 8N • 5/8” drum roller wall Retro. Must have extremely low hours. 715-296-2162 thickness

MANDAKO 12’-60’ LONG ROLLERS

E-Z TRAIL GRAIN CARTS

510 - 710 - on hand

E-Z TRAIL WAGONS

400 Bu. & 500 Bu. - on hand

AZLAND SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand 4 Box Scale & Talc - on hand 4 Box Skid - on hand

STROBEL SEED TENDERS

2 Box - on hand BT-200 - on hand BT-300 ............................................Call

SEED SHUTTLE SEED TENDERS

SS-290 - on hand SS-400 - on hand SS-500 - coming in ......................Call

ENDURAPLAS NURSE TANKS

1100 Gal., 6.5 Honda & hoses $5,750

AZLAND FUEL TRAILERS

500 Extended Platform ................................$7,800

‘08 CIH 215, FWA, 900 hrs., 3 PTO ................................................................$135,000 CIH 8920, FWA, 4800 hrs. ..................................................................................$78,000 CIH 7120, 2WD, 7500 hrs. ..................................................................................$45,000 IH 5488, FWA, 18.4-42 tires - 90%, new motor, Sharp ....................................$41,000 IH 5488, 2WD, 5200 hrs., 18.4x38 tires, New Paint ..........................................$27,500 IH 5488, 2WD, 12.4-50 tires, 5400 hrs, 540/1000, New Paint ..........................$27,000 IH 1066, new motor, cab, ....................................................................................$15,500 CIH 8930, FWA, 3300 hrs, Sharp........................................................................$89,000 CIH 7220 Magnum, FWA, 941 hrs., duals, Sharp ............................................$97,000 CIH 7210, 2WD, 18.4-42, 2500 hrs. ....................................................................$59,500 CIH 7130, FWA, 18.4-42, 5400 hrs. ....................................................................$65,000 IH JX55, 2WD, 2300 hrs ......................................................................................$12,000 CIH 4800, 24’ field cult. ........................................................................................$9,500 CIH 4800, 26’ ........................................................................................................$9,500 CIH 4300, 30’ ......................................................................................................$10,900 CIH 3900, 24’ cushion gang disk ......................................................................$18,500 CIH 6500, disk chisel, 9 & 12 shank ....................................................................$7,500 CIH 6750, 6-shank w/lead shank, w/hyd. lever ................................................$16,500 CIH 527B ripper ..................................................................................................$20,500 (2) CIH 2500, 3 pt., 5 shank ripper, Like New....................................................$10,500 DMI 530B ............................................................................................................$21,000 DMI 500, 5 shank, 3 pt., w/disc leveler ................................................................$6,500 DMI 527 w/disk leveler........................................................................................$15,000 White 445, 11-shank disc chisel ..........................................................................$8,500 JD 714, 11-shank disc chisel..............................................................................$12,000 IH 55, chisel, 12 shank ..........................................................................................$2,500 CIH Tigermate II, 26’ & 28’ ................................................................................$26,000 CIH 600, blower ....................................................................................................$3,900 (3) Demco 450, box ................................................................$8,500/$9,500/$10,500 DMI Tigermate II, 28’ ........................................................................................$22,500 CIH 3950, 25’ cushion gang disk w/mulcher ....................................................$26,500 CIH 496 w/mulcher, cushion ..............................................................................$16,500 (6) Demco 365 boxes ..................................................................From $5,500-$6,500 (2) Demco 550, box ............................................................................................$10,500 Brent 540, box ....................................................................................................$10,900 Demco used gravity boxes, all sizes available ..........................................................Call Gehl 125 ..............................................................................................................$16,000 New Mandako Land Rollers in stock ........................................................................Call H&S 10-wheel V-rake..............................................................................................$2,900 Gehl 135 grinder ..................................................................................................Coming Gehl 125 grinder ..................................................................................................Coming

New Sitrex Rakes Available Many New & Used Rakes Available

GREENWALD FARM CENTER Greenwald, MN • 320-987-3177 14 miles So. of Sauk Centre

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

470 Brent Grain Cart................................$6,500 1210A JD Grain Cart................................$2,750 Feterl 12” drive over, Like New ..............$4,500 10-41 Westfield Auger ............................$2,150 10-71 Westfield Auger ............................$3,750 10-71 Hutch Auger ..................................$3,750 1872 Land Pride Mower ..........................$1,250

17 B

• 42” drum diameter • 4”x8” frame tubing 1/4” thick • Auto fold New Rock Wagons AVAILABLE!

USED EQUIPMENT LARGE SELECTION OF WHEEL RAKES IN-STOCK Allis Chalmers 8030, 2WD, P.D.........................................................................$13,500

*************** USED EQUIPMENT ***************

2004 JD 9420T ....................................$129,900 AC 6080 tractor w/ldr & cab, 2WD, nice ....Call 1981 Versatile 555..................................$12,750 2012 SS-400 scale ................................$24,500 2012 SS-400 ..........................................$21,500 EZ Trail 860 grain cart, red, Like New ..$21,500 510 E-Z Trail Grain Cart ..........................$9,500

039

FOR SALE: Int'l 720, 4-18s Disc chisels: JD 714 & 712, Wanted To Buy: JD 843 or 893 cornhead. JD 920 flex plow, excellent condition. Glencoe 7400; Field Cults head & JD 9400, 9410 or 9450 507-375-4289 under 30': JD 980, small combine w/ extremely low grain carts & gravity boxes Reconditioned IH 800 9-13 hrs. 715-296-2162 300-400 bu. Finishers under bottom auto reset plows for 20', clean 4 & 6R stalk chopsale. Call 507-830-2115 pers; Nice JD 215 & 216 WANTED TO BUY: White flex heads; JD 643 corn435 or 445 disc chisel. 320Used parts for IH 720 heads Must be clean; JD 352-3878 plows, toggle/auto reset. corn planters, 4-6-8 row. ½ price of new or less. 715-299-4338 WANTED: Bisch (or equivaWe ship anywhere. lent) head adapter to put Wanted To Buy: 14' silo unCall Maple Valley Farms JD 643 on IH 2366 combine; loader MUST be very much Randy Krueger or CIH 6RN head to fit IH like new-NO rebuilds! 715(715)250-1617 2366 combine. 320-282-4846 296-2162

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HARVEST INTERNATIONAL AUGERS

Tillage Equip

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

JD 7720 combine, approx FOR SALE: DMI 500 Ecoli4000 hrs, 2 yrs of shop retill 3pt 5 shank disk leverpairs that total $15,000, aller, new coulters, ways shedded & well main$6,000/OBO. 507-236-3371 tained, 925F bean head also avail. $12,000/OBO. Call/text FOR SALE: IH 720 5 bottom onland plow, AR coulters, Dean 507-381-4422 good wear parts; JD 215 15' JD 9400 Combine, 2,250 Sep, disc. 952-466-2593 3,400 Engine, asking FOR SALE: IHC pull type 6 $33,500. 515-570-4382 bottom 16” plow, coulters, good condition, all new Planting Equip 038 wear parts, very clean, $4,800/OBO. 320-220-3114 1996 Great Plains CPH-20, no-till grain drill, markers, FOR SALE: JD 2700 ripper, nice, $15,000. 319-404-3415 5 shank, stored inside, exc cond, $20,500. 320-243-4359 Tillage Equip 039 FOR SALE: JD 2800 plow, 5 CIH 735 vari width plow, AR, bottom, variable width, 5 btms., no welds. 507-220auto re-set. 507-877-2036 6810 FOR SALE: JD 510 disk ripFOR SALE: '01 JD 512 disk per, 7 shanks, covering ripper, 5 shank, good teeth boards, good tires, disks & & blades, nice, $18,000. 507points, no welding on 847-4693 frame, $10,000. 320-221-0750 FOR SALE: '05 530B DMI w/ Grove City MN lead shanks, field ready, & 2 sets of covering boards & FOR SALE: JD model 400, 20' rotary hoe, gauge extra points, $19,500/OBO. wheels, like new condition, 320-510-0427 $2,250. 507-370-2149 FOR SALE: Case IH #14 V ripper, 9 shank, black FOR SALE: White 588 5 botsprings, dual gauge wheels, tom plow, spring reset, good condition, $5,725; Kool good condition, $2,250. Betsilage blower, $250. 507-427ter Bilt 2300 vac for parts, 3561 bad tank, Make Offer. 507381-2627 FOR SALE: DMI V ripper 5 shank w/ front disc & rear Glencoe 9 shank disc chisel, leveling disc, McFarland walking tandems, 5 bar spike toothed drag, 8” covharrow, new shanks, very ering boards, good shape, good condition, $7,000/OBO. $11,400/OBO. 507-339-3745 (715)746-2332


Feed Seed Hay

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

18 B

© 2011 CNH America LLC. New Holland is a registered trademark of CNH America LLC

TJOSVOLD EQUIPMENT Sales & Service • West Hwy. 212 — Granite Falls, MN 56241 800-337-1581 • 320-564-2331 • After Hours (320) 212-4849 www.tjosvoldequip.com

USED TRACTORS

‘95 Ford 9280, bareback, 20.8R38 duals, 3600 hrs., Nice! ..............................................................$62,500 ‘88 Ford TW35, MFD, w/18.4R42 duals, 4900 hrs ........................................................$33,900 ‘83 Ford 7710, MFD, w/4500 hrs ....................$21,900 ‘97 NH 7740, SLE pkg., MFD, 18.4-34, 4600 hrs. ........................................................$35,900 ‘11 NH T3045, MFD, cab, CVT, 350 hrs. ..........$35,500 ‘97 NH 7740, SLE pkg., MFD, w/cab, A/C, ldr & bkt ................................................................29,900 ‘80 Versatile 875, bareback, 20.8R38 duals, 6650 hrs. ........................................................$25,900 ‘08 Buhler 435, 4WD, 710/70R42 duals, 2050 hrs ......................................................$175,000 White 2-70, MFD, w/loader, No Cab ............Coming In White 2-85, 2WD, cab/heat, w/loader ..........Coming In

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

COMBINES/HEADS

‘98 CIH 1020, 30’ flex head ..............................$9,900 ‘07 NH CR9060, 800 hrs., 420/80R46 duals, 1015 sep. hrs, Field Ready. ..........................$189,900 ‘03 NH CR960, 2000 hrs., 20.8R42 duals......$129,000 ‘01 NH TR99, 2100 hrs., 18.4R42 (4), Y/M, GPS, Field Ready ............................................$89,900 ‘01 NH TR99, RWA combine, straddle duals, bin ext., chaff spreader, 40K in parts, Field Ready! ....$109,900 ‘00 NH 996, 8R30” cornhead w/K&M chopper$39,950 ‘92 NH 974, 8R30” cornhead ............................$8,900 ‘10 NH CR9065, w/620/80R42 duals, 500 sep. hrs. ................................................$229,900 ‘98 NH 973, 25’ flex head ..................................$9,500 (2) ‘97 NH 973, 30’ flex head ..........................$10,500 ‘00 NH 996, 6R30” cornhead ......................Coming In NH 974, 10R22” cornhead ..............................$12,900 ‘93 NH 974, 12R22” cornhead ........................$11,900 ‘97 NH 973, 30’ flex head w/AWS reel ............$15,900 ‘10 NH 99C, 8R30” chopping cornhead ......Coming In ‘04 NH 98C, 6R30” cornhead, Like New! ........$33,000 ‘00 NH 996, 6R30” cornhead, Nice! ................$16,900 ‘95 NH TR97, 18.4R42, duals ......................Coming In CIH 1000 Series, 8R22” cornhead ..............Coming In

MISCELLANEOUS EQUIP.

‘10 Case 100, 50’ crumbler, Like New!............$18,900 ‘10 JD 200, 45’ crumbler ................................$15,000 ‘79 Wilrich 4400 chisel plow ............................$9,900 ‘92 NH 499 haybine............................................$4,950 JD 27, 15’ shredder ..........................................$4,950 JD 680, 15’ chisel plow ................................Coming In IH 20’ chisel plow ..............................................$2,150 ‘‘11 Wilrich 657DCR, 23’ w/discs & rolling baskets & harrow ..........................................$51,900 ‘07 NH 1475 w/HS 14 head, Clean! ................$19,900 ‘09 Wilrich 657DCR, 23’ w/discs & harrow ....$33,950 ‘00 JD 980, 45’ field cult. w/harrow, Nice! ......$19,900 ‘88 CIH 4900, 45’ field cult. w/harrow ............$10,900 Wilrich 30’ field cult w/Nobel harrow ................$1,950 ‘12 NH SG110, 60’ flex-coil packer, Like New..$36,900 ‘13 Degelman LR7651 & LR7645, Demo’s, New! Call (2) ‘06 Wilrich 957DDR rippers, 7x30” & 9x24” ..............................................................From $19,900 (2) Parker 2500 wagons..............................Ea. $5,000 Parker 725 wagon w/tarp ..................................$9,900 H&S 450 wagon ................................................$4,900 ‘11 Parker 524 grain cart, holdover ........................Call Parker 4500 grain cart, side auger, Nice..........$10,900 (2) ‘12 EZ Trail 510 grain carts /tarps & ltsea $14,900 ‘11 Tebben TC94, 10’ rotary cutter....................$5,950 Red Devil 9654B 96” snowblower, 2-stage ......$2,950

050 Feed Seed Hay

USED DRYERS

MC 690, 16’, 1 Ph., LP, SS Sheets BEHLEN 380, 1 Ph., LP HEAT RECLAIM DELUX DP6030, 20’, 3 PH, LP HEAT RECLAIM SS SHEETS DELUX DPX7040, 15’, 3 Ph., LP, SS OUTER SHEETS TOP, ALUM. BTM. BEHLEN 700 3 Ph., LP DOUBLE BURNER

USED LEGS

60’ 3000BPH PAINTED, 10 HP, 3 Ph. DRIVE & MOTOR, PAINTED

USED AUGERS

10”x71’ MAYRATH SWINGAWAY 8”X62’ MAYRATH BP, PTO 8”X62’ WESTFIELD TD PTO 8”X57’ KEWANEE PTO

We carry a full line of Behlen & Delux dryer parts; Mayrath and Hutch augers parts. Large inventory of Welda sprockets, hubs, bearings, chain & pulleys.

SKID STEERS

‘12 NH L230, w/pilots cab, AC, hyd. Q/A, 2-spd., 760 hrs. ..........................................................$39,900 ‘07 NH L185, w/cab & heat, 2-spd., hyd. Q/A, 4100 hrs. ........................................................$20,900 ‘09 NH L175, 2-spd, cab, A/C, 890 hrs., pilots $29,900 ‘05 NH LS185B w/cab & heat, 1500 hrs., hyd. quick attach ............................................$24,500 ‘84 Case 1840, diesel, ROPS, w/bucket, 3100 hrs. ....................................................................Coming In

Visit Us At: www.tjosvoldequip.com

050 Feed Seed Hay

050 Cattle

056

FOR SALE: Certified Spoon- Hay For Sale: Round or HAY seller wanted. SELL- 120-200#, 150-200# (ready Sept 25) 40-450#, 45-550# Holstein ING HAY? We send reer rye seed and common large square bales, alfalfa, started steers, vaccinated, quests from buyers to you rye. Wigen Seed Farm 320straw or grass hay. Delivdewormed, dehorned, nice at no cost. Buyers contact 221-1917 ery available by semi. Ose cut, implanted. Taking orus and we send them to Hay Farm, Thief River ders to raise calves, can FOR SALE: Wheat Straw you. Check it out & sign up Falls, MN. Call or text handle in groups up to 550 for Sale, 3x3x8 square at: www.sellhaynow.com Leroy at (218)689-6675 count. 715-613-2072 bales. Delivery available. 605-850-1551 Livestock 054 FOR SALE OR LEASE REGISTERED BLACK FOR SALE: Purebred Black ANGUS Bulls, 2 year old & Angus bulls, calf ease & yearlings; bred heifers, good disposition; also York, calving ease, club calves & Hamp & Hamp-Duroc balance performance. Al boars & gilts. 320-598-3790 sired. In herd improvement program. J.W. Riverview Dairy 055 Angus Farm Glencoe, MN 55336 Conklin Dealer 320Complete Surge pipeline for 864-4625 44 cows. 4 Surge orbit milkers, new pulsators, new FOR SALE: 10 cows bred for vacuum pump. Also barn early spring calving, herd cleaner & chute. (715)307reduction, by the pound, 4736 market price; also, 3 black polled breeding age bulls. Dairy Herd for Sale: Take 40 yrs of Simmental breedyour pick out of our 75 cow ing. Riverside Simmental. herd, must pick at least 25. Gerald Polzin, Cokato. 320At breeding, large frames, 286-5805 deep bodies, good milkers. (715)797-2134 FOR SALE: 300 head of 450# WANTED TO BUY: Dairy Holstein feeder steers, heifers and cows. 320-235vaccinated, de-horned, im2664 planted & home raised. 320510-0588 WANTED TO BUY: Open short bred or springing HolSALE: Purebred stein heifers. 608-788-6258 or FOR British White Beef Cattle 608-792-4223 – Heifers, bulls & steers, We are retiring from Dairy, 13 yrs of progressive our closed AI's herd of red breeding & culling. 320& white and a few black & 815-5192 white Holsteins will be sold as springing cows & heifers. 39 years of great Polled Shorthorn breeding stock. 3 yr old Roan herd breeding w/top bulls, such sire. Bred cows. Good seas: Jordan, Advent & Lawn lection of weaned heifer Boy. Call for more info: calves. (715)597-2036 320-796-5514

1409 Silver Street E. Mapleton, MN 56065 507-524-3726 massopelectric.com

The Affordable Way to Tile Your Fields 3 Point Hitch & Pull Type Models Available • Walking Tandem Axles • Formed V Bottom on w/425/65R22.5 Tires for Superior Grade Control • Tile Installation Depth Gauge

Buy Factory Direct & $AVE!

Shoe & Boot forms to Tile. No more Crushed Tile • Paralled Pull Arms, Zero Pitch for the Most Accurate Tile Placement


Cattle

056 Goats

062

Livestock Equip

075

FOR SALE: Suffolk, SuffolkHamp & Polypay-Dorset ram lambs, big & meaty, ewe lambs also. 507-445-3317 Please leave message. FOR SALE: True-breed type fall born rams, same breeding that have won 11 championships & 6 reserve in carcass shows at MN State Fair, data to prove it, bred with a purpose.. cutability. 320-587-6668

165,000 bushel bin with new 6” 75 hp. continuous air fill. This bin has a 9,000 bushel holding bin with an electric, below grade 14” truck unloading auger for continuous hauling and filling. Located at 36402 15th St., Elmore, MN (3 miles west of Elmore)

Call 507-240-0030 Larry Mages - Mages Land Co.

USED PARTS LARSON SALVAGE Good selection of tractor parts - New & Used All kinds of hay equipment, haybines, balers, choppers parted out. New combine belts for all makes. Swather canvases, round baler belting, used & new tires. 6 miles East of

CAMBRIDGE, MN 763-689-1179 We Ship Daily

Visa and MasterCard Accepted

Notch Equipment: • Rock Buckets • Grapple Forks • Manure Forks • Bale Spears • Hi-Volume Buckets & Pallet Forks • Bale Transports & Feeder Wagons, 16’-34’ • Adult & Young Stock Feeders & Bale Feeders • Land Levelers Smidley Equipment: • Steer Stuffers • Hog Feeders • Hog Huts • Calf Creep Feeders • Lamb & Sheep Feeders • Cattle & Hog Waterers • Mini Scale Sioux Equipment: • Gates • Calving Pens • Haymax Bale Feeders • Cattle Panels • Feeders Panels • Head Gates • Hog Feeders • Squeeze Chutes & Tubs • Port-A-Hut Shelters (Many Sizes) • Bergman Cattle Feeders – Special Prices • Lorenz Snowblowers • GT (Tox-O-Wic) Grain Dryers, 350-800 bu. • Sheep & Calf Feeders • Livestock Equipment by Vern’s Mfg. • Mister Squeeze Cattle Chutes & Hd. Gates • Peck Grain Augers – Big Discounts • MDS Buckets for Loaders & Skidloaders • Powder River Livestock & Horse Equipment • Tire Scrapers for Skidsteers, 6’-9’ • Hay feeders for horned animals • Jari Sickle Mowers • Grasshopper Lawn Mowers – Special Price Now! • “Tire” feeders & waterers

• MDS Roto King Round Bale Processor • Good Stock of parts for GT Tox-O-Wic Grain Dryers, Also, Some Used Parts • Sitrex Wheel Rakes • Walco 3 pt. Mowers • Bale Baskets • SI Feeders & Bunks • (Hayhopper) Bale Feeders (Prices Lowered) • Mandako Land Rollers • E-Z Trail Wagons, Boxes & Grain Carts • Calftel Hutches & Animal Barns • R&C Poly Bale Feeders • JBM hay & grain feeders & bunks • Corral Panels & Horse Stalls • EZ-Trail Head Movers & Bale Racks • Roda Mini-Spreaders • Amish Built Oak Bunk Feeders & Bale Racks • JBM Bale Trailers • Goat & Sheep Feeders • Mist Sprayers, gas or PTO • NEW ITEM! * 3 Pt. Fence Mowers* • Fainting goats & min. donkeys

DR® POWER EQUIPMENT • Field & Brush Mowers • Roto-Hog Power Tillers • Stump Grinders • Log Splitters • Chippers • Power Graders • Power Wagons • Leaf & Lawn Vacuums • Versa-trailers

~ USED EQUIPMENT ~

• Brady #5600 15’ Stalk Chopper or Windrower • (2) SI 8’ SI Junior Bunks • IHC #80 Snowblower, Very Good • Smidley Cattle & Hog Feeders • Tebben V-Ripper, 3 pt., 3 shank • Vermeer Tree Spade, 3 pt. • Roto-Tiller 6’, 3 pt.

• Steer Stuffer, 10’ - $1,275 • (2) Bale Baskets • JD BWA 15’ disk w/duals, very good • Gravity Boxes & Wagons

Wanted to Buy:

GT(Tox-o-wik) PTO Grain Dryers, Cattle & Calf Feeders, Hog Feeders, Cattle Handling Equip.

FARM, HOME & CONSTRUCTION

Office Location - 305 Adams Street Hutchinson, MN 55350

320-587-2162, Ask for Larry

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Suffolk ewe lambs & pregnancy tested tried ewes. Martens Suffolks 507-380-1828

- FOR RENT Huge Grain Bin

~ NEW EQUIPMENT/BIG INVENTORY ~

19 B THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

SALE: Agro-matic Registered Texas Longhorn Boer Goats 6 yearling does, 1 FOR year old & 5 year old Boer auger type bunk feeder w/ breeding stock, cows, bucks. (715)658-1618 48' of auger, new, never heifers or roping stock, top used, always stored inside. blood lines. 507-235-3467 507-766-4620 Swine 065 WANT TO BUY: Butcher FOR SALE: New steer cows, bulls, fats & walkable feeders, calf & finisher cripples; also horses, Compart's total program features superior boars & sizes 1 ton to 8 ton cap. sheep & goats. 320-235-2664 open gilts documented by 920-948-3516 BLUP technology. Duroc, www.steerfeeder.com Yearling Corriente Heifers York, Landrace & F1 lines. and Steers. (715) 658-1618 Terminal boars offer lean080 ness, muscle, growth. Ma- Cars & Pickups ternal gilts & boars are Sheep 060 productive, lean, durable. '91 Ford F250 w/contractor box, $2,000. 507-220-6810 All are stress free & PRRS FOR SALE: January Dorset free. Semen also available ram lambs, $300/ea; Dorset through Elite Genes A.I. yearling ram, $250; Suffolk Make 'em Grow! Comparts yearling ram, $250. 320-212Boar Store, INC. Toll Free: 1031 877-441-2627 FOR SALE: Spot & Chester white boars for sale. Resler Spots & Durocs. 507-456-7746

“Where Farm and Family Meet”


YOUR HARVEST HEADQUARTERS (B) Belle Plaine, MN • 1051 Old Hwy. 169 Blvd.

20 B THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

(952) 873-2224

(H) Hollandale, MN • W. Hwy. 251

(507) 889-4221

‘11 JD 9630T, 755 hrs., Extended Warranty......$297,900

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4WD TRACTORS

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

(507) 451-4054

‘11 JD 8235R, 250 hrs., PS, ‘11 JD 9870, PRWD, ‘12 JD S670, 263 sep. hrs., Extended Warranty......$186,900 798 sep. hrs. ................$294,900 Extended Warranty......$289,900

(O)’12 JD 9560R, 360 hrs., IF tires ................................$319,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 500 hrs., Lease Return ....................$314,900 (O)’13 JD 9560R, 500 hrs., Lease Return ....................$314,900 (O)’12 JD 9560R, 400 hrs., Extended Warranty ............$312,500 (B)’12 JD 9650R, 536 hrs., Lease Return ....................$312,500 (O)’12 JD 9650R, 400 hrs., Lease Return ....................$312,500 (O)’13 JD 9510R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$299,900 (O)’13 JD 9510R, 300 hrs., Lease Return......................$299,900 (O)’12 JD 9510R, 306 hrs., Lease Return......................$289,900 (O)’13 JD 9510R, 450 hrs, Lease Return ......................$284,500 (B)’11 JD 9630, 782 hrs., Extended Warranty................$279,900 (O)’13 JD 9460R, 300 hrs., Lease Return......................$279,900 (O)’13 JD 9460R, 300 hrs., Lease Return......................$279,900 (O)’13 JD 9410R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$274,900 (B)’11 JD 9430, 474 hrs., 710/42’s ................................$267,900 (O)’13 JD 9410R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$264,900 (O)’13 JD 9360R, 300 hrs., Lease Return ....................$229,900 (B)’02 JD 9520, 2910 hrs., 710/70R42’s ........................$174,900 (O)’06 JD 9320, 2002 hrs., PS ......................................$169,500 (H)’97 JD 9400, 5755 hrs., 650/42’s ................................$99,900

TRACK TRACTORS

(O) Owatonna, MN • 3555 SW 18th St.

(O)’11 JD 9630T, 1200 hrs., Extended Warranty ..........$314,900 (O)’11 JD 9630T, 644 hrs., Extended Warranty ............$309,900 (B)’11 JD 9630T, 753 hrs., Extended Warrranty ............$297,900 (O)’10 JD 9630T, 1650 hrs. ............................................$287,500 (O)’09 JD 9630T, 1720 hrs. ............................................$283,000 (H)’09 JD 9630T, 1110 hrs. ............................................$279,900 (H)’11 JD 8335RT, 943 hrs., IVT ..................................$258,900 (O)’12 JD 8310T, 166 hrs., PS,25” tracks ......................$257,900 (H)’06 JD 9520T, 3625 hrs., Auto Trac ready ................$159,900 (B)’03 JD 9320T, 4621 hrs., 36” tracks ........................$139,900 (O)’06 JD 8230T, 3596 hrs., 16” tracks ..........................$127,900 (O)’04 JD 8420T, 5580 hrs., 16” tracks ..........................$110,000 (H)’00 JD 9400T, 5160 hrs., PTO ..................................$105,000 (O)’98 JD 8300T, 5500 hrs., 16” tracks ............................$67,900

(O)’69 JD 4520, syncro, cab ............................................$10,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 gal., 90’ boom ..............................$209,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 520 hrs., 90’ boom ..............................$209,700 UTILITY TRACTORS (O)’12 JD 4730, 490 hrs., 90’ boom ..............................$209,600 (B)’11 JD 5085M, 271 hrs., reverser ................................$48,900 (H)’07 JD 5325, 362 hrs., loader, MFWD ........................$35,900 (O)’10 JD 4830, 934 hrs., 90’ boom ..............................$203,500 (B)’67 JD 3020, gas, loader ..............................................$7,900 (O)’10 JD 4830, 1104 hrs., 90’ boom ............................$201,900 (B)’65 JD 3020, cab, loader, syncro, gas ..........................$7,900 (O)’07 JD 4930, 3093 hrs., dry box ................................$200,000 (O)Ford 5000, 16.9x34, Sharp ..........................................$6,250 (O)’09 JD 4830, 2400 hrs, 100’ boom ............................$185,000 (B)’41 JD “B” ......................................................................$2,995 (H)’05 JD 4720, 1800 hrs., 90’ boom ............................$129,900 (O)’03 JD 4710, 2000 hrs., 90’ boom ............................$115,000 COMBINES (O)’01 JD 4710, 2400 hrs., 90’ boom ............................$109,900 (O)’12 JD S680, 511 hrs., Extended Warranty ..............$345,000 (O)’03 Ag Chem 1264, 3770 hrs., 90’ boom ....................$85,900 (H)’12 JD S680, 232 sep. hrs.........................................$339,900 (O)’03 Willmar 8650 Eagle, 3326 hrs., 90’ boom ............$61,500 (O)’12 JD S670, 225 sep hrs, PRWD ............................$319,900 (O)’95 Tyler WT, 4612 hrs., 75’ boom ..............................$36,900 (B)’11 JD 9870, 511 sep. hrs., PRWD, 800/70R38 ........$309,900 (O)Patriot XL, 800 gal., 75’ boom ....................................$28,900 (O)’12 JD S560, 231 sep. hrs., 2630 display ................$305,900 FALL TILLAGE (O)’11 JD 9870, 700 sep. hrs., PRWD ..........................$294,900 (O)’12 JD S670, 263 sep. hrs., duals ............................$289,900 (B)’12 JD 3710, 10-bottom ..............................................$57,900 (O)’12 JD 512, 9-shank ....................................................$54,000 (H)’11 JD 9870, 508 sep. hrs., duals..............................$284,500 (B)’10 JD 9770, 328 sep. hrs., PRWD ..........................$275,000 (O)’11 JD 3710, 10-bottom ..............................................$52,500 (B)’11 JD 9770, 511 sep. hrs., duals ..............................$256,500 (B)’10 JD 2410, 60.5’ chisel plow ....................................$49,500 (B)’10 JD 2410, 60.5’ chisel plow ....................................$49,500 (B)’09 JD 9870, 814 sep. hrs., PRWD ..........................$249,900 (O)’10 JD 9770, 788 sep. hrs. ........................................$245,900 (B)CIH 330 Turbo, 34’ vertical tillage, rolling basket ........$45,000 (O)’10 JD 9670, 600 sep. hrs., duals ............................$230,000 (O)’11 JD 2700, 7-shank, 30” ..........................................$37,900 (B)’08 JD 9870, 1068 sep. hrs., PRWD ........................$210,900 (O)’11 JD 3710, 8-bottom ................................................$34,900 (B)’10 Gleaner A76, 382 sep. hrs...................................$199,900 (B)’10 JD 2700, 9-shank, 24” ..........................................$33,900 (H)’09 JD 9570, 700 sep. hrs., duals..............................$197,000 (H)’10 JD 512, 5-shank ....................................................$27,500 (O)’06 JD 9760, 1918 sep. hrs., duals ..........................$179,900 (H)’02 JD 2400, 24’ chisel plow........................................$26,900 (H)’06 JD 9560, 667 sep. hrs., duals ............................$163,500 (H)’07 JD 3710, 8-bottom ................................................$25,995 (O)’06 JD 9760, 1363 sep. hrs., duals ..........................$162,900 (B)’04 JD 512, 5-shank ....................................................$20,900 (O)’04 JD 9760, 1192 hrs. PRWD ..................................$159,900 (O)’03 JD 2700, 9-shank ..................................................$20,900 (B)’98 CIH 2388, 2750 sep., hrs., duals ..........................$75,900 (B)’05 Wilrich 957, 7-shank ..............................................$19,900 (H)’92 JD 9500, 2812 hrs. ................................................$49,900 (O)’95 DMI 730, 7-shank ..................................................$10,500 (O)’90 JD 9500, 3642 sep. hrs., duals ............................$34,900 (H)M&W 1465, 7-shank, 24” spacing ................................$7,950

(B)’82 JD 6620SH, side hill, 3231 hrs. ............................$20,900 (B)’82 JD 7720, 4600 hrs., PRWD ..................................$14,900 (B)’82 JD 8820, 5571 hrs., duals......................................$13,900 (B)’80 JD 7720, 5000 hrs. ................................................$12,900 (H)’79 JD 7720..................................................................$11,900 ROW CROP TRACTORS (O)’13 JD 8360R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..............$279,900 (O)’76 JD 6600, diesel........................................................$4,500 (O)’13 JD 8360R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..............$279,900 (O)NEW Mudhog PRWD for 70 Series Combines ..........$16,900 (O)’13 JD 8335R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..............$259,900 (B)’77 JD 6600, diesel, 4000 hrs. ......................................$2,595 (O)’13 JD 8335R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..............$259,900 CORNHEADS (O)’13 JD 8335R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..............$259,900 (O)’12 JD 618C, 18R22” chopping ................................$159,900 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 300 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..............$249,900 (B)’09 JD 612C, 12R22”, chopping ..................................$82,900 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 321 hrs., IVT, Lease Return ..............$244,900 (O)’06 Drago 12R20”, chopping ......................................$75,000 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ..............$239,900 (O)’11 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ....................................$69,000 (O)’13 JD 8310R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ..............$239,900 (B)’10 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ....................................$64,900 (O)’10 JD 8345R, 1732 hrs., IVT, triples ........................$239,900 (H)’09 JD 608C, 8R30”, chopping ....................................$58,900 (O)’11 JD 8310R, 608 hrs., PS ......................................$223,900 (O)’04 Geringhoff 120, 12R20” ........................................$54,500 (O)’13 JD 8285R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ..............$219,900 (B)’08 JD 606C, 6R30”, chopping ....................................$49,900 (O)’13 JD 8285R, 300 hrs., PS, Lease Return ..............$214,900 (B)’11 Harvest Tec, 8R30”, chopping................................$49,900 (O)’11 JD 8235R, 232 hrs., Extended Warranty ............$186,900 (O)’07 JD 893, knife, hyd. deck ........................................$32,500 (O)’09 MF 7495, 1500 hrs., MFWD, loader ....................$114,900 (B)’95 JD 893, knife ..........................................................$17,900 (O)’95 JD 8200, 5780 hrs., MFWD ..................................$75,900 (O)’81 JD 644, 6R30” ........................................................$6,000 (O)’94 JD 7800, 5329 hrs., MFWD ..................................$66,900 (O)JD 444, 4 RW................................................................$2,395 (O)’91 JD 4955, 7188 hrs., MFWD, PS............................$58,000 SPRAYERS (B)’84 JD 4450, 10,000 hrs., MFWD ................................$34,900 (O)’12 JD 4940, 489 hrs., 120’ boom ............................$292,750 (O)’78 JD 4440, 7094 hrs., Quad ....................................$26,900 (O)’12 JD 4940, 467 hrs., dry box ..................................$290,500 (O)’73 JD 4630, 7948 hrs., PS ........................................$19,900 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1343 hrs., 120’ boom ..........................$249,750 (B)’76 JD 4630, 8105 hrs., Quad ....................................$16,900 (O)’11 JD 4930, 1216 hrs., 120’ boom ..........................$245,900 (B)AC 7060, 18.4x38’s ....................................................$14,250 (O)’11 JD 4830, 610 hrs., 90’ boom ..............................$220,750 (O)’74 JD 4030, open station ..........................................$12,900 (O)’12 JD 4730, 800 gal., 90’ boom ..............................$210,250

PLATFORMS

(B)’13 MacDon FD75, new 40’ draper..............................$79,900 (O)’11 JD 630F, 30’ air reel ..............................................$42,900 (O)’10 JD 635F, 35’ ..........................................................$34,900 (O)’10 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$32,500 (H)’10 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$31,900 (H)’09 JD 635F, 35’ ..........................................................$31,900 (O)’07 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$28,900 (O)’06 JD 635F, 35’ ..........................................................$28,900 (B)’09 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$28,495 (O)’10 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$25,900 (B)’06 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$25,900 (O)’06 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$25,900 (B)’04 JD 635F, 35’ ..........................................................$25,900 (B)’10 Agco 8235, 35’, full finger ......................................$24,900 (B)’04 JD 630F, 30’ ..........................................................$23,900 (O)’06 JD 635F, 35’ ..........................................................$23,500 (O)’03 JD 635F, 35’ ..........................................................$21,900 (H)’01 JD 930, air reel ......................................................$19,900 (B)’08 CIH 1020, 30’ ........................................................$19,900 (H)’00 JD 930, full finger, air reel ....................................$16,900 (B)’01 JD 925, 25’ full finger ............................................$15,900 (O)’01 JD 930, 30’ ............................................................$14,900 (H)’99 JD 925, 25’ ..............................................................$9,500 (H)JD 925, 25’ ....................................................................$7,950 (B)’97 JD 930, flex..............................................................$6,900 (O)’94 JD 925, 25’ ..............................................................$5,000 (B)’92 JD 930, 30’ ..............................................................$4,900 (B)JD 922, 22’ ....................................................................$4,900

Visit agpowerjd.com for online auction listing

Your Southern Minnesota & Western Wisconsin John Deere Commercial Sprayer Center

Cars & Pickups

080

FOR SALE: Ford 7.3 dsl used engines & parts, all years, Greg's Diesels 320583-0881 Trucks & Trailers

084

'73 Chev C60, 2 spd, 350, 15' grain box, no rust, heavy duty hitch, 81,000 miles, white w/blue trim, $3,950. 952-442-4259 '84 Intl 2500, Cummins eng, 9 spd, 19' box & hoist, $12,500; '93 White GMC, 60 Det. eng., 7 spd, 20' box & hoist, $14,000; '93 Kenworth semi, 60 Det. eng, 10 spd., $7,000; '92 Intl semi, Cat eng., 9 spd, $6,500; '86 GMC Topkick, 3208 Cat eng.,5 spd, 26' fold down impl. bed, $3,500. 320-587-6301 FOR SALE: '03 Ford F-250 Super Duty. 6.0 dsl, automatic 4x4, exc cond. 168,500 miles. Sell outright or trade for cattle. 715-579-7200 FOR SALE: '71 Ford Louisville 390 5&3, twin screw, 18' steel box, new clutch, 43,000 miles, $6,000/OBO. 952-240-2193 FOR SALE: '74 IH 1800 twin screw truck, 540 engine, uses oil, VG 20' steel box & hoist, VG rubber, BO. 20' steel grain box & hoist, $3,500. '74 IH 1800 parts truck, 392 engine, 5-4 trans, 18' steel box & scissors hoist, BO. 507-665-3739 FOR SALE: '78 Mack R Model tri axle, 21' box, hoist & tarp, 300, 5spd, $17,500. 320-240-2193 FOR SALE: '87 Ford L9000, L10 engine, Cummins, 9spd, Pintle hook, all white. 320815-3495 FOR SALE: '88 White, 38' steel trailer, 350 Cummins, 9spd, good tires & brakes, DOT'd, $10,000/OBO. 507381-2320 FOR SALE: '91 Wilson Pacesetter hopper bottom, 41', 66”, w/ '92 Volvo tractor, daycab w/ L10 Cummins, $20,000/OBO. 507-236-3371 FOR SALE: (2) '74 LN800 tandems, like new, 1000-20 tires, 20' box, roll tarp, recent DOT'd, $4,500/ea. 10” drive over pit; 250 bu pup trailer. Call 320-841-1471 Miscellaneous

090

FOR SALE: 19,000 gal vertical fuel tank, newly re-conditioned, 30 gal a minute pump, fuel gauge, good paint, 4 yrs old. 320-269-8719 or 320-226-0296 FOR SALE: 25” tracks for JD 8000-8030T series tractors, less than 200 hrs, use w/ mid rollers, good shape, reasonably priced. Call 507920-8442 WANT MORE READERS TO SEE YOUR AD?? Expand your coverage area! The Land has teamed up with Farm News, and The Country Today so you can do just that! Place a classified ad in The Land and have the option of placing it in these papers as well. More readers = better results! Call The Land for more information. 507-3454523 • 800-657-4665


Miscellaneous

090

Miscellaneous

090

• FALL CLEARANCE SALE •

Clark Forklift: propane, 6,000 lb., short mast ................................$2,250 PiCo bucket lift box ........................................................................$1,000 24x96 reefer body, multi-temp, freezer/cooler/dry..........................$1,250 Hackney 16’ body, unit inoperable ..................................................$2,200 Hydraulic wet kit for semi tractor mounted on headache rack. Includes tank, pump, hoses, PTO, mounting clamps. 2 available ..............................................................................................Ea. $1,800 Fontain high clearance 5th wheels. 2 available ............................Ea. $450 Aluminum 20” step deck load levelers. 4 available ......................Ea. $225 Aluminum ramps: several at 22’-27’ long x 14’-16’ wide ........$250-$375 Firestone 16.5/22.5 tires, 16 ply rating, 19/32 depth. 2 available Ea $225 * Also over 50 used truck tires and rims Screw ratchets-$25 Ea.; Large ratchets-$40 Ea.; Small ratchets-$20 Ea.; Load straps-$10 Ea.; Bars-$10 Ea. Grade 4 chains-$15 Ea.; Grade 7 chains-$25 Ea.

Miscellaneous

090

RANGER PUMP CO. Custom Manufacturer of Water Lift Pumps for field drainage Sales & Service 507-984-2025 or 406-314-0334 www.rangerpumpco.com

Miscellaneous

DAMAGED GRAIN WANTED ANYWHERE We buy damaged corn and grain any condition - wet or dry TOP DOLLAR We have vacs and trucks CALL HEIDI OR LARRY

COSMOS, MN 56228 Toll Free: 888-279-6922 • Office: 320-877-7331 www.minnesotausedtrucks.com

TILLAGE

JD 2700, 5-shank, Nice ..............................$21,500 CIH 530B w/leads............................................CALL M&W 9-shank, 24” w/leveler ......................$12,500 Sunflower 4412-07, 7-shank ..........................CALL JD 2700, 5-shank ........................................$21,500 ‘04 DMI 530B w/leveler ..............................$23,900 DMI Econo Champ II, HD, 11-shank ............$7,500 ‘05 JD 2700, 9-24 shank..............................$25,000 ‘12 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..................................CALL ‘10 JD 3710, 10 bottom ..................................CALL JD 3600, 8 bottom, on land ..........................$8,000 CIH 4900, 46.5’ ............................................$12,500

SKIDSTEERS

PLANTERS

NEW White planters ........................................CALL (2) White 8516CFS, 16-30 ..............................CALL White 6700, 12-30, w/res ..............................$6,500 White 6222, 12-30 front fold ......................$29,500 White 6122, 12-30........................................$16,500

COMBINES

‘10 JD 9770, Nice, w/warranty ..................$193,000 ‘08 Gleaner R75, loaded, 880 sep. hrs. ..........CALL ‘01 Gleaner R72, just thru shop......................CALL ‘03 Gleaner R65, CDF, lat ................................CALL ‘90 Gleaner R60 w/duals ................................CALL NEW Fantini chopping cornhead ..................CALL Gleaner N6 ....................................................$6,750

HAY TOOLS

New Hesston & NH Hay Tools On Hand

MISCELLANEOUS

NEW Salford RTS units ..................................CALL NEW Salford Plows ..............................AVAILABLE NEW Unverferth seed tenders ................ON HAND NEW Westfield augers ..........................AVAILABLE NEW Rem 2700 vac ........................................CALL NEW Century HD1000, 60’ sprayers ..............CALL NEW Hardi sprayers ........................................CALL NEW Riteway rollers........................................CALL NEW Lorenz snowblowers ..............................CALL NEW Batco conveyors ....................................CALL NEW Brent wagons & grain carts ..................CALL NEW E-Z Trail seed wagons ..........................CALL NEW rock buckets & pallet forks .................. CALL REM 2700, Rental............................................CALL Unverferth 8000 grain cart ..........................$19,000 Kinze 1050 w/duals ....................................$43,000 Pre-owned Sprayers........................................CALL

(DMI Parts Available)

SMITHS MILL IMPLEMENT Hwy. 14, 3 miles West of Janesville, MN

Phone (507) 234-5191 or (507) 625-8649 Mon. - Fri. 7:30-5:00, Sat. 7:30-Noon www.smithsmillimp.com

COMBINES

‘12 CIH Magnum 290, MFWD, ‘11 JD 9770, 4x4, 766 eng./ 569 sep. hrs., CM, ext wear, 590 hrs., 3 pt., hyd. valves, chopper, 520x42 duals 540/1000 PTO, luxury cab, ..................................$199,000 19 hyd. pump, 380x50 tires & ‘11 JD 9770, 880 eng./613 sep. duals, front duals, complete Auto Guide system ....$172,500 hrs., CM w/5 spd. feeder house, Pro drive, chopper, ‘12 CIH Magnum 260, MFWD, 520x42 tires & duals $190,000 525 hrs., Deluxe cab, 4 hyd., 540/1000 PTO, 3 pt., 420x46 ‘10 JD 9670, 4x4, 1471 eng./ 1076 sep. hrs., CM, chopper, tires & duals, complete Auto Guide system ............$150,000 18.4x42 tires, Ext. Warr. ..................................$170,000 ‘07 CIH Magnum 245, 3050 ‘01 JD 9550, 2800 eng/1869 hrs., 3 pt., 540/1000 PTO, sep hrs, CM, 4x4, 30.5x32 4 hyd., 420x46 tires & duals ..................................$105,000 tires, chopper, autoheader ..................$75,000 ‘04 Buhler Versatile 2210, ‘00 JD 9550, 2799 eng./1919 MFWD, 4081 hrs., 18-spd. sep. hrs., 24.5x32 tires, bin PS, Super Steer, 4 hyd., 1000 ext., chaff spreader, chopper PTO, 20.8x42 tires & duals, ....................................$69,000 also front duals & wgts. ‘08 JD 9770, 1380 eng./938 ....................................$75,000 sep. hrs., 4x4, HID lights, ‘94 NH 8770, MFWD, 5242 hrs., Contour Master w/hi-torque 3 pt., 1000 PTO, 14.9x46 tires variable spd., chopper, & duals, 4 hyd. 1250/45/32 tires........$159,500 ....................................$55,000 ‘98 JD 9610, 3578 eng./2379 ‘94 JD 7800, 2WD, 8500 hrs., sep. hrs., chopper, 20.8x42 PS, 540/1000 PTO, 3 hyd., duals, bin ext. ..............$55,000 18.4x42 tires & duals ..$41,000 ‘02 CIH 2388, 3412 eng./2570 sep. hrs, AFX rotor, yield & 4WD & TRACK TRACTORS moisture mon., chopper, rock ‘12 JD 9560R, 780 hrs., PS, trap, bin ext., 30.5x32 tires 4 hyd., 800x32 Michelin ....................................$65,000 radials, duals ............$265,000 ‘94 CIH 1688, 3734 eng. hrs., ‘10 JD 9630T, 1055 hrs., rock trap, chopper, bin ext., PS, 30” tracks, front wgts., 30.5x32 tires ..............$29,000 5 hyds. ......................$230,000 ‘87 CIH 1640, 3468 hrs., rock ‘12 JD 9510R, 1288 hrs., trap, auto header, 24.5x32 710x42 tires & duals, power tires..............................$23,000 shift, 5 hyds., rear wgts. COMBINE HEADERS ..................................$220,000 ‘09 NH T9050, 4WD, 485 hp., ‘09 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head ....................................$19,000 1040 hrs., 710x42” tires & duals..........................$175,000 ‘07 CIH 2020, 35’ flex head ‘03 NH 425, 3850 hrs., 710x42 ....................................$16,000 ‘05 JD 630F, 30’ flex head tires & duals, 12-spd. gear ....................................$16,500 drive, 4 hyds., Nice Clean Tractor ......................$110,000 ‘11 JD 608C Stalkmaster, 8R30” chopping head ............$55,000 ‘11 Cat MT755L, 402 hrs., ‘05 Lexion C512-30”, 12R30” 3 pt., PTO, 5 hyd., 25” tracks, cornhead ....................$24,000 Top 6N auto steer ......$180,000 ‘07 Lexion F540, 40’ flex head ....................................$22,500 Check Out Our Large On-line Inventory of Trucks, Semis & ‘97 JD 930 flex, full finger Industrial Equipment @ auger, single pt hookup $8,500 www.larsonimplements.com

LARSON IMPLEMENTS 5 miles east of Cambridge, MN on Hwy. 95

763-689-1179

Free delivery on combines in MN, Eastern ND & SD

Look at our Web site for pictures & more listings www.larsonimplements.com

21 B

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

NEW NH skidsteers on hand ..........................CALL NH LS170 ....................................................$13,750 ‘06 NH L170 ................................................$17,500

NORTHERN AG SERVICE INC 800-205-5751

ROW CROP TRACTORS

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

USED TRACTORS

NEW NH T4.105 w/loader ..............................CALL NEW Massey 4608 w/loader ..........................CALL NEW Massey 4610 w/loader ..........................CALL NEW NH T4.75 w/loader ................................CALL NEW NH T9.560, 4WD ....................................CALL NEW NH Boomer 50 w/loader ........................CALL NEW Versatile 450, 4WD ................................CALL NEW Versatile 250, FWA ................................CALL NEW Versatile 305, FWA ................................CALL NEW Massey 5450, FWA, cab ........................CALL NH TV6070 bi-directional ................................CALL NH TV140 bi-directional ..................................CALL Versatile 895, 4WD ......................................$25,500 Ford/Versatile 876, 4WD, Nice ....................$43,500 ‘08 NH 6070 w/cab, 2WD ............................$69,000 NH 8870, SS ................................................$67,500 Ford 5000, diesel, w/cab ................................CALL ‘60 IH 560, WF ..............................................$5,200 White 2-105......................................................CALL

090

Winpower Sales & Service Reliable Power Solutions Since 1925 PTO & automatic Emergency Electric Generators. New & Used Rich Opsata-Distributor 800-343-9376

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

One call does it all! PARMA DRAINAGE With one phone call, you can PUMPS New pumps & place your classified ad in parts on hand. Call MinThe Land, Farm News, nesota's largest distributor AND The Country Today. HJ Olson & Company 320Call The Land for more 974-8990 Cell – 320-212-5336 info @ 507-345-4523 • 800-6574665.


10% - 25% Fuel Savings

22 B

Dynamic Tractor Management

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

Massey Ferguson Exclusive

HANCOCK, MN HOPPERS

<< www.TheLandOnline.com >>

Built in Minnesota Allows operator to preset ground speed. Tractor will automatically control engine rpm & transmission ratio for maximum fuel efficiency. 1) MF Exclusive: CVT Transmission with no clutch packs. 2) Option of both suspended cab & front axle for a smoother ride. 3) Headland Management: Can operate up to 35 different tractor & implement functions with the touch of one button. 4) Dual Speed PTO: Allows full 1000 PTO rpm at either 1970 or 1605 engine rpm

• • • • • • • • • •

‘13 MF 1652, cab, loader, hydro ‘13 MF 7624, MFD, cab, CVT ‘13 MF 8690, 350 hp., CVT ‘12 MF 1529, compact, 59 hp., loader ‘05 MF 451, 45 PTO hp., 400 hrs. ‘98 MF 8150, cab, MFD, 3385 hrs. MF 4610, MFD, loader, cab MF 1705 compact tractor ‘77 JD 4630, 2WD, cab, 320/90R50 duals, Quad ‘72 IH 656 hydro w/loader & cab, dsl.

CORN HEADS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Geringhoff 1822RD, ‘09 (3) Geringhoff 1622RD, ‘08, ‘07, ‘04 (2) Geringhoff 1230RD, ‘09, ‘08 (4) Geringhoff 1222RD, ‘08, 07, ‘05 (5) Geringhoff 1220RD, ‘12, ‘11, ‘05, ‘04, ‘02 (8) Geringhoff 830RD, ‘12, ‘10, ‘08, ‘05, ‘04, ‘01 (3) Geringhoff 630RD, ‘05, ‘97 ‘93 Geringhoff 630 PC ‘04 Gleaner 1222, hugger, GVL poly JD 893, KR, HDP, ‘04 ‘98 JD 893, KR, AC, SL JD 822, steel, KR, HT JD 622, GVL, poly (2) CIH 1083, ‘98, ‘92 MF 883, 8R30”, ‘97 MF 1163

COMBINES

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

Monthly Special

TRACTORS

• • • • • • • • • •

‘07 MF 9690, duals, LTM, 1300/970 hrs. MF 8570, RWA ‘86 MF 8560 '98 Gleaner 800, 25' flexhead ‘97 Gleaner R62, duals, 2052 sep. hrs. ‘92 Gleaner R62, 2063 hrs. MF 9750 PU table MF 9118 bean table (4) MF 8000 30' bean table ‘03 Cat Challenger 660, duals, w/30’ flex head

GRAIN HANDLING • • • • • • • • • • •

Parker 2620 seed tender Brandt 7500HP, grain vac. Brandt 5200EX, grain vac ‘09 Brandt 8x47 auger ‘00 Brandt 4500 EX, grain vac. ‘05 Brandt 1070, auger, PTO Drive, w/swing hppr Brandt GBL-10, bagger Brand 20110 swing hopper auger Brandt 1515, 1575, 1585 belt conveyors Brandt 8x45 auger, 18 hp., Briggs Brandt 8x35, 8x37, 8x40, 8x47, 8x52, 8x57, 8x62, 8x67, 10x35, straight augers • Brandt 1060XL, 1070XL, 1080XL, 1380XL, 1390XL swing hopper augers

MF 2856 Baler twine, mesh, kicker - 32,000

GRAIN HANDLING (CONT.) • • • • • • • • •

Brandt 20 Series Drive Over Deck Parker 1039, grain cart, w/tarp Parker 839, grain cart, tarp, 850 bu. Parker 605 gravity box, 625 bu. Parker 165-B gravity box Unverferth 5000, grain cart Hutchinson, 10x61 auger A&L 850S grain cart, 850 bu. tarp Batco 1814 pit stop

HAY & LIVESTOCK • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

JD 275, disc mower, 9’ JD 38, sickle mower, 7’ Woods S106 mower Chandler 22’ litter spreader (2) NI 5408 disc mowers MF 2856, round baler, net, twine MF 1745, round baler MF 1329 & 1330, 3 pt. disc mower MF 200, SP windrower, cab, auger, header ‘11 NH H6750, 3 pt., disk mower, 110” NI 528, 3 pt., disc mower, 94” Sitrex MK16, 14 wheel rake Sitrex RP2 wheel rake Sitrex RP6 wheel rake Sitrex 10 wheel rake on cart Roto-grind 760 tub grinder Westendorf 3 pt. bale spear H&S 16’ bale wagon

MISCELLANEOUS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

DMI Coulter Champ II, 13 shank Wil-Rich 36’, field cult. Wil-Rich 25’ stalk chopper, SM '08 JD 520 stalk chopper Loftness 30' stalk chopper, SM Loftness 20’ stalk chopper Melroe 912, 4 bottom plow Loftness 8’ snowblower Mauer 28'-42' header trailers WRS 30’ header trailers EZ Trail 38’ header trailer Degelman 6000HD, rock picker Degelman 7200 rock picker Degelman LR7645 land rollers - Rental Returns ‘11 SB Select snowblower, 97” & 108”, 3 pt. ‘13 Sunflower 4412-07 disk ripper ‘13 Sunflower 4530-19 disk chisel ‘13 Sunflower 4511, 11 ‘13 Sunflower 4511, 15 ‘13 Sunflower 4412, 05

‘98 Wilson, 42x96, 66” sides, extra lights, roll tarp, 24.5 LP tires ............................$21,000 ‘12 Peerless Grain Hopper, New, 43x96x72, AR, Steel Wheels, Roll Tarp ..........................$32,500 ‘03 Timpte Ag Hopper, 40’, 66” sides ................................$25,500 ‘01 Wilson, 41’ AL Hopper, 72” Sides, AR, Vibrators, Roll Tarp, AL Disc Wheels ................$23,500 ‘95 Merritt 42’ AL Hopper, 68” Sides, 2-Spd. Doors, Roll Tarp, Disc Wheels ....................$12,500 ‘94 Wilson Convert-a-Hopper, 45x102, 78” Sides, 80% Virgin Rubber, AL Wheels, Electric Door Openers............................$15,000 ‘86 Wilson, 43x96, 72” sides, 70% 1124.5 Tires, 70% Brakes, 2-Spd. Hoppers............................$12,500

TRUSS TRAILER

‘98 Lakeside RollerMaster, 32’-45’ Extension, 102” wide, Elec over Hyd Lift, Top Locking Deck Rollers, Winches ..............$10,000 ‘97 JDH Trussmaster, 42’-60’ extension, 102” wide, 8 winches, Elec. over Hyd. to Tilt. Elec. over Air to Extend, tandem axle ................................As Is $11,500

DROPDECKS

‘74 Trailcraft, 42’, Good T&B, Lights & Floor ..................$10,750

THE LAND D LAN E TH

END DUMPS

Summit End Dump, 30’, 72” sides, 3 axle, AR ........................$16,750

MISC. MOVING TRUCKS

‘89 Ford F-700, 6.6L Turbo Diesel, AT, 24’ AL Van Body, Roll-Up Door, 205” WB, Good for moving cross country ..............................$4,000 ‘88 International S1900, DT466, SEMI TRUCKS Auto., 81⁄2’ from cab to center axle ‘92 Kenworth T600 Conv., 400,000 $4,000 on overhaul ......................$10,000 VAN/WATER TRAILERS ‘90 Kenworth T800 DayCab, 400 Cummins, 13-spd., 210” WB, wet ‘02 Great Dane 36’ Reefer, Roll Up kit ....................................$12,750 Door, 2 Side Doors, Sliding Tandem ..............................$5,750 ‘74 International 4300, 350 Hp. Cummins, 10 spd, 8 new tires, ‘01 Utility Reefer, 48/102, Roll Up Clean ..................................$5,000 Door, 2 Side Doors, AR, 60%T, 80%B..................................$6,500 FLATBEDS ‘97 Great Dane Reefer, 48/102, Roll ‘00 Trailmobile AL Combo, 48/102, Up Doors, 2 Side Doors, AR, 60%T, Sliding Tandem ..................$7,500 80%B, Stainless Steel Back ‘98 Great Dane, 45x96, Moffit ..........................................$6,500 Forklift Carrier Brackets, Sliding Tandem ..............................$6,250 Van Trailers, 48/102-53/102; Great for water storage or over ‘95 Dorsey, 45x96, D-Ring Tie Downs, SPX/AR ..................$6,750 the road hauling ....$3,500-$7,000 48’ & 53’ Van Trailers to rent. ‘95 Transcraft, 45’, AL Floors & ........$145.00 per month plus tax. Crossmembers, Rebuilt Frame, ..$2.00/mile for pickup & delivery 50% Tires, 70% Brakes, SPX/AR ..............................$6,000 AUTOS ‘94 Fontaine, 48/96, SPX/AR $6,750 ‘04 Dodge Grand Caravan ‘93 Wilson, 48x96, SPR, Sliding SXT ....................................$5,750 Tandem ..............................$7,750 MISCELLANEOUS ‘81 Great Dane, 48/96 ..........$5,000 Axles, Suspensions & AL or Steel CATTLE/HOG TRAILER For Trailers..........$1,000 AR/Axle ................................$500 SR/Axle Barrett 46’, 3 floors – Rims - 22.5 & 24.5 steel ........$60 1 removable, 50% T 70% B, 24.5 tires ..................As Is $5,500 aluminum ............................$175 Tires: (4) 385 Super Singles GRAVEL TRAILER w/Polished AL Rims; 2 new, ‘90 Load King Belly Dump, New 1 @ 50%, 1@ 40% Brakes, Tires 50%, Lights gone through ............................$16,500 ..............................$1,400/set of 4 Pre-Hung Slab Interior Doors: BELTED Oak, Cherry, Maple, Pine. ‘04 Etnyre, 37’, 48” Belt, Bedliner, All Sizes. Over 200 doors to Roll Tarp, Great for Sugar Beets choose from ..............$10-$80 ea. or Lime, 70% Tires & Brakes, Air Swing Gate ................$22,500 10,000’ of Oak & Maple trim ..........................................$.50/ft. Red River Inco Mfg., 42’, 48” Belt, We can also convert flatbed All Alum., 60% 445/50/22.5 Tires, trailers to be used as a bridge. 70% Brakes, Hyd. Dump Gate, See our website. Shur-Loc Roll Tarp, Clean $28,500

Delivering insightful articles to keep you informed on the latest farming technology

USED EQUIPMENT NEW EQUIPMENT • Wilrich 5830, 39’

chisel/harrow • JD 680B, 23’ chisel • DMI 730B, 7-30 • Wilrich 614, 26’ disc • Wilrich Quad X, 55’, rolling basket • CIH TII, 55’, rolling basket • Hardi 6600, 132’ • Hardi Com. 1500, 132’ • Hardi Nav. 1100, 90’ USED EQUIPMENT • Hardi Nav. 1000, 88’ • Hardi Nav. 950, 88’, (2) • White 8524-22 planter • ‘12 Amity 12-22/wheel • JD 7300, 18-22 planter • ‘12 Amity 12-22 • Pickett thinner, 24-22 • ‘10 Amity 12-22 • Alloway 22’ shredder • ‘07 Amity 8-22 • Alloway 20’ shredder • Killbros 1810 cart, tracks • Amity 8-22, (3) • ‘11 Artsway 6812, 12-22 • Killbros 1400 cart • ‘10 Artsway 6812, 12-22 • Brent 410 grain cart • ‘11 Artsway 6812, 8-22 • IH 13x82 • ‘06 Artsway 6812, 8-22 • Sheyenne 1410, 10x66 • Artsway 898, 8-22 hopper • Artsway 692, 8-22 • Feterl 12x72 hopper • Amity 12-22 topper, • Coverall 13” drive over St Ft, (2) • REM 2100 grain vac. • (2) Alloway 12-22 folding • ‘09 JD 2700, 7-30 topper • NH 770, 7-30 • Alloway 12-22 topper, • CIH 9300, 9-30 St. Ft, (3) • Wilrich 957, 9-24 • Artsway 12-22 topper w/harrow • JD 2410, 41’ chisel • Agco • Hardi Sprayers • REM Grain Vac • Woods Mowers • J&M Grain Carts • Westfield Augers • Sunflower Tillage • White Planters • Wilrich Tillage

• All Trailers DOTable •

Will Consider Trades!

Call 320-212-5220 or 320-392-5361

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE!!! www.DuncanTrailersInc.com Delivery Available!

Clara City, MN 56222 320-847-3218 www.wearda.com


23 B

‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 987 hrs., full Pro 700 steering ................$339,500

‘12 CIH Steiger 550 Quad, 1140 hrs., PTO ..........................................$317,500

‘03 CIH STX450Q, 3100 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lights ....................................JUST IN

‘11 CIH Magnum 290, 1380 hrs., susp. front axle, susp. cab, Lux. cab, 360 HID lites, Loaded! ..........................$172,800

‘90 CIH 9170, 5647 hrs., PS ....$59,000

‘12 CIH Steiger 450, 522 hrs. .................................................$249,900

‘07 Steiger 430, PTO, 3 pt, 2530 hrs ...... ................................................$169,900

‘11 CIH Magnum 340, 1153 hrs. ................................................$196,000

‘79 JD 4440, 7294 hrs., power shift ..................................................$28,900

THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013

‘12 CIH Steiger 600Q, 475 hrs., full Pro 700 steering, loaded....$359,500

Your 4WD & Quadtrac Headquarters We Stock Quadtrac Tracks & Parts O.E.M. CASE IH GOODYEAR BRAND TRACKS HAVE PROVEN TO BE THE BEST TRACK MADE FOR COG DRIVEN QUADTRAC TRACTORS

‘12 CIH 9230, track, AWD, 260 sep. hrs. ................................................$359,900

Our Experience Saves You Money CALL FOR USED TRACK AVAILABILITY ~•~ Salvage Tracks Free • Used Tracks: $800 to $4,500

USED 4WD TRACTORS

Interest Free to January 1, 2015 ••• Call For Details ••• ‘12 CIH Steiger 600Q, 475 hrs., Lux. cab, susp. cab, HID lites, Pro 700 steering, 36” tracks ..........................................................................................................................$359,500 ‘12 CIH Steiger 600Q, 643 hrs., Lux. cab, susp. cab, HID lites, Pro 700 steering, PTO, 36” tracks ..........................................................................................................................$359,500 ‘11 CIH Steiger 600Q, 947 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, full Pro 700 Auto Guide ..............$339,500 ‘13 CIH Steiger 550Q, 1140 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, PTO, big hyd. pump ..................$317,500 ‘12 CIH Steiger 450Q, 409 hrs., Lux. cab, HID lites, 6 remotes, big hyd. pump, 36” tracks, full Pro 700 steering ..........................................................................................................$310,000 ‘12 CIH Steiger 450, 522 hrs., susp. Lux. leather cab, HID lites, HD hyd., full Pro 700 steering, PTO, 710/70R42 tires ........................................................................................$249,900 ‘03 CIH STX450Q, 3100 hrs., Lux. cab ............................................................................$149,500 ‘07 CIH Steiger 430HD, Lux. cab, 3 pt. hitch, PTO, 2530 hrs ........................................$169,900 ‘90 CIH 9170, 5641 hrs., 20.8x42 tires, powershift ............................................................$59,000 ‘01 CIH STX375, 20.8x42 tires, 5815 hrs, PTO ..............................................................Coming In ‘89 Ford 846, 5145 hrs., 3 pt. hitch, PTO ............................................................................$39,000 STX and STEIGER PTO, TOW CABLE & 3 PT. KITS ON HAND!!!

USED 2WD TRACTORS

Interest Free to January 1, 2015 ••• Call For Details ••• ‘12 CIH Magnum 340, 603 hrs., susp. cab, leather, 360 HID lites, big hyd. pump, full Pro 700 Auto Guide, Loaded ......................................................................................$209,900 ‘12 CIH Puma 160, 300 hrs., CVT trans., L765 loader, susp. axle ................................$135,800 ‘11 CIH Magnum 290, 1380 hrs., susp. cab, susp. frt. axle, leather cab, 360 HID lites, Loaded ..............................................................................................................................$172,800

USED 2WD Continued

‘11 CIH Magnum 340, 1153 hrs., susp. cab, leather cab, 360 HID lites, big hyd. pump, Loaded ..............................................................................................................................$196,000 ‘12 CIH Farmall 95, MFD, cab, loader, RENTAL RETURN ................................................$48,900 ‘08 CIH Farmall 95, 414 hrs., MFD, cab ............................................................................$33,800 ‘99 CIH MX240 ..................................................................................................................Coming In IH 1086, duals, loader, 6316 hrs ..........................................................................................$16,500 NEW CIH Farmall 140A, MFD, cab, 115 PTO hp ................................................................Just In

USED COMBINES

Interest Free to January 1, 2015 ••• Call For Details ••• ‘12 ‘12 ‘12 ‘06 ‘05 ‘12 ‘10 ‘06 ‘05 ‘04 ‘91 ‘90

CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH CIH

9230, 300 eng. hrs., track drive, RWA ................................................................$359,900 9230, 315 eng. hrs., track drive, RWA, folding covers ......................................$359,900 2608, 8R30” chopping cornhead ..........................................................................$66,500 2208, 8R30” ............................................................................................................$28,000 2208, 8R30” ............................................................................................................$25,900 3020, 35’ platform, Crary air reel ..........................................................................$44,900 2020, 25’ platform w/Crary air reel ........................................................................$26,800 1020, 30’, full finger auger, 3” knife, rock guard ..................................................$14,900 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ..............................................................................$13,900 1020, 30’, 3” knife, rock guard ..............................................................................$12,900 1020, 20’, 11⁄2” knife ..................................................................................................$5,500 1020, 16.5’, 11⁄2” knife ................................................................................................$4,000

Call For Details

LOW RATE FINANCING AVAILABLE thru

Herb

Paul

CNH Capital’s Commercial Revolving Account provides financial assistance for parts and service when you need it, keeping your equipment running as its best with the quality parts and service you’ve come to expect from Case IH. Contact your local dealer or visit www.cnhcapital.com today for details.

www.matejcek.com

Blake

“Where Farm and Family Meet”

I-35 & Highway 60 West • Faribault, MN • 507-334-2233 ©2012 CNH Capital America LLC. All rights reserved. CNH Capital and Case IH are registered trademarks of CNH America LLC. Printed in the USA.

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‘89 Ford 846, 5145 hrs., 3 pt., PTO ..................................................$39,000

STX/STEIGER AG 30” ................................................$6,720 STX/STEIGER AG 36” ................................................$9,724 STX/STEIGER SCRAPER 30” ....................................$8,385 9380 AG 30”..............................................................$7,381


“Where Farm and Family Meet”

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THE LAND, SEPTEMBER 6, 2013 24 B


THE LAND ~ Sept. 6, 2013 ~ Northern Edition