Issuu on Google+

lancer LE express

Carlsbad High School 3557 Lancer Way Carlsbad, CA volume 25, issue 5

MARCH 2012

WE HAVE ISSUES

Social Networking: More addictive than drugs? pages 10-11 Boys and Girls Lacrosse face-off

pg.

8

Harry Potter theme park comes to CA

pg.

15

Teens travel abroad to help others

pg.

18


currents

march 2012

volume 25, issue 5

calendar

March

p h o t o

“Mini” 7college

h i g h l i g h t

fair

13

American history film series

13-14

CAHSEE

(late start for non-sophomores)

26-28

Battle of the Bands

29-31

Dance Xtreme

2

gaby wagner

With the help of ASB, CHS put on the annual talent show on Feb. 28, 2012. The entertaining show consisted of five Lancer Idol finalists and sixteen various acts, including an amazing magic act by freshman Cameron Penn. This act consisted of several mind-blowing tricks, like this one above where the magician appeared to cut his own body in half.

Student deadlines approach ALLIE GORDON I staff writer

FYI:

Sophomores to take CAHSEE in the weeks to come ALLIE GORDON I staff writer

For students taking AP classes, the deadline to On March 13 and 14, sophomores will u sign up for testing is Friday, March 9. If students ng yo i take the California High School Exit Exam. p e e K fail to sign up by this date, a $25 late fee will be The CAHSEE is a standardized test to ed on t a d p added to the already $92 cost per test, although u determine whether students meet set high s some students qualify for fee reductions. school graduation goals for the state of ampu c Check School Loop for the registration form, California. They are tested in basic levels of issues which must be turned into the ASB/Finance office. reading, writing and mathematics. When signing up, make sure to bring payment as Only sophomores must take the test, unwell as your student ID card. less any upperclassmen failed to pass the For sophomores and juniors who want to take exam, or were unable to take it during their the SAT, the next opportunity is on May 5. Students must sophomore year. sign up online on collegeboard.org by April 6, or by the late On the testing days, sophomore students must come to deadline, April 20. The fee for the SAT is $49, but students can school at 7:30 a.m. and go to an assigned classroom for their apply for fee waivers if they cannot afford the cost. exam, which can be found on School Loop. They will test until Students can also sign up for the ACT test on April 14 by 10:55 a.m., and then have lunch until 11:25 a.m. registering on actstudent.org. If you sign up by March 9, the All other students will not have to get to school until 11:30 regular fee of $34 applies, with an additional $21 added if you a.m., when their first period begins. After that, the schedule will register by the late deadline, March 23. However, if students continue as normal, with even periods on Tuesday, and odd want to take the writing portion as well, the test costs $15.50 periods on Wednesday. However, the classes will only be 55 more. Most colleges only accept the ACT with writing. minutes long, and school will end at the normal time, 2:30 p.m. Finally, the deadline for Grad Knight is March 19. Seniors Even though student’s test scores in the CAHSEE won’t can sign up in the Plaza for this fun night of celebration at directly affect their grades or overall GPA, unless they pass the Disneyland/California Adventure after graduation. test, students will not be allowed to graduate. So remember, it’s Links to the forms are on the School Loop website. Seniors always important to try your best and do well. Make sure to treat must fill out a ticket order, contract and medical release form it that way. to sign up. The cost is $95 which includes transportation and As for the rest of the students who have already passed, entrance into both parks, where there will be rides and dancing March 13 and 14 will be a treat, where they can sleep in, go out all night long. for breakfast or even jump in the ocean if weather allows.


currents

volume 25, issue 5

march 2012

Prop 8 found unconstitutional by federal court HANNAH KIRSCH I staff writer

O

n Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012, a federal appeals court in San Francisco struck down Proposition 8, the ban on gay marriage in California, declaring it unconstitutional according to the government. The purpose of the federal appeals courts in the United States is to review appeals, or petitions to change certain laws, that have been passed by lower courts. In this case, Prop 8 became an amendment, or change, to California’s Constitution in 2008. Recently, two gay couples have

appealed, or challenged, this decision through the federal appeals court. “The federal appeals court is the step right below the Supreme Court, so if [the proponents of Prop 8 challenge] their decision [in declaring Prop 8 unconstitutional], it will go to the Supreme Court,” said senior Brianna Wood, an officer in the Gay Straight Alliance. In response to this ruling by the federal appeals court, groups such as ProtectMarriage.com and other proponents of Prop 8 are gathering resources and filing paperwork to make their appeal. Andy Pugno, general counsel for the

Photo Credit: Jamison Wieser/Flickr/Creative Commons License

A rainbow flag flies outside San Francisco City Hall.

ProtectMarriage.com coalition, said on the website that the group “will immediately appeal this misguided decision,” and that their “path to the U.S. Supreme Court is now very clear.” The appeal process is long and complicated, and organizations such as ProtectMarriage.com have already begun to collect resources. “The problem with this, though, is that if it does go through the Supreme Court, and they say it’s unconstitutional, our opposition is taking a huge risk with that,” said senior Trio Harris, president of the GSA. “They are risking having gay marriage become legal across the country.” Once the appeal moves to the Supreme Court, the bench could rule three different ways. In the first option, the Supreme Court may rule that gay marriage must be allowed under the US Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause in the Fourteenth Amendment. The clause allows the federal government to uphold the Constitution’s claim that “all men are created equal,” in case a state government somehow takes away this equality. In the second option, the Supreme Court may decide that it is the states’ choice to have gay marriage. This means that in California, gay marriage will continue to be banned. Some states like Washington and New York have passed laws making gay marriage legal. “In a state like California, which has passed an amendment to the state constitution saying it’s not allowed, it wouldn’t be allowed,” said Mr. Aster, United States government teacher. “Until such time, as I think will happen, the

people of California will vote to amend the constitution again to allow it. That could still happen.” Some people, however, fear that the Supreme Court may make a more confusing and narrow ruling. In this third option, the Supreme Court may only rule in regards with this specific situation occurring in California, leaving the rest of the states in the dark. “They could limit their ruling to just California, which will leave the rest of the country wondering, ‘what’s the scoop?’” Aster said. “I think the country is changing. And we’ll see more states allowing homosexual marriage. That’s kind of where it’s going.” No matter what the ruling, this decision will have a big affect on students and the community. And what if the Supreme Court matches the federal appeals court decision: what if gay marriage was legal? “[Being gay] wouldn’t be so hidden. You’d see same sex couples out with their kids, and wouldn’t be like, ‘Oh, are they friends?’” said Kara Breyer, member of GSA. “I think it would be more accepted.” And although the community will definitely see the differences, the school might not see such obvious changes. After all, most high schoolers aren’t getting married. Still, the school is expected to see vast social changes. “It would definitely promote more tolerance,” said Brianna Wood. “If people know that on a federal level, it’s okay to be gay, and to get married, and you have the same rights as everyone else, [the legalization of gay marriage] would definitely promote that.”

A new mom’s in town: French “tiger mothers” take over KATE JERMAN I editor-in-chief

L

ast year, Amy Chua’s book, Tiger Mom, swept the world up in a frenzy of debate about parenting technique. The extreme disciplinary actions and stubborn parenting detailed in the book shocked readers, some even going as far as calling it abusive, while others defended Chua’s parenting techniques. Chua justified her strict standards by citing the obvious outcome of successful children, and the fact that honesty always benefits the child more in the end. As Chua stated in the Wall Street Journal, “Western parents worry a lot about their children’s self-esteem. But as a parent, one of the worst things you can do for your child’s self-esteem is to let them give up.” But now, Pamela Druckerman-- an American mother-- has fired back, asserting that French culture possesses the superior parenting skills. In her new book, Bringing Up Bébé: One American Mother Discovers the Wisdom of French Parenting, Druckerman emphasizes discipline, not unlike Chua, but believes it should be emphasized in social situations—not unreachable academic goals. While neither Chua nor Druckerman

advocate babying children, they both believe in parents asserting their authority and not giving into the child’s whims and temper tantrums-- something Western parents are frequently accused of. Western culture, according to Chua and Druckerman, has become the center of babying, giving in to whining, bratty children, and underachieving expectations. Druckerman believes in constancy, honesty, and straight shooting discipline— no wishy washy changing of rules, no giving into demands, and absolutely no sass of any kind from their children. One of the more common French practices? Spanking or slapping a child as punishment. While taboo and stigmatized in the current Western world, over 84% of French parents said they spanked or slapped their children, and that it resulted in fewer disciplinary problems (Yahoo News). Advocates of a “kinder” method of parenting often call this use of corporal punishment scarring and abusive. While the French and Chinese methods seem to be gaining more traction in the overwhelming mix of parenting techniques, it remains to be seen if the impact will be substantial . Because of the mix of cultures in Carlsbad, students experience many

different parenting techniques, but find that the most popular one for Carlsbad parents is to provide the opportunity for success and encourage their children, but allow the children to set their own goals. “Well I definitely don’t have tiger parents, but they definitely expect me to do well because they know I can and they provide me the tools to do well,” senior Sammie Duffy said. “They’re not hard on me if I don’t do perfectly, if I tried my best.” However, though the pressure may not be as pronounced as children French and Asian cultures, for many, it still exists in a more subtle form. For American students, the drive to succeed can come from themselves and the pressure to be accepted by college. Senior Camille Sanzi experiences more pressure from her parents, but finds

that the greatest pressure comes from her own motivation. “They pressure me,” Sanzi said. “It’s not ridiculous, though. They just expect it and I guess I expect it from myself so I guess they don’t really need to push me that much because I do it by myself.”

3


march 2012

currents

volume 25, issue 5

Ten states freed from NCLB ALLIE GORDON I staff writer

U

nder the Bush administration, the controversial No Child Left Behind Act passed through Congress in 2001. The act aimed to improve education by setting reachable goals for schools, but caused controversy from the beginning because of its standardized take on education, as well as other issues. “The goal is admirable,” junior Sage Naumann said, “But the way we’re attempting to reach it is ineffective.” On Feb. 9, President Obama granted waivers exempting ten states from the NCLB Act: CO, FL, GA, IN, KY, MA, MN, NJ, OK and TN. With these waivers, states no longer have to meet educational goals set for 2014, provided they create their own, federally approved plan to improve education and test scores. Obama’s waivers may signal the start of turning the country away from Bush’s educational policies. New Mexico already began working with the government to get approval of their plan, and thirty other states and territories have indicated interest as well. An appealing aspect to the waivers is that they theoretically prevent teaching to the test. Under NCLB, the government judged school and student achievement only by standardized testing scores, which standardized education across the country. However, with its repeal, states have the opportunity to look for broader ways to measure student success, based on practical learning rather than test taking. They also will save money they would have used on testing, in order

to have more instruction days. Additionally, even without NCLB, national SAT and ACT tests will continue to ensure standardized education throughout the country. Moreover, when schools failed to meet standards, they suffered the much-lamented budget cuts and teacher layoffs, only making it harder for them to meet standards. “Education should be the last thing cut,” senior Nik Millian said. “An educated future generation means a more economically promising future.” States also have more control over their own education with the repeal. This limits the role of the federal government, which some protested as being too involved in education. “States know better how a student will perform,” sophomore Rohan Deshmukh said. “It’s better if states are geared towards their own education at their own pace.” Currently, no country but America uses the NCLB program, or anything similar.

Though NCLB intended to raise educational standards, America still falls far behind leaders Korea, China and Finland. The repeal of the act will doubtlessly change the workings of education in America, but whether it will ultimately help or hurt the future generation remains to be seen.

An extra day to celebrate: Leap Day 2012 TILLY RUDOLPH I staff writer

I

n the midst of achieving legendary military feats, ruling as dictator of Rome and writing Latin prose, Julius Caesar found the time to invent a modernized calendar with the introduction of Leap Day. Leap Day: an idea which has permeated the modern world so greatly we still celebrate Leap Day today. The year 2012 was graced with the presence of Leap Day on Feb. 29, a day which comes once every four years. So what is the big deal with Leap Day anyway? The addition of Leap Day allows for there to be 366 days in the calendar instead of 365. But the most important part of Leap Day deals with the astronomical reasons for adding another day. It takes the Earth 365.242199 days to circle around the Sun. If an extra Leap Day was not added approximately every four years, the modern calendar would lose six hours each year. That means, after one hundred years, a whopping twenty-four days would be missing. With Leap Day comes unusual traditions and superstitions specific to different regions around the world. An old Irish legend says this is the only day women can propose to men, in an attempt to balance gender roles like Leap Day balances the calendar. In Scotland, it is unlucky to be born on Leap Day, and in Greece, it is unlucky to be married on Leap Day. Yet these superstitions do not scare everyone. In the San Diego County Clerk’s office, an average of thirty marriage ceremonies occur each day. But this Feb. 29, forty-eight couples tied the knot.

4

While many young couples began their lives together on Leap Day, some began a new chapter of their lives through welcoming children into the world. The chances of being born on Leap Day are 1 in 1,461. The idea of not celebrating one’s birthday every year seems foreign to most. Out of the nearly three thousand students here on campus, sophomore Mario Miller is the only one who was born on Leap Day. Turning four (in reality, sixteen) this year, Miller considers himself lucky to be born on Feb. 29. “Some people laugh at me when I tell them my birth

date,” Miller said. “But having my birthday on Leap Day is not that big of a deal to me.” Miller was about ten when he figured out his birthday was not like everybody else’s. “My mom told me I had to celebrate it every four years,” Miller said. “So I celebrate with my brother on his birthday, Feb. 15, instead.” For all those born on Leap Day, there is an exclusive Honor Society of Leap Year Day Babies to join. Miller says he just might look into becoming part of this Society in the future. Nowadays, however, Leap Day seems to slip by us, furtively darting through our busy lives without us even realizing we have a whole extra day added to our year. “I don’t really do anything out of the ordinary for Leap Day,” sophomore Nicole Harris said. “It’s just another ordinary day.” Yet despite this perception, Leap Day still created one extra day we can call 2012. For some, this meant spending the day—and night—at the happiest place on earth: Disneyland. Disneyland was open from 6 a.m. on Wednesday, Feb. 29 until 6 a.m. on Thursday, March 1. “It was a unique experience to go on Leap Day,” senior Cory Bice said. “It felt more alive during the night—all the lights were on and it was decorated.” Disneyland reached capacity, forcing to refuse eager Leap Day celebrators at 9:30 p.m., only to re-open the gates again at 2 a.m. Junior Emma Gumner stayed until 4:30 a.m. with the help of caffeinated coffee. “[Disneyland] felt like a whole different place,” Gumner said. “It was crazy—there were people everywhere.”


editorial

volume 25, issue 5

march 2012

Helicopter parents: prepare for landing Overbearing parents swarm susceptible students

THE EDITORIAL BOARD

T

hey hover. They make lots of noise. They swiftly swoop in to sweep away obstacles and take care of problems and nothing will stand in their way. Watch out; the Helicopter Parent is preparing for takeoff. Although people may not have heard the term “Helicopter Parents” before, anyone can probably guess what they are—guardians who involve themselves in their children’s lives to the point of ridiculousness. They hover over their child, watching his or her every move, poised to fly in and viciously attack any obstacle or problem that comes their kid’s way. If a parent frantically calls a teacher to complain about a homework load, you can bet it’s a helicopter parent. If a mother tells her daughter what to major in and what colleges to go to, she’s a helicopter parent. If a father writes his son’s college application essay, he’s a helicopter parent. If parents spend all night doing a school project for their kid to ensure they get a good grade, they’re definitely helicopter parents. Overbearing parents aren’t a new phenomenon; but recently, helicopter parents are aided by the rise of technology. Cell phones allow parents to constantly pop in on their child’s social life. Parents can also track their kid’s location using a GPS on their cell phone. Websites like College Board, although often helpful, are abused by persnickety parents who feel the need to completely control their child’s college application process. Computers and programs like School

Loop allow parents to email teachers and other authority figures in their kid’s life. Parents can put a parental lock on television, controlling what shows they watch. But what’s the big deal? So parents get a little too involved. What harm does it do? Actually, it does a lot.

When children grow up with parents who take care of every single problem—whether it involves their social life, work life or academic life—those children do not learn to deal with overcoming their own obstacles. They learn a different lesson: that their parents will always take care of everything for them. Because hovering helicopter parents do not allow their children to make mistakes and learn their own lessons, those children never mature; they end up perpetually dependent on their parents and remain inside a bubble shielding them from the realities of life. With helicopter parents, coddled kids grow up into clueless individuals, struggling with learning how to find solutions on their own and dealing with their own problems. They get used to being rescued, and whenever a situation comes up where they face decisions and might possibly fail, they turn to their helicopter parents to save the day. Parents, we know you need to do your job. But please, please don’t work overtime. Do you really want to be the CEO of your child’s life? Parents who intervene in every aspect of their kid’s life send this message to the child: You are not capable of handling your own issues. You cannot face your life on your own. You need someone else to do everything for you. Helicopter parents need to hover over their own lives. Find a hobby or purpose other than micromanaging your children. Sometimes you need to just give your propellers a rest and let your kid learn to fly on their own.

Welcome to the friend zone, population: you “Y

SHANNON CASEY I editor

ou’re such a great friend!” Sounds like a compliment, right? Apparently not. Apparently this is now known as “friend zoning”. Allegedly, this friend zone is where generally good guys go when females shun them romantically. Girls (apparently) have a giant, invisible label maker and (apparently) go a little label-crazy, (thusly) mislabeling tons of good guys. I don’t quite understand all this hubbub surrounding this elusive “friend zone.” For those of you who have not familiarized yourselves with this pretty vague term, Wikipedia says that “the friend zone is when one person in a platonic relationship wishes to enter a romantic relationship while the other does not.” Fair enough, not everyone wants a relationship. However, Urban Dictionary limits this broad definition to a strict gender role, where girls constantly shut down male pursuers—pages upon pages of definitions where supposedly witty, real-life intellectuals blame women for the “friend

zone.” And women-shaming definitions don’t stop here; go on Facebook and read about that guy who was just “friend zoned” (and how much it sucks), flip on MTV (where you can watch an entire program devoted to following teenagers as they attempt to break the Friend Zone) or eavesdrop through the halls of a high school (which, unfortunately, includes this one). Lately, the elusive “friend zone” has transformed from some imaginary symbol for teenaged male angst into something completely absurd. And that misleads young men everywhere to mope and moan about their newly “friend zoned” status and that “(derogatory term towards women)” who put him there. Funny, I’ve never heard a girl publicly complain about being “friend zoned” even though that, too, happens. Even if this “friend zone” did exist, what’s wrong with just being friends? Why can’t a girl just be friends with a guy? More importantly, why can’t people accept that? I mean, certainly the fact that a girl does not feel any attraction towards a guy must make her a freak of nature? Isn’t everyone you ever come in contact with supposed to find you intriguing and attractive and want to pursue a relationship with you? Don’t blame a girl if she doesn’t like like

you or want a relationship with you or (oh, God forbid) only wants to be friends. Labeling girls as “friend zoners” or guys as “friended” only contributes to the long-lasting stigma that women exist only to please men. Yeah, it’s a bit of a farfetched idea, but think about it: we live in a society that blames women and champions men. When something goes wrong in a relationship, people—even women—are quick to blame a woman. As a girl, we’ve been taught to blame ourselves. Did we act uninterested? Too interested? Not eager enough? Did we say something wrong? Did we say the wrong thing? Did we act too sexual? Did we act too prude? Did we cause too much drama? Did we get too attached? Did we play too hard to get? The list goes on... Never once does it cross anyone’s mind that maybe, just maybe, guys just don’t go to the same efforts to “get” the girl that they used to; they just sort of expect her to feel the same. Sorry, boys, it does not work like that. Maybe you should try chivalry or—get this—respecting women and our feelings. I apologize if my “friend zoning” offends you, but you and your medieval gender roles give me every reason (and more) to put you there.

lancer express staff ...Dr. Seuss edition editor-in-chief ...the cat in the hat kate jerman editors ...the star-bellied sneetches shannon casey alex gnibus kaili masamoto staff writers ...the whoovians michelle chu katrina comaroto stefan cooper kathleen dooley allie gordon ramona gutierrez chase heck jessica jenkins jennifer kim hannah kirsch kaylee pitts tilly rudolph garrett snyder robert sweeney photographers ...red fish, blue fish andrew daRe natasha menard gaby wagner designers ...green eggs and ham julia flickinger nic flores eric tarter artist ...sam i am tina li business ...thing one and thing two dylan donn jalen lovato adviser ...the lorax mrs. ryan

front cover photo illustration by seannie bryan Editorial Policy As a public forum for student expression, Lancer Express welcomes letters to the editor, but reserves the right to the refuse inappropriate or anonymous letters. Letters must be directed to room 3104 or to the editor-in-chief. Lancer Express adheres to a strict policy regarding propriety of all photos and text. Controversial advertisements and opinion articles do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the entire staff. Both sides of any issue are welcome here. Letters, questions, or comments by emails to lancerexpress@gmail.com are welcome.

5


opinions

march 2012

editors

True...fast food will be fast food. It’s unhealthy by definition. But if you are going to be unhealthy, then do it in the tastiest way possible. Jack in the Box

Normally, we would ditch Jack in the Box due to its food that tastes like an actual cardboard...box. But in this case, the milkshakes trump the burgers. They offer scrumptious Oreo milkshakes and, of course, the brilliant bacon milkshake that the restaurant recently introduced. Not to mention the snazzy soda machine. In-N-Out

Nothing says “California” more than a burger, fries and a shake from the West Best Coast’s finest. In-N-Out gives you a choice between a total of four options on their beautifully simple menu: a burger, fries, soda or a milkshake. Locals even know how to order from a secret menu exclusive to In-N-Out enthusiasts. No matter what you order, you can bet that it will taste like sunshine, happiness and all things good in life. McDonald’s

Forget the food inside; just eat the paper bag instead. At least it’s healthier than what the food has to offer. Sure, when you think of fast food, those golden arches pop into mind...but so does food poisoning, less-than sanitary conditions and annoyed employees. McNuggets, albeit “tasty” and “filling”, consist mostly of filler. The horror stories don’t stop there. McDonald’s? McNasty. Taco Bell

Taco Bell is the epitome of every nasty fast food rumor ever. With questionable meat, funky soda, and tortillas that hardly look like tortillas, it’s shocking that Taco Bell even calls themselves Mexican food. The upside? It’s the cheapest food you’ll find. Unfortunately, the dirt-cheap prices are the perfect match for the dirt food. Disgustingly unhealthy, even for fast food. Nasty. But hey, at least it’s cheap.

The soda and shakes make up for sub-par food. Practically gourmet.

6

Fast food restaurants try to curb obesity by placing a price on kids’ toys

C

onfiscating toys isn’t unheard of in a world full of distractions—but reaping the fun from the happiest meals on Earth? That’s sure to create a frown. Starting this year, kids in San Francisco will not be getting a free toy with their McDonald’s Happy Meal. Thought of as an incentive to buy the 485-calorie meal, the San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors voted last November to ban McDonald’s, and all fast food restaurants, from plying kids with free toy giveaways on meals that are deemed to be too full of calories, fat, and sodium. All in hopes to stop obesity. Now, that just begs the question, “What have the toys done wrong?” It’s fair to say that the kid’s meal toy has tempted children to some degree. Who wouldn’t want a McNugget Buddy? Ironically though, throwing away the toy still leaves the 485 calories ready to settle in a kid’s tummy. The fact that one bite of a McDonald’s Happy Meal can “put a smile on,” what child wouldn’t want one, even without a toy? Originally, the Happy Meal toy focused on making kids happy and not costing mom a dime. However, as a business vying for profit, McDonald’s won’t let go of

JENNIFER KIM I staff writer

ALEX GNIBUS SHANNON CASEY

Taking the happy out of Happy Meals that dime...literally. Following the toy ban, McDonald’s decided to place a ten cent cost for the toys that can be purchased outside of the meal. So, curbing obesity is definitely a lost cause when profit is involved. Toys are still available and the calories are still there. Making a half-hearted decision won’t help solve a nation’s dilemma. Unless fast-food restaurants are willing to reform their menus, obesity will be here to stay… especially since ten cents is nothing compared to the whine of a child. Thus, it’s nothing to be surprised about when parents are just as against this toy ban— but for an entirely different reason. Parents argue that this law will limit their parental control over their child’s health. Now, if the parents were actually maintaining their kid’s diet, they wouldn’t take their child to McDonald’s for a

485-calorie meal in the first place. So, the need for any argument over the fate of the toy would disappear. Toyless Happy Meals will not stop widespread obesity. Yet, it has shown America that the problem of obesity must be attacked at its core: the calories in the meal—not in the toy. Simply put, parents should look out for their child’s health, even if it means going to McDonald’s one time less per month. Though the temptation to chomp on some greasy french fries seems overwhelming, sometimes, preparing a meal creates fewer calories—especially when you know what’s in your food. Yes, it takes extra work, but any solution America’s growing problem should. Confiscating a toy simply won’t work. Let’s keep the Happy Meals happy. Relive the fun in having the toys, just go less often. Find happy on the dinner table to make up for the fewer times you spend at McDonald’s. As for the toy ban, McDonald’s says it best. I’m lovin’ it...not.

You can swag without having to sag Saggers need to pull their pants off the ground and get some class

I

know the majority of the world is against sagging. The only reason I can think of for people to still do it is simply retaliation to the “haters” of sagging. On Jan. 13, 2011, Fox premiered a new audition episode of American Idol. With one of the most laughable auditions in the show’s history, “General” Larry Platt sang his original song, “Pants on the Ground”. The song instantly went viral and peaked in the top 50 chart of the Billboard Hot 100. Platt’s hit song discusses his views against sagging, as the common male is “lookin’ like a fool with [his] pants on the ground.” Please—like Platt says—pull up your pants. No one wants to see your boxers. Sagging originated in prisons, where belts are prohibited because many

ROBERT SWEENEY I staff writer

The sad, the bad, and the rad

volume 25, issue 5

inmates would use their belts as weapons or a way of hanging themselves. Before the jumpsuits, the belt less pants would fall below the butts of the convicts, creating one of the worst styles in fashion history. Teenagers all over the country now follow the trend, many after their favorite rappers, in a style of rebellion. My guess is, the view of sagging would change if women began to sag in retaliation. Maybe that would be the trick to get guys to finally pull their trousers up. Now, millions across the country walk around with their jeans below their waist. Do not be fooled. It’s obvious; they don’t want to spend money on a two dollar belt or even a fifty cent shoelace, right? And buying T-shirts three times the size you should be wearing doesn’t solve the problem. I might not be able to see your underwear, but I may mistake your gigantic blank tee for a dress. Rappers follow the trend more than any other celebrities. Dwayne Carter (better known as Lil’ Wayne) received national criticism after he performed shirtless at

the Grammys, while exposing his Calvin Klein briefs with his skinny jeans below his derriere. Rapper Marcus Hopson, or Hopsin, promotes the practice in the song appropriately titled “Sag My Pants.” Rappers are not the only ones partaking in the act. Japanese snowboarder Kazuhiro Kokubo was prevented from attending the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics opening ceremony due to sagging and sloppy etiquette. It’s not to be “swag” (to match perfectly) either. Plenty of people at the school have swag with their pants at their waists. Some large cities have finally started taking action. The transportations services of Fort Worth, Texas passed a rule declaring anyone sagging would not be allowed on the buses in June 2011. Fifty have been kicked off the buses since. Sagging seems to be emerging as a bigger and bigger problem in society. We could save much more time if every guy would just pull up their pants or buy a belt, instead of sponsoring your boxer company.


opinions

march 2012

Hats off to student rights? ROBERT SWEENEY I staff writer

irst discovered by the Greeks thousands of years ago, the hat has evolved into a lifestyle for many. Today, society debates whether or not people should be allowed to wear hats indoors. The answer is simply yes. In the past, people wore hats for fashion. Then, with the introduction of the broad-brimmed baseball cap, practicality met fashion in a gloriously perfect combination of form and function. Women donned frilly bonnets purely for fashion in the eighteenth-century. Many were actually forced into wearing the hats out of style because they couldn’t afford a new hat, but were required to keep their heads covered outside because of modesty. This was the first hat designed strictly for style, instead of the hats original purpose, keeping the sun off peoples’ faces. Ever since, the hat has become less and less of a necessity for the sun, and more and more a way to simply add pizzazz to the attitude of ladies AND gentlemen all over the world. Thus, there shouldn’t be any formal obligation for men, or women in fact, to be told to take their hats off indoors. People, especially those of an older generation, need to realize the hat is simply part of an outfit. Without the hat, there is no swag. A hat is part of a student’s fashion statement, and the clothes we wear represent who we see ourselves as and who we want to be. Asking me to remove my hat is like asking me to remove my very fashionable shoes. Older generations need to realize that their generation created unique fashion statements as well. For women, trends like the platform shoes and winged eyeliner have permeated today’s culture, and men’s leather jackets have remained stylish for multiple decades. Trends like Converse high tops have defined generations and are still iconic and popular today. I guarantee you that the elders of their generation were against styles like this. So please don’t tell me to take my hat off. Society frowned upon your slicked back hair and leather jacket, so why are you doing it to my hat? And don’t tell me the hat is helpful for cheating. There’s no way any student could take off his or her hat and read answers off the tiny area of the brim. Any teacher would spot a student looking away from their test and at their hat. Wouldn’t it also be weird that the student only took their hat off on test days? Another reason why both men and women should be allowed to wear hats are bad hair days. We all have those days when our hair is a complete disaster and nothing on earth will fix it. A hat provides an easy fix for men and women, causing others to not notice the bad hair, only the hat and the smiling face beneath it. Not to mention, a hat only takes three seconds to put on. It’s simply unconstitutional for anyone to disable the wearing of hats indoors. Whether it is a beanie, bonnet, flat-brimmed, or beret, the hat has changed from a sun-blocking article of clothing to a lifestyle worn by almost a billion people all over the world.

A

plea to all students: let’s revive our lost manners and take the hat off our heads indoors. Personally, I don’t know whether I should be pleased or annoyed. Pleased that an age-old sign of respect is still being upheld or annoyed at the fact that we have to be reminded to do so. To many, the act of removing our hats indoors seems like an ancient tradition, probably originating during our grandparent’s era. They just don’t see the point. What’s so offensive about a baseball cap? Yet, it’s a practice of respect that needs to be revived for the sake of maintaining etiquette… or whatever we have left of it. The removal of the hat originated with medieval knights. They would lift the visor on their helmet and show their face as a sign of respect and hold out their empty hand to show they held no weapon. Eventually the tradition survived time (for a reason) and soon the removal of the hat became a sign of a civilized culture. If you refuse to remove your hat out of contempt—much like refusing to shake someone’s hand—then fine. You have made a conscious choice to buck society. However, if you don’t remove your hat because of ignorance, then it makes you look foolish and uneducated, like not knowing what to do when someone held out their hand for you to shake. Take a teacher’s advice to heart when they ask you remove your hat in a classroom. They’re helping you, for a lack of a better word, seem smarter and save you the trouble of shaming your ancestors—in more ways than one. What would your elders say if you had a record of cheating in class? Sometimes, wearing a hat in class forms a new problem: attracting unwanted suspicion. Teachers can’t help but to suspect drooping eyes hiding underneath your cap. And it’s definitely not brain science that hats create a perfect place to scribble some formulas for the next quiz. But then students shout, “Self-expression! Shielding our heads from the cold! Sun protection!” And I can’t help but to respond, “Really? You want to go that far?” One piece of fabric on our head probably won’t save our heads from anything… but air. Also, I believe blinds were invented to block sunlight indoors. And defining ourselves with the hat we wear?  What about defining ourselves with a respect for our teachers and those we speak to. And in walks another dilemma: communication. Seems like hats can’t cap its problems but is an expert at capping conversations. In an era of emails and text messages, face-to-face communication hardly lasts a full 160 characters. Direct communication has turned into a rare phenomenon. I know for a fact though, that no one wants to attract the attention of a hat’s brim when they speak to...wait, where is that face? No one wants to talk to a hat, no matter how much personality it says it has. So the next time you enter a building, take off that hat and show everyone that you respect the one you are talking or listening to. No excuses. If hats were truly part of your self-expression, there’d be no need to hide under that brim.

JENNIFER KIM I staff writer

F

soapbox

volume 25, issue 5

Should students be allowed to wear hats indoors?

“They should be allowed to because students have the freedom to wear hats indoors or outdoors. levi sebahar junior

“They should be allowed to, as it does not affect their learning ability.”

rebecca lonas sophomore

“We should be allowed to. It could be part of someone’s lifestyle.” saul enciso senior

michala norte senior

“They should be allowed to, if they are having a bad hair day they might not want everyone to see it.”

“We should be allowed to wear hats indoors, I don’t see why it matters.” eric dominguez freshman

7


sports

march 2012

volume 25, issue 5

Boys and girls lacrosse faceoff SHANNON CASEY I editor MICHELLE CHU I staff writer

Comparing one of high school’s most contrasting sports

I

n theory, boys and girls lacrosse do not sound so different—a ball, a stick, a field. In reality, that is about all the these two sports share. Even so, these “common” elements—the stick, the field—all differ greatly. More than that, the dynamic of the sport differs so much—more so than any other sport here at CHS—between genders. The differences between boys and girls lacrosse begins even before the game starts. In a nutshell, the sport of lacrosse uses a stick with a net to propel a ball up a field to score goals for points. However, the size of the field, the size and shape of the stick, and the gear worn by players varies from boys to girls. Girls play with one, uniform stick. Boys have sticks specific to their position. “I like our style because it allows for more diversity,” senior Tiani Calip, who has played varsity girls lacrosse for two years, said. “A girl can play any position with her stick while a guy with a D-pole has to play defense unless he has another stick.” The structure of the sticks differ as well. Boys have longer sticks and deeper pockets. This requires strength and force, and explains why they wear so much more gear; faster balls create more injuries. For girls, the small depth of the pockets make it more difficult to carry the ball longer distances and throw at faster rates. Not only do boys have to worry about faster balls, but boys lacrosse allows physical contact, whereas girls lacrosse does not. Boys lacrosse engages spectators with a fast paced, physical game. “Boy’s lacrosse is a lot faster and more physical and—in my opinion—more entertaining,” junior Addison Sherwood, who has played varsity boys lacrosse for three years, said. Specific rules and regulations prohibit contact between girls, albeit the occasional shoulder check. Girls can only have seven girls on the offensive at a time; four players must remain behind a restraining line. Boys do not have a similar rule, but they only have ten players on the field at a time.

natasha menard

Senior Tiani Calip and sophomore Dylan Harris take a quick break from practice to pose in their lacrosse gear. Both lacrosse teams undergo a rigorous training schedule, hitting the field nearly every day for either a practice or game. “Girl’s lacrosse has a lot more rules and it’s more confusing to watch, “ sophomore Troy Durie, who has played varsity boys lacrosse for two years, said. “The pace is slower.” “[Boys lacrosse]

Girls

8

requires a lot more quick thinking and more toughness. And it takes a lot more practice to be good.” Both teams dedicate themselves to the sport, attracted by the novelty and

competitive nature. Currently, Carlsbad does not have a club lacrosse team, but that does not stop CHS students from finding off-season lacrosse opportunities. Junior Courtney Ragland, a returning girl’s lacrosse starting players and an avid lacrosse player, plays for Sharkz and West Coast Stars (a traveling all-star team). Sophomore David Manning plays for the Coastal Lacrosse Club in the summer and also for a competitive team called Boltz Lacrosse. While dedication is apparent on both teams, each team—both boys and girls— questions the validity of their counterpart. “I just think [girl’s lacrosse] is so easy,” Manning said. “It’s not a sport. It’s a hobby.” Girls, though, claim that the animalistic, aggressive nature of boys lacrosse has far less class than their “ladies’ sport.” The girls also question the hygiene of the boys team, whose gear is allegedly very fragrant. While both teams have incredible amounts of Lancer pride, apparently the men make that very blatantly clear. “Guys have to rep it super hard,” senior Turi Fiske said. “But how many of the boys get scholarships? Barely any. If you’re good at something, you don’t have to rep it that hard.” CHS has a habit of producing talented players in high school and beyond. Last year alone, Spencer Harding received a scholarship to San Diego State University and Danielle Protzeller, currently at Cal Poly Slo, achieved recognition as an all league goalie. Meanwhile, Spencer Beyer and Kendall Strahal from boy’s lacrosse received scholarships to Wagner College. Before the season even started, the University of Oregon awarded senior Natalie Simpson a full-ride scholarship. This year’s lacrosse players hope to achieve the same success, both during their high school season and in their lacrosse careers. “I like playing lacrosse because I get to travel, meet new people and get opportunities I never thought I would have,” Ragland said.

Boys

Gear:

Eye goggles, mouth guard, cleats, stick

Helmet, mouth guard, chest pads, shoulder pads, cup, rib pads, gloves, cleats, stick

Contact:

Limited contact; checking with the side

Full body checking

Duration:

Two 30 minute halves

Players:

12

Four 15 minute quarters

10


volume 25, issue 5

sports

march 2012

Sports highlights: Lady Lancer standouts seannie bryan

gaby wagner

Senior Sami Keville, a member of the women’s varsity soccer team, takes control of the ball and leads her team down to the goal. Keville scored in the first quarter for a 3-0 win against East Lake High School on Wed. Feb. 29. Women’s soccer competed in CIF finals on March 3 against San Pasqual at Mater Dei. This season is the first time Women’s soccer has made it to CIF finals. The varsity team consists of 22 members and is coached by Carl Higham.

Junior Destiny Girley flies into the air during a pole vault practice after school on February 16. The daily track practices are often grueling, but have proven effective with a record of 3-0-1 from last season. Athletes in track compete in 11 events, of which pole vault is one of the 5 jumping events. While pole vaulting is scary to many because of the heights reached and tenuous nature of the equipment used, for those trained in it, all that is necessary is agility, strength, and timing.

Reach new heights with SUMMA!

Real prep. Real results.

Now enrolling for...

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE TWO SUMMA STUDENTS WHO EARNED PERFECT "2400" SCORES ON THE JANUARY 2012 SAT!

Summa Education founder Christopher Hamilton has personally helped more than 30 students achieve perfect scores on the SAT and guided hundreds more to acceptance to the colleges of their choice.

12760 High Bluff Drive, Suite 160, San Diego, CA 92130

9-week SUMMA SAT Essentials March 9th - May 5th $920 Spring SAT Subject classes Math II Chemistry US History Physics Biology Literature AP Intensive Review Classes Calculus A/B and Chemistry Summer Programs Summer Boot Camp 2300 Goal and 2300 Plus Summer Intensive Weekend SAT and Summa Junior classes...

www.summaeducation.com

(858) 793-8880


feature

volume 25, issue 5

Many of us have jokingly said, “I am addicted to Facebook.” Or, “Don’t join Tumblr, it is so addictive.” However, new scientific evidence actually backs up these casual claims. A recent study by University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business found social networking sites may be more addictive than cigarettes or alcohol. The research team used BlackBerry devices to monitor 205 participants in Wurtzburg, Germany. Seven times a day, they were asked what their desires/impulses were at the time and to rate them from “mild” to “irresistible.” Surprisingly, stereotypical addictive desires like smoking and drinking ranked low. The number one desire, which many high school students could relate to, was taking time for leisure or sleep. Number two was the urge to check social networking sites and social emailing. The leader of the research team, Wilhelm Hofmann, explained the possible reason why the highest rate of “self-control failures” were linked to social media. “Desires for media may be comparatively harder to resist because of their high availability and also because it feels like it does not ‘cost much’ to engage in these activities, even though one wants to resist,” Hofmann said. The dangers of smoking and drinking have been widely publicized -lung cancer! drunk driving! DEATH!- but the lack of consequences of checking Facebook or Twitter allows people to succumb to these urges. Although the study’s finds seem unbelievable, sophomore Declan Savage, an unabashed Facebook addict, says he believes the results. “People can get around it with Facebook because they say it can’t affect your health. Unlike an alcohol/cigarette habit, it’s free so you can’t waste money on Facebook,” Savage said. “The main problem with Facebook is obesity.” Savage joined Facebook awhile ago because it was a popular trend at the time. “A lot of people had it and would say ‘The homework is on Facebook’ or ‘Facebook me,’” Savage said. He now enjoys Facebook for the ability to check people’s statuses, post his own statuses, check other people’s walls and “basically anything to avoid doing homework.” Like most people, Savage says he can live without Facebook although it is a big part of his life. “The truth is if I have access, I will always be on it,” Savage said.

KAILI MASAMOTO I editor STEFAN COOPER I staff writer KAYLEE PITTS I staff writer

smoking

1

march 2012

Social networking accounts for

of every

6

social media

alcohol

sleep

leisure

When facing temptation, what are the most problematic desires?

minutes spent online provided by comScore So yes social networking can be addictive, but why? A new study conducted by MIT and the University of Milan suggests there are chemical reasons behind the addiction. Researchers had 30 participants look at pictures of nature, solve math problems and check Facebook while they monitored blood volume, pulse, pupil dilation, etc. The study found users showed more positive responses to Facebook than the pictures or math problems. Oddly enough, the reactions users showed when logging onto Facebook were similar to those when people play a musical instrument or do other creative activities. The study said “biological signals revealed that Facebook use can evoke a psychophysiological state characterized by [positive emotions] and high arousal.” The results of the study supported the researchers hypothesis that the rise in popularity of social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook is due to the pleasurable chemical state users experience.

10

Of all the time spent on social networks, 75% is spent on Facebook.

Say you are finally fed up with Facebook. It takes up too much time and is the perfect procrastination device. The relationships you have with your 1739 “friends” feel shallow. You are tired of going through your day mentally posting things to your Facebook wall. So you quit. What happens now? On the plus side, many people reported feeling more social when interacting with people and even more relaxed without endless status updates flowing through their lives. However, on the downside, if most of your friends have a Facebook, you may feel left out from Facebook jokes, or feel the urge to share or stalk. Senior Ciara Turner quit Facebook at the beginning of November and lived to tell about her experience. Lancer Express: Why did you quit Facebook? Ciara Turner: I quit because I was extremely addicted. I would spend hours online. I wanted to focus on school work and have more time for everything else. Not only that

Facebook is the 3rd largest web property online.

but people write things on there that I didn’t see a point in reading. Statuses and comments people would never say in person. It’s just so full of unneeded drama. LE: How did people react when you told them that you were going to quit Facebook? C: People actually supported the decision. Sometimes people are shocked and others say they wish they could quit but they all have some reason they are tied to it. LE: Benefits of quitting Facebook? Consequences? C: I believe I have a lot more time since I quit, and I know I have control to end bad habits. I also hear about things my friends write and the drama and think “I am so glad I don’t have to read that kind of thing daily.” However, it’s hard when doing group projects because everyone connects on Facebook. But I’ve acclimated so it’s alright. I also miss out on sharing photos and seeing my friends’ pictures for events I go to.

Facebook has over 800,000,000 active users..

Of all social networking sites, Facebook is #1 in 127 countries.

socailnetworkingwatch.com

11


feature

volume 25, issue 5

Many of us have jokingly said, “I am addicted to Facebook.” Or, “Don’t join Tumblr, it is so addictive.” However, new scientific evidence actually backs up these casual claims. A recent study by University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business found social networking sites may be more addictive than cigarettes or alcohol. The research team used BlackBerry devices to monitor 205 participants in Wurtzburg, Germany. Seven times a day, they were asked what their desires/impulses were at the time and to rate them from “mild” to “irresistible.” Surprisingly, stereotypical addictive desires like smoking and drinking ranked low. The number one desire, which many high school students could relate to, was taking time for leisure or sleep. Number two was the urge to check social networking sites and social emailing. The leader of the research team, Wilhelm Hofmann, explained the possible reason why the highest rate of “self-control failures” were linked to social media. “Desires for media may be comparatively harder to resist because of their high availability and also because it feels like it does not ‘cost much’ to engage in these activities, even though one wants to resist,” Hofmann said. The dangers of smoking and drinking have been widely publicized -lung cancer! drunk driving! DEATH!- but the lack of consequences of checking Facebook or Twitter allows people to succumb to these urges. Although the study’s finds seem unbelievable, sophomore Declan Savage, an unabashed Facebook addict, says he believes the results. “People can get around it with Facebook because they say it can’t affect your health. Unlike an alcohol/cigarette habit, it’s free so you can’t waste money on Facebook,” Savage said. “The main problem with Facebook is obesity.” Savage joined Facebook awhile ago because it was a popular trend at the time. “A lot of people had it and would say ‘The homework is on Facebook’ or ‘Facebook me,’” Savage said. He now enjoys Facebook for the ability to check people’s statuses, post his own statuses, check other people’s walls and “basically anything to avoid doing homework.” Like most people, Savage says he can live without Facebook although it is a big part of his life. “The truth is if I have access, I will always be on it,” Savage said.

KAILI MASAMOTO I editor STEFAN COOPER I staff writer KAYLEE PITTS I staff writer

smoking

1

march 2012

Social networking accounts for

of every

6

social media

alcohol

sleep

leisure

When facing temptation, what are the most problematic desires?

minutes spent online provided by comScore So yes social networking can be addictive, but why? A new study conducted by MIT and the University of Milan suggests there are chemical reasons behind the addiction. Researchers had 30 participants look at pictures of nature, solve math problems and check Facebook while they monitored blood volume, pulse, pupil dilation, etc. The study found users showed more positive responses to Facebook than the pictures or math problems. Oddly enough, the reactions users showed when logging onto Facebook were similar to those when people play a musical instrument or do other creative activities. The study said “biological signals revealed that Facebook use can evoke a psychophysiological state characterized by [positive emotions] and high arousal.” The results of the study supported the researchers hypothesis that the rise in popularity of social networking sites like Twitter and Facebook is due to the pleasurable chemical state users experience.

10

Of all the time spent on social networks, 75% is spent on Facebook.

Say you are finally fed up with Facebook. It takes up too much time and is the perfect procrastination device. The relationships you have with your 1739 “friends” feel shallow. You are tired of going through your day mentally posting things to your Facebook wall. So you quit. What happens now? On the plus side, many people reported feeling more social when interacting with people and even more relaxed without endless status updates flowing through their lives. However, on the downside, if most of your friends have a Facebook, you may feel left out from Facebook jokes, or feel the urge to share or stalk. Senior Ciara Turner quit Facebook at the beginning of November and lived to tell about her experience. Lancer Express: Why did you quit Facebook? Ciara Turner: I quit because I was extremely addicted. I would spend hours online. I wanted to focus on school work and have more time for everything else. Not only that

Facebook is the 3rd largest web property online.

but people write things on there that I didn’t see a point in reading. Statuses and comments people would never say in person. It’s just so full of unneeded drama. LE: How did people react when you told them that you were going to quit Facebook? C: People actually supported the decision. Sometimes people are shocked and others say they wish they could quit but they all have some reason they are tied to it. LE: Benefits of quitting Facebook? Consequences? C: I believe I have a lot more time since I quit, and I know I have control to end bad habits. I also hear about things my friends write and the drama and think “I am so glad I don’t have to read that kind of thing daily.” However, it’s hard when doing group projects because everyone connects on Facebook. But I’ve acclimated so it’s alright. I also miss out on sharing photos and seeing my friends’ pictures for events I go to.

Facebook has over 800,000,000 active users..

Of all social networking sites, Facebook is #1 in 127 countries.

socailnetworkingwatch.com

11


“ MiraCosta College has wonderful music and political science programs, and the Honors Program

at MiraCosta College gives you a great shot at transferring to the public universities in the country.�

best

Curran Dwyer

MiraCosta College student

Cardiff / Oceanside / Online www.miracosta.edu

facebook.com/miracostacc

760.757.2121


arts & entertainment

volume 25, issue 5

Film class leads students into the industry KATHLEEN DOOLEY I staff writer

C

arlsbad High School shines through its many specialized programs and opportunities for students. For many Lancers, the unique Film Academy serves as the perfect escape from tough academic classes, while still pushing the participating students to strive to reach new heights. Enrolling in the Film Academy is a natural choice for those who wish to express their artistic abilities

gaby wagner

Senior Natalie Weldon works on a screenplay during film class.

through motion pictures in high school and in the future as well. “I grew up loving movies so I love the film class,” senior Vinnie Zellefrow said. “We are learning how movies are made: we write scripts, we learn the entire movie making process and get to mirror that in our film making class.” Ms. Parr, the Filmmaking teacher, involves her students in the movie-making world to give them a foundation on which to base their own film endeavors. After learning about the career and art of filmmaking, students create films of their own. “We worked on silent films, music videos and now short films based off of a picture,” senior Lenay Marshall said. “We take the picture and create our own interpretation of it as a group — it’s really fun.” Having enrolled as juniors in the Film Academy, students have gotten to know each other through their history and English classes, and now they apply their mutual passion for film by working together as seniors to produce their own works of art. “It’s a very visual class, and everyone is extremely artistic and imaginative,” Marshall said. The Filmmaking students are currently working on their short films and other movies for the CHS Film Festival that will take place later in the school year. This showcase is something for the students to look forward to as an opportunity to debut the films they have dedicated their time and effort to throughout the year. Also, friends and family have the chance to see the effort of their Film student on the big screen, sharing in the pride of each film student involved.

march 2012 gaby wagner

Seniors Sarah McKelvey and Julia Peterson work on a film project during class, preparing for the film festival presented by the Film Academy at the end of the year. “The show is designed to show off our best work,” senior Trent Ryan said. “It’s a recognition of our hard work for everyone to see.” All of the teachers from the Film Academy collaborate to select the best films to feature in the festival. From the top films chosen, some are even re-edited and perfected to be entered in outside film festivals, giving students a view into the professional world of film making. Being relatively new to the curriculum of CHS, the Film Academy serves as an interesting two-year program for students wanting to pursue their love for film. Also, for the many students in the program wishing to continue in the film industry, the class gives insight into the world of moviemaking, as well as builds a solid foundation of film knowledge. With valuable experience and an ignited passion for film, students of the Film Academy break into the world of moviemaking with a sense of confidence

only Carlsbad’s program could have given them. “I have been thinking about taking film into the future, but I know it’s a really competitive field,” Marshall said. “I’m really glad to have had the film class to prepare me for what I’ll see in the future.” Not all students enrolled in the Filmmaking class plan to go into the film industry in the future, but it is unanimous that the techniques and skills learned in the film class will benefit the students regardless of what career field they choose. “This class has been extremely useful for me because I know that whatever industry I chose to go into, I’ve learned valuable skills in filmmaking, as well was more general things such as working as a team to succeed,” Ryan said. Because of its extreme success, CHS’s film program will remain in the curriculum for years to come, giving students an alternative outlet for their creativity.

Hunger Games fights its way to the big screen

JESSICA JENKINS I staff writer

T

he Hunger Games has become a prominent book series the past few years, grabbing the attention of millions of teenagers and young adults. This year, many dedicated fans anticipate the release of the Hunger Games movie, which comes to theaters March 23.  The novel takes place in a post-war area of Northern America called Panem, where the Capitol government controls the poorer surrounding districts. After the districts’ attempt of rebellion against the Capitol, the Capitol forces children ages 12-18 from the various districts to battle against each other to the death in an annual televised event. The movie will revolve around the plot of the first book of the trilogy written by Suzanne Collins.  “I am excited to see how they portray the characters and how they are different from how I portrayed them; as well as the

actual games because they are gory and directed towards children,” junior Katie Ohlin said. “One girl and one guy from each district fight until death.”  Many readers of the novel wait eagerly for the movie to be released to find out if their expectations will be reached.  “I don’t think the movie will be as good, it will be marvelous if they can pull it off,” junior Emma Chong said. “I am expecting the plot to change a little, but also be a lot of fun.”  The speculations have already begun as to whether the movie will be able to live up to the fans’ expectations. Still, many people are more than thrilled to see their favorite book of the moment come to life. The intense setting of an arena and a plot revolved around teenagers will definitely make the movie all the more interesting, even for those who haven’t read the novels.  “I am excited to see how they will

set it up because the whole book is in an arena,” Chong said. “So it will be interesting to see if they will pull it off.”  Anyone interested in the series should venture over to their local book store or library and get their hands on the book prior to seeing the movie.  “Movies are never as good as the book; based on the trailers released, it may be good but its never as good as the book,” Ohlin said. “There is never enough depth.”  For those who find themselves at the movie theater on the night before this movie is released, expect to be overwhelmed by a crowd of fans similar to those from Twilight or Harry Potter.  “I read the series and am a huge fan,” junior Monica Gurolla said. “Going to the premiere and seeing enthusiastic Hunger Games fans as myself should be very exciting.”

13


Lancer Express would like to thank it’s generous 2011-2012 donors!

Purple

Black

White

Trish & Chris Lovato Brookdale Fish Joint Frank Jenkins Kathleen & Terry Dooley For subscription and donation Laurie & Jay information DaRe e-mail: Mike & Debby lancerexpressbusiness@yahoo.com Heck Eric & Allison Tarter Universal Driving and Traffic School Brendan & Linda (760) 434-9504 Dooley www.universaldrivingschool.com Walter Wickboldt Dan Callaway Hill Street Cafe In Classroom Driver’s

Dan Callaway Davin Waite Sishi Poppers Eric & Allison Tarter Linda & Doug Adam

The Cooper Family Brent Hurst Dolores Fritzsche

Established in 1980 390 Oak Avenue “L” Carlsbad, CA 92008

Toyota Yaris

Telephone Hours M-Th: 9-5:30 F & Sat. Until Noon Closed Sundays and Holidays

$50 discount for in class Ed and 6 -In Classroom or Online Driver’s Ed Hours Behind-the-Wheel -6-12 Hours Behind-the-Wheel Plans Free in Class Ed with 12 hours -Free pick up for behind-the-wheel Behind-the-Wheel with Ad -Experienced DMV licensed woman or Ask about our $20 discount for man instructor friend referrals -Juvenile/Adult Traffic School -In Classroom Dates: All Saturdays and Breaks

DMV Lic#2514 and T.V.S. #0682

Free

Education with a 12 Hour Behind the Wheel Course (With Coupon)

Online U.D.S. Driver’s Education & Behind the

$50.00

Toward Behind the Wheel (With Coupon)


volume 25, issue 5

arts & entertainment

march 2012

Hogwarts comes to Los Angeles JESSICA JENKINS I staff writer

The magic of Harry Potter finally meets the magic of Hollywood butterbeer and a Gryffindor scarf.” Harry Potter fans can look forward to an experience they have only imagined. Visitors will step onto rides that take them through the various locations mentioned in the novel. Some of the rides and attractions from the Wizarding World in Florida may carry over to the new park, but it is also possible that completely new locations will be explored, like Diagon

jessica jenkins

I am excited

to go into the park and pretend for a day that I am a wizard”

The new addition to Universal Studios was designed to resemble Hogwarts as accurately as possible. Fans from across the nation will be able to experience Harry’s world.

A

popular addition to Universal Studios Orlando, Florida is now making its way to Universal Studios Hollywood. Plans for the Wizarding World of Harry Potter have surfaced to begin construction on a brand new section to the theme park in Los Angeles. The new area of the popular Universal

Studios will feature rides and interactive experiences relating to aspects of the Harry Potter series, focusing on bringing the small details of the story to life. “It is good that it will be in Los Angeles now because people won’t have to travel to Florida,” senior Remy Smith said. “I am stoked to go Hogsmeade and get

Remy Smith senior Alley and the Horcrux Cave. “I am looking forward to the atmosphere because I have imagined it but never been there,” junior Danni Zombolas said. “I am as excited as Harry was when he defeated Voldemort.” Fans can expect features such as tours through the Hogwarts castle, shopping

in the stores Harry shopped at during his stay at Hogwarts and possibly stopping by Olivander’s wand shop to get chosen by a wand. The new attractions may parallel those in the Orlando theme park or completely vary; the plans are not known yet. “I am excited to go into the park and pretend for a day that I am a wizard,” Smith said. “I will bring my wand and run around like a Gryffindor.” If the park is anything like Universal Florida’s, attendees will not only be able to wander through the village of Hogsmeade, in and out of the Three Broomsticks Inn and Zonko’s Joke Shop, but will also be able to get their hands on various treats straight from the book like butterbeer and pumpkin juice. Gift shops will also allow fans to indulge themselves in Harry Potter attire and souvenirs like time turners and owls. “I am so excited I just want to go home and watch all the movies,” Zombolas said. “Us Gryffindors are excited to connect to the wizarding world that is now becoming reality.” Unfortunately, the new park is estimated to be opened in 2016 at the earliest. Until then, fans can still get their hands on this experience by traveling to Florida and visiting the attraction in Universal Orlando.  

Smash brings some honesty to television KATE JERMAN I editor-in-chief

W

ith its 2009 debut, Glee came barreling onto the entertainment scene to critical acclaim, rabid fans and a cast of mostly unknowns who found instant stardom. Revered for addressing controversial issues like teen pregnancy, gay bullying, suicide and mental disorders like OCD, Glee cultivated a fan base through its exploration of teen life by covering songs from cult favorites (like Rocky Horror) to Top 40 hits (like “Teenage Dream”). However, many found their awe of the show fading as plot lines become increasingly ridiculous and failed to mirror any part of normal high school life. For those who watch the over-thetop musical productions staged by a show choir of twelve(ish) people with a (supposedly) limited budget with disbelief, there’s a new show in town, and it shows every nitty gritty detail of show business and delights in the actual work that goes towards putting together a show. Smash isn’t a cheap knock-off of Glee, like many

believed it to be; it’s an answer to those who wonder about the true reality of show business. Set in New York City, the show focuses on the creation of a new Broadway show by celebrated writers Tom and Julia (played by Christian Borle and Debra Messing). Young ingenue Karen Cartwright (Katharine McPhee) dukes it out for her big break with theatre veteran Ivy Lynn (Broadway darling Megan Hilty), and the conflict between the two divas drives much of the story. A conniving assistant to Tom (Ellis, played by Jaime Cepero), Jack Davenport as strong minded and volatile director Derek Wills and Eileen Rand (Angelica Houston) as the producer who finances it all, round out the cast and create an effortless back and forth between characters. Each episode presents a cohesive story line, with logical actions by characters (unlike the wildly random Glee plots i.e. Sam as a stripper), and reasonably wraps up within the hour, but leaves enough of a tantalizing cliffhanger to pull you back for the next

week. The plots may not be the most ground-breaking in the world, but they’re well done, interesting and accurate representations of the ups and downs of show business, unlike Glee’s fantasy world of 30-year-old high school students. Most importantly, Smash honestly presents the real effort and creativity put into making musical numbers and shows work. Shows like Glee often throw out wildly produced productions with no evidence of the practice—just a smooth transition from everyday life to a seemingly perfect-on-the-first-try routine. While this makes for fast-moving and highenergy television, it doesn’t even come close to the truth of show choir, which Glee claims to represent. Smash makes a much smarter decision in choosing to focus on the backstage drama—the true focus of any show business. For a mid-season premiere, Smash has proved itself as a strong show sure to return for following seasons. The plot entertains without overreaching and sucks the audience into the drama and intrigue. All in all, Smash is a smash hit.

Smash airs Monday nights at 10 o’clock on NBC.

15


student life

volume 25, issue 5

march 2012

the

BUZZ

Caffeine consumption and how it impacts students and their busy lives KATRINA COMAROTO GARRETT SNYDER staff writers

H

Coffee is the most popular beverage worldwide with over 400 million cups consumed each year.

A recent study has found that coffee has an antidepressant effect that makes people happier. A study published in the Sept. 26, 2011, issue of Archives of Internal Medicine showed that women who drank two to three cups of caffeinated coffee a day were 15 percent less likely to develop depression over a 10 year period compared with those who drank one cup of coffee or less per week.

Even though it tastes “stronger”, dark roasted coffees actually have LESS caffeine than medium or light roasts. One cup of coffee has more caffeine than a shot of espresso.

68% of coffee drinkers have their first cup within an hour of waking up. The average consumption in the United States is 3.1 cups of coffee per day.

Caffeine stimulates the mind and boosts short term memory. Antioxidants in coffee are similar to those in green tea that prevent aging. It can promote weight loss by speeding up the metabolism.

Disadvantages:

Drinking coffee: a necessary evil? Advantages:

igh school students alter their lives nearly every day. How? They make a choice to drink caffeinated beverages. Students use coffee and energy drinks for an extra boost of energy when dealing with daily stresses. For most students, these drinks are used to counteract the many hours of sleep deprivation due to school and work. These drinks run for three to five dollars per drink; daily or weekly trips to Starbucks and six packs of energy drinks cause a wallet to shrink in size quickly. Starbucks line practically every street, and students continue to pour their dollars into the pockets of these companies. Students view caffeine as an indispensable supply of energy, not as a dangerous combination of chemicals. People still consume caffeine even after hearing about the detrimental effect coffee and similar drinks have on the human body. Some justify the chemical-ridden taste by arguing that they need the energy for daily tasks, especially in the face of procrastination and massive work loads. In most energy drinks, caffeine levels were higher than the FDA limit for soda, which is 65 mg of caffeine per 12 ounces. Still, students end up chugging energy drinks one after the other, for that pick-me-up, or just to feel that buzz. Some students drink decaffeinated coffee with the misconception that it is safer than fully caffeinated coffee. Even decaffeinated coffee has its health risks, especially concerning the chemicals used to process it. Beans used in decaf coffee are steamed while an organic solvent called methylene chloride washes the caffeine off. Even then, decaf still has a bit of caffeine—just not nearly as much as a regular cup of Joe. Students need to regulate their daily intake of caffeine, for both their wallet and their health’s sake.

Coffee causes calcium loss, which may lead to bone loss.

Brian DeGour junior

“It is difficult to wake up and to fuel for late projects without coffee.”

Devin McDaniel senior

Drinking coffee on an empty stomach causes discomfort.

http://www.livescience.com/16297-coffeefacts-national-coffee-day-infographic.html

CHS students on: CAFFEINE

“I just learned to control how much I drink.”

Too much coffee over time can stain teeth.

“I drink energy drinks before athletic events and to keep me going or focused for an extended period of time.”

Ian Luck junior

“I don’t get anything done unless I have an energy drink for focus.”

Stephen Sweeney sophomore

“I feel happier and healthier because I’m not addicted to it.”

Sammie Duffy senior

17


profile

march 2012

volume 25, issue 5

Wanderlust with a purpose

KATHLEEN DOOLEY I staff writer

L

iving in Carlsbad, it is easy to become entangled with the trials and tribulations of our own lives. In doing this, we often forget about the big picture—attending to the world around us and changing the lives of others. Most students of CHS complete service hours around the community, but there are a select few who have chosen to drop their Carlsbad lives to take on bigger issues around the world. Junior Dane Brody and sophomore Hank Kollar are among these students, having traveled to other countries for service projects and mission trips this past year. These students, as well as many others at CHS, got the chance to travel to remote places not just for the experience, but to gain a new perspective on the world, and the reality of life beyond the borders of Carlsbad. Learning about other countries, they are able to share in the lives of others, and return home with the stories of their adventures.

Dane Brody - Nicaragua

courtesy of hank kollar

Sophomore Hank Kollar learns a traditional dance from a Nepalese teen while traveling in Nepal.

Hank Kollar - Mexico and Nepal

Lancer Express: How did you feel when you were given the opportunity to go to Nepal and Mexico? Hank Kollar: I felt very lucky and blessed to be able to go to Nepal and Mexico to meet a lot people who live there and build relationships with them. I did a leadership training with people about 16 years old and older and I also did a youth sport program called Kids Games when there. LE: What did you find when you arrived there? HK: In Nepal, there was a lot of poverty and people who had close to nothing, but still seemed to be grateful for the things they did have...which was really interesting to see and very inspiring. I was surprised that all of these people lived in such poor conditions but they really didn’t seem to mind it. LE: Did you miss Carlsbad or anything specific from home? HK: Yes, definitely. I missed having a constant and reliable water/electricity source. And I missed having a variety of food: in Nepal it was rice for breakfast, lunch and dinner. LE: What was the most memorable part of your trip? HK: My favorite part of the trip was building relationships with so many great people who were so nice. I think it’s cool to have relationships with people all over the world. LE: Were you sad to be leaving or were you ready to come home? HK: I was ready to come home, but I wanted to bring all my new friends home with me because almost none of them have never been to the United States and I wanted to show them what my life was like and how different everything is. LE: Would you say this trip affected your life? HK: Yes, this trip affected my life because it showed me first-hand how there are so many people out there who have so much less than we do, and I never heard them complain about the things they did and didn’t have. It helps me to be grateful for the things I do have because it could be so much worse. LE: Do you plan to continue to travel in the future? HK: Yes, I plan to travel for the rest of my life. No where in particular in mind, but mostly for mission trips and also for vacations.

18

Lancer Express: Tell us about where you traveled this past year. Dane Brody: Over Spring Break last year my mom led a team of doctors to Nicaragua. I went with them acting as a translator. We were there for 7 days and 6 nights. LE: What was the purpose of the trip? DB: The purpose of the trip was to perform various surgeries at no cost to the community. Nicaragua is the most impoverished country in the western hemisphere and the people can barely afford to put food on the table, let alone pay for medical care. LE: What did you experience once you arrived there? DB: When I arrived in Nicaragua, the first thing that hit me was just the extreme poverty. I remember opening the sliding door to the airport and getting hit with a wall of hot muggy air. Within seconds there was a group of orphans in tattered clothes crowded around me begging for money. As we drove to the clinic we’d be working at, we passed houses made of cardboard and corrugated tin. I’d never seen anything like that. I think I speak for everyone on the team when I say we experienced excitement, apprehension and everything in between. LE: Did you miss Carlsbad or anything specific from home? DB: Going to a third world country is definitely something that is outside most people’s comfort zone. It’s physically and mentally draining and takes a lot to cope with. I missed the comfort of Carlsbad. LE: Would you say the trip affected your life? DB: The trip affected me in so many ways. It made me realize how sheltered myself and most people in the U.S. are. Sure, it’s easy to hear about these people in third world countries and feel sorry for them, but that only lasts a little while. Then life catches up and people get caught in the daily grind and forget. They forget about the realities of what’s going on outside our borders. The team completed 33 surgeries in 3 days. A minor miracle. Even in the states that is a huge amount of operations in such little time. It makes me feel good to know that, at least for those 33 patients, we made a difference. The trip as a whole gave me a drive to do something and act. LE: Would you say that traveling is a big part of who you are? DB: Yes, I plan on much more traveling to come.

courtesy of kelley foyt

Junior Dane Brody and a fellow volunteer stand with a patient while working in Nicaragua.


profile

volume 25, issue 5

march 2012

More about Mormons

ALEX GNIBUS I editor CHASE HECK I staff writer

An inside look at our student body’s Mormon population

C

hances are, you know a Mormon. But do you really know them? Whether or not students are aware of the Mormon church right across the street from the CHS campus, it is impossible to deny that Mormon students are common here at our school. But like many of the smaller groups in a diverse community, Mormons are often subjected to judgmental, insensitive, and unusual stereotypes. “People think we’re Amish, or polygamists,” junior Shannon Perdue, a lifelong Mormon, said. “They think we hate gay people, or that we’re stuck up and don’t have fun.” These derogatory stereotypes build up a wall of misunderstanding between stu-

There are over

dents who aren’t Mormon and those who are. Because of a lack of correct information regarding Mormons, teens may be quick to judge others based on the fact that they belong to the Mormon church. “People do judge me for being Mormon. People are like, ‘Oh, cute little Mormons, they don’t do anything bad,’” Perdue said. The media often portrays Mormons in a way that does not represent all Mormons. The news only talks about Mormon extremists in Texas whenever there’s a scandal; TV shows like “South Park” illustrate Mormons as strange, misguided individuals who ride around in horsedrawn carriages. Even the Internet offers articles that advertise “How to Date a

13 million Mormons worldwide.

is tio onism ion interna g reli

Morm

800 converts to M ormonism 300,000 per year

pproximate

per day and

owing

r

stest-g a f h 0t nally. the 1

There are a

Mormon Boy.” Because of these negative images, people cannot separate fact from fiction. “Jokes that people make are, ‘What kind of magic underwear do you have?’ or that we’re super uptight,” junior Tanner Tucker said. In order to stop the insensitive stereotypes surrounding Mormons, students must learn the truth. Once people make the effort to educate themselves and learn the facts about Mormons, they will see that Mormons aren’t too different from the rest of the student body. “I feel like anyone who actually knows me doesn’t judge me,” Tucker said. “People are surprised to find I’m Mormon.”

ly

The Numbers

are There

146

s.

e Templ n o m r Mo

24.1% of the There are approximately Mormons in t h e world. Tha makes 5, t 503,192 Mo 50,000 Mormon missionaries rmons in A

America ha

s

merica.

The Myths - Mormons are polygamists: In truth, only extremist sects who left the mainstream church practice polygamy. - They must go on mandatory 2-year missions: It’s highly recommended but not mandatory. Also, only males typically participate but girls can go on missions. - They aren’t allowed to date or marry anyone outside the Mormon church: They are allowed to marry a non-Mormon, but if they do, they will not be allowed to marry in the Temple. - Mormons have magical underwear: Before they enter the temple ( typically Mormons enter the temple before marriage or going on a mission), Mormons receive undergarments which are an outward expression of their commitment to follow God’s commandments. It’s underwear, but it’s not magic. - They aren’t allowed to date: Once Mormons are 16, they are allowed to have boyfriends/girlfriends.

in the world

The Facts - The formal name of the religion is The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, but it is more commonly known as the Mormon Church - The Church was restored by Joseph Smith in 1830 - They are Christian - They believe in both the Bible and the Book of Mormon - Teens go to seminary in the mornings before school, which is where they go to the church and learn about different areas of the Mormon faith - They are encouraged to dress modestly - They must abstain from alcohol, drugs, and R-rated movies - They aren’t allowed to have sex until marriage

For more information, visit LDS.org, the official website of the Mormon Church

19


photojournalism

march 2012

volume 25, issue 5

Carlsbad loses its favorite skate spot SEANNIE BRYAN I photographer Below: Skater Kris Markovich proudly walks away with a smile.

Above: Markovich clears the Gap for the very last time. Observers watch as the 50 year old Gap is torn apart into pieces by the construction crew. Many stayed after to keep pieces of the concrete as souvenirs.

Right: Two of the assistant principals pose for a picture, showing their support for the skaters. Far right: Kris Markovich’s son collects the remaining pieces of the skate spot his father created.

20


Lancer Express 3.6.12