Page 1

Senior Destinations

Thanks to Teachers

MAP pgs. 6-7

Senior Sports

TEACHER TRIBUTES pg. 8

Volume XLVI, Issue 14 | June 3, 2009 |

Circulation 2,500 |

LEADERS..........................................Pg. 1 NEWS..................................................Pg. 2 OPINION............................................Pg. 3 FEATURES........................................Pg. 4 VALEDICTORIANS.........................Pg. 5 MAP...............................................Pgs. 6-7 TRIBUTES.........................................Pg. 8 FAREWELL TO FACULTY.............Pg. 9 ENTERTAINMENT.........................Pg. 10 SPORTS.............................................Pg. 11 SENIOR SPORTS............................Pg. 12

SPORTS pg. 12

Thousand Oaks High School

|

2323 N. Moorpark Rd., Thousand Oaks, CA 91360

Marissa Morrison Student Body President

Kristine Kilgore Co-Senior Class Pres.

Crystal Lepley Co-Senior Class Pres.

Matt Bradbury and Jean Kim Co-Newspaper Editors-in-Chief

BY MATT

BRADBURY Senior Editor

AS WE GRADUATE, WE RETRACE THE STEPS WE TOOK THROUGH OUR FOUR YEARS OF HIGH SCHOOL...

FRESHMAN YEAR 2005-2006

Our freshman year of high school began with a bang, as Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast in late August of 2005. To this day, clean-up operations are still underway. At TOHS, a bomb threat placed by a sophomore in December added to the overall terror, and not longer after the school placed security cameras outside every restroom. Baseball expanded in early 2006, as America hosted the first World Baseball Classic. Japan won, and won again in 2009. 2005 marked a breakthrough year in cyberspace. Everyone’s favorite website, youtube.com was launched and instantly became a teenage sensation. The Xbox 360 made its debut as well. Many of us came to TOHS from Redwood, and we did not come alone. Tim Carpenter and Marty Crawford came with us.

SOPHOMORE YEAR 2006-2007

Saddam Hussein, the dictator of Iraq for over 25 years, was convicted and executed by his countrymen. The Virginia Tech school shooting toppled our sense of school security. In January, Apple unveiled its newest product – the iPhone. Today, iPhones can be found all over campus. The next month, The Departed won Best Picture at the Academy Awards, giving acclaimed director Martin Scorsese his first award in the ceremony’s foremost category. Also, New Moon, the second installment in Stephanie Meyer’s Twilight Series, reached number one in the New York Times Bestseller List in September. Through our four years, these books and 2008 movie became the biggest cultural phenomenon since Harry Potter. At school, we found our gym brand new after summer renovations, two years after coming back to a new pool area. As we took the notoriously easy California High School Exit Exam, we looked forward to moving into the world of upperclassmen. ALL PHOTOS FROM WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

JUNIOR YEAR 2007-2008

Our junior year ended with disappointment, as the Lakers fell to the Boston Celtics in the NBA Finals, reviving a thirty year rivalry. Girls soccer not only won the CIF Championship, but finished second in the state championship, capping one of the greatest runs for any sport in school history. The school band performed in Rome, Italy; one of the longest school trips in school history. In January of 2008, the United States Stock Markets plunged after growing fears of a recession, fueled in part by the housing mortgage crisis. At the end of the year, Assistant Principal Brian Crain, long hallowed as the man behind the sunglasses, left TOHS to take a job in Oregon.

SENIOR YEAR 2008-2009

As seniors, many of us became swept up in the political wave that encompassed our city, state, and country. The 2008 general elections energized more young people than ever before, and the election of Barack Obama and passing of Proposition 8 polarized the campus and fueled the creation of several student political clubs. The 2008 Summer Olympics, held in Beijing, saw American swimmer Michael Phelps bring the sport back into the national spotlight. Meanwhile, here on campus, senior leaders Sean Gildea and Andrew Snyder led the cross country team as they traveled to Oregan for the Nike National Team Invitationals. Equally captivating was the CIF championship run for boys basketball which ended with a 52-57 loss to Loyola in the Westlake High School Gymnasium. In May, NPHS closed down temporarily due to swine flu. Tennis doubles partners Marcos Giron and Denis Lin won their second consecutive CIF Title.


2

the lancer june 3, 2009

newswire

State cancels coveted school award

Following the application process and approval as a distinguished school, TOHS, NPHS, Colina, Los Cerritos, and Redwood Middle School were disqualified as Distinguished schools for 2009. Only a school that is invited to apply may do so for distinguished school status. During the application process, the testing scores of specific subgroups are analyzed. The state neglected to take these scores into account and consequently allowed the schools to apply for an honor that they would later be denied.

Losing this award does not, however, affect the award for Exemplary Technical Education in recognition of the newly adapted EThOS program. “Although [the awards] are certainly appreciated,” Superintendent Mario Contini said. “They are not the primary measure of the amazing success of our schools.” In spite of the loss, the schools retain the fact that they have, in the past, been recognized with Distinguished School and National Blue Ribbon awards. -Dakota Jones

■ See TOHS Robbed, pg. 3

VENTURA COUNTY STAR AWARDS 2009

EMILY ARNDT Second Place Graphics Second Place Features KATIE BUTLER Third Place News Writing ARLAN CASHIER Third Place Series Third Place Review

TREVOR CROWN First Place Series Third Place Series Second Place Opinion Third Place Review DAKOTA JONES First Place Series

JACOB MARKUS Third Place Graphics

SEAN MCMINN Second Place Column Third Place Graphics

REBECCA SYLVERS First Place Review First Place News Photo Second Place Sports

GISELLE QUEZADA Second Place Graphics Second Place Features LOUISA LENANDER Third Place Series

Lancer Newspaper

Second Place General Excellence

Editors-in-Chief: Matt Bradbury and Jean Kim

Students explore animal anatomy AP Biology students started their pig dissection labs the week after AP testing. “In this lab students will dissect a pig to see and identify all of the body’s systems that they have been learning about all year,” Dana Grooms, the AP Biology teacher, said. The lab was a way for students to learn about body systems. “This lab was not only a great way to review on what they learned but it is also a great experience to see these systems and to have a hands on [experience] about the inside of the animal as well as the systems similar in the human body,” Grooms said. Junior Natalie Kennedy appreciated the activity. “At first it’s a little gross but once you get into it you really get a feel for how a body works, you can see the parts in books, and you know they exist but its way

USED WITH PERMISSION OF CARLEN HANDLEY

THIS PIG WON’T FLY— The organs within a dissected fetal pig help students understand anatomy.

cooler in person because it makes up a living thing," Kennedy said. Anyone absent or not participating was required to write an essay and do a presentation on sociological biology developments in evolution theory and how they relate to the development of social theories. -Olivia Sundstrom

Working: KATIE BUTLER Staff Writer BY

Anyone who has ever had a job can relate to the spring play “Working.” The play opened on Wednesday, May 13 and closed on Saturday, May 23. Similar to the 2007 fall play “Spoon River Anthology,” this play consisted of monologues from a broad array of everyday jobs, ranging from housewives and ironworkers to prostitutes and valets. “This play is about working in a modern day America with tough times. I think that the reason behind Donia choosing this play was that it parallels with what’s going on in our America today,” senior Samantha Stimpson said. A challenge for the actors and actresses of “Working” was breaking the fourth wall, a theater term for characters talking directly to the audience, something not usually accepted in a play. “I loved the fact I got to break the fourth wall, I got to get up and talk directly to the audience,” sophomore Ryan Brodsky said. Between the monologues were upbeat dance numbers that enticed the audience’s interest with flashy outfits and eye catching choreography. One such dance involved several ensemble members wheeling shopping

NEWS

DRAMATIC DEPICTION OF WORKERS CAPTIVATES AUDIENCES

PHOTO BY KATIE BUTLER

LOVEN AL’ OF WORKING—Junior Ben Brooks (center) leads background dancers (left to right) junior Kate Pelota, sophomore Brooke Bowers, and senior Caitlyn Arndt to a jazzy tune from “Working.”

carts to the stage while dancers inside waved their legs around before jumping out of the carts. A more unusual challenge was the managing of a cast over 40 people strong from freshmen to seniors. “With a large cast there is definitely a lot more just standing around and waiting for your turn…but since there are a lot of people, you can get

more feedback and suggestions from your fellow cast members about how you’re doing,” Stimpson said. Along with students who have acted in Donia’s plays before ‘Working,” several underclassmen found positions in the play as well. “We’ll have the underclassmen in place to develop [the graduating class’s] acting skills as the plays go

on,” junior Laura Zazueta said. After the final curtain fell, students were pleased with their successful results. “The casting was awesome, the choreography was epic, and all the dancers executed it perfectly,” Brodsky said. “The whole cast really pulled it together and I was happy to be a part of this awesome show.”

Community honors teachers KATIE BUTLER Staff Writer BY

The Teacher of the Month award goes to a teacher who dontates their time and energy to his/her classes and who inspires students. Usually, from month to month the award goes to teachers from different schools. This spring, however, two teachers from TOHS achieved the honor. The April winner was band director Marty Martone and the May winner was ceramics teacher Jerry Sawitz. Martone was surprised to receive Teacher of the Month. “I’ve worked on three different campuses but here there is a great atmosphere and I’m humbled to be recognized by the staff,” Martone said.

Reagan Library Scholarship Winners

Martone believes it is not his teaching alone that inspires the band to win competitions, but his philosophy on how to handle the outcome of a competition as well. “I teach the band to be a humble winner and a gracious loser,” Martone said. Martone’s students feel his award is well deserved. “Everyone has their own personal story to show when he was supportive of the band and he cares about every single person in band,” junior Brandon Dickson said. Sawitz expressed surprise at receiving the award. “I teach an elective and [the award] is usually given to an academic subject teacher,” Sawitz said.

Stephen Marsh

Kyle Priske

JERRY SAWITZ

MARTY MARTONE

“The staff was even better than I thought and the school presented a lot of opportunities. If you want to be connected to the school, there’s something for you whether it’s yearbook or journalism or something else and it’s just a great school to be a part of,” Sawitz said. Sawitz’s favorite moment of teaching comes from the emails his students send after they’ve graduated.

Nadia Safaeinili

“It’s the greatest reward getting emails from students who went here 20, 25 years ago and see what they’re doing and where their lives went,” Sawitz said. Students appreciate the time and effort Sawitz puts in his ceramics class everyday. “He is always hands on with everyone and he’s always running around because everyone needs help and he’ll keep doing that until we develop our skills,” senior Kristina Sherman said. The two have both demonstrated their commitment to the tradition of excellence that teachers at TOHS have continued for many years. It is a high honor and a welcome one for the two teachers.

Michael Valentino

The seniors who received the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library Scholarship were awarded grants of up to $2,000 in tuition funds for colleges. Each recognized senior maintained an average 3.0 GPA and demonstrated outstanding excellence in extracurricular activities.

What’s Black & White & Read All Over? The Lancer School Newspaper

Buy a subscription for the 2009-2010 school year. Get all 10 issues for only $30. Please complete the form below and return to the Activities Office or to journalism, I-4. Thousand Oaks High School, 2323 N. Moorpark Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 Name:

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EDITORIAL/OPINION

TOHS robbed of ‘distinguished’ title

the lancer june 3, 2009

STAFF EDITORIAL

While the Lancer editorial section has been known to criticize and scrutinize various aspects of Thousand Oaks High School, we acknowledge the fact that the school is truly a great establishment, and a quality provider of education. For that reason, we were shocked and outraged to recently discover that the California Department of Education (CDE) has rescinded the school’s status as a California Distinguished School. According to an e-mail from the District Superintendent, Mario Contini’s office, both TOHS and NPHS were disqualified by the state, due to an inability to meet “one or two of their subgroup targets” for standardized test results. The superintendent’s office called this decision by the CDE

Dear Editor, I am a junior and I have attended every rally held since my freshman year. I used to look forward to the festivities and I thoroughly enjoyed going. However, since my first year the rallies’ entertainment value has decreased exponentially, and so has my school spirit. The general atmosphere of a rally is distracted and apathetic. However, everyone comes to attention when presented with the opportunity to cheer for his or her class. The administration urges us to have “school spirit”, and in the past, the class that showed the most spirit got their flag hung in the quad. But that honor is no longer awarded to enthusiastic classes. Even without the prize of school wide recognition, classes still showed spirit by chanting and cheering for their class. This has never been frowned upon, but I suppose that after the SWIT rally, the administration is more inclined to tyrannically regulate personal conduct at the rallies. So ASB ad-

“disheartening and inexcusable.” We couldn’t agree more. This announcement is a huge disappointment, supported by very weak reasoning. Many take for granted the distinguished status, but it should be noted that the title of Distinguished School is more appealing on college applications, and could help to attract students who are new to the area. In addition, it is also fact that this school’s faculty and students well deserve recognition for their hard work and excellence. Every individual effort that has gone into making the school what it is today is owed at least a mere title as reward. After a school is named a “candidate” for the designation of Distinguished School, test scores should not affect its chances be-

visors decided that because of what they deemed as “excessive” cheering, we could not see the end of year slide show. Now, I don’t know who it was, but someone must have put a lot of effort into putting the presentation together, and no one got to see it because of an administrator’s overreaction. And this wasn’t the first time either. The juniors and sophomores that danced in the SWIT rally can tell you that ASB advisors’ censorship crusade is not something that you want to get in the way of. Ultimately, the rallies’ advisors seem to prefer to squash the enthusiasm of the students, thereby rendering the rallies pointless, considering that the intent of a rally is to increase spirit. At this point, people are going to rallies because they wait for fleeting moments of entertainment, including dance team and cheer, both of which can be seen at other school events. So really, there’s not much keeping people enticed. If the administration wants people to be spirited, there needs to be less overreaction and less punishment. No one is going to get pumped up at a boring rally, where they can just expect to be yelled at or scolded. So, as I look to my senior year, it will most likely be a year where I do not attend rallies. Sincerely, Benjamin Brooks

Prejean soils California crown LOUISA LENANDER Staff Writer BY

Miss California, Carrie Prejean, gained national fame because of her answer to a question posed by celebrity judge Perez Hilton. When asked about her views on gay marriage, Prejean stated she supported “opposite marriage.” She signed on with the “traditional” group National Organization for Marriage (NOM) to star in a million-dollar campaign against gay marriage. Prejean ditched required public appearances with Miss California and instead spoke publicly at churches, radio stations, and rallies of her support of NOM. According to the Los Angeles Times, Miss California Officials ruled a few weeks ago that Prejean was in breach of contract because she “entered the contest under false pretenses.” Around the time Donald Trump was scheduled to decide if she would keep her crown, semi-nude pictures of Prejean surfaced online. In a swift display of good PR, Prejean turned the tables and spoke at a press conference, crying to the public about the persecution she had endured. She claimed she had been punished for exercising her right to free speech that her grandfather fought in WWII. She blamed a shady photographer and a windy day for the release of her topless photos. When asked why she hadn’t simply mentioned the photo shoot to the Miss California organization, Prejean faulted the 12-page contract she signed, and asked an audience member if she remembered what she did at age 16. Prejean did not accept any blame for lying to officials. Despite this blatant violation of her contract, Donald Trump allowed her to continue her reign as Miss California, and applauded

cause they are already considered as part of the qualifications for a school’s candidacy. This demonstration of a lack of courtesy and fairness by the CDE should spark embarrassment within its own infrastructure, and bring about change in the validation process of naming California Distinguished Schools. Those who provide education to children in our communities are of the utmost importance to

theLancer

EDITORS

Editors-in-Chief Ben Longawa Sean McMinn Chief of Staff Ben Moon News Maya Fried Dakota Jones

Opinion Trevor Crown Giselle Quezada Features Jacob Markus Julia Model Center Erin Barber Matt Young

Entertainment Emily Arndt Rebecca Sylvers

Sports Brian Kim Michael Kunisaki

Advertising/Finance Louisa Lenander Elyse Nuttall

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY TREVOR CROWN AND GISELLE QUEZADA

Dear Lancers,

In recent days, ASB and Administration has come under fire because of issues at the SWIT and Finale Rallies. We would like to address the facts regarding each of the rallies and set the record straight. The facts are these: Before students can participate in the SWIT rally their skit needed to be approved by a class advisor or ASB advisor. The skits that were approved and the skits performed by the Sophomore and Junior classes were not the same as what was approved. On the day of the rally, the classes are given another chance to run through their skits in front of the ASB advisors, but the skits that were run through were again not the skits that were performed at the rally. The skits performed at the rally had sexual connotations and were entirely inappropriate for the school environment, thus the skits were stopped but the rally continued on. Whether or not students feel the skit was OK in no way justifies the fact that they were not honest and withheld the truth about the skit they were planning on performing. We are a public school and Must adhere to rules and regulations for EVERY student on this campus not just the 20 kids in the skit who thought it was OK to use sexual connota-

Prop 8 cries ignored by California Supreme Court BY KELLY CURTIS AND

REBECCA

SYLVERS Senior Editor and Entertainment Editor

her courage and beauty. Following his decision, a peeved official from the Miss California organization resigned a few days later. Now, this is not about Prejean’s alienating remarks towards countless individuals. This is not about her self-victimizing attitude. This is about decisions lacking both forethought and subsequent consequence. Of course, the responsibility is shared between Prejean and Trump, the man who allowed her to slip by. However, for Miss Nevada, Katie Rees, this was a different story. In December 2006, Rees was stripped of her crown when topless photos of her were released to the media. The photos, like those of Prejean, were explicit and inappropriate, but these actually cost Rees her title, unlike the new Miss California. Call it luck, or her guardian angel Mr. Trump, Prejean remains Miss California, despite her past.

the future, and thus, their labor ought to elicit a higher recognition than a snubbing by the state of California. Despite this complicated blunder by the state, our school will remain proud. In the the words of District Superintendent Mario Contini to the faculty, “It is all of you who have made your school distinguished, and no recall of an award will ever change that.”

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The California State Supreme Court issued a ruling last Tuesday, May 26, that upheld Proposition 8, eliminating the right of same-sex couples to marry. The 18,000 couples that wed during the short period of legality, however, are allowed to stay married. Proposition 8 takes away the rights of a distinct minority group, legitimizing the prejudiced views of the majority. While we are not surprised by this outcome, we are nevertheless ashamed to be citizens of a state that has failed to follow the suit of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Vermont, Maine, and Iowa have all succeeded in promoting acceptance through providing equal for all people. The ruling is fundamentally corrupt because, while the specific right to marry is not outlined in the constitution, this amendment divides the California population, treating one group as superior to the other. This goes against the very fabric of our country. Isn’t America supposed to be about equal rights and equal opportunities? Whatever happened to American exceptionalism? If America is supposed to be setting the bar for the rest of the world to meet, we are setting it far too low. While we believe that the court made

tions in their skit. Instead of blaming ASB or Administration for ruining the SWIT rally why not address the real problem: students performing skits which had inappropriate content and not previously approved. It was the students’ decision to add the inappropriate content which ultimately led to their skits being stopped.

At the end of the Finale Rally we lost the sound system, because of electrical problems in the gym. The Sophomore, Junior, and Senior classes started cheering which was acceptable, but then they started to jump on the bleachers which is not acceptable. The stability of the bleachers is in question when people are standing/jumping on them (this is why since the beginning of the year, students are only allowed to sit on the bleachers). The jumping on the bleachers is extremely dangerous and creates a situation that is potentially hazardous to everyone in the gym. Since we had no way to get the students to listen to directions the rally was stopped and students were asked to leave. Remember, student safety is always our first responsibility! Sincerely, Coreen Pefley, Dean of Students Toni Young, ASB Advisor Danielle Oliver, ASB Advisor the correct decision in maintaining the legality of marriages before the proposition was passed, it is hypocritical to allow couples married prior to Proposition 8’s upholding to remain so, while taking that right away from gay people who are not yet married. The ruling establishes a double standard in the GLBT community in addition to the more obvious division it creates between homosexuals and the heterosexuals. Proposition 8 promotes prejudice and segregation, which the Supreme Court should have realized. The fact that the court ruled in favor of such a discriminatory amendment will go down as yet another blemish on our country’s faulty record of handling civil rights issues. We are nothing short of disappointed and appalled in regards to the shortcomings of our judicial system. The court is in place to protect the rights of the minorities in order to prevent creating a government that is controlled only by the wishes of the majority, leaving the opinions of others by the wayside. The root of the problem lies in the proposition itself. Religious groups and other members of the heterosexual majority voted on this amendment due to their own personal prejudices and opinions rather than addressing the issue for what it was—a matter of limiting the rights of fellow citizens. It is disgraceful that our Supreme Court, the alleged defender of our rights, failed to recognize this, and therefore failed to perform its duty.

Copy Adam Buchsbaum Caitlin Wire Website Radu Puchiu

Illustrators Alicia Ireland Shayna Wiley Photographers

Matt Stevenson Sarah Knobel

Senior Editors Matt Bradbury Kelly Curtis Neda Iradjpanah Alicia Ireland Alex Johnson Jean Kim John Kim Matt Stevenson

STAFF

Writers Rafael Ancheta Emma Bellucci Katie Butler Arlan Cashier Neil Forsythe Edwin Kim Alysse King Samir Malhotra Ben Reich Rachel Riedel Olivia Sundstrom Nikole Swift Jacob Wissusik

ADVISER

J. Zimmerman

Thousand Oaks High School 2323 N. Moorpark Rd.

Thousand Oaks, California 91360

(805) 778-0947

Fax: (805) 374-1165

thelancer.tohs@gmail.com The Lancer is the official school publication of Thousand Oaks High School, created and produced by students in Advanced Journalism. The Lancer is a member of the Journalism Education Association (JEA), National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA) and Columbia Student Press Association (CSPA). Awards include eight NSPA Best of show awards, a 5th place national ranking, eight NSPA All-American awards, and CSPA Silver crowns. The Lancer is published every three weeks. Call (805) 778-0947 to leave a message regarding advertising rates and information. The Lancer reserves the right to refuse advertising we deem inappropriate for high school publication. Guest editorials and “Letters to the Editor” are welcome, but must be signed and are subject to editing for length, libel, obscenity and grammar.


4

FEATURES

the lancer june 3, 2009

Every Lancer Has a Story: Nolan Fulton

BY ARLAN

CASHIER Staff Writer

In the summer of 2008, following his sophomore year, junior Nolan Fulton stood at 5’10” and weighed 135 pounds. He was moderately athletic, running cross-country and playing pick-up football on the weekends, but tired of physical mediocrity and getting ridiculed for being slow and weak. It was during that summer that he made the decision to start lifting weights. “I started seriously lifting about 8 months ago,” Fulton said. “I did it because I was tired of being small and I wanted more attention and to be stronger than other people.” As he began to learn more about lifting, Fulton’s quest for physical superiority led him to bodybuilding. Unlike powerlifting, body-building centers on stimulating muscles and adding muscle mass rather than lifting as much weight as is physically possible.

“At the end of the day I’d rather be huge than to just be able to lift a lot of weight,” said Fulton. “It’s about stimulating the muscle, not lifting as much as possible with bad form.” Like many aspiring young lifters, Fulton made the mistake of not properly educating himself before he began lifting. “At the very beginning,”he said, “I didn’t know the right way to train so I would basically spend three to four hours in the gym every day thinking I was getting jacked.” Fulton soon realized he was overtraining and wasting time at the gym. He took tips from professional natural bodybuilder Layne Norton, whose internet videos are a critical source of information for many bodybuilders. “Once I started training the right way, I started getting results and started to make my way from 135 pounds to my current weight of 170.” Despite adding 35 pounds of muscle in less than a year, Fulton remains unsatisfied and realizes he has a long way to go. One of the most difficult aspects of Fulton’s transformation was the 180 degree shift in his daily life. “It’s a 24/7 ordeal. I have to devote all of my time to making sure I’m getting the right nutrition, supplements, and sleep to compliment my training.” Fulton’s workout routine focuses on

adding muscle and keeping his body healthy. He lifts every three days followed by one day off. The first day of the rotation is spent working the chest and triceps, while the second and third days exercise the legs, back, bicep, and shoulders. On his day off, Fulton does High Intensity Interval Cardio exercises to keep sharp away from the gym. “I try to set up a program that can allow me to target my weak points and improve them.” Weight lifting is a serious activity, and Fulton encourages anyone entering into the arena of competitive lifting or bodybuilding to research extensively beforehand to maintain a healthy lifestyle. “My advice to people who want to get into lifting or bodybuilding is to educate yourself. Do some research on the proper ways to train, eat, sleep and everything before you step into the gym.”

Junior Nolan Fulton decided that he wanted to increase his muscle mass through consistent exercise. He began weight training and has learned a lot about body-building techniques in the process.

At the end of the day I’d rather be huge than to just be able to lift a lot of weight. It’s about stimulating the muscle, not lifting as much as possible with bad form.

- Junior Nolan Fulton

Blasting into the decades through historical music

Juniors in AP U.S. History joined with U.S. History CP on the final project of the year. Each group chose a decade and worked together to perform a skit as well as a dance to display the culture and customs of that decade. BY KATIE

BUTLER Staff Writer

After the stress of studying for the U.S. history AP test, Robert Haar’s junior class soaked in the revelation that there would be no more late nights or weekly essays to practice writing. Down the hallway in Krister Swanson’s CP U.S. History class, students were winding down the year, getting ready for final papers and studying for the final test. Neither class knew that soon they would be collaborating for a creative end of year project involving dance and song. The two classes merged for a project where both AP and CP students picked a decade

from the 50s to the 90s and performed a dance and skit that went along with the culture of that decade. “This is something we always did when we had Mrs. Beaudoin here and this is the first year we’re doing it with Haar. It’s a great way to wrap up a year of history,” Swanson said. In the past, Haar’s class has prepared oral and video presentations on important historical people and events. Haar feels that both final projects are beneficial to wrap up his class this year. “Both are good at giving us an avenue of creativity and we get more personality out of these assignments that gives you a new look at the person performing their project, even at the end of the year,” Haar said. Group members Katrina Futilrich, Meagan Forrest, Kayla Barkley, Madeline Fryzek, Daniel Kim, Daniel Adelpour, and Dakota Jones chose the 50’s bubblegum rock for their project after Barkley suggested the idea to the group. “I’ve seen Grease a lot of times and I thought it would be fun and easy to write as a script,” Barkley said. Some of the songs included in the skit are well known such as “Earth Angel,” “Rock

Around the Clock,” and “Twist and Shout.” Along with the dancing and singing, the group had to interview people who were teenagers during the particular time period and present the social issues of the era within the script. “I play a greaser who falls in love with a girl and tries to impress her by winning a car race and I also end up getting into a fight,” Adelpour said. Rehearsals happened regularly to practice the skits for perfection. “We practiced every class day, and every day after school,” Fryzak said. The final performances were June 1 and 2. The group felt the project was a good way to wrap up the year. “As far as final projects go, it’s a good idea,” Barkley said. Haar is not sure if the decades project will replace his former one but is pleased with the success of both. “Whether it happens next year or not depends on scheduling and if it fits in with Swanson’s schedule or not,” Haar said. As the PAC curtains closed on the 90’s decade, both classes went back to separate classrooms with a shared commonality of sharing in the culture of the past through song and dance.

TRAINING PAYS OFF— Over the past year, Fulton has devoted his time and energy to strengthening his muscles and improving his body mass index.

PHOTO COURTESY OF NOLAN FULTON

PHOTOS BY KATIE BUTLER

THROUGH THE DECADES— Swanson and Haar’s group project required groups to dance and perform skits that captured the music, culture and society of their given period of time.


The Breakfast Club 2009 Valedictorians


6

Life after TOHS S E N I O R D E S T I N AT I O N M A P 2 0 0 9

the lancer june 3,2009

1. ACADEMY OF ART UNIVERSITY

2. AZUSA PACIFIC UNIVERSITY Collin Nakos

3. BAKERSFIELD COLLEGE

Camden Butler

Caitlyn Benzie

4. BIOLA UNIVERSITY Spencer Posey

5. CALIFORNIA LUTHERAN UNIVERSITY Diana Fielding Aschli Hicks Kathryn Jones Danny Kuntz

Maria Melendez Katie Musselman Antonella Puglisi Colin Reed

California State University

6. CAL POLY SAN LUIS OBISPO Kathy Choi Matt Downey Cameron Kanney Hilary Koenig Rachel LaBonte Mary Madden 7. CAL POLY POMONA Matt Tallman 8. CHANNEL ISLANDS John Burdick Ryan Newkirk Brian Karpf Neil Johnson 9. CHICO Avery Kennedy 10. FRESNO Eric Lawson 11. LONG BEACH Jason Mamakos 12. MONTEREY BAY Torey Best Kristie Kilgore Susie Ruth 13. NORTHRIDGE Lyndsi Alvarez Corey Campbell Amy Chavez Brian Crandall Eduardo Gonzalez Julianne Hoehn Kevin Kiani Alex Kish 14. SACRAMENTO Scott Billington 15. SAN BERNARDINO John Koman 16. SAN DIEGO Alden Blair Jordan Jones Tyler Marbach 17. SAN FRANCISCO Ethan Clifford Alexandra Garcia Michelle Greenberg Kayla Harris Kelly Jensen 18. SAN JOSE Ashleigh Jamal Kelsey Life 19. SAN MARCOS Erin Dunn Heston Maddie Evensen Lindsay Friedman Milana Giacalone 20. SONOMA Mitchell Dennen Talyah Iannolo Kody Kasper

21. CHAPMAN UNIVERSITY Adam Slomiak

Robert Mclaughlin Sami McSweeney Maria Palomino Kyler Sauer Kyle Shipman Spencer Woodworth Samantha Kramer Andrea Delgadillo Doug DeGroff Zachary Walker Emily Rossignol

Erin Schiller Christina Sherman Crosby Weiner Shane Langhans Li Lin Geoff Miller Holly Newton Amy Ogle Evan Wood Miriam Yong Kaitlyn Vivero Matt McQuade Tyler Rauch Brynn Vigneux

Alex Kim Mitch Larsen Kaitlyn Nagel Patrick Shramm

Joseph Navarro Kate Treen Brittney Luther Kelly Purcell Erin Heston Megan Kauffman Kaitlin Marriott Kari Slattum

22. CLAREMONT MCKENNA COLLEGE

Alex Johnson

23. COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS Conor Bush

24. COLLEGE OF THE DESERT Zach Zimmerman

25. CUESTA COLLEGE Dylan Avnet Brandon Chiapuzio Elliott Davies

7

A guide to class of ‘09 destinations

IN STATE Annelise Walsh

the lancer june 3, 2009

Lauren Hannick Brian Sidenberg

26. GLENDALE COMMUNITY COLLEGE Amber Sheehan

27. ITT TECH

Sam Moody

28. LOYOLA MARYMOUNT UNIVERSITY

Samantha Chasse Kurt von Klosst-Dohna

Marissa Morrison

Truman Kain

Amy Holguin-Howell

Daniel Aasa Moises Aasa Sarah Abrahams Brizzett Aguilar Justin Alamar Kathryn Alimohammadi Erin Allred Amber Anderson Taylor Andrews Omar Arambula Alberto Avalos Jason Averill Christopher Avina Baxter Bailey Alberto Barajas Jennifer Barboza Cassandra Barry Daniel Belding Ashley Benton

Began Berlinger Alexis Beyer David Bishop Emily Bolcik Gracie Borja Ashley Bowser Sheila Boyle Christian Bragado Jessica Brooks Kevin Brown Allyson Bryant Cassandra Buckley Nick Caprarelli Chase Carlson Cindy Casanova Raymon Chapman Matthew Canchola Casey Conkling Sean Cook

29. MAMMOTH COMMUNITY COLLEGE

30. MOORPARK COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Meagan Culhane Evan Craft Edwin Cruz Tony De Franco Gerardo Delgado Bradley Dempsey Curtis Dempster Wayne Dewing Lillianna Diaz Sergio Diaz Jeff Dickson Cameron Dibble Julia Dixon Mellissa Douglas Stefani Dziuba Alexa Ellen Erin Engel Mayra Espinoza Roya Fatahi Crystal Fernandez Michael Fernandez Jorge Fernandez Samantha Ferry Kristen Flores Sidney Flores Sean Fowler Ryan Franklin Katie Freeman Anais Fuentes Brittany Garcia Dylan Gassert Angelia Gaxiola Mariam Ghani Brandon Giragosian Andrew Goldberg Stephanie Goldstein Lauren Gordon Nicole Greene Brenden Gross Levia Hamlet Travis Hankins Brandon Hay Amanda Henson Sean Henson Johnny Herrera Chad Hildebrand Dusty Holmes Stefan Hyland Molly Hunt Duwan Irons Christian Johns-Manz Shelby Johnston Loren Johnstun Ethan Jones Jackson Judge Alison Kale Parveen Kaur Tyler Karp Jennifer King Haley Kirby Chelsey Kirksey James Klein William Knowls Andrew Kokiousis Nanice Kollee Nick Kurtz Karina Lachina Nicholas Lambert Erin Leiterman Crystal Lepley Emily Linderman Katelynn Llanos Bronson Lobato Shara Longbotham Wendy Lopez Yesenia Lucio Mina Maccabee Justin March Matthew Markum Vanessa Martineze Kathryn McBride Rachel McDonald Megan McFarland Eddy McGilvra Wes McLaren Samantha Mendlen Sherry Molino Jonathan Morales

Brian Morris Derek Munson Ana Muro Evan Murray Amanda Mytych Jessica Neuner Clary Newell Jaya Nicely Michelle Nissen Telemachus Orfanos Shane Olivas Samuel Overton Sari Pagliarulo Fatima Pantoja Kimberly Panzica Austin Parr Nathan Pederson Nakomi Pedrazo Patricia Pena Jonathan Perez Ryan Person Justin Phommasaysy Thomas Pizano Michael Polzien Adderly Porras Miles Premo Nicole Price Natalie Prike Zachary Pritchard Katie Ragusin Karina Ramirez Samantha Reid Vanessa Riedell Tracy Rinebold Nicholas Rodriguez Jacob Ross Danielle Rosebrugh Jill Rosenberg Alexander Rubin Jonathan Ruelas Oliver Ruelas Andrea Russell Joshua Sales Nikki Sandlin Heidi Safian Adena Scharf Cameron Schaver Eric Scoggan Kathryn Scott Michael Shank Walker Shaw Amanda Scheivert Rosemarie Sherbetjian Ian Shultis Deven Simmons Shaun Snider Amanda Snyder Hannah Snyder Jessica Somarriba Alexis Souza Lauren Steiner Brenden Stevens Justin Stevens Samantha Stimson Kevin Stolt Delanie Tanghal Noah Taylor Nathan Terrazas Ryan Thompson Jessica Tiberio Michael Tkalec Andrew Trautman Elena Tucker Tyler Tunney Jordon Turner Chris Vannelli Jorge Vasquez Tia Watkins Brittany White Ryan Whitehead Shayna Wiley Tyler Williams Trevor Wolchover Ryan Woren Jose Zarate Cynthia Zepeda

31. OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE Evan Hillman

32. OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN Ariella Seltzer

33. OXNARD COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Elke Brachtl Chris Carter Jason Gentry

34. PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY

Tanya McGinley Ty Odle Sarah Palomino

Katie Donahoe

35. PIERCE COLLEGE

Kelsey Van Uden

Marla Vasquez-Rebodello

Andrea Mutter Whitney Riles Amber Rule

Stephanie Saccardi Nick Snyder Tori Tejera

Samira Fathi

Octavio Villa

36. SANTA BARBARA COMMUNITY COLLEGE 37. SANTA MONICA CITY COLLEGE

38. SANTA ROSA JUNIOR COLLEGE Hannah Fulcher

39. SKYLINE COMMUNITY COLLEGE Yvette Garcia

40. STANFORD UNIVERSITY

Marissa Buell

Denis Lin

University of California 41. BERKELEY Kelly Curtis Malorie Frayssinet

Mitchell Korey Nadia Safaeinili

BY THE NUMBERS...

46.6%

76

Junior Colleges

92

9

20 1 49

18

41

39

45

88

3

77

85

84

57 95 93 71

61 58

66

17.2%

California State University

2.1% Military

0.6%

75

Vocational

68

87

70 56 86 78

82

62 55

1.9% Military

72

81% In State

12.9%

89

Out of State

0.2%

80

69

International

0.6% Work Force

48 36

8

23

53

29

15

43

16

Donald Morrow III Hussai Nuristani Andrew Snyder Michael Vigliarolo Bob Lamm Kyle Priske Kevin Sciarillo

Brent White Mailei Hasan Ben Kang William Lees Stefan Schneider Andy Teague Daniel Watson Daniel Zamora Shirley Zhang Nathan Kwong Bryan Lucarini Megan Meyer Susmita Sahu Adam Slomiak Gavin Smith Josie Tressel John Kim

*NOTE*: SIZES NOT TO PROPORTION

44 35

30 5 27 31 32 13 33 28 11 4 26 2 54 7 21 101 100 22 34

37

51. UNIVERSITY OF SAN DIEGO

90

74

10

6 25

47. SAN DIEGO Amanda Albi Matt Bradbury Christian Castillo Katie Chuh Zack Graham 48. SANTA BARBARA Hunter Buchanan Frank Chang Ariela Cher Tanja Dannas Sierra Griffin Russell Jackson Ashley King Chad Kingi 49. SANTA CRUZ Brendan Berenger Donya Hofnor 50. UNIVERSITY OF REDLANDS Samantha Rivera

63

73

52

42. DAVIS Allie Lopez 43. IRVINE Natasha Ashe Neda Iradjpanah Kyle Johnson Christine Mathewson 44. LOS ANGELES Michael Beck Ryan Farjadi Nicole Hjerling

64

14

42

12

Taylor DeMirjian

65

60

40

45. MERCED Ben Comfort 46. RIVERSIDE David Chen Patricia Cheng Angela Forster Conor Gibbons

83

59

17

University of California

91

81 94 79 38

11.8%

67

51

47

24

96

50

46

19

52. UNIVERSITY OF SAN FRANCISCO

64. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES

81. REED COLLEGE

Patrick Frawley

Michael Hsu

Rachel Gardner

Sean Foley

Rachel Brooks Josh Coaly Alyson Forster Nicholas Joelson Rachel Lambert Camerina Lopez Katie McCarley

Zachary Neyman Alex Noad Sara Olson Marissa Poling Kyle Reynolds Macy Sarria Nastasha Watley

Carlen Handley

53. UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 54. VENTURA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

OUT OF STATE

55. AMERICA INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE Jacqueline Claunch

56. ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY Desirae Raceanu Jordan Frakes

57. BARD COLLEGE

Lauren Seybold

Linnea Marik

58. BERKLEE COLLEGE OF MUSIC Kelsey Worley

59. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY-IDAHO Becca Berg Mackenzie Maynard Samantha Price

Ariel Scheu Trevor Wooley

60. BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY-PROVO Jonathan Ashton Davis

61. BOSTON UNIVERSITY Alicia Ireland

62. COLGATE UNIVERSITY Shannon Pearson

Clay Venetis

63. COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY Benjamin Blackwell

Sean Gildea

65. DEPAUL UNIVERSITY

Lisi Bender-Brown

INTERNATIONAL

82. STATE UNIVERSITY NEW YORK, NEW PALTZ

96. UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (Canada)

Julie Angel

Francie Batarse

Michael Valentino

Jackie Duran

Noelle Richards

Alex Spencer

MILITARY

83. SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY

66. DREXEL UNIVERSITY

67. GONZAGA UNIVERSITY

84. TARRANT COLLEGE

68. HIGH POINT UNIVERSITY

69. LOUISIANA STATE UNIVERSITY Alex Misthos

70. MESA COMMUNITY COLLEGE David Gates

Stephen Morgan

Peter Botz

Lex DaSilva

71. NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

72. NORTH CAROLINA STATE A&T UNIVERSITY Alexis Trent

73. NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY Nick Magnusson Annalise O’Toole

Dana Verbalaitis

74. NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY Ryan Smith

75.OTTERBEIN UNIVERSITY Pascal Domicone

76. OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY Tyler Smith

77. PHILADELPHIA UNIVERSITY Danielle Carney

78. PIMA COMMUNITY COLLEGE

Nolan Kovach

79. PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY Ben Burditt Wictorex Ngo

80. PRINCIPIA COLLEGE Owen Loose

Dereck Jester

85. TEXAS CHRISTIAN UNIVERSITY 86. UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA Antonio Lopez Ellen Querrey

87. UNIVERSITY OF ARKANSAS

Eric Rosenthal

Steven Fuertes

88. UNIVERSITY OF HAWAII John Lister Michael Taxter

Paige Mitchell

89. UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, ATHENS Kathleen Luft

90. UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME

Angie Chang

91. UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT Asher Lober

92. UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON Kyle McMorrow

Ryan Schroeder

93. WEST POINT MILITARY ACADEMY Josh Bounds

94. WILLIAMETTE UNIVERSITY Thomas Ritch

95. YALE UNIVERSITY Jackie Manzer Stephen Marsh

Jenna Ritz

Carrie Chau

97. U.S. Army

Jose Fernandez Shane Krantz-Condon

98. US Marine Corp

Eder Rangel

Ulyses Ramos Fernando Vasquez

99. US Navy Tyler Bass Adam Frost

Daniel Martin Matt Stevenson

VOCATIONAL

100. Simi Valley Cosmotology Meagan Breck

Kristen Ciari

101. West Valley Occupational School Meghan Kearney

WORK FORCE

Beth Cohen Victoria Hosford

Josefa Mouneu

Compiled by: MATT BRADBURY, ALICIA IRELAND, JEAN KIM AND MATT STEVENSON


8

TEACHER TRIBUTES

Teacher Tributes

the lancer june 3, 2009

d d an e l l e pu itive, ll in v a e e h ou ing pos as we y lif ard tim y , m e h ged very h g not vitc everyth ul of m . You u a n o a R y h . . f r n ank d Mrs plified respect teache nces in ne c uring a sideri raight h o t t , e n o xem c, and Mar ally. D as con me st T and zing st influ now t phy nce a ast e . r a r u i m t e M atic hen I w he se the SA ed. I rtist ng an a greate ght me ys s. M r pati the p a r m a , t M r dr fe, w ou ove have ge e ke radua bei of the ve tau I alwa ld y e a b s l t l r a i s o o l t g c ou fo nes . You d to n e o u ha n y I o g w l e e a my n e r i u n d m m r n s e Y o on I d o n a r o i t I t i . y n d s s a a t f . e i o r k e t e f e c a o t att onvinc llege y li tter pe of wha big de ock n he g my life one, ur y t me n cer, bu k up m t o a f o c a be think every Rav! R gh r dan . I loo you He tend c now th n with . Mart e u b a t to t for mama y te rson miss n r t e o ou Mr m d v e h e n i to a happ o s e b e rste e i s l u a o l m p y K a m o i g F o y r o k x s tte and w you a phy. ecom . I love Ale yson am ed t . Than y life. e r l t b A a r k u r u iv n m ot ake o yo y. Tha ing M rlinge m mot im a l nging t e h a ! rl th roll dea every egan B owe ruly ch t -M for for g bein s r t a s o o o ye ery he m r I have s t w t s w t ool, i v t o e k d s a h n a h a c o O a s p n e Mr. R ear ted te housand ed the ve bee lass wa n t m and sch r h e g r T a v h i c u o kind- ntered at always ca ve, o lasses h e. Your ard to . I r ta nglish how t o e i L l . u e e a s Mr u art c erienc forw o much es enco chool. H hev nly in ght me ould ith hi uld d w C e p d o . S i k s x e o r y t o o u w e e li M in High s involv ay, he w lass not . He ta s that re. He the able one I lo ught m stic abi f a y c r d y w o s a i r j u e e i h a e ve so en and ve t my art re one o us n lif e choic my fut ader in y. s th ts. E by telling ays a i n y h e a t d ’ p w e bu e wis stu alw ay. You own in ape be a le riousl is odby mans,”al ts to . You his cam h o s s g r r k d a g y a y to sa m s se on Dav my ve two ye s on t all ext d hu s studen e was g a o n w u h n o t o i s g I i r t s H “Be raging h even ht me h take th n Ash feel the last teache our cla tter. her. To the e b u n a l d y o l a g m c il o h r a n u t t x e h m i e enc the wor . u a t v a c p c e d l g t g ares a an who obv o a n t n a n i n n s g h i o t i i a n o e h iou J e C V b e t out ou k s b and h ma influ rynn las r educ sly he m ll miss r every aymon t B c t o s w o i ation t will ap lives. -R fo I’ years the m p 3 T l y t h s a t a and Thanks o ou ep hard w nk you fo . r all yo r for th ther ork an r e h c ur M o year d orri ded tea t an I hav e caree had Mr. D r, and o this w even nia all 4 y a w Mr. D s a teach hen I w ears of m as y o e give nia is one r who ca a freshm high sch you c o r onstr of those ed a lot a an, I reali ol you t b z p u o e o e enter do your ctive crit ople tha ut his st d that icism best. t isn’ uden taini ts t n H mem a ories g, and mo e always nd alway afraid to . s enc made st of were most o m m f c there rom Mr. D ade in th y best hi lass fun urages o g at th a onia r h sch e the y nd do it i and t s not to b atre. Wha ool ears follo o be learn t I le e afr wi yo ar a e Than d from hi ng my gr ur own p id to just ned adua m wi ks Do e g r o out son t th m nia! e and ion, I will . I know in t use i t in m ake what I y fut ure. -Jess ica N eune r

Mrs. Bud ny Thank yo , u for three ye ars of moral, intellect ual, and spiritual guidanc e. Y are my m ou entor; now and forever. -Mike Fr ieda

e as a ever m ach of her ave Villa n a e r v o a ñ g Se g. I h y for e her and h y Havin n a blessin o genuinel l h from ill definite s e c e s u b e r m s a w ha so oc lass. I e best arned er wh teach s. I have le rd to her c s one of th e a a th nt stude looked forw eñora Villa serves all e S s d ose alway remember d; She a h en Lo r s e w y v O e a w e al hav orld. ers I teach e in the w ud gratit

you er, u h c tea s, yo d u a year er, an o y r w ap ide ast fe ewsp r s n p ou co it sn we or the of thi inds. Y ade othh m g F n m u e s . ou o ltho more ducti f our ine ha all th ank y te a , o s l o h pr on s. Z uch ll a e t d la cip Mr so m n the turati d dis s we rs. W ds an a n are e give e ma ove a niors e yea eeken ot be h l v t th e w l a da s dn r d a h de Ne on or us t ove ayout woul l i t o i is, Jean t m ond ile f ugh ng l per r Cu n, n unc thwh ave ta e duri the pa elly ohnso venso r K r h , o , e J u y e w you g h o r t x y t dbu Ale wS ers stayin ithou Bra land, atthe r W w o e . f e Ir dM hts tth nig sible. -Ma Alicia im an , s K po hn nah jpa m, Jo d a i Ir K

Mr. M agaña more has t a than just m ught me past etal t 2 hese me to years. He has t be mo aught not o re res nly in p o nsible schoo He ta l, but ught in m best not o e that doi life. ng my nl but e veryo y benefits me ne would like to around me , “Gani ” for m say thank too. I yo aking me be u tter. -Shan e Oliv as

your r o f u nk yo re a h t , a n arola glad you alk to. C . r M t m ort. I’ ho I could you for a p p u s d one w I only ha in your e m o s g r, gh thou oved bein e teache n e v l m E ter, I an aweso s e m e k. se You’r good wor acie Borja . s s a cl -Gr p the u p e ke

Mr. S herid an, y have ou alway s b ee there n f advic or me to e or l any h end can. e l W p to st henever I you ore a n eed proje some ct wher e or some talk one, to I go to know I can your cl You a re my assroom. teach favor er it alway , thank y e ou fo s b ei ng a r and a f r i en ment d or to me -Amy . Ogle

s. ic senio Your class ation Mr. r year m ade m fu learne d thin n and I stil y l g our w orld. G s about pe o o the lo p ttery. od luck win le in ning -Shan non Pe arson

s elfles s , g ri n st ca e does o m h ts he g is t school. S er studen u r o e y b i e h ng rs. Bl at the hig to teach h year, but rythi were M e v e r e n r e ch fo though w d ache g she ca rial for th t life and u e t m te so u ne h in Al veryt ssary ma ches abo scend all k you r. Wick. lass, I lear . You e n a e a n r Th M e nec ns she te erson tra g t me itional” c any othe s life h h t g u d n e ta lesso a better p s. Bleiber bby Kane k e “tra class tha hat teach e n h h a t t t no in g -Bo s. Th e Mr our er t m u v y h o o c h l n c t a i i e e h e e t b w c r v f u y a o r e teacher h n M r mo e o . a u k p n i s c o h y r t y to et can es y ank othe It is funn pact on a m i are th s that we portuniti them. Th n a h c su nt n e p can make or t amou h r s lesso r all the o ppreciat a o n i f e f s li u . a o student’s Llano k yo these known Mr y l n you f e. I truly n n o a n e v y h e a h l t r ut m m of time. I -Kate ol year, b o nt to ne for love fo h c given a s e n w o o r d t act Sawitz fo I jus have d tion an come a to de an imp a you! m e h u a ers, e c e o e r. lik

d i l ve b y it feels ll last fore . San g that our ded me to I am ab y i w s t r a h t e n M d ssons on my lif rs. Y ture e wa ythi pire itz, for le w a S . ever two yea has ins n the fu best th er r M ut i r h Thanks hrough o t e m h t i past you do pe that do thei and ot h I yw t e I will car r wha er. I ho dents to e for m ow muc her and h iams my life. teac vate stu ays don o idea h s a teac contact Tyler Will i a mot ave alw have n te you keep in e been h u v a you nts. Yo ppreci always You ha and you t e a . stud ct and hope to my life o years er forge e t I resp friend. ughou past tw will nev o e fe as a you thr on thes rever. I y Li e s l i o - Ke with nspirat to be f i e my ontinu c will ! you for this school out of the kindness

GRAPHIC BY NEDA IRADJPANAH

Mrs. Cooper does so much nts and of her heart. She really cares about all of her stude ssful succe a such is Crew Link fellow faculty members. nce. program because of her incessant hard work and dilige -Jordan Frakes


9

FAREWELL TO

the lancer june 3, 2009

FACULTY

“A TEACHER AFFECTS ETERNITY: HE CAN NEVER TELL WHERE HIS INFLUENCE STOPS” -HENRY B. ADAMS

Tim Carpenter PRINCIPAL

MATT YOUNG Center Editor BY

Alumni memories

Moving from Principal to Assistant Superintendent of Personnel at the district office, Principal Tim Carpenter waves goodbye to TOHS this year. Carpenter has worked 35 years in the district, initially working in the “Timber” District, which later unified into the Conjeo Valley Unified School District as we know it today. Carpenter left Redwood Middle School four years ago and started the new semester as principal at TOHS. The seniors of this year who also attended Redwood have had Carpenter as a principal for the past seven years, spanning their entire secondary to high school education. “[I’ll miss] what I call campus life,” Carpenter said. “Everything involved around a high school campus. Sports, clubs, performances. I don’t think there has been a most memorable [moment]. Four years of…just…it’s been great. All who work in clubs, band, everything.” While Carpenter has fond memories of his times at TOHS, he will have no trouble saying goodbye to one of his daily routines. “One thing I won’t miss is telling high school kids to put their trash in the trash can.” All in all, Carpenter has enjoyed his experience as the principal of TOHS. “It’s been a phenomenal high school. There’s a tremendous amount of lancer pride.”

“I don’t know of any other principals that would allow students to climb on top of the Lancer statue to take a picture for the newspaper. That event alone symbolizes the kind of man Mr. Carpenter is.” -Young Kim: Class of ‘08

“The thing I remember most about Mr. Caprenter was the time he had for a little sophomore news writer tasked with writing about the new principal. It was my first story as a journalist and he couldn’t have been more helpful.” -Stephen Reynders: Class of ‘08

“FOUR YEARS OF... JUST... IT ’S BEEN GREAT. ONE THING I WON’T MISS IS TELLING KIDS TO PUT THEIR TRASH IN THE TRASH CAN.”

T O R I S T O S U P P O RT T E A C H E R S .”

Ed Chevalier

MATT YOUNG Center Editor BY

“I FELL IN LOVE WITH THE IDEA OF HAVING SUMMERS OFF.

I AM

STILL IN LOVE WITH

NOW, ALL I WILL HAVE ARE SUMUndergrad degree: MERS, AN ENDLESS SUMB.s. of anThopologY MER OF SORTS.”

nator, Chaired the Digital High School Grant committee, Digital High School Coordinator, Co-chaired the WASC/Focus on Learning accreditation process, Coached football, wrestling, and softball,” he said. Life presented Barker with two chances to serve his country. While he was first employed in the 1970’s as a football coach and assistant trainer at California Lutheran University (then California Lutheran College), he also awaited for a day to come along on which he would be drafted to go to war in Vietnam. Lucky for him, his draft number was never called and he started off on a whirlwind career as a teacher. “One of the other CLC coaches Ron Barney, an assistant principal at TOHS at the time, asked if I would be interested in teaching Geography. I was hired in September of 1974,” Barker said. “Uncle Sam did not call my draft number, and I did not end up going to Vietnam.”

PSYCHOLOGY/FOOD TEACHER

THAT IDEA.

After teaching at TOHS for 33 years, English teacher Ed Chevalier will be retiring with the end of this school year. Chevalier taught classes ranging from English teacher, English department chairperson, boys JV and varsity basketball coach, assistant JV baseball coach, assistant track coach, athletic coordinator, member of the leadership team, and a distinguished member of the rally supervision team. Chevalier has been connected to school not only with his career, but also personally as two of his sons graduated in 2000 and 2002. Leaving will mean leaving behind many memories. “I will miss much about TOHS,” Chevalier said. “I have met and worked with excellent educators and great kids. I

CAREER PREP/GEOGRAPHY TEACHER “THE STUDENTS, ARE WONDERFUL PEOWORK...I BELIEVE IN AND

I FEEL I HAVE

MADE A SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE.”

“I’VE BEEN HERE FOR 38 YEARS. IT ’S TIME TO GRADUATE. I’M

alma maTer: cal polY san loUis oBispo

LOOKING FORWARD

Undergrad deGREE: B.S. IN HOME EC.

SCHOOLBUSES DON ’T

TO SLEEPING IN, AS LONG AS THE WAKE ME UP.”

Greg Barker

alma maTer: UcsB

PLE WITH WHICH TO EDUCATION FOR ALL,

appreciate the academic freedom that teachers enjoy at TOHS, which I believe serves to enhance the educational experience of all of our students. The English department has long been a bastion of fervent professionals and exciting ideas. When the discussion of public- vs. private-school education occurs, my remark is that TOHS is as close to a private school education as a public school can get.” Chevalier looks forward to retirement and the relaxing lifestyle it will bring him. He plans to spend a couple of years doing volunteer work, taking a few trips, catching up on his reading, and being with his family, which includes his new grandson in Santa Cruz. “I look forward to the sane life of the unemployed, of the happy, of the Arthur Doolittle’s of the world. I look forward to the day when I do not know what day it is.”

Years Teaching: 36 ToTal

TEACHERS AND STAFF

Linda Williamson

Years Teaching: 38 ToTal, 38 aT Tohs

PHOTOS BY ERIN BARBER AND MATT YOUNG

H AV E A LWAY S

AS AN ADMINISTRA-

alma maTer: l.a ciTY college/ l.a ValleY college/ Ucla

In History and Career Prep teacher, Mr. Barker’s retirement, TOHS is losing a well rounded and well loved educator. Mr. Barker has had especially broad experiences here at T.O. His range of positons that he has enjoyed taking part is vast but Barker has taken every opportunity to provide for the fulfillment of his students’ learning. “Each opportunity has offered its own challenges and I have enjoyed them all,” said Barker Barker’s teaching resume he has accumulated over a teaching span of 36 years is extremely extensive and while an average would instruct in two or maybe three subject areas Barker has taught eight, including three sports teams. “I have served as School-to-Career Coordi-

As students stood idle in the hallway gossiping with friends, Mrs. Bryant would be the one to straighten them out and remind them to “get to class”. However her legacy and duties as assistant principal extends much farther than discipline. She has catered to the needs and teachers and all those who make up our high school community in a bittersweet dedication. While Bryant helped Mr. Carpenter run the show here, she has heartwrenchingly sacrificed six years of bonding with family that lives clear across country. Bryant has appreciated and enjoyed her days here at TOHS but is wel-

come to the idea of moving back home. “I’m looking forward to moving back closer to home. I have been in California for six years and only see my family once a year in the summer,” Bryant said.“My son barely knows his grandparents.” Bryant has been able to associate herself with students on a personal level due to her position as a Dean of Attendance for three years and Assistant Principal for one year. Her motivation for joining the TOHS administrative family really lies in with the devoted teachers and their importance as mind molders of this generation. “I love helping teachers in whatever way I can. I have always felt that my job... is to support teachers.”

F E LT T H AT M Y J O B

Years Teaching: 33 aT Tohs, 37 ToTal

ERIN BARBER Center Editor

ERIN BARBER Center Editor BY

“I

ENGLISH TEACHER

BY

Beth Bryant ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL

Undergrad degree: B.a. of geographY/hisTorY ERIN BARBER Center Editor BY

Over a teaching span of 38 years Mrs. Williamson has served under every single one of them. She has been completely dedicated to her career as a mind molder. Educating seems to be in her blood seeing as to the fact that it runs in her family. “My whole family are teachers. When my family gets together it looks like the Teacher’s Association,” said Williamson. Williamson drew her inspiration to start her journey of a career as a teacher from her family but also from her own experience with adolescents. “I worked with kids my whole life. I was actually going to be a dietician. I guess I got scared off and decided to be a teacher instead,” she said. During her numerous years of teaching she

has particularly enjoyed the privilege of being able to teach in many subject areas. “I’ve taught culinary classes. Beginning levels, advanced and gourmet…human development, family relationships and child developmen,” Williamson said. In her well-deserved retirement, Williamson particularly looks forward to having a more relaxed lifestyle. “I’m joining a retirement group. We [my husband and I] each have things to do. I’m taking care of my parents. It’s nice just knowing I can go places without having to do everything,” Williamson said. While life will begin a new chapter in her retirement, or as she refers to it as her “graduation”, Williamson will miss the social aspect of working on a high school campus. “I’m a people person. I’m going to miss talking with people. I have students over the years that are friends of mine, Williamson said. “And I’ve grown over the years.”


10

ENTERTAINMENT

the lancer june 3, 2009

ST R TREK

BY EMILY ARNDT

Entertainment Editor

With my affinity for chick flicks, going to see Terminator Salvation was a step out of my movie genre box. I decided to check out the latest movie after enjoying the three previous installments of the Terminator films, if for no other reason than to watch Christian Bale fight machines on the big screen. Terminator Salvation was a pleasant surprise, even to an outsider to action films. From one of the first scenes, in which John Connor (Bale) treks through an empty desert and sin-

The Scoop: Touches on essential points of an action film, but may disappoint hardcore fans of the series.

gle-handedly fights off a machine, I knew the movie would be full of nonstop action. Sprinkle in a little romance and a sufficiently developed plot line and Terminator Salvation does not fail to disappoint viewers. Avid Terminator fans, however, may feel slightly dissatisfied. After the first few scenes, the audience learns that it is the year 2018 and SkyNet controls most of the planet. The few survivors of the nuclear apocalypse that remain exist in groups known as the Resistance. Viewers also learn of the criminal Mark Wright’s (Sam Worthington) death sentence, and how he makes amends by donating his body to science. Although viewers are kept in the dark until later in the film as to why, Wright turns out to be a central character in the fast-developing plot. Another piece to the puzzle is a young Kyle Reese (Anton Yelchin), Bale’s father. Connor, Wright and Reese, although following separate paths, all pursue the common goal of stopping SkyNet. Complete with plenty of man-on-machine battles, incredibly large guns and even a computer generated Arnold Schwarzenegger, Terminator Salvation leaves an open end for another installment of the Terminator series. I fully enjoyed watching Christian Bale battle redeyed machines that could withstand molten steel. As a general sci-fi/action flick, Terminator Salvation does a decent job of stepping up to the plate, but there are no promises that the fourth chapter will bring salvation to those who have been fans of the other three films. Although the film was on the longer side, Terminator Salvation is sure to provide enough entertainment for most audiences. However, with an even distribution of action, romance and dark comedy, the film contains something for everyone.

USED WITH PERMISSION OF WARNER BROS.

JOHNSON AND SEAN MCMINN Staff Writer and Editor-in-Chief

The

BY ALEX

Breakdown on

USED WITH PERMISSION OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Sometimes not knowing when to quit is a good thing. After all, who could have predicted that Green Day’s eighth album, 21st Century Breakdown—one released nearly 15 years after their Dookie, Insomniac and Nimrod days—would actually rock? Come to think of it, who even thought that they would make an eighth album? Breakdown comes five years after Green Day’s riskiest album, American Idiot. Idiot gained enormous popularity for the band, though serious music critics and fans saw it for what it really was: a desperate plea for attention. The nine minute tracks and the cheesy rock opera storyline just didn’t cut it for those who wanted to see more of the Green Day of old. Though it didn’t always succeed musically speaking, American Idiot did have one success: it brought Green Day back to the forefront of the music industry. Multiplatinum awards combined with two Grammys reenergized the band as they showed to the world that they

Lotus’ new self serve is unique in a competitive frozen yogurt market BY EMILY ARNDT AND

REBECCA SYLVERS Entertainment Editors

Location

From size to flavors to toppings, Lotus lets customers take complete control of their frozen yogurt experience. Although some of the flavors don’t measure up and the texture is never quite right, the ability to serve oneself and select as many flavors and toppings as one

Price

Nutrition

of original (tart) flavor

per 8 oz. (without toppings)

per 4 oz. of original flavor (all have zero grams of fat)

The Bottom Line

88 calories 14 grams of sugar

The best-tasting selection, but disappointing if your favorite flavor isn’t in the day’s rotation.

$3.99 (Pomegranate and Green Tea cost a dollar extra)

100 calories 20 grams of sugar

Highest quality in both yogurt and toppings. hands-down best for original flavor, but only allows for three choices of flavors.

$3.15

80 calories 36 grams of sugar

About equal to Golden Spoon in regards to quality, but provides less flavor selection.

$3.12 (39¢ per ounce)

90 calories 14 grams of sugar

Self-serve format allows for true customization, but the yogurt itself falls short.

$3.10

BY ERIN

BARBER Center Editor

Stormed with adventure, sprinkled with romance, doused with action and of course shadowed by science fiction is the forecast for the latest addition to the famous Star Trek saga. What started 43 years ago gathered speed and avid followers to become what most hail as a phenomenon. I have to agree with the critics that this film deserves to be graded with an A (or at least a high B). Director J.J. Abrams did a praiseworthy job of taking the original plotline of Star Trek and crafting it into a movie that can be enjoyed by the everyday movie lover. Walking into the theater, I didn’t know exactly what to expect other than a cheesy sci-fi picture that could entertain only an obsessed trekkie. Instead, I was presented with a film that had an understandable plotline, a smooth script and an appropriate cast. Overall, Star Trek was well worth the money. There was never a dull moment starting from the very first scene, in which James T. Kirk’s (Chris Pine) father is faced with a challenging mission. The USS Enterprise is attacked, and he must evacuate the entire crew including his wife who is going into labor. He does this while knowing that he must pilot the ship and will not make it out alive to meet his newborn son, James, who grows up rebelliously without the guid-

would not fall into the crowd of quiet bands around the country who hid their views on contemporary issues in order to sell more records. Their heart-on-your-sleeve, gung-ho attitude in everything from politics to...well, more politics, greatly aided the band as they began to find their new identity. Five years later, the climax of that soul searching finally appeared with the release of 21st Century Breakdown. This new Green Day identity is so great because they are able to pull off the three chord teenage anthems from the early 90’s but are no longer limited to these alone. Some prime examples are the power chord ridden songs such as “Murder City” and “Horseshoes and Handgrenades” contrasting with epic power ballads like “¡Viva la Gloria!” and “Restless Heart Syndrome.” Produced by Butch Vig, the man behind Nirvana’s Nevermind, and Smashing Pumpkins’ Siamese Dream, the album starts off with “Song of the Century.” The song consists of guitarist and singer Billie Joe Armstrong singing with a static effect on his voice, making for a very eerie first song. After hearing this, it becomes clear that this album is different from any other Green Day album, see-

wishes is unique. Though the concept of selfserve yogurt is innovative, it is the only thing that separates Lotus from any other frozen yogurt location. Below, we compare Lotus with three other frozen yogurt hotspots in Thousand Oaks.

Taste

The Scoop: The original sci-fi classic mixed with a new generation war on the final frontier.

PERMISSION OBTAINED FOR ALL LOGOS

ance of a father. Reluctant at first, Kirk eventually follows in his father’s footsteps and becomes a captain of Starfleet, but only after overthrowing Spock (Zachary Quinto), a half human half Vulcan protagonist. While Kirk grows up as a rebellious child on Earth, Spock lives on the planet Vulcan. However, Spock doesn’t quite fit into the Vulcan community because of his human side. He therefore chooses to become part of the human community of Starfleet, where he meets Kirk. After some development, the two form a friendly rivalry, which becomes more apparent as the film progresses further. The movie centralizes upon their struggle to work together against the enemy, Nero, who coincidentally is the same villain that killed Kirk’s father. All of this occurs in a two-and-a-half hour time span, which is enough time to hold the audience’s attention. Star Trek also raises the bar for future sci-fi flicks. Its visual effects are monumental and the talented cast adds glamour to a not-soglamorous storyline.

PROMOTIONAL MATERIAL PROVIDED BY PARAMOUNT

ing as they’ve never done an a capella song, let alone an introduction song less than a minute long. The album then splits seventeen tracks into three different acts. Act One is titled “Heroes and Cons,” Act Two is “Charlatans and Saints,” and Act Three is “Horseshoes and Handgrenades.” It seems that Green Day has once again taken the rock opera approach with this album, but it works a lot better than it did in American Idiot, most likely because the storyline is easier to grasp, and perhaps more thought out. The experience the band gained from their first rock opera is invaluable as it makes for a much more well developed and coherent album. The story behind the record is about Christian and Gloria, a couple living in post-Bush America, but the plot is a bit less present than that of Idiot, which makes for easier listening. With lyrics like “My beating heart belongs to you/I walked for miles ‘til I found you,” “Last Night on Earth” could simply be a love song directed at Armstrong’s wife. All one can say is “Viva la Green Day!” and hope that they will make another album just as good as this.


11

SPORTS

the lancer june 3, 2009

PHOTO BY REBECCA SYLVERS

PHOTO BY BRIAN KIM

T ENNIS

— Division I —

LAST MATCH- Tuesday, May 26 vs. Mater Dei. SCORE- 11-7 win.

NEXT MATCH- Wednesday, June 3 vs. University at Claremont University.

T RACK

— Division II — S TATE Q UALIFIER LYDIA FRENCH - High Jump

SPENCER BOONE TAYLOR YAMEK

CIF Q UALIFIERS ALLIE LOPEZ - 1600, 800, 4x400 SAM RIVERA - 4x400 CAITLIN TURNER - 4x400 TAYLOR DEMIRJIAN - 4x400 SEAN GILDEA - 3200 KEVIN JOERGER - 3200 PHILIP HANLEY - High Jump

S WIM

— Division II —

LAST MEET- Tuesday, May 26 vs. Mater Dei. SCORE- 11-7 win.

S OFTBALL — Division I —

LAST GAME- Thursday May 28 vs. Norco SCORE- 1-7 loss.

V OLLEYBALL

MARCOS GIRON

GRAPHIC BY BEN MOON

Tennis MICHAEL KUNISAKI Sports Editor

— Division II — LAST MATCH- Wednesday, May 27 vs. Westlake.

USED WITH PERMISSION OF THE ACORN

Swim

Track RAFAEL ANCHETA Staff Writer

Softball

BEN REICH Staff Writer

REBECCA SYLVERS Entertainment Editor

SCORE- 0-3 loss.

Volleyball BRIAN KIM Sports Editor

BY

BY

BY

BY

BY

Ba-Bum Ba-Bum. The sound of the bongos rings throughout the courts as the tennis team huddles around junior Tyler Bridges. As a pre-game ritual, the boys varsity tennis team chants in hopes of heightening their spirits. “The other team is always surprised and confused to see a player holding bongos during the pre-game, but once they feel the resonating of the beat and the deep vibrato of the chant, they know what’s up,” senior Bobby Kane said. With a flawless Marmonte league record, the team steps into its CIF matches with confidence. After blowing through its first few matches, winning 16-2 against San Marcos and 15-3 against Loyola, the team entered its first challenging match against Corona del Mar which its barely won last year in games. Besides seniors Denis Lin and Kyle McMorrow and sophomore Marcos Giron sweeping in singles, doubles won three sets giving TOHS a 12-6 win. “Matt [Skwaruzynski] and Brendon [Josephson] stepped up their game to win two of their sets,” coach Dave Assorson said. During the semifinals, Bridges and senior Alex Johnson showed superiority winning their last two matches. The overall match score was 11-7. Through all of these past experiences, the boys look to win their first ever CIF championship title. “This is the best team ever at TO,” Assorsan said. “It’s hard to imagine any team in the past that was this good.” This is the second time in school history that the boys tennis team has made it to CIF finals. “Its an honor to be on a team with such talent,” Bridges said. CIF finals opponent, University High School, is the returning champions from the previous two years but TOHS players believe they can win. “I like our chances. We’ve got three incredible single players and a couple really strong doubles teams, we just need to play our game,” Kane said. All the players are getting ready in their own way for the fated day whenboys tennis could make Lancer history. “I started hitting a lot more,” Kane said. “Before matches I sit in my room and pray so that God can guide my racket to the ball.”

The girls varsity team took first place and the boys varsity team came with a close second in Marmonte League, in a stunning spring season for Track and Field. “[Thousand Oaks High School’s] always good, boys were second in league four years straight; girls have had a shot at first for the last seven years,” lead track coach Steven Kloch said. “ I think we had an excellent year.” After an exceptional season, the track team reflects back on its season proudly and into the future with optimism. “I think [the track team] did exceptional. The boys were their usual self; they lost just one meet,” middle distance coach Bob McCarter said . “The girls are beginning to look like they have in have in past years, dominant in the league.” Despite the remarkable season, the track and field team might have exceeded expectations this year if it were not for a great deal of injuries. With the loss of seniors such as Zach Friedman and Donald Morrow later in the season, the track team fell to a slight disadvantage. Despite this other athletes came to take their place. “ I think two of the top athletes were Cameron Schneider and Allie Lopez,” said Kloch. “They scored the most points.” In addition to the loss of some athletes this year due to injuries, next season the team will lose many of its experienced seniors and be replaced by a younger team in many of the events. “On the distance side we’re losing a ton of seniors so it will be harder,” junior distance runner Kevin Joerger said. “If our sprinters stay healthy this year, it’ll help a lot because in the other events we have a really young team.” Kloch felt similarly with the team about the loss of so many seniors this coming year. “We have a lot of seniors graduating so we need people to step up and take their place,” Kloch said. Although the season ended for much of the track and field team, a substantial number of the track competitors continued to represent Thousand Oaks in CIF Finals such as Allie Lopez, Lydia French, Sean Gildea, Kevin Joerger, Philip Hanley, Caitlin Turner, Kalin Padberg, Shara Longbotham, Jillian Krulac, Katie Chuh, and Emily Bass.

The 2009 Lancer swim season ended last week, but not before the boys varsity team left its mark on the record books. The boys varsity team rolled through the Marmonte league season as they swam to a 6-0 undefeated league season. The boys followed up the regular season by dominating the Marmonte League finals. They finished the meet winning by over 100 points. “We swam really well in league this year,” sophomore Tyler Henry said. Following the Marmonte League season the swim team traveled to the CIF meet where the record breaking season continued. The CIF meet was highlighted by sophomores David Armstrong and Henry who both qualified for Masters with great times in their individual events. Armstrong swam strong in the 100yard butterfly finishing fifth, while Henry took seventh in the 500-yard freestyle. The boys season ended at the 2009 Masters meet at the Belmont Plaza in Long Beach. All three Lancer relay teams swam strong but the performance was highlighted by the 200 yard- freestyle team of Armstrong, junior Henley Ko, senior Spencer Posey, and freshman Luke Haga broke a 25 year-old school record with a time of 1:28.47.“We’ve really improved the last few seasons, we’ve got a good future,” Henry said. The 2009 season was a strong one for the athletics program, and with the help of Armstrong, Henry, Boone, and Posey in addition to the current juniors in the program TO will look to again take the Marmonte League crown in 2010.

“No one takes our dirt from us—no one,” sophomore second baseman Alysha Payne said. For the 2009 Lancer softball team, that was almost the case. It all came down to this—a whole season’s worth of preparation would be put to the test against the number one seed, the second best softball team in the nation. A coin flip in the Lancers’ favor gave them a glimmer of hope in what seemed like an impossible situation— home field advantage. For the first four innings, playing at home seemed to be doing wonders for ninth-seeded Thousand Oaks. They were up 1-0 after sophomore third baseman Paris Shipp rocketed a homerun over the left-center fence in the bottom of the 2nd. The Lancers quickly discovered there was only so much that screaming fans and familiarity with the dirt could do against the top draw. Norco rallied back, scoring four runs in the 5th and three in the 6th to put the game out of reach. “When you’re behind in the game, it’s easy to try to pick up your team and get more runs, but when you’re ahead it’s hard to keep a lead because all the other team wants to do is catch up. We tried [to stay ahead], but we made a few mistakes here and there and they took advantage,” Shipp said. Thousand Oaks' 1-7 defeat to Norco was preceded by a 5-0 trouncing of Saugus and a come from behind 6-2 road victory over Oxnard Pacifica. Instead of feeling dejected from the loss, the team chose to stay upbeat. “I think [it was because of] the fact that we didn’t make a tremendous amount of errors and the fact that we had gone so far and already accomplished so much in league that losing didn’t sting as badly,” sophomore Kaelee Nelson said. The road to the CIF quarterfinals was filled with hard-fought battles both on and off the field, struggling against tough competition and injuries. “No one besides our school and our coaches and our team even thought we would be playing in [the quarterfinal] game at all,” freshman centerfielder Kanani Datan said. The Lancers end the season with a 256 overall record, a finish identical to last year’s except for one crucial detail—this year’s team secured the elusive Marmonte League crown for the third time in four years.

After repeatedly fruitless seasons in Division I of CIF, the entire Marmonte League was demoted to Division II. But if success in Division I was beyond the reach of local teams, success in Division II is dictated by the league. This spring season, three of four top teams in Division II were from Marmonte, including an all-Marmonte final between Westlake and Royal, with Westlake as the victor. The TO boys volleyball team ended its impressive run through CIF with a semifinal loss to Westlake High School and an overall record of 17-11. The boys’ first round victory over the top team out of the Pacific View League, Oxnard, was followed by another triumph against Chapel Hill and Claremont until their third untimely loss against Westlake. Unlike previous matches against rival Westlake, this last match-up was did not fulfill the intensity of the two previous matches. Because of this lackluster performance, Westlake was able take all three sets, 25-20, 25-19, 25-13. “We didn’t play as well as we were playing before this game. But the seniors should have stepped up, and we didn’t really respond to the game,” senior setter and outside Chad Kingi said. Additionally, their league record of 77 was enough for a third place finish behind Westlake and Royal, who shared the Marmonte League title. Ultimately, the relatively young team was hampered by its inexperience, a decisive factor in its loss to Westlake. “We’re a young team with little experience, but we definitely matured,” Coach Andrew Vasquez said. “We expected to be in the finals, and it was a bit of a disappointment to lose to Westlake.” Though the team was lead by key seniors Sean Foley, Chad Kingi, and Michael Taxter, most of the starting lineup comprised of first year varsity members, including sophomores Matt Hall and Austin Kingi. “We did very well, considering how young our team was. But in the end, it was the lack of experience that caught up to us,” Kingi said. Experience, though, is a trait garnered over the years, and despite its absence this season, will be built upon and aid the team in future seasons. “This was a trying season,” Foley said. “I’m glad that we finished a much better team than we started with.”

EVENT

CIF MASTERS RELAY TEAMS

TIME

1:39.51

200-yard Medley

Armstrong, Boone, Talen and Posey Armstrong, Ko, Posey and Haga

1:28.47

400-yard Freestyle relay

Armstrong, Henry, Boone and Ko

3:13.00

Henry

4:36.52

100-yard Butterfly

Armstrong

200-yard Freestyle relay

500-yard Freestyle

51.8


12

SENIOR SPORTS

the lancer june 3, 2009

Torey Best Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Torey Best Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Softball, First Base College: CSU Monterey Bay Playing in college? Intramural Favorite Memory: “All the team sleep overs because it was a great bonding experience getting to know all the girls.” Pre-Game Preparation: “Megan Kauffman [co-captain] and I would get together and talk about staying positive.”

Dusty Holmes Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Megan Meyer Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Neda Iradjpanah Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Megan Meyer Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Soccer College: UC Santa Barbara Playing in college? Playing club Favorite Memory: “The bus trips to the games and being with my teammates.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I would try to get more excited than nervous.”

Sean Gildea Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Allie Lopez Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Alex Johnson Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Neda Iradjpanah Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Samantha Rivera Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Soccer College: University of Redlands Playing in college? Yes Favorite Memory: “Winning CIF last year because we worked so hard for it.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I braid my hair and listen to music.”

Lauren Seybold Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Alex Johnson Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Tennis College: Claremont McKenna College Playing in college? Yes Favorite Memory: “Getting to CIF finals this year and getting to play in Claremont.” Pre-Game Preparation: “Getting yelled at by Coach Dave to go warm up.”

Mary Madden Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Allie Lopez Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Track and Cross Country College: UC Davis Running in college? Yes Favorite Memory: “Freshman year when we won State in cross country, and recently when I ran sub-five in the mile.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I think through the race and envision ... and mentally prepare myself for the pain and suffering I’m about to go through.”

Samantha Rivera Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sean Gildea Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Track and Cross Country College: Colorado School of Mines Running in college? Yes Favorite Memory: “Going to Nationals during Cross Country because it was just a bunch of us guys going to Oregon together.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I say to myself that it’s just like any other race, and try not to stress myself out too much.”

Sport: Tennis College: UC Irvine Playing in college? Intramural Favorite Memory: “Beating undefeated Calabasas this past season because they hadn’t lost a league match in a few years.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I talk to all my teammates during warm-up to strategize for the match.”

Hilary Koenig Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Tennis College: Cal Poly San Luis Obispo Playing in college? Not competitively. Favorite Memory: “The team songs each year at practice.” Pre-Game Preparation: “Me and my doubles partner do pep talks before we start the match.”

Michael Fernandez Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Swim College: Moorpark College Playing in college? at Ventura College Favorite Memory: “Being the youngest on the varsity team.” Pre-game Preparation: “I listen to music, specifically Tech N9ne.”

Dusty Holmes Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Swim College: Moorpark College Swimming in college? No Favorite Memory: “Going to CIF because we got to stay in a hotel with everybody...not swimming.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I don’t prepare, I’m just amazing.”

Hilary Koenig Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Michael Fernandez Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Mary Madden Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Soccer College:Cal Poly San Louis Obispo Playing in College: Intramural Favorite Memory: “Winning CIF because it was a really cool experience. We got to travel and our team was really close.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I warm-up and shoot on the goal and talk with my friends.”

Lauren Seybold Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Swim College: Arizona State University Swimming in college? No Favorite Memory: “The whole trip when we went to CIF.” Pre-Game Preparation: “Honestly, I really don’t do anything.”

Shayna Wiley Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Shayna Wiley Crime: 4 Year Varsity

Sport: Golf College: Moorpark College Playing in college? No Favorite Memory: “Practicing before a match, hitting golf balls on the range and bonding with my teammates.” Pre-Game Preparation: “I hit balls on the driving range and talk with my friends because it calms my nerves.”

Senior Issue  

theLancer 2009 Senior Issue