Page 1


\\

00

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

01


\\

THE LAKE WE ARE FOOLISHLY Ambitious

#25 / 150219 ““That’s the problem with drinking, I thought, as I poured myself a drink. If something bad happens you drink in an attempt to forget; if something good happens you drink in order to celebrate; and if nothing happens you drink to make something happen.” - C harles B ukowski

CONTENTS REGULARS:

PUBLISHER

Advertising / MARKETING

News 04 Wax Junkie 69 Print Run 74 Plimsoll 76

THE LAKE MAGAZINE PTY LTD info@thelake.co

Brett Bellairs brett@thelake.co

Editor / Art DirectOR

ONLINE EDITOR

ART:

Stefan Naude’ stefan@thelake.co

Brett Bellairs brett@thelake.co

Submissions

SOCIAL MEDIA PLATFORMS

PHOTOGRAPHY:

info@thelake.co

Stalker 11 Aberration 39 Ruffler 61

COPY EDITING

www.thelake.co.za @the_lake_magazine

MUSIC:

COVER

Motherhood 33 Dog teeth 49

Photography On the cover Concept / Styling Make up Creative Direction Lighting / Studio Retouching

Facets of identity 17 Emoting 55

LIFESTYLE: Rehearsal 23 Eyes wide shut 29

cONTENTS PHOTO Billy Monk www.billymonk.com

The views and opinions expressed within the editorial and advertisements of THE LAKE do not necessarily reflect those of its staff, nor any of its associates.THE LAKE and anything contained within is copyright. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form whatsoever, copied or stored electronically without prior permission in writing from the publisher.

02

Christine Stewart

Hayden Phipps Pure Pure Chloe Hicks Stefan Naude Big Time Studios Naomi E’camara

photography

contributors

Tandekile Mkize Jacqui van Staden Billy Monk Joshua Stein Dan Charles Dewald bruwer Gabrielle Weinstein Oliver Kruger Stan Kaplan Sven Kristian

Rick De La Ray Jacqueline Flint Joshua Stein Hayden Phipps Dewald bruwer Sean O’Toole Tecla Ciolfi Kate White Discodeta Xavier Nagel

PRINTING

Tandym print Tel: +27 21 505 4200 Email: print@tandym.co.za

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

03


\\

NEWS VANS / New Drill Chore Coat WN1 The life of skateboarder thrives on destruction, whether it’s a curb, a wall, a rail, or anything in their way— skateboarders demand the toughest protection for everyday use. Enter Vans’ new Drill Chore Coat WN1, inspired by the routine wear and tear skateboarders endure, and specifically engineered with Cordura® brand fabric and reinforced stitching for maximum durability. This classic coat will withstand all the abuse a professional skateboarder can throw. INFO: www.vans.com

PERMANENT RECORD / TATA Behold the sizzling South African boogie sound of Tata Sibeko. As South African pop embraced 1980s synth culture, maxi-singles on 12-inch vinyl became the new canvas of expression with wider grooves for fat beats and extended mixes that suited dancefloors. Former Kabasa frontman Tata Sibeko dropped “It’s A Mess” in 1985, cutting Cold War political tension with dramatic synths, a seductive bass groove and an appeal to “learn to love each other” and “save ourselves from catastrophe.” INFO: www.permanentrecord.co.za

HURLEY X CRYPTIK COLLABORATION Ancient. Spiritual. Mythic. Hurley’s second collaboration with legendary LA artist Cryptik is inspired by the lore of ancient Hawaiian gods. The men’s jacket features an internal print and sleeve with his iconic script style. Made from lightweight nylon, this field jacket ticks all the boxes of fashion and function.The women’s jacket features an intricate script embroidery in a sleek bomber silhouette. Made from lightweight fabric with a water-repellent finish, this jacket looks good and feels great wherever you go. INFO: www.hurley.com

ADIDAS / SLEEK & HYPERSLEEK adidas Originals’ womens-exclusive Sleek sneaker steps out in two classic variations this month, rendering the contemporary casual model in timeless all-white colorways, in both its original and plateau-soled form. Meanwhile, the elevated Hypersleek model pushes the OG’s understated mode into new territory thanks to its ‘plateau tooling’, placing the upper atop an extra-large sole unit, rendered in smooth leather. The result is a duo of contemporary models offering timeless 3-stripes style in an unexpected form. INFO: www.adidas.co.za 04

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

HURLEY.COM 05


\\

NEWS SUPERDRY 70’s nostalgia and western influences ring true across the womenswear’s AW19 range ‘All American Girl’. Hand-drawn eagles and vintage florals are seen across distressed and ripped denim, with washed cords and rose pink Sherpa trimmed jackets taking centre stage. Delicately embroidered dresses and eyelet broderie skirts bring a feminine edge against badged check shirts and dungarees, chunky cable knits in chestnut and rich desert caramel hues feature heavily. INFO: www.superdry.com

ROASTIN RECORDS / Diamond Thug Diamond Thug / ‘Apastron’. As a body of work, ‘Apastron’ represents a sonic coming of age for the band. With slow swelling synthesizers, psychedelic break downs and honeycomb vocals, the band pull you into their world and allow you to lose yourself in a 44 minute emotional adventure through the depths of the band’s understanding of the universe. ‘Apastron’ tells a story of celestial beings dancing amidst the stars, pulled together and pushed apart by forces beyond their control. INFO: www.roastinrecords.com

NIXON / SMART ASS WATCH Nixon proudly announces the launch of the original eye-free time teller, the Dork Too. A smart ass watch with a personality all its own. The Dork Too is iconic Nixon style that doesn’t take itself too seriously, with a mashup of retro electronics, simple, modern forms, and progressive maker culture. Press a button and The Dork yells the time and much more. This fun-loving digital comes fully juiced, but when it does run low just plug in the USB cord provided for easy charging. INFO: www.nixon.com.

ROOK CYCLES Rook is here to change the way you see cycling: More fun, more attitude, less hassles. We firmly believe when you strip away all the excess, you’re left with a ride that’s pure, beautiful and challenging but most of all, fun. We manufacture Rook frames and forks and source the best components from around the globe to build your Rook ride. Countless hours go into testing, riding, designing and building what we believe is the best urban transport you can lay your hands on. Rook bicycles are a realisation of a lifestyle and will to move. INFO: www.rookcycles.com 06

THE LAKE


\\

08

THE LAKE


>

RUN TO THE HILLS adidas Originals / Nite Jogger adidas Originals offers up two new iterations of the updated Nite Jogger model this month, further modernizing the ‘70s road running silhouette with an unmissable aesthetic update. Keeping with the original Nite Jogger model’s lightweight, collapsible design, each shoe in the release features a retro nylon ripstop, mesh and suede upper which packs down with ease. Structural overlays around the toebox, sides and heel maintain the shoe’s form, while reflective details add a new dimension to the shoe’s name as well as adding some unmissable visual pop.

All of this is then rounded off with a Boost™ midsole and durable rubber outsole, combining the best elements of a shoe from the genesis of road running culture with the pinnacle in contemporary running tech. Offered in clean white and black colorways, the result is a striking new expression of the Nite Jogger’s enduring aesthetic in a form that’s truly impossible to ignore.

www.adidas.com/nite_jogger @adidasZA / #NITEJOGGER THE LAKE

09


\\

10

THE LAKE


> INTERVIEW - RICK DE LA RAY

PHOTOGRAPHY - Tandekile Mkize

STALKER Tandekile Mkize I feel as though it is important for creatives to be able to be vulnerable. It’s not necessarily the easiest thing but that’s the most effective way to connect with your audience, by opening ourselves up to share our stories and dig deep within ourselves to portray our truths in our most authentic voices. The truth isn’t always pretty but nothing resonates more than authenticity. Where are you from and how do you feel it has influenced the way you look at the world? I was born and raised in Cape Town; for the first 3 years of my life I stayed in Langa and then my mom bought a house in Brooklyn where we still stay. I wouldn’t say that places influenced the way I see the world but rather the experiences I had in those spaces. What I remember most about growing up is being reprimanded for portraying effeminate characteristics through the way I walked or talked. People would often point it out. It would annoy me that I would often check myself, ‘’am I masculine enough?’’ I don’t know when I decided, “ fuck it, I’m gonna do me and stop putting people with their discomfort at ease”, but I learnt to not care at some point. I guess I was tired of feeling repressed.   When and how did photography become a part of your life? Photography became a part of my life when I decided I wanted to model and create my own fashion editorials. I started off working with photogra-

phers I found on Instagram whose work I admired, like my friend MilkandOj, Luxolo Witvoet, Saif and Meghan Daniels. It was Saif who encouraged me to get a camera and start shooting. So I got my first film camera which was some old Kodak, I didn’t know what I was doing but I got some interesting images from that camera. Do you have any inspiration that influences you and your work? What inspires my work are stories of how we are able to overcome our personal struggles. I love the idea of flowers blooming in dark rooms. I’m inspired by everyday life and how people move day to day through the city. People who are bold and unapologetically living their truths.  Do you feel its important for creatives to be open abut their experiences? I feel as though it is important for creatives to be able to be vulnerable. It’s not necessarily the easiest thing but that’s the most effective way to connect with your audience, by opening ourselves up to share our stories and dig deep within ourselves

HIGH FIVES Robin Thicke

Tupac Shakur

The Roots

Lauryn Hill

Lady Gaga

The Evolution of Robin Thicke

All Eyez on Me

Things Fall Apart

The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill

Born This Way

2006

1996

1999

1998

2011

Star Track

Death Row

MCA

Ruffhouse

Interscope

THE LAKE

11


\\

12

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

13


\\

to portray our truths in our most authentic voices. The truth isn’t always pretty but nothing resonates more than authenticity. How do you feel your experience as a stylist has influenced your photography? I think that it’s helped me to see the image more holistically and highlights the mood or feeling I’m looking for. What inspires the subject matter in your images or do you allow it to happen spontaneously? I like to let it happen spontaneously and allow my muse’s special nature to shine.  Do you see photography becoming a full-time thing for you in the future or how do you see yourself evolving? I love having a camera on me and capturing moments that move me. I would incorporate it seamlessly and effortlessly with everything that I do because its how I would like to document my journey as a human and a creative. Immortalise those moments. I aim to share African stories in an authentic voice and rewrite the narrative and share images that speak of our power and glory as Africans.  What medium do prefer shooting in and what 14

camera are you using at the moment?

Who’s work do you admire locally and why?

I prefer shooting with 35mm film but I’m slowly moving toward shooting digital and I would love to start shooting medium format as well. At the moment I shoot with a Pentax P5035mm.

Noncedo Gxekwa. Noncedo captures her muses so gracefully and I love her perspective - it reminds me to look beyond what I see in front of me and look at things from a different angle. Justice Mukheli. Justice has such powerful magical energy and it comes through in his photographs. He pays attention to his muse’s eyes and is able to capture the essence of his muse that makes me feel as though I know that person’s story just by looking at the portrait. Haneem Christian. A power house! Haneem’s work excites me. Their compositions reflect the power and strength they see in their muses.

Besides the styling what other work are you currently busy with? Besides styling, I’m working on producing content for THUG ALCHEMY, a multi-medium production house. What drives you to capture an image? What type of situation appeals to you? I see an image in my mind and just want to see it through. It’s an extension of my thoughts and desires to a tangible thing that depicts my thoughts. I also want to capture what moves me. It could be the way a muse slightly tilts their head to right facing down or how the golden light illuminates their skin. Or the tension in their face when they are in an uncomfortable position or the softness in their face when they are relaxed and at ease. What is the most uncomfortable moment you have encountered while shooting? That hasn’t happened yet. THE LAKE

Do you have any future projects in the pipeline that you would like to share with us? I’m working on a portraiture series with Cape Town rapper GREEKGOD, capturing him and his collaborators on his latest EP called ‘Phila’. I’m working on a series of fashion editorials with Noncedo Gxekwa that aims to expose our limitlessness and liberate us from the conditioning of the past. I’m also working on a multi-medium project called ‘The Jewel of Africa’ which I hope to release early next year. INFO: @tandekile_mkize INFO: www.inthelandofthugalchemy.tumblr.com


>

THE LAKE

15


\\

16

THE LAKE


> WORDS - Jacqueline Flint

PHOTOGRAPHY - JACQUI VAN STADEN

facets of identity STEPHANÉ E. CONRADIE

The single bed in Stephané Conradie’s studio, which doubles up as a guest bedroom, is currently inadequate for its original purpose. The wooden bed base has been flipped over and transformed into an over-sized tray,offering a vast array of objects – ashtrays, vases with wavy flared mouths, ornamental swans (you know the ones), porcelain teacups with sweet florals and golden rims and handles, carved wooden coasters, coffee pots, embellished scales, terrines, candlesticks... Each and every one is destined to play a role in one of Conradie’s sculptural works – an elaborate three-dimensional cornucopia of household bric-abrac, affixed and finished with gleaming, glossy resin. The nostalgic weight of these objects is equivalent to the actual weight bearing down on the base of that bed. Conradie was born in 1990 in Windhoek, to a pair uncommon for their time – her father is white Afrikaans, and her mother a descendant of the Basters of Namibia who are, according to the official strum, “mainly persons of mixed-race descent”. At the time of their meeting and wooing, Conradie’s parents’ relationship was unacceptable under the apartheid regime, and so they married and began their family in Namibia, where rules were not so harshly drawn at the intersection of love and complexion. The family moved south after some time, after democracy, to Kimberley and finally settled in Fish Hoek on the South Peninsula. Conradie was always aware of brown-ness, she says, but it was only upon moving to Stellenbosh to pursue her studies at the university that she felt pressure to classify herself within a particular “category”. And so began her excavation of the layers and politics of identity – her own, and that of other people having the same skin colour. Although she was never encouraged as a child to identify with any racial group, and she has observed both her parents and their families flout many of the meta-narratives of their own heritage, she did for a time identify as “coloured” – a moniker that is hotly debated, and for good reason, considering how many thousands of people (like the Basters) with a rich, nuanced and varied history were bluntly lumped into this single category within the bureaucratic cogs of apartheid ethnic classification. There are contentious and complex issues at play here – more than I am bold enough to tackle – but suffice

it to say that in her exploration of these things, Conradie was ultimately led home... or to the idea of it which, as it turns out, is just as complex and contentious for people of colour in this country.

rated with the fashions of their time; things that were used and loved every day and therefore woven into the fabric of the everyday lives of the people that lived then.

Conradie’s sculptural compositions are a throwback to the flower arrangements found on graves in cemeteries of Moravian mission stations. She first encountered them while doing research into the idea that religion is inalienable to coloured identity in South Africa. Although she is still in search of defining qualities, her focus has shifted from the overarching to the underpinning. If you’ve ever been to Athens, you’ll know that the Parthenon is a total let-down. The foundations and the aesthetic gold standard of the West – sure. But enough to inspire great stirrings of the soul? Not so much. The hassle of climbing up that ancient hill with throngs of sunburnt, strop-clad tourists is perhaps to blame, but don’t be disheartened. There back at the bottom of the hill, inside the (truly) impressive Acropolis Museum, alongside all the grand narrative stuff, is the real deal: hair combs, trinkets, spoons and knives and bowls and pots deco-

It is a shambles of true treasure. This is material culture, where Conradie has found her flow. For the last few years, Conradie’s research (currently towards her PhD) has seen her sipping and nibbling many a rooibos and buttermilk rusk in the living-rooms of working-class people, soaking up the details of the interiors of their homes. Victims of forced removals during apartheid, these are people who were wrenched from their original homes. Pushed to the periphery (geographically and otherwise), they were required to make new homes in places that they did not choose. In this context, the power of the things that made them feel at home – often the only and few things they were able to retrieve from their condemned and demolished residences –cannot be underestimated. The ornaments lovingly dusted, and the brass with a freshly-polished glint in its eye, became anchor points for identity formation. The

TOP FIVE BOOKS Shame

The Shadow of the Wind

Pedagogy of the Oppressed

Shirley, goodness & mercy

The God of Small Things

Salman Rushdie

Carlos Ruiz Zafón

Paulo Freire

Christopher van Wyk

Arundhati Roy

1983

2001

1968

2004

1997

THE LAKE

17


\\

Stephané E. Conradie - “Agency” / Mixed media relief sculpture: resin, found objects, enamel paint - 80 x 80 x 70 cm // 2017

18

THE LAKE


>

The role of women in this creation of identity is fundamental.The home is traditionally the domain of women – specifically, of the mother. Creators by design, mothers are inherently implicated in the granular character of their family’s interiority.

LEFT: Stephané E. Conradie - “Regional variationsy” / Mixed media relief sculpture: resin, found objects, imitation gold leaf, enamel paint and spray paint - 158 x 35 x 40 cm// 2017 RIGHT: Stephané E. Conradie - “Extravaganza” / Mixed media relief sculpture: resin, found objects, enamel paint - 167 x 37 x 47 cm // 2017

THE LAKE

19


\\

RIGHT: Stephané E. Conradie - “Taste” / Mixed media relief sculpture: resin, found objects, imitation gold leaf, enamel paint and spray paint - 170 x 40 x 40 cm // 2017

20

THE LAKE


>

LEFT: Stephané E. Conradie - “Inalienability” / Mixed media relief sculpture: resin, found objects, imitation gold leaf, enamel paint and spray paint // 2017 RIGHT: Stephané E. Conradie - “Facets of identity” / Mixed media relief sculpture: resin, found objects, enamel paint // 2017

idea of home is shot through with violence. The role of women in this creation of identity is fundamental.The home is traditionally the domain of women – specifically, of the mother. Creators by design, mothers are inherently implicated in the granular character of their family’s interiority. Socially, the role of women is as a stabilising force, although it comes at great personal cost. Ordentlikheid – a word included in the title of Conradie’s first solo show held at Gallery Momo last year – to be decent, to keep up appearances. To keep the house in order, which is also to keep it psychologically safe. The guiding and the grounding is the work of women, who create the home and the sense of security from which we are able to speak our truth. The things that contribute to the personality of our homes form the foundations of our taste, and they let us breathe easy. For previous generations – the mothers, the grandmothers – the locations of these new homes are not only politically and emotionally fraught, but also inherently soulless, being born

of brutality. For the current generation however, these are their birth places. They are their true and original homes. Even so, the pain of parents, the grief of forefathers cannot help but be taken on. The material culture is just as grounding to the current generation as it was to those that came before them – as grounding as it is to anyone who has grown up in a house with things. These are the very kinds of things that Conradie trawls for through flea markets, Gumtree and garage sales. Her process of putting them together into balanced three-dimensional compositions is intuitive. Her extravagant and elegant feminine formations speak to the relative political stability and ideological freedom that younger generations enjoy, which allow for both the looking back in order to remember, and the looking forward in order to re-tell, re-imagine and restore nuance, complexity and compassion. INFO: www.stephaneeconradie.com INFO: www.gallerymomo.com

THE LAKE

21


\\

22

THE LAKE


> WORDS - Joshua Stein

PHOTOGRAPHY - Joshua Stein

rehearsal Cape Town City Ballet

It was getting close to nine in the evening as I made my way happily along the N2 towards Stellenbosch. I had a large cup (half full now) of black coffee and my cheesiest collection of disco hits playing in my car. As I turned off the highway I felt a sense of tense excitement.

The sun was setting, illuminating the mountains in the distance in a yellow sheath of light and I was high on caffeine and anticipation. In not too long I would be at the Oude Libertas theatre, just outside Stellies, where The Cape Town City Ballet was getting ready to start dress rehearsals for Romeo & Juliet. The only contact I had had with the company so far was a few emails and a brief phone call with its then CEO, Elizabeth Triegaardt. That interaction had been curt and yielded little in the form of an impression. There is a long straight road lined with street lamps adorned with banners that leads towards town where you turn off to get the theatre. It was here that it dawned on me that I had gotten the times mixed up and was in fact an hour late. The tentative excitement that had kept me in high spirits on the roughly hour drive out of Cape Town fell away and was replaced with a caffeine fuelled panic. This resulted in speeding and a recital of every variation of ‘oh fuck’ that I could think of. With apologies readied I arrived .The venue was a modestly sized open air amphitheatre shaped like a wide wedge with firm stone seats wrapped about the radius of the curved stage. It was as classically styled as a theatre in Stellenbosch could be. When full, the stage was wrapped in gazing eyes, perhaps even trapped. I kept sheepishly to the side and had a look at the wide open venue. The seating was almost entirely empty with the exception of an older women sitting in the middle of the audience area watching the stage with focused intent. I presumed this woman to be Elizabeth. The only light falling on her came from what of the stage lighting was reflected back onto her face so I wasn’t sure until I got closer. Several rows above here sat Robin Van Wyk, the artistic director of the company and choreographer for this production. From his high vantage he saw all and gave comments on the production and the dancers through a microphone…

instagram.com/joshnsphotos

THE LAKE

23


\\

24

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

25


\\

26

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

27


\\

28

THE LAKE


>

EYES WIDE SHUT

PHOTOGRAPHY: Sven Kristian / STYLIST: Mikhailia Petersen / Hair and Make Up: Inga Hewett Models: Jeremy Pelser and Sandra Drew / Clothing: All garments from Babette Clothing THE LAKE

29


\\

30

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

31


\\

32

THE LAKE


> WORDS - DAN CHARLES

PHOTOGRAPHY - HAYDEN PHIPPS

MOTHERHOOD Purity Zinhle Mkhize / PURE

“I just want to be as honest as possible to myself through this whole music process. I don’t want to half-heart what I’m doing and I don’t want to do it just because people expect me to be a musician. I want to do it in the most sincere way that makes me feel good and safe and when I release stuff I want to be like: Yeah, listen.”

There was a moment during my interview with Purity Mkhize (the avant-garde neo-soul artist better known simply as Pure) that caught me offguard after we had snuck off to a remote corner of a child’s birthday party to which her 7-year-old daughter Naledi, had been invited. Naledi had managed to track us down during our chat in order to get someone to attend to her untied shoelace and then decided to join us for a bit as we discussed Pure’s debut solo EP, Vocal Alchemy. As Naledi gently perched herself on her mother’s lap, Pure asked me an unnerving question: Do you see yourself having children? As a frightened young man who relishes fashionably-nihilistic rhetoric, I wasn’t sure how to express my youthful disdain to the proud mother of a beautiful and inquisitive 7-year-old girl. But, during my clumsy response, I was let off the hook as Pure gave her perspective on entering parenthood: “Everybody knows the story - when the child is there, things change. You always make a way because you know that there’s something bigger than yourself that needs you to be your best self.” Over the years, Pure has become well-versed in these sorts of changes and it’s these changes that ultimately had to lead to the gradual halt of her first band - the legendarily debauched Durban punk rock outfit, Fruits and Veggies. Despite the joy that went into performing with the band, even during her pregnancy, it was clear that the Veggies were heading towards a more and more destructive boiling-point, which caused Pure to wonder whether the paths of motherhood and punk-rock-martyrdom could run parallel to each other.

mom and that was the first time that I drank again and I smoked a joint and felt weird. Then I went back home and I was hungover and I felt so fucking guilty. I was breast-feeding and my milk needed to be the best that it can be so that she can grow from it, and I was being selfish. So I started rethinking being in Fruits and Veggies altogether.” The conclusion of the Fruits and Veggies saga and her subsequent relocation from Durban to Cape Town, led Pure to manifest, in the form of a new solo career, the many lessons that she learned during her twenties, in which the urgency and abrasiveness of her punk roots were converted into a silkier, more organic and refined future-RnB sound that’s more reflective of her current state of being. “Going from sharing the music with 4 or 5 other energies, being at band practice and being able to contribute to a sharing environment, to just sitting alone with my computer, has been a major shift. But it’s been a very necessary pro-

cess in terms of where I’m at in my life. Going from partying really hard and constantly really exerting my energy with other people, to going sober and focusing on myself - my music has taken that same shift as well. So I know that this is where I need to be with my music.” The Vocal Alchemy EP comes across as a source of sonic solace. It’s a meditation on the power of the words that we use in our internal conversations that have the potential to shift our own realities - all scored to smooth down-tempo beats from the likes of producer-heavyweights such as Maramza and Jonty Hurd, as well as being mixed by Thor Rixon. This profound attention to the power of these conversations has been a source of strength to Pure and this EP marks the start of her journey towards sharing that strength with those who care to listen out for it. But it’s during Pure’s live performances where this strength is most solidified and easily exchanged between herself and the audience, as she regularly abandons the stage in order to maintain an unrestrained connection with her audience.

HIGH FIVES Princess Nokia

Noname

Jojo Abot

Oshun

Sophie

1992 Deluxe

Telefone

NGIWUNKULUNKULU

bittersweet vol. 1

Product

2017

2016

2017

2018

2015

Rough Trade

SoundCloud

Bandcamp

OSHUN

Numbers

“I knew that I couldn’t be this fucking punk rock lead-singer and a mom. The first show that I played after I gave birth, I left Naledi with my THE LAKE

33


\\

34

THE LAKE


>

“Going from sharing the music with 4 or 5 other energies, being at band practice and being able to contribute to a sharing environment, to just sitting alone with my computer, has been a major shift. But it’s been a very necessary process in terms of where I’m at in my life. Going from partying really hard and constantly really exerting my energy with other people, to going sober and focusing on myself - my music has taken that same shift as well. So I know that this is where I need to be with my music.”

THE LAKE

35


\\

36

THE LAKE


>

DISCOGRAPHY PURE Vocal alchemy EP 2018 Soundcloud

“I just want more and more for my live performances to make people feel like we’ve experienced something together. Like, I’m having conversations with people and I’m actually touching people while not being on the stage and breaking that barrier that separates us. I still get extremely nervous before I go on stage but when I’m half-a-song in, then that anxiety turns into a fuel and then I’m able to ignore every feeling of anxiety or shame. I do have weird issues with my body but sometimes I find myself on stage showing people my belly or flashing a boob so it enables me to be less self-conscious and more playful.”

The path that Pure has taken with her creative and personal life has not been easily forged. But the questions that are pondered at the start of such a path - Where does it all lead? What will become of us? - are, as Patti Smith suggested in her memoir Just Kids, young questions that reveal young answers: “It leads to each other. We become ourselves.” Of course, Patti was referring to her late partner Robert Mapplethorpe but in this instance it could refer to Pure and Naledi, her audience and her music. Together, they have found themselves and will continue to do so. “I just want to be as honest as possible to myself through this whole music process. I don’t want to half-heart what I’m doing and I don’t want to do it just because people expect me to be a musician. I want to do it in the most sincere way that makes me feel good and safe and when I release stuff I want to be like: Yeah, listen.” INFO: www.soundcloud.com/purity-zinhle-mkhize THE LAKE

37


\\

38

THE LAKE


> WORDS - Dewald bruwer

PHOTOGRAPHY - Dewald bruwer

aberration Dewald bruwer

“I don’t like captions. I prefer people to look at my pictures and invent their own stories” - Josef Koudelka

Any preconceived idea of what I have in mind to photograph gets consumed by the world around me. I’m not in control of what happens, but I’m observant and receptive to what goes on. The act of taking photos is a voyage of discovery of myself, others and to what I orient myself towards. The photos I’m interested in are the ones that ask questions and suggest rather than state, leaving it open to interpretation. Being aware of narratives within the picture and following your intuition will lead to a certain disclosure; as the saying goes, anything that is truly personal becomes universal.

www.instagram.com/dewaldbruwer

THE LAKE

39


\\

40

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

41


\\

42

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

43


\\

44

THE LAKE


>

Vans Versa Functionality and style at its finest Continuing to build on franchise success from past seasons, this spring Vans expands the Versa QZP offering, introducing a mock-neck silhouette to compliment the Versa Hoodie’s subtle technical benefits. The Versa QZP brings purposeful innovation into a classic fleece design that embraces timeless style and skateboard functionality all-in-one.

THE LAKE

45


\\

Vans designers continue to focus on creating a garment that is fully functional and versatile in various climates. Pro-built with a super-durable fleece fabric construction, the Versa QZP features a Storm Cotton™ finish to repel water and keep you dry. The Versa QZP’s new checkerboard details line the fleece’s sleeves and interior collar, injecting Vans ubiquitous aesthetic into the franchise staple. In addition, the Versa QZP features a patent-pending hidden media pocket offering additional utility, a front kangaroo pocket and a low-profile drawstring hem. www.vans.com

46

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

47


\\

48

THE LAKE


> WORDS - Tecla Ciolfi

PHOTOGRAPHY - Gabrielle Weinstein

DOG TEETH Shadowclub

When Shadowclub released their debut album Guns and Money in 2011, South Africa’s music scene was in a very different space to the one it’s currently in. MK was thriving, 5FM played rock music and Just Music was the premiere indie label making the majors look subpar by signing, well, pretty much everyone who was hot property. Shadowclub was one of the main Joburg-based jewels in Just Music’s crown, a fact which was cemented when the band won a SAMA for Best Rock in 2012. There was a period of about two years postGuns and Money when no band could touch the trio performance-wise. Led by a manic, wide-eyed Jacques Moolman (vox/guitar) who was flanked by Louis Roux (bass) and Isaac Klawanksy (drums), their sound was unashamedly raw, their presence magnetic. Their strength lay in their ability to seamlessly translate what you heard on one of their albums, to what you experienced at one of their shows. It’s this syncopation quality, which is overlooked by a myriad of bands nowadays, that quite simply makes Shadowclub so goddam great. But after some severe graft to reach and remain at the top of their game, through a serious case of blistering the candle at both ends, Shadowclub’s exhausting stint on the road began to take its toll. “We weren’t in a great place,” Klawansky states frankly. “Our expectations for the second album [Goodbye Wild Child] were high, and when it didn’t perform as well as we wanted it to we became quite despondent. We toured it for over 18 months and by the end

of it we were fed up with the songs and our set and were feeling quite cynical about life as a band.” “At one point we were doing anything from 20 to 25 shows a month and it’s tough in so many respects,” Moolman explains, shaking his head in a sort of retrospective disbelief. “I felt like we’d lost the feeling of camaraderie that is essential for me personally within the creative space of a band. It felt like our egos were getting the better of us and I just wanted to throw in the towel.” “Personally I wasn’t sure if we’d ever get busy with Shadowclub again, but it turns out we had unfinished business,” Klawansky laughs.

Five years later and their third album Big Green Mamba Dream is a mature, slowed-down seven-track body of work. It’s also reflective of the state the trio is in – calm and somewhat collected.

HIGH FIVES The Presets

Bombay Show Pig

Bass Drum of Death

Vulture / Provider

Bass Drum of Death

2008

2012

Modular

Rough Trade

Apocalypso

THE LAKE

The Black Keys

Dr. Dre

Thickfreakness

2001

2013

2003

1999

Innovative Leisure

Fat Possum

Aftermath Entertainment

49


\\

50

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

51


\\

52

THE LAKE


>

“In its simplicity it’s one of the most honest representations of what longing for a new love feels like when you’re on your way back to them from far away,” Moolman explains. “In the few words I used to compose it, I left an imprint of the excitement I felt for the new life I knew was coming to fruition through being back in the studio, back on stage and allowing my heart to love and be loved again.”

But the road to crafting the album and getting Shadowclub’s train back on its tracks was not without its adversities for everyone, but especially for Moolman. “I went through a terrible divorce at the end of 2015 and literally felt like the carpet of the life I’d built had been pulled from under my feet,” he begins. Moolman pauses for a good few seconds before continuing, “Probably one the scariest experiences I’ve ever had, but a blessing in the long run. I lost Shadowclub at the same time and it really was the hardest blow and no one’s doing but mine.” It was on his dad’s farm, in the agricultural town of Groot Marico in the North West Province, that Moolman found solace and a sense of salvation as he detoxed physically (while clearing 20-odd hectares with his trusty axe, saw and shears) and emotionally (while teaching a local kid how to play guitar and in turn starting to write songs again). It was also a freak encounter with a mamba, and several other snakes on the farm, that gave rise to the new album’s title.

far away,” Moolman explains. “In the few words I used to compose it, I left an imprint of the excitement I felt for the new life I knew was coming to fruition through being back in the studio, back on stage and allowing my heart to love and be loved again.” Looking to the future, even with Klawansky living in Cape Town now, Shadowclub seem to finally have their collective shit together. “The only downside is not being able to jam or write or record whenever we want, but honestly it feels like it’s running smoother now than it ever has,” he shrugs.

stage you realise the wheat has immediately been separated from the chaff because even now, few bands come close. INFO: www.facebook.com/ShadowclubFanPage INFO: @shadowclubofficial INFO: @shadowclub

DISCOGRAPHY Shadowclub Big Green Mamba Dream

Klawansky is also the first one to admit that the bumps in the road are part and parcel of what builds character saying, “You can’t be in a band and not go through shit. I guess our egos have dissolved slowly over the years which means we’re taking ourselves less seriously. We’ve also got pretty stupid senses of humor so that helps.”

2018

2013

The outer-spacey lyrical themes that weave their way through Big Green Mamba Dream are reinforced by the bright and bold He-Man-like artwork that was created for each track by Elio Maovero. But it’s “Intergalactic Hook Up”, a ballad which Moolman wrote for his current girlfriend, that stands head and shoulders above the rest owing mainly to one of the finest hooks he’s ever written.

As for Roux, despite being overwhelmingly busy running the highly successful Joburg eatery Pablo Eggs-Go-Bar and the gorgeous Pablo Guest House in Melville, he is characteristically upbeat about the band’s resurgence declaring, “Once we got back in the room together, it was like a fresh start and old feels all over again. I have no idea what the future holds for Shadowclub but after what we’ve been through both personally and together over the last decade or more, anything is possible.”

“In its simplicity it’s one of the most honest representations of what longing for a new love feels like when you’re on your way back to them from

In an indie scene that’s currently saturated by garage and psych bands, Shadowclub sticks out like a bluesy sore thumb. And as soon as they’re on-

Just Music

THE LAKE

Just Music Shadowclub Goodbye Wild Child

Just Music

Shadowclub Guns and Money 2011

53


\\

54

THE LAKE


> WORDS - Sean O’Toole

PHOTOGRAPHY - OLIVER KRUGER

emoting DANiel LEVI

How do you do these things? It is a fair question. Congenially, I say. Ah yes, he smiles. Coffee? Yes please, I say. The painter ignites a blue flame on the gas hob. We stumble into a beginning. Long after the coffee is boiled, poured, honey dispensed, broth stirred and cup placed on a table next to two paintings from the time before declared himself a painter, again … Long after invoking Johannesburg, where he grew up, started drumming at age nine, played in bands with names like Almighty Thor (with Markus Wormstorm), started making music videos for a scenester friend called Watkin Tudor Jones … Long after hearing about his urbane granny, who collected paintings by Irma Stern, and his German grandfather, who was a witness against Adolph Hitler following the moustached fascist’s arrest for concocting a failed coup in a Munich beer hall in 1923 …Long after speaking about Michaelis, the snooty Cape Town art school where he was taught by Peggy Delport and Malcolm Payne, mimicked English portraitist Lucian Freud and met painter Matt Hindley, with whom he started one of this country’s first online design agencies … Long after all this talk, this extended introduction, Daniel Levi takes me in his painting studio. Lenny, his dog, follows us inside. The studio, a second bedroom in Levi’s ground-floor apartment, overlooks Vredehoek’s many attempts at budget art deco. It is summer outside, unusually wind still for this gusty corner of Cape Town. The studio’s walls are lined with evidence of Levi’s recent labours, technically accomplished portraits of solitary figures rendered against neutral backdrops of mostly bleached yellows and sandy browns. Collectively, they explain what Levi did in 2018, after he decided to take a pause from directing. Seen on Instagram, these paintings, these painstaking but joyous labours, tend to look life-like, precise, photorealist. Instagram dissembles. In the real Levi’s paintings are just that, accumulations of studiously mixed colour pigment directed with a brush. At one point Levi demonstrates how he holds his brush, at the far tip from the soft hairs. It produces gestural images. “I like the idea of capturing form and tone with a gesture,” he says. “It is technically showy, but it appeals to me.”

The embrace of flashiness is deeply coded into the practice of painting. It is what distinguished Frans Hals from his workmanlike contemporaries of the Dutch golden age, or John Singer Sargent from other court painters during America’s first gilded age. Levi admires bravura flair in painting. His personal pantheon includes painterly showmen like Auerbach, Bacon, Freud and Velázquez. Oh, and Michaël Borremans. “I’m obviously looking very closely at his work,” says Levi of the contemporary Belgian master of pensive stares. Obviously. It is visible in the denuded contexts of Levi’s brooding subjects presented in three-quarter poses, in the declined heads of his mostly fictional sitters, in his deep investment in mood and emotion, and – super obvs – in all those shrouded faces. Many of Levi’s figures are masked. Borremans is an important reference, but – it should be stressed – not the only one. A cinephile, Levi’s paintings are littered with filmic quotes. State of Siege (2018), an arresting portrait of a shrouded figure achieved in tones of brown

and yellow, references Greek-French director Costa-Gavras’s flick State of Siege (1972). Morning Child (2018), which portrays a masked woman in yellow oilskin, is based on Alfred Sole’s horror film Alice, Sweet Alice (1976). It also bears a striking resemblance to Borremans’s Mombakkes I & II (2007), two differently scaled works depicting the same woman wearing a transparent mask with exaggerated rouge cheeks and blue eye shadow. Levi’s reverence for Borremans is complicated and not dissimilar his youthful quest to “unwrap the puzzle” of how Freud painted. Levi was 19 when he saw a Freud in the real for the first time. It was in London. Instead of spending time doing larger and pills in front of large speaker stacks he and a friend opted to draw and sketch in front of famous paintings. In a cartoon adaptation of Levi’s life his eyes would be shown popping in front of the Freud. He still recalls the “visceral feeling” of the encounter, the experience of “seeing paint as flesh”. He adds, “There was something so raw and human about his work, matched with an extreme technique.”

HIGH FIVES Laurie Anderson Homeland

Brian Eno & David Byrne My Life in the Bush of Ghosts

John Coltrane Both Directions at Once: The Lost Album

Kamasi Washington

Diamond Thug Apastron

Heaven and Earth

2010

1981

2018

2018

2018

Nonesuch

Sire Records

Impulse!

Young Turks

KuduKudu

THE LAKE

55


\\

Dan Levi - “Safely Faking” / Oil on Canvas - 70x60cm // 2018

56

THE LAKE


>

Dan Levi - “Mr Lonely” / Oil on Canvas - 70x60cm // 2018

Dan Levi - “Uncertain Comforts” / Oil on Canvas - 70x60cm // 2018

Dan Levi - “Looking Out” / Oil on Canvas - 60x50cm // 2018

Dan Levi - “The Crowd Pleaser” / Oil on Canvas - 60x50cm // 2018

THE LAKE

57


\\

Dan Levi - “State of Seige” / Oil on Canvas - 70x60cm // 2018

58

THE LAKE


>

“There’s a poetry in the macabre and melancholic that, I think, many people, many South Africans, would prefer to avoid because it’s too vulnerable a space to occupy,”

Dan Levi - “Alan C” / Sumi Ink on paper - A4 // 2018

Dan Levi - “Drawing of a woman” / Sumi Ink on paper - A4 // 2018

Dan Levi - “Squeeze” / Sumi Ink on paper - A4 // 2018

Not so hidden in this flashback is a clue to appreciating Levi’s new paintings, which unashamedly emote. “I’m at my best emoting,” he says. “As much as I like the technical aspect of painting, the thing that ultimately connects me is the emotional engagement.”

pealing to his admirers? Perhaps it is the way he isolates his subjects to convey human complexities of joy and inner exile. Quite possibly too it is his refusal of Cape Town’s sharp Atlantic light in favour of a murky palette that embraces frigid elegance. Levi’s paintings are principally composed from ochre and cadmium yellow, titanium and flake white, cadmium red, French ultramarine blue and black. Another possibility for explaining the cascading likes his works generate on Insta is his unashamed embrace of identity angst in his work. All of Levi’s preoccupied subjects are white.

leavens with cute. In one painting from last year Lenny, his dog, is portrayed wearing a sheet with cutout eyes. It is Wes Anderson gothic.

Take his paintings of young men wearing tinfoil masks. Based on photographs he took of a friend, Levi briefly exhibited these works last year on curator Wendy Fredriksson’s Penumbra, a nifty survey of new work by whizz-kids like Io Makandal, Mitchell Gilbert Messina and Thuli Gamedze. Two things happened. One, Levi sold a couple of paintings, enabling him to eat. Two, his paintings briefly escaped the ersatz world Instagram, where lightning strikes, flames, black hearts and jittery hands clapping are the vestigial traces of how we now look, and are moved. Just what is it that makes Levi’s portraits so different, so ap-

“I’m an extreme introvert,” says Levi by way of accounting for himself and his work. “The stuff that informs my work is not Cape Town and the external world.” Rather, it is intangible psychological states of being – thought, introspection, nostalgia, melancholy – which, on occasion, he THE LAKE

“There’s a poetry in the macabre and melancholic that, I think, many people, many South Africans, would prefer to avoid because it’s too vulnerable a space to occupy,” Levi later writes in an email, long after this critic and his notebook have walked out into the bright sunshine. Those emails multiply. They expand, clarify and unapologetically argue the context and ambition of his singular, lugubrious portraits. “Our shadowy history seems to cause people to seek out happy, bright things – we have not yet arrived at place where light and shadow are both seen as equally and perfectly acceptable and wondrous parts of life.” INFO: www.instagram.com/danieladamlevi 59


\\

60

THE LAKE


> WORDS - Kate White

PHOTOGRAPHY - BILLY MONK

ruffler BILLY MONK

It’s 1967 and we’re at Les Catacombs Club in Cape Town. Billy Monk is the bouncer. He’s the guy who decides who’s welcome. The Terrorism Act had just been passed, but his door policy is decidedly democratic. Billy Monk is also the photographer.

Before and after, he’s a kreef poacher, a Woolworths model, and a Transkei drug runner. He’s gone to jail for trying – and failing to – steal a safe from OK Bazaars. He has ‘a look’. The charm of a hustler. A childhood that includes one spoken-memory of dad puking in the gutter. Three sisters. A wife named Jeanette. Always late; prone to violence. His sexual appetite is legendary: ravenous, a ladies man who – nbd – hooks up with men. There is definitely a boast here – you want to have slept with Billy Monk.

Brown, white, black, and passing-as. Male, female, more passing-as. East and West: Japanese trawlermen, American boys. Beehives, mini-skirts and no skirts. Sex workers. Interracial loving. The gays. More than three black men in one place. Jazz. Rock n Roll. Illegal booze (the club didn’t have a liquor license so Coca-Cola was the official tender, with brandy, known as Harries, sold by Billy himself). A lifestyle unchanged for over four hundred years: sailors heading dockside for food and drink, sex and love.

In the end he becomes a diamond diver – totally legit, above board. In the end, he is remembered as a photographer. In the end, he is the person who is shot. When he dies he knows that Jac De Villiers moved into his old studio and has found three ring-binders of negatives. Endorsed by David Goldblatt, a solo exhibition is organised for July 1982 at The Market Gallery. Billy Monk was due to attend. He does not make it to Johannesburg.

Under the brutality of public Apartheid, a private world. Sex, race and gender meld. See: here is lust. Genuine laughter. Happiness in just being yourself. That man has spread his legs, straddled a chair and is pointing his toes. Witness the full-face graunch, a bottle in one hand, a lady in the arms. Another lady, but with the jaw of a man and luscious lips.

He never finds out that his photos were bought by JAG and the South African National Gallery. That Martin Parr writes about him and Phaidon, amongst many others, publishes him. That all the international papers fawn over his work. That he is referenced alongside Diane Arbus, Mary Ellen Mark and Daido Moriyama. But he is a photographer so he does not die and the people he has captured do not die either. Here are their nights. Here is the immortalisation of liminal people, illegal people. Between 1967 and 1969, Billy Monk documented the sailors, their ladies and men, and locals who drank at two of the dodgiest bars in Cape Town’s Red Light District. THE LAKE

Superficially speaking, Billy Monk created the documents for posterity – but not for museums or fancy houses. These so-called snapshots were sold to the patrons. Itinerants who wanted to remember that night. But a newspaper article from 1982 points out that he opened a photographic studio in Bloem Street. He shot on a Pentax and chose Ilford PF4, his negatives and contact sheets were itemised (the bane of any photographer’s life), and he briefly tried wedding photography (apparently, this gave him ‘the horries’ which makes sense when your special skill is capturing the loose honesty of late night debauchery). There is intention in his technical choices. The film he chose overaccommodates two stops in bad light and he used a flash that shows up all the details - background, foreground and everything in between. His framing is also layered: ladies wait for patron-lovers under a sign that says A Clean Heart & Cheerful Spirit; men line up outside a toilet door that announces they are indeed Gents. 61


\\

62

THE LAKE


>

THE LAKE

63


\\

64

THE LAKE


>

Before and after, he’s a kreef poacher, a Woolworths model, and a Transkei drug runner. He’s gone to jail for trying – and failing to – steal a safe from OK Bazaars. He has ‘a look’. The charm of a hustler

THE LAKE

65


\\

66

THE LAKE


>

The details of his murder are murky: everyone was drunk, there was a fight at a bar in Green Point, possibly over furniture. He was shot once or twice. The newspapers all wrote about it. His last words were either ‘okay, you’ve shot me, so now what?’ or ‘now you gone and killed me’.

In 1979, photographer Jac De Villiers moved into the Bloem Street studio. He contacted Billy Monk and by 1982 the work was public. The original prints were 11 x 15cm, but De Villiers entrusted the developing and printing to Andrew Meintjies who chose to re-present the images at 17 x 25. He also cleaned up the quality and, between De Villiers and Meintjies, they chose visuals more aesthetically minded. They’ve said that it felt like Billy Monk didn’t really believe the show would happen. But it did and the exhibition was an immediate success. The appeal is the honesty of the patrons. How relaxed everyone is. How happy the subjects are to be seen and appreciated by a fellow rogue. Objectively, there is a sense of the exotic, but in most of the photos, the subjects have ownership of their moment. There is pride in the poses. Billy Monk returns the trust. In 2019’s late post-modernism of looking, we think we’re accustomed to the candid. But our current appropriation is sanitised (consider the difference between the series Pose and the documentary ParTHE LAKE

is is Burning). The pictures get looser, the night later – more empty bottles, legs wider, kissing that seems louche. Is that man doubled-over even alive? Are the women smiling for their hard-earned rands or are they legitimately having a good time. The photographer knows the answers to these questions, but his body is with the fishes. Billy Monk was, aptly, given a sailor’s burial. On 5 August, 1982 friends and family took his body out on a boat. There was poetry, champagne and crying. The details of his murder are murky: everyone was drunk, there was a fight at a bar in Green Point, possibly over furniture. He was shot once or twice. The newspapers all wrote about it. His last words were either ‘okay, you’ve shot me, so now what?’ or ‘now you gone and killed me’. It doesn’t matter what he said: the monk who took pictures of sex workers and dodgy sailors in a venue named after European cemeteries that exhibit corpses has immortalised the dead. Billy Monk is not forgotten and neither are his people. INFO: www.billymonk.com 67


\\

68

THE LAKE


> WORDS - DISCODETA

PHOTOGRAPHY - STAN KAPLAN

WAX JUNKIE Odette Kleynhans / DISCODETA I started collecting LPs when my gran handed me a box of my father’s records that she had held onto after his death. My father had an extensive collection of Talking Heads, Uriah Heep, Deep Purple, Elvis and a bunch of “hits”mixes. At sixteen I thought my father’s collection was rather impressive, but being an avid East Coast hip hop head and Fourways local, I didn’t appreciate all of it. After that the years I spent hangin out with Rick De La Ray in Melville and being exposed to good music, bars and the XAI XAI, my love for vinyl grew deep. Erykah Badu Baduizm 1997 / Universal

THE SMITHS Hatful of Hollow 1984 / Rough Trade

Along with Tribe Called Quest – Love Movement, this is the first CD I bought, and have had to replace both of them probably about 3 times thanks to friends and brothers “borrowing” them. I love this on my own, loud in my car, (any music loud in the Fox), singing from “Rimshot” to finish and especially hitting the ‘tude on “Tyrone” when she says …. “but you can’t use my phone”... Take a seat please.

I love the single “PANIC”. I find it hard to choose a favorite album because I love it all, but “Hatful of Hollow” comes to mind because of a burst geyser. The Scottish plumber arrived on a Saturday morning while I was going about my Saturday morning movements listening to Hatful of Hollow, and said (in a heavy Scottish accent), “aaaaaah…… The Smiths!! Fuck the Smiths!!! You should listen to Spandau Ballet!” With The Smiths, you either love it or you don’t. #HANGTHEDJ

Yazoo You and Me Both 1983 / Mute Records

the Pharcyde Bizarre Ride II the Pharcyde 1992 / Delicious Vinyl

For me, one of the best synthpop groups of its time. Alison Moyet and her deep bluesy bellows, and Vince Clarke’s mournful music on keyboard, who later went on to compose for Depeche Mode, The Assembly and then to form Erasure in 1985 – of course it’s going to be good. Alison Moyet was in her early twenties when she recorded the first 2 Yazoo albums. Nobody’s Diary is perhaps to this day one of the finest songs credited to Alison Moyet and is an outstanding opener to “You and Me Both”. “Walk away from love” is one of my all time favorite break up tracks, a classis delivered with passion and a powerful first track to side B.

Fourways Mall, skate comps, after parties, joints, and a blue golf DECO with 6x9” speakers pumpimg i the in the back. What a time to be alive. Roces rollerblading skate comps had the best after parties, Ready D and his crew of B-Boys, DJ Hamma, Morgan and then on the odd occasion the Brassa van die Kaap crew along with my introduction to The Pharcyde. It is in my opinion, one of hip hops finest and most influencial albums released in the 1990’s. Every track is a ride into their comedic look on modern day life. The album demonstrates the passion of hip-hop with enthusiasm and commitment, two elements I believe have been diluted by today’s hiphop artitsts. As an old school hip-hop fan I am waiting for the ‘return of the b-boy’

Julia Jacklin Don’t Let The Kids Win 2016 / Polyvinyl Record Co

Talking Heads Speaking in Tongues 1983 / Sire Records

While I was living in NYC, my Aussie friend Amy introduced me to the soulful sweetness of Julia Jacklin. “Pool Party” is the first single of her debut album “Don’t let the kids win” and starts off with a guitar riff that gets your attention and makes you want to listen to what comes next.And then, for Triple J radio, Like a Version show, she covers “The Strokes – Someday”. Enough said - heart stolen. I saw her a few times when I lived in NYC and bought “Don’t let the kids win” vinyl at one of her gigs. Thank you Amy. Forever.

There wasn’t a chance that I wouldn’t be a massive Talking Heads fan. Thanks Dad. “This must be the place” is hands down one of the most honest love songs ever written. It is my absolute favorite track of all time. The album’s tour was documented in the film “Stop making sense” and David Byrne dancing with the lamp makes me want to dance like David Byrne or Fred Astaire. Then you get Tina Weymouth on the bass. ITS EVERYTHING !

THE LAKE

69


\\

70

THE LAKE


>

Superdry started with a handful of t-shirts and has since expanded to create thousands of designs to date. A mix of ultramodern technology and retro techniques mean that each garment is stamped with the Superdry magic.

This season goes old school - taking inspiration from America’s iconic urban landscape. Bright graphics in a bold primary colour palette with soft retro lights set the tone for the season. Master your layer game with standout t-shirts and tops stamped with the brand’s signature attention to detail. @SuperdrySA PHOTOGRAPHY - Aden Ajam @adenajam Main Image - Anesu Chogugudza @aneyx_ / Top left - Aden Ajam @adenajam / Top right - Abongwe @iamabongwe THE LAKE

71


\\

72

THE LAKE


>

Tattoo Mania Francois coertzen “There is so much I love about what I do. I get to create artwork for people that they will carry with them for a lifetime. Each tattoo has a story and the wearer will share that story with me.” Exploring some of Cape Town’s best tattoo artists who have been inspired by the legendary tattooist Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins and the rum that carries his name Sailor Jerry Rum.

Why and how did you become a tattoo artist?

What do you most enjoy about the work that you do?

After working in the Animation industry I didn’t quite know what I wanted to do or where I was headed with my career; all I knew was I loved drawing and wanted to do something that allowed me to do that - it was at that point that I decided that I wanted to be a tattoo artist. I approached many tattoo studios about getting an apprenticeship but to no avail, though through my dedication and persistence I was able to get an apprenticeship, which ended up being one of the best decisions of my life.

There is so much I love about what I do. I get to create artwork for people that they will carry with them for a lifetime. Each tattoo has a story and the wearer will share that story with me.

What is your personal style of tattooing? I’m versatile in all styles but my preferred style would be anything from neo-traditional to full color cartoon and anime-related.

Does Cape Town have a particular style of tattoo artistry? If so, please describe it. I would say Cape Town has a wide variety of tattoo artistry; there are so many amazing, talented artists that are pushing the boundaries of tattooing as a whole.

I also see that more people are open to custom designs as of late, rather than getting something straight out of a book or off the internet. How did Norman Sailor Jerry Collins influence your personal style? I’ve always loved the American Traditional tattoo style; seeing how well the tattoos age over long periods of time made me look into Norman “Sailor Jerry” Collins’ work. From that I started to put bold lines and solid color saturation into my work. Which of his iconic designs is your personal favourite and why?

What specific trends have you seen happening in the Cape Town tattooing scene?

If I had to pick one, it would be the classic pin-up girl or mermaid.

The semicolon tattoo has become quite popular and has significant meaning to the individual.

STUDIO INSTA: @tattoomaniacapetown WEB: www.tattoomania.co.za

THE LAKE

73


\\

PRINT RUN REVIEWS - XAVIER NAGEL

SUPPLIED BY - BIBLIOPHILIA

Why Materials Matter

Adjustment Day People pass the word only to those they trust most: Adjustment Day is coming. They’ve been reading a mysterious book and memorizing its directives. They are ready for the reckoning. Adjustment Day (R290) is an ingeniously comic work in which Chuck Palahniuk does what he does best: skewer the absurdities in our society. Smug, geriatric politicians bring the nation to the brink of a third world war in an effort to control the burgeoning population of young males; working-class men dream of burying the elites; and professors propound theories that offer students only the bleakest future.

74

Kinnes Almal in Jurassic Park op die Kaapse Vlakte ken vir Anwaar ‘Ahnie’ Brandt vandat hy ’n ekstra in die film GangStar was. Maar die baas van die Butcher Boys soek nog meer roem. Nou maak die gang hulle eie movies met hul selfone – movies wat die vrees in mense se oë vasvang. Rolanda Fischer wil ’n lewe van weelde soos ’n Cape Kardashian hê, en as sy nie ’n celebrity op sosiale media kan word nie, gaan sy vir haar ’n ryk man kry. In Kinnes (R220) deur Chase Rhys word moeilike waarhede met deernis en humor oopgeskryf.

In Why Materials Matter; Responsible Design for a Better World (R1290) Seetal Solanki presents a colorful panoply of ideas, technologies, and creative efforts that focus on the earth’s most basic elements, while also showing how these elements can be transformed into entirely new materials. It explores how ancient practices such as dyeing fabric and making glue may hold the secret to renewable and earth-friendly consumer products, as well as how recycling plastics can tackle food waste, and how a type of light metal being developed may one day make air travel less fuel-reliant.

How To Be Invisible Kate Bush is a true iconoclast and one of the most revered contemporary musical artists of recent years. Since her emergence in 1978 she has forged a creative path which has proved to be both highly innovative and hugely inspiring. Her artistic achievements have helped shape our cultural landscape and her singular vision has influenced many others. Selected and arranged by the author, and with a new introduction by novelist David Mitchell, How To Be Invisible (R335) presents for the first time the lyrics of Kate Bush, in a beautiful cloth-bound edition.

One Hundred Lyrics and a Poem

Journey to Everywhere

Throughout a career that spans four decades and thirteen studio albums with Pet Shop Boys, Neil Tennant has consistently proved himself to be one of the most elegant and stylish of contemporary lyricists. Arranged alphabetically, One Hundred Lyrics and a Poem (R335) presents an overview of his considerable achievement as a chronicler of modern life: the romance, the break-ups, the aspirations, the changing attitudes, the history, the politics, the pain. Often surprisingly revealing, this volume is contextualised by a personal commentary on each lyric and an introduction by the author, which gives a fascinating insight into the process and genesis of writing.

Journey to Everywhere (R275) documents the evolution of cyber-consciousness via social networking from a uniquely South African viewpoint. It’s a look-see into a world of psychedelics, an experiential romp with sacred madness through a desert of corporate zombification to an oasis beyond insanity. Join Mike Kawitzky’s alter-ego, Schwann the cybershaman, at a night on Ibiza, the LSD Symposium in Basel, covering solar eclipses or hanging out with the animals in South Africa’s Kruger National Park and meeting some of the leading psychedelic thinkers of our time, like Terence and Dennis McKenna, Rupert Sheldrake, Ralph Abraham and other extraordinary characters.

THE LAKE


>

Photo: Jacqui van Staden

YOUR MONEY IS NO GOOD HERE

five years of bedlam / the book NOVEMBER // 2019 THE LAKE

75


\\

PLIMSOLL

VANS - SK8-HI (Patchwork) Multi True White

VANS - ERA (Patchwork) Multi True White

VANS - CLASSIC SLIP-ON (Patchwork) Multi True White

VANS - OLD SKOOL (Mix Checker) Chili Pepper True White

VANS - AUTHENTIC (Mix Checker) Chili Pepper True White

VANS - CLASSIC SLIP-ON (Mix Checker) Chili Pepper True White

VANS - SK8-HI (Mix Checker) Chili Pepper True White

VANS - SK8-HI (Blur Check) Black Classic White

VANS - OLD SKOOL (Blur Check) Black Classic White

VANS - AUTHENTIC (Blur Check) Black Classic White

VANS - CLASSIC SLIP-ON (Blur Check) Black Classic White

VANS - VARIX (Staple) True White Marshmellow

ADIDAS - SLEEK diva / diva / red womans

ADIDAS - SAMBA RM core black / shock cyan gold met

ADIDAS - SAMBA RM ftwr white / core black clear mint

ADIDAS - SAMBA RM core black / ftwr white clear orange

ADIDAS - TAEKWONDO cream white / core black GUM 3 womans

ADIDAS - TAEKWONDO core black / ftwr white GUM 3 womans

ADIDAS - SUPER COURT raw white / chalk white off white

ADIDAS - A.R. TRAINER ftwr white / raw white off white

ADIDAS - CONTINENTAL 80 ftwr white / scarlet collegiate navy

ADIDAS - CONTINENTAL 80 core black / scarlet collegiate navy

ADIDAS - NITE JOGGER core black / carbon active blue

ADIDAS - HYPERSLEEK ftwr white / off white crystal white womans

New Balance - 997H RAIN CLOUD / DARK MANGO

New Balance - 997H SEA SALT / PEONY womans

New Balance - 997H White Leather

New Balance - 997H Black leather

New Balance - 997H MAGNET / ENERGY RED

New Balance - 997H BLACK / AIR womans

76

THE LAKE


>

WE ARE FOOLISHLY Ambitious

www.thelake.co.za Photo: Joshua Stein

THE LAKE

77


\\

78

THE LAKE


>

STREET SPIRIT NEW BALANCE / 997h

INTRODUCING THE 997H. A brand new silhouette inspired by the classic 997, but streamlined for a contemporary, modernized look. Released in 1991, the classic 997 boasted new technology and a new aesthetic for the 99x range. The silhouette fused C-Cap within the ENCAP sole unit, making a visual progression from previous styles.

The new silhouette offers more of a progression with GCEVA construction and modernized outsole for a lightweight ride. The Silhouette also features a synthetic leather and edge deboss on the tongue and collar directly inspired by the original 997, as well as suede, mesh, synthetic and leather details. www.newbalance.co.za THE LAKE

79


\\

80

THE LAKE


>

OUTRIDER JJF SIGNATURE OUTRIDER 3 SHELL JACKET BY HURLEY

designed in partnership with 2x world champion, john john florence. This lightweight jacket is built to keep you dry. With a modern parka-fit, it’s built for all-purpose weather, supported by bonded seams, hidden chest pocket and internal hidden phone pocket. An all-round stylish jacket to wear on the street or around water.

www.hurley.com THE LAKE

00


Profile for THE LAKE MAGAZINE

THE LAKE #025  

THE LAKE #025  

Profile for thelakeco
Advertisement

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded