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The Knox School CO-EDUCATIONAL | ELC TO VCE

Year 10 and VCE Subject Selection Handbook 2020


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Principal & Chief Executive’s Welcome Subject selection in the senior years of secondary education is both important and ‘overblown’ as an urban myth. Let’s deal with the urban myths first. There are far too many stories circulating amongst parents and students that these choices are critical and the remainder of your life can depend upon these choices. This is rarely the case. It is true that a few career directions have subject prerequisites and these need to be understood by those interested in these careers. Our careers practitioner, Ms Jacky Burton is superb, and students and parents should check with her if they are uncertain. The second myth is that you should choose subjects that will scale up and thus improve your ATAR. The research is conclusive. The best ATARs are developed by studying subjects in which you are motivated to engage with the topics and thus engage with the work involved. It is wise to remember that an ATAR is simply an invitation that lasts for 15 months. The higher the ranking, the broader the invitation to choose from amongst all the tertiary courses on offer. Our collective aim is to position our young people to be able to pursue a tertiary education and to study the course of their choice. Thus the ATAR is only important to the extent that it provides entry to the course of choice. It is also wise to remember that many courses use other methods to determine entry as well as, or instead of, the ATAR. Again, it is wise to check with Ms Burton. For most students the advice is really straight forward. Study the courses you are interested in and courses you like. You are committing to a lot of work over several years. Success at the VCE level is highly connected to how hard and how effectively students work. It is easier to put in long hours of effective study in subjects where interest and engagement is high. It is the hard work that gets the good results. Keep your pathways open. You may not know what career direction to take or if you do have a clear direction in mind, you may change your mind. Experience suggests that you should keep as many options open as long as possible. Keep pathways open and select a broad range of subjects. It is wise to remember that the future is, and will remain, ‘cloudy’ for most of us. Even if you know your career direction, the common advice is that many jobs and professional roles that will exist in the years to come currently are yet to be invented. Many current jobs and roles may come under threat from digital and economic disruption. You are most likely to remain in high demand in the decades ahead if you are: • articulate • able to write well • can calculate numbers • hard working • good at working with people • able to solve problems • able to draw on a solid body of knowledge. Above all else, enjoy yourself at school. Our school days should be amongst our happiest memories.

Allan Shaw Principal and Chief Executive

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Table of Contents Principal & Chief Executive’s Welcome .

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Table of Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Senior School Subject Information .

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7

Heads of Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Senior School Subject Videos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Year 10 at The Knox School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Year 10 Curriculum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Core Subjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Elective Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 The Year 11 and 12 Curriculum .

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12

Common Study .

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VCE Subjects .

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VCE VET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Selecting a Study Program at Year 10 .

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Pathways to Years 11 and 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Study Program – Years 11 and 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Subject Selection Process .

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16

Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 The Victorian Certificate of Education .

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16

The Victorian Baccalaureate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Entry into two VCE Subjects at Year 10 .

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Assessment and Reporting .

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Assessment of VCE Subjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 School-Assessed Coursework . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 School-Assessed Tasks .

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18

Satisfactory Completion – S and N .

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18

The General Achievement Test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Study Scores .

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Scaling of Study Scores .

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18

Australian Tertiary Admission Ranking (ATAR) .

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English .

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Year 10 Subjects .

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English as an Additional Language (EAL) Application and Skills . . . . . . . . . . 20 Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 History .

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. 24

Year 10 Subjects - Elective Subjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Digital Art .

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Finance and Wealth .

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26

Health and Human Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Chinese First Language (CFL) .

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27

Chinese Second Language (CSL) and Chinese Second Language Advanced (CSLA) .

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French .

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German . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Law and Politics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Music .

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30

Sports Science .

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31

Visual Communication Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 VCE Subjects .

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Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Applied Computing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Software Development .

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35

Biology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Business Management .

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37

Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 English .

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English as an Additional Language (EAL) Application . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Bridging EAL .

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Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Health and Human Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 History .

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Languages: Chinese First Language .

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Languages: Chinese Second Language .

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Languages: Chinese Second Language Advanced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Languages: French . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Languages: German .

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52

Legal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Literature .

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Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Mathematics: General Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Mathematics: Mathematical Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Mathematics: Specialist Mathematics .

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58

Music Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Music Investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Physics .

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. 62

Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Studio Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Theatre Studies (offered in alternate years) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Visual Communication Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Vocational Education and Training .

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67

Alternative Study Options .

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68

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VET in Schools (VETIS) programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 VCE VET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Glossary of VCE Terms .

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. 72

Step 1 – Logging on to Web Preferences .

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Subject Selection and Forms .

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70 73

Step 2 – Adding subject preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Year 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Year 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 Year 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Step 3 – Confirming subject preferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Step 4 – Printing your confirmation .

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Application to study two VCE subjects at Year 10 form .

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78

Application to study a VCE subject form . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Senior School Subject Information

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Senior School Handbook The Senior School Handbook is available through SEQTA and is a document that can be used alongside this Subject Handbook to clarify all aspects of course patterns and requirements for students and of The Knox School entering Years 10-12. The Senior School Handbook provides detailed information regarding the academic program offered in the Senior School. The focus of the curriculum program in the Senior School is on the development of pathways through to VCE. The Senior School Handbook draws on information published by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA). This includes information provided through specific subject study designs, the VCE Administrative Handbook and the booklet ‘Where to Now?’ distributed to all Year 11 students through the careers department. Questions regarding the Senior School academic program or the VCE at The Knox School can be directed to:

Ms Suzanne van Strien Head of Senior School suzanne.vanstrien@ knox.vic.edu.au

Dr Jane Lawrence Head of Differentiated Learning jane.lawrence@ knox.vic.edu.au

Mr Ben Ritchie

Ms Jacky Burton Career Development Practitioner jacky.burton@ knox.vic.edu.au

Ms Emma Kenny Head of English emma.kenny@ knox.vic.edu.au

Mr Cameron Bacholer Deputy Principal cameron.bacholer@ knox.vic.edu.au

Mr Alex Wilson Head of Health and Physical Education alex.wilson@ knox.vic.edu.au

Mrs Amanda McCleery

Mr Brenden Morris

Head of The Humanities

Head of Languages

Head of Mathematics

ben.ritchie@ knox.vic.edu.au

amanda.mccleery@ knox.vic.edu.au

brenden.morris@ knox.vic.edu.au

Ms Julia Stoppa Director of Music and Performing Arts julia.stoppa@ knox.vic.edu.au

Mrs Lindi Chiu

Ms Karen Lucas

Head of PEAK / EAL

Head of Science

lindi.chiu@ knox.vic.edu.au

karen.lucas@ knox.vic.edu.au

Mrs Birgit Verhagen Head of Technologies, Art and Design birgit.verhagen@ knox.vic.edu.au

The VCAA website at www.vcaa.vic.edu.au is a further source of information regarding the VCE. VCE Subject Extracts taken from VCAA Study Designs http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vce/studies/index.aspx

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Senior School Subject Videos Hear from current teachers and students about their subject, why they chose it and what makes their subject so great!

English Ms Emma Kenny, Victoria Balasis and Sienna Grove

Health & Human Development Mr Alex Wilson & Akshaay Shankar

Humanities Mr Ben Ritchie, Mrs Melodie Matheson, Chloe Newnham & Brianne Daly

EAL Mrs Lindi Chiu, Xiao (Gary) Lin & Aiqi (Ann) Xu

Music Ms Julia Stoppa & Caitlin Giang

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Senior School Subject Videos Hear from current teachers and students about their subject, why they chose it and what makes their subject so great!

Maths Mr Brenden Morris & Sahana Sughesh

Science Ms Karen Lucas & Ben Dimattina

TAD Mrs Joanne Vanderpol & Mr Nick Weiler

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Year 10 at The Knox School The Year 10 academic program serves two functions: to continue the development of core skills in the disciplines of English, Mathematics and Physical Education, and to offer students the chance to begin to specialise in areas of ability and interest. Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) subjects are offered to students for the first time, allowing those with clearly identified pathways to pursue their interests. Fundamentally, the Year 10 academic program offers students the opportunity to build a program of study that interests them and meets their needs. Year 10 students undergo a comprehensive Careers Testing program and receive substantial guidance on potential pathways. Year 10 students also participate in a camp which offers an opportunity to develop leadership skills, with the experience being planned by students requiring collaboration, communication, critical thinking and creativity to scaffold a unique time of service and skill acquisition.

The Year 10 Curriculum Core Subjects • English / English as an Additional Language (EAL) Application & Skills • Physical Education • Mathematics • Science • The Humanities - History or Geography

Elective Program Generally, students choose between two and four electives for study in Year 10; students who meet the requirements of English as an Additional Language (EAL) will also complete EAL Skills in place of History or Geography. The number of electives a student undertakes varies as Languages and VCE subjects are offered as full year subjects; all other electives are offered for one semester. All electives are offered providing there are sufficient student numbers and there are sufficient resources available regarding specialised spaces or equipment as well as an appropriate teacher.

Year 10 Electives (One Semester)

VCE Electives

• Digital Art

• Accounting Units 1 & 2

• Entrepreneurship

• Applied Computing Units 1 & 2

• Finance and Wealth

• Biology Units 1 & 2

• Health and Human Development

• Business Management Units 1 & 2

• Law and Politics

• Economics Units 1 &2

• Music

• Geography Units 1 & 2

• Sports Science

• History: Global Empires Units 1 & 2

• Visual Communication Design

• Legal Studies Units 1 & 2

Year 10 Electives (full year) • Chinese • French • German

• Music Performance Units 1 & 2 • Physical Education Units 1 & 2 • Psychology Units 1 & 2 • Studio Arts Units 1 & 2 • Theatre Studies Units 1 & 2

VCE VET Electives • Hospitality Units 1 & 2: Certificate II in Hospitality

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

The Year 11 & 12 Curriculum All subjects are offered subject to sufficient interest and resources.

Common Study English Units 1-4 English Unit 2 / Literature Units 1, 3-4 English as an Additional Language (EAL) Bridging EAL (English Units 1 & 2) English as an Additional Language Units 3 & 4 Note: Students wishing to undertake Literature will complete the Literature Unit 1 / English Unit 2 stream in which they will complete one unit of Literature and one unit of English preparing them for the study of either or both subjects. All other students will complete English Units 1-4 or for eligible EAL students, EAL Units 1 & 2, Bridging EAL Units 1 & 2 and EAL Units 3 & 4.

VCE Subjects • Accounting Units 1-4 • Applied Computing Units 1 & 2 • Applied Computing: Software Development Units 3 &4 • Biology Units 1-4 • Business Management Units 1-4 • Chemistry Units 1-4 • Economics Units 1-4 • Geography Units 1-4 • Health and Human Development Units 3 & 4 • History: Global Empires Units 1 & 2 • History: Revolutions Units 3 & 4 • Languages: Chinese First Language Units 1-4 • Languages: Chinese (Second Language) Units 1-4 • Languages: Chinese (Second Language Advanced) Units 1-4

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• Legal Studies Units 1-4 • Mathematics: General Mathematics (Further) Units 1 &2 • Mathematics: Further Mathematics Units 3 & 4 • Mathematics: Mathematical Methods Units 1-4 • Mathematics: Specialist Mathematics Units 1-4 • Music Performance Units 1-4 • Music Investigation Units 3 & 4 • Physical Education Units 1-4 • Physics Units 1-4 • Psychology Units 1-4 • Studio Arts Units 1-4 • Theatre Studies Units 1 & 2 • Visual Communication Design Units 1-4

VCE VET • Hospitality Units 1 & 2: Dual Recognition Program

• Languages: French Units 1-4

• Hospitality Units 3 & 4: Certificate II in Kitchen Operations

• Languages: German Units 1-4

• Hospitality Units 3 & 4: Certificate III in Hospitality


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Core Subjects

Language Yes

Languages No

VCE Subject Yes

VCE Subject No

VCE Subject Yes

VCE Subject No

Complete

Choose 2 more semester units

Choose 2 more semester units

Choose 4 more semester units

Selecting a Study Program at Year 10 Students select between two and four electives to study at Year 10; the precise number will be dependent upon whether they select to study a language or a VCE elective which are offered as full year subjects. Initially, students will be asked to indicate a series of preferences. Every endeavour will be made to enable students to study their desired electives; however, in some instances, students may instead be offered one or more of their alternate selections. All subjects are offered subject to the following constraints: • Student interest; classes which do not attract sufficient student interest will not proceed • Teacher availability; some classes may not be able to proceed if a suitable teacher is not available • Timetabling that might prevent students from studying certain combinations of subjects • Resource limitations; some subjects have a quota restriction due to limitations on the resources required. • Unit 1 & 2 subjects may be offered as a single unit study for one semester in the interests of maximising opportunities for students to study their preferred pathways. In such circumstances adjustments will be made to ensure the best possible preparation for study at the Unit 3 & 4 level. In selecting their study program for Year 10 at The Knox School students should: • Select studies in which they are interested • Consider what electives they studied in Year 9 and whether they would like to continue or broaden their study in that area • Consider whether they will undertake a Unit 3 & 4 study at Year 11 and what the appropriate pathway is to that study • Be aware of the implications of any requirements of tertiary courses or careers in which the student is interested

English In Year 10 English, students are given an opportunity to study a variety of texts; both preselected texts and a novel they may choose from a limited list. The associated tasks will expose students to the skills and demands necessary in both VCE English and Literature. Student write and perform in a variety of different forms and for different purposes to enhance their communication skills and to prepare them for their chosen VCE course.

Geography and History Students are offered the choice to continue their studies of The Humanities by undertaking Geography or History for the duration of the year.

Mathematics The Mathematics course at Year 10 prepares students for study of any of the VCE Mathematics courses. Students will

generally undergo pre-testing on each topic to determine their prior knowledge and skills. The results of the pretests, alongside the level of mathematics the student wishes to study at the VCE level, will determine the work program for the individual student through a topic.

Science The Science course at Year 10 provides a broad engagement with the three areas of scientific endeavour: biology, chemistry and physics. This prepares students for study of any of these science disciplines in VCE. The work program for individual students will be guided by the student’s prior knowledge and skills, and their intentions for study of a particular VCE science discipline.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Pathways to Years 11 & 12 The Year 10 programme offers students pathways through to VCE study whilst also enabling them to pursue areas of passion and interest. For some students, the most appropriate pathway towards Year 11 may be to undertake a VCE Unit 1 & 2 subject in Year 10. This will not be the case for all students. Students may elect to study a VCE Unit 1 & 2 subject at Year 10, creating an option to study the VCE Unit 3 & 4 of the same subject in Year 11. This can carry the benefit of gaining a 6th subject towards the scores used to generate an ATAR. The following table provides the recommended pathways for students through the Senior School:

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Common Study Programs – Years 11 & 12 A typical study programme at Year 10, 11 and 12 could consist of the patterns shown below. However, with the Knox School’s commitment to personalised learning, other options may be available after consultation with the Career Development Practitioner and the Head of Senior School. Year 10: One Unit 1 & 2 study and other Year 10 core and elective subjects Year 11: One Unit 3 & 4 (a continuation from Year 10); Five Unit 1 & 2 studies Year 12: Five Unit 3 & 4 studies The undertaking of two Units 3 & 4 studies in Year 11 is not advised as the workload, together with the student’s four other subjects, can compromise a student’s achievement. Six studies in Year 12 is a very heavy study program and is very rarely advised. Restrictions may be applicable to a student’s desired study plan due to: • Timetable restrictions (particularly for students who request a change to their study program at the commencement of the new year) • Necessary class size limitations in some subjects

Subject Selection Process Following the subject selection evening students will be invited to enter their preferences online. Once all preferences have been received, a printed copy of a student’s selections will be provided for parents to view, comment and sign.

Languages The study of a language other than English contributes to the overall education of students, most particularly in the area of communication, but also in the areas of cross-cultural understanding, cognitive development, literacy and general knowledge. It provides access to the culture of communities which use the language and promotes understanding of different attitudes and values within the wider Australian community and beyond. The study of a language requires continuity; as such, students considering undertaking the study of a language in Years 11 and 12 are required to study this language throughout Years 9 and 10 as well. Students are generally not able to change languages at Year 10.

The Victorian Certificate of Education The Victorian Certificate of Education is a two-year (four semesters) program of study, the equivalent time frame of Years 11 and 12. The Year 11 subjects are designated as Units 1 & 2 studies, whilst the Year 12 subjects are designated as Units 3 & 4. At The Knox School, some students elect to undertake a Unit 1 & 2 study in Year 10. Each VCE unit lasts for one semester or half-year, and represents approximately 100 hours of work, of which 50-60 hours is class time.To meet the graduation requirements of the VCE each continuing student must satisfactorily complete a total of no fewer than 16 units. There is no upper limit to the number of units a student can complete or the number of years a student may take to complete their VCE; most students will complete between 22-25 units of VCE study throughout their time in Years 10 to 12. Credit can be sought for equivalent interstate and overseas studies. Units 1 & 2 are designed to be taken by Year 11 students but they can be taken by students in other year levels following discussion with the Head of Senior School and the Careers Practitioner. Units 1 & 2 may be taken separately or in sequence. Units 3 & 4 are designed to be taken by Year 12 students but they also can be taken by students at other year levels with approval from the Head of Senior School and the Careers Practitioner. Units 3 & 4 must be taken as a sequence. To complete the Victorian Certificate of Education students must satisfactorily complete a minimum of 16 units of study which include: • A minimum of three units from the English group, including Units 3 & 4 At The Knox School students are required to undertake the following: • Year 12: English Unit 3 & 4 or English as an Additional Language Units 3 & 4 or Literature Units 3 & 4 • At least three other sequences of Units 3 & 4 studies that may include both English and Literature Units 3 & 4. 16


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

The Victorian Baccalaureate The Victorian Baccalaureate is an additional award recognising students who have undertaken a broad study plan. To be eligible for the award of the VCE (Baccalaureate), students must satisfactorily complete sixteen units of VCE study and meet the following requirements: • Complete a Units 3&4 sequence from English or Literature or English Language with a minimum study score of 30 or English as an Additional Language (EAL) with a minimum study score of 33 • Complete a Units 3 & 4 sequence in either Mathematics Methods or Specialist Mathematics • Complete a Units 3 & 4 sequence in a VCE Language. Students meeting the requirements of the Victorian Baccalaureate will have this recorded on their senior secondary certificate indicating they have successfully completed the VCE and met the requirements of the Victorian Baccalaureate. There is no application process.

Entry into two VCE Subjects at Year 10 Some students may wish to enrol in two VCE subjects at Year 10. Generally, this pathway is not recommended as the increase in workload is often difficult for a student to manage. Students achieving mainly ‘As’ in their studies may make a formal application in writing to be considered for the study of two VCE subjects. A sample form can be found at the back of this booklet. Students can obtain these forms from the office of either the Head of Senior School or the Career Development Practitioner.

Assessment and Reporting Grades in Year 10 are awarded according to the following standards. Students are assessed on their performance against the objectives and assessment criteria established for each task. A+

95 - 100%

A

85 - 94%

B+

80 - 84%

B

70 - 79%

C+

65 - 69%

C

50 - 64%

D+

45 - 49%

D

30 - 44%

UG

0 - 29%

NA

Well above the relevant national or state achievement standard

Above the relevant national or state achievement standard

Meeting the relevant national or state achievement standard

Approaching the relevant national or state achievement standard Not yet at the relevant national or state achievement standard Not Assessed

NA (Not Assessed) is recorded where a student has been unable to complete a task due to absence, illness or other extenuating circumstances. All assessment tasks are created whereby a ‘C’ is considered the proficiency of skills expected at thatgiven year level according to the relevant Australian or Victorian curricula.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Assessment of VCE Subjects Unit 1 & 2 assessment is graded on a 10 point scale, A+ - E in accordance with other subjects at Year 10 and throughout the School. This grading is for learning purposes and provides students with an indication of their learning progress and their level of achievement; a student’s achievement at the Unit 1 & 2 level has no bearing on the calculation of their Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) that is calculated at the end of Year 12 based on their achievement in Unit 3 & 4 subjects. Units 3 & 4 assessment is numerical and in all subjects constitutes an internal and external component. Units 3 & 4 internal assessment data is forwarded to the VCAA and is an important factor in determining a student’s ATAR. There are two forms of school-based assessment to assess the achievement of outcomes at the Units 3 & 4 level. One of these is SchoolAssessed Coursework (SACs). The second form of assessment is School-Assessed Tasks (SATs). Of the VCE studies offered at The Knox School, subjects such as Studio Arts, Software Development and Visual Communication Design have at least one SAT.

School-Assessed Coursework SACs must be completed within a specified time, mainly during class. In most studies the teachers select from a range of tasks designated for the assessment of learning outcomes. In most cases all students do the same task and these tasks are of comparable scope and demand. The amount of time allowed for each SAC is given to students in advance and specific details of the task are communicated prior to the starting date of each task. The SAC calendar is made available for all students at the commencement of the year to assist in the planning of their time. The School is responsible for the initial assessment of coursework. All SACs at The Knox School are cross-marked to ensure accuracy. SAC results are provided to the VCAA in July and October and are combined with a student’s examination result to determine their overall achievement for the subject; this is provided in the form of a study score which is in turn used to calculate a student’s ATAR. For further information on ATAR calculations, refer to the Senior School Handbook.

School-Assessed Tasks SATs are used in the studies of Studio Arts, Software Development and Visual Communication Design. The specifications for each task are set by the VCAA and are the same for every school. The assessment of a student’s level of achievement is conducted by the teacher using criteria provided by the VCAA. The initial assessment made by the School is forwarded to the VCAA and returned to the student as graded levels of achievement with an accompanying study score for the subject.

Satisfactory Completion – S and N All VCE subjects require specified learning outcomes to be achieved; outcomes for each respective VCE study are listed together with the subject information in the pages that follow. If a student completes work set by their teachers which demonstrates that the learning outcomes have been achieved, they will be deemed to have satisfactorily completed the unit. This decision is made by the school and reported to the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) as S (satisfactory) or N (not satisfactory). It should be noted that the awarding of an S or N for a given unit is entirely discreet from a student’s level of achievement.

The General Achievement Test Students enrolled in any Units 3 & 4 subject will complete a three-and-a-quarter hour examination in June known as the General Achievement Test (GAT). The GAT consists of two Writing Tasks and a series of multiple-choice questions. The GAT is a test of general skills - not specific knowledge - designed to measure a student’s skill across the broad areas of Written Communication, Mathematics, Science, Technology, Humanities, Arts and Studies of Society and the Environment. The VCAA will use students’ GAT scores as a basis for contributing to statistical moderation of school-based assessment results, checking the accuracy of external assessment marking, and calculating the Derived Examination Scores. Students undertaking a Units 3 & 4 study will be issued with an information booklet replete with sample questions that explains the nature of the writing tasks and the multiple-choice questions. The booklet also explains how GAT results will be used in VCE assessment. Students will undertake a Practice GAT in the first year of their study that includes a Unit 3 & 4 sequence.

Study Scores, Scaling and ATARs For information on these aspects of the VCE, please refer to the Senior School Handbook. 18


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Year 10 Subjects

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Year 10 Subjects - Core Subjects The core program of study at Year 10 provides increased choice allowing students to continue to pursue areas of interest and accelerate their learning. Year 10 represents the final year of a compulsory study program at The Knox School prior to entry to the VCE.

English Subject Description In Year 10 English, students will respond in written and oral form to the chosen texts. They will explore both preselected texts and text they may select from a limited list to produce analytical and creative responses. Students will also begin to develop strategies to identify and analyse persuasive arguments and language in various written and visual texts. They will also compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes through the study of two texts.

Areas of study • Text Response • Exploring Literature • Language Analysis • Comparative Writing

Assessment • Text response and language analysis essay • Creative Writing • Oral Presentations • Examinations

Resources • Texts set for study and English text book (as per booklist).

Pathway to future study This subject provides an introduction to many of the key skills that would benefit students studying English Unit 1 & 2 and / or Literature Unit 1 and English Unit 2.

English as an Additional Language (EAL) Application and Skills This subject is only available for students of a non-English speaking background who meet the requirements for enrolment in the VCE as an EAL student.

Subject Description The Year 10 EAL course consolidates skills and knowledge that will be needed for VCE study.

Areas of study • Language Skills – Development and reinforcement of the macro skills of listening, reading writing and speaking at the paragraph, sentence and word levels. • Using Language to Persuade - Students will first work on their oral skills and note-taking. They will then analyse persuasive language use in the media. • Text Study - Students will study printed and multimedia texts, focusing on the development of knowledge and skills for reading, creating and comparing in VCE English.

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Assessment • Text response and language analysis essay • Creative Writing • Oral Presentations • Homework Tasks • Examinations

Resources • Texts set for study and English text book (as per booklist).

Pathway to future study This course provides students with preparation to undertake VCE EAL Units 1 & 2.


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Physical Education Subject Description This subject focuses primarily on the practical component of Physical Education while also educating students on the health benefits of physical activity. This subject commences with a unit on minor games where the focus is on enjoyment, participation, teamwork and sportsmanship. Students will then embark on an individualised fitness journey, identifying baseline data through a range of fitness tests, before applying a chosen training method to strive for improvement. Students will also participate in a number of different sports and activities with the core focus of developing the skills and knowledge to be a lifelong participant and advocate for physical activity well after secondary school. This course is the duration of one year.

Areas of study • Positive action to enhance own and others’ health, safety and wellbeing. • Develop an understanding of their personal fitness and methods of improvement. • Students develop specialised movement skills and understanding in a range of physical activity settings.

The following are just some of the Units that are contained within this dynamic course; • Individual and group training programs • Lifelong recreational sports • Lifelong physical activities • Various ball, foot, net, stick based sports and games.

Assessment • Practical Assessment • Students will be assessed in a variety of areas including: sportsmanship, participation, motor skill development, and game play.

Pathway to future study This subject provides an introduction to many skills which will ideally be studied alongside the Year 10 elective, Sports Science. This subject ensures that students are thoroughly prepared for VCE Physical Education or Health and Human Development.

• Students explore the role that games and sports, outdoor recreation, lifelong physical activities, and movement activities play in shaping cultures and identities. They reflect on and refine personal and social skills as they participate in a range of physical activities.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Mathematics The Year 10 Mathematics course prepares students for any of the three mathematics courses available in VCE Mathematics. As at the previous levels, the Year 10 Mathematics course continues to apply a personalised learning model, using a textbook as the primary resource alongside formal teacher instruction, supplemented by online resources. Students study the same topic at the same time, but with pre-testing used to determine their starting point. Based on the pre-test, students will receive instruction and complete work suitable to their prior knowledge and skills. Students undertake a common test at the end of each topic, although students progressing into Year 11 concepts within the topic can also be assessed on this supplementary material. Students develop their proficiency in Understanding, Fluency, Problem Solving and Reasoning within three content strands: Number and Algebra, Measurement and Reasoning, and Statistics and Probability. Students apply their knowledge in the above areas to analyse, investigate and solve problems in a variety of situations. They also learn to communicate mathematical ideas and make effective use of technology.

Areas of study Numbers and Algebra Students recognise the connection between simple and compound interest. They solve problems involving linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations and pairs of simultaneous linear equations and related graphs, with and without the use of digital technology. Students substitute into formulas, find unknown values, manipulate linear algebraic expressions, expand binomial expressions and factorise monic and simple non-monic quadratic expressions, with and without the use of digital technology. They represent linear, quadratic and exponential functions numerically, graphically and algebraically, and use them to model situations and solve practical problems.

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Measurement and Geometry Students solve and explain surface area and volume problems relating to composite solids. They use parallel and perpendicular lines, angle and triangle properties, similarity, trigonometry and congruence to solve practical problems and develop proofs involving lengths, angles and areas in plane shapes. They use digital technology to construct and manipulate geometric shapes and objects, and explore symmetry and pattern in two dimensions. Statistics and Probability Students compare univariate data sets by referring to summary statistics and the shape of their displays. They describe bivariate data where the independent variable is time and use scatter-plots generated by digital technology to investigate relationships between two continuous variables. Students evaluate the use of statistics in the media. They list outcomes for multi-step chance experiments involving independent and dependent events, and assign probabilities for these experiments.

Assessment • Classroom Tests and Semester Examinations • Problem solving assignments and Projects

Resources • Cambridge Essential Mathematics Textbook or pdf as per booklist • TI Nspire CAS calculator • Access is also made to Cambridge textbook website

Pathway to future study Advanced Mathematics offers thorough preparation for VCE Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2 and VCE Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2.


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Science Subject Description Students will gain scientific skills to equip them to study any of the VCE sciences. Students explore chemical communication by writing word equations and investigating different factors that influence the rate of chemical reactions. Students will study the importance of DNA to life and how characteristics are inherited. They will apply Newton’s Laws to predict how a balanced or unbalanced force affects the motion of an object. Students explore how natural selection and evolution occurs.

Areas of study • Motion and Energy • Chemical Reactions • Reaction Types • DNA and Genetics • Natural selection and Evolution

Resources • Science Textbook and Activity Book (as per booklist) • Scientific calculator

Pathway to future study Science provides students with the opportunity to either complete their secondary school education in science or to undertake any of the VCE science specialisations providing they have acquired a strong enough understanding of the knowledge and skills.

Personalised Learning Students will generally undergo pre-testing on each topic to determine their prior knowledge and skills. The work program offered in Year 10 includes extension activities to provoke and extend students understanding in the various science disciplines.

Assessment • Evaluating understanding involving key knowledge, scientific understanding, application of scientific concepts, and analysis and evaluation of data • Skills acquired through laboratory tasks, scientific communication, inquiry based learning, and creativity.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Year 10 Subjects - The Humanities At Year 10, students chose to study either a full year of Geography or a full year of History.

Geography Subject Description

Assessment

Students predict changes in different places over time and identify implications of future, for example, the changing patterns of coastal waterways. Students evaluate alternative views on geographical challenges and alternative strategies to address these challenges such as deforestation of the world’s forests. They explore the interconnections of an environmental change and evaluate their impact on the natural environment. Students analyse the spatial distribution of a variety of geographical phenomena including the distribution of forests at risk of deforestation. They use environmental, social and economic criteria to explain the predicted outcomes and consequences of a lack of addressing such changes, and ethically collect relevant geographical data from reliable and useful sources contained in research and field trips.

Skills Based Assessment of the following 6 key skills:

Areas of study

• Skill 1: Predict changes for the future • Skill 2: Identify, analyse and explain spatial distributions • Skill 3: Identify, analyse and explain interconnections • Skill 4: Data Collection • Skill 5: Select, organise and represent data • Skill 6: Identifying, describing and explaining using appropriate terminology

Pathway to future study The study of this subject would lead to VCE Geography.

• Environmental Change and Management • Wellbeing

Dying Coral - The Great Barrier Reef

History Subject Description

Assessment

Students study History from the end of World War 1 through to modern day. The transformation of the modern world during a time of political turmoil, global conflict and international cooperation provides a necessary context for understanding Australia’s development, its place within the Asia-Pacific region, and its global standing. Exploring Human and Civil Rights both in terms of African American Rights and Rights for Indigenous Australians will further provide context to the world in which we live.

Skills Based Assessment of the following 6 key skills:

Areas of study • Between the World Wars • World War II • Rights and Freedoms - US and Australia

• Skill 1: Chronological sequencing • Skill 2: Historical Inquiry and Referencing (Evaluate and reference useful and reliable sources of information) • Skill 3: Source Analysis (Analysis of different perspectives and interpretations) • Skill 4: Analysis of short and long term cause and effect • Skill 5: Analysis and evaluation of patterns of continuity and change • Skill 6: Evaluation of historical significance of key events / individuals / groups / ideas / places

Pathway to future study The study of this subject leads to VCE History Units 1 & 2.

The bombing of Darwin

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Year 10 Subjects - Elective Subjects At Year 10, students chose to study elective subjects.

Digital Art Subject Description This elective offers the chance to delve into the world of Digital Art. Combining digital platforms with the creativity of art, to transform a space to digitally express students’ artwork.

Areas of study • Research, conceptualise and implement a public display, working collaboratively to integrate animation, video, VFX processing and projection mapping. • Explore a range of contemporary digital technologies and artists to realise innovative and exciting installations • Develop and format a professional pitch document to fund and promote the event.

Assessment • Contextual research • Artistic conceptualisation and implementation • Entrepreneurial pitch

Resources • Wacom tablets, video cameras, school computers, video projectors • Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, Storyboard Quick, Final Cut Pro, MadMapper

Pathway to future study The study of this subject would lead to VCE Geography.

Entrepreneurship Subject Description

Areas of study

This unit will provide students with an overview of what a modern day entrepreneur needs to be successful in the 21st Century.

• Communicating ideas

Some examples of topics covered include the need for effective communication, the desire to see creativity, the use of technology and the ability to collaborate amongst one’s peers.

• Dealing with the financial side of entrepreneurship

Students engage with current media articles and work in teams to pitch ideas, create new and innovative concepts (or products) and to learn what a social entrepreneur actually does to create their own success. Through practice, and trial and error, students establish and build upon key skills to help them move forward with confidence into the world of work. This subject offers a practical insight into selling, marketing and developing concepts from scratch.

• Documenting ideas • Pitching innovative concepts

Assessment • Presentations • Research and Development of concepts • Examination

Resources • All resources will be provided

Pathway to future study This subject leads to Business Management, Units 1 & 2 Accounting and Units 1 & 2 Economics

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Finance and Wealth Subject Description

Assessment • Folio of exercises

This unit will provide students with the fundamentals of how to implement basic Accounting, Economic and Business Management procedures and, how to survive financially beyond the home, as a business owner or as an individual. Students will be guided through the basic laws of accounting and economics and will learn ways to record information and well as make good financial decisions leading to the building of long term wealth. They will investigate ways to analyse good business performance and will gain skills in balancing and following budgets.

• Case Studies • A Report • Tests and Examination

Pathway to future study This subject leads to Units 1 & 2 Accounting and Units 1 & 2 Economics, but is also beneficial to Units 1 & 2 Business Management.

Areas of study • Financial Skills • Economic Decision Making

Why Study Accounting?

• Personal and Small Business Management

Health and Human Development Subject Description

• The World Health Organization, The United Nations, Sustainable Development.

This study examines the concepts of Health and Human Development in the context of Australia’s youth. Students investigate various health issues surrounding Australian youth and strategies designed to influence and promote health and individual human development.

• The individual human development of Australia’s youth across the lifespan.

Areas of study • Theory topics may include; • Foundations of Health: key concepts, health status, case study analysis and the determinants of health. Investigating factors that can raise or lower aspects of health and individual human development of Australia’s youth and adults. This includes: biological, behavioural, physical and social environments. • Nutrition during youth. This includes nutrients, vitamins, minerals and eating habits, Five Food Groups, the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, Dietary Guidelines. • National Health priority areas – discover the NHPAs and field work.

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Assessment • Individual Projects / research assignment • Practical Assessment • Interactive assignment, topic reflections and presentations will provide variety and a clear indication of student progress.

Resources • Dedicated workbook

Pathway to future study This course familiarises students with the concept of determinants of health and much of the subject specific vocabulary fundamental to the study of VCE Health and Human Development Units 3 & 4.


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Chinese First Language (CFL) Subject Description This course is aimed at students with an extensive background in the Chinese culture and language and exposes students to more advanced linguistic techniques. The four language skills – speaking, listening, reading and writing are further developed with an increased emphasis on oral communication and writing styles. The course sets out to consolidate the content and skills covered in previous years of learning and to ensure a thorough and solid preparation for the requirements of VCE Units 1 & 2.

Areas of study • Traditional Chinese families • Environmental issues • Personal world • Modern and traditional Chinese art

Assessment • Listening comprehension tasks • Reading comprehension tasks • Vocabulary and syntax tests • Oral tasks • Writing tasks • Homework • Examination

Pathway to future study Chinese First Language is an elective subject at Year 10. This is a two semester course and should be taken by all students wishing to continue with the study of VCE Chinese First Language in Years 11 and 12.

• Chinese legends and myths • Impact of modern technology

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Chinese Second Language (CSL) and Chinese Second Language Advanced (CSLA) Subject Description The four language skills – speaking, listening, reading and writing are further developed with an increased emphasis on oral communication. The emphasis in Year 10 is on consolidation of the characters and structures and an extension of vocabulary. Students learn to expand comprehension skills, knowledge of complex sentence structures and reading levels. More emphasis is also placed on fluent reading with the correct tones in PIN YIN (Romanised form) as well as in characters. Students develop and consolidate all language skills in preparation for VCE.

Areas of study Back to school • School’s great • Extremely busy • Always on the net A friend from afar • When in Rome do as the Romans do • Barbecue in the park • Everything is fine Earning pocket money • Feeling great • Really unbearable • A long hesitation

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Young people’s world • No big deal • Just for fun • A little dilemma

Assessment • Listening comprehension tasks • Reading comprehension tasks • Vocabulary and syntax tests • Oral tasks • Writing tasks • Homework • Examination

Pathway to future study CSL and CSLA is an elective subject at Year 10. This is a two semester course and should be taken by all students wishing to continue with the study of VCE CSL and CSLA in Years 11 and 12.


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

French Subject Description This is the fourth year of a cumulative study of spoken and written French. The course continues to develop the four macro skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing, and to develop the students’ understanding of the culture of the French-speaking world. The course sets out to consolidate the content and skills covered in previous years and to ensure a thorough and solid preparation for the requirements of VCE Units 1 & 2.

Areas of study • Shopping for food • Sports and physical activities, injuries, health • Talking about how things used to be • Relating past events • Constructing a narrative • Personal problems and relationships • Future aspirations

Assessment • Listening comprehension tasks • Reading comprehension tasks • Oral tasks • Writing tasks • Online and written quizzes and tests • Examination

Resources • Texts and materials to be purchased as per the booklist

Pathway to future study This is a two semester elective course and should be taken by all students wishing to continue with the study of French in Year 11. This study leads sequentially to VCE French in Years 11 and 12.

German Subject Description The course consolidates the material covered in previous years and aims to prepare students for the requirements of VCE Units 1 & 2 through the assessment tasks and the structure of the examination. A stronger emphasis is placed on grammar and language structures, as well as encouraging independent study, wide reading and research. Students also create a film to be presented in a state-wide competition.

Areas of study • House rooms and furniture, household tasks • Shopping, earning and spending money • Talking about weekends, excursions and trips • Holidays and travel • Topics include: Music, films, television programs, young people’s problems, parties and going out, sightseeing in Berlin and giving directions.

Assessment • Listening comprehension tasks • Reading comprehension tasks • Oral tasks • Writing tasks • Online and written quizzes and tests • Examination

Resources • Texts and materials to be purchased as per the booklist

Pathway to future study German is an elective subject at Year 10. This is a two semester course and should be taken by all students wishing to continue with the study of VCE German in Years 11 and 12.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Law and Politics Subject Description

Assessment

This unit will provide students with an understanding of the Australian Legal and Political Systems.

• Case studies

Some examples of topics covered include the criminal laws of Victoria, the High Court and changes to our Country, the civil system of law, politics at the federal level and how to influence society through the political movement.

• Tests and examination

Resources

Students engage with current media articles and court cases. They will also investigate changes to laws through parliament and critique our system of law making with another Asian based country.

Pathway to future study

Areas of study

• Report

• Texts and materials to be purchased as per the booklist

This subject leads to Units 1 & 2 Legal Studies but is also beneficial to Units 1 & 2 Business Management.

• The Victorian Criminal and Civil Laws • Federal Parliament • Changing societies’ values • Alternative legal systems

Music Subject Description Year 10 Music gives students the exciting opportunity to develop their knowledge, understanding and practical application of music concepts. The program allows students to work on their own individual areas of performance interest, while also covering a range of fundamental preVCE theory and aural skills, music technology projects and creative composition activities. The subject is an excellent complement to school ensemble involvement and private instrumental / vocal lessons, and will equip students with the necessary skills for a strong start in VCE Music in Year 11.

Areas of study • Performing solo and as part of a group • Effective approaches to practice • Developing rhythm performance skills • Music theory and notation • Aural skills including written and practical activities • Listening analysis written response

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Assessment • Listening analysis written response • Performance • Composition • Aural & theory examination • Practical aural skills

Resources • Solo sheet music in conjunction with instrumental lessons, workbook, 2B pencils, headphones, Musicianship and Aural Training textbook as per the booklist.

Pathway to future study This subject provides a pathway to the study of both VCE Music Performance, and VCE Music Investigation Units 3 & 4.


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Sports Science Subject Description

Assessment

Each week students will undertake a practical session which is designed to link their theoretical knowledge in a practical setting. Those students enrolled in this course will have the option to attend the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) in Canberra to experience the life of an elite athlete.

• Comprehensive fitness training program design & implementation

Areas of study

• Contribution to practical lessons

• Students will focus on issues in relation to preparation such as training programs, body systems and fitness component development. They will be introduced to concepts relating to nutrition healthy eating models, hydration and fuels for performance. Students will consider training methods and principles required to optimize physical performance. • Students will also focus on concepts relating to First Aid and sporting injuries, recovery and the exploration of the various methods available to both elite and amateur athletes. Sport psychology including motivation, self-confidence and goal setting will also be covered in this semester.

• Sports performance strategies

enhancement

recovery

• Topic tests • Examination

Resources • Year 10 Sports Science workbook

Pathway to future study This subject provides a thorough preparation for VCE Physical Education or VCE Health and Human Development.

• Theory topics may include: fitness requirements of sports, training methods & principles, recovery strategies, sport psychology, nutrition. • Practical topics may include: weekly practical classes and fitness program implementation. • Excursion / camp may include AIS, Canberra.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Visual Communication Design Subject Description This elective Visual Communication Design (VCD) course is one semester in length. Students learn about the role of a designer, their contribution to society, and the significance of the creative industries. Students are encouraged to reach their creative and intellectual potential by igniting informed, imaginative and innovative thinking. They will look into Environmental design using manual and digital technologies to produce design work.

Areas of study • Explore assorted technical and freehand drawing techniques • Use both manual and digital technologies to produce design works

• Digital design task (using Illustrator, Photoshop, SketchUp and Floor planner) • Manual Design task (technical drawings, creative designing, using different methods and media) • Environmental Design Task (model making) • Examination

Resources • Nelson Visual Communication Design Units 1-4 book (class set) • A4 folio • Laptop computer with Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator (School)

• Explore the role of a designer in the design industry, analysing cultural, social and historical factors that influence current design work

Pathway to future study

• Students will learn about design elements and principles and their importance in all design tasks

This subject provides a solid foundation for VCE Visual Communication Design.

• Study Environmental design in depth by researching the role of the architect

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Assessment


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

VCE Subjects

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Accounting Unit

Description

Assessment

Establishing and operating a service business

Unit 1

This unit focuses on the establishment of a small business and the accounting and financial management of the business. Students are introduced to the processes of gathering and recording financial data and the reporting and analysing of accounting information by internal and external users. The cash basis of recording and reporting is used throughout this unit. Using single entry recording of financial data and analysis of accounting information, students examine the role of accounting in the decision-making process for a sole proprietor of a service business.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Accounting for a trading business

Unit 2

This unit extends the accounting process from a service business and focuses on accounting for a sole proprietor of a single activity trading business. Students use a single entry recording system for cash and credit transactions and the accrual method for determining profit. They analyse and evaluate the performance of the business using financial and non-financial information. Using these evaluations, students suggest strategies to the owner on how to improve the performance of the business. Students develop their understanding of the importance of ICT in the accounting process by using a commercial accounting software package to establish a set of accounts, record financial transactions and generate accounting reports.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: Recording and reporting for a trading business This unit focuses on financial accounting for a single activity trading business as operated by a sole trader and emphasises the role of accounting as an information system. Students use the double entry system of recording financial data and prepare reports using the accrual basis of accounting. The perpetual method of stock recording with the First In, First Out (FIFO) method is also used.

Unit 3&4

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Unit 4: Control and analysis of business performance

SACs Unit 3 - 25%

This unit provides an extension of the recording and reporting processes from Unit 3 and the use of financial and non-financial information in assisting management in the decision-making process. The unit is based on the double entry accounting system and the accrual method of reporting for a single activity trading business using the perpetual inventory recording system. Students investigate the role and importance of budgeting for the business and undertake the practical completion of budgets for cash, profit and financial position. Students interpret accounting information from accounting reports and graphical representations, and analyse the results to suggest strategies to the owner on how to improve the performance of the business.

SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Applied Computing Unit

Description

Assessment

Students are introduced to the stages of the problem-solving methodology. They focus on how data can be used within software tools such as databases and spreadsheets to create data visualisations, and the use of programming languages to develop working software solutions.

Unit 1

In Area of Study 1, as an introduction to data analytics, students respond to a teacher-provided analysis of requirements and designs to identify and collect data in order to present their findings as data visualisations. They present work that includes database, spreadsheet and data visualisations solutions. In Area of Study 2 students select and use a programming language to create a working software solution. They prepare, document and monitor project plans and engage in all stages of the problem-solving methodology.

SACs Unit 1 - 60% Examination - 40%

Students focus on developing innovative solutions to needs or opportunities that they have identified, and propose strategies for reducing security risks to data and information in a networked environment.

Unit 2

In Area of Study 1 students work collaboratively and select a topic for further study to create an innovative solution in an area of interest. The innovative solution can be presented as a proof of concept, a prototype or a product. Students engage in all areas of the problem-solving methodology. In Area of Study 2, as an introduction to cybersecurity, students investigate networks and the threats, vulnerabilities and risks to data and information. They propose strategies to protect the data accessed using a network.

SACs Unit 2 - 60% Examination - 40%

Software Development Unit

Units 3&4

Description

Assessment

In Software Development Units 3 and 4 students focus on the application of a problem-solving methodology and underlying skills to create purpose-designed solutions using a programming language.

SACs Unit 3 - 10%

In Unit 3 students develop a detailed understanding of the analysis, design and development stages of the problem-solving methodology and use a programming language to create working software modules. In Unit 4 students focus on how the information needs of individuals and organisations are met through the creation of software solutions used in a networked environment. They continue to study the programming language used in Unit 3.

SACs Unit 4 - 10% School Assessed Task - 30% Examination - 50%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Biology Unit

Description

Assessment

How do living things stay alive?

Unit 1

Students examine the cell as the structural and functional unit of life, from the single celled to the multicellular organism, and the requirements for sustaining cellular processes in terms of inputs and outputs. They analyse types of adaptations that enhance the organism’s survival in a particular environment and consider the role homeostatic mechanisms play in maintaining the internal environment. Students investigate how a diverse group of organisms form a living interconnected community that is adapted to, and utilises, the abiotic resources of its habitat. The role of a keystone species in maintaining the structure of an ecosystem is explored. Students consider how the planet’s biodiversity is classified and the factors that affect the growth of a population.

Tests and Assignments - 50% Major Practical Investigation - 15% Examination - 35%

How is continuity of life maintained?

Unit 2

Students examine the process of DNA replication and compare cell division in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms and explore the mechanisms of asexual and sexual reproductive strategies. The role of stem cells in the differentiation, growth, repair and replacement of cells in humans is examined, and their potential use in medical therapies is considered. Students use chromosome theory and terminology from classical genetics to explain the inheritance of characteristics, analyse patterns of inheritance, interpret pedigree charts and predict outcomes of genetic crosses. They explore the relationship between genes. They consider the role of genetic knowledge in decision making about the inheritance of autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive and sexlinked genetic conditions.

Tests and Assignments - 45% Major Ethical Investigation - 15% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: How do cells maintain life?

Unit 3&4

Students explore the importance of the insolubility of the plasma membrane in water and its differential permeability to specific solutes in defining the cell, its internal spaces and the control of the movement of molecules and ions. Students consider base pairing, the response of receptors to signalling molecules and reactions between antigens and antibodies to highlight the importance of molecular interactions based on the complementary nature of specific molecules. They explore the chemistry of cells, how cells communicate with each other, the types of signals, the transduction of information within the cell and cellular responses. At this level students study the human immune system.

Unit 4: How does life change and respond to challenges over time? In this unit students consider the continual change and challenges to which life on Earth has been subjected. They investigate the relatedness between species, examine change in life forms using evidence from palaeontology, biogeography, developmental biology and structural morphology. They explore technological developments in the fields of comparative genomics, molecular homology and bioinformatics. Students examine the structural and cognitive trends in the human fossil record, the biological consequences, and social and ethical implications, of manipulating the DNA molecule and applying biotechnologies.

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SACs Unit 3 - 16% SACs Unit 4 - 24% Examination - 60%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Business Management Unit

Description

Assessment

Planning a business

Unit 1

Businesses of all sizes are major contributors to the economic and social wellbeing of a nation. Therefore how businesses are formed and the fostering of conditions under which new business ideas can emerge are vital for a nation’s wellbeing. Taking a business idea and planning how to make it a reality are the cornerstones of economic and social development. In this unit students explore the factors affecting business ideas and the internal and external environments within which businesses operate, and the effect of these on planning a business.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Establishing a business

Unit 2

This unit focuses on the establishment phase of a business’s life. Establishing a business involves complying with legal requirements as well as making decisions about how best to establish a system of financial record keeping, staff the business and establish a customer base. In this unit students examine the legal requirements that must be satisfied to establish a business. They investigate the essential features of effective marketing and consider the best way to meet the needs of the business in terms of staffing and financial record keeping. Students analyse various management practices in this area by applying this knowledge to contemporary business case studies from the past four years.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: Managing a business

Unit 3&4

Students explore the key processes and issues concerned with managing a business efficiently and effectively to achieve the business objectives. Students examine the different types of businesses and their respective objectives. They consider corporate culture, management styles, management skills and the relationship between each of these. Students investigate strategies to manage both staff and business operations to meet objectives. Students develop an understanding of the complexity and challenge of managing businesses and through the use of contemporary business case studies from the past four years have the opportunity to compare theoretical perspectives with current practice.

Unit 4: Transforming a business Businesses are under constant pressure to adapt and change to meet their objectives. In this unit students consider the importance of reviewing key performance indicators to determine current performance and the strategic management necessary to position a business for the future. Students study a theoretical model to undertake change, and consider a variety of strategies to manage change in the most efficient and effective way to improve business performance. They investigate the importance of leadership in change management. Using a contemporary business case study from the past four years, students evaluate business practice against theory.

SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Chemistry Unit

Description

Assessment

How can the diversity of materials be explained?

Unit 1

Students investigate the chemical properties of a range of materials from metals and salts to polymers and nanomaterials. Using their knowledge of elements and atomic structure students explore and explain the relationships between properties, structure and bonding forces. Students examine the modification of metals, assess the factors that affect the formation of ionic crystals and investigate a range of non-metallic substances. Students are introduced to quantitative concepts in chemistry including the mole concept. They apply their knowledge to determine the relative masses of elements and the composition of substances. A research investigation is undertaken in Area of Study 3 related to one of ten options that draw upon and extend the content from Area of Study 1 and / or Area of Study 2.

Tests and Assignments - 70% Examination - 30%

What makes water such a unique chemical?

Unit 2

Students explore the physical and chemical properties of water, the reactions that occur in water and various methods of water analysis. They explore the relationship between bonding forces and the physical and chemical properties of water. In this context students investigate solubility, concentration, pH and reactions in water. Students are introduced to stoichiometry and to analytical techniques and instrumental procedures. Students explore the solvent properties of water in a variety of contexts and analyse selected issues associated with substances dissolved in water. A practical investigation into an aspect of water quality is undertaken in Area of Study 3. The investigation draws on content from Area of Study 1 and / or Area of Study 2.

Tests and Assignments - 70% Examination - 30%

Unit 3: How can chemical processes be designed to optimise efficiency?

Unit 3

Students explore energy options and the chemical production of materials with reference to efficiencies, renewability and the minimisation of their impact on the environment. Students compare and evaluate different chemical energy resources, including fossil fuels, biofuels, galvanic cells and fuel cells. They investigate the combustion of fuels, including the energy transformations involved, the use of stoichiometry to calculate the amounts of reactants and products involved in the reactions, and calculations of the amounts of energy released and their representations. Students consider the purpose, design and operating principles of galvanic cells, fuel cells and electrolytic cells. In this context they use the electrochemical series to predict and write half and overall redox equations, and apply Faraday’s laws to calculate quantities in electrolytic reactions. Students analyse manufacturing processes with reference to factors that influence their reaction rates and extent. They investigate and apply the equilibrium law and Le Chatelier’s principle to different reaction systems, including to predict and explain the conditions that will improve the efficiency and percentage yield of chemical processes. They use the language and conventions of chemistry including symbols, units, chemical formulas and equations to represent and explain observations and data collected from experiments, and to discuss chemical phenomena. A student practical investigation related to energy and / or food is undertaken either in Unit 3 or Unit 4, or across both Units 3 & 4, and is assessed in Unit 4, Outcome 3.

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SACs Unit 3 - 16%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Unit

Description

Assessment

Unit 4: How are organic compounds categorised, analysed and used?

Unit 4

Students investigate the structural features, bonding, typical reactions and uses of the major families of organic compounds including those found in food. Students study the ways in which organic structures are represented and named. They process data from instrumental analyses of organic compounds to confirm or deduce organic structures, and perform volumetric analyses to determine the concentrations of organic chemicals in mixtures. Students investigate key food molecules through an exploration of their chemical structures, the hydrolytic reactions in which they are broken down and the condensation reactions in which they are rebuilt to form new molecules. In this context the role of enzymes and coenzymes in facilitating chemical reactions is explored. Students use calorimetry as an investigative tool to determine the energy released in the combustion of foods.

SACs Unit 4 - 24% Examination - 60%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Economics Unit

Description

Assessment

The behaviour of consumers and businesses

Unit 1

Economics is a dynamic and constantly evolving field covering the way humans behave and the decisions made to meet the needs and wants of society. Students explore their role in the economy and the way economic models and theories have been developed to explain the causes and effects of human action. They examine economic models and investigate the motivations and consequences of both consumer and business behaviour. They examine how individuals might respond to incentives and investigate examples to enhance understanding of economic concepts. Students examine a microeconomic model to explain changes in prices and quantities traded and how market power can affect efficiency and living standards.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Contemporary economic issues

Unit 2

This unit looks at contemporary issues. The decisions made by consumers, businesses and governments and how they benefit some stakeholders but not others. Trade-offs between the pursuit of growth in incomes and production and, the goal of environmental sustainability and long-term economic prosperity are covered. Students investigate economic growth in terms of raising living standards and evaluate how achievement of this goal might result in degradation of the environment. Economic growth is generally associated with improvements in living standards as real incomes grow over time. Students evaluate the role of government intervention in markets and discuss whether achieving greater equality causes a decline in growth and average living standards.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: Australia’s economic prosperity

Unit 3&4

40

Students develop an understanding of the macro economy. They investigate the factors that influence the level of aggregate demand and aggregate supply in the economy and use models and theories to explain how changes in these variables might influence the achievement of the Australian Government’s domestic macroeconomic goals and affect living standards. Australia’s economic prosperity is linked to strong economic relationships with major trading partners. They analyse how international transactions are recorded, predict how economic events might affect the value of the exchange rate and evaluate the effect of trade liberalisation.

SACs Unit 3 - 25%

Unit 4: Managing the economy

SACs Unit 4 - 25%

Students investigate how the Government alters the composition and level of outlays and receipts to directly and indirectly influence the level of aggregate demand and the achievement of macroeconomic goals. Aggregate demand and supply policies used for stabilising the business cycle are investigated including the role of the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA). Students analyse the effect of Government budgets, and how particular initiatives have stabilised aggregate demand and influenced economic goals. If the productive capacity of the economy is expanding, growth in aggregate demand can be met and economic growth can be maintained both now and into the future.

Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

English Unit

Description

Assessment

Unit 1

Students read and respond to set texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts.

Assessment tasks for Unit 1 include: text response and analytical essays, creative writing and an oral presentation of an issue.

The term ‘set text’ refers to texts chosen by the school for Areas of Study 1 in Units 1 & 2.

Unit 2

Students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in set texts. They analyse arguments presented and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts. The term ‘set text’ refers to texts chosen by the school for Area of Study 1 in Units 1 & 2.

Assessment tasks for Unit 2 include: text response, analytical, persuasive and comparative essays.

Unit 3 Students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts. Texts selected for study in Area of Study 1 must be chosen from the Text List published annually by the VCAA. The texts selected for study in Unit 3 Area of Study 2 must have appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year. The term ‘selected text’ refers to a text chosen from the list of prescribed texts in the Text List published by the VCAA.

Unit 3&4

Unit 4 Students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media. Texts selected for Area of Study 1 must be chosen from the Text List published annually by the VCAA. The issues selected for Area of Study 2 must have appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year, but need not be the same as the issue selected for study in Unit 3. The term ‘selected texts’ refers to a combination of texts chosen from the list of prescribed texts for comparative study in the Text List published by the VCAA.

SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

English as an Additional Language (EAL) Unit

Description

Unit 1

Students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts. The term ‘set text’ refers to texts chosen by the school for Areas of Study 1 in Units 1 & 2.

Unit 2

Students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They analyse arguments presented and the use of persuasive language in texts and create their own texts intended to position audiences. Students develop their skills in creating written, spoken and multimodal texts. The term ‘set text’ refers to texts chosen by the school for Area of Study 1 in Units 1 & 2.

Assessment Reading and creating - 40% Persuasive language analysis - 40% Examination - 20%

Comparative analysis - 40% Persuasive language analysis and presenting a point of view - 40% Examination - 20%

Unit 3 Students read and respond to texts analytically and creatively. They analyse arguments and the use of persuasive language in texts. Texts selected for study in Area of Study 1 must be chosen from the Text List published annually by the VCAA. The texts selected for study in Unit 3 Area of Study 2 must have appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year. The term ‘selected text’ refers to a text chosen from the list of prescribed texts in the Text List published by the VCAA.

Area of Study 3 – Listening to texts

Unit 3&4

In this area of study students develop and refine their listening skills. They listen to a range of spoken texts and use active listening strategies to understand information, ideas and opinions presented in texts. Listening skills are developed in the context of Areas of Study 1 & 2 and specific speaking and listening activities.

Unit 4 Students compare the presentation of ideas, issues and themes in texts. They create an oral presentation intended to position audiences about an issue currently debated in the media. Texts selected for Area of Study 1 must be chosen from the Text List published annually by the VCAA. The issues selected for Area of Study 2 must have appeared in the media since 1 September of the previous year, but need not be the same as the issue selected for study in Unit 3. The term ‘selected texts’ refers to a combination of texts chosen from the list of prescribed texts for comparative study in the Text List published by the VCAA.

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SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Bridging EAL Unit

Unit 1

Unit 2

*compulsory subject for EAL Students at Year 11

Description In this unit, students build their understanding of how spoken and written Standard Australian English (SAE) is used to communicate effectively in a variety of contexts and for a range of purposes. Students develop the ability to listen, speak, read and write for everyday and academic purposes. They explore how language features, structures and conventions can be used to express ideas and opinions, and to create their own spoken and written texts.

In this unit the elective areas of study enable students to extend their understanding of how English is constructed and used to communicate in a variety of contexts and for a range of purposes. The following areas of study will be undertaken in Unit 2: Area of Study 2: English literature Area of Study 3: English in the media Each area of study in Unit 2 has key knowledge and key skills specific to each outcome.

Assessment Text types portfolio and listening assessments - 40% Analysis and production of texts for self-expression - 40% Examination - 20%

Analysis and production of literary texts - 40% Analysis and production of texts to position audiences - 40% Examination - 20%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Geography Unit

Description

Assessment

This unit sees students studying hazards that cause harm to people and or the environment. Hazards include a wide range of situations such as fast moving traffic, coastal erosion, drought and infectious disease. Students examine the processes involved with hazards and hazard events, including their causes and impacts, human responses and interconnections between human activities and natural phenomena. This unit investigates how people respond to hazards. Types of hazards include:

Unit 1

• geological (or geophysical) hazards: volcanic activity, erosion, earthquakes, tsunamis, landslides and avalanches • hydro-meteorological (weather, climate, water) hazards: droughts, storms, storm surges and bushfires

floods,

• biological hazards: infectious diseases, animal transmitted diseases, water borne diseases, and plant and animal invasion such as blackberries and cane toads in Australia

Tests and Assignments - 60% Internal Written Examination - 40%

• technological hazards: oil spills, air pollution, radiation leaks, flooding, climate change or increased intensification of weather events. Students undertake fieldwork in this unit and report on fieldwork using the structure provided.

Tourism

Unit 2

Students investigate the characteristics of tourism, how it has changed and continues to change and its impacts on people, places and environments. Students select contrasting examples of tourism from within Australia and elsewhere in the world to support their investigations. Over one billion tourists a year cross international boundaries with greater numbers involved as domestic tourists within their own countries. The scale of tourist movements since the 1950s and its predicted growth has had and continues to have a significant impact on local, regional and national environments, economies and cultures. The travel and tourism industry is directly responsible for one in every twelve jobs globally and generates around 5% of its GDP. The growth of tourism at all scales requires careful management to ensure environmentally sustainable and economically viable tourism.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Internal Written Examination - 40%

Students undertake fieldwork in this unit and report on fieldwork using the structure provided

Changing the Land

Unit 3

This unit focuses on two investigations of geographical change: change to land cover and change to land use. Land cover includes biomes such as forest, grassland, tundra and wetlands, as well as land covered by ice and water. Land cover is the natural state of the biophysical environment developed over time as a result of the interconnection between climate, soils, landforms and flora and fauna and, increasingly, interconnections with human activity. Natural land cover has been altered by many processes such as geomorphological events, plant succession and climate change. People have modified land cover to produce a range of land uses to satisfy needs such as housing, resource provision, communication, recreation and so on. Students investigate three major processes that are changing land cover in many regions of the world: Deforestation, desertification, and melting glaciers and ice sheets. They select one location for each of the three processes to develop a greater understanding of the changes to land cover produced by these processes, the impacts of these changes and responses to these changes at different scales.

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Structured Question - 50% Fieldwork - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Unit

Description

Assessment

Human Population: Trends and Issues In this unit students investigate the geography of human populations. They explore the patterns of population change, movement and distribution, and how governments, organisations and individuals have responded to those changes in different parts of the world.

Unit 4

In this unit, students study population dynamics before undertaking an investigation into two significant population trends arising in different parts of the world. They examine the dynamics of populations and their economic, social, political and environmental impacts on people and places. The growth of the world’s population from 2.5 billion in 1950 to over 7 billion since 2010 has been on a scale without parallel in human history. Much of the current growth is occurring within developing countries while the populations in many developed countries are either growing slowly or are declining. Populations change by growth and decline in fertility and mortality, and by people moving to different places. The Demographic Transition Model and population structure diagrams provide frameworks for investigating the key dynamics of population.

Analysis: Geographic Data - 40% Structured Questions - 60%

Population movements such as voluntary and forced movements over long or short terms add further complexity to population structures and to economic, social, political and environmental conditions.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Health and Human Development Unit

Description

Assessment

Unit 3: Australia’s health in a globalised world

Unit 3&4

This unit looks at health, wellbeing and illness as multidimensional, dynamic and subject to different interpretations and contexts. Students begin to explore health and wellbeing as a global concept and to take a broader approach to inquiry. As they consider the benefits of optimal health and wellbeing and its importance as an individual and a collective resource, their thinking extends to health as a universal right. Students look at the fundamental conditions required for health improvement, as stated by the World Health Organization (WHO). They use this knowledge as background to their analysis and evaluation of variations in the health status of Australians. Area of Study 2 focuses on health promotion and improvements in population health over time. Students look at various public health approaches and the interdependence of different models as they research health improvements and evaluate successful programs. While the emphasis is on the Australian health system, the progression of change in public health approaches should be seen within a global context.

Unit 4: Global Health and human development This unit takes a global perspective on achieving sustainable improvements in health and human development. The United Nations’ (UN) human development work is encapsulated in the Sustainable Development Goals, where the world’s countries have agreed to a set of measurable goals and targets. A significant focus of the Sustainable Development Goals is reducing the inequalities that result in human poverty and lead to inequalities in health status and human development. The World Health Organization (WHO) is the directing and coordinating authority for international health within the United Nations. Both the WHO and the UN have a range of strategies aimed at reducing global burdens of disease and promoting human development through the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals. Non-government organisations also play a role in promoting sustainable human development.

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SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

History Unit

Description

Assessment

The Making of Empires: 1400 – 1775

Unit 1

Students explore the Early Modern era, 1400–1775, including the transition between medieval feudalism and the modern, secular nation-state. International trade was dominated by three powerful empires – the Venetian Empire, China under the Ming dynasty and the Ottoman Empire – who between them controlled key industries and trade hubs including the Silk Road. Portugal, Spain, France, Britain and the Netherlands circumvented the power through alternative means and routes. By harnessing new knowledge and technology, they launched voyages to the Asia-Pacific, the Americas and Africa. The Ptolemaic model, which placed Earth at the centre of the universe, was challenged and the Catholic Church was threatened by both new scientific knowledge and the Protestant Reformation (1517–c. 1648). Gutenberg’s printing press (c. 1450) allowed ordinary people, to circulate ideas, leading the way for new debates. The key idea, however, to give impetus to new global empires was trade.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Empires at Work: 1400 - 1775

Unit 2

Students explore the operation of European colonies and the challenges they faced. New empires began to establish colonies and to trade on a global scale. Britain, France, the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, Russia and the Ottoman Empire gained colonial possessions. The Mughals in India and the Ming and Qing dynasties in China gained control over vast territories. Through the ‘Columbian exchange’ that followed Christopher Columbus’ arrival in the New World, technologies, plants, animals, culture and diseases began to travel between continents. Gradually, humans began to be traded as commodities too. Indigenous peoples resisted colonisation, settler societies were complex and unpredictable and colonies were a drain on resources. The many wars waged between Early Modern empires culminated in all-out global warfare in the Seven Years’ War (1754–63). Britain’s success in this war led to a period of dominance which lasted well into the twentieth century.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Units 3 & 4: Revolutions

Unit 3&4

Students investigate the significant historical causes and consequences of political revolution. Revolutions represent great ruptures in time and are a major turning point which brings about the collapse and destruction of an existing political order resulting in a pervasive change to society. Revolutions are caused by the interplay of ideas, events, individuals and popular movements. Their consequences have a profound effect on the political and social structures of the post-revolutionary society. Progress in a post-revolutionary society is not guaranteed or inevitable. Post-revolutionary regimes are often threatened internally by civil war and externally by foreign threats. These challenges can result in a compromise of revolutionary ideals and extreme measures of violence, oppression and terror.

SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Languages: Chinese First Language Unit

Description

Common Areas of Study

The areas of study for Chinese First Language comprise themes and topics, text types, kinds of writing, vocabulary and grammar. They are common to all four units of the study, and are designed to be drawn upon in an integrated way, as appropriate to the linguistic needs of the student, and the outcomes for the unit. The themes and topics are the vehicle through which the student will demonstrate achievement of the outcomes, in the sense that they form the subject of the activities and tasks the student undertakes. The text types, kinds of writing, vocabulary and grammar are linked, both to each other, and to the themes and topics. Together, as common areas of study, they add a further layer of definition to the knowledge and skills required for successful achievement of the outcomes.

Assessment

The common areas of study provide the opportunity for the student to build upon what is familiar, as well as develop knowledge and skills in new and more challenging areas. There are three prescribed themes: Self and others, Tradition and change in the Chinese-speaking communities & Global issues For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 1

• establish and maintain a spoken or written exchange related to an issue of interest or concern. • listen to, read and reorganise information and ideas from spoken and written texts.

Writing & listening - 20% Responding - 20% Speaking - 20% Examination - 40%

• produce a personal response to a fictional text. For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 2

• participate in a spoken or written exchange focusing on the resolution of an issue. • listen to, read, and extract and compare information and ideas from spoken and written texts.

Writing & listening - 20% Responding - 20% Speaking - 20% Examination - 40%

• produce an imaginative piece in spoken or written form.

Unit 3: For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. • express ideas through the production of original texts. • analyse and use information from spoken texts.

Unit 3&4

• exchange information, opinions and experiences.

SACs Unit 3 - 25%

Unit 4:

SACs Unit 4 - 25%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of two outcomes. • analyse and use information from written texts. • respond critically to spoken and written texts which reflect aspects of the language and culture.

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Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Languages: Chinese Second Language Unit

Common Areas of Study

Description

Assessment

VCE Chinese Second Language focuses on student participation in interpersonal communication, interpreting the language of other speakers, and presenting information and ideas in Chinese on a range of themes and topics. Students develop and extend skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and viewing in Chinese in a range of contexts and develop cultural understanding in interpreting and creating language. Students develop their understanding of the relationships between language and culture in new contexts and consider how these relationships shape communities. Throughout the study students are given opportunities to make connections and comparisons based on personal reflections about the role of language and culture in communication and in personal identity. There are three prescribed themes: The individual, The Chinese-speaking communities & The world around us For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 1

• Exchange meaning in a spoken interaction in Chinese. • Interpret information from two texts on the same subtopic presented in Chinese, and respond in writing in Chinese and in English. • Present information, concepts and ideas in writing in Chinese on the selected subtopic and for a specific audience and purpose.

Writing & listening - 20% Responding - 20% Speaking - 20% Examination - 40%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 2

• Respond in writing in Chinese to spoken, written or visual texts presented in Chinese. • Analyse and use information from written, spoken or visual texts to produce an extended written response in Chinese. • Explain information, ideas and concepts orally in Chinese to a specific audience about an aspect of culture within communities where Chinese is spoken.

Writing & listening - 20% Responding - 20% Speaking - 20% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. • Participate in a spoken exchange in Chinese to resolve a personal issue. • Interpret information from texts and write responses in Chinese.

Unit 3&4

• Express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in Chinese.

SACs Unit 3 - 25%

Unit 4:

SACs Unit 4 - 25%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Examination - 50%

• Share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in Chinese. • Analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in Chinese. • Present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in Chinese.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Languages: Chinese Second Language Advanced Unit

Common Areas of Study

Description

Assessment

VCE Chinese Second Language Advanced focuses on student participation in interpersonal communication, interpreting the language of other speakers, and presenting information and ideas in Chinese on a range of themes and topics. Students develop and extend skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing and viewing in Chinese in a range of contexts and develop cultural understanding in interpreting and creating language. Students develop their understanding of the relationships between language and culture in new contexts and consider how these relationships shape communities. Throughout the study students are given opportunities to make connections and comparisons based on personal reflections about the role of language and culture in communication and in personal identity. There are three prescribed themes: The individual, The Chinese-speaking communities & The world around us For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 1

• Exchange meaning in a spoken interaction in Chinese.

Writing & listening - 20%

• Interpret information from two texts on the same subtopic presented in Chinese, and respond in writing in Chinese and in English.

Reading & Viewing 10%

• Present information, concepts and ideas in writing in Chinese on the selected subtopic and for a specific audience and purpose.

Speaking - 20%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 2

• Respond in writing in Chinese to spoken, written or visual texts presented in Chinese. • Analyse and use information from written, spoken or visual texts to produce an extended written response in Chinese. • Explain information, ideas and concepts orally in Chinese to a specific audience about an aspect of culture within communities where Chinese is spoken.

Examination - 50%

Writing & listening - 20% Reading & Viewing - 10% Speaking - 20% Examination - 50%

Unit 3: For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. • Participate in a spoken exchange in Chinese to resolve a personal issue. • Interpret information from texts and write responses in Chinese.

Unit 3&4

• Express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in Chinese.

SACs Unit 3 - 25%

Unit 4:

SACs Unit 4 - 25%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. • Share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in Chinese. • Analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in Chinese. • Present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in Chinese.

50

Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Languages: French Unit

Common Areas of Study

Description

Assessment

The areas of study for French comprise themes and topics, text types, kinds of writing, vocabulary and grammar. The themes and topics are the vehicle through which the student will demonstrate achievement of the outcomes, in the sense that they form the subject of the activities and tasks the student undertakes. The text types, kinds of writing, vocabulary and grammar are linked, both to each other, and to the themes and topics. Together, as common areas of study, they add a further layer of definition to the knowledge and skills required for successful achievement of the outcomes. The common areas of study provide the opportunity for the student to build upon what is familiar, as well as develop knowledge and skills in new and more challenging areas. There are three prescribed themes: The individual, The French-speaking communities & The world around us

Unit 1

Unit 2

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Writing & Listening - 20%

• Exchange meaning in a spoken interaction in French.

Reading - 20%

• Interpret information from two texts on the same subtopic presented in French, and respond in writing in French and in English.

Speaking - 20% Vocabulary and Grammar - 10%

• Present information, concepts and ideas in writing in French on the selected subtopic and for a specific audience and purpose.

Examination - 30%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Writing & Listening - 20%

• Respond in writing in French to spoken, written or visual texts presented in French.

Reading - 20%

• Analyse and use information from written, spoken or visual texts to produce an extended written response in French. • Explain information, ideas and concepts orally in French to a specific audience about an aspect of culture within communities where French is spoken.

Speaking - 20% Vocabulary and Grammar - 10% Examination - 30%

Unit 3: For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. • Participate in a spoken exchange in French to resolve a personal issue. • Interpret information from texts and write responses in French.

Unit 3&4

• Express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in French.

SACs Unit 3 - 25%

Unit 4:

SACs Unit 4 - 25%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Examination - 50%

• Share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in French. • Analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in French. • Present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in French.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Languages: German Unit

Description

Common Areas of Study

The areas of study for German comprise themes and topics, text types, different styles of writing, vocabulary and grammar. The themes and subtopics encompass a wide range of study areas designed to expand the student’s knowledge of German culture as well as their linguistic competency. The areas of study enable the student to build on their prior knowledge of the subject and also enhance the sophistication of the language they are able to produce in speaking and writing. Students are required to demonstrate their understanding of the topic, grammar and vocabulary through a range of school assessed tasks with each tasks focusing on different linguistic skill that the students are required to master at VCE level.

Assessment

There are three prescribed themes: The individual, The German-speaking communities & The world around us

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 1

• Exchange meaning in a spoken interaction in German.

Reading - 20%

• Interpret information from two texts on the same subtopic presented in German, and respond in writing in German and in English.

Speaking - 20%

• Present information, concepts and ideas in writing in German on the selected subtopic and for a specific audience and purpose. For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes.

Unit 2

Writing & Listening - 20%

• Respond in writing in German to spoken, written or visual texts presented in German. • Analyse and use information from written, spoken or visual texts to produce an extended written response in German. • Explain information, ideas and concepts orally in German to a specific audience about an aspect of culture within communities where German is spoken.

Vocabulary and Grammar - 10% Examination - 30% Writing & Listening - 20% Reading - 20% Speaking - 20% Vocabulary and Grammar - 10% Examination - 30%

Unit 3: For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. • Participate in a spoken exchange in German to resolve a personal issue. • Interpret information from texts and write responses in German.

Unit 3&4

• Express ideas in a personal, informative or imaginative piece of writing in German.

SACs Unit 3 - 25%

Unit 4:

SACs Unit 4 - 25%

For this unit the student is required to demonstrate achievement of three outcomes. • Share information, ideas and opinions in a spoken exchange in German. • Analyse information from written, spoken and viewed texts for use in a written response in German. • Present information, concepts and ideas in evaluative or persuasive writing on an issue in German.

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Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Legal Studies Unit

Description

Assessment

Unit 1: Guilt and Liability

Unit 1

Criminal law and civil law aim to achieve social cohesion and protect the rights of individuals. Criminal law is aimed at maintaining social order and infringing criminal law can result in charges. Civil law deals with the infringement of a person’s or group’s rights and breaching civil law can result in litigation. In this unit students develop an understanding of legal foundations, such as the different types and sources of law and the existence of a court hierarchy in Victoria. Students investigate key concepts of criminal law and civil law and apply these to actual and / or hypothetical scenarios to determine whether an accused may be found guilty of a crime, or liable in a civil dispute.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Unit 2: Sanctions, Remedies and Rights

Unit 2

Criminal law and civil law aim to protect the rights of individuals. When rights are infringed, a case or dispute may arise which needs to be determined or resolved, and sanctions or remedies may be imposed. This unit focuses on the enforcement of criminal law and civil law, the methods and institutions that may be used to determine a criminal case or resolve a civil dispute, and the purposes and types of sanctions and remedies and their effectiveness. Students undertake a detailed investigation of two criminal cases and two civil cases from the past four years to form a judgment about the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve the principles of justice.

Tests and Assignments - 60% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: Rights and Justice

Unit 3&4

The Victorian justice system, which includes the criminal and civil justice systems, aims to protect the rights of individuals and uphold the principles of justice: fairness, equality and access. In this unit students examine the methods and institutions in the justice system and consider their appropriateness in determining criminal cases and resolving civil disputes. Students consider the Magistrates’ Court, County Court and Supreme Court within the Victorian court hierarchy, as well as other Victorian legal institutions and bodies available to assist with cases. Students explore matters such as the rights available to an accused and to victims in the criminal justice system, the roles of the judge, jury, legal practitioners and the parties, and the ability of sanctions and remedies to achieve their purposes.

Unit 4: The People and the Law The study of Australia’s laws and legal system involves an understanding of institutions that make and reform our laws, and the relationship between the Australian people, the Australian Constitution and law-making bodies. In this unit, students explore how the Australian Constitution establishes the lawmaking powers of the Commonwealth and state parliaments, and protects the Australian people through structures that act as a check on parliament in law-making. Students develop an understanding of the significance of the High Court in protecting and interpreting the Australian Constitution. They investigate parliament and the courts, and the relationship between the two in law-making, and consider the roles of the individual, the media and law reform bodies in influencing law reform.

SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Literature Unit

Description

Assessment

Approaches to literature

Unit 1

Students focus on the ways in which the interaction between text and reader creates meaning. Students’ analyses of the features and conventions of texts help them develop increasingly discriminating responses to a range of literary forms and styles. Students respond critically, creatively and reflectively to the ideas and concerns of texts and gain insights into how texts function as representations of human experience. They develop familiarity with key terms, concepts and practices that equip them for further studies in literature. They develop an awareness of how the views and values that readers hold may influence the reading of a text.

A series of tasks including: journals, oral presentations and essays.

Unit 3: Form and transformation

Unit 3&4

Students consider how the form of a text affects meaning, and how writers construct their texts. They investigate ways writers adapt and transform texts and how meaning is affected as texts are adapted and transformed. They consider how the perspectives of those adapting texts may inform or influence the adaptations. Students draw on their study of adaptations and transformations to develop creative responses to texts.

Unit 4: Interpreting texts Students develop critical and analytic responses to texts. They consider the context of their responses to texts as well as the ideas explored in the texts, the style of the language and points of view. They investigate literary criticism informing both the reading and writing of texts. Students develop an informed and sustained interpretation supported by close textual analysis.

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SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Mathematics The following flow chart represents the pathways in VCE Mathematics

Unit

Unit 3&4

Description Further Mathematics consists of two areas of study, a compulsory Core area of study to be completed in Unit 3 and an Applications area of study to be completed in Unit 4. The Core comprises ‘Data analysis’ and ‘Recursion and financial modelling’. The Applications comprises two modules to be completed in their entirety, from a selection of four possible modules: ‘Matrices’, ‘Networks and decision mathematics’, ‘Geometry and measurement’ and ‘Graphs and relations’. ‘Data analysis’ comprises 40 per cent of the content to be covered, ‘Recursion and financial modelling’ comprises 20 per cent of the content to be covered, and each selected module comprises 20 per cent of the content to be covered. Assumed knowledge and skills for the Core are contained in the General Mathematics Units 1 & 2 topics: ‘Computation and practical arithmetic’, ‘Investigating and comparing data distributions’, ‘Investigating relationships between two numerical variables’, ‘Linear graphs and modelling’, ‘Linear relations and equations’, and ‘Number patterns and recursion’. For each module there are related topics in General Mathematics Units 1 & 2. In undertaking these units, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, and graphs. They should have a facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation.

Assessment

SACs Unit 3 - 20% SACs Unit 4 -14% Examination 1 - 33% Examination 2 - 33%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Mathematics: General Mathematics Unit

Description

Assessment

General Mathematics provides for different combinations of student interests and preparation for study of VCE Mathematics at the Unit 3 & 4 level. The areas of study for General Mathematics Unit 1 & 2 are ‘Algebra and structure’, ‘Arithmetic and number’, ‘Discrete mathematics’, ‘Geometry, measurement and trigonometry’, ‘Graphs of linear and non-linear relations’ and ‘Statistics’. For Units 1 & 2, to suit the range of students entering the study, content must be selected from the six areas of study using the following rules: • for each unit, content covers four or more topics in their entirety, selected from at least three different areas of study

Unit 1&2

• courses intended as preparation for study at the Units 3 & 4 level should include a selection of topics from areas of study that provide a suitable background for these studies

Classroom Tests - 40%

• topics can also be selected from those available for Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2

Examination - 50%

• content covered from an area of study provides a clear progression in knowledge and skills from Unit 1 to Unit 2. In undertaking these units, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations and graphs with and without the use of technology. They should have facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic, financial and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout each unit as applicable.

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Major Project -10%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Mathematics: Mathematical Methods Unit

Description

Unit 1

In undertaking this unit, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, graphs and differentiation with and without the use of technology. They should have facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout the unit as applicable. The focus of Unit 1 is the study of simple algebraic functions, and the areas of study are ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Probability and Statistics’

Unit 2

In undertaking this unit, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational and real arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations, graphs, differentiation and anti-differentiation with and without the use of technology. They should have facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout the unit as applicable. In Unit 2 students focus on the study of simple transcendental functions and the calculus of simple algebraic functions. The areas of study are ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, and ‘Probability and Statistics’.

Unit 3&4

Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4 are completely prescribed and extend the introductory study of simple elementary functions of a single real variable, to include combinations of these functions, algebra, calculus, probability and statistics, and their applications in a variety of practical and theoretical contexts. Units 3 & 4 consist of the areas of study ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Calculus’, ‘Algebra’ and ‘Probability and Statistics’, which must be covered in progression from Unit 3 to Unit 4, with an appropriate selection of content for each of Unit 3 and Unit 4. Assumed knowledge and skills for Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4 are contained in Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2, and will be drawn on, as applicable, in the development of related content from the areas of study, and key knowledge and skills for the outcomes of Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4. For Unit 3 a selection of content would typically include the areas of study ‘Functions and graphs’ and ‘Algebra’, and applications of derivatives and differentiation, and identifying and analysing key features of the functions and their graphs from the ‘Calculus’ area of study. For Unit 4, this selection would typically consist of remaining content from the areas of study: ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Algebra’, and the study of random variables and discrete and continuous probability distributions and the distribution of sample proportions. For Unit 4, the content from the ‘Calculus’ area of study would be likely to include the treatment of anti-differentiation and integration.

Assessment

Clasroom Tests - 40% Major Project - 10% Examination - 50%

Clasroom Tests - 40% Major Project - 10% Examination - 50%

SACs Unit 3 - 17% SACs Unit 4 - 17% Examination 1- 22% Examination 2 - 44%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Mathematics: Specialist Mathematics Unit

Description

Unit 1&2

Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2 provide a course of study for students who wish to undertake an in-depth study of mathematics, with an emphasis on concepts, skills and processes related to mathematical structure, modelling, problem solving and reasoning. This study has a focus on interest in the discipline of mathematics in its own right and investigation of a broad range of applications, as well as development of a sound background for further studies in mathematics and mathematics related fields. Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2 and Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2, taken in conjunction, provide a comprehensive preparation for Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4. The areas of study for Units 1 & 2 of Specialist Mathematics are ‘Algebra and structure’, ‘Arithmetic and number’, ‘Discrete mathematics’, ‘Geometry, measurement and trigonometry’, ‘Graphs of linear and non-linear relations’ and ‘Statistics’. In undertaking these units, students are expected to be able to apply techniques, routines and processes involving rational, real and complex arithmetic, sets, lists and tables, diagrams and geometric constructions, algebraic manipulation, equations and graphs with and without the use of technology. They should have facility with relevant mental and by-hand approaches to estimation and computation. The use of numerical, graphical, geometric, symbolic and statistical functionality of technology for teaching and learning mathematics, for working mathematically, and in related assessment, is to be incorporated throughout each unit as applicable.

Unit 3&4

Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4 consist of the areas of study: ‘Functions and graphs’, ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, ‘Vectors’, ‘Mechanics’ and ‘Probability and statistics’. The development of course content should highlight mathematical structure, reasoning and applications across a range of modelling contexts with an appropriate selection of content for each of Unit 3 and Unit 4. The selection of content for Unit 3 and Unit 4 should be constructed so that there is a balanced and progressive development of knowledge and skills with connections among the areas of study being developed as appropriate across Unit 3 and Unit 4. Specialist Mathematics Units 3 & 4 assumes familiarity with the key knowledge and skills from Mathematical Methods Units 1 & 2, the key knowledge and skills from Specialist Mathematics Units 1 & 2 topics ‘Number systems and recursion’ and ‘Geometry in the plane and proof’, and concurrent or previous study of Mathematical Methods Units 3 & 4. Together these cover the assumed knowledge and skills for Specialist Mathematics, which are drawn on as applicable in the development of content from the areas of study and key knowledge and skills for the outcomes. In Unit 3 a study of Specialist Mathematics would typically include content from ‘Functions and graphs’ and a selection of material from the ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’ and ‘Vectors’ areas of study. In Unit 4 this selection would typically consist of the remaining content from the ‘Algebra’, ‘Calculus’, and ‘Vectors’ areas of study and the content from the ‘Mechanics’ and ‘Probability and statistics’ areas of study.

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Assessment

Clasroom Tests - 40% Major Project - 10% Examination - 50%

SACs Unit 3 - 17% SACs Unit 4 - 17% Examination 1- 22% Examination 2 - 44%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Music Performance Unit

Unit 1

Unit 2

Description

This unit focuses on building students’ performance and musicianship skills to present performances of selected group and solo music works on their chosen instrument/s. They study the work of other performers and explore strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.

This unit focuses on building performance and musicianship skills. Students present performances of selected group and solo music works on their chosen instrument/s and take opportunities to perform in various venues and spaces. They study the work of other performers and refine selected strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.

Assessment Practical Aural Skills -10% Music Analysis - 10% Performance Technique Presentation - 20% Recital Performance - 20% Composition Examination - 20%

Practical Aural Skills -10% Performance technique Presentation - 20% Recital Performance - 30% Composition - 20% Examination - 20%

Unit 3:

Unit 3&4

This unit focuses on building and refining performance and musicianship skills. Students focus on either group or solo performance and begin preparation of a performance program they will present in the end-of-year examination. As part of their preparation, students will also present performances of both group and solo music works on their chosen instrument/s and take opportunities to perform in various venues and spaces. They study the work of other performers and refine selected strategies to optimise their own approach to performance. They identify technical, expressive and stylistic challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and endeavour to address these challenges. Students develop their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills and apply this knowledge when preparing and presenting performances.

Unit 4: This unit focuses on further development and refinement of performance and musicianship skills. Students focus on either group or solo performance and continue preparation of a performance program they will present in the end-of-year examination. All students present performances of both group and solo music works on their chosen instrument/s and take opportunities to perform in various venues and spaces. Through analyses of other performers’ interpretations and feedback on their own performances, students refine their interpretations and optimise their approach to performance. They continue to address challenges relevant to works they are preparing for performance and to strengthen their listening, aural, theoretical and analytical musicianship skills.

SACs Unit 3 - 20% SACs Unit 4 - 10% Performance examination - 50% Music Language examination - 20%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Music Investigation Unit

Description

Assessment

Unit 3:

Unit 3&4

Students design and conduct an investigation into performance practices that are characteristic of a music style, tradition or genre. They describe and explore their selected Investigation Topic and its practices through critical listening, analysis and consideration of technical, expressive and contextual issues, and through composition, improvisation or arrangement and performance. Students begin by researching a representative sample of music and related contextual issues. They develop their knowledge and understanding of techniques and ways of achieving expressive outcomes and other aspects relevant to performance practice in the style, tradition or genre they are investigating. In this study research involves critical listening, analysis of live and recorded performances and study of scores / charts and other texts as appropriate to the Investigation Topic. Students develop and maintain a portfolio to document evidence of their research and findings. The portfolio also includes exercises, sketches or recorded improvisations that demonstrate their developing understanding of the Investigation Topic. Concurrently, students select, rehearse and prepare to perform a program of works that are representative and characteristic of their Investigation Topic. Through performance, students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of expressive and instrumental techniques and conventions and other relevant aspects of performance practice. As they learn and practise each work in the program, students use findings from their research to trial and make decisions about interpretative options and develop their ability to master technical and expressive features of the music.

Unit 4: Students refine the direction and scope of their end-of-year performance program. They also compose, improvise or arrange and perform a work that is characteristic of the music style, tradition or genre they are investigating and continue developing their understanding of relevant performance practices. Students continue to listen to the work of other performers and develop their ability to execute technical and expressive demands and apply performance conventions to realise their intended interpretations of each work.

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SACs Unit 3 - 30% SACs Unit 4 -20% Examination - 50%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Physical Education Unit

Description

Assessment

Unit 1: The human body in motion Through practical activities students explore the relationships between the body systems and physical activity, sport and exercise, and how the systems adapt to the demands of the activity. Students investigate the role and function of the main system structures and how they respond to exercise. They consider the implications of the use of legal and illegal practices to improve performances of the musculoskeletal and cardiorespiratory systems, evaluating perceived benefits and describing potential harms.

Unit 1

Unit 2: Physical activity, sport and society Students are introduced to types of physical activity and the role participation in physical activity plays in their own health and wellbeing as well as in other people’s lives in different populations. Students investigate how participation in physical activity varies across the lifespan. Students investigate individual and population-based consequences of physical inactivity and sedentary behaviour. They create and participate in an activity plan relevant to the particular population group being studied. Students study and apply the social-ecological model and / or the Youth Physical Activity Promotion Model to critique a range of individual- and settings-based strategies.

SACs Unit 1 - 25% SACs Unit 2 - 25% Examination - 50%

Unit 3: Movement skills and energy for physical activity

Unit 3&4

Students are introduced to the biomechanical and skill acquisition principles used to analyse movement skills, and energy production from a physiological perspective. They use a variety of tools and techniques to analyse and apply biomechanical and skill acquisition principles to improve and refine physical activity. They use practical activities to demonstrate how correct application of these principles can lead to improved performance in physical activity and sport. Students investigate the relative contribution and interplay of the three energy systems and their characteristics to physical activity. Students explore the causes of fatigue and consider different strategies used to postpone fatigue and promote recovery.

Unit 4: Training to improve performance Students analyse movement skills from a physiological, psychological and sociocultural perspective, and apply relevant training principles and methods to improve performance. Students analyse skill frequencies, movement patters, heart rates and work to rest ratios to determine the requirements of an activity. Students consider the physiological, psychological and sociological requirements of training to design and evaluate an effective training program. Students participate in a variety of training sessions designed to improve or maintain fitness and evaluate the effectiveness of different training methods. Students critique the effectiveness of the implementation of training principles and methods to meet the needs of the individual, and evaluate the chronic adaptations to training from a theoretical perspective.

SACs Unit 3 - 25% SACs Unit 4 - 25% Examination - 50%

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Physics Unit

Description

Assessment

What ideas explain the physical world?

Unit 1

Students explore how physics explains phenomena, at various scales, which are not always visible to the unaided human eye. They examine some of the fundamental ideas and models used by physicists in an attempt to understand and explain the world. Students consider thermal concepts, probe common analogies used to explain electricity, consider the origins and formation of matter, and use thermodynamic principles. Students examine the motion of electrons and explain how it can be manipulated and utilised. They explore current scientifically accepted theories that explain how matter and energy have changed since the origins of the Universe.

Tests - 40% Practical Report - 20% Examination - 40%

What do experiments reveal about the physical world?

Unit 2

Students investigate a variety of phenomena by making their own observations and generating questions, which in turn lead to experiments. Students make direct observations of physics phenomena and examine the ways in which phenomena that may not be directly observable. They investigate the ways in which forces are involved both in moving objects and in keeping objects stationary. Students choose one of twelve options related to astrobiology, astrophysics, bioelectricity, biomechanics, electronics, flight, medical physics, nuclear energy, nuclear physics, optics, sound and sports science.

Tests - 20% Research Project - 15% Investigation - 15% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: How do fields explain motion and electricity?

Unit 3&4

Students explore the importance of energy in explaining and describing the physical world. Students consider the field model as a construct that has enabled an understanding of why objects move when they are not apparently in contact with other objects. They explore the interactions, effects and applications of gravitational, electric and magnetic fields. Students use Newton’s laws to investigate motion in one and two dimensions, and are introduced to Einstein’s theories to explain the motion of very fast objects. They consider how developing technologies can challenge existing explanations of the physical world. Students design and undertake investigations involving at least two continuous independent variables. A student-designed practical investigation related to waves, fields or motion is undertaken and presented in a scientific poster format.

Unit 4: How can two contradictory models explain both light and matter? Students explore the use of wave and particle theories to model the properties of light and matter. They examine how the concept of the wave is used to explain the nature of light and explore its limitations in describing light behaviour. Students further investigate light by using a particle model to explain its behaviour. Students learn to think beyond the concepts experienced in everyday life to study the physical world from a new perspective. Students design and undertake investigations involving at least two continuous independent variables.

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SACs Unit 3 - 21% SACs Unit 4 - 19% Examination - 60%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Psychology Unit

Description

Assessment

How are behaviour and mental processes shaped?

Unit 1

Students investigate the structure and functioning of the human brain and the role it plays in the overall functioning of the human nervous system. Students explore brain plasticity and the influence that brain damage may have on a person’s psychological functioning. They examine the contribution that classical and contemporary studies have made to an understanding of the human brain and its functions, and to the development of different psychological models and theories used to predict and explain the development of thoughts, feelings and behaviours. A student-directed research investigation related to brain function and / or development is undertaken in this unit.

Coursework - 40% Investigation - 30% Examination - 30%

How do external factors influence behaviour and mental processes?

Unit 2

A person’s thoughts, feelings and behaviours are influenced by a variety of biological, psychological and social factors. In this unit students investigate how perception of stimuli enables a person to interact with the world around them and how their perception of stimuli can be distorted. Students explore a variety of factors and contexts that can influence the behaviour of an individual and groups. A student practical investigation related to internal and external influences on behaviour is undertaken in this unit.

Coursework - 30% Investigation - 30% Examination - 40%

Unit 3: How does experience affect behaviour and mental processes?

Unit 3&4

The nervous system influences behaviour and the way people experience the world. In this unit students examine both macro-level and micro-level functioning of the nervous system to explain how the human nervous system enables a person to interact with the world around them. They explore how stress may affect a person’s psychological functioning and consider the causes and management of stress. Students investigate how mechanisms of memory and learning lead to the acquisition of knowledge, the development of new capacities and changed behaviours. They consider the limitations and fallibility of memory and how memory can be improved. A student practical investigation related to mental processes and psychological functioning is undertaken in either Unit 3 or Unit 4, or across both Units 3 & 4.

Unit 4: How is wellbeing developed and maintained?

SACs Unit 3 - 16% SACs Unit 4 - 24% Examination - 60%

Students examine the nature of consciousness and how changes in levels of consciousness can affect mental processes and behaviour. They consider the role of sleep and the impact that sleep disturbances may have on a person’s functioning. Students explore the concept of a mental health continuum and apply a biopsychosocial approach, as a scientific model, to analyse mental health and disorder. They use specific phobia to illustrate how the development and management of a mental disorder can be considered as an interaction between biological, psychological and social factors. A student practical investigation related to mental processes and psychological functioning is undertaken in either Unit 3 or Unit 4. 63


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Studio Arts Unit

Description

Assessment

Studio inspiration and techniques

Unit 1

Students focus on developing an understanding of the stages of studio practice and explore, develop, refine, resolve and present artworks. Students explore sources of inspiration, research artistic influences, develop individual ideas and explore a range of materials and techniques related to specific art forms. Using documented evidence, students refine and resolve their skills to communicate ideas in artworks.

Artistic design and Creation - 80% Examination - 20%

Students research and analyse ways in which artists have developed their studio practice to interpret and express ideas, source inspiration and apply materials and techniques.

Studio exploration and concepts

Unit 2

Students establish a studio practice to produce artworks. This includes documenting sources of inspiration, and experimentation with materials. They explore and develop ideas and subject matter, create aesthetic qualities and record the development of the work. Using a range of art periods, movements or styles, students develop a broader knowledge about the history of art.

Artistic design and Creation - 80% Examination - 20%

The exhibition of artworks is important and students are encouraged to visit a variety of exhibition spaces, reflect on the environments and examine how artworks are presented.

Unit 3: Studio practices and processes

Unit 3&4

Students implement an individual studio process leading to the production of potential directions. This process records trialling, experimenting, analysing and evaluating the extent to which art practices communicate ideas presented in the exploration proposal. Students investigate and analyse the response of artists to a wide range of source material and examine their use of materials and techniques. They explore professional art practices of artists from different historical and cultural contexts in relation to particular artworks and art forms.

SACs Unit 4 - 5%

Unit 4: Studio practice and art industry contexts

SACs Unit 3 & 4 - 60%

Students plan, produce and evaluate to develop, refine and present artworks. They present visual and written evaluation that explains a range of potential directions to produce at least two finished artworks.

Examination - 30%

This unit also investigates aspects of artists’ involvement in the art industry, which the student has visited with reference to specific artworks. Students investigate the methods and considerations of the artist and / or curator involved in the preparation, presentation and conservation of artworks.

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SACs Unit 3 - 5%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Theatre Studies (offered in alternate years) Unit

Description

Assessment

Pre-modern theatre styles and conventions

Unit 1 offered in 2019

This unit focuses on the application of acting, direction and design in relation to theatre styles from the pre-modern era of theatre, focusing on at least three distinct theatre styles and their conventions. They study innovations in theatre production in the pre-modern era and apply this knowledge to their own works. Students develop knowledge and skills about theatre production processes including dramaturgy, planning, development and performance to an audience and apply this to their work. Theatre styles from the pre-modern era of theatre include Ancient Greek, Roman, Liturgical drama such as morality / miracle / mystery plays, Italian and the Commedia Dell’Arte, Elizabethan, Restoration comedies and dramas, Neo-classical, Naturalism / Realism, Beijing Opera, Noh, Bunraku and Kabuki and other traditional indigenous theatre forms. Students begin to develop skills of performance analysis and apply these to the analysis of a play in performance.

Course work including a research report, interpretation of script performance pieces, analysis of a performance, class tests: - 80% Examination - 20%

Modern theatre styles and conventions

Unit 2 offered in 2019

This unit focuses on the application of acting, direction and design in relation to theatre styles from the modern era, that is, from the 1920s to the present. Students creatively and imaginatively work in production roles with scripts from the modern era of theatre, focusing on at least three distinct theatre styles. They study innovations in theatre production in the modern era and apply this knowledge to their own works. Students develop knowledge and skills about theatre production processes including dramaturgy, planning, development and performance to an audience and apply this to their work. They study safe and ethical working practices in theatre production and develop skills of performance analysis, which they apply to the analysis of a play in performance. Theatre styles from the modern era of Theatre include Epic Theatre, Constructivist theatre, Theatre of the Absurd, Political theatre, Feminist theatre, Expressionism, Eclectic theatre, Experimental Theatre, Musical Theatre, Physical theatre, Verbatim theatre, Theatre-in-Education and Immersive / Interactive theatre.

Course work including a research report, interpretation of script performance pieces, analysis of a performance, class tests: - 80% Examination - 20%

Producing theatre

Unit 3&4 offered in 2020

In this unit students develop an interpretation of a script through the three stages of the theatre production process: planning, development and presentation. Students specialise in two production roles, working collaboratively, creatively and imaginatively to realise the production of a script. They use knowledge developed during this process to analyse and evaluate the ways work in production roles can be used to interpret script excerpts previously unstudied. Students develop knowledge and apply elements of theatre composition, and safe and ethical working practices in the theatre. Students attend a performance selected from the prescribed VCE Theatre Studies Unit 3 Playlist and analyse and evaluate the interpretation of the script in the performance. The Playlist is published annually on the VCAA website.

Presenting an interpretation In this unit students study a scene and an associated monologue. They initially develop an interpretation of the prescribed scene. This work includes exploring theatrical possibilities and using dramaturgy across the three stages of the production process. Students then develop a creative and imaginative interpretation of the monologue that is embedded in the specified scene. To realise their interpretation, they work in production roles as an actor and director, or as a designer. Students’ work for Areas of Study 1 & 2 is supported through analysis of a performance they attend. The performance must be selected from the VCE Theatre Studies Unit 4 Playlist. The Playlist is published annually on the VCAA website. Students analyse acting, direction and design and the use of theatre technologies, as appropriate to the production.

SACs Unit 3 - 30% SACs Unit 4 - 15% Monologue Examination - 25% Written Examination - 30%

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Visual Communication Design Unit

Description

Assessment

Introduction to visual communication design

Unit 1

This unit focuses on using visual language to communicate messages, ideas and concepts. Students practise drawing what they observe and exploring their ideas and concepts. Through exploration of the relationship between design elements and principles, they develop an understanding of how these affect the visual message. Students review the contextual background of visual communication through investigating design styles. They are introduced to three stages of the design process: researching designers, generating ideas and then applying design knowledge and drawing skills to develop concepts.

Artistic design and Creation - 80% Examination - 20%

Applications of visual communication design

Unit 2

This unit focuses on the application of visual communication design knowledge, design thinking skills and drawing methods to meet specific purposes in designated design fields. Students use technical drawing conventions to communicate information associated with the environmental or industrial fields of design. They investigate how typography and imagery are used and apply design thinking skills when exploring ways to communicate ideas. Students engage in the stages of research, generation of ideas and development of concepts to create visual communications.

Artistic design and Creation - 80% Examination - 20%

Unit 3: Design thinking practice

Unit 3&4

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Students gain an understanding of the process designers employ to communicate ideas. They understand how methods, media, materials and the application of design elements and principles create effective visual communications. They investigate and experiment with manual and digital methods, media and materials to make informed design decisions. Students establish a brief and apply design thinking skills through the process. They describe a client, two distinctly different needs of that client, and the purpose, audience, context and constraints relevant to each need. Design from a variety of historical and contemporary design fields provides directions for investigation.

Unit 4: Design development and presentation The focus of this unit is the development of design concepts and two final presentations. Students utilise a range of digital and manual two and threedimensional methods, media and materials. As they revisit stages to undertake further research or idea generation when developing and presenting their design solutions, they develop an understanding of the iterative nature of the design process. Students refine and present two visual communications within the parameters of the brief. They evaluate their visual communications and devise a pitch to communicate their design thinking and decision making to the client.

SACs Unit 3 - 25% School assessed Task- 40% Examination - 35%


Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Vocational Education and Training All Vocational Education and Training (VET) subjects (excluding VCE VET Hospitality and Kitchen Operations) take place off-site and are conducted after normal school hours. VET subjects are offered at students’ expense and must fit with the School’s timetable. VCE VET programs are designed to broaden the range of options available to the growing and increasingly diverse senior secondary school population. The provision of VCE VET programs enables students to undertake accredited vocational studies (VET) within an accredited senior secondary program (VCE). VCE VET offers students the opportunity to: • Combine general and vocational studies • Undertake learning in the workforce • Gain a nationally recognised VET qualification, or credit towards one, as part of their VCE. • Take new pathways into further full time vocational training, or combined work and vocational training that supplement existing pathways into tertiary study. All certification of the VCE VET program is issued by the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority. VCE VET programs also contribute to the ATAR and hence to post-secondary courses. The VCE VET program aims to equip senior secondary students with three sets of competencies (or skills): • Generic competencies which are based on Mayer Key Competencies and comprise the skills everybody needs to function successfully in contemporary Australian society. • Enterprise competencies which are vocational skills and qualities that are required in all workplaces. • Industry specific competencies which are the skills needed for specific occupations. VCE VET is equally relevant to those planning to enrol in a university after Year 12 as it is to those who plan to enrol in a TAFE institute. An increasing percentage of university students now are gaining TAFE qualifications either upon completion of their degree or in conjunction with their university studies. Who should consider a VCE VET course? Students who have a strong interest or a clear career goal in one of the areas covered by a VCE VET course. There are two types of VET programs that can contribute both to the VCE and to the ATAR. • Scored assessed programs • Blocked credit recognition http://www.vcaa.vic.edu.au/Pages/vet/programs/index.aspx

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Alternative Study Options If a student wishes to enrol in a subject beyond those offered through our curriculum, or a subject which circumstances preclude them from studying on campus, students should first make enquiries with the Careers Development Practitioner, and then seek permission from the Principal via the Head of School. In such circumstances, The School can partner with the following organisations: • Distance Education Centre Victoria (CRICOS 00861K) • The Victorian School of Languages (CRICOS 00861K) Vocational Education and Training subjects (VET), not offered by the School, can also be undertaken through consultation and by arrangement. Off-site VET subjects will be studied in partnership with an accredited Registered Training Organisation (RTO). International students wishing to study a VET subject at an off-site RTO will be limited to opportunities available through accredited RTO providers that also hold CRICOS registration. All external studies that form part of a student’s formal study program must be approved by the Principal through the Head of School.

VET in Schools (VETIS) programs The range of VETIS is constantly expanding. Those currently available include

• Financial Services* • Food Processing (Wine)

• Acting

• Furnishing*

• Automotive

• Hairdressing

• Bricklaying

• Health and Community Care

• Building

• Horticulture

• Business*

• Hospitality*

• CISCO Networking

• I.T. (Games Creation)

• Clothing

• Interactive Digital Media*

• Community Recreation*

• Laboratory Skills*

• Community Services*

• Multimedia*

• Conservation and land Management

• Music*

• Dance*

• Outdoor Recreation*

• Electrical

• Plumbing

• Electrotechnology*

• Residential Drafting

• Engineering*

• Tourism and Events

• Equine Studies*

• Welding and Fabrication

Those studies marked with an asterisk receive a scored assessment i.e. there is an exam and a study score as for any other VCE subject. Other studies receive an ‘increment’ and are acknowledged in the calculation of an ATAR in the same manner as a fifth or sixth subject. The increment is calculated as 10% of the average score of the primary four subjects used in calculating an individual student’s ATAR.

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VCE VET VCE VET Hospitality incorporating: Certificate II in Hospitality, Certificate II in Kitchen Operations & Certificate III in Hospitality Please note that while VCE VET Hospitality classes are conducted at The Knox School, at least part of the instruction will occur after normal school hours.

Description Units 1 & 2: Hospitality and Kitchen Operations Dual Recognition Program

Units 3 & 4:

Hospitality

Students study units drawn from both SIT20316: Certificate II in Hospitality and SIT20416: Certificate II in Kitchen Operations. The dual recognition program provides skills and knowledge to a ‘front-of-house’ role and includes training in customer service and basic food preparation skills. It also provides cookery skills, knowledge and training in the use of food preparation equipment, basic methods of cookery and cleaning kitchen premises and equipment.

Coursework tasks Successful completion of units of competency Examination

Study of VCE VET Hospitality Units 1 & 2 incurs an additional cost of $370 per student for food and equipment.

Hospitality and Kitchen Operations are two distinct subjects with specific outcomes. Students may choose to undertake both streams.

VCE VET Hospitality Units 3 & 4 provides additional skills and knowledge specific to a ‘front-of house’ role and includes training in the preparation of non-alcoholic beverages and barista training, table service of food and beverages, the provision of advice on food and the processing of financial transactions. Study of VCE VET Hospitality Units 3 & 4 incurs an additional cost of $220 per student for food and equipment.

Kitchen Operations

Assessment

Coursework tasks Examinations for Hospitality and Kitchen Operations Successful completion of units of competency

VCE VET Kitchen Operations Units 3 & 4 provides additional specific cookery skills and knowledge and includes training in commercial production of appetisers and salads, stocks, sauces and soups, vegetables, fruit, eggs and farinaceous dishes. Study of VCE VET Kitchen Operations Units 3 & 4 incurs an additional cost of $370 per student for food and equipment.

Units of Competency

For details of the VCE VET Hospitality and Kitchen Operations units of competency please refer to the VCE VET Hospitality program booklet published by the VCAA and which can be found by following this link.

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Glossary of VCE Terms The following glossary, listed alphabetically, is provided to assist in an understanding of the VCE. The Senior School Information Book provides further detail regarding the formalities of the VCE.

Australian Tertiary Admissions Ranking (ATAR) The ATAR is an overall percentile ranking reflecting the comparative performance of a student against all students in the given year. The highest rank therefore is 99.95%, and will be expressed to two decimal points. An ATAR will be issued to students who have accumulated a minimum of four normalised global scores, including a score for English or ESL, and who are completing at least one VCE study in the current year. Students will receive an advice letter containing their ATAR from VTAC at the same time that they receive their Study Scores from the VCAA.

Coursework Assessment This assesses how you have performed the nominated assessment tasks specified in the Study Design. These tasks must be done mainly in class time.

General Achievement Test (GAT) Tests which measure the level of general achievement students have accomplished across three broad areas: • written communication • mathematics, science, technology • the humanities, arts, studies of society and the environment. The GAT forms part of the assessment process for VCE school-assessed tasks in Unit 3 - 4 studies. The GAT is held in midJune.

Learning Outcomes Descriptions of the knowledge and skills you should have by the time you have completed a unit.

School Assessed Tasks (SACs) These type of tasks will be the same for every school. However, the exact content of the tasks will be decided by the school to match what has been taught.

School Reference A personal testimonial, usually prepared for the Principal’s signature by the student’s tutor, commenting on any or every aspect of character and achievement relevant to future employment or study. This is a privilege, not a right, and is written on special request for particular purposes.

Semester Equivalent to half a school year.

Sequence of Units Most Studies have been designed as a sequence of four units, to be taken in each semester over two years.

Statement of Results A cumulative statement of results will be issued by the Board of Studies at the end of each year to all students enrolled in the VCE.

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Results of Unit 1 & 2 Studies will be reported on the statement as S (satisfactory) or N (not satisfactory). The Knox School will use a ten point scale to report on levels of achievement in these units. Results of Unit 3 & 4 Studies will also be reported as S (satisfactory) or N (not satisfactory) and, in addition, grades (A+ E) will be reported for each Graded Assessment Task undertaken. These grades will be based on definitions of levels of performance.

Student Programs A Student Program is the overall program of studies undertaken by a student during the two-year VCE. The program for full-time continuing students at The Knox School will normally include 22 units taken over four semesters.

Student Record A school-generated summary record of prizes, positions of responsibility and co-curricular involvements in the senior years.

Study A sequence of half-year units in a particular curriculum area, for example English, Mathematics, Chinese.

Study Design The Study Design describes the units available within the Study and prescribes the objectives, areas of study, work requirements and assessment tasks.

Unit A semester-length component of a Study, representing about 100 hours of work, of which about 50-60 hours are class time.

Unit 1 & 2 Studies Units within a VCE Study designed to approximate the Year 11 level of difficulty.

Unit 3 & 4 Studies Units within a VCE Study designed to approximate the Year 12 level of difficulty.

VCAA The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority - responsible for curriculum, assessment and certification at Year 11 and 12 levels in Victoria.

VCE The Victorian Certificate of Education Study Areas developed by eight Key Learning Area Committees: the Arts, English, Health and Physical Education, Languages Other Than English, Mathematics, Science, Studies of Society and the Environment, Technology.

VTAC The Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre - the body which administers a joint selection system on behalf of Victorian institutes of higher education.

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Subject Selection and Forms

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Subject Selection Process This guide is designed to assist in using Web Preferences to select and submit your subject preferences. For any queries please contact travis.parker@knox.vic.edu.au This user guide contains the following sections: Step 1 – Logging on to Web Preferences Step 2 – Adding subject preferences

Year 12

Year 11

Year 10

Step 3 – Confirming subject preferences Step 4 – Printing your confirmation

Step 1 – Logging on to Web Preferences After your subject selection evening you will receive a unique username and password. These are to be used for logging on to Web Preferences. After you have decided upon your subjects that you wish to choose, you may log on to Web Preferences. The link is: https://www.selectmysubjects.com.au/ Enter your Student Access Code and your Password in the text fields provided. Click on “Log In” to proceed.

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Senior Subject Selection Handbook

Step 2 – Adding subject preferences Year 12 After reading through the information provided, click on “Add New Preferences”. Rules for subject selection:

1.

English, Literature or EAL must be selected in Block 1

2.

You must choose at least 4 subjects, and up to 6.

Once you have selected your subjects click on “Proceed”. This doesn’t become clickable until you have entered a subject in each dropdown field.

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Year 11 After reading through the information provided, click on “Add New Preferences”.

Rules for subject selection: 1.

English, English / Literature or EAL must be selected in Block 1.

2.

You must choose at least 6 options plus two reserves.

3.

There is an option for “Off campus subject”. This is for students who are studying VET courses at other locations.

4.

Reserve preferences will only be used if a student is unable to be placed into one of their top 6 options.

Once you have selected your subjects click on “Proceed”. This button doesn’t become clickable until you have entered a subject in each dropdown field.

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Year 10 After reading through the information provided, click on “Add New Preferences”.

Rules for subject selection: 1.

Select English or EAL from Preference 1.

2.

Selection of a Humanities subject or Bridging EAL in Preference 2. If you selected EAL in Preference 1, you must choose Bridging EAL.

3.

Preference 3 is the electives. Year-long electives count as 2 units and semester-based subjects count as 1 unit. You need to select at least 4 units of electives along with 2 reserve subjects.

4.

Students will need to choose a minimum of 8 units and 2 reserve subjects to be able to proceed.

Once you have selected your subjects click on “Proceed”.

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Step 3 – Confirming subject preferences You will now be shown a screen that lists all of the preferences that you have selected. If you have made a mistake you may click “Cancel” to begin the selection process again, however if this is correct you may click “Submit Valid Preferences” to continue.

Step 4 – Printing your confirmation Finally you will need to print your subject preferences and have your parents sign them. To do this first click on “Open Print View”.

In the window that opens click “Print Receipt”. Once they are signed by both you and your parents please submit the form to the box located at Reception and they will be kept on file.

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Application to study two VCE subjects at Year 10 form

Application to study two VCE subjects at Year 10 Section 1:

Application details

Student's Name:

Tutor Group:

I wish to apply to study the following VCE subjects in Year 10: List the Subject(s):

Acceptance of Conditions: We understand and accept that: 1.

Submitting this application does not guarantee the study of two VCE subjects in Year 10.

2.

The Senior School Information Book identifies the achievement of an overall ‘B’ result in English and a related subject(s) as a prerequisite for consideration to study a VCE subject, and predominantly ‘As’ to study two.

3.

The study of two VCE subjects at Year 10 is a significant workload and is only provided for students who have demonstrated the capability to manage this workload.

4.

VCE subjects have a high level of accountability. Expectations are the same for all students enrolled in the subject regardless of the year level.

5.

It is expected that successful applicants will maintain a very high level of achievement in all other Year 10 or Year 11 subjects.

Student's signature:

Date:

Parent / Guardian's signature:

Date:

Section 2: Signatures in support of application Tutor Head of Department Teacher of related Year 9 subject Teacher of related Year 9 subject

QF 17b

Filename & Path \\knox.vic.edu.au\Staff_Home\Admin\Lutj\09c ISO\ISO MASTERS\Forms\ISO 2018 Forms QF 17b Application to Study two VCE subjects at Year 10.docx Author Document Date Date Accessed/Printed Vice Principal 02 July 2018 (v2) 2 July 2018 Page 1 of 2

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Section 3:

Written application

In your application, please indicate how you believe you have demonstrated the study skills required for the successful undertaking of two VCE subjects at Year 10, the required level of achievement in Year 9, and both your reasons for wishing to study two VCE subjects at Year 10 and your prospective pathway to future study at Years 11 and 12.

Please submit completed application, along with the signed web preferences receipt printout of your subject selections, by the due date to the Senior School office. A confirmation e-mail will be sent. Applications will be considered by the Head of Senior School together with a student’s Head of House and through consultation with the Career Development Practitioner.

QF 17b

Filename & Path \\knox.vic.edu.au\Staff_Home\Admin\Lutj\09c ISO\ISO MASTERS\Forms\ISO 2018 Forms QF 17b Application to Study two VCE subjects at Year 10.docx Author Document Date Date Accessed/Printed Vice Principal 02 July 2018 (v2) 2 July 2018 Page 2 of 2

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Application to study two VCE subjects at Year 11 form Application to study two VCE Unit 3 & 4 subjects at Year 11 A normal study program in Year 11 at The Knox School would include the undertaking of five VCE Unit 1 & 2 and one VCE Unit 3 & 4 subjects to make for a total of six subjects. At Year 12, students would normally complete the VCE Unit 3 & 4 continuation of the five VCE Unit 1 & 2 subjects they undertook at Year 11.

Section 1:

Application details

Student's Name:

Tutor Group:

I wish to apply to study the following VCE Unit 3 & 4 subjects in Year 11: List the Subject(s):

Is this an application to continue the study of two VCE Unit 1 & 2 subjects from Year 10?

Y/N

If yes, then please disregard section 2 and 3 and submit your request accordingly. Acceptance of Conditions: We understand and accept that: 1.

Submitting this application does not guarantee the study of two VCE Unit 3 & 4 subjects in Year 11.

2.

The Senior School Information Book identifies that the normal and preferred study program for a student in Year 11 consists of five VCE Unit 1 & 2 subjects and one VCE Unit 3 & 4 subject.

3.

The study of two VCE subjects at Year 11 is a significant workload and is only provided for students who have demonstrated the capability to manage this.

4.

VCE Unit 3 & 4 subjects have a very high level of accountability and expected study. Expectations are the same for all students enrolled in the subject regardless of the year level.

5.

It is expected that successful applicants will maintain a very high level of achievement in all other Year 11 subjects.

Student's signature:

Date:

Parent / Guardian's signature:

Date:

Section 2: Signatures in support of application Tutor Head of Department

QF 17a

Filename & Path \\knox.vic.edu.au\Staff_Home\Admin\Lutj\09c ISO\ISO MASTERS\Forms\ISO 2018 Forms QF 17a Application to Study two Unit 3 4 subjects at Year 11.docx Author Document Date Date Accessed/Printed Vice Principal 02 July 2018 (v2) 2 July 2018 Page 1 of 2

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Section 3:

Written application

In your application, please explain why you believe the completion of two VCE Unit 3 & 4 subjects is the best study program for you. Your application should include both your reasons for wishing to study two VCE Unit 3 & 4 subjects at Year 11 and your prospective pathway to future study at Year 12, evidence as to your study habits and time management, and your levels of achievement in relevant Year 10 subjects.

Please submit completed application, along with the signed web preferences receipt printout of your subject selections, by the due date to the Senior School office. A confirmation e-mail will be sent. Applications will be considered by the Head of Senior School together with a student’s Head of House and through consultation with the Career Development Practitioner.

QF 17a

Filename & Path \\knox.vic.edu.au\Staff_Home\Admin\Lutj\09c ISO\ISO MASTERS\Forms\ISO 2018 Forms QF 17a Application to Study two Unit 3 4 subjects at Year 11.docx Author Document Date Date Accessed/Printed Vice Principal 02 July 2018 (v2) 2 July 2018 Page 2 of 2

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Thank you!

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Year 10 & VCE Subject Selection Handbook  

Year 10 & VCE Subject Selection Handbook