Page 1


TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL

MAGAZINE.

EDITORIAL.

Among the less arduous duties of the editorial staff is the reading of those contributions, and they are many, which are not published. On numerous occasions the contributions are not sent in any spirit of levity, which rather adds to the humour. It is felt, however, that a magazine which attempts to be the organ of a scholastic establishment should show signs of a degree of literary attainment not always noticeable in the contributions submitted. It can be said, that the cultural standards of a community can be gauged by its literature, and if this is so, it behoves the editors of a school magazine to see that a standard befitting the school and its reputation is maintained. The reader, however, ought not to expect the same standard of literary skill from all parts of the school. He should keep in mind that it is a far cry from IIA. to the V. or VI. The latter forms should also remember that their contributions axe not judged by the same standards as those of the lower school. Let us then have contributions worthy of the school magazine, let us have quality as well as quantity, so that the magazine may not only reflect the varied activities of the school but may maintain and even increase its high standard of achievement.


2

EASTER SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES.

This term the phrase which we have so often had to use, " The war has interfered with School activities," may cheerfully be rejected as false. Plenty, surprising though it may seem, has arrived to liven up " the trivial round, the common task." First of all there were two very exciting 1st XV matches against Whitley Bay and Monkseaton High School, and two Under 14 matches against South Shields High School, all of which are described elsewhere. Then there were the " Runs," which, though very tiring to most of the runners, provided quite a lot of excitement. These also are more fully described within the pages of this journal. Towards the end of term the School witnessed a thrilling series of House Matches, both for senior and junior teams. These matches, which are described elsewhere, were won by Tynemouth House, after which a united team from the other Houses played the victorious House, who again won. In celebration Mr. Wastle, Tynemouth House Master, gave his teams a tea, which has since been described as " scrumptious." We must warmly congratulate J. G. Hunter on being awarded his colours, which were not given him last term on account of a regrettable oversight, for which we must apologise. Jackson is to be congratulated on winning a prize for public speaking, an achievement which may be regarded as unique in the history of the School. E A S T E R T E R M , 1943.

V. III. Ila. lib. I.

Avete.

M.P.S.

H. D. R. G. J. L. S. F. P.

F. Beaumont. M. Wallace. Browell, J. A. Brown, P. C. Smith, D. S. Taulbut. J. Hoskin, G. K. Jones, G. C. Stokoe, D. N. Watt. Edminson, R. A. Peel, M. J. Read, J. D. Watt. D. Gilroy, J. Hunter, A. R. Moore, R. C. Naughton, V. Sergeant, C. J. Sergeant. W. Atkinson, D. Atkinson, A. M. Donaldson, J. Robinson, A. Webster-Grinling.

IV. III. Juniors. M.P.S.

L. A. A. D.

M. Mason, R. Peirson. J. Robson, M. G. Taylor, M. G. Lumb. R. Moore. A. Cook.

Juniors.

Valete.

MONKSEATON

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL.

The most important event of this term, to the children at any rale, was the visit of the whole school to a matinee of " Peter Pan " at the Theatre Royal in February. The production was delightful in every way, Alastair Sim being an almost loveable Captain Hook, with just the right suggestion of the sinister to satisfy the older boys. The scene in which the children learnt to fly was a source of unfailing wonder for days afterwards. We were very pleased to have Airs. Rodgers and her small daughter with us, and were grateful for her help in shepherding the children to and from the station.


3 During the term we did very well with War Savings, and during the last week of term held our special effort for Whitley Bay's " Wings for Victory Week." Our target was £25, but we more than doubled it, actually collecting £52, to which total every child in the school contributed. H . G. G. NORTH

SHIELDS

Housemaster: Mr. Cox.

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Captain: P.

S.

CHESNEY.

This term we were unfortunate in the House Matches. We had several men off at the beginning, and before the last game we lost Hunter. It was, therefore, not a great surprise to find that we lost. Nor did we do too well in the runs, but it was noteworthy that the few members running generally gained good positions. We were quite well represented on the School teams, on the First XV. by Chesney, Hunter, Slack and Horseman, and on the Under 14 by Chick, A. Dunlevy, A. N. Hunter, Peirson, C. Dunlevy, Joice, Hewitt and Wardhough. We must congratulate J. Hunter on being awarded his colours, and Laffey on being top of 1IA. TYNEMOUTH

House Master: Mr.

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Captain: D.

WASTLE.

WEBSTER.

This term our House has again won the Rugby Cup; playing two teams, each seven-a-side, we gained the maximum number of points, which is a record. In the first team we were represented by D. Webster, N. Calvert, Parrack, N. Lee, Wight, D. Coxon, and A. Lee, and by Matthews, J. Evans, Edminson, Towell, Thompson, Burn, and Gardner in the second team. We had a marvellous celebration towards the end of term, and once more thank Mr. Wastle for his untiring keenness. I feel sure that after such encouragement the future members of the House Rugby team will strive and succeed in retaining the cup. We have had four members on the School Team this term—Parrack, Calvert, Webster and N. Lee, of which the first three have their colours. We have also been represented by A. Lee, Matthews, Edminson, Gardner, Evans and' Towell on the Under 14. A. Lee has captained the under 14 this term, and Matthews has also been the principal scorer. We must also congratulate Schofield on gaining his first M.B. at King's College, and A. Lee and Lilburn on being top of their form. WHITLEY

House Master: Mr.

MILLER.

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Captain:

A.

I.

WELCH.

At last we have discovered the sport in which we are unconquerable— running. Out of the three runs organised by Mr. Miller, which have been held this term, Whitley Bay House has each time been triumphant. This success did not prevail in the Rugby House Matches, and neither team was able to win a match. This was due in some measure to the lack of weight in the scrum caused by Dunkerlev's unfortunate illness. We suffered other misfortunes but this js neither the time nor the place to make excuses. We congratulate A. Proctor who was selected to play on the Under 14 Rugby team. Next term will, I hope, see the return of the Sports in which we will be able to exploit our running triumph with success, and perhaps we will be more fortunate in the Cricket House Matches.


4 MONKSEATON

House Master: Mr.

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Captain: G.

WOOD.

CROCKER.

There has been been nothing out of the ordinary to disturb the usual routine of work this term, and everything has proceeded quietly and smoothly. Though the First Fifteen has only played two matches, the House was well represented on the team by Crocker, Barclay, R. Smith, Casey, Brodie, and J. A. Jackson. In the Under 14 we had two members, namely, Blunt and Pringle. Unfortunately, we were not able to beat Tynemouth in the House Matches this year but managed to be second with 29 points, which, all things considered, was not so bad. However, we hope to have better luck next year and once again to assert our superiority over the other Houses. The idea of playing with two seven a-side teams, adopted this year, seems to have aroused more than the usual inter-house rivalry, and it is our earnest wish to see it continued in the future. In conclusion we congratulate Jackson on winning the Public Speaking Prize of the Young Farmers' Union—a fine achievement. RUGGER.

Having been blessed with remarkably fine weather this Spring Term, very few Rugger games have had to be cancelled. Of School Matches there have been only four owing to difficulty in obtaining opponents. The first two were against Whitley Bay and Monkseaton High School and we unfortunately lost both. The second two were Under 14 matches against South Shields High School, the first, played at Percy Park we won, the second we lost. Short accounts of these are given elsewhere. In the case of both the First Fifteen and the Under Fourteen I felt that it was not a case of being outplayed by opponents experienced iu the arts of Rugger, but rather due to a lack of any life or initiative in our play. Time after time boys simply run with the ball, usually across the field, until held, and then try a pass when it was obvious that nothing would come of it. Never once did we see any attempt to give the " dummy," and attempts at the cut-through and kick ahead were few and far between. The kicking of both teams was weak, and many of the tries scored against us were directly due to kicking wildly up the middle of the field instead of making sure of touch. In the Under 14 in particular fly-kicking has been one of the worst faults. The Seven-a-Side House Matches produced some better and, at times, exciting play. Tynemouth House are to be congratulated on winning the Cup, without losing a point. Their first team was so strong that it would have been surprising if they had lost a match. Besides the above matches there were two good games played between IIA. and the Illrd. Form. The Illrd., with a sadly depleted team, had to face defeat, but they got their revenge in a week or so later in a return match. The enthusiasm shown in the lower games has been very encouraging and augurs well for the future. J.M.M. FIRST

FIFTEEN

MATCHES.

Our first match this term was on February 6th when we played Whitley Bay and Monkseaton High School at Home. Although Cully had left since the previous term it seemed as though we might win in the first half, since we were continually attacking. However, we only scored one unconverted try and one penalty kick, both by Webster. Tn this half


we were aided by both the wind and the slope. In the second half these were against us with the result that the opposing team broke through several times and scored fourteen points. Tynemouth School, 6 points. Whitley Bay and Monkseaton High School, 14 points. T E A M : Chesney (Capt.), Parraek, Calvert, Crocker, Boyes, Webster, Hunter. Welch, Jackson, Dunkerley, Horseman, Barclay, Brodie, Slack, R. Smith.

RESULT:

Our second match was also against Whitley Bay and Monkseaton High School, but this time on their ground. The High School obtained four tries none of which were converted, but only a few minutes before the end of the game our team rallied and began to attack, and Webster scored from a penalty kick just before the final whistle blew. Tynemouth School, 3 points. Whitley Bay and Monkseaton High School, 12 points. T E A M : Chesney (Capt.), Parrack, Calvert, Crocker, Boyes, Webster, Hunter, Welch, Jackson, Dunkerley, Horseman, Barclay, Casey, N. Lee, McQueen. RESULT:

UNDER

FOURTEEN

MATCHES.

March 13th.—Tynemouth School v. South Won 6-3.

Shields High School.

This game was really won by the forwards though actually the two tries were scored by three-quarters, Matthews running from his opponents' " 25 " for the first try, and Proctor just managing to get the touch-down after fly-kicking the ball across his opponents' line, for the second. In the first half, South Shields, with a number of reserves playing in their team, were not together, but in the second half they pressed hard at times, and on two occasions at least a certain score was saved by a good tackle by C. Dunlevy. Our forwards really did play a livelier game in this match, and if the three-quarters had come up to scratch we would have won by a wider margin. March 27th—Tynemouth School v. South Shields High School. Lost 3-32.

This second match was a very different story. Peirson, who had led the forwards well in the previous match, and also Gardner were off. The pack and the team as a whole, with one or two exceptions, played a lifeless game. The tackling, especially.of Chick, Blunt, and Evans, was good, but Chick and Blunt seemed to be the only ones to realise that they must fall on the ball to stop a forward dribble effectively. Most of South Shields' tries were scored by forward dribbles and good backing up. In this match the forwards, faced with a heavier pack, scarcely once got the ball, so it is not surprising that the backs got no chances to show their paces. HOUSE

MATCHES.

i One of the best matches was the first played, when the North Shields second team put up a stubborn resistance against their bigger opponents. Twice Pringle seemed certain to score for Monkseaton but each time he was stopped in the nick of time. It looked as if Monkseaton were certain to_ win when Hewitt, the North Shields captain, had to go off with an injured knee. He pluckily resumed in a few minutes, and the North Shields defence held out to the end, neither side scoring.


6 Monkseaton and North Shields first teams also had a good tussle. The only score came in the first few minutes when Smith R. scored a good try. Later Crocker broke away and, after running almost the whole length of the field, was caught just under the posts by Peirson. The North Shields team, despite great efforts by Chesney and Hunter, were unable to break through, and so Monkseaton were able to hold their lead to the end. , The other two games, between Whitley Bay and Tynemouth, were rather one-sided, but not to the extent indicated by the scores. The W hitley Bay second team put up a stout resistance but found Matthews, who scored three tries and converted two, too fast for them. Towell also scored for Tynemouth. In the match between the first teams Whitley Bay, despite valiant efforts by Welch, Boyes and McQueen, were overwhelmed by the better combination of the Tynemouth side. Tries for Tynemouth were scored by Calvert, Wight and Webster, the latter converting two. On the second day play opened with the game between the second teams of North Shields and Whitley Bay. The latter, with two reserves, had no one fast enough to catch M. Harrison, who scored three tries and converted one. C. Dunlevy also scored twice. C. Thomson scored for Whitley Bay. The match between the first teams was very even, but Whitley Bay, with Dunkerley and W. Miller off, did not combine or backup as well as North Shields who won by one try scored by Chick, and a penalty try awarded for obstruction, to nil. The next game was an even and exciting one between Monkseaton and Tynemouth second teams. Monkseaton scored first through Pringle and held on to their lead until in the second half Towell dashed through to score and Matthews converted. The chief features of this game were the good tackling of Evans and Towell, and the fact that Matthews was never given a chance to use his speed. In the last game of the day Tynemouth's good combination and backing-up proved too much for Monkseaton, and they won by 18 points to nil. Tries were scored by Lee N. (2), Webster (1), and Wight (1). Webster converted two and Lee one. Monkseaton tackled well but there were too many speedy players against them. The third round was played on a cold and misty, afternoon, and this seemed to depress everyone. Tynemouth, already well in the lead, had an easy task in making sure of the cup for their opponents, North Shields, were short of several of their best players. It is not surprising that the score was 34 points to nil in favour of Tynemouth who scored practically when they liked. The North Shields second team was also very weak, so that Tynemouth had things very much their own way. Tries for Tynemouth were scored by Matthews (2), I. Thompson, Towell, Edminson and Matthews converted two. The other two matches were more evenly contested. In the first between Whitley Bay and Monkseaton second teams Whitley Bay opened the scoring when Proctor broke through for a try. In the second half Monkseaton fought back hard and Pringle ran well to score an unconverted try. This made the scores even, but Storey settled the issue by scoring for Monkseaton just before the end. The last match was also a close game. Crocker opened the scoring to which Whitley Bay replied by a try from Boyes. In the second half Monkseaton gradually gained the ascendency and Crocker again scored for them. Later Hesslegrave scored.


7 Thus ended a very entertaining and at times exciting series of matches. It was unfortunate that the two weakest houses, North Shields and Whitley Bay, should have been handicapped by some of their better players being cfl. All credit must go to Tynemouth, the winners, for keeping their unbeaten record throughout and having only one try scored against them. HOUSE

MATCHES.

The series of seven-aside matches was resumed this year. As before, each House entered two teams. 10 points were for a victory and 5 for a draw in the case of the first teams, and 6 and 3 points respectively for the second teams. The results were as follows:— Date. Teams and Scorers. March

8—2nd M (0) v 2nd N.S. (0) 1st M (3) v 1st N.S. (0) 2nd T (18) v 2nd W.B. (0) 1st T (25) v 1st W.B. (0) March 11—2nd N.S. (17) v 2nd W.B. (3) ... 1st N.S. (6) v 1st W.B. (0) ... 2nd T. (5) v. 2nd M. (3) 1st T (18) v 1st M (0) March 18—1st NS (0) v T (34) 2nd NS (0) v 2nd T (19) 2nd W.B. (3) v. 2nd M. (6) 1st WB (3) v 1st M (9) Total Points SCHOOL

Points. M.

3 10

0 0

N.S.

3 0

6 10

6 10 29

19

T.

6

10 6 10 10 6

W.B.

0 0 0 0

0 0

48

RUNS.

When the ground was unfit for Rugby it was decided to revive crosscountry running instead of the usual hour's work. A points system was devised to encourage the competitors, and the first ten runners in each form were awarded points for their House. These points did not count for the House Shield, however. The points were almost equally distributed in the first run, but after the third one Whitley Bay were thirtythree points ahead of Tynemouth who were their nearest rivals. They can thus console themselves for their defeats in the House Matches. Monkseaton were third and North Shields last. The runs were for the most part without incident, but two runners who tried to hitch-hike found themselves at a farm well off their route. Others who got lifts on bikes were made to run round the field, and forfeited any points which they had scored. NATURE

NOTES.

The weather has been exceptionally fine this spring: the finest known for many years. I saw many interesting sights in January, so I can only mention briefly my main observations. On January the sixth a Mute Swan flew south, and later in the day nine Whooper Swans flew overhead in a south-westerly direction. On the 7th a Woodcock flew over Cullercoats, and on the 17th, a flock of Bramblings (winter visiting Finches) were seen near Preston. These are birds T did not expect to see here.


8 On January 24th there was a Black-headed Gull on the beach with black hood almost complete. To my great surprise I saw a Great Northern Diver in Cullercoats' Bay on Feb. 6th. On the 12th, a Smew visited the Bay. The Smew is one of the rarer diving ducks. Two Waders (unusual on the shore here) a Curlew and a Bar-tailed God wit were also seen. On the 14 th I saw another Curlew on the shore. Oystercatchers, Redshanks, and Ringed Plovers are very common on these beaches, and Duntin, Knot and Purple Sand Piper are abundant. A Corn-bunting was seen near Marden Farm on the 17th, and on the 21st I saw two Partridges at the same place. On March 4th I saw a Fulmar Petrel, the first one this year. Two Swans flew low over Cullercoats on March 13th, and landed at the Quarry, near the Broadway. An Iceland Gull has spent the whole winter in this district. I have found many wild flowers in bloom this spring. Two of them, Wild Carrot and Beaked Parsley, usually bloom during the summer. I found them in bloom as early as March 25th. Soon we must watch for the arrival of summer migrants which are likely to be early this year. A Cuckoo was reported to be in the Isle of Wight in February. Some of our migrants never leave the South of England. G.R.L. F O R M III.

LIBRARY

NOTES.

This term the efficiency of the library was slightly impaired owing to the fact that the " nomad " VIA has once more settled in the library. Chaucer, who hitherto was not in the library, began to appear on the shelves, and books on French composition have been placed in the part set aside for salvage. (Was this deliberate?—Ed.) However, apart from this, life in the library has gone on much the same as usual. But still the members of the junior forms hold the lead over the seniors as far as attendance at the library is concerned. Of books taken out this term the majority were taken by members of the Third Form downwards. LIBRARIAN.

EVENTIDE

FROM

A

HILL-TOP,

Down in the West the sun sinks low, Tinging the sky with russet red, And flooding the countryside below With a wealth of shadow in field and stead. Away in the distance far beneath, Twinkling lights shine through the gloom, Marking a spot on the windswept heath. Where man has stopped and made his home. A lark now rises high above, High'r and high'r in the purple night,


9 Filling the world with his song of love, As he soars ever upward in beauteous flight. He stops his song, and all is still, And down to earth just like a stone He drops, and with his final trill The world seems empty and alone. Now in the valley beneath my feet, The cattle low their homeward way, And in the inn all'workers meet, Work is o'er, 'tis the end of day. Slowly I tread the winding path That leads me homeward o'er the heath; For night has come, and nature calls, And all mankind must rest in sleep. J.R.M. POETS

ON

FORM V.

SCHOOL—11.

Owing to popular demand I have been encouraged to write another version of my " Poets on School." PREPARATION

FOR

THE

EXAMS.

The heavy weight of hours has chained and bowed One too like thee: tameless, swift and proud." THE

EXAMS.

THE

EXAM.

—Shelley.

" The sequel of to-day unsolders all." —Tennyson.

RESULTS.

" The struggling pangs of conscious truth to hide, To quench the blushes of ingenuous shame." THE

END

OF

—Grey.

TERM.

" No farther seek his merits to disclose. Or draw his frailties from their dread abode." THE

—Grey.

HOLIDAYS.

" How dull it is to pause, to make an end To rust unburnished, not to shine in use. NEXT

THE

—Tennyson. Yet much remains To conquer still; new foes arise, Threatening to bind our souls with secular chains." —Milton.

TERM.

HEAD'S

STUDY.

" The great brand made lightnings in the splendour of the moon." —Tennyson. THE

SCHOOL

CERTIFICATE.

" Avenge, O Lord, thy slaughter'd saints." ON

LEAVING

SCHOOL

OR

APRIL FOOL'S

-Milton.

DAY.

"Hitherto lords, what your commands imposed I have performed, as reason was obeying . . . . . Now of my own accord, such other trial, I mean to show vou of mv strength, vet greater."

—.Milton.


10 THE

TEACHERS'

COMMON

ROOMS.

" Lords, ladies, captains. councillors or priests, Their choice nobility and flower Met from all parts." THE

SCHOOL

RUGBY

TEAM.

—Milton.

' We are not now that strength which in old days Moved earth and heaven; that which we are we are; One equal temper of heroic hearts, Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will To strive, to seek, to find, and not to vield." —Tennyson. K.B.

THE

ART

OF

MAKING

FORM

VIB.

EXCUSES.

The art of making excuses is not very honourable, for it must be composed of untruths. If the excuse were truthful, it would not be an art, therefore it is dishonourable to a certain extent. It is very difficult to make up an excuse which a sceptical person will believe, on the other hand some people will believe some of the most crude tales. If it is known beforehand that an excuse will be required at some future date, a very ingenious and plausible story can be told with an air of innocence (well practised) to help it along; but if it is a quite unexpected occasion, a quick wit is needed to think of an excuse under a searching scrutinv without wrinkling the brow in thought. A well practised and experienced person will generally pull off these excuses, unless one of those very incredulous beetle-browed people who have an uncanny knack of telling whether an excuse is truthful or not is met. The schoolboy has to be well exercised in the use of excuses, to keep himself out of endless trouble. The sensible boy will have a ready supply of excuses, especially about reasons for not having done prep, or not knowing it. When asked how long a time was spent on prep, the answer is invariably exaggerated. Some unfortunate people cannot make false excuses without blushing in an alarming manner which gives the whole show away. Sometimes a sign of guilt is shown by opening and shutting one's mouth, changing colour rapidly, shifting nervously from one foot to the other, and fingering some object about one's person. Others can tell some awful " whoppers " without batting an eyelid. I sympathise with those unfortunates who are unskilled in the art of making and telling excuses. The telling is very important, as shown, for a lot of time may be spent on making up the excuse, then the effect will be lost by saying it in a parrot-like fashion, as if it was a foreign language. A more skilful person would just think of the outline of his story, then he would be able to make it sound plausible. If the hearer once gets the idea that the story was predesigned the untruthfulness would be detected. A clever excuse is to state a not very plausible story, but one which is quite possible. The hearer, if suspecting a false excuse', will expect something more plausible from such a known maker of excuses; and anyway an excuse which shows ingenuity and thought is not a very likely excuse for a true case. There is certainly an art in selecting an ingenious excuse for a sceptical person, and an excuse simple enough to sound reasonable to a credulous person who is not used to judging the plausibility of excuses, for a real excuse is naturally made up on the spur of the moment. R.C.

FORM

V.


11 THE

RUN.

The runners came to the starting line And IIA started dead on time. Then the Third Form ceased their play And were dispatched upon their way. When the Fourth's turn came to run Away they went 'neath the waning sun. Soon the Fifth Form took its place And went round the bend at a mile-eating pace. With anxious minds the Sixth Form stayed In Rugby-running kit arrayed. At last however it was their turn And the way they went the track did burn. As each form started they travelled fast But this high speed could never last. So once away from the starting line They slowed their pace and took their time. But even this pace affected their breathing And soon their innards were pitching and heaving. And those who were badly out ot training Heartily wished it were snowing or raining. When the runners were puffing and blowing The checkers came round to keep them going. And those who at first had set off so fast Alas, alack, were now nearly last. The route lay past the Dolphin Inn And longing looks were cast therein. However they keprt together and pressed on Up the road that leads to Preston. A little more road then down a track That was designed to bring them back. Soon the Broadway hove in sight And thoughts of home caused much delight. The first one in crawled down the street With aching legs and blistered feet. But when the School appeared ahead He quickened his pace and raised his head. Those who were following did the same And speeding round the bend they came. But having passed the line and stopped This spurious front was quickly dropped. And having donned their clothes once more They tenderly fingered each blistered sore. Then when they had traversed their homeward path They gladly got in a steaming bath. J. G. H. Form VIA-. SCHOOL O F F I C E R S .

S. Chesney. S C H O O L P R E F E C T S : P. S. Chesney, D. Webster, N. Calvert, J. G. Hunter, A. I. Welch, G. Crocker, P. Bellerby. C A P T A I N OF F O O T B A L L : P . S. Chesney. HOUSE CAPTAINS: North Shields, P . S. Chesney. Tynemouth, D. Webster. Monkseaton: G. Crocker. Whitley Bay:' A. I. Welch. HEAD

BOY:

EDITORS

OF

P.

THE

SCHOOL

MAGAZINE:

P. S. Chesney, N. Calvert, J. G. Hunter. L I B R A R I A N S : D . Webster, P . Bellerby. S U P E R V I S O R O F E D I T O R I A L S T A F F : Mrs. A. Rodgers.


12

SUMMER SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES.

Contrary to expectations it would not be strictly truthful to write our favourite phrase " Nothing much has happened this term," because quite a lot has happened. We have had House Matches once more, North Shields being the winners. Then one morning we found Mr. Cox absent. Having fallen whilst entering a shelter in the course of his duties he has had to receive treatment at the R.V.I, for some weeks. We hope he will be quite recovered by the beginning of next term. We welcome in his place Mr. Gibson who has temporarily come to help us. On Trinity Sunday B. H. Rushton (1926-36) was ordained in the Cathedral Church of St. Nicholas, Newcastle-on-Tyne, by the Bishop of Newcastle. Rus<htont who is a B.Sc. of Leeds University, has taken up his duties in the parish of Holv Trinity, North Shields. We congratulate Flying Officer W. M. Burnside, Deputy Town Clerk of Gateshead, -on the award of the D.F.C. The citation says " He has navigated his aircraft to many targets in the Ruhr, on mine-laying flights, and on three occasions to Italy. The accuracy of his navigation has been proved by the high percentage of successful sorties and by photographs secured. On several occasions his aircraft has been in great difficulty. Despite these experiences this officer has invariably displayed great coolness, courage and devotion to duty." Burnside was for many years Treasurer of the Old Boys' Club. He was commissioned in 1940 in the 51st A.A. Regiment, R.A., and was appointed to a commission in the R.A.F. in 1942. The D.F.C. has also been awarded to Flight Lieut. I). Murray who was for a time in the School before going to Glenalmond. No citation is available. The A.F.C. has been awarded to Flight Lieut. W. M. Mackay, who was educated here before serving in the Great War when he held a commission in the Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders. He learnt to fly before the outbreak of the present war, and was commissioned in the R.A.F. in 1939. He is an instructor in night and day flying. We regret to announce the following deaths on Active Service: L/C. Colin Campbell, R.T.R., as the result of an accident in Palestine. He was for many years a prominent member of the Old Boys' CluB, and was Hon. Secretarv and Captain of the Cricket Club which he was instrumental in starting. J. A. Martin (1927-34) in action in Libya. R. V. Morgan (1929-31) in Tunisia, whilst serving with the Grenadier Guards. The staff and boys extend their deep sympathy to their relatives. War Savings for the term amounted to ÂŁ110/8/6, including Z65/5/6 subscribed during " Wings for Victory " Week. During the first year of our support of Dr. Barnado's Homes the sum raised was ÂŁ54/1/1. As the number of members has now been doubled we hope to " adopt " one or two boys as our special care. SUMMER n l

-

Ha. lib. IJuniors.

TERM,

Avete.

1943.

W. Anderson, W. Elliot, J. Elliot, S. M. Rodgers, A. H. Stonehouse. G. B. Scarth, J. A. Wells, J. H. Reavley, J. Watson; G. G. Davison, P. H. Heyes. S. Auton, J. C. Bilclough," R. J. E. Clarkson, R. S. Matthews, E, W. Robson, E. D, Sandon, M. Sandon,


13

M.P.S.

Via.

VIb.

V. IV. III. Ila. Juniors. M.P.S.

M. Smith, D. J. C. Whitfield. R. B. Carruthers, J. Matthews, P. J. Murray, S. A. Murray, P. A. M. Shaw, J. Talbot, F. H. Twining, W. J. K. Walker. Valete.

P. S. Chesney, Prefect 1941, Head Boy 1942-43, Matric. July, 1942, XV. 1941-2-3. Capt. 1943. J. G. Hunter, Prefect 1942-3, Matric. July, 1942, XV. 1942-3, XI. 1942, 1943, Capt. 1943. P. J. Bellerby, Prefect 1942-3, Matric. July, 1943. K. Boyes, Matric. July, 1943. XV 1942-3. G. G. Crocker, Prefect 1942-3, XV. 1942-3: A. Dunkerley. R. G. Smith, Matric. July, 1943. D. Webster, Prefect 1941-2-3, Matric. July, 1943, XV. 1942-3. N. A. Lee, ]. A. Spark. W. J. C. Blakey, J. E. B. Pyle. P. F. T. Kime, G. H. Mainland. C. W. Thomson. J. A. Brown, M. M. lames, P W. Wright. R. S. Terrv. P. L. Hazell, A. W. Grinling. MONKSEATON

PREPARTAORY

SCHOOL.

During this term our Savings continued to maintain a high standard, and by the end of the term we had saved almost ÂŁ400 in the three terms that we have existed as a Savings Group. We were pleased to have a visit from the District Organiser for Dr. Barnardo's Homes and almost all our new children were enrolled as members of the Helpers' League. Prize Day was held on the last afternoon of term and approximated sixty parents or friends were present. The Headmaster acted as chairman and Mrs. Ellison presented the prizes. She was presented with a bouquet of sweet peas by D. Mertens. Prizes were awarded as follows: Form Ila: G. P. Rhode, P. E. Fawcett. Form lib: S. Gordon, A. S. M. Wood. Form 1: D. Mertens, I. S. Crawford. Special Progress Prizes were awarded to: Form II: G. N. Walker. Form 1: G. Simpson. Savings stamps awarded by the local Savings Committee for a drawing competition were won by M. Studdy, G. N. Walker, H. .L. Peers. The parents were entertained by the children, who gave various items including North Country Songs, Verse Speaking, Miming, an historical l>ageant and the dramatisation of the " Mad Hatter's Tea Party." PRIZES. MATRICULATION:

P. J. Bellerby (Distinctions in English Language, Scripture, English Literature, Latin, French, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry). K. Boyes (Distinctions in English Language, English Literature, Geography, Physics). O. P. Casey (Distinctions in English Language, Mathematics). R. G. Smith. D. Webster (Distinction in French). A. I. Welch (Distinctions in English Literature, Latin, French, Mathematics, Chemistry). Stockdale Prize for Languages: P. J. Bellerby, A. I. Welch. Prizes for Science: P. J. Bellerby, A. T. Welch, A. Dunkerley, K. Boyes.


14 Form Prizes.

V. III. IIB. Jun. IV. IIA. I.

HOUSE

R. Clarkson, W. G. Miller. D. A. Parkin, E. Shippen. J. H. Wakefield. I. Bower, G. H. Stephenson, H. C. Dixon A. G. Lee. J- W. Laffey, J. Wardhough. D. W. Lilburn. SHIELD: Autumn Term, 1 9 4 2 , Monkseaton. Spring Term, 1943, Monkseaton. Summer Term, 1943, Monkseaton. NORTH

SHIELDS

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Master: Mr. Cox. House Captain: P . S . C H E S N E Y . This term there has been one tragedy and one matter for rejoicing in our House. The tragedy was the unfortunate fall which Mr. Cox, our House Master suffered while entering an Air Raid Shelter in the course of his duties. This has resulted in his enforced detention in a Newcastle hospital. We hear that he is now speedily recovering and we hope that he will soon be able to take his place among the Staff once more. The matter for rejoicing was our outstanding victory in the House Matches, which we won with rather less effort than we had expected. We have been represented on the 1st XI by J. G. Hunter (Capt.), Horseman and Slack. Hunter is leaving this term to go to University, and we wish him the 'best of luck, as well as thanking him for his valiant work on the House and School teams and elsewhere. Chesney is also leaving this term to go to Downing College, Cambridge. We wish him the very best of luck. TYNEMOUTH

H O U S E NOTES.

House Master: Mr. W A S T L E . House Captain: D . W E B S T E R . This term has seen two important inter-House activities—the Sports Cup and the Cricket Cup. After a very thrilling finish we managed to get the Sports Cup. In the Cricket House Matches we won the first round, but unluckily the team we faced in the finals possessed the two best bowlers on the school team. We congratulate Webster, Wight, and N. Lee, for playing for the 1st XI, and Lee A. (Capt.), Gardiner, Towell, for playing on the "Under 14" team. In form positions, too, Moore for being third in the Vth form, A. Lee for being top in the I Vth form, Wakefield for being third in the lib, and Lilburn for being first in the Ist, are to be congratulated for obtaining these good results. This term we have only one candidate from our house entering for the School Certificate—Webster—and we wish him the very best of luck. WHITLEY

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Master: Mr. M I L L E R . House Captain: A . I . W E L C H . This term started with the Sports in which we did very well, being only beaten by 1J points by Tynemouth House. We led all the way until the last race, the House Relay, in which, unfortunately, we did not get a place. Boyes, in particular, is to be congratulated on his fine performance in winning outright six out of eight possible events, and so gaining the honour of being Champion of Sports. Welch supported him well, and others to be congratlated on their good performances are Bristow, Brierly, Cox, Merideth, and C. Lowson. In the Cricket House Matches we did not do so well, being drawn against Tynemouth in the first round and beaten fairly easily.


15 The House was represented on the 1st XI by A. I. Welch, and K. Boyes, and on the Junior XI by Thorn. We also congratulate W. Miller who is second top in the Vth Form; R. Lunn second in the Illrd Form; and Reavley, top of lib; and hope they will continue to gain such form positions. The School Certificate Examinations were held this term and we wish the best of luck to Welch, Boyes, Stephenson, Dunkerley and Morton. MONKSEATON

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Master: Mr. F. L. W O O D . House Captain: G. G. C R O C K E R . On the whole this has been a very pleasant term; even the weather has been favourable for games. Unfortunately the House has not distinguished itself in games as it should. During the sports we managed to secure second place in the House Relay but we were not at all successful in the other events. However, we hope to do better next year and to see more keenness displayed in the inter-House activities. In the House Matches we met North Shields in the first round and lost with 27 against 69 runs. There was great dismay when the first five wickets fell for about 10 runs. However, the members of the lower school made the tail wag valiantly so that the defeat was not so bad as we first feared. We must congratulate the Elliott brothers who were responsible for dismissing most of the other team. We were well represented in the school team by Crocker, Bellerby, and Jackson. Although we have played more matches the school team has not yet recovered its old standard. We look forward to more success next year. Work, too, proceeded as smoothly as usual. Crocker, Bellerby, Casey, R. Smith and Brodie have taken the School Certificate Examination this term and we wish them every success. Our thanks go to the Head Master who managed to take some heroes of the Sixth Form over a submarine. It was an extremely interesting trip for everyone. Our best wishes go to Crocker, Brodie and R. Smith who are leaving us this term. Crocker has worked hard as House Captain and has done much* for the House both in that capacity and as a prefect. THE

SPORTS.

After an interval of two years Sports were held again at Preston Avenue on May "11th. There were some excellent performances. Boyes, by winning six of the eight possible events open to him, had a great personal success, but in spite of this Tynemouth House won the House Cup by one-and-a-half points. The prizes were presented by Mrs. Rodgers at the conclusion of the list of events. Results:-â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Long Jump, over 14: 1, Boyes; 2, Calvert. Long Jump: 11-14: 1, J. Elliott; 2, M. Harrison. Long Jump, under 11: 1, Lilburn; 2, F. Evans. Cricket Ball: 1, Webster; 2, J. G. Hunter. High Jump, 11-14: 1, A. N. Hunter; 2, M. Harrison. High Jump, under 11: 1, Wakefield; 2, Meredith. Half-mile, open: 1, Boyes; 2, Welch; 3, Webster. 75yds., 11-14: 1, Brierly; 2, J. Elliott; 3, A. Harrison. 75yds., under 11: 1, Sutherland; 2, Lilburn; 3, Meredith. High Jump, over 14: 1, Boyes; 2, Webster; 3, Wight; W. Miller. 220yds., under 10: 1, Lilburn; 2, J. Watt. 220yds., 10-11: 1, Meredith; 2, C. Lowson. 100yds, over 14: 1, Boyes; 2, Wight; 3, Calvert. 220yds., 13-14: 1, M. Harrison; 2, Brierly. 220yds., 12-13: 1, Bristow; 2, C. Dunlevy. 220yds, 11-12: 1, Tilby; 2, Towell.


16 Quarter-mile, open: 1, Boyes; 2, Parrack; 3, Webster. 220yds, over 16: 1, Boyes; 2, N. Lee. 220yds, 15-16: 1, Calvert; 2, Parrack. 220yds, 14-15: 1, Matthews; 2, Stonehouse. School Handicap, over 12: 1, A. Lee; 2, Rodgors; 3, Anderson. â&#x20AC;˘ House Relay: 1. Tynemouth; 2, Monkseaton. School Handicap, over 12: 1, Lee A.; 2, Rodgers; 3, Anderson. Mile: 1, Welch; 2, J. Hunter; 3, Boyes. Sports Champion K. Boyes. Middle Cup M. Harrison. Junior Cup D. W. Lilburn. House Cup Tynemouth. CRICKET

NOTES.

The season has been a poor one as far as wirfning matches was con cerned. The First XI., with two good bowlers of different types in Hunter and Anderson, ought to have won some of their matches. In every case, however, their batting let them down. Having got their opponents out in many cases for a very moderate score, they were quite unable even to top the modest total which confronted them. Lack of net practice was partly to blame, but very few on the team had any good defensive strokes and very seldom watched the ball carefully enough. The fielding, on the whole, was better than last year, but there is still plenty of room for improvement. The Under 14 side, like the First XI., suffered from not being able to make runs. It was only the last match of the season (against South Shields High School) that any fight was put up. Here they very nearly managed to pull off a draw but they were just beaten on time. The following played for the Under 1! team at different times: lilakey (Captain), Hewitt, Thom, Forrest, A. Lee, M. Harrison, Gardner, Joice, J. Elliott, W. Elliott, Towell. J. M. Jackson, J. Evans, Kime. Our thanks are due to Casey and Prest for scoring so adequately for the First XI. and Under 14 respectively. FIRST

XI.

CHARACTERS.

J. G. H U N T E R , Captain; Colours 1942: As captain he has had a difficult task with a side which was very weak in batting. He has captained it well and shown a fine example in the field, especially in bowling where his 22 wickets for 74 runs in school matches only speak adequately for themselves. A medium-paced off-break bowler, who brought the ball off the pitch very fast, he could also bowl a useful leg-break. His outstanding performance (in the first school match of the season against South Shields) should be put on recordâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;7 wickets for 28 runs, the last four wickets being all clean bowled in one over without the addition of a single run. It was unfortunate that this fine performance did not win us this match, which was lost by only one run. C . G. C R O C K E R : A S a bat he never came off in matches, for being a hitter by nature he was never able to play himself in first. His fielding was good. J . A. J A C K S O N : The only left-hander in the side. He is a good bat, but, like the rest of the team, made few runs in matches. Throughout the season he was handicapped by being unable to take advantage df balls on the leg-side, usually a strong point with left-handers. A . I . W E L C H : An excellent field, his batting style is somewhat cramped and he does not get much power into his strokes. P. L. WIGHT: His batting in matches did jiot come up to expectations. He must develop a sounder defence. His fielding was very good. IJ. A N D E R S O N : A fast bowler with a beautiful action, he did not have much luck in school matches. He keeps a fine length and being comparatively young should develop into a first class' bowler. His batting is stylish and he has a good defence, but is apt to walk away to leg, a fault which I hope he will make every effort to overcome.


17 His batting did not come up to expectations, but his excellent fielding at point set a fine example to the rfcst of the side. D. W E B S T E R : Like most of the resit of the side he proved to be a broken reed when facing accurate bowling chiefly because his defensive strokes were weak. A strong hitter when his eye was in, his fielding was good. J. F. H O R S E M A N : Purely a hitter, he unfortunately never came off in matches. Must learn to play the good balls carefully and choose the right ball to hit. His fielding was not very good, and here he must learn to keep on his toes all the time. I). N. S L A C K : Quite a stylish bat, he never really got going in matches. His fielding could be improved. N. LEE: He always looked as if he could make runs, but very seldom did. His fielding was good and at times also his bowling, although he was inclined to be somewhat erratic. J.M.M. P.

J.

BEULF.RBY:

SUMMER

NATURE

N O T E S , 1943.

As lar as coast birds are concerned, this district is not so interesting in the Summer months as in Winter. Nevertheless, f have noted several things of interest, especially earlier in the season. On the evening of April 2 four Curlews flew over Cullercoats, heading inland. More recently, I have heard the cry of the Curlew when flying overhead. The next day several Sheld-Duck, noticeable in their smart plumage, flew North, probably going to take possession of nesting burrows in the sand dunes higher up the coast. On the same day two eggs were found in a Hedge-Sparrow's nest. On April 8 I was fortunate enough to see the majestic Gannet, wheeling amongst the gulls. It is the first time I have noticed this bird in the district. On May 4 a green Wood Pecker was seen industriously tapping on a tree in a large garden at Gateshead. On May 7 I found a Misstle Thrush's nest, high in the fork of a tree in Jesmond Dene. I was also surprised to see a female Yellow Wagtail in a field at Cullercoats. By the middle of May practically all the waders had left the shore, cither to go to distant breeding grounds abroad, or just to nest in more secluded parts of the coast. Even during June, however, an occasional Oyster Catcher was seen, and on July 10 when crossing in the Shields Ferry, I saw a Redshank flying up-stream, close to the water. Migrant records I have noticed are as follows:— Swallow—April 13 (an early date for Swallows in the North). Whitethroat—April 15. Willow Warbler-—April 16. House and Sand Martins—April 22. Wood .Warbler—April 19. Swift and Spotted Flycatcher-—May 13. Two good places for bird watching in this district, easily reached by cyclists, are Marsden Rock, three miles south of South Shields, and a stretch of marshy ground to the South of Blyth. On Marsden Rock anil the surrounding cliffs, numbers of Fulmars breed, as well as a number of Kittiwakes, Herring Gulls, Jackdaws, and a few Cormorants. In the cliffs occupied by Fulmars there are small holes tenanted by Swifts. On the marsh I have seen at various times in Autumn, Winter and Spring, Snipe, Jack Snipe, Red Shank, Reed Buntings, Teal, and even a Water-rail. An April 10 Whooper Swans flew low over the marsh. It might be of interest to know that pigeons with the Aim/ in Africa frequently flew a distance of 35 miles in 32 minutes. Space only permits me to mention a few of 'he mo,'; recent flower records:— On May 3 I found Clover in flower. On May 27 Silverseed was found. On July 10 I found a number of Harebells on the sea-cliffs. In rocky parts of the sea banks Sea-thrift can be found, as well as an abundance of Common Scurvv Grass, a small white flower. G.A.L. F O R M III.


18 LIBRARY

NOTES.

Librarian: D . W E B S T E R . Once again the labour of the librarians has borne little fruit in the upper forms. This is perhaps due to traditional nervousness engendered by the School Certificate and the Term Examinations. However, the lower forms have been seemingly unaffected by these exams, and have come regularly every Wednesday and Friday. May I send out a plea to members to be a little more careful with books as they cannot be replaced so easily. THE LIBRARIAN. T H E

INQUISITION

?

1

?

The following questions were asked of certain outstanding personalities in the school. These persons have been given a " Nom de Plume" from which their name may be gathered. The questions:— (a) What is your opinion of the modern girl? (b) What improvements, in your opinion, would be to the best advantage of the school? (c) What are your opinions of the School Magazine and of the editors? (d) Does English play too great a part in the school curriculum? (e) What is your opinion of food rationing? The following are the impromptu replies received from the various persons. The answers:— (a) She spoils her natural looks by the extravagant use of cosmetics. (b) That Association Football should take the place of Rugby Football in this school. (c) That the Magazine should alford more space to the pursuit of sport. That the editors lack sense of humour. (d) No. More time should be devoted to English as it is a subject of major importance. (e) We get plenty—we can't grumble. THE SCHOOL M.P. (a) Very straightforward, likeable. (b) That Via should have a new classroom. (c) The editors have a good time relaxing; others in lower forms would like the job so that they too might slack at the end of term. (d) No! Thinks more dramatic work is necessary. (e) Don't like it; its too worrying. A BLUE STOCKING. (a) Unbearable.—it would take a book to explain fully. (b) Improvements in the school at the moment are unneccessary. (c) A fine lot of hard-working fellows. (d) I don't know. (e) An unnecessary precaution. A COLOURFUL PERSONALITY. (a) Pretty ghastly! (b) The school is in need of no improvements. (c) A lazy lot of chaps, who can't type and who can hardly spell. (d) No, there is room for still more English. (e) Too bad, but it can't be helped. SILVA. (a) Terrible. Too many cosmetics. (b) Less work and a more plentiful supply of chalk. (c) Could be improved in every possible direction. (d) Yes, literature especially. (e) I'm hungrv! THE REVOLUTIONARY.


19 THE LATEST

HOBBY.

Rabbit-keeping has become one of the. predominant interests in the school; we therefore decided to interview experts on the subject and publish their accounts. Jackson of the Vth form gave us two main reasons for their popularity; first because they provide a welcome addition to the meat ration, and secondly because they are very attractive pets. He said that Flemish Giants are the best flesh-producing variety, but that he and his brother prefer rearing Chinchillas. This he acclaimed is a profitable aspect, as a hutch is easily and cheaply made, and greenstuff forms the chief part of a rabbit's diet. Hedley of the fVth form was seized with the desire to emulate Jackson, and set the ball rolling in his form. Gardner is particularly keen and seems to have a real affection for his pets. His description of their habits is vivid and interesting, for instance there is " Black Benny." Whenever it is at all damp he comes into the house and stretches himself in front of the fire. He tells us that his doe, however, is not so friendly. Gardner tells us that he believes in teaching his rabbits to feed themselves at a very early age, their first solid food being small pieces of bread. Stonehouse of the Illrd holds the lofty position of Secretary and Treasurer of the Rabbit Club. He has won a number of prizes, 1st for Dutch and English, and 2nd for English. He finds rationing a great problem, but the pleasure he derives from the hobby is well worth the trouble. There is no doubt he is an authority on the subject and breeds them with the best possible results. There is in the school a great number of rabbit keepers not mentioned here, but who are just as interested in their hobby as any expert. HARVEST

TIME.

The corn is ripening in the sun, While girls and boys do jump and run; The little field-mouse makes her nest Upon the ground for her young to rest. The reapers come the corn to cut. To reap and bind and ready put; To stook, and for the sun to dry, Next come the birds to eat the rye. Some days have passed and carters came, To carry all the precious grain, To store in stack and in the farm To rest, for all is done. J.M.J. A

FAREWELL

FORM

Ila.

It is strange how great a hold a building can obtain upon a person, and Tynemouth School is no exception. After the first few days of awe and terror in lib a boy begins to feel himself a part of the school, and at liberty to take part in the games of " Chargey " in the playground. Soon he knows by sight all the great men of the sixth, and speaks of them with due reverence. I doubt if there has ever been a new boy at Tynemouth School who has not, within a few weeks of his arrival, clashed swords with the redoubtable Fred. This is doubly true if it is the Easter Term and snow is lying thick, except for some carefully dug paths, which are " taboo " to all unwary snowball-throwers. When he goes up to Ila he feels the thrill of walking upstairs to his classroom. For the first few weeks the museum is the chief attraction. This wears off, except to the hard-working curators who treasure it jealously, and are forever re-arranging the exhibits. It is about this time that one begins to take an interest in the Lab. and Mr. Wastle's frog dissections give one the most marvellous thrills possible.


On entering the third, the delight begins to wane. Those wonderful glass bulbs and tangled masses of wire, which transported one into ecstacies of delight in Ila reveal themselves as horrible instruments of torture. And great difference now is felt in the awe and respect which the Juniors begin to pay one, it gives most of the Illrd a superioritycomplex. The greatest appeal that the IVth can lay claim to are its single desks, which arouse general approval. The students' minds begin now to be a whirl of liar-numibers, cosines and how to stop someone's fast bowling, and thus get into the 1st XI. All these reminiscences ouly serve to give me the best possible memories of the kindness, understanding, and patience of the Headmaster and the Staff. I P., Form IV. SICILY.

White Ensign, lied Ensign, Stars ami Stripes, Lay waiting in harbours of every type. What thoughts lay in the minds of the men, Some never to see dear home again? Those in command prayed anxiously, For great was the need of a placid sea. " Dear God, grant Thy Blessing thrice, Or must Dunkirk and Africa suffice?" Silently, surely, at the break of dawn, The Armada of Liberty was borne, In two thousand ships and more, To the long Sicilian shore, The Blessing was granted thrice. G.R.L., III. IF.

1 wish I were a famous cricketer; I wish I had been born in Lancashire; Or if it had been Yorkshire better still. And then T could play in the Festival. If I were Herbert Sutclifle or Jack Hobbs, I'm sure I should enjoy a game at Lords; It would be fun among the cheering crowds, To make a lovely duck or thereabouts. If I could bowl like Hedley Verity, Or Freeman, Rhodes, or Tate, or Bowes, or Voce, To take ten wickets in a match would be Something which cannot be achieved by most. If I could field like Arthur Mitchell does, How lovely it would be to make a catch Right out upon the boundary or close in, To Hedley Verity like Mitchell does. M.W.H.i Form III. PEACE.

Oh, to be alone in the woods, Or alone on the open plain. To be away from man and his moods, And worldly cares and pain. To wander afar with pleasure, And hear the songs of birds, To listen with careless rapture To God s own song and words. There alone can one find peace Wrapp'd deep in Nature's arms, There all cares and worries cease, Soothed by Nature's gentle balms. J.R.M., V.


21 THE

COMING OF

NIGHT.

The daylight steps away in misty shrouds. The sunset stipples all the cify streets, The pouring rain, the driving billows, clouds The buildings, overflowing gutters; sheets Of damp and common roadways glow Red and orange tints. The impetuous ride Of fever-laden clouds writhes at a blow, Sprawling across the restless eventide, Keeling beyond the horizon's flooded gates, The fleeing hordes of daylight pars rtway, The city's magic snatched by angry fates Departs amid the ruins of the day. N.C., VIA. A VISIT

TO A

SUBMARINE.

Standing on the dock side the submarine we were visiting looked very belligerent. It was rather small and fragile but (we learnt later) it had already performed useful work in the Mediterranean and was indeed the sub. which sank the floating dock off the Italian coast. We split up into two partiesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one under a Lieutenant and the other under a Petty Officer. The Lieutenant, in whose party I found myself, explained every possible thing about the boat. Descending the hatchway by some miraculous means, we found ourselves in a midst of machinery, dials and a strong, clean smell of oil. Walking along narrow gangways we toured the ship. The maze of machinery enthralled us and we all wondered if the men understood the meaning of each instrument. The periscope was the object of greatest interest. Upon looking through it, we saw all of the surrounding sea and countryside. In the torpedochamber we had a very interesting talk on " How the Thetis" sank." We asked if we could ascend the conning tower and upon receiving permission, we contrived to squeeze our bodies through a very narrow hatchway. Attempting to descend the " sailor's way," many of us found ourselves in difficulties and discovered that our feet had nohing to rest upon. When we were standing on the very narrow deck, Dunkerley, who has no head for heights, found the sea was too near and too easy to fall into, so he stood in a little hatchway while we looked at the gun which, by the way, was made in 1894. Leaving the sub., we had a very impressive talk with the Petty Officer, who told us many thrilling episodes of " War in a Submarine." One result of this afternoon's entertainment was that Dunkerley changed his mind as to joining the submarine service when he is conscripted. The forrrt unanimously thank all those who were concerned in giving us this verv interesting outing. K.B., Form VIB. SCHOOL

OFFICERS.

S. Chesney. PREFECTS: P. S. Chesney, D . Webster, N . Calvert, J. G . Hunter, A. 1. Welch, G. Crocker, P. Bellerby. C A P T A I N OF C R I C K E T : J. G . Hunter. H O U S E C A P T A I N S : North Shields, P . S. Chesney. . Tynemouth, D. Webster. Monkseaton, G. Crocker. Whitley Bay, A. Welch. E D I T O R S OF T H E S C H O O I . M A G A Z I N E : P. S . Chesney, N. Calvert, K. Boyes, J. R. Moore. R. M. Parrack. L I B R A R I A N S : D . Webster, P . Bellerby. S U P E R V I S O R OF THF. E D I T O R T A I . S T A F F : Mrs. A . Rodgers. MEAD

BOY:

P.


22

AUTUMN SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES.

This term we have the sad duty to perform of announcing the death of Mr. Cox. He had been ill for a large part of last term as the result of an accident, but during the holidays it was thought that he had made a complete recovery. However, a few days before the beginning of term he had a relapse and died just before the term began. He will be very much missed by all of us and we wish to express our sympathy with his relatives. As the result of Mr. Cox's death, we were without a mathematics master for a short time until Mr. Rushton, an Old Boy, helped us out during the time that elapsed before Mr. J. F. Roberts was able to take up his duties.. We-thank Mr. Rushton for so readily filling the gap. This term we welcome Mrs. Turnbull and Mr. Roberts to the Staff. The former is teaching History, French and English, and the latter Mathematics. We hope that they will be happy in their work here. During Mrs. Miller's absence we have been very glad to have the services of Mrs. Hilton and thank her for her work with the Juniors. The results of the July School Certificate were brilliant. Out of ten entrants six obtained their Matriculation. Particulars of the results will be found in last term's magazine. We must, however, particularly mention the result obtained by Bellerby, who took nine subjects and obtained eight distinctions and one credit. To Brodie and Stephenson, who take it again in December, we offer our best wishes for their success. We congratulate D. Webster on winning the Dux Cup. Early in the term A. I. Welch was installed as Head Boy. We were glad to welcome Mr. and Mrs. Welch on this occasion. The following were elected Prefects 'this term: Parrack, Moore, J. A. Jackson, Barclay, Casev, Horseman and Wight. The collection on Poppy Day amounted this year to £10 5s. 0d., and the annual Christmas donation to the Missions for Seamen totalled £3. War Savings for the term amounted to £64 2s. 6d. With a record entry of new boys, 63 in all, the numbers have now reached a total of 258, thus taxing our accommodation to the limit. We congratulate Miss Jean Henderson on her marriage to Sq/Ldr. Dudley Hobbis, D.F.C., at Holy Saviour's Church, Tynemouth. We regret to announce that the following have died on Active Service:— Lt. Keith Angus (1930-1939), Royal Scots Fusiliers attached to the Gordon Highlanders. Died from wounds received in Sicilv. He was a Prefect and a Colour in the 1938-9 team; Sports champion in 1939 and matriculated in 1938. After passing through Sandhurst he was posted' fo the Royal Scots Fusiliers. Lt. J. R. Sheedy (1926-1935), Royal Corps of Signals. Died of pneumonia as a Prisoner of War in a Malayan camp. After leaving school he became a member of the engineering section of the G.P.O. at Newcastle-on-Tvne. After serving in France and Belgium he escaped from Dunkirk.


23 G. P. Bridger (1934-1936). Died as the result of an aeroplane accident in North Africa. After leaving school he took up aeronautical engineering and was attached to the R.A.F. We also regret to learn that Sgt. A. F. Williamsom, R.A.F., has been reported missing, believed killed, after a raid on Berlin. He was at school from 1931 to 1940. He was in the XV and XI and was a Prefect. The Staff and Boys extend their deep sympathy with the relatives. We congratulate the following Old Boys on their examination successes:— M.B., B.S.—P. Brace (1927-1935) L.R.C.P., L.R.C.S.—P. Weyman (1931-1935). B.D.S.—D. M. Turnbull (1933-1938). B.Sc. Mining.—W. G. H. Latham (1936-1939) 4th B.D.S.—A. McCaw (1930-1938). 2nd and 3rd (part) B.D.S.—R. M. Adams (1932-1939). 2nd and 3rd (part) B.D.S.—K. W. Holden (1939-1940) 2nd and 3rd (part) M.B.—V. Harrison (1933-1940) 3rd (part) M.B.—C. B. Schofield (1931-1940). 2nd year B.Sc.—J. ,W. Hall (1931-1941). K. W. Holden was awarded the Elliott Prize for Operative Dental Surgery. J. M. Tweedy, Nat. Sci. Tripos, Cambridge, Part 1, Class 1. As the result of this Tweedv has been awarded a Scholarship by Queen's College to the value of £100. AUTUMN TERM, Avete.

IIT. Ila.

lib. I. Juniors. M.P.S.

VIb. V. IV. III.

1943.

D. Brodie, J. W. Thompson, R. G. Travis, W. Hall, G. J. Shaw. R. D. Basey, Herron, A. D. Bowman, W. W. Grieves, D. ). Harrison, R. G. Lee, J. R. Martin, W. G. Mavhew. G. Oliver, A. S. Pearson, J. H. Reid, P. R. Skee. I. J. Tait, C. Taylor, W. Thompson, G. Towers, B. W. Turner, W. E. Brown. R. E. Davies, W. Hedley, D. A. Lambert, B. G. Robson, J. G. Stark, M. G. Sanderson, R. H. Harrison. G. W. Bower, D. B. Truscott, J. S. Crawshaw, C. E. M. Hall, C. R. F. Hedley, B. Harrison, M. N. Arthur, J. II. Turnbull. G. E. Stephenson, A. B. Muir, P. J. Schofield, L. Y. Mansell, A. D. Shotter. D. H. Allen, S. Appleby, T. A. Baker, B. J. Bell, V. M. Evans, J. A. Forgie, W. P. Harrison, J. N. Hedley, j. E. Hogg, G. W. Hood, R. Howarth, D. R. Jones, D. E. W. Laidler, H. T. H. MacPherson, J. B. Nicholson, W. M. Norris, T. M. Shaw, C. K. Strickland, W. D. E. Ure, E. G. Weatherhead. J. G. R. S.

Valete.

Brodie. McD. Hay, B. Hesslegrave. A. Godfrey. T. Taulbut.

MONKSEATON

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL.

This term saw a large increase in our numbers, and we now have exactly three times the number we had a year ago, including several girls. On Trafalgar Day we had a visit from Mr. Peel, tKe District Commis-


24 sioner for National Savings, and Mr. Cordingley, one of the Committee. After giving the children a delightful talk, a Certificate of Honour was presented to the School in recognition of our effort in " Wings for Victor}' Week." A vote of thanks to the visitors was proposed by D. E. C. Wright. Our Poppy Day collection amounted to £2 18s. 6d. As last year we re.-ponded to an appeal for the Missions to Seamen, with the result that we sent parcels of clothing, groceries, and £1 Is. Od. for the local Gift Day. Two large sacks of toys, books, and clothing were sent to the Dr. Barnardo Home at Washington, Co. Durham. The term ended with two parties, one for the upper and one for the lower form. Parents responded very generously to our appeal for help with the catering, and the children enjoyed a truly magnificent tea of pre-war standard. This concluded a very happy year. H.G.G. XMAS. 1943.

WHITLEY

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Master: Mr. J . M. M I L L E R . House Captain: A . I . W E L C H . First of all we congratulate Welch and Boyes upon their good results in the July Examinations, and hope that Stephenson will succeed in December. The House wishes all of its members who have since left, the best of luck in their various careers. We welcome Wight to the House this term and congratulate him on being appointed Prefect. With this addition we should be able to avenge our defeat in House Rugger last year. Welch, Wight, Miller, Morton, McQueen, and Proctor, who have represented the House on the First XV, and Brierly, McConway, and Thorn on the Under 14. are also to be congratulated. The scholastic members were given a chance to shine this term, and we must congratulate Miller, Bristow, Reavely and Stark upon their form positions. This brings to a close another term and we look forward to success in the New Year, with the return of inter-House activities. TYNEMOUTH

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Master: Mr. W A S T L E . House Captain: N. C A L V E R T . At the beginning of this term we were joyful at the fact that three members of our House were made Prefects, making, as we thought, four in all—Calvert, Parrack, Moore, Wight. Unfortunately Wight was transferred to Whitley Bay House which had only one Prefect. This will be a sad loss to our House team, although we still have the School Captain and Vice-Captain. We must congratulate Webster on two accounts. He obtained the Dux Cup and has passed his matriculation, with one distinction. Farther down the school another member of our House, Truscott, was top of his form. Lastly, we must congratulate all our prefects for becoming particular school officers—Moore has become school librarian, Parrack .and Calvert have become captain and vice-captain of the school Rugby team. Coxon and Golding have also played this term. MONKSEATON

HOUSE

NOTES.

House Master: Mr. F . L. W O O D . House Captain: J . J . J A C K S O N . We must congratulate P. Bellerby on his marvellous achievement in the July Examination, and R. Smith, who also Matriculated; and we wish Brodie great success in the December Examination. At the beginning of


25 the term we lost two keen sportsmen in Crocker, our late House Captain, and R. Smith. However, this term we were lucky in getting some of the best new-comers. We must congratulate J. A. Jackson, Barclay, and Casey on being appointed School Prefects. This term we have been very well represented on the two Rugby teams. Barclay, Casey, Storey, Brodie, Hesslegrave and Jackson played for the First XV, while J. Elliot, \Y. Elliot, Pringle, Greener and Blunt, who captained the team, played for the Under Fourteen. Now we look cheerfully to next term, when the House matches will be fought out. "Last, but not least, we must congratulater the following members of our House who have gained high positions in their respective forms: Rose, Clarkson, Blunt, Hesslegrave, Parkin, Forrest, N. Watt, W. Turnbull, Reid, J. Watt, E. Robson, and B. Harrison. NORTH SHIELDS HOUSE

House Master: Mr. J. F.

ROBERTS.

NOTES.

House Captain: D.

N.

E.

SLACK.

We had a severe blow at the beginning of term in the loss of Mr. Cox, Maths. Master and House Master of North Shields, and we miss his cheery greeting every morning. We welcome Mr. Roberts to the Housemastership in the place of Mr. Cox, and hope he will be very happy among us. We were very sorry to lose P. S. Chesney and J. G. Hunter, and wish them the best of luck in future years. We must congratulate Slack and Horseman on being appointed school prefects. We are proud to have contributed five members to the First XV and four members to the Under 14. Team. Our First XV members are: Slack, Horseman, Chick, Anderson, and Stonehouse. Our Under 14 members are: C. Dunlevy, Joice, McGilvray, and A. N. Hunter. We must congratulate the scholars of the House, T. Dunlevy, Hewitt, Grieves, Laffey, A. Harrison, and Wardhough, on their new form positions. Being well represented in both Rugger teams we can look forward with brave hearts to the House Matches next term. LIBRARY

NOTES.

This term a greater interest has been taken in the library. We thank Morton, Golding, and Thompson for their assistance in checking the books at the end of this term. A number of books were found to be missing, and it is suggested that each member wishing to join the senior library should present one book. NATURE

NOTES.

Once again Autumn has come, and with it the Summer migrants depart, trees drop their leaves, and many animals begin to hibernate. It is hard to decide whether this has been a fine Autumn or a poor one. It has not been very cold, but quite a lot of rain has fallen, and many trees, particularly the sycamore, have, I think, dropped their leaves earlier than usual. Ash-trees, covered with golden seed-pods, look as though their leaves have not yet fallen when seen from a distance.


26 The majority of the summer visitors left about the usual time. An occasional straggler was seen later, two Swifts and three Sand-martins being seen at Cullercoats on October 23rd. I saw the last House-martin and Swallow on October 6th and October 10th respectively. Warblers and Flycatchers went about the third week in September, and Wheatears, mountain birds which spend a few days on the shore before leaving, left slightly earlier. I have made quite a number of interesting observations in this district this Autumn. On September 10th I witnessed a most remarkable and interesting sight. About the middle of the morning ten Gannets flew past, heading South, to be followed by small parties and single birds for the next two hours. The adult birds look magnificent in their gleaming white plumage and colossal wing-span. Two visits to Gosiorth Bird Sanctuary proved well worth while. Large flocks of water-fowl were on the lake, including Mallard, Pochard, Widgeon, Teal, Tufted Duck, Coot, Water-hens, and Little Grebes. 1 was also fortunate enough to see a Shoveller-Duck, a Heron, a Jay, a great Spotted Woodpecker, and numerous Magpies. Goldcrests, the smallest European bird, were about Tynemouth and Cullercoats between October 19th and 23rd. These birds were probably Winter visitors from Scandinavia. I saw Redwings and Fieldfares, our two commonest winter visitors, arriving on these shores on October 5th and 10th respectively. These were some other interesting records:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; September 8th. Two Whooper Swans fly South past Whitley Bay. September 9th. A flock of about twenty Sheld-Ducks flew past Cullercoats, heading South. September 14th. An Arctic Tern and an Arctic Skua seen at Seaton Sluice. September 18th. Much to my surprise 1 saw a female Pied Flycatcher at Cullercoats. September 25th. I saw four Golden Plovers on Newcastle Town Moor. October 16th. A flock of thirteen Teal flew along the coast, heading South. November 4th. A male Pochard, diving duck, seen on Tynemouth Park Lake. November 10th. An Arctic Skua was seen chasing Gulls at Tynemouth. I hope you will let me know about interesting observations you make during the winter. G.R.L. RUGBY

NOTES.

This season so far has not been exactly a successful one, but it has been a definite improvement on last season, both for the First XV and also for the Under Fourteen team. The First XV played very poor football in their first two matches this term, but there was a distinct improvement after that, especially among the forwards. If the backs had shown the same form in matches as they displayed in ordinary games, the results of some of the matches lost would have been very different. The side as a whole played their best games against South Shields High School, the strongest of the teams we have met, and although they were well beaten in each case they played good


27 clean Rugger and never stopped trying, which, after all, is one of the main things in all games. Parrack has captained the side well and led the forwards magnificently, but there are still too many members of the team who fail to appreciate the great importance of low'tackling and of falling 011 the ball to stop a forward rush. The Under Fourteen side this season has been a big improvement on last season's. We have been fortunate in being able to keep practically the same team together all through the term. It is unfortunate, however, that Blunt, the captain, was unable to play in the last two matches, for 1 am sure his presence would have made a big difference to the result. He not only leads the side well but sets a magnificent example to the others by his hard and low tackling and his plucky play. Joice, in his absence, has captained the side and led the forwards very well. The whole team, in fact, has shown a very commendable keenness and enthusiasm. The forwards all play hard and the wing forwards, Evans and Towell, have been of great assistance to the backs with their hard tackling and backing-up. The backs are a useful lot, and C. Dunlevy, at full-back, is very safe in defence. A word of praise should be accorded to the Elliot twins, who, in their first term of Rugger, have taken to the game like ducks to water, and filled the inside positions in the threequarter line with conspicuous success. A number of fixtures have been made for the Spring Term, so I look forward with hope to a more successful term as far as winning the matches is concerned. FIRST

1.

XV CHARACTERS.

He has proved a very good full-back and a sure kicker. He is inclined to apply Soccer tactics, which are out of place on the Rugger field, but he has saved a number of tries in this way. His tackling could be improved. 2 . C A L V E R T (Colours 1 9 4 2 - 4 3 - 4 4 ) : An excellent wing man, who does not get a chance to show his best, as he does not get the ball enough. A sound tackier. 3. W I G H T : Possessed of great speed, but is rather selfish with the ball. He must tackle low. 4. J A C K S O N : He is not an exceptional runner and consequently he slows up the three-quarter line. He plays hard always, but his real place is in the forwards. 5 . M I L L E R : He must learn to take passes, and he must rely more on his own initiative. He has a good turn of speed. He played well in his first match,, when he scored two tries. 0 . W E L C H : A very sound player and a very good kicker. He is more at home in his present position of stand-off half, than at full-back. 7. C H I C K : A very good scrum-half. Though handicapped by his size, he plays very hard indeed. He must watch where he is passing the ball. 8 . C A S E Y : A very useful forward with plenty of weight behind him, and a good knowledge of the game. Unfortunately he lacks speed and is rather weak in the line-outs. 9 . P A R R A C K , Capt. (Colours 1 9 4 2 - 4 3 - 4 4 ) : He has captained the First X V very well and set a good example to the side, and to the forwards in particular by his hard play, low tackling, and his lying on the ball. He has a sound knowledge of the game and he is in no way to blame for the defeats his side has incurred. ANDERSON:


28 good heavy forvyard who keeps up on the ball. His tackling needs attention; he also needs to study the off-side rule. 11. H O R S E M A N : A forward who could be good if he put his mind to the game. He lacks fight in the matches, and he must learn to tackle low. He has a good turn of speed. 12. B A R C L A Y : A very good second row forward who is rather lacking in weight. He is a sound tackier. 1 3 . S T O N E H O U S E : Rugby being a new game to him, he still needs to study the rules. He is a hard player, who is always ready to " mix it " when necessary. He tackles well, but must learn to be less selfish with the ball. 14. M C Q U E E N : A forward whose considerable weight helps a great deal in the scrum. He tackles and kicks well, but he must remember that his place is with the forwards and not the backs. 1 5 . P R O C T O R : He plays his best in the forwards where his weight and considerable speed make him a useful wing-forward. He must learn to check his fly-kicking and must tackle low. 1 6 . S T O R E Y : A good player who has played for the team occasionally. He unfortunately lacks weight. With more development he should prove an excellent player. 1 7 . B R O D I E : A big forward, whose weight has helped the team on several occasions. He follows up well, but must show more fight and improve his tackling. 10.

SLACK: A

RUGBY

FIXTURES—AUTUMN

TERM,

1943.

First X V .

Oct. Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Nov. Nov. Nov. Dec.

2nd v. Dame Allan's—T.S. 3, D.A. 9. Lost. 9th v. Tynemouth M.H.S.—T.S. 0, T.M.H.S. 23. Lost. 23rd V . South Shields U.S.—T.S. 6, S.S.H.S. 20. Lost. 30th V . Tynemouth M.H.S.—T.S. 9, T.M.H.S. 6. Won. 13th V . Dame Allan's—T.S. 6, D.A. 8. Lost 20th V . South Shields H.S.—T.S. 0, S.S.H.S. 14. Lost. 24th V . Morpeth G.S.—T.S. 0, M.G.S. 14. Lost. 27th V . Tynemouth M.H.S.—Scratched. 11th V . Dame Allan's—T.S. 3, D.A. 6. Lost.

Oct. Oct. Oct. Nov. Dec. Dec.

9th 16th 30th 27th 4th 11th

Under 14.

V. V. V. V. V. V.

South Shields II.S.—T.S. 0, S.S.H.S. 12. Tynemouth M.H.S.—T.S. 3, T.M.H.S. 3. Dame Allan's—T.S. 9, D.A. 6. Won. Tynemouth M.H.S.—Scratched. South Shields H.S.—T.S. 3, S.S.H.S. 25. Dame Allan's—T.S. 6, D.A. 15. Lost. ON •

THE

Lost. Drawn. Lost.

FARM.

During the summer holidays seven members of the school and Mr. Miller went to a farm about five miles out of Rothbury, to help with the ' harvest. We arranged to meet at the Regal Cinema, Monkseaton, about two o'clock. We started out on our forty mile journey to Rothbury; this proved to be uneventful, except that three members of the party arrived three hours late and missed a very welcome meal of eggs and bacon. Work commenced the next day about eight-thirty in the morning and we were taken into a field to stook oats. At first we found this rather difficult, but the saying " Practice makes perfect " was applied, and we soon learned to be excellent stookers.


9 During the next three weeks we stooked oats, barley and wheat. We found that wheat was the best and the easiest to stook and therefore there was a rush every day for the wheat field, where we usually got the job of binding the slack corn into sheaves. After a hard day's work we often went fishing at night in the lake which was part of the estate. On the lake there was a boat and we had a great time fishing from it. Mr. Miller was the only successful fisherman in the party, although some of us managed to catch one fish. The lake was also used for bathing, and it was very refreshing on a hot day, after picking potatoes in the morning, with one's back nearly breaking, to enjoy _ a swim in the cool water. The weather was not very good during the first two weeks, and we spent one or two days in the house reading and chatting. There was an improvement during the last week and we made up for lost time by working longer hours. We had some good sport when the farm-workers were finishing cutting a field of corn with the binder. As many as thirty rabbits would attempt to escape as the binder closed in, ever narrowing the means of escape, whilst we boys patrolled the field, armed with four-foot sticks, eagerly awaiting a kill. By this means we killed thirty rabbits in one evening. We sold these at Rothbury and this increased our pocket-money by a considerable amount. We returned home by cycle, complete with a few rabbits, and spent the remaining few days in a quiet and restful manner to fit us for a hard term's work at school. P.L.W. VIB. THE GRAMOPHONE

CLUB.

The Gramophone Club was formed after numerous discussions. So far this term only five meetings have been held; each one has been very enjoyable. The Committee decided, as a result of all the kind encouraging offers which were made by the Headmaster to ask him to become President of the Club. He accepted and agreed to give the first selection of records. The Headmaster chose an excellent selection, including the well-known piece by Weber, " Invitation to the Waltz," and four of Chopin's Ballads played by Alfred Cortot. The object of the Club is to provide a wide and varied selection of music, so the next meeting was a " swing session," which was presented by J. Brodie. Some of his records, including " South Rampart Street Parade," were more to my choice than his variety of " B l u e s " records, which struck me as lacking in vitality. At the next meeting N. Calvert presented a selection of records from the Gilbert and Sullivan light opera " Princess Ida," which was very entertaining. Calvert explained to us the parts of the opera which he had not had time to include. R.M.P. VIB. ORIGINAL

CONTRIBUTIONS.

" AS Y O U

LIKE IT."

Just before our new reading teacher came, and Mr. Wood took us, we read about the Shakespearean play, " As You Like It," We liked it so much that we asked Mr. 'Wastle if he would take us to the Theatre Royal to see it. He said that he could not, but he would ask the Headmaster to take us. It was arranged that we should go on the following Saturday, and that the Headmaster and Mr. Wood would go too. This caused great excitement amnogst us, and we longed for Saturday to come.


30 At last the day came, and we met outside the theatre; we were so excited we could hardly wait. At last we went in and took our seats. There was a lot of noise until the curtain went up, then everything was quiet. The play was well acted, and I think that Rosalind, Celia and Orlando were marvellous. Many of us would have liked to live in the Forest of Arden as Rosalind's father did, I am sure. After the play was over we all dispersed; some of us went home, others went to caf6s for tea, while others went to their relatives. Thus ended a verv exciting and langed-for dav. J.U.R. FORM IIA. OUR

FRIEND

ROMANY.

All flowers that are refreshed with rain, Poor Romany ne'er will see again. Besides Nature he loved each child And roamed with them in country wild. Romany used to broadcast on the B.B.C., And nearly always with him were the other three, Doris, Muriel, and Raq, occasionally Jim, . Who often used to go a-rambling with him. M.G.S. IIB. THE

FOX.

The fox is a sly beast, He creeps among the reeds. Trying to suit his taste Looking for a moor-hen Who flew away in haste. Then after finding his prey had flown, He sneaks into a farmyard, looking for a tone. He finds no bones, but chickens galore, And kills them all with a swipe of his paw. With three great crushes of his mighty jaw, He will devour just more than a score. Out of the farm-came the farmer's wife, And gave a shriek of terrible fright. Then out of the farm rushed the farmer, gun in hand, And killed poor old Foxy, his coat looked so grand. He kept his pelt which felt so warm, His bones he gave to the fowls, •And he put his flesh in a box, That is the end of the tale of a Fox. W.G.M. IIA. SCOUT

A B C D E F G H I J

ALPHABET.

is for axe, the friend of a scout. is for bunk, which can't be left out. is for camouflage, make sure it's sound. is for D.C. who might be around. is for excavate—put in that spade. is for frying pan, food, and first aid. is for ground-sheet to keep out the damp. is for the helping hand needed in camp. is inspection—held every day. is the jollity all scouts display.


31 K is for khaki to wear in the sun. L are the lashings that have to be done. M is for matches, don't strike them at night. N is the novice so tuck them in tight. O are the orderlies, don't they took keen. P is the porridge pan they have to clean. Q is for Q.M. the chief of the stores. R is for rucsac, the cyclist deplores. S are the scouters who must be well fed. T is the tent peg so watch where you tread. U is for nothing but Union Jack. V is for vigour with which S.M.s whack. \V is wide game, I'm sure you will plav. X is Xcitement you have every day. Y is for youth who is healthy and gav. Z is the zeal in your movements today. J.U.R. A V I S I T TO A

FORM

TIa.

LOCOMOTIVE SHED.

One day a friend and myself were invited to go and spend a day in a locomotive shed. When the day came we took our dinner and tea and proceeded to the sheds. We arrived there about 8.30 a.m. and went straight to the foreman's office. He had expected us, and greeted us warmly. He tokl us that we had the freedom of the shed and we could go where we desired. After thanking him we went to see some of the standing engines which were being cleaned. First of all we saw a 4-0-2 engine. It was having its fire lit from the "everlasting fire" because it was needed for duty that afternoon. Standing at the back of this was a 4-4-0 locomotive which was getting up steam ready to leave " home " and proceed to the station where it would be attached to its train and go on its way. There were many different types of engines there and many different classes. There were engines coming in and going out every few minutes. One of those coming in was a streamlined 2-6-2 named the " Wolf of Baderock," and another was a Pacific class "named " Call Boy." All these we watched with interest, and every now and then moved to another part of the shed. After two or three hours in the shed we wandered outside to see some more waiting locomotives and were just in time to see the " Flying Scotsman " express go past at a great speed on the main line. Time rolled on, and presently we went back into the shed and had our dinner. In the afternoon we saw and did many interesting things, and after tea we thanked the foreman and one or two other men, and went to the station for a train home. We both agreed it was the best day we had spent for a long time. J.A.W. F O R M III. T H E WASPS'

NEST.

Walking slowly through the country with a gamekeeper on# day, 1 noticed some wasps emerging from a hole in the ground. On further investigation my companion found it was a wasps' nest. There being an orchard in the district it was his duty as a keeper to destroy the nest because the wasps would eat the fruit. Going quickly to his cottage we procured some poison which, I think, was strychnine. Returning to the nest he poured some poison down the hole, and, after arranging to meet me, left it for an hour or two.


32 When I met him again he was carrying a stout spade, which he explained was to dig out the nest, and in a few moments it was laid bare. It was about the size of a football, and made of what looked like a soft grey tissue paper. It was wonderfully constructed. The keeper described to me how in spring the Queen wasp planes off wood fibre from old fences and chews it up until it is pulp. From this the nest is made. On breaking up the nest we found many layers of small, podgy, white wasp-grubs, which, he said, were excellent as bait for fishing. Needless to say, next day I had a grand time fishing in the brook. E.S.H. F O R M IV. "AN

ACROSTIC."

T 'is clear to me that something I must write, Y ea even should it bore all those who read, N ot for a high ideal, but just to spite E ach one who out of ignorance, hath said: " M y school I hate! It's memories I abhor! O happy day, when I'll suffer no more U nder the cursed tyranny of men; T hose who always enforce strictest law, H ard-hearted, cruel— " but I must halt my pen:— S uch are the words of very foolish boys, C asting away what others hold most dear. H ow they will repent in after years! O h! How they'll wish their school-days they'd enjoy'd! O foolish ones, if ye would not regret them, L ook out! Beware! On guard! Lest ve forget them. W.G.M. F O R M Vlb. HEAD

BOY:

I. Welch.

A.

SCHOOL PREFECTS:

CAPTAIN HOUSE

OF

FOOTBALL:

OF T H E

LIBRARIANS: SUPERVISOR

J. OF

R.

M.

Parrack.

Whitley Bay, A . I . Welch. Tynemouth: N. Calvert. Monkseaton, J. A. Jackson. North Shields: D. N. E. Slack.

CAPTAINS:

EDITORS

I. Welch, N. Calvert, R. M. Parrack, J. R. Moore, J. A, Jackson, J. C. Barclay, O. P. Casey, D. N. E. Slack, J. Horseman, P. L. Wight.

A.

SCHOOL

R. THE

MAGAZINE:

N. Calvert, R. M. Parrack, A. I. Welch, W. G. Miller.

Moore, R. Clarkson. EDITORIAL

STAFF:

Mrs. Rodgers.


TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL

MAGAZINE.

EDITORIAL

We welcome in place of Mrs. towards editing standard she has

Miss M. A. Harrison as Supervisor of the Editorial Staff Rodgers, whom we wish to thank for all she has done the previous issues. We hope to maintain the high set us during the past four years.

It has not been possible to publish all the contributions which have been submitted. At the same time we would like to see more literary efforts sent in by the upper forms. With these words we present the fifth war-time edition for your approval and again ask for earlier and more numerous contributions. THE EDITORS.


2

EASTER TERM SCHOOL

NOTES

Rugby football is the main topic of this term's magazine. We congratulate Welch, Wight, Slack, Casey, Chick, J. A. Jackson, Barclay, Horseman, McQueen and Morton on receiving their XV colours. The House matches were a thrilling episode this term. The weather interrupted them for some days, increasing the tension and excitement, and the final result was not known until the final match had been played. The account of these matches is given elsewhere in the magazine. Whitley Bay won the Cup, leading North Shields by 8 points. We congratulate Stephenson on his Matriculation, and J. Brodie on his School Certificate last December. This term we have had the heats for the School Sports which will be completed next term. We regret to announce the death in January, of L.A.C. Robert Trewhitt, R.A.F. He was killed in a flying accident at the very end of his training, lie was here from March, 1939, to July, 1941. MONKSEATON

P R E P A R A T O R Y SCHOOL

We were pleased to welcome Mrs. Barker to the Staff at half-term, and hope she will be happy with us. The children have now been re-classified, and we have been able to introduce specialisation in teaching into our three forms, to the benefit of both staff and children. Once again we were able to take the whole school to " Peter Pan " at the Theatre Royal. This time we had several rows in the stalls, and were glad of the help of the mothers who were in our party of 56. The performance was thoroughly enjoyed by the mothers, who were delighted at the spirit of eternal Youth depicted in the " whimsical Sir James," by the older boys who found Harry Welchman a sufficiently blood-curdling Hook, by the girls who found Tinker Bell so enchanting, and by the four-year-olds paying their first visit to a theatre. The children of the top form spent an afternoon in Newcastle visiting the Norman Castle, the Black Gate Museum, and the Armoury of the Laing Art Gallery. They were very interested in the model of the Tyne and the Tyne Bridges. V. IV. III. Ila. lib. I. Jun. M.P.S.

Avete

F. Rowntree. S. A. Errington. R. G. Hardie. T. F. Potts. J. Anderson. J. B. Hadaway, J. D. McKenzie, J. A. Lodge, R. A. Gofton. W. R. Gair, F. M. Porter, J. C. Tocher, K. Kirsebom. M. C. Alexander, J. A. Barker, J. F. L. Nicholson, C. J. Shepherd, L. Warren. Valete

V. IV. lib. ]un. M.P.S.

R. J. R. L. C.

O. Matthews, R. Lamb, W. Ponton. S. Hewitt. E. Davies. D. Gilroy, A. B. Muir. K. Strickland, C. J. Carruthers.


3 W H I T L E Y BAY

House Master: Mr.

J.

M.

MILLER.

HOUSE NOTES

Hou=e Captain:

A.

I.

WELCH.

At last we have some really good news to report, for this term we have won the House Rugger Cup, after a very close finish between our House and North Shields. Our first team, all of whom have played for the first XV., won all their matches, and the second team won one of theirs. Welch, Wight, Miller, Morton, McQueen, Proctor and Linkleter have represented the House on the First XV., and Brierley, McConway, Thom, Cox, and Hall on the Under 14. Wight has also captained an Under 16 team, which included Proctor and Brierly. Welch, Wight, Morton and McQueen are to be congratulated on being given their Rugger Colours this term. We also congratulate all members of the House who have gained good form positions, and so maintained our high standard in work as well as in play. Next term will bring us Sports and Cricket, and we can hope to be as successful in these sports as we have already been in Rugger. However, it also brings the School Certificate Examinations, and we wish those members of the House, who are sitting them, the best of luck. TYNEMOUTH

House Master: Mr.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

WASTLE.

N.

CALVERT.

This term the Rugby in our House has been extremely varied. We have had, however, both the Captain and Vice-Captain of Rugby, both of whom have played occasionally for Percy Park. Apart from these, members of our House have only played on odd occasions for the 1st Fifteen. On the Under 16 we were well represented, and on the Under 14 Evans, Towell, and Gardner are in our House. We must congratulate all those members of our House who have gained high form positions, and particularly Lee, A., and Truscott for becoming top of the 5th and ]st forms respectively. We must also congratulate those who have reached the finals of the School Sports, and we wish them the best of luck next term. For the rest, we can only await the result of these finals jn hope and expectation. MONKSEATON

HOUSE

NOTES

House Master: Mr. F. L. W O O D . House Captain: J. A. Jackson. We congratulate Brodie on obiaining his School Certificate and we wish him success in the future. This term, through losing some of our best players, we came down very badly in the House Matches. Although our two teams were very keen and played hard they were no match for the stronger sides of the other houses. Again we provided our fair share to the two School XV's. Barclay, Casey and Jackson played for the First XV., and Blunt, the Elliot twins, Pringle Errington, Greener and Forest for the Under 14. We must congratulate Casey, Barclay and Jackson on obtaining their Colours. In the heats for the sports we did not come off too well, so that next term we will have to make amends and go all out for the Cricket Cup. This term the following boys gained high positions and we heartily congratulate them, Parkin, Forrest, Rodgers, Elliot, J., Watt, N., Harrison, R, and Hall, C.


4 N O R T H SHIELDS HOUSE

NOTES

House Master: Mr. J. F. R O B E R T S . House Captain: D. N. E. Slack. This term we were again beaten in the House Matches, but we must congratulate the Junior House Team which won all its matches. The Senior Team lost to the superior sides of Whitley Bay and Tynemouth. We hope to win the Cricket House Matches next term, however, as we did last season. We are pleased to have contributed five members to the First XV., and five to the Under 14 Teams. These are: â&#x20AC;&#x201D; First XV. : Slack, Horseman, Chick, Anderson, and Stonehouse. Under 14: : Joice, Hewitt, Dunlevy, C., Wardhough, McGilvray. Slack, Horseman, and Chick are to be congratulated on receiving their First XV. Colours. S P R I N G N A T U R E N O T E S , 1944

1944 brought with it, like its predecessor, a mild January and February, well advancing the growth of vegetation. It is stated that in sheltered nooks in Lakeland, spring flowers are as profuse as in April, despite heavy and general snowstorms in the area, and that someone has listed thirty wild and forty garden flowers in bloom near Ponteland before February was out. On going to the Quarry on December 24, 1943, I was pleasantly surprised to see about fifty tufted ducks, regular winterers on this water, but I have not previously recorded more than a dozen. The next day I counted seventy-four, after which they steadily declined to twenty or thirty, which are still present. On March 5th four pochards, another diving duck, were identified among the tufted ducks. A visit to Gosforth Bird Sanctuary late in December, 1943, added two interesting birds to my list of observations there, a golden-eye duck and a water-rail. In the sharp winter of 1929 water-rails left the Sanctuary but they are apparently re-established. Recently a guillemot was found wandering on the Broadway, Tynemouth, and was taken into protective custody by the police. It was unable to fly, its wings being coated with oil, but it was cleaned up while in the care of the police and has since returned to the sea. I was fortunate enough to be leift a copy of Charlton's " Birds of South-East Northumberland," a book of unending interest to local bird watchers. The distribution of many birds has varied greatly from pre-1912 to the present day. For instance Charlton says that the cormorant " occasionally flies past," whereas now seldom does a day pass in Autumn, Winter and Spring when they are not seen. Stranger still, he has only three records of the eider duck, another frequenter of the coast, and fulmar petrels had not reached England in their spread southward. Incidentally, they colonised Marsden Cliffs, South Shields, in 1927, but did not breed on the Fames, much further north, until 1935. Both are now flourishing colonies. G.R.L., Form IV. L I B R A R Y N O T E S , S P R I N G , 1944

This term has been a very successful one for the library, and we have been pleased to welcome many new members, especially from the upper forms. This term the books in the library have been re-classified, and it now contains the following sections :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Classical, Fiction, Magazine, Nature, Reference, Biographical, Scientific, Travel, and Historical. We should be pleased to receive books for any of these sections, especially for the Travel and Nature sections. Lastly, we wish to thank all those who have kindly brought new books for the library. L I B R A R I A N .


5 RUGBYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;SPRING TERM,

1944

The weather on the whole has been quite kind to us this term, and the long-distance runners in the school have only been able to show their prowess on two or three occasions. The First XV. started the term well by beating Whitley and Monkseaton High School by 16 points to 3, but after that things did not go so well for them for they lost the rest of their matches, some, however, only by a small margin. I feel the backs were more to be blamed than the forwards for the defeats, for they never seemed to get going even in their one and only victory. They could have doubled thieir score in that match if they had seized the many opportunities that came their way, for their opponents' tackling and handling were anything but sound. The forwards, however, cannot be completely absolved from all blame, for it was quite obvious on several occasions that certain members of the pack did not consider it important enought to keep in training for a School Match. and lost who fine was

One Under 16 match was played and this was against the Whitley Monkseaton High School. This was quite a good game which we by 5 points to 12. Our weakness lay in our inside three-quarters, were poor, and, in consequence, the wings never had a chance. A drop goal by the Whitley full back in the last minute of the game the outstanding feature of the game.

JUNIOR

RUGBY

Four Junior matches were arranged this term, two against Dame Allan's and two against Bede Collegiate School, Sunderland. In the first match, on February 19th, against Dame Allan's, played at Percy Park, the School team, weakened by illness, lost by 12 points to 18. We had as much, if not more of the game than our opponents, and it was only the failure to stop one of their tall three-quarters that lost the match. For Tynemouth Errington scored twice and Evans J., once, and Elliott kicked a penalty goal. In the first match against the Bede School, played on the Westoe ground, the team played well to win by 10 points to nil. The final match against the Bede School at Percy Park on March 25th, was a well fought out game, but here again the feeble attempts to tackle a rather tall opponent nearly lost us the match. It should be obvious that it is quite useless trying to tackle someone larger than oneself round the neck, .especially when that someone has a good hand-off, but it was tried time and again in this match even by boys who, as a rule, are good tacklers. In the first half, Brierly scored two good tries far out;. Then Bede opened their score with a penalty goal. Bede then went ahead with two mqre tries, both scored between the posts by their tall captain, after long runs in which he could easily have been laid low by several opponents. Both tries were converted, so Tynemouth started the second half with a score of 13 points to 6 against them. This was much against the run of play, and in the second half the Tynemouth forwards kept up the good work of the first half and pressed their opponents hard. Soon Errington forced his way through a mass of opponents for a try, which Elliot J. converted. This inspired the Tynemouth team, and soon further tries were added by the Elliot twins and Greener, who pounced on the ball after Towell had crossed the line and been held up. The Elliot's each converted one of these tries. Bede failed to score in this half, so Tynemouth had a well deserved win by 24 points to 13.


6 Thus ended quite a successful season for the Junior XV. It has been unfortunate that Blunt, who captained the side last term on most occasions, has been unable to play in any of the matches this term; his fearless tackling and line play as scrum half have been sadly missed. Joice has filled his position as captain well and shows promise of being a useful forward. All the forwards have in fact played well, but one fault in certain members must be cured and that is unnecessary talking during a game. One cannot talk and play Rugger too. Amongst the backs a word of special praise should go to the Elliots, the two inside three quarters, whose hard low tackling, straight hard running and fine kicking have been an outstanding example to the rest of the team. Dunlevy, C., at full back, has played some good games.

SEVEN-A-SIDE

HOUSE

J. M. M.

M A T C H E S , 1944

Tuesday, February 15th, 1944.

Through the luck of the draw, Monkseaton and North Shields again had the honour of starting the ball rolling in this year's series of matches. This year it was Monkseaton's turn to be dogged by bad luck in having so many of their players incapacitated through injuries, etc. It was not surprising, therefore, when North Shields 2nd team won the first match by 16 points to 0, although, in the second half, the smaller Monkseaton team put up a plucky fight. For North Shields C. E. Hedley scored three times, and C. Dunlevy once; M. Harrison converting twice. Final Score: North Shields, 16; Monkseaton, 0. The game between the 1st teams of the e houses was almost a repetition of the previous game. North Shields were the faster side, but thanks to strenuous efforts by J. A. Jackson, Casey and Barclay, well backed up by the rest of the Monkseaton team, North Shields were onlyable to score once in the first half, when Horseman ran through for a try. In the second half North Shields asserted their superiority and added further tries by A. Dunlevy and Horseman, the latter converting one. Final Score: North Shields, 11; Monkseaton, 0. The next two games were more evenly contested. In the first between Tynemouth and Whitley Bay second teams, the first half resulted in two scores for Tynemouth, one by J. Evans and the other by Black, after a long run in which he outpaced the defence. The second half was more evenly contested, but eventually C. Edminson broke away to score and converted the try himself. Final Score: Tynemouth, 9; Whitley Bay, 0. The last game of the afternoon was the best. Tynemouth opened the scoring when Matthews got clean away and used his speed well to score near the posts. The easy kick was missed. Whitley Bay fought back hard and just before half-time Welsh gathered a Ixmncing ball well and dashed over between the posts. Again an easy kick was missed. In the second half the keen marking and good tackling by both sides continued to dominate the play. At last, however, Linkleter, on the Whitley right wing, was given a perfect pass by Welch. He had about forty yards to go to reach the line, but he made a determined run for the corner flag and was just able to score before being overwhelmed by the opposition. After this encouragement, Whitley Bay pressed hard, but several times Tynemouth, in forward rushes led by Parrack, looked dangerous and only good falling on the ball by Welch and Morton in particular held them. Calvert, too, made strenuous efforts to break through but Welch marked him well and allowed him no scope. The only other score came when Morton just beat Lee for the touch down and so ?cored Whitley Bay's final try. Final Score: Whitley Bay, 9; Tynemouth, 3.


7 The second round of the House Matches, which had had to be postponed because of the weather, was played on Tuesday, Mairch 7th at Rockcliffe ground. Six games were played during the afternoon. The outstanding feature of the play was the stout defence put up by the weakened Monkseaton team against Tynemouth and Whitley Bay. Against Tynemouth they managed to force a draw, each side scoring once, Calvert for Tynemouth and Jackson for Monkseaton. In their match with Whitley Bay, although beaten by 11 points to 0, the Monkseaton team again put up a valiant defence, and made their much faster opponents play hard for their victory. Welch scored first for Whitley Bay, McQueen converting, followed by a score bv Miller after a forward dribble. The only other score in the second half came when Miller got over near the corner flag. North Shields First Seven did not play on this afternoon as Slack, their Captain, was sitting an examination. In the second team matches North Shields did well to win both their games, and Monkseaton seconds lost both their matches to Whitley Bay and Tynemouth. C. Dunlevy, Hedley, and M. Harrison (2), were scorers for North Shields, Harrison converting two of the tries. For Whitley Bay second team, Cox scored their only try against North Shields, and against Monkseaton the three scorers were Stephenson, Brierly, and Thom. For Tynemouth second team Ponton, Black, and Edminson scored against Monkseaton, the latter converting two of the tries. The remaining two matches were plaved during the following week. On Tuesday, March 14th, Whitley Bav First Seven beat North Shields First by 2 points to 0, in a sparkling display in which the handling and backing up were very good, Welch and Wight being particularly outstanding, the latter scoring twice and the former three times. McQueen converted three of the tries. On Thursday March Kith the last of this House Match series was played. Tynemouth First Seven proved too good for North Shields First, handicapped as they were by Horseman being off, and won by 13 points to nil. Scorers for Tynemouth were Calvert and Matthews. This left Whitley Bay winners of the House Cup, the final points being Whitley Bay, 36; North Shields, 28; Tvnemouth, 27; and Monkseaton, 5. ORIGINAL

CONTRIBUTIONS

ON A COLD A N D F R O S T Y M O R N I N G

" A drowsy numbness pains my sense." So feel I, when I am awakened out of a deep sleep, on a cold and frosty morning, and told that it is " time to get up." Although the icy breezes play about outside, I, in bed, am snug and warm, and very loth to leave my comfortable cocoon. I open my eyes and ponder upon the subject of arising. After wondering for some minutes whether to get up right away or not, I suddenly spring out of bed, get washed and dressed, and warm from my exertions, dash into the dining-room for breakfast. My warm, cheerful mood upsets the other members of the family, who are cold and rather disgruntled. When I brightly remark upon the beauty of the morning, I am answered by sarcastic grunts from behind the morning newspaper, and discreet, though muffled coughs from behind the tea cosy. Even the dog just snores. Having finished my breakfast, I rise to depart. I am told that it is very cold, and that I had better put my coat on. I murmur something about it not being so very cold, and that I should be too hot with it on anyway; then, after wrapping a scarf round my neck, pulling my gloves on, yelling " Good-bye " at the top of my voice, this makes even the dog wake up, I seize my bicycle and hurtle off to school.


8 After being nearly run over by a lorry, on the wrong side of the road of course, I somewhat slow down my careering steed, and have time to look about me. The sky is blue, the newly risen sun 9ends his golden- light skimming over the house tops to lie in brilliant patches on the red walls and grey road. The ice-covered pools glow golden in the early light, I am reminded of some lines of Wordsworth's, relentlessly driven into me, " Never did sun more beautifully steep, In his first splendour, valley, rock or hill." The house windows seem to have removed, and to have been replaced by squares of liquid gold, which gleam and glimmer in the clear, frosty air. Everything stands out clearly, the white clouds against the icy blue sky, the houses, chimneys, the church steeples; even the air-raid siren, perched on its housetop assumes a beauty of its o-wn. The weather cock on the spire gleams, its normal gold being replaced by a frosty silver, which can be seen from a great distance, hanging like some fallen star. Half a mile away, in front of me, the sea shakes and swirls, its green-blue waves capped by brilliant white foam; foam never looks so white as on a cold and frosty morning. The wind caused by my motion, swishing into my eyes, makes them water, I surreptitiously wipe them dry and look around. Many other people, I am glad to see, are in the same position. The oldfer people on the sidewalks shuffle along, wrapped up in heavy overcoats and tightly wound mufflers, and I know that they are wondering why they ever got up this terrible morning. As I ride along I hear snatches of conversation such as " another Ice Age on its way " and " temperature down to thirty today," from the very intellectual passers-by, and such obvious ones as " cold, isn't it? " and " chilly " from the less intellectual. The young men who have disdained to wear a scarf, and find a(n overcoat too cumbersome to take about with them in the bus, stride along, blue in the face with cold, and with fingers and noses that look as though they would drop off at any moment, pretending that they really enjoy this sort of thing, " good for you, old chap." The milkman's horse, looking utterly dejected, skates along over the icy street, the milkman, looking even more dejected, stumbles up the garden paths, dropping bottles left and right, to the immense joy of the various cats which are roaming about. Bv this time even I am beginning to feel the cold, so I hurry to school, greet my form mates and securle a seat on one of the radiators. D.P.C. VIB. EDWARD

Edward was a handsome child, His manners, though, were rather wild, And not what manners ought to be, At least, that's how it seemed to me. And all his other kind relations, Who groaned aloud with lamentations When his parents let him playâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; (They took no notice of our dismay!) At last this infant, now called Ned, Went to school with heavy tread. Soon he found that he was able Almost to say his twelve times table Just as printed in his book! Thus it came that Ned forsook The idleness of former days, And found that Mathematics pays, For he could add up two and two And to apply the Maths he knew To other subjects. So we gazed


9 Upon the boy with looks amazed— It really seemed he might be sane! In School Certif this boy did gain Distinctions quite a few, His pride now quickly grew Until, indeed, the poor boy Ned, With better manners, but swollen head, Forgot the subject which had brought Him such great glotry—it was naught! And so we find that without Maths Poor Ned has taken other paths And other subjects, more obscure, And so hap lost a happy cure, Which could have made him wise and sane, For now he has turned wild again! Moral

Those who give up Mathematics Soon become insane fanatics.

A.I.W.

VIa.

POETS ON SCHOOL (Cont.)

NOTE, In the past this serie- has proved very popular, so the editors have decided to bring out a further version. GOING

VTH

TO

SCHOOL.

" Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing boy."

FORM.

FORM

VIB.

FORM

VIA.

THOSE

—P.C. Johnson.

ENGLISH:

" Dreaming on nought but idle poetry, That fruitless and unprofitable art."

-Ben Johnson.

»

" You know physics, something of geology, Mathematics are your pastime."

BOY.

MEMORIES

" If it chance as sometimes chance it will That, though schoolbred, the boy be virtuous still." —Cowper. "Cheer up the worst is yet to come."

SCIENCE.

OLD

—Wordsworth.

-—Browning.

" How haughtily he cocks his nose To tell what every schoolboy knows." OF

WHO

" And all his store of sad experience he Lays bare of wretched days." TACKLE

FORMROOM.

—Arnold.

BADLY.

" E'en then would be some stooping and I chuse Never to stoop." VIA.

—Swift.

SCHOOL.

—Browning.

" But this place is too cold for Hell." -—Shakespeare (Macbeth).


10 T H E I V t h FORM

I have endeavoured jn this story to include all the names of the people in the I Vth Form. I have only succeeded in including fourteen of them. Well, to get on with the story: One day I was driving along in my car when I came to a Wood which was so big and dense that it was nearly a Forrest. I entered, and after I had driven along for a time, I came upon a Stonehouse which had rambling roses over the door, and a Towell, hanging out of the window, completely spoilt the whole house. I drove on but soon had to stop, as a tree was hanging with the branches nearly touching the road, my friend remarked that someone would have to Hewitt down, so I had to Parkin by the side of the road. Soon a Gardner came along, swinging an axe; after a few chops he had the tree down and we continued on our way. Then I saw in the distance the Shippen and my mouth watered, as I had just finished a Cox's orange pippin. Just as I pulled up in the front of the inn, I saw three people having a picnic in a nearby orchard; they were eating Prest beef which looked very nice. After lunch, we continued on our way until we saw an old-fashioned mill, with the Miller, standing in the door, wiping his hands on his apron. Behind the mill was a Derek (Anderson) with which two men were lifting blocks of stone to rebuild part of the mill. After a few more miles in the car, we came to a lovely river with grassy banks, and my friend and I lay down and I was soon asleep. I dreamt that I was a pirate sailing up the river to atack a town. I was flying the " Jolly Roger'". I soon woke up and headed for home in the car. The first sign of the town was the Mariners' Holmes, and so we retuned home after a very interesting ride. P.L.P.

IV.

T H E ART OF READING

To acquire the art of reading is a hard and painful task. To do this one must be able to read any classical book and enjoy it, but as most of these are thick and voluminous and boring, I am not inclined to read them. When one has to choose between an exciting book and Dickens, the former is invariably chosen. As soon as I was able to understand and appreciate books, I began to devour, avidly, large quantities of books. Unfortunately my choices of books were, alas, not to the tastes of my parents, who were always pestering me to read classical books instead of such trash as I had been reading. Trash indeed! they were much better than such musty old books as Sir Walter Scott's. One day the crushing blow fell. I was informed at school in no uncertain terms, that my command of English was deplorable, and I was asked what type of books I read. On hearing that I liked murder stories, the more gruesome the better, and adventure tales, my teacher told me what she thought about such books. To put it mildly, I don't think they met with her approval. Furthermore, I was ordered to start reading classical books. I tried to keep this ultimatum from parental ears as long as possible, but inevitably it reached them by a roundabout route. I was immediately accosted and asked why they had not been informed of this demand. I said that I had forgotten, and anyway I had been working too hard with my homework to do any reading. They politely remarked that they hadn't noticed this sudden spate of homework which had descended upon me; and passed nasty remarks about what happens to people who forget, which I will not repeat here.


11 From this moment onwards all types of classical books were showered upon me in ever increasing quantities. I tried to smuggle exciting books into my home, but in vain. Every attempt was discovered and frustrated. Distributing; secret newspapers in occupied Europe is child's play compared wih smuggling forbidden literature under the penetrating eyes of a suspicious parent. To make matters worse an extremely old and tiresome aunt of mine sent me a huge bookcase full of musty old classical books. She beset me with stories how in her youth she had read them over and over again and enjoyed them immensely. Eyeing the dust on the books, I asked her how long it was since she had read them. She pretended not to hear, and went on telling my father how she was making a great sacrifice giving the books to me, because she loved them so much. Her tone implied that she was glad to get rid of them. I gazed at the huge pile of books and wondered how I was to get rid of them, but it turned out that my father actually expected me to read them. I noticed that, although very keen on making me read classical books, my parents did not seem over inclined to read them themselves. I suggested that, as there were a lot of classical books in the house, they could read some of them. At this I received a cold, icy stare, and a muttered reply about not having enough time to read books. No matter how hard I try to be interested in and understand classical books, I never succeed. They are just as boring and dull as they always are. Perhaps some day I will know the art of reading; but at present I have no inclination towards it. D. K. C. V. SCHOOL O F F I C E R S

A. I . Welch. A. I. Welch, N. Calvert, R . M. Parrack, O. P. Casey, J. R . Moore, P. L. Wight, J. A. Jackson, D. N. E. Slack, J. F. Horseman. C A P T A I N O F F O O T B A L L : R . M. Parrack. H O U S E C A P T A I N S : Whitley Bay, A. I. Welch. Tynemouth, N. Calvert. Monkseaton, J. A. Jackson. North Shields, D. N. E. Slack. HEAD

BOY:

PREFECTS:

EDITORS

OF THE

LIBRARIAN: SUPERVISOR

SCHOOL

MAGAZINE :

N. Calvert, A. I. Welch, R. M. Parrack, W. Miller. J . R. Moore. O F E D I T O R I A L S T A F F : Mrs. A. Rodgers.


12

SUMMER SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES.

There has been a great deal of sport in school this term. Apart from cricket we have had the annual sports. These were very successful, partly owing to the fact that, for once, we had good weather. A full report is given later in the magazine, but we must particularly congratulate Wight on becoming the Champion of Sports, fu school cricket we have been somewhat unsuccessful in spite of all our efforts. On one occasion Anderson even obtained a hat-trick, but in vain We have also had the House Matches. There was much speculation beforehand as to whether Whitley Bay or North Shields would win, but North Shields won by a wide margin. They are to be congratulated. The main affair of the term has been, however, the prospect of the coming examinations. For the Seniors, this horror consists of the School Certificate and the Higher Certificate, but even for the rest of the school there are the annual examinations. There are several boys leaving this term. We wish them the best of luck, and at the same time we would like to congratulate Bellerby, Webster and Boyes on their successes since leaving school. We would like to welcome Miss Baird who has come to take the Juniors. We are proud to record that Capt. J. G. Scott, R.A.M.C., has been awarded the M.B.E. (Military Division) for " gallant and distinguished service " on the Burma front. Also in the Birthday Honours we note with pride the award of the O.B.E. (Military Division) to B. Sinclair (1932-1935) for special but undefined services to the Fleet Air Arm. We regret to announce that the following have died on Active Service: F/O R. H. Graham, R.A.F. After training in Florida he was a SergeantPilot in Coastal Command until August, 1943, when he obtained his commission. He was here from September, 1928, to December, 1937. He was a Prefect and a colour in the XV from 1935 to 1937 and in the XI during 1936 and 1937. He matriculated in December, 1937. Lt. J. S. H. Lunn, South Staffs. Regt. Died of wounds received in Normandy. He was here from September, 1935, to July, 1939. He was a Prefect and Head Boy in 1939. He was a member of the XV in 1937-8 and the XI in 1938 and 1939. He matriculated in 1939, and after a period at King's College he joined the Army. The staff and boys extend their deep sympathy to the relatives. MONKSEATON

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL.

Summer Term.

We begin with our " Salute the Soldier " campaign. Our target was fixed at £100 but we actually took £137. This term, far the first time since the war, M.P.S. took part in the School Sports. ' 'Training " and preliminary heats were taken seriously and we had several afternoons on the Links making our selection of runners to represent us. Results are included in the School Sports account. The top form had another outing, this time to the Marine Laboratory at Cullercoats, an experience which was much enjoyed. Mrs. Basham, from Dr. Barnardo's Homes, gave us a film show during the term, and we all enjoyed the pictures showing the lives of the Barnado children. All our efforts this term, in Music, Drama and Speech Training were directed towards our Prize Day Programme, which was given on July 21st at Livingstone Hall. Tickets were sold and the entire proceeds were given to the Mission to Seamen. Mr. Newman, Assistant to the Chaplain of the Blyth-Tyije Area presented the prizes and received a cheque for £11/2/6


13 from Mr. Ellison on belialf of the School. A vote of thanks to Mr. Newman was given by N. P. Herbert. About 200 parents and friends were present, and much appreciation of the efforts of the children was expressed by them. The programme consisted of plays, percussion band items, a P.T. display, sea shanties and the Sleeping Beauty acted completely in mime by the 4-5-year-old children. All scenery and properties were made in handwork lessons. We are grateful to the six boys from Tynemouth School who gave such valuable help in scene shifting, ticket collecting, etc. Prizewinners.

I. 1, F O R M II. 1, F O R M III. 1, " Salute

FORM

FORM FORM

N. Hedley; 2, P. Robinson, Progress, Julie Hogg. G. Simpson; 2, D. E. Laidler; Progress, Gillian Weatherhead. Sheila Gordon; 2, N. P. Herbert; Progress, H. L . Peers. the Soldier " Drawing Competition (prizes awarded by the local Savings Committee):â&#x20AC;&#x201D; II. 1, T. Browne; 2, W. Walker. III. 1, T. Baker; 2, P. J. Murray. SUMMER

V. III. lib. I. Jun. M.P.S.

Via.

VIb.

IV. III. Ila. lib. I. ]un. M.P.S.

1944

K. Appleby. E. H. Fenwick, P. Prosser, D. E. Ward, F. G. Willey, W. B. Harper, A. Hilton, D. C. Lewis. F. J. A. Scott. E. 'H. Craney, S. Felton. A. D. Dodd, H. D. Jeffcock, E. D. Ormston, C. W. 1'. Peacock, J. Phillips, J. B. Porter, R. Scott, D. W. Turnbull. D. R. Browell, J. T. Browne, J. D. Dawson, K. B. Dobson, P. Gofton, R. J. Hall, P. J. Hughes, D. M. Mudie, W. E. Simpson, T. Tutton, C. Watt. Valete

A. I. Welch, Prefect 1942, Head Boy 1943, Matric. July 1943, XV 1943/4, XI 1944. N. Calvert, Prefect 1942, Matric. 1942, Higher Cert. 1944, XV. 1942/3/4. J. C. Barclay, Matric. December 1942, XV. 1943/4, Higher Cert. 1944. O. P. Casey, Prefect 1943, Matric. July, 1943, XV. 1943/4. D. A. Stephenson, Matric. December, 1943. W. G. Miller, Matric. July, 1944. R. Clarkson, Matric. July, 1944. P. L. Wight, Prefect 1943, Matric. July, 1944, XV. 1943/4, XI. 1944, Sports Champion 1944. R. M. Parrack, Prefect 1943, S. Cert. July, 1944, XV. J- OHU I 1 .

V.

TERM, Avete

J. A. Jackson, Prefect 1943, Matric. July, 1944, XI. 1944, XV. 1943/4. J. R. Moore, Prefect 1943, Matric. July, 1944. L. A. M. Morton. K. Appleby, R. E. Greenhalgh, F. M. Basey, N. H. McQueen. A. R. Hunter, N. Fawkes, C. C. Edminson. N. P. Thom, D. B. Smith, D. Brodie. W. W. Grieves. E. W. Robson, T. A. T. Beale. D. E. C. Wright. T. R. Davison, E. A. Johnson, P. J. Schofield. J. CÂť. Copland, D. F. Smith, T. A. Baker, R. Howarth, P. J. Hughes.


14 PRIZES H I G H E R CERTIFICATE :

N. Calvert.

MATRICULATION :

R. Clarkson, Distinction in French. J. A. Jackson. W. G. Miller, Distinctions in French and Latin. J. R. Moore, Distinctions in English and Literature. I. R. Rose, Distinction in Physics. P. L. Wight, Distinction in Literature. D. A. Stephenson.

SCHOOL

CERTIFICATE :

H. F. Beaumont, R. E. Burn, D. P. Coxon, R. M. Parrack, J. Brodie. STOCKDALE

PRIZE

FOR

LANGUAGES :

W. G. Miller. FORM

PRIZES

V. IV. III. Ila. lib. 1. Jun. Ila. HOUSE

A. Lee, T. A. P. Dunlevy, B. E. Blunt. D. A. Parkin, D. R. Lunn, A. R. Hunter. J- W. Lafiey, J. Wardhaugh, N. P . Thom. D. N. Watt, J. U. Reavley. J. G. Stark, J. D. Watt. D.. B. Truscott. R. M. Downey, E. H. Craney, S. Auton. Latin Grammar: D. N. Watt. S H I E L D : Autumn, 1943, Monkseaton. Spring, 1944, Whitley Bay. Summer, 1944, Tynemouth. WHITLEY

House Master: Mr.

MILLER.

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

A.

I.

WELCH.

The Sports Cup has at last been secured by our House with a very safe lead. Last year we were defeated by only 1J points, but this year we made sure of victory, winning by about 40 points. Congratulations are due to Wight, Champion of Sports, Bristow, who has half-share in the Middle Cup, and to Welch, Miller, W.; Linkleter, Brierly, and Meredith, who have helped to bring about this triumph. We congratulate Welch on being elected Vice-captain of Cricket and also on receiving his cricket colours with Wight. These are our only permanent representatives on the 1st XI, though Morton, Thorn, and Potts have played at times. Thom, Fenwick, Potts and Pearson, A., have represented the House on the Under 14. In House Cricket we were unfortunately beaten by North Shields during the final round, after we had beaten Monkseaton by 9 wickets! This is, I think, the only cause for sorrow this term and, with luck, it might have been averted. Success, however, has not been confined to the playing field, for Lunn D., Thom, Reavely, Harrison D., and Stark have maintained a high standard. Wight, Miller W., Morton, and Linkleter are sitting their School Certificate Examinations this term and we wish them the best of luck.


15 TYNEMOUTH

HOUSE

NOTES

House Master: Mr. W A S T L E . House Captain: N. C A L V E R T . This term the House has excelled rather in the scholarly than the sporting direction. The most notable achievement is that of Lee who is again top of the Fifth Form, obtaining in the term examinations, full marks in mathematics. Several members of ouir House are sitting examinations. We must wish the best of luck to Parrack, Moore, Coxon, Thomson, Golding, and Burn, on sitting their School Certificate, and to Calvert on sitting his Higher Certificate. We must congratulate Calvert,, Evans J., Evans C., and Lilburn on winning events in the sports, and all those others who also gained points for the House. Towell is a joint holder of the Middle Cup. We have done better in Junior Cric.ket than in Senior; in fact we have had no regular members on the 1st Eleven, although Moore and Lee have played occasionally. We have had four members however on the Under 14, Towell, Evans, Shaw, and Wakefield. Naturally, therefore, he did not succeed particularly well in the House Matches. MONKSEATON

HOUSE NOTES

House Master: Mr. W O O D . House Captain: J. A . / A C K S O N . This term saw the finals of the House sports, and although we knew from the start that we had not much chance against the other Houses, especially Whitley Bay House, the members of our House on the whole did very well, considering our humiliating defeat in the Sports last year. We especially congratulate Barclay, Errington and Greener on their respective successes. At cricket, this House was notable as we provided the captains of the first XI and under XIV teams, J. A. Jackson and Forrest. J. Elliott and W. Elliott played for the 1st XI all this season, while W. Elliott, M/. Jackson, Hardie, and Blunt have played for the Junior XI. However, in spite of this, we were unable to beat Whitley Bay in the first round of the House Matches. We must congratulate Parkin, N. Watt, and D. Watt on gaining high positions in their respective forms, while we wish the best of luck to Barclay, who has been sitting the Higher Certificate, and Clarkson, Rose, Storey, and Jackson, who have been sitting the School Certificate. This term will probably be the last for some of the members of our our House and we wish them good luck in the future. In conclusion, the members of the House wish their fellow member, W. Elliot, a speedy recovery from his serious illness. NORTH

SHIELDS

HOUSE

NOTES

House Master: Mr. J . F . R O B E R T S . House Captain: D . N . E . S L A C K . This has been a successful term for North Shields. Despite growing opposition for the Cricket Cup, the House has once again managed to retain it. This time we have been very well represented in the Cricket XI, to which we contributed; D. N. E. Slack, J. F. Horseman, D. H. Anderson, M. Harrison, Joice, Stonehouse, and Hedley C. We have also contributed the following to the Under 14 team: Brown W., Prest, Laffey. Anderson, Horseman, and Stonehouse are to be congratulated on being awarded their Cricket Colours for their excellent work on the XI. We wish Slack, Horseman, and Beaumont the best of luck in the School Certificate.


16 Shields did better than was to be .expected in the School Sports this term and those who scored points for their House are to be congratulated as are the House scholars on their new form positions. Finally, we look forward to the Rugger season with great hope and confident hearts. THE

SPORTS

The Sports were held on the Preston Avenue ground on May 6th. There was a very large attendance of parents and friends to watch under very pleasant weather conditions. Mrs. Welch presented the prizes. Results

Long Jump (over 14): 1, Wight; 2, Calvert; 3, Stonehouse. Long Jump (11-14): 1, Greener; 2, Towell; 3, Bristow. Long Jump (under 11): 1, Lilburn; 2, Hoskin; 3, Edminson, J. Cricket Ball: 1, Stonehouse; 2, Errington; 3, Horseman. High Jump (11-14): 1, Reid; 2, Dunlevy, C.; 3, Hardie; Evans, J. High Jump (under 11): 1, Hoskin; 2, Sutherland; 3, Evans, C.; Turnbull. Mile (open): 1, Welch; 2, Barclay; 3, Parrack. Half-mile (open): 1, Welch; 2, Barclay; 3, Calvert. 75 yds. (11-14): 1, Taylor; 2, Towell; 3, Dunlevy, C. 75 yds. (under 11): 1, Porter; 2, Watt, J.; 3, Hoskin. 75 yds. (over f»|): 1, Matthews; 2, Downey; 3, Welch, J. 75 yards (under 6J): 1, Gee; 2, Bilclough; 3, Sandon, M. 75 yds. M.P.S. (over 6£) : 1, Nicholson; 2, Wood; 3, Norris. 75 yds. M.P.S. (under 6|): 1, Jean Matthews; 2, Donaldson; 3, Crawford. 100 yds (over 14): 1, Wight; 2, Linkleter; 3, Miller, W. 220 yds. (under 10): 1, Evans, C.; 2, Peel; 3, Edminson, J. 220 yds. (10-11): 1, Lilburn; 2, Hoskin; 3, Porter. High Jump (over 14): 1, Miller, W.; 2, Horseman; 3, Wight. 220 vds. (13-14): 1, Bristow; 2, Dunlevy, C.; 3, Greener. 220 yds. (12-13) : 1, Tilby; 2, Towell; 3, Evans, J. 220 yards (11-12): 1, Meredith; 2, Grieves; 3, Watt, N. Quarter-mile (open): 1, Welch; 2, Barclay; 3, Wight. Half-mile (Junior): 1, Evans, .; 2, Bristow; 3, Forrest. 220 yds. (14-15): 1, Errington; 2, Brierly; 3, Harrison, M. 220 yds. (15-16): 1, Wight; 2, Stonehouse; 3, Black. 220 yds. (over 16): 1, Calvert; 2, Barclay; 3, Horseman. Handicap (under 12): 1, Evans, C.; 2, Lilburn; 3, Crawshaw. Handicap (over 12): 1, Reid; 2, Parrack; 3, Shaw. House Relay: 1, Whitley Bay; 2, Tynemouth. Old Boys' Race : 1, K. Boyes. Sports Champion Wight (Whitley Bay) Middle Cup - Bristow (Whitley Bay) and Towell (Tynemouth) Junior Cup Hoskin (North Shields) House Cup Whitley Bay Dux Cup A. I. Welch NATURE

NOTES.—Marsden

Rock

Not many people realise that we have a small but flourishing sea-bird breeding station not far from the mouth of the Tyne, on the outskirts of this highly industrial area. I refer to Marsden Rock and the surrounding cliffs, just south of South Shields. It is close to the shore and can be reached, in peacetime, at low-tide, but the birds can easily be watched from the cliff-top or the lower terrace.


17 The most remarkable, and 1 think the most abundant, breeders there are the Fulmar petrels, which nest on the ledges on the mainland cliffs. Queerly enough, the fulmars, in their great drive southward, colonised these cliffs in 1927, a year before a colony was established higher up the coast, on the Fames. The rock itself is mainly tenanted by Kittiwakes and Herring Gulls, the kittiwakes being on the ledges and the gulls on the grassy top. I sawLesser Black-backed and Common Gulls feeding and resting in the neighbourhood when I was last there, so these probably nest also. A few Cormorants nest in one corner, and the young birds can plainly be seen standing up in their nests. On the arrival of a bird with food, a youngster thrusts its head into the parent's mouth to reach the partly digested food. On a neighbouring islet a Jackdaw colony flourishes, and Swifts nest in small holes in the cliffs, amongst the Fulmars. Even here I have never seen them when not in flight, as they fly straight into their holes. Guillemots and Razorbills are also stated to breed there. The rock is easily reached by cyclists, but the birds will not be present between August and March. NOTE. Before 1878 Fulmars bred only on the island of St. Kilda off the west coast of Scotland, but they have since spread south and established breeding stations all round the coast, as far South as Wexford, Eire, in the West and South-East Yorkshire, in the East. In 1939 birds were present in the breeding season at Pembrokeshire, Lundy Isles, Cornwall, Scilly Isles, and even the French West Coast, but were not proved to breed, although they probably do now. They also spread North-East and colonised the Scottish Islands. G.R.L. IV. LIBRARY

NOTES

This term has again been a successful one for the Library. The third form have again taken out the most books, while the sixth form have taken out hardly any. A fact probably due to the impending horror of the School Certificate Exam. I have been very pleased to see boys of the lower forms taking an interest in the Scientific Section of the Library. This section is really very interesting and not " dry " as some boys suppose. I would be glad to receive any new books for the Library, especially for the Nature Section. Finally I would like to thank all those who have brought books or who have helped in checking the Library books this term. C R I C K E T , 1944

The weather has not been very kind to us this term as regards cricket, and the Junior Team in particular has been unfortunate in having three of its matches, all home games, cancelled. Batting has, as last year, been the weakest point of the Ist Eleven, although the fielding at times has been very poor. On the whole, however, there is an improvement all round on last year's performances. Anderson, with 34 wickets for 272; and Wight, with 22 wickets for 262, have been the spearhead of the attack. Both have bowled very well at times, but latterly have not been helped by the soft wickets. Welch's fielding at " point " has again been outstanding, and Wight, Anderson, and Stonehouse have all set fine examples in the field. The Junior team has had a more successful term from the point of view of winning matches. Unfortunately four of the eight matches arranged had to be scratched. Of the other four they have won two and lost two. Forrest has captained the side very well and his keenness and that of the whole side has been very refreshing. The bowling and batting has been good which is shown by the fact that only on one occasion have their opponents scored more than fifty runs against. Forrest has been the most successful bowler with 29 wickets for 81 runs, and Thom next


18 with 10 wickets for 49 runs. The following have played on the Junior team: Forrest (Captain), Thom, W. Elliot, Towell, Evans, J. Laffey, J. M. Jackson, Fenwick, Potts, Prest, Blunt, W. Brown, Wakefield, A. Pearson, Hardie, Shaw, Mackie. FIRST XI. CHARACTERS J . A. J A C K S O N , Captain; Colours 1944 : As a Captain he has led the 1st XI well, and on he and Wight, as opening pair, have given the team a good start, of which unfortunately the later batsmen have not been able to take advantage. His batting has steadily improved but he must curb his enthusiasm for short runs. As a wicket keeper he has kept the byes down to a minimum. A . I . W E L S H , Vice-Captain; Colours 1 9 4 4 : A very keen and energetic player; although his batting has been poor, his fielding has been excellent. P. L . W I G H T , Colours 1 9 4 4 : Has played well this season and as one of the opening batsmen has batted well. He has taken many wickets through his speedy delivery, although at times he becomes erratic. D . A N D E R S O N , Colours 1 9 4 4 : As the best bowler of the side has bowled very well. A good batsman but has been unlucky in not getting high scores. His fielding is of a high standard. F . H O R S E M A N . Colours 1944: His fielding has greatly improved. He has some powerful strokes and in time should develop into an offensive batsman. H. S T O N E H O U S E , Colours 1944: A keen player and should do well. His fielding is good and his batting has at times been of a great help to the side. J. E L L I O T : A good player and has bowled well as our first change bowler. He has batted well and is quite a good fielder. M. H A R R I S O N : A defensive batsman but he has failed to score runs, his fielding could be improved. C. H E D L E Y : Quite a good bowler but is sometimes erratic. Has developed a good defensive stroke. D . S L A C K : Although very keen to do well his batting has been very poor. His fielding has slightly improved. W . E L L I O T T : A good fielder and should improve into a good batsman; he is specially good on the leg side. J O I C E : He must learn to keep the ball down when batting instead of giving catches. His fielding could be improved. Thanks are due to Casey and Moore for scoring for the 1st XI and to Cox for the Junior XI.

HOUSE

M A T C H E S , 1944

The first of the. House Matches, Monkseaton v. Whitley Bay was played on June 15th. Monkseaton batted first, and from the very first things began to go badly for them, the whole side being out for 24 runs. Wight took 5 for 8, and Thom 4 for 2. Whitley Bay had an easy task in making the runs for the loss of only one wicket, Morton being well caught at square-leg by Blunt after making 15. Wight and Welch passed Monkseaton's total without further trouble. The second match, North Shields v. Tynemouth, was played a week later. North Shields batted first, and although they lost two wickets for only 4 runs, Stonehouse with 44. Harrison with 25, Anderson and Joice treated the poor Tynemouth bowling with scant respect. North Shields eventually declared at 108 for 5. Tynemouth innings did not last long, and their collapse was somewhat accelerated by Parrack, who, although making top score of 12, succeeded in running two of his side out and finally himself. They were all out for 35 runs.


19 The final House Match, North Shields v. Whitley Bay, was played on June 27th. Slack won the toss and put Whitley Bay in. Anderson bowling slow leg-breaks as a change from his usual fast deliveries, soon had Whitley Bay in difficulties. They were all out for 21, Anderson getting 5 wickets and Hedley the other 5. North Shields started badly also, for Horseman was out to Wight's first ball. Harrison was also out before he scored, but Anderson and Stonehouse easily made the necessary runs, so North Shields for the second year in succession won the Cricket Cup. AN

ACROSTIC

S ilently, swiftly, Father Time C reeps. o'er the endless sea of years, H aving effect upon this rhyme O f introducing woes and fears. 0 h soon will the Matric. arrive, L et us hope we will survive. C andidates of every kind, E specially those inclined to slack, R edouble efforts, set their minds T o work; for there's no turning back. 1 f they should fail in that exam, F ar-reaching woes will be their fate. In desperation they will ' cram,' C ould they have started work too late? A t length the days of dread are past, T he wearied schoolboys breathe at last, E xams are done â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the die is cast . (1)

JUNIORS

IN

CONTEMPLATION

W.G.M., VIb.

There was a young boy from Monkseaton, Whose bowling had batsmen well beaten. But one day for his side He bowled wide after wide: When asked why, said, " It's something I've eaten." D.A.L., Form lib. (2) A Crow once was flying, and it saw an aeroplane on the ground. He did not think its was an aeroplane he thought it was a very big bird, and he flew down beside it and said " Caw," which really meant, " Do you want to go for a fly?" But it did not answer, so he said, " Which way do you speak?" But still it did not answer, so he gave a peck on the propeller and the propeller went round and gave the crow such a fright that he went home to his wife with not a feather on his skin. G.W., Form I. (3) The flooded river rushes along, Passing the farms and mills, In gurgling sounds like a thundering song As it winds among The hills. Drowned are the cattle and spoilt are the hops, And the fields are covered with mud; And many a farmer has lost his crops, In the heavy winter flood. D.L., Form lib. (4) When Jesus came to Bethlehem The children felt gay; They gathered boughs and fresh green palms And waved them in His way. But if He came to England Some lovely blue spring day, We'd gather willow branches decked With velvet pussies grey. B.H., Form I.


20 PROLOGUE

TO

THE

TYNEMOUTH

TALES

Ther is a teamen of greet renoun That came fro scole at Tinmouthe Toune, Bifel that in that season on a day, If wel the scene of bataille I purtreye, Ready to wenden on their pilgrimage To Morpethe with ful devout corage. At mortal batailles hadde they been fiftene But nevere such a pitchen hadde they seen. like one of hem in clothes smerte, And ilke teamen weyted for the sterte, And ilke one thoght it was very harshe To maken playe the game upon a marshe. They were as fresshe as is the monthe of May, And greet the dinne before they gan to play. A stalwart of the scole y-clept Dickee, (Ful loude he songe " Com hider love to me ") Was yelling threats that sounded dyre But slipt and floundered in the myre. The scrumen now began to forme around But sanken in and fille into the ground. But now algate fro out the mudde ther wriggles First Paddy, then McQueen, and Wiggles. The ballen now began to flie aboute And passe fro hande to hande amidde the route; And they were cladde in cote and hoode of broun For ech of hem hadde ofte fallen doun; But of their port as meke as is a mayde, They nevere yet no vilainye ne sayde, And special in his lvf no maner Wight. It was a verrav parfit gentil fight. CHAUCER, Form X. ON W R I T I N G AN

ESSAY

When perusing one of the masterpieces of such eminent essayists as Leigh Hunt or Lamb, with the words, phrases, and sentences so beautifully moulded together; with such smooth-gliding style and a rich depth of meaning, we feel when writing our essays, as if we are vainly reaching upward for that which is unattainable, as a small child tries to grasp a door-fhanldle. We (feel within ourselves as we labour. painfully over sentence-constructions, that we may never be given the satisfaction of having achieved what thev have, namely, to have composed the perfect essay. On Wednesday evening, at about six o'clock, a boy may be observed seated at a table, reading over the essays, one of which has to be handed in by the Friday. He can hear faintly in the distance, the voices of the rest of the family, chatting round the dining-room fire, which he has just left, the noise rendering impossible the task of concentrating. Any ideas which had ever entered his head concerning those five or six subjects, immediately seem to vanish into the black obscurity whence they came. By slow degrees the essay-titles which seem the least inspiring, he rejects, with the result that one remains. Then comes the great question of sorting out the ideas which have shyly re-entered his mind, into something a little more orderly than the confused muddle in which they exist at present. At last, however, the preliminaries are passed over, and the essay itself begins to form. Bv this time, darkness js beginning to fall, and the grey dusk creeps into the room through the window, filling the corners with eerie shadows, and so, while the essay is just progressing pleasantly, he js interrupted in the middle of some fantastic simile, and ordered by some member of the family-to put the " b l a c k o u t " up everywhere.


21 A quarter of an hour later, he returns, and after washing his hands of the dust gathered in executing the command, he seats himself once more and resumes his essay. Recalling his former train of thought, he picks up the threads where he left off, and proceeds; thus several more paragraphs are completed. Out of the corner of his eye, he perceives to his horror, that the fire, which he has been specifically told to watch, has diminished in size until it is at its very last dying ember. There, is a sudden rush for the coal-house, and, tripping over himself in his endeavours, he shovels on the fire so much coal that the solitary little ember is extinguished and he has to re-set the fire, as quietly as possible, so as not to disturb those in the next room. After cleansing his hands a second time, therfore, our hero sits down and continues his essay. This time, there are no more interruptions, and he races ahead, finishing all but the last paragraph, which is so near, and yet so far from the end of the essay. It has always been his trouble to compose the introduction and conclusion in such a way that they differed from each other; both of these, in his estimation, having such a magnetic influence upon each other, that eventually thev resolve themselves into the same subject-matter. At long last, however, the required result is obtained, and he can now say that he has written, nearly, if not quite, that which is defined as an essay. So ends with relief a typical day in the life of a school-boy, leaving him still to dream of the heights to which he had hoped to attain in his literarv efforts. ' W.G.M., Form VIn. POEM

The rabbit and the centipede went for a walk one day, And as the day was very hot, they rested 'neath a cabbage stalk, Upon their weary way. Said the rabbit to the centipede, " If it's not indiscreet, I would like to ask you why you use so many feet. You need not use them all, you know, Trv walking on a scoire, With practice and good management, I know you'll not need more." Said the centipede, " That notion is clever in its way, Hut you have two eves, two ears which you use everv day. Tf one would do, why use two? Come tell me that T pray. Now I have many servants who are working under me, And T do not intend that they should idle be, And this the rabbit owned was a question of degree. . P.O., Form IV. SCHOOL

OFFICERS

A. I . Welch. P R E F E C T S : A. I . Welch, N. Calvert, R . M. Parrack, O. P. Casey, T- R Moore, P. L. Wight, J. A. Jackson. D. N. F. Slack, J. F. Horseman. C A P T A I N O F C R I C K E T : T. A. Jackson. H O U S E C A P T A I N S : Whitley Bay: A. I. Welch. Tvnemouth: N. Calvert. Monkseaton: J. A. Tackson. North Shields: D. N. E. Slack. E D I T O R S OF THE S C H O O L M A G A Z I N E : N. Calvert. A . I . Welch, R . M . Parrack, W. G. Miller, T. A. Dunlevy. L I B R A R I A N : J. R. Moore. S U P E R V I S O R O F E D I T O R I A L S T A F F : Mrs. A . Rodgers. HEAD

BOY:


22

AUTUMN TERM. SCHOOL

NOTES

After many years of service in the Junior School, Mrs. Hobbis (Miss Henderson), left us at the beginning of term. We wish to thank her for her work here during a period of about ten years. In her place we welcome Miss K. Baird, hoping that she will have a happy time here. At the end of term we regretfully said good-bye to Mrs. A. Rodgers and to Mrs. Miller. The former has been with us for four years and her work in English and History with the top forms has been most successful. All those who have passed through her hands will very deeply regret her departure. Mrs. Miller has been taking the youngest juniors for over two years and we shall miss her very much. We wish them both health and happiness in the future. We congratulate Calvert on his success in the Higher Certificate and on his award of a Major Scholarship on his result. In the School Certificate Miller, Clarkson, Wight, Jackson and Moore obtained their Matriculations. Coxon, Parrack, Linkleter, Burn and Beaumont obtained their School Certificates. We congratulate them on their success. The following were elected Prefects this term: Lee A., Chick, Dunlevy T., Brierly, Baty, W., Coxon, D., Linkleter, Burn. The Poppy Day collection this year amounted to just over £10. With the aid of several film shows £10 was collected for the Christmas Fund of the Mission to Seamen. Many thanks to all those who made this possible. Wlar Savings totalled £41 8s. 6d., bringing the year's total to £313 10s. 6d. During the year £48 4s. lOd. was sent to Dr. Barnado's Homes from the members of the Helpers' League. The number of boys reached a total of 293. Lt. B. S. Bates, a former master, was wounded in Holland and is now convalescing in a hospital in England. During the year members of the staff have had many letters from Capt. Darke, Lt. Gentle, Sergt. Fullarton and Cpl. Appleby. The two former are under S.E.A.C. In the December School Certificate Slack obtained his Matriculation with Distinctions in both Englsh Language and Literature. Linkleter and Storey obtained School Certificates and Burn and Coxon were successful in subjects necessary for Matriculation. AUTUMN

V. Ila. lib. I. Jun.

M.P.S.

T E R M , 1944

Avete

C. R. Johnson. D. B." Armstrong, J. C. Dodd, C. H. Gibson, R. B. Gristwood, M. R. Lloyd, D. Taylor. D, E. Pickering, C. B. Scott G,. J. Mutch. R. Crozier, I. B. Davis, C. Scott, D. Thompson, R. F. G. Checkley. M. R. Gordon, M. Chapman, M. Gray, A. M. Davis, C. F. Everett, D. N. Everett, G. N. Tait, B. W. Pengelly, M. T. Yeeles, A. Lamb, N. W. Brady, M. M. Stephenson, R. B. Cube v. D. H. Mason, J. H. Blades, J. M. A Slack. J. Atkinson, J. A. McGregor, J. S. Harrison, J. D. Featonby, M. T. H. Todd, R. Warren, N. R. Forgie, M. W. Andrews, H. E. Evans.


23 Valete

VIb. IV. Ila. I. Jun. M.P.S.

J. Horseman, Prefect 1943/4, XI. 1944, XV. 1943/4. D. W. Linkleter, Prefect 1944, S. Cert. Dec. 1944. C. G. Storey, S. Cert. Dec. 1944. K. M. Smith. C. A. Lowson, P. Prosser. G. W. Hood, R. M. Downey. L. Mansell. T. M. Shaw. OLD

BOYS'

NEWS

We congratulate K. Stokoe (1939-40) on winning the D.F.C. J. 1. Dawson (1932-40) and J. D. Macara (1936-41), have been commissioned in the R.A., and I. L. McCombie (1931-40) in the R.A.F. A. Angus (1928-37) has been repatriated after a long period as a P.O.W. and has resumed his course at King's College. J. Goldsbrough (1930-35) has returned home after having been liberated by the Army in Italy. We congratulate the following on their examination success: â&#x20AC;&#x201D; B.Sc., Civil Engineering: J. W. Hall (1931-41). 4th B.D.S. : R. M. Adams (1932-9), K. W. Holden (1939-40). 2nd D.B.S.: J. G. Walton (1935-42). 1st B. Arch, (part): K. Boyes (1941-3). 1st M.B.: D. Webster (1935-42). 2nd M.B. : A. Hand (1931-40). 3rd M.B. : C. B. Schofield (1931-40), V. Harrison (1933-40). K. Boyes has been playing Rugby for Manchester University, and A. I. Welch has been awarded his Colours at Magdalene College, Cambridge. J. W. Hall was awarded the " Miller Prize " by the Institute of Civil Engineers in open competition. MONKSEATON

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL

The end of the Autumn Term is regarded as one of the brightest in our school year, and the children were very disappointed this year that so much illness caused us to close a week early and it was found inadvisable to have the Christmas Party. We hope to hold it on the first Friday of next term. The Nativity Play which we had prepared in conjunction with the Wireless English Lessons was a great success and the impromptu costumes were very effective. Cymbals gave a truly Oriental touch to the entry of the Three Kings, and the carols sung during and preceding each scene made a fitting setting, and everybody felt he had a part in the production. The Christmas collection of toys was sent to Scaffold Hill Hospital, the Isolation Hospital for the district. The special Christmas Tree collection for Dr. Barnado's Homes realised 15s. 9d. By the end <jf the year our Savings total amounted to ÂŁ687, and the number in the school is 56. MONKSEATON

HOUSE

NOTES

House Master: Mr. F. L. W O O D . House Captain: W . H. B A T Y . We must first congratulate I. Rose, R. Clarkson and J. A. Jackson who Matriculated in the July Examination, and we hope that C. G. Storey will be successful in the December Exam.


24 This term the weather has not been favourable for games and it is hoped that next term, when the House matches will be played, it will take a turn for the better. In the first XV we were represented by Storey, Hesslegrave, lirrington and Elliot J., also on other teams by Elliot J., Errington, Pearson D., Turner, Bowman and Blunt who was Captain of the Under 15 team. At the end of last term we lost a good sportsman in J. A. Jackson, to whom we wish all success in his future career. J. C. Barclay has gone to Cambridge to study Law and O. P. Casey to King's College. We wish them success in the future. Lastly we congratulate W. H. Batey on being appointed House Captain and all those who have gained high places in their forms. W H I T L E Y BAY H O U S E N O T E S

House Master: Mr. J. M I L L E R . House Captain: D. L I N K L E T E R . We must first congratulate our late House Captain, Welch, on " going up " to Magdalene College, Cambridge, and on getting his Rugger Colours for the College in his first term there. Congratulations also to Miller and Wight on their matriculation results in July. We wish them happiness in their work. All the House express their thanks to Mr. and Mrs. Miller for taking such a lot of trouble in preparing the House Sports Tea held at the beginning of the term. NORTH

SHIELDS HOUSE

NOTES

House Master: Mr. J . F. R O B E R T S . House Captain: J. F. H O R S E M A N . We congratulate Horseman on being appointed Head Boy and Captain of Rugby, and Chick and Dunlevy T., on becoming Prefects. Horseman, Slack, Chick, Anderson, Stonehouse, Joice, Wells and Laffey have represented the House on the First XV this term and Harrison, M., Wardhaugh/ Dunlevy, C., and McGilvrav have played on other School teams. T Y N E M O U T H HOUSE NOTES

House Master: Mr. G. A. W A S T L E . House Captain: R. E. B U R N . The members of the House will be pleased to hear we won the House Shield by a clear margin. We congratulate Calvert who, as the result of his success in the Higher Certificate, was awarded a Major County Scholarship. The following were successful in the School Certificate in July; Moore, who gained Distinctions in English Literature and History; Coxon, D., with four Credits, Burn with three Credits and Parrack with a Distinction in English Literature. We welcome to the House Dodd J. C., Nicholson, Davis I., and Porter J. B. SENIOR

RUGBYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;AUTUMN

T E R M , 1944

The First XV has had a poor season so far. The chief fault has been in defence where tackling and falling on the ball has been the great weakness. Some of the older boys are the chief offenders and in consequence many of the younger players have been called on to play in matches against much older and stronger opponents. There are however plenty of good players in the school and the experience some of them are getting in matches should stand them in good stead in the future. They should not be too disheartened if they are always on the losing side at present. The


25 following have played on the First XV. this term:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Horseman (Captain), Colours 1943-1944. A fast and hardworking forward who has had the somewhat thankless task of leading a weak side. He has set a good example by his hard tackling and his falling on the ball. Slack (Vice-Captain), Colours 1943-1944. He has played hard in the scrum, and despite his slowness is usually well up with the ball. He is not afraid to fall on the ball and in this respect he has set a good example. Chick, Colours 1943-1944. A very plucky and hard-working scrumhalf and one of the outstanding members of the team. He is always in the thick of it, too much so at times as he should remember that his duty is to feed his backs. Stonehouse. Really a forward, but playing at stand-off has shown great dash and uses his weight well. He has to learn to get the ball out to his three-quarters more often. Anderson. At the beginning of the season he was a tower of strength at full-back. Now at stand-off half he shows good promise. He has good " hands " and a valuable swerve and cut-through. Proctor. A wing-forward who is heavy and fast. With more real enthusiasm he would l>e a most useful player. Storey. As a wing-forward has plaved well. He is fast and a good tackier. Hesslegrave. A wing three-quarter who has been handicapped by illness. He has a good turn of speed and can tackle well when he likes. Brierly. One of last year's " Under 14 " team who, at wing-threequarter, is a sound tackle with a good turn of speed. Linkleter. He has plenty of speed but has lacked determination in tackling. Elliot J. A plucky young player who can tackle well and as a centre three-quarter goes straight and hard. At present his size is a handicap in First XV matches. Lunn and Wells. Two forwards who have only just started to play this term. They show distinct promise and, with more experience, should be very useful. JUNIOR

RUGBY

The Under 14 team has only lost one match so far and is quite a useful team. The forwards are a lively lot with Evans J. a good leader with a devastating tackle. He has been well backed-up by Mackie, McGilvray, Wardhaugh and Hall. Towell has captained the side well and Dunlevy C. has been outstanding amongst the backs. The tackling of the whole team is good and there has been a great improvement in falling on the ball. This was very marked in the last match against the Roval Grammar School. The following have played for the side this term: Towell (Capt.), Evans J., Dunlevy, C.. McGilvray, Mackie, Wardhaugh, Hall, W., Fenwick, Brown, W.. Potts, Holmes, Wood, J., Gofton, W., McAughtry, Mayhew, Pearson, D., Wakefield, Skee, Bowman and Turner. There is plenty of promising talent and keenness lower down the school. Some of the tackling in the most junior game of all Would do credit to many a more senior boy. AUTUMN

NATURE

NOTES

July 11th. A Nightjar was seen and heard in the School field during the dinner-hour. July 23rd. A Corn Bunting's nest was found with three eggs in it. August 11th. A pair of Whea tears were seen at Sea ton Delaval. August 23rd. The bird-table is progressing well after being there some ten days. Todav there are three Blue-tits and one House Sparrow there together.


26 September 13th. There are many Blue-tits in Bedlingtonshire. A Cole-tit was seen at East Cramlington. October 28th. At a pond near Bebside Station sixteen Waterhens were seen, two Mute Swans and a large flock of Gull. November 6th. A Wren was seen. November 22nd. Six Mute Swans were seen on a flooded field. November 25th. Many birds were seen. A low-hovering Kestrel was seen at ten yards. December 12th. Nine Mute Swans were seen and numerous Waterhens. J.A.W., Form IV.

MISSIONS TO AFRICA

Ever since the days of St. Paul and the first mis-ionaries, men have given their lives to the furtherance of the Gospel in heathen lands, but it was not until the nineteenth century that the Church of England first sent out missionaries to Africa. Livingstone, on his arrival back in England from Africa in 1857, gave a speech to the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge wherein he .asked the men present to go out to Africa as missionaries. A society was formed which became known as the Universities' Mission to Central Africa, and the first small band of missionaries, six in all, were sent out. They set up their headquarters in the Zambesi river valley, but after a time they were forced to leave owing to fever and famine. The famine was due to the action of slave traders who were working in the neighbourhood. The missionaries often had to fight against these slave traders and in those days a missionary went to Africa with a Bible in one hand and a rifle in the other. Well, because these missionaries were leaving the Zambesi valley they were called cowards by the people at home in England. People who had worked hard for the missionaries in Africa did not realise the terrible hardships that confronted a white man there. The missionaries, therefore, to prove that they were not cowards, decided to hit right at the core of Africa's troubles, Zanzibar. Now of all the vile places on the earth's surface, Zanzibar, at that time, was the worst. For it was there that the greatest slave market in Africa was situated and, as though that was not enough, it was also the centre of a large majority of the African cults and beliefs. Yet there the missionaries set up their headquarters, right next to the slave market and within sight of the Sultan's palace. Now, after nearly a century of missionary work there the slave market has vanished and the beautiful Cathedral of Christ Church stands on the very same spot where men, women, and children were sold into lifelong servitude. Yes, the slave market has vanished and Zanzibar is now the centre of the Universities' Mission to Central Africa which now covers a good third of that continent and which is growing larger every day. Now let us look at the problems and difficulties which the present day missionaries are called upon to solve. First and foremost comes disease, but that is the work of the gallant medical missions although the church missionaries help as much as they can. Then there comes witchcraft. O yes! Wie who sit here in England may laugh at the belief in witches and magic which the uneducatd African has, but I can assure you that it is no joke to the missionarv who has to deal with it. We say that it is superstition, that is very true, but it is a superstition that governs the natives' life from being" born to when he dies, unless he becomes a Christian. Let us examine our lives here in England, we are superstitious, for example, most of ns will not walk under a ladder. Yet try to imagine a life where every thought and every movement is ruled by


27 a superstitious belief! If we can do this we have a very good idea of how an African native lives. We have all heard of thie taboos and charms in which the African believes, and perhaps we have heard of the terrible "occult societies which are carried on in Africa. Societies whose members' whole existence is to do evil. Societies whose members have feasts of human flesh and who have such a grip on the mind of the African that the sceptical British Government is now fighting against it. I said that these societies have a great power over the mind of the African native; for example, if a jvitch, that is a man or a woman who is a member of one of these societies, puts a curse on a native and tells that native that, he will die, that native invariably dies. He dies not because of any power the witch has, but because of his great and terrible fear of the witch and her supposed power, a fear which he has had since he was born. Now think of the great work missionaries are doing, for a Christian, whether he be white man or native, does not care a " tinker's curse " for all the witches in Africa and their magic. Therefore think of the missionary bringing to the African the message of the Gospel, which shines like a golden ray through the dark and filthy swamp of the natives' superstitions and fears. F.B., VI8. TALES OF T Y N E M O U T H

There are many tales and legends about Tynemouth. a few of them, but which of them are true I cannot say.

I will relate

Jingling Geordie's Cave

One story of this cavern is the legend of Walter the Bold, and it begins when a young nobleman wanted to show his mother that we was as great as his father. Walter's mother told him that hidden inside the Priory Rock was a vast quantity of treasure and so he thought he would try and get it. Armed with his shield and sword one night he climbed the cliffs and entered the cavern just as a storm broke out. He made his way along the dismal passage in spite of the fact that it was guarded by goblins. As he got further in, blue flames rose from the glaring eyeballs of the guardian spirits and the howlings grew louder. In addition to these, great dragons blockd his path, he beat them back, and large bulldogs came baying out of their dens; he fought them off also. He then came to a deep cavity, however without shedding any armour, he leapt the gulf; on the other side he found many creatures still impeding his way. He breathed a prayer and rushed onwards. Soon he found himself facing the grim portal of the treasure-house. Catching a horn which was hanging by the door he blew three blasts in spite of it turning into a deadly snake. When the last sound had died away all the spirits vanished and the door opened with a crash. We cannot tell of the unaccounted wealth, all of which became the property of Walter. " It may not be sung what treasures were seen: Gold heaped on gold and emerald green, And diamonds and rubies and sapphires untold Rewarded the courage of Walter the Bold." How the " Hole " received its name

"Jingling Geordie" is said to have been a wrecker who made his home in the cavern, and who, on account of the shortness of one foot, wore a boot with a spike upon it. From the mouth of the cave, on a dark night, he would shine a light and lure a ship to its doom. Because of the noise that his spike made while he gathered the plunders he got his name. Then again " Jingling Geordie " is said to have been a shipwrecked foreigner who made his haunt in the cave. We are further told that he acquired his name by making the clanking noise in an unknown manner. H.J., IV.


28 LIBRARY

NOTES

This term .started well and the strength of the library has been swelled by the contribution of books from various sources. We thank Rose for his most valuable help in this matter. The interest of the higher forms seems to be waning more and more whilst that of the lower forms is indifferent, the fllrd having borrowed the greatest number of books from the library during this term. Great help has be>en given by Baty and Storey in checking and re-arranging at the end of the term, and we thank them for their assistance. Owing to the unfortunate misuse of books, we have been forced to impose the following rules: 1. Not more than one book may be borrowed at a time. 2. Books must be returned within 14 days from the day of issue. 3. No one is authorized to use the Library unless permission has been grantd by a member of the staff or the librarian. May we again send out an appeal for more books to build up the strength of the Library. LIBRARIAN. SCHOOL O F F I C E R S

Horseman. P R E F E C T S : J. Horseman, A. Lee, T. A. P . Dunlevy, D. K. Chick, H. D. Brierly, W. H. Baty, D. P. Coxon, D. W. Linkleter, J. W. Burn, D. N. E. Slack. C A P T A I N OF F O O T B A L L : J. Horseman. H O U S E C A P T A I N S : Whitley Bay, D. W. Linkleter. Tynemouth," J. W. Burn. Monkseaton, W. H. Baty. North Shields, J. Horseman. L I B R A R I A N : H. D. Brierly. E D I T O R S O F T H E S C H O O L M A G A Z I N E : J. Horseman, Brierly, T. Dunley, and A. Lee. HEAD

BOY:

J.


TYNEMOUTH SCHOOL MAGAZINE.

EDITORIAL

Whilst Christmas is once more stealing upon us, we Editors find that another editorial for the Magazine has to be written for our first post-war edition. We sincerely hope that in the future the lifting of the restrictions on paper will allow us, as we have done in the past, to have three editions of the Magazine a year. This will only be possible if we have sufficient contributions to fill up the ample space that will be afforded to us, at the same time maintaining the high quality for which our magazine has been noted. With this we wish all our readers A Merry Christmas and a Happy and Prosperous New Year. THE EDITORS. V


a

SPRING TERM. SCHOOL

NOTES

We welcome Miss Harrison this term. She has come to take the place of Mrs. Rodgers who has been our English mistress for several years. We would like to take this opportunity of thanking Mrs. Rodgers for her work here which has been very greatly appreciated, not least by the boys. We congratulate Anderson, Stonehonse and Proctor on receiving their XV Colours, and also Anderson and Proctor on being made School Prefects. T. A. P. Dunlevy was installed1 as the new Head Boy in succession to J. F. Horseman. The heats for the Sports were held this term in preparation for the finals to be held next term. The House Football Cup was won by North Shields who obtained the maximum number of points possible. Ila. lib. I. Jun. M.P.S.

Avete

D. J. Joicey. W. S. Dixon. J. C. Fenwick, K. R. Sibbald. C. A. Bishop, R. C. Bishop, R. H. Dawson, R. A. Sutton, G. F. Stenhouse. W. J. Badsey, D. Crone, J. Si McKenzie. Valete

Via. I. Rose, D. N. E. Slack, H. F. Beaumont. VIb. F. H. Rowntree. V. R. P. Gardner, E. S. Holmes. IV. J. M. Jackson. III. W. Hall, A. Ives. Jun. E. D. Ormslon, J. M. Phillips, S. Sergeant. M.P.S. J. Atkinson, P. A. N. Shaw, C. J. Shepherd, J. Talbot. WHITLEY

House Master: Mr.

J.

M.

BAY

MILLER.

HOUSE NOTES

House Captain: H.

D . BRIERLY.

This term we must congratulate Brierly on his appointment as House Captain in succession to Linkleter who left us at the end of last term. To Linkleter we extend our best wishes for every success in his new post. Also to be congratulated is A. R. Proctor upon his appointment as a Prefect and on gaining his First XV Colours. The only inter-House activity this term has been the House Matches in which we gained a well-earned second place. We must congratulate both the First and Second teams. The Second team, although beaten in every game, showed great determination against much bigger sides. Brierly and Proctor are also to be congratulated on their position on the First XV Team. Finally let us hope that we shall be victorious in thei Sports which are to be held next term.


4 T Y N E M O U T H HOUSE NOTES

Housemaster: Mr. G.

House Captain:

A . WASTLE.

K.

E.

BURN.

We must first congratulate D. Coxon and R. E. Burn on obtaining their Matriculations last December, Coxon now having five Credits and Burn six. As usual, the " seven-a-side " House Matches took place this term, and although Tynemouth only gained fourth place, the teams played very well considering the large percentage of School Fifteen players in the other House teams. The Junior team played exceedingly well, only being beaten by North Shields, and it is to them that we owe our final score of twelve points. The Senior team, although defeated on three occasions, played a good game,, and, except in the case of North Shields, was only beaten by a narrow margin. We were not very well represented in the First Fifteen having only one member, A. Lee, but we congratulate Towell on being made Captain of, and Evans, Wakefield, McAughtry, Holmes, and Mackie, on being made members of the Under Fourteen Team. We are now looking forward to the Sports activities of next Term, and hope to succeed] rather better than we have done this Term. MONKSEATON

House Master: Mr. F.

HOUSE

L . WOOD.

NOTES

House Captain:

W.

H.

BATY.

This term the House is very sorry to hear that our House Master, Mr. Wood has to leave us. We hope that he will be as popular amongst his new pupils as he is amongst us. We must congratulate C. G. Storey on passing the School Certificate in December and we wish him every success in his coming career. We also congratulate those members of our House who have gained high positions in their forms and those who have represented the House in the School Matches. The House Matches were not successful owing to the high percentage of Seniors who were unable to play. We did better than was expected, for after the first half of them had been played the House was bottom with no points, but after the second part, the teams rallied and we are glad to say that Tynemouth House took our place. NORTH

House Master: Mr.

SHIELDS

J. F . ROBERTS.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

T.

A.

DUNLEVY.

First of all we must say how sorry wo are to lose J. F. Horseman who was Head of the School and House Captain of North Shields. We wish him the very bust of luck in future years. T. A. Dunlevy must be Captain of Rugger, and D. Anderson on being appointed a School Prefect, congratulated on being appointed Head Boy, D. Slack on being appointed This term has brought us great success in the ' seven-a-side ' House Matches. Not one point was scored against us either in the Senior or Junior Matches, Consequently we obtained the maximum number of


points possible. D. Anderson and H. Stonehouse are to be congratulated on obtaining their First XV. Colours. We have contributed many members to the First XV. and Under Fourteen Teams. D. Slack, D. K. Chick, T. Dunlevy, D. Anderson, H. S^onehouse, H. Joice, J. Laffey and J. A. Wells were our First XV representatives. A. McGilvray, C. Dunlevy, J. Wardhaugh and E. Brown represented the House on the Under Fourteen. We look forward to the cricket next term, and we are confident of our chances in the Cricket House Matches. R U G B Y â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S P R I N G T E R M , 1945

Nine Senior (including 3 Under 16) matches were arranged for this term. Six games had, however, to be scratched. Except for one win by the Under 16 team over Whitley and Monkseaton High School, the senior matches were a series of defeats. The Under 14 and Under 13 each won one of their matches. During this season the Junior Teams have won 4, drawn 1, lost 4 of the matches played. The following played in most of the 1st XV matches: Slack (Capt.), Chick (Vice-Capt.), Stonehouse, Anderson, Proctor, Brierly, Dunlevy A., Lakey, Lee A., Black, Errington, Gardner, Joice, Greener, Laffey and Wells. Slack, Chick, Stonehouse, Anderson and Proctor are Colours. The following have played in most of the Under 14 matches:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Towell (Capt.), Evans J., Mackie, Gofton, Holmes, Fenwick, Wood J., Dunlevy C., Wardhaugh, McGilvray, McAughtry, Brown W., Wakefield, Potts, Hall W., and Mayhew. The latter have been a good lively team. Many of them are big tor their age and should help to improve the standard of play when they move up to the senior game next season. House Matches

Seven-a-side matches were again played, each house providing a first and a second team. North Shields, with every member of their 1st VII also a, member of the 1st XV defeated their opponents in turn quite easily, and their 2nd VII, with one member of the 1st XV swamped their smaller opponents in every game. North Shields being so strong took away most of the interest for the result of the competition was a foregone conclusion. Some of the other games were evenly contested and provided quite a lot of excitement. Results 1ST

TEAMS

2ND

TEAMS

North Shields beat Tynemouth 8-0. North Shields beat Tynemouth 21-0. North Shields beat Monkseaton 16-0. North Shields beat Monkseaton 25-0. North Shields beat Whitley Bay 24-0. North Shields beat Whitley Bay 26-0. Monkseaton beat Whitley Bay 6-0. Whitley Bay beat Monkseaton 6-3. Tynemouth beat Whitley Bay 19-0. Whitley Bay beat Tynemouth 6-3. Tynemouth beat Monkseaton ]4-0. Monkseaton beat Tynemouth 5-3. ... 48 Final Points: - -North Shields Whitley Bay ... 20 Monkseaton ... 16 Tynemouth ... 12


6 FIRST

XV

CHARACTERS

Slack. A slow, but hard-working forward, he has had a hard task in captaining a poor side. He performed his duties well. Chick (Colours 1943-44-45). A really outstanding member of the • team, and a very efficient scrum-half, despite the fact that he is apt to become mixed up in a loose scrum. However, his fighting spirit should be a source of inspiration to some of the forwards. Anderson (Colours 1944-45). A very capable stand-off with a useful sidestep. Kicks well with both feet, and is a very good tackier. Stonehouse (Colours 1944-45). He is a good wing-forward who is always ready to light vigorously for the ball. A good tackier, he should be less selfish with the ball. Proctor (Colours 1944-45). A useful, heavy forward who keeps up on the ball. He should study the off-side rule. Lee. A fast centre who, though he takes and gives passes erratically shows keeness. He tackles well in comparison to other members of the team, but there is still plenty of room for improvement. Brierly. A reliable winger with .good speed. Should tackle lower and with more vigour. Joice. Has hooked well but is greatly handicapped by the lack of weight in the scrum. Keeps up with the ball, but must watch his tackling. Lakey. A heavy forward who works hard throughout the game. Should tackle more vigorously. Errington. A fast winger who unfortunately injured his leg early this term. His passing could be improved. • unlevy. His correct position is lock and here he keeps the scrum firmly together. His tackling is poor but is improving. Laffey. A good kick, but his tackling is erratic. Should be more reliable in his position of full-back. Gardner. A useful forward with plenty of keenness and vigour. A good tackier, his passing should be improved. Greener. A fast second row forward who plays hard but must learn to tackle. Wells. Though he does not yet kndw the gam® very well, he shows promise in the three-quarter line. Must learn to tackle low and pass quickly with precision. Is a useful place kick. Black. A very keen forward who keeps up on the ball. Is apt to become flustered when pressed, and should use his own initiative more. A V I S I T TO T H E OPERA

On March 22nd the Headmaster very kindly took the Prefects to the Theatre Royal to "see " Cavalleria Rusticana " and " II Pagliacci " presented by the Carl Rosa Opera Company. As very few of us had ever seen an opera before, we awaited the opening bars with great expectation. Our seats were in an excellent position for hearing and seeing. Of the two operas presented that evening most of us preferred " II Paglaicci." It was brilliantly presen.i^d and we enjoyed the music and the singing of the Clown. We all spent a most enjoyable evening. T. A. 1).


7 SPRING BIRD NOTES

Jan. 9th. A Bluetit was feeding on some fat which I had hung out when a Goldcrested Wren alighted near him. The Bluetit promptly gave chase. Jan. 14th. A Robin visited my bird-table. Jan. 19th. There were six Bluetits and one Great Tit feeding on the fat and cheese, etc., which I have suspended from a line in the garden. Jan. 29th. A Redwing was seen at Tynemouth. Feb. 3rd. A fine day after very heavy frosts. I saw a; Fieldfare at Seaton Delaval. Feb. Sth. Chaffinches are singing well. A Kingfisher has stayed several days at a park in Tynemouth. Feb. 6th. There was a pair of Tawny Owls in Northumberland Park. Tynemouth. Feb. 10th. A very large flock of Fieldfares seen at Seaton Delaval. Thrushes were singing beautifully. Feb. 11th. I saw a flock of some forty Bullfinches near Bedlington Station. Feb. 20th. Two Pigeon's nests with two eggs each have been found. Feb. 22nd. Twelve Mute Swans were seen on a pond at Bebside. Feb. 27th. About a dozen Mute Swans and two Whooper Swans were on a pond near Seghill. Mar. 9th. During the Winter all the nests in Tynemouth School Rookery were blown down, but one is well under construction now. Mar. 14th. A House Sparrow's nest has been found with one egg in it at Tynemouth. Mar. -17th. I saw many species of birds whilst out for a cycle ride to-day. These included—Rock Dove, Pied Wagtail, Kestrels, Ring Ousel, Chiffchaff, Whitethrojit, and less important ones—Chaffinch, Greenfinch, Mallards, Bluetits, and members of the Crow family. A Heron's nest has been found with three eggs. Mar. 19th. A Woodpigeon's nest was found with two eggs. Mar. 20th. Flocks of Eider-Ducks have been seen lately on the shore near Cullercoats. I hope you will pass on to me anything of interest concerning birds. J.A.W., Form IV. THE

'BUS S T R I K E

When on Monday I was going to school, The buses had stopped; I did feel a fool. I learned soon afterwards that there was a strike, So I came four miles upon my bike. Some people have such nerve you know! —I doubt it not you've found it so— I hung on a lorry. But I did feel sorry For I buried my nose in the road. I got to school—without my bike— And afterwards I resolved to hike. W.T., Form III.


THE

SLAUGHTER

While the seal-herds were swimming north The seal poachers would go forth To the place where the seals would rest. Then all would land And, club in hand, Would start to slaughter the best. We should hear no cry, But they'd no more lie In the sun by the wild, wild sea.

THE

M.G.S., IIa.

CLIMAX

A cool breeze had replaced the relentless heat which had already garnished the carpet of green turf to a dirty yellow in the past few days. Intent on my thoughts 1 failed to observe a man approaching. However I was quickly aroused by a loud roaring which echoed and re-echoed in my head jarring all my thoughts and meditation. All too late I saw the danger. Who was this stranger? What did he want? Was he friend or foe? I was quickly reconciled on the last query. For as he approached I glanced into his cold blue eyes: they gleamed like some unnatural fire, no mercy was to be there. His face was twisted into a grotesque Jeer which seemed to represent fully the rapture of triumph. His teeth were bared like a mighty beast surveying his helpless prey. Faster and faster he sped towards me. Cold beads of perspiration began to trickle down my back. I prepared for the worst. All hopes of rescue had vanished. I was alone, afraid and helpless. The dull roar rose to a gradual crescendo jarring again and again my already frayed nerves. Nearer and still nearer he approached, until his hot breath seemed to fan against my face sending a feverish sickness through my trembling limbs. He stopped a short distance in front of me and prepared for the kill. Would help come? With these thoughts racing through my mind I tried to shout for aid. My tongue however refused to obey the command. Only in my brain could my words be heard. The stranger prepared to shoot. " Don't shoot! Give me a chance!" I tried to say but I remained mute. In the brief second while the stranger hesitated, a lifetime seemed to slip away. He sensed my thoughts and quickly with a snarl of triumph fired.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;-Crack! At the same time I leapt forward and fell with a groan in a huddled heap. The end had come.â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The ball glanced off the post and shot in*o the net. The Rovers' centre-forward had scored the first goal in the cup final S.A.E., V. THE

BRITISH

NAVY

Britain's got a Navy, A Navy that's quite true, I love to sit and watch, The men in Navy Blue. They're sailing over water, They're sailing over sea, They're sailing off to other 'lands. To bring things back for me. J.B.P., Form I.


" MY

FIRST

VOYAGE "

It was a stentorian voice echoing across the landscape which first attracted our attention. George and I, with thoughts of lire or robbery in our minds wandered over to the focal point, from which the foghorn-like voice was proceeding. The owner of the abnormally loud vocal chords was waving his arms wildly and trying to inform his sarcastic audience of the virtues of a sea voyage on a particularly smoky and grimy little steamer which lay moored to the quay behind him. The idea appealed to George, and I, having nothing better to suggest, readily agreed. After paying what seemed an exorbitant sum of money, we clambered aboard and surveyed, with a slight distaste the decks of the steamer on which I was to make my first sea voyage. The ship may have been clean and new once upon a time, but it was well past its prime now. The decks were a shambles and I am still not sure what kept the ship from foundering beneath us. It would have done credit to Heath Robinson; but it was too late to withdraw now as the quay was slipping behind us. A terrible aroma, which poured from the ship's single, stumpy, funnel, pervaded the atmosphere, as if tarry rope was being burnt to drive it along. Trying to forget the precariousness of the situation we peered through the oily smoke to take stock of our surroundings. The harbour piers were falling astern and we were surging out into the open sea. When we were on the safety of land, it had looked blue, calm, and serene, with hardly a breath of wind to ripple the surface. Now that we were on the sea it seemed to have changed miraculously, maliciously. It was grey and threatening, a chilly breeze had sprung up and the tops of the waves curled themselves over with foaming cres.s. No longer did the ship glide easily through the water. She Would climb slowly up one side of a towering wall of green, hover for a moment at the crest, then lurch down the other side to hit the bottom with a shuddering " whoof!" A sheet of water would sweep over us and the ship would roll alarmingly. The journey seemed endless, up one side of a wave, then down the other. Occasionally I would glimpse the shore. It looked so far away and yet so solid, compared with the pitching and yawning of the ship. After awhile George disappeared for a short time but soon re-appeared clutching a large, yellow and greasy dough-nut in each hand. He enthusiastically attacked one with relish, at the same time offering one to me, which strangely enough, did not appeal at the moment. So sickly-looking was it that I beat a hasty retreat to the rail and payed homage to Father Neptune in no uncertain manner. Several minutes later I turned round to see George, very red in the face, with tears pouring down his cheeks enjoying a good laugh at my expense. This naturally annoyed me and I started to curse him loudly and heartily, but of no avail; he took not the slightest notice of me. This loud and ungentlemanly speech threatened to be endless, but it was interrupted when George stopped eating; a sickly look came over his face and a few seconds later he made a rush, and draped himself ungracefully over the side. I stopped my flow of abuse and stared at the funny spectacle. After a while I burst out laughing and George, on turning round, seemed to be rather annoyed and began to show his resentment. He refused to see the funny side of the joke, but that is characteristic of George; he is so serious. I glanced up at the tiny bridge in front of the belching smoke stack. There I saw the Captain calmly smoking his pipe, taking not the slightest notice of the huddled groups of suffering passengers lying on the decks.


10 As the ship rolled, an assortment oÂŁ odds and ends rolled from one side of the deck to the other. At each lurch a cluster of buckets, chunks of iron, spars of wood, and an occasional passenger would come bounding down on top of us. At one particularly vicious roll the cook came flying out of the galley, followed by a flock of pots and pans and the best part of the crew's dinner. He landed a cursing and enraged bundle of humanity against the bulwark, to be bombarded with pots and pans. I ceased to count time after that, George and 1 huag around each other's necks making sporadic rushes to the side to stare with yellow faces and rolling eyes at the green water swishing by. I had given up trying to stand upright at all, but on one of my periodic rushes to the rail the fact slowly pierced into my dazed brain that X was not flung unmercifully down again, but managed to keep my feet. I began to take interest and after a few minutes I perceived a blurred outline off thai starboard bow. Staring hard at the outline, it slowly took shape and I realised that it was " terra firma " again. I tried to arouse George out of his stupor, to impart to him the joyous news, but he was so insensible, that he had to be dragged off the ship. Once on land we collapsed on to the nearest seat, exhausted. An hour later we managed to pull ourselves together enough to enable us to stagger home and spend the next few days recovering, and resolving never to go to sea again. D.K.C., Form VIb, " ROBERT

REECE "

Once there was a little boy, whose name was Robert Reece, Arid every Friday afternoon, he had to speak a piece. So many poems thus he learned, that he soon had a store Of recitations in his head, and still kept learning more. And this is what happened; he was called upon one week. And totally forgot the piece he was about to speak. His brain he cudgelled, not a word remained within his head. And so he spoke at random and this is what he said: By Beautiful, my beautiful, that standest proudly by, It was the schooner Hesperus the breaking waves dashed high. Why is the Forum crowded? what means this stir in Rome? Under the spreading chestnut tree, there is no place like home. When freedom from her mountain heights cried " Twinkle little star " Shoot if you must this old grey head, King Henry of Navarre. Roll on thou deep and dark blue crags of Drachan fells, My name is Norval on the Grampian Hills, " Ring out wild bells " If you're waking call me early. To be or not to be The curfw must not ring to-night " Oh Woodmen spare that tree." Charge ! Chester! Charge ! On Stanley! On ! And let who will be clever. The boy s + ood on the burning deck but I go on for ever. His elocution was superb, his voice and gestures fine. His schoolmates all applauded as he finished the last line. It little matters, Robert thought, whatever words I say. So long as I declaim with oratorical display. This is not an original contribution, but it was submitted by S.M.R. of Form V who had it passed on to him by various members of his family. He wonders if anyone knows the name of the writer.


LIBRARY

NOTES

Librarian: H. D.

BRIERLY.

The number of books taken out this term has been the lowest for some time. The Third form again holds the lead for the use of the library, whilst VIb have shown negligible interest. This, however, is a yearly occurrence due mainly to the Examination in July. May I again venture to send out a request for books? It is time the Library was strengthened, and the addition of some new volumes would re-instil u new hie into the Library. A Junior section was opened for Form lib "and Form I, at the beginning of term and since then many books have been taken out. Let us hope that the rest of the School will show as great an interest as these two forms have shown. SCHOOL

OFFICERS

T. A. P. Dunlevy. PREFECTS: T. A. P . Dunlevy, D. N. E. Slack, R. E. Burn, D. P . Coxon, A. G. Lee, D. K. Chick, W. H. Baty, H. D. Brierly, A. R. Proctor. CAPTAIN OF FOOTBALL: D . N . E . Slack. HOUSE CAPTAINS: Whitley Bay, H . D . Brierly. Tynemouth, R. E. Burn. Monkseaton, W. H. Baty. North Shields, T. A. P. Dunlevy. HEAD BOY:


12

SUMMER TERM. SCHOOL NOTES

The Sports were held at the beginning of the term in good weather. There was a very large attendance of parents and friends. A report of the results is given later on in this number. We thank Mr. Welch for his kindness in giving a silver cup for the Mile. We regret the departure of Mr. F. L. Wood after serving on the staff for four years and we thank him for the work he has done here, and wish him happiness in his new post. Mr. Merrick has come temporarily in his place. We celebrated V-E Day in the approved way. Later we had a short commemoration Service in the Hall which was attended by many of the parents. The Rev. L. B. Tirrell took the service and the Headmaster read out the names of those Old Boys who are known to have lost their lives in the war. The list is a grievously heavy one containing the names of 23 Old Boys. We regret that since the last magazine was published we have to add the names of Capt. H. Evans (1928-1936) West Yorks. Regt., Segt. J. Potts (1928-1934) R.A.F., and Capt. N. Wilfon. To the parents and relatives we offer our deepest sympathy in their loss. We regret the departure of Miss A. Elliott from the staff. She has been with us for over two years. We wish her happiness in her retirement. Towards the end of term we had a most interesting lecture by three Members of the Institute of Illuminating Engineers. The subject was the development of interior lighting from the early days down to the present day. The lecture was illustrated by numerous experiments which delighted the audience. SUMMER

TERM,

1945.

Avete

III. T. R. Young. Ila. J. A. Ryan, F. T. Turpie. I. A. Black, R. G. Dodsworth, T. D. Harrison Jun. K. Bowmaker, G. B. Hill, I. W. Wigham, A. Porter. M.P.S. J. R. Brunton, W. H. Jones, B. C. C. Tindale, M. J. Price. J. A. E. Wright. Valete

R. E. Burn, Prefect 1944, Matric. December, 1944. D. P. Coxon. Prefect 1944, Matric. December, 1944. A. G. Lee, Prefect 1944, Metric. July, 1945. W. H. Baty, Prefect, 1944. VIb. C. E. Hedley. D. Lakey, School Cert., July, 1945. I. A. Thompson. A. S. Pearson, C. Taylor. in. R. Browell, J. G. Stark. Ila. D. B. Truscott. lib. D. Lawson, R. S. Matthews. I. R. C. Bishop. C. A. Bishop, H. C. Dixon, K. Kirsebom. Jun. A. R. F. Sinclair. M.P.S. J. E. Hogg, W. M. Norris, H. L. Peers, T. Tutton. Via.


13 PRIZES MATRICULATION:

B. E. Blunt, Distinctions in English, History, Latin, French. D. K. Chick, Distinctions in History and Geography. A. G. Lee, Distinctions in Scripture, History, Latin, Mathematics. SCHOOL

CERTIFICATE:

H. D. Brierly, R. A. Bristow, T. A. P. Dunlevy, N. K. Lakey, A. R. Proctor.

STOCKDALE PRIZE FOR

LANGUAGES:

B. E. Blunt. FORM

PRIZES

V. Lunn, Hunter, Shippen, Wallace. XV. Lafley, Wardhaugh, Wells, McAughtry. III. D. Watt, Reavley, D. Harrison. Ila. Stark, J. Watt, Nichol. lib. W. Bower, Heyes, Fawcett, Dixon. I. Crozier, G. Stephenson, P. Hilton, Porter. Jun. A. Lamb, Whitfield. Jun. B. K. Kirsebom, Gair, D. Everett. 11a. Latin Grammar Prize : Nichol. Monkseaton Preparatory School

Ilia. Illb. II. I. HOUSE

Peers, Tutton. Laidler, Simpson. N. Hedley, Weatherhead. Dobson, E. Evans. SHIELD: Autumn, 1 9 4 4 , North Shields. Spring, 1945, North Shields. Summer, 1945, North Shields. WHITLEY

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES

House Master: Mr. MILLER. House Captain: H. D. BRIERLY. Once again the Summer Term has provided much to do, both in the way of ordinary school work and sporting events, which consisted of the Sports and the House Cricket Matches. We lost the Sports Cup, which had been so well won last year, at the beginning of the term, and were unfortunate enough to be beaten by North Shields against whom we played very well, in the House Cricket Matches. We have been represented on the First XI by Potts and Fen wick, and on the Junior XI by Pearson, A. and Gofton, W. Some reparation has been made however by the excellent standard of work maintained by those members of the House who shine in this sphere. To be congratulated on attaining high positions in their forms are: Crozier, Dixon and Heyes, D. Watt, Reavely and D. Harrison, Lunn and Wallace. We wish Brierly. Proctor, Lakey and Bristow the very best of luck in the results of the School Certificate Examinations which were held as usual, towards the latter part of the Term.


14 MONKSEATON

House Master: Mr.

HOUSE NOTES

House Captain:

MERRICK.

W.

H.

BATY.

This Term we welcome Mr. Merrick as House Master to take the place of Mr. Wood who left us at the end of last term. Once again the Summer Term comes round, and with it, cricket. In this sport our House has been fairly successful. We were represented on the school team by W. H. Baty, Forrest, J. Elliot and W. Elliot, therefore as our House Team had four First XI players on it we had a good chance of winning. After the first of the House Matches were played it was evident we had quite a formidable team, for we beat Tynemouth by more than twenty runs, J. Elliott taking seven wickets for eighteen runs and W. Elliott scoring a valuable thirty eight. In the finals however we were severely handicapped through both the Elliots being ill, consequently we suffered a resounding defeat at the hands of North Shields. Lastly we wish W. H. Baty, Bellerby and Blunt the best of luck in the July Examination and congratulate Rodgers for gaining a high position in his form. N O R T H S H I E L D S HOUSE NOTES

House Master: Mr.

ROBERTS.

*

House Captain:

T . A . DUNLEVY.

This term started with the Sports in which we did very well, gaining an easy victory over Tynemouth by 127 points to 81. Stonehouse and Anderson were largely responsible for this victory, Stonehouse gaining the honour of being Champion of Sports and Anderson being second on points. We were well represented this term on the First XI by D. Anderson (Capt.), Stonehouse (V. Capt.), Joice, Harrison and Laffey. Consequently we won the House Cricket Cup with apparent ease from Monkseaton in the finals, the score being 299 runs to 27. Anderson is to be heartily congratulated on scoring 202 in the match. McGilvray and Tilby represented the House on the " Under 14 " team. We must also congratulate Wells, Wardhaugh, Laffey and Bower on gaining good positions in their forms. Finally we wish T. A. Dunlevy and D. Chick the best of luck in the results of the School Certificate Examination which they took at the end of this term. TYNEMOUTH

House Master: Mr.

WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

R.

E.

BURN.

Participation in the school sports this year proved not to be such a heavy defeat by North Shields as was originally expected. Tynemouth running team won the relay race against the expectation of all and our total score for all the races was 81 points, a close second to North Shields score of 127, compared with the low scores of Whitley Bay and Monkseaton. The Evans brothers receive our heartiest congratulations for their outstanding victories in many races. Tynemouth is represented in the First XI by only one~member, Lee, but we make up for this deficiency by having Evans (Capt.), Towell, Shaw, Mackie, Wakefield and Mayhew in the Under Fourteen Team.


15 We wisli this year's School Certificate Candidates, Coxon, Lee, and Thompson, success in their endeavours and hope that August 20th will be a happy day for all of them. Finally, a word to those of our House who are leaving us this term: we wish them all the best of luck in their present undertakings and happiness in the future. THE

SPORTS

The Sports were held on May 12th, on the Preston Road Ground before a large gathering. Mr. Welch presented the prizes. The results were notable for the personal success of Stonehouse who won seven out of eight events, including Mr. Welch's Cup for the Mile. Results

Long Jump (over 14): 1, Stonehouse; 2, Anderson, D.; 3, Lee, A. Long Jump (11-14): 1, Towell; 2, Taylor, C., 3, Evans, J. Long Jump (under 11): 1, Evans, C.; 2, Edminson; 3, Peel. Cricket Ball: 1, Stonehouse; 2, Evans, J.; 3, Anderson, D. High Jump (11-14): 1, Evans, J.; 2, McGilvray; 3, Harrison, D. High Jump (under 11): 1, Evans, C.; 2, Turnbull, I.; 3, Rhode. Mile (open): 1, Stonehouse; 2, Lakey; 3, Anderson, D. Half-mile (open): 1, Stonehouse; 2, Lee, A.; 3, Anderson, D. 75 yds. (11-14): 1, Taylor, C.; 2, Towell; 3, McGilvray. 75 yds. (under 11): 1, Truscott; 2, Evans, C.; 3, Edminson. 75 yds. (over 6ÂŁ): 1, Everett, C.; 2, Sandon, S., 3, Stephenson, M. 75 yds (under fii): 1, Gair; 2. Peacock; 3, Everett, D. 75 yds. M.P.S. (A): 1, Norris; 2, Jean Matthews; 3, Andrews. 75 yds. M.P.S. (B): 1, Donaldson; ,2, Hall, R; 3, Weatherhead. i 75 yds. M.P.S. (C): 1, Robinson; 2, Moira Gordon; 3, Badsey. 100 yds. (over 14): 1, Stonehouse; 2, Errington; 3, Black. 220 yds. .(under 10): 1, Truscott; 2, Hunter, J.; 3, Checkley. 220 yds. (10-11): 1, Evans, C.; 2, Edminson; 3, Davison, G. High Jump (over 14): 1, Anderson, D.; 2, Wells; 3, Pringle. 220 yds. (13-14): 1, Towell; 2, Tilby; 3, Evans, J. 220 yds. (12-13): 1, Taylor, C.; 2, Meredith; 3, Hedley, W. ' 220 yds. (11-12): 1, Watt, J.; 2, Porter, J. C.; 3, Taylor, D. Quarter-mile (open): 1, Stonehouse; 2, Lee, A.; 3, Anderson. D. Half-mile (junior): 1, Evans, J.; 2. Mackie; 3, Gofton. 220 yds. (i4-15): 1, Greener; 2, Wood, J.; 3, Lunn. 220 yds. (15-16): 1, Errington; 2, Lee, A.; 3. Laffey. 220 yds. (over 16): 1, Stonehouse; 2, Anderson, D.; 3, Wells. Handicap (under 12): 1, Evans, C.; 2, Nicholson; 3, Crawshaw. Handicap (over 12): 1, Evans, J.; 2, Pringle; 3, Harrison, D. House Relay: 1, Tynemouth; 2, North Shields. Sports Champion Middle Cup Junior Cup House Cup

-

-

-

-

-

NATURE

Stonehouse (North Shields) Evans, J. (Tynemouth). Evans, C. (Tynemouth). North Shields. NOTES

Birdnesting seems to be taking hold of both young and old in the school, so I am offering a little advice which I hope will prove useful to beginners.


16 Try to get to know the birds by both sight and sound. (A good book, such as " A Birdoook for the Pocket," by Kdmund Sanders at 1U/6, or " A J^ocicet Book of British Birds," 3/6, will help you in tnis matter.) Do not take more than one egg as a rule, and always leave at least three. If the eggs are cold, it does not always mean they are deserted, 'the bird does not begin to sit until tne complete clutch ot eggs has been laid. Try to upset tlie Dirds as little as possible, lor tney are afraid of you to start witn, so do not make matters worse. Finally try not to leave traces of your hunting, for you do not want to help other people find " your " nests. I shall always be pleased to try to help you if you get into any difficulties about identifying Dirds, or eggs. Here are my chief observations for this term: March 26th. The Rookery near Tynemouth School has fourteen nests up to now, several of which have sitting birds. March 27th I found three nests of the thrush or blackbird type at Seaton Delaval. 1 saw .two magpies in a field. April 2nd. I saw five redshanks in a field near a marsh. April 6th. There were twenty-one swans on Bebside Pond, and several Wnooper, perhaps preparing for migration. April Sih. I saw a large flock of curlews flying high over Horton Church in a V formation. April 17th. A tree creeper was seen creeping industriously round a tree at Mitford. The next day a sandpiper was seen flying low over the Wansbeck at Mitford on Aprii 24tn. A woodlark's nest was found in a field containing three eggs. May 1st. Five eggs were found in a chaffinch's nest at Tynemouth. May 9th. I found a reed bunting's nest with three eggs at Seaton Delaval. Several other nests of this species were found a few days later. A ramble down the River Blyth on May 9th proved very interesting. There were twenty-six swans on the river and among birds identified was a sedge warbler. Up to this date, sixty-four different species of birds have been identified this year. Crossing the Wansbeck on May 21st, I noticed a swan nesting on an island. July 4th. A thrush's nest was found containing three eggs. A willow warbler's nest, now containing six eggs, was found nearby. July 12th. To my great surprise I found a lesser redpoll's nest containing five eggs. The diameter of the nest is no more than one and a half inches. It is made of fine roots and well lined with white feathers. The eggs hatched the next day. Here is an interesting study of a house sparrow's nest. The nest found in a disused pipe, was being built on April 9th. An egg was laid on the 21st and four days later the house sparrow was sitting on four eggs. Young ones were heard on May 6tli, and these fledged about May 20th. On July 10th another egg was laid. An investigation on July 13th showed the three eggs to be pure white, rather unusual. J.A.W. IV. LIBRARY

NOTES

The clatter of typerwiter, innumerable persons rushing about, compiling essays, making out House Notes and other items of school interest for the Magazine, have caused the most excitement in the Library this term.


17 ' The School Certificate Examination, not to mention the examinations of tfie lower torms, seems to have left people lutle time to read Dooics, and consequently tne LiDrary nas been rareiy visited.

"This, however, is to be expected and, in fact, is a boon to the Librarians who have a lign^er tasH in cneciang and re-arrangmg tne books. We thank those people wno have assisted us in this respect and hope that next term the .Laorary will be more frequently visited and the snelves filled with new books. Librarian. H.D.B. C R I C K E T â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1 9 4 5 SEASON

We have had another poor season as far as winning school matches is concerned. Both in the f irst XI and in the Junior learn batting has been tne cnief weakness. The bowling and fielding on the whole have been good. The majority of the members of both teams do not seem to realise tne importance of defending their wicket by playing a straight bat to a straight ball, and of watching the ball carefully right on to the bat. Too many prefer to continue in their bad habits from game to game instead of taking the trouble to try and eradicate some of them. The First XI has been a particularly young side this term and I' hope the majority of them will be available 'for next year. There is quite a lot of promising talent in the Junior team so I look forward hopefully to a much more successful season next year. Before closing I feel that particular mention should be made of Anderson's feat in making 202 in the House Match for North Shields against Monkseaton, probaDly a record score for House Matches. Apart from school matches three very enjoyable afternoon games were played against the R.A. at the Castle. The fixture against the Old Boys in Race Week was renewed this year. The following is a summary of the match. Old

J. A. Jackson P. L. Wight J. G. Hunter A.McCaw E. N. Larke L. Baston W. Campbell N. Lee R. Elliott A. I. Welch R. Clark D. Slack Extras

... ... ...

... ...

Boys

... ... ... ... ... ... ...

5 4 0 0 19 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 2

School

W. Baty 5 J. Elliot 1 W. Elliot 2 D. Anderson, not out 57 A. Stonehouse ... 13 Lafifey 0 Joice 8 Forrest, not out 2 A. Lee, Towell Fen wick, Evans, J., did not bat. Extras 3 For 6 (declared)

!) 1

37 Anderson 5 for 16; Elliot J., 5 for 21. After tea the Old Boys batted again and made 93 for 6 before stumps had to be drawn. House Matches

The first round of the house matches was played on June 14th. Monkseaton beat Tynemouth by 4 wickets, Elliot, W. making 38 and Elliot, J.


18 taking 7 wickets for 18 runs for Monkseaton. In the Whitley Bay v. North Shields game Whitley Bay made 56, thanks to some hard hitting by Proctor and some excitement ensued wtjen the first three wickets of North Shields went down to Potts for only one run. Anderson and Stonehouse. however, knocked off the runs without being separated. The final round was started on July 12th. Baty, W. won the toss and put North Shields in. They batted all the afternoon, Anderson making the remarkable score of 202, and the whole side making 299 all out. Some of the spectators, including two lady members of the staff, had narrow escapes from some of the 29 boundaries (including 6 sixes) hit by Anderson. The match was finished on the 18th, when Monkseaton were all out for 27 in less than an hour. First

XI

Characters

D. ANDERSON, Captain; Colours 1944-45 : He has captained the First XI well and made as much use as he could of the somewhat limited talent he had at his disposal. His batting, bowling and fielding have all been an excellent inspiration to the rest of the team. He is a fast bowler with an easy action and can bowl a useful leg break at times. He is a stylish bat who can hit the loose balls hard and his fielding, especially in the slips, is often brilliant. STONEHOUSE, V. Captain, Colours 1944-45: Has kept the wicket very well for the school eleven, and has not let many chances pass by him. He can hit when set, but, he must learn to keep a straight bat when playing the ball. When fielding he is always alert and has a good throw-in. ELLIOTT, J. : A very good slow spin bowler, who flights the ball very cleverly and causes the batsman a great deal of trouble. His fielding is good and his batting is improving. ELLIOTT, W. : Has proved himself one of the best batsmen of the team. At cover point his fielding has been of a high standard. BATY, W . : Quite a sound batsman. He plays a number of attractive strokes, but his runs come very slowly due to the fact that he is always playing defensively. A good opening bat for tiring the bowlers. He is also a very good fielder at point. LEE, A. : Is inclined to be erratic when bowling, therefore his length suffers a great deal. Quite fast at times. With the bat he would do better if he used more footwork in making his strokes. LAFFEY : A useful change bowler, who mixes the slow leg break and the fast ball. His batting has been a disappointment this season. JOICE. Still has a habit of just swinging his bat, and hoping for the best. Several times catches have been kncicked up this way. Has fielded well at short leg. FORREST'. Is inclined to draw away to leg, which leaves his wickets unguarded. He has fielded extremely well. HARRISON. M . : Has not had much luck this season with the bat. Seems very slow in thinking about which stroke to make. His fielding could improve. FENWICK : A good reserve wicket-keeper who can be of useful service when he tries hard. Played well for the Junior team before coming into the Senior side. POTTS : Should develop into a very fine bowler. He keeps a eood length and has a free and easy action. Is always on the alert when fielding.


19 WANDERERS

I deplore people who wander aimlessly about with no set purpose in view, 'lney have a decided effect on a person's morale, and are most irritating when one is trying to concentrate. The chief offender that I know is the dog. He wanders about on rainy days making little whines now and then, that would completely shatter the complacency of the mildest person. It is a rainy day, and he knows he cannot go out, so he deliberately sets out to plague the household. I make a move towards the cupboard in the kitchen and instantly the dog springs up, ears alert, head cocked on one side, expecting his leash to be taken down from the hook. When he finds out that the unhooking of the leash is not the purpose of my journey 1 have to watch him because his temper is such, and his teeth are so strong that some priceless article, perhaps cherished for years, will be utterly and ruthlessly destroyed. Just when I am settled in an armchair he will be up again wanting to be let out. into the garden. I let him out and no sooner is he out of the scullery door, than he is digging for a rather doubtful looking bone in father's prize flower bed— if it can be called that after its present treatment. Then the. wrath and ire of the head of the household descends upon him and all is quiet—for a short while. Quite a horror you will agree; but to look at him you would believe that butter would not melt in his mouth. Everybody who meets him will say, " O h , what an intelligent looking beast." Sometimes I disllusion them, but more often than not I let them go on with their thoughts. His stomach must be like an auction room; for, amongst his achievements in the realm of eating, he has devoured coke, coal and linoleum; chewed rugs and many other objects that are too numerous to list. But wandering is his chief fault. He knows he will be taken out, and if, for any reason, no one has any time to give him his customary run, then life is just not worth living. Sunday morning is the worst time, for he knows he is going out and nothing will induce him to be settled. He has, however, a rather mistaken idea about the time and is out and about as soon as the household has arisen. The Sunday walk usually settles him for the day, and little trouble is caused when he comes back. I sometimes think that it is worth while to take him out as soon as the symptoms of wandering start; for some small degree of rest and quietness can be obtained for the remaining part of the day, after he has had his walk. You will think when reading this that my dog has very few good points and is nothing but an unending source of trouble—perhaps you are right—but everyone in our house is now used to it—more or less—and on rainy days we just sit back in our chairs, and resign ourselves to our ultimate fate. H.D.B. VIb. WOOD AFTER

RAIN

The sudden burst of sunshine, filtering through the fresh green foliage overhead, pronounced the end of the shower. The steady pit pit of the rain rolling off the'higher branches on to the leafy boughs below, seemed to blend with the merry trickling of the brook. Songs of the thrushes, blackbirds and finches resounded from every part of the wood, tiny rabbits ventured out from their burrows, and with their tails bobbing up and down, went scampering into wet, luscious


20 grass. The sun shone down on to the patch of green into which the rabbits had vanished, and it was soon quite dry, so I sat down and gazed through the leafy branches at the blue sky and the enormous billowing clouds, like the walls of great, white castles. I was startled a little later by a small grass snake, which, still wet, shone and twinkled in the sunshine. It coiled up right in the middle of the sunlit patch and seemed to go to sleep. I watched it for awhile and it sooned turned to a muddy brown colour as the rain dried on its skin. I then thought that rain could make ugly things beautiful, and beautiful things still more beautiful. C.P.D., IV. FIND

THE

BIRD

There is the name of a bird concealed in each of the following sentences. Answer on page 31. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

The sea gleamed in the morning sun. I saw her on the bus yesterday morning. This wall owned by Farmer Giles is two hundred years old. Take your hat off in church. By this path rush to the hospital. He was a good athlete: he could spar, row and swim very well. This is a similar kind of book to that one. This is not it. It is strange how luck changes. I ate all the cakes. THRILLER

I charged along at full speed. A few yards and I should be safe. All around me men waited for me to make one slip and they would be on me. Not far now. I ducked. Something whistled past me. I made a dive for the white line. I was safe. I had scored a run. G.J.S., IV. SWIMMING

A sunny day and the Junior School, Troops merrily down to the swimming pool; A rush to change with noise and clatter. Knees that shake and teeth that chatter. Then to the edge and one, quite bold, Cries, " Let's get in, it's not so coldT" So with gasping and splashing, in we tumble, It's better than maths; so we have no grumble. W.S.D.,

lib


21 AN

ENGLISH GENTLEMAN

There is an old Gentleman Of world-wide fame, Who smokes a cigar And made his name. To conquer the Hun He pledged his word. As be smoked and schemed, And made himself heard. The Army, Navy and Air Force too Worked with a will to pull this through: They worked and sweated but not in vain, And beat the Jerry again and again. The people followed In their leader's wake, Suffering softly For what was at stake. Unconditional Surrender He promised the Hun, And to-day that surrender Has surely come. We should go down On our knees and pray That this breed with us Will always stay. We thank Mr. Churchill, Who has led the way Through terrors and blackouts To the light of day. D.B.A., Ila. SCHOOL

OFFICERS

T. A. P. Dunlevy. PREFECTS: T. A. P . Dunlevy, R. E. Burn, D. P. Coxon, A. G. Lee, D. K. Chick, H. D. Brierly, A. R. Proctor, W. H. Baty. CAPTAIN OF CRICKET: D . W . Anderson. HOUSE CAPTAINS: Whitley Bay, H . D . Brierly. Tynemouth, R. E. Burn! Monkseaton, W. H. Baty. North Shields, T. A. P. Dunlevy. HEAD BOY:


22

AUTUMN

TERM.

SCHOOL NOTES

Towards the end of the term we welcomed back Mr. Bates and Mr. Fullanon from their service in the Army. We hope to have Mr. Gentle with us again very soon. We were glad to have the services of Mrs. Hobbis again but regret that she had to undergo an operation before the end of term. We wish her a speedy recovery. The following were elected Prefects this term: B. E. Blunt, D. R. Lunn, M. Harrison, A. H. Stonehouse, J. A. Wells. / 4 / 5 / 6 was collected for the Christmas Fund of the Mission to Seamen. Part of this sum was the result of film shows given by Hichol. Many thanks. During the year /34/1/6 was sent to Dr. Barnado's Homes by the members of the Young Helpers' League. The number of boys this term was 310. A book of poems just published by D. J. Thompson (1928-1936) has been very well reviewed. The title is " Spring Sacrifice " published by John Lane, Bodley Head. Thompson has been serving in Egypt, Palestine, Syria, Iraq, India and Burma. In the December School Certificate, Bristow, Brierly, Dunlevy T., Lakey and Proctor A., all obtained the credits needed to make up matriculations. O L D BOYS' N E W S

We Congratulate the following on their examination success:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; B.Sc., Civil Engineering: A. S. Angus (1928-1937). B.D.S.: R. Adams (1932-1939). A. McCaw (1930-1938). M.B., B.S.: V. F. Harrison (1933-1940), C. B. S. Schofield (1931-1940), D. S. Thompson (1930-1937). Inter B.Sc.: O . P . Casey (1942-1944). 1st year B.Sc., Agriculture: D. A. Stephenson (193(5-1944). Law Prelim.: J. C. Barclay (1933-1944), N. Calvert (1936-1944). Economics Tripos Pt. 1: A. I. Welch (1940-1944). A U T U M N T E R M , 1945

V. III. Ila. lib.

Avete

D. I. Brennan. K. R. Dodsworth, M. H. Say, J. A. Urwin, G. E. Wakefield. G. B. Alexander, D. J. Curry, P. J. Richardson, A. S. Carrick, D. J.' Lavelle, G. C. Rainey, J. D. Smiles, P. Wigham. I. D. W. D. Caldwell, M. P. Dunlevy, D. J. B. Dunn, J. S. Graham, R. M. Hardie, J. A. McKinnell, G. R. Scott, G. C. Stobbs, I. W. Sutherland, T. H. Tait, E. G. Whitaker, J. M. Yarham, ]. A. S. Wilson. Jun. J. H. Burn, R. D. Elliott, D. Hobson, G. Hobson, M. O. C. Joy, C- M. Leighton, T. M. Oliver, D. O. Paisley, J. M. Paisley, W. R. Sanderson J. S. Thompson. M.P.S. R. C. Boyle, P. Burke, W. C. Craven, T. G. Grant, T. F. Harbottle, C. A. Lewis, J. C. Parr, R. C. Steel, R. F. Wharton, F. E. Worsley.


23 Valet*

VIb.

D. D. B. H. A. V. J. IV. T. Ila. F. Jun. B. M.P.S. H.

K. Chick, Prefect 1944, Matric 1945, XV 1943/4/6. W. Anderson, Prefect 1945, XI 1944/45, XV 1944/5. L. Bellerby. D. Brierly, Prefect 1944, S. Cert 1945, Matric." 1945. R. Proctor, Prefect 1944, Matric 1945, XV 1945/6. H. Coxon, E. Davison, A. Lowes, F. N. Lowson. F. Potts. T. Turpie. W. Pengelly. Allen, F. Atkinson, G. G. Simpson.

MONKSEATON

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL

NOTES

During the first two terms of the year a great deal of absence through illness curtailed some of our usual activities, necessitating the dropping oi plans for our annual School Concert, greatly to the disappointment of both children and parents. The first week of the Spring Term saw the party which had been postponed from the end of the previous term. The children thoroughlv enjoyed the occasion, and as always, mothers responded magnificently to tne appeal for help with the catering problem. The Summer Term saw the introduction of a regular weekly " Games Afternoon," with the whole school going to a nearby field for organised games. Mr. Miller kindly lent us a set of stumps and bats, so that the older boys were able to play cricket. The enthusiasm with which they greeted this innovation augurs well for their future process at the game. As last year, events for M.P.S. were included in the Annual Sports Day programme, the results being included in the School Sports account Towards the end of the term, the older children spent an afternoon at Cullercoats, visiting the Marine Laboratory, and finishing the day with games and a picnic on the beach. Mrs. Basham, from Dr. Barnado's Homes, paid us a visit early in the Autumn Term, and over twenty children were enrolled as new members of the B.H.L. Our efforts for this cause have met with excellent results this term. The Box Opening yielded approximately £C\ and our special Christmas tree collection, £3/10/0. D. Mertens, a member for more than three years received a Special Service Badge for his individual collection We decided to send our annual collection of toys, books and clothing to the Washington Home. There were sufficient toys to give each off the 116 children in the Home at least one gift. Our Christmas party was held on the last Friday of term in the Royal Hotel. It was a really festive affair, with a visit from Santa Claus, and the " Merry Magician " who entertained the children with conjuring tricks. Our visitors included Mr. and Mrs. Ellison, Mrs. and Miss Miller, Dunlevy and Brierly. Our special thanks are due to the last pair for their assistance. , The last afternoon of term was given over to a performance of. a Nativity Play, another play and a sing-song. The Poppy Day collection amounted to £3/13/0. Thanksgiving Week Savings (target /100) "brought in /126, bringing our total savings in three years to £938. We await the completion of our new school with interest and enthu siasm. Once installed there, we hope to have an " Open Day " for parents. H . G. G


24 N O R T H S H I E L D S HOUSE NOTES

House Master: Mr.

House Captain: T. A.

ROBERTS.

DUNLEVY.

This term has been very quiet as far as house activities are concerned, but we look forward to the House Matches of next term in which we hope we shall be successful. At the beginning of the term we were unfortunate to lose Stonehouse, Wells and Harrison who have been put into other houses. Best wishes and thanks go with them for they have all done a great deal of good work in procuring the Sports and House Cricket Cup for North Shields. We have contributed several members to the First XV this term including Chick, who at first captained the team but has since left, Anderson, D. (Vice-Capt.), Dunlevy, A., Joice, Wardhaugh, Laffey and McGilvray. The following represented the house on the Junior teams: McGilvray, Laffey, Wardhaugn, Dunlevy, C., Hunter. A. N., and Brown, W. Chick is to be congratulated on gaining his Matriculation in July and Dunlevy a School Certificate. Finally we must congratulate Scott, G., and Hunter, A. N., on gaining high positions in their respective forms. WHITLEY

House Master: Mr.

BAY

MILLER.

HOUSE NOTES

House Captain: H.

D.

BRIERLY.

First of all we are very pleased to announce that Brierly, Proctor and Bristow who sat the July examination obtained their School Certificates. They are all trying to get the few extra credits which are needed to get Matriculation, and we wish them the best of luck. The house has been represented on the First XV by r Proctor, Brierly, Lunn and McConway. On the Junior teams we were represented by Gofton, Fenwick, E., and Potts on the Under Fifteen and Meredith, Richardson, D., Harrison D., Willey and Wakefield. Our congratulations go to Lunn, Wallace, Gofton, Reavely, Dixon and Crozier on gaining high positions in their respective forms. MONKSEATON

House Master: Mr.

BATES.

HOUSE NOTES

House Captain:

J. A . WELLS

This term it gives us great pleasure to welcome back Mr. Bates who has been serving in the Forces. Let us hope that by the help of his excellent coaching we may be enabled to do well in the House Matches next term. We must congratulate Blunt on achieving his Matriculation in July and Greener on being awarded his First XV colours. Our hearty congratulations must also go to Brennan and Watt on being top of their forms, and to all the others whq have gained high positions. Our house has been represented on the First XV this term by Greener, Wells, Blunt, Errington and Elliot, J., and on the Under Fourteen by Pearson, D., Brennan, Humble and Turner. This term we welcome Wells as. House Captain. In conclusion we extend our best wishes to those leaving us this term, hoping they will be successful in their future.


TYNEMOUTH

House Master: Mr.

G.

A.

WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain: H.

STONEHOUSE.

This term we welcome Stonehouse as our House Captain and Harrison. M.. as vice-captain. Congratulations to Lee, A., for gaining the best School Certificate of the year: four distinctions and four credits. We wish him further success when he begins his career at King's College. We also congratulate Evans, J., on being chosen to play in a County trial for Under Sixteens and also on gaining his First XV Colours. We have been represented in the First XV this term by Stonehouse (Captain), Evans J., Towell D., Shaw G. and Wakefield J. and on the Junior Team by Evans, J., Shaw, Wakefield, G., Stokoe, Lee, Mayhew, Thompson W., and Evans C. We are pleased to note that Mackie VIb., McAughtry V., Armstrong III., Peel Ila. and Hilton P. in lib. have all gained high positions in their respective forms. We wish all the members of our house a Merry Christmas and Prosperous New Year in school and in the playing field. SENIOR

RUGBYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;AUTUMN

TERM

This term has seen a much higher standard of play than last season. The winning of several matches has created greater enthusiasm, but the interest shown by the rest of the school has ."Been lacking judging by the few spectators at matches on Saturday mornings. Younger boys do not seem to realise how much they can learn by watching the older boys play. In both the Ist XV and Under 16 games the forwards have been outstanding and have rather overshadowed the backs. In many of the games this was due partly to the wet conditions of ground and ball, but the forwards were often loth to heel, especially from loose scrums and so the backs were starved. The tackling and falling on the ball have in general been good. Stonehouse, the Captain and Anderson, the Vice-Captain have each set a fine example of hard and low tackling and amongst a good set of forwards Greener and Evans J. have been outstanding in this respect. The Under 16 have won two of the three matches played, their best performance being the defeat of the R.G.S. Under 16 on their own ground. Greener has captained the team well and he, Evans J., Wardhaugh, Joice and Lunn have been the best of a lively pack. McGilvray has been the most outstanding of the backs. Greener, Evans J., Wardhaugh, Errington, Joice, McGilvray are to be congratulated on playing in the Under 16 County Trial and Stonehouse, Anderson and Proctor in the Senior Schoolboy Trial. Anderson has been selected to play full-back for the Northumberland Schoolboys against Durham Schoolboys, and Stonehouse has been picked as first reserve for wing-three-quarter. Two very enjoyable games have also been played against Rockcliff R.U.F.C. In the first game the side was strengthened by the inclusion of 5 Old Boys and in the second by including Mr. Unsworth and 5 Old Boys. Both games were won by the school side. I have to thank Mr. Unsworth for the great help he has given me in running the Rugger this term; this and the very welcome return of Mr. Bates late in the term have had a marked effect on the all-round improvement this term. J.M.M.


JUNIOR

RUGBY

, The " Under 15 " have unfortunately had only two matches, both against R.G.S., winning tne home game and losing the other. In both matcnes tney played very well as a team and with more practice together they should maice a very good side. Fenwick at full-bacK was botn safe and enterprising; Potts at scrum-half was untiring and fearless, and of a good pace. Evans J., the captain, was outstanding, while Wardhaugh, McAughtrey and McGilvray played exceptionally well. The " Under 14 " was handicapped by all its members being small and have had a very disappointing season. They lost all four matches, largely owing to the weaKness in defence. However in the last match against Dame Allan's their form was much more encouraging. Thompson at full-back was always fearless in falling on the ball, but his tackling was poor. Wakefield J., the Captain, is still young and should turn into a polished centre-three-quarters or fly-half. Richardson D., improved immensely and runs straight and hard and his defence is good. Of the forwards, Willey was excellent in defence, and the two smallest players on the side Evans C. F., and Urwin were both quite fearless and show great promise. A V I S I T TO T H E B A L L E T ^

One evening during October the Headmaster invited the Prefects to accompany him to see tne Sadler's Weils Ballet at the Theatre Royal. On that evening the Ballet Company were performing " Coppelia." We all arrived in good time and took our seats in the stalls, l h e theatre was filled to capacity. As none of us had ever before seen Ballet we awaited the rise of the curtain with interest and expectation. We all enjoyed the performance very much indeed and we were particularly impressed by the graceful and faultless dancing of Margot Fontein in the role of Swanilda. She was well supported by Alexis Rassine as Franz and by Mavis Spence in the title role, Gordon Hamilton as Coppelius, the toy-maker, provided much humourous relief with his small mincing steps which drew rounds of applause and laughter. Finally the Prefects take this opportunity to extend their grateful thanks and appreciation to the Headmaster for his kindness in introducing them to yet another form of Art. T.A.P.D. BIRD

NOTES

This year has proved most interesting for bird observation. 1 have seen, up to the end of November, eighty-one different species. On July 25th, I saw a female, and several young Wheatears near Bebside. Shortly afterwards I saw the male, carrying food, flying towards them. Whilst coming from King's Cross to Newcastle in the train on August 10th, I was fortunate enough to identify a Merlin. I also saw a Cuckoo, Swan, Partridges and a good number of others. On August 11th I was at a very beautiful little place near Darlington, and saw many species of birds. To my great delight a majestic Peregrine Falcon circled above me, and later I saw a Sparrow Hawk.


27 Taking a walk along the banks of the River Allan at Dunblane, on the 22nd of August, I saw several Grey Wagtails among oiany Pied Wagtails, on the docks. As I expected I also perceived the res..less Dipper. The next day, I saw the following birds in a very short time at a delightful little village called Inchture (Scotland):â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Robin, Whitethroat, Spotted Flycatcher, Blackcaps, Red Wagtails, Coal Tits and a Wren. These birds were in a small garden near the road. whom I spoke, told me he had seen many different kinds of birds on the loch, at various times. These included Golden Eagles, White Tailed or Sea Eagles, a Buzzard, Ravens, Gooseanders, Mergansers and Grey Lag Geese. Some thirty Swans were seen on the Tweed at Berwick, as I passed on August 30th. I also saw six gannets on a pond near Tweedsmouth. On the first of September, I Saw a flock of Tits and Chaffinches, in some trees at Meldon Bridge. Early in the morning of the 15th of September a flock of some hundred Swallows were seen on telegraph wires near Longframlington. - There were about eighty Mallards in two flocks on the Wansbeck at Morpeth on October 27 th. I also saw some skilful maneouvring from Blackheaded Gulls. On November 5th I set up a new bird-table at 9.40 a.m., which was inspected by a pair of Blue Tits a quarter of an hour later. I saw a bird on the 17th of November at Bebside Pond, which I am sure could only have been a " Vulture of the Sea "â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a Great Blackheaded Gull. J.A.W., Form V. W H A T ! NO MORNING TEA?

With these words on my lips, I unwrapped myself from my three G.S. blankets down in Devon, after that first uncomfortable night in the army way back in 1940, a civilian turned soldier. With these words on my lips, I raised myself from my snug couch at Tynemouth School in November, 1945, a soldier turned civilian. In the army of 1940 private soldiers in the prone position were not served with refreshment: in " civvy street " in 1945 the Ministry of Labour and the Ministry of Food are to blame. But in 1941 Nobby Clarke, a little cockney from Chiswick was allotted to me and henceforth brought the steaming brew: perhaps in 1946 the Ministry of Labour and the Ministry of Food will have changed heart. Tynemouth School of 1945 has changed: a sea of new faces at my first school prayers, when sheeplike, clad in a frayed gown and an elegant " demob " suit, I sidled nervously into the school hall. " Yes! there are Brierly and Mackie and Miller, but who are all the ladies? Oh yes! of course! they have been holding the fort, haven't they?" We sang a hymn, the headmaster led the prayers, a prefect read the lesson, we sang the 23rd psalm. Perhaps it has not changed so much after all! rugger in


28 the afternoon at Percy Park, a little game and a big oneâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the same old black mud! Saturday morning but no school! Pity! we shall miss the crowded touchline with the cry of " Come on school." A week or two sped byâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;then examinations looming ever nearer. Onefinger exercises on the type-writer, a few turn's of the duplicator and xhe papers are ready! Marxs 10 acid up, reports to prepare, end-of-term parties, break-up on the final day. twenty-one days leave! No! Three weeks holiday! We're sorry but the school does not issue a free travel warrant. " Goodbye, Sergeanc-Major! I'm sorry! Goodbye Mr. " No! It hasn't changed very much or if it has, Plus fa cnange, plus c'est la meme chose. B. T O O C L E V E R -BY H A L F

Tommy and Johnny were boys at school, Tommy was clever, but Johnny a fool. Tommy at lessons was snarp and bright, Johnny could never do anything right. Genius often is known to fail; Tommy turned forger, and went to jail: Johnny, though slow as he well could be, Plodded away and became an M.P. A.H., Form III. NATURE

Nature forth comes in Summer sweet; The Sun shines down as if to greet Her in her robes so bright, And bathes her in his golden light.

P.R.H., lib.

S H A K E S P E A R E O N T H E SCHOOL Before " 2nd " bell:

" What means this scene of rude impatience." (Richard III)

An Anxious Moment in Form:

': pray you keep seat; The fit is momentary; upon a thought He woke up with a sleepy head,

(Macbeth)

Thoughts of the Staff:

" How blessed are we that are not simple men." (Trolius and Cressida)

Defence in the Study:

" By innocence I swear, and by my youth, I have one heart, one bosom and one truth." (Twelfth Night)

During the Physics Lesson:

" This fellow is wise enough to play the fool; And to do that well craves a kind of wit: He must observe their mood on whom he jests, The quality of persons and the time." (Twelfth Night)

H.D.B


29 SCHOOLBOYS SCRAMBLE

Johnny one night went late to bed. He woke up with a sleepy head, " Johnny you are late," said Mother And up jumped Johnny full of bother, Down the stairs he came tumbling And to his breakfast he ran grumbling, The toast in two he did cleave For be had very soon to leave, Down the doorstep he did leap And to the bottom fell in a heap. His satchel on his back was swinging As he heard the school bell ringing, Into his class he did arrive And to his desk made one great dive, Just as the roll was being read out Flustered he answered with a mighty shout, " Here Sir!" W.C., Form III. A RAMBLE

The golden fingers of the rising sun crept) slowly over the Eastern horizon, giving promise of a fine day. From the top branches of an old oak tree the song of a cock blackbird piped forth to greet the dawn, and a skylark sprinkled the earth with her fluent, unpremeditated art. I arose, and having had breakfast, collected my binoculars and notebook and went! out to enjoy a few hours watching my feathered friends, the birds. It was my first visit to this part of the country and I intended to make the most of it. My idea for this first walk was to follow the river, which, I had been told, made a wide detour of the little village, in the shape of a huge horse-shoe. I followed the road.for a short way, and then cut ofi down a. little path towards the river. From the hedge-rows all around gushed out the doleful cries of the Yellow Hammers, the hurried song of Whitethroats, the trilling of Hedge Sparrows and the long drawn-out " pee-ow " of mating Greenfinches. Up in the tree tops Blackbirds, Thrushes, Robins and Chaffinches mingled their songs, while the fine ringing animated song of a Black Cap reached my ears from a distant spray. As some of the birds saw man (their most hated enemy) approaching, their delightful notes changed to calls of fear and alarm. The nearby Blackbirds cocked their tails, and departed with their characteristic cackling cry; the Chaffinches yelled their " pink pink " and the Black Cap replied, " tack tack." I walked on and soon the morning chorus struck up again. When I reached the river I stopped to take a look ahead. Over in the distance the bluey-grey hills made the background, and between them and the twisting river were ploughed fields and flower spangled green meadows, lying on little hillocks. Trees were dotted here and there, and herds of cattle and sheep were scattered about, grazing peacefully on the gentle slopes. The sun smiled down on the pleasant scene. In the ploughed fields the green plovers were twisting and diving in a wild zigzagging frenzy, crying " pees-weep-weep-weep " and pulling out of their dives by a swift turn just as they seemed they would dash themselves to pieces.


30

When 1 had gone a short way along one of the banks, I saw a sprightly little bird in mid stream. He was for ever bowing and jerking his tail, running and scrambling, swimming and diving, in an endless hunt for aquatic insects. I watched this restless bird some timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;he took no notice of meâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and then walked on, leaving the dipper still bowing and diving, running and swimming, scrambling and jerking his tail, just ahead of me was a pair of Pied Wagtails. These birds were constantly wagging their tails up and down. From all sides came the strident " caw " of rooks, as they searched for twigs, and carried them into a small plantation. As I wandered round a corner in the river, I was startled by a harsh, loud " frank," as a Heron flapped into the air. Suddenly it vomited a half-digested fish, as Herons sometimes do when they are startled, loud " frank ", as a Heron flapped into the air. Suddenly it vomited a half-digested fish, as Herons sometimes do when they are startled. Before I had finished my ramble, I saw many interesting sights, and a great number of birds, including a Barred Woodpecker, and a Pied Flycatcher. I returned to my Aunt's house very pleaesd with my first walk. Needless to say I went a different walk at every opportunity, and when my holiday came to an end, I returned home after a very enjoyable holiday. It was certainly a grand place for bird-life! J.A.W. Form V. RIVER

Glinting and gleaming, Dancing and Dreaming With swirling sparkle and shiver. Chuckling and chasing Roaring and racing, With ripple and rush went River.

G.W.F.

Ila.

D I C T I O N A R I E S HO!

(With acknowledgments to " A Concise English Course.") 1 stood before a shop-window which was hung with scintillating raiments. Their brightness made me feel like a human derelict and I tapped my pedal extremity in melancholy musing. I could see the tailor snipping away with glittering forfex, his olfacti ry organ scarce raised above his indoor activity. It was highly expedient that I should array myself thus in case I should be obliged to adopt a conciliatory attitude to my-friends. I was, however, deluded by an unforseen contingency â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the peremptory demand of the sartorial artist for monetary payment. However, my abysmal ignorance of pecuniary affairs deterred me from accepting his demands. This was partly due to his repulsive countenance. A.N.H.

Form V.


31 LIBRARY

NOTES

This term has been a busy one and there has been quite a large number of books taken out. No doubt this is due to the long evenings when a book by the fire is very welcome. The fiction section has again attracted the most attention, the emphasis being on the old and battered William books, these in a decrepit state of repair with their much turned leaves only just hanging together! Whilst a fiction book is very enjoyable there are many classical, scientific, travel, biographical and other such books which would afford just as much pleasure if only people would bother to read them. The term ended, as usual, in a frantic rush to finish the routine check-up and once again the library was in order. H.D.B., Librarian. Answers to " Find

1. 4. 7. 10.

Eagle. Finch. Lark. Teal.

the Bird " on page

2. Heron. 5. Thrush. 8. Tit.

20,

3. Swallow. 6. Sparrow. 9. Owl. S.M.R., V.

SCHOOL O F F I C E R S HEAD BOY: T .

A.

P.

Dunlevy.

T. A. P. Dunlevy, B E. Blunt, D. R. Lunn, M. Harrison, D. W. Arfderson, A. H. Stonehouse, H. D. Brferly. A. R. Proctor, T- A. Wells."

PREFECTS:

CAPTAIN OF FOOTBALL : HOUSE CAPTAINS:

Whitley Bay, H . D . Brierly. Tynemouth, H. Stonehouse. Monkseaton, J. A. Wells. North Shields, T. A. P. Dunlevy.


TYNEMOUTH SCHOOL MAGAZINE.

EDITORIAL Our last year's hope t h a t it would be possible to return to the pre-war custom of

having

three editions each year has not y e t been realised.

However, we still live in hope that 1948 will see this happen.

Meanwhile

the number of acceptable contributions is far too small for our requirements.

If we are to have three editions we must have a readier response

to our requests for these original contributions. THE

EDITORS.


2

SPRING

TERM.

SCHOOL NOTES We regret the omission of a welcome to Mr. D. S. Unsworth who joined the staff at the beginning of the A u t u m n Term last year. He came to us after five years of c a p t i v i t y in Germany and has quickly settled down with us. With two Classical members on the staff we look forward to greater successes in Latin and also a continued expansion in the number of boys taking Greek. Miss Baird left us at the end of the term to take up an appointment in Surrey. We are sorry to lose her after her success as Mistress in charge of the Junior School. We wish her happiness in her new post. She has been succeeded by Miss Harrison who has been with us for some time in charge of the English in the Upper school. West House, the former Boarding House, has been converted into flats and is now occupied by members of the staff. The heats for the Sports were held at the end of the term in preparation for the finals next term. The House Football C u p was won by North Shields

Avete Ila. Jun. M.P.S.

J. M. A. M.

G. Gibson. J. Altaian, H. Dale. Fisher, S. B. Forrest, A. L. Jukes, C. R y l e .

V. IV.

J. P. A. H. J. J.

Elliot, W. Elliot, D. Towel!, B. L. Greener ( X V . 1945/6). C .Smith. D. Dodd. Dale, J. E. Turpie. W. Jukes, M. A. L. Jukes, B. H. Mason, J. M. Matthews, D. Mertens, J. G. L. Nicholson, R. F. Wharton.

J.

L.

Gatenby,

J.

W.

Jukes,

Valete

lib. Jun. M.P.S.

WHITLEY House Master :

Mr. MILLER.

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES House Captain :

D. LUNN.

We are pleased to say we won the House Shield last term by a margin of thirty points. Unfortunately we did not do so well in the House Matches, only winning one match. We hope to do much better next year. Only McConway and L u n n have played in the First X V , but we have been well represented by Richardson D . , Wakefield G . , Harrison D. and Meredith on the Under Fourteen Tfcam. We are sorry to have lost our House Captain, H. D. Brierly, who with Proctor and Bristow matriculated last term. All those who have obtained high positions in their forms are to be congratulated. Several of our members have reached the finals for Sports D a v . when it is to be hoped t h a t we shall do better than in the House Matches.


3 TYNEMOUTH

House Master :

Mr. WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House C a p t a i n :

A. STONEHOUSE.

T h e "seven-a-side" House Matches took place this term as usual. We were second, being beaten by North Shields by the narrow margin of two points. The Senior team played very well, winning t w o matches and drawing the other, b u t the second team rather let us down, winning only one match and losing the other two. E v a n s J. must be congratulated on playing " U n d e r 1 6 " against Cumberland " U n d e r 1 6 . "

for

Northumberland

On the First XV we were represented by Stonehouse (Captain), E v a n s J., Towell, Ward, Mackie, M c A u g h t r y and Harrison M., and exceptionally well on the Junior Teams by E v a n s J., Towell, Mackie, M c A u g h t r y , Shaw, Wakefield J., Stokoe, Lee R . , Mayhew, Thompson W. and E v a n s F . Congratulations to all members of the House who have gained high positions. We look forward to the Sports and Cricket next term, in which we hope to do well. We are sorry to say good-bye to Towell who is leaving us this term We wish him the best of luck. MONKSEATON

HOUSE

House Master : Mr. BATES.

NOTES

House Captain :

J. A. WEILS.

Unfortunately, this term we have once more been unlucky in the House Matches. During the course of the Matches several of our players were unable to take part owing to illness. We are glad to say t h a t Errington, who was injured in an a w a y match against Dame Allen's, has now recovered. We^ congratulate Brennan and the W a t t brothers on being top of their forms, and all others who have gained high positions. We wish the very best of luck to all those leaving us this term, hoping t h a t t h e y will be successful in their careers. We have been represented on the Ist XV this season by Wells, B l u n t , Hesslegrave, Greener, Elliot J., Pringle, Hardie, Forrest and Reid on several occasions, and in the Under Fourteen by Humble, Brennan, Pearson, Turner, Turnbull and Dodsworth. Finally we congratulate Errington and Greener on being chosen to play in the Northumberland C o u n t y Trials. Unfortunately Errington was unable to play owing to his illness. NORTH

House Master :

SHIELDS

HOUSE

Mr. ROBERTS.

NOTES

House Captain :

T. DUNLEVY.

This term has been a most successful one for House activities. By playing hard the House has once more saved the R u g b y C u p from passing into foreign hands. We have been represented on the First XV by D u n l e v y T . , Joice, W a r d h a u g h and MacGilvray. Shippen has played once or twice and Hunter has played for the Under Sixteen. We have been able to hold our own in the sports this term and a few of our members have qualified to compete on Sports D a y . Hunter is congratulated on winning the L o n g Jump, and Joice on being made a Prefect. We wish examinations.

all

members

SENIOR

of

the

House

RUGBYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;SPRING

good

luck

TERM,

for

next

term's

1946

I hope t h a t soon it will be possible to include in the Magazine and in the local press detailed reports of all First XV matches as we used to do before the war. At present it must suffice to make a few general remarks.

t


4 The long-looked-for improvement in the standard of football did not come until late in the term when we visited H e x h a m Grammar School for the first time since 1938. The Fifteen played extremely well and were perhaps unlucky to lose by a narrow margin, for, except on one occasion when our opponents were presented with five points " on a p l a t e , " all members of the side showed a liveliness and aggressiveness which it was a pleasure to see. The next d a y at Whitley B a y Grammar School, the team showed almost the same determination to play rugger worthy of T y n e m o u t h School. The team was winning within seconds of " n o - s i d e " b u t had to be content with a draw 6 — 6 , after Whitley B a y had equalised with a magnificent penalty goal from the half-way line. T h e previous matches of the term had been lost, b u t the " U n d e r 1 6 " game on the last S a t u r d a y of term against Whitley Grammar School at Percy Park perhaps augurs better things. The result was rarely in doubt. The tries were scored by Elliot J. and Greener both being converted by E l l o t t J. T h e whole side played.well, with Towell doing good work at full-back, and Greener and E v a n s outstanding in the pack. Rugby Football at Tynemouth will only return to its old glory, if we get back all or most o£ the following things :—-whole hearted enthusiasm from players and supporters (boys should never miss any practice games except on justifiable medical grounds). Much can be learned from watching our good friends the local c l u b s — P e r c y Park and Rockcliffe—and no County Matches should be missed. There was a splendid turn out for the Kiwis Match and much must have been learned from that game ; the touch line at all School Matches should be crowded. Hard play " a l l o u t " all the time, strong running, keen tackling, unselfish passing to a player in a better position, team work, keenness, backing up, reading books on the game, a clean and smart turn out on the field—these are some of the essentials. Unpunctualitv and failing to turn up for any match are at all times unforgivable. Finally I should like to congratulate E v a n s on his excellent display at Carlisle for the Under 16 County Side, to condole with Errington who but for his unfortunate injury would also have played for the County, and to thank Mr. Miller and Mr. Unsworth for their admirable support at all times. B.S.B. HOUSE

MATCHES

Seven-a-side matches were again played, each House providing a first and a second team. W h i t l e y B a y had very little good material from which to select teams, b u t there was little to choose between the other three Houses. Monkseaton were unlucky to have Errington a w a y for all matches and other members of the first XV missed games through injuries ; thus their second teams were seriously weakened. This left T y n e m o u t h and North Shields as favourites. The whole competition was completed in t w o d a y s and there was splendid enthusiasm throughout, from players and spectators alike. Ten points were awarded for a win by the First VII, and 6 points for a win by the Second V I I .

Results FIRST

TEAMS

North Shields drew with T y n e m o u t h 5-5 North Shields beat Whitley B a y 16-0 Tynemouth beat Monkseaton 13-3 Tynemouth beat W h i t l e y B a y 30-0 Monkseaton beat North Shields 9-0 Monkseaton beat Whitley B a y 13-3

SECOND

TEAMS

North Shields beat T y n e m o u t h 16-6 North Shields beat Monkseaton 5-0 North Shields beat Whitley B a y TT-O T y n e m o u t h beat Whitley B a y 14-0 Monkseaton beat T y n e m o u t h 6-3 Whitley B a y beat Monkseaton 6-5


5 Final Points : â&#x20AC;&#x201D; N o r t h

Shields

33

Tynemouth Monkseaton Whitley

FIRST

FIFTEEN

Bay

26 6

CHARACTERS

Stonchousc (Colours 1944-45-46). Has been the captain, fly half and outstanding member of the X V . Is inclined to take the ball disconcertingly with one hand and often tries to " b u l l o c k " his w a y through the opposition rather than to get the three-quarters going, b u t he runs strongly and his splendid tackling has been a grand example. Greener (Colours 1945-46). A fine example of forward who can adapt himself to a n y position in the scrum ; his best position is wing-forward. He runs strongly and is usually up with the three-quarters to make the extra man. E v a n s J. K. (Colours 1945-46). One of the best and most energetic forwards the school has had for many years. He puts his heart and soul into the game, backs up well, and tackles splendidlv. Though still under fifteen, he well deserved his place in the C o u n t y Under 16 game against Cumberland at Carlisle. Towell. A most useful player who has " c o m e o n " remarkably in the last month. His best position is scrum-half, b u t he is also a very reliable full back and an energetic forward. It is unfortunate t h a t he is leaving, as his services for another two or three seasons would have been most valuable. D u n l e v y T. Has disliked his position as full back, and is much too slow for the position ; would be well advised to return to his old position in the scrum. Elliot J. A strong centre, he has plenty of keenness and determination b u t should not normally aim at beating more than one opponent, and must never be guilty of starving his wing. McGilvray. A very young anil powerful centre. Is inclined to get dispirited if things are not always going right. N e x t season he should develop well. Errington. Was unfortunate enough to break a couple of ribs in the act of scoring a try against Dame Allans. He is a very promising wingthreequarter with a long stride. Hesselgrave. A very fast wing-threequarter ; usually manages, by his speed, to catch his opponent by the scruff of the neck, b u t must learn to tackle, in defence, around the knees. B l u n t . Has promised well as the school scrum-half, b u t is inclined to be very wild with his passes in his own twenty-five, when hard pressed. Lunn. A good hard-working front row forward, speed up and his line out work must improve.

b u t he must t r y to

Joice. His hooking is moderate and at times he tackles brilliantly. He must learn to go " a l l o u t " and get his head into all loose scrums. W a r d h a u g h . A useful front row forward especially in the line out. does not, however, make use of his weight in loose mauls. McConway. A hard-working second row forward, put more fire into his football. Wells.

who irfust t r y to

K i c k s splendidly, but he must show more keenness if he is to

get real value from his rugger.

\

He


6 JUNIOR

RUGBYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;EASTER,

1946

The Under 14 have had only two matches this term, and though they lost both of them their play was distinctly better than last term. Brennan, Pearson and Parkin of the forwards have improved immensely and Brennan should make a good scrum leader as he goes hard all the time himself ; Parkin does not yet make full use of his weight, but he has been excellent in the line out. Of the other forwards Turnbull W. is that best type of forward who is scarcely ever seen as he always has his head and shoulders well down in every scrum, loose as well as tight. Outside, Stokoe has been a hard-working scrum-half whose passing has improved considerably ^ Wakefield G., the captain, has an excellent pair of hands and a good eye for an opening, and Richardson D. is the most improved player in the side, his straight and determined running in attack being admirable. The weakness of the team as a whole throughout the season has been a lack of real fighting spirit and poor defence. Willey and Wakefield G. have been outstanding exceptions in this respect, but until the rest of the side learn to tackle hard and low. and fall on the ball as the only adequate w a y of stopping a forward rush, they will never make really good players. The Under 13 lost their solitary match, but by no means disgraced themselves and there are several most promising players amongst them ; particularly Urwin, who though light for a forward, uses his head and has an excellent sense of position, and Gibson J. whose tackling is first rate. D.S.U.

SPRING

NATURE

NOTES

As usually proves the case, the weather in the period covered by these notes showed the greatest variety. There have been no prolonged periods of frost, nor has snow lain for more than a few hours, although snowsqualls persisted well into March. We experienced a period of thaw towards the end of January that appears to have been strictly local, even Newcastle and Sunderland being in the country-wide frost grip. The hottest April weather for ninety years was experienced in many parts on April 3. A regular winter feature of local bird-life was suddenly discontinued on January 9 by the departure of all the Tufted ducks wintering on the Quarry (Whitley B a y ) . Eighty-three were counted on January 6, and four appeared on the 9th, but none have been present since. These birds usually arrive late in September and reach peak numbers about Christmas (150 birds. January 5, 1945), which steadily decline till the last leave in April. A Little Auk, an ocean-dwelling bird sometimes forced to the shore by storms, was resting on Tynemouth beach on January 2. A month earlier, a single guillemot and a puffin were seen in Cnllercoats B a y . Golden Plovers have been seen feeding in the fields on three occasions : Near Willington Square, December 15, 1945. In B r o a d w a y fields (96 birds were counted), January 19, 1946. At Clifton, near Morpeth, on February 25. These birds are well camouflaged in their winter haunts, ploughed fields, and are probably often overlooked. A closer look at feeding peewits might show some golden plovers amongst them. Jays have also been recorded on three occasions, and it would be interesting to know more of their distribution in Northumberland. T h e y were seen and heard several times during a visit to Gosforth Bird Sanctuary on February 2, at Mitford on February 25, and on April 5 at Bothal and Ulgham. A visit to the Hancock Museum on February 26 coincided with a visit of a soldier accompanied by a tame greenfinch. He had reared and fed it since it was a nestling, and' it appeared quite unperturbed by its admirers.


7 As usual we conclude with a few short notes .— January

1—A Tree sparrow seen feeding with House sparrows at Bedlington Station. January 5, February 25 and March 26—Bullfinches at Mitford. J a n u a r y 20—Carrion Crow feeding on fat hung for tits (Bedlington Station). J a n u a r y 30—2 skeins of geese flying South over T y n e m o u t h and B l y t h . March

1 6 — F r o g spawn found at Cullercoats.

Towards the end of January good displays of the Northern L i g h t s were seen. G.R.L. J.A.W.

" GOING AWAY AND ARRIVING " John Henry Arrowsmith was a v e r y worried man. He had the responsibility of making the arrangements for the Summer H o l i d a y — a most important occasion. It was all right making arrangements for two or three, but when it came to e l e v e n — W e l l ! In spite of this, Mr. Arrowsmith used to say with pride, " No family to speak o f — o n l y e l e v e n . " T h e ages of the children ranged from nineteen to three ; hence, when they stood up for inspection before going to church, being of very even growth, they rose in regular graduation, one above the other, like a flight of stairs. The " P a r a d e in the P a s s a g e " on Sunday mornings was a realistic copy of Cruickshank's amusing sketch, and poor Mr. John Henry used to say mournfully but not without a feeling of pride, that he walked in thirteen pairs every day, and wore thirteen hats and thirteen complete suits of clothes, of one kind or another. There was great excitement in his home the night when he finished making all arrangements and all that was to be done was to pack. They learned that their objective was Hastings and t h a t very night the children began their preparations in liveliest earnest for the following morning. It is needless to describe the excitement t h a t prevailed among all the members of the family when the arrangements for spending a week at the sea-side were made known. The only person who made difficulties was the nurse, Sophia. Sophia had things to get ; she must go home and tell her mother. She had never seen the sea, and only hoped that there was no danger of being washed a w a y and drowned. B u t the children stopped her with one accord. The packing was a great source of delight to the children, b u t their parents were much worried by this, and m a n y small toys which the children were loath to leave had to be secreted into a large case b u t their parents dragged them out and m a n y tears were shed, and so Mr. Arrowsmith popped them back again unknown to his wife. At last, all the packing was finished on the morning of the great d a y , and m a n y friends and children came to see them off from the nearby railw a y station. The train came in very slowly and soon after, all the children had scrambled in with cases, boxes, bundles, and countless other oddments, and the leave-taking went on till something was dropped under the t r a i n — a b a b y someone said, which caused great terror and commotion, though it turned out providentially to be only an umbrella. T h e y had scarcely recovered from this shock when the train began to move, and handkerchiefs were waved and kisses thrown in great profusion. After they had gone a short way, Mrs. Arrowsmith distributed some buns and oranges ; when the peel had been deposited out of the windows, everyone settled down to enjoy the journey.


8 Presently one or two of the younger children, dazed, perhaps, with looking at the passing trees and banks, grew sleepy and were made as comfortable as possible and slept until the train drew into the station at Hastings. It was another headache for the children's parents to get all parcels and bundles together ready for getting out of the train, and at when the train drew in at the station at Hastings, everyone had their separate bundles, and parcels to carry up to the house which F a t h e r rented for a week.

the last own had

On getting out of the train, there was the business of handing in tickets, counting heads and a host of other things. At last t h e y set off up the hill leading to the house with cases, wooden spades, tin buckets, sixpenny boats with sails flying and a host of indispensables of the sea-side. W h e n t h e y reached the house, a small cheerful cook had a marvellous tea waiting for them. It was indeed welcome, b u t this was only a very small part of their holiday. Y e s ! it would not be the family's fault if the week to come was not enjoyed by all, and talked about in years to come, as the best holiday they had ever spent. J.L., Form V.

THE

FRUIT

SHOP

Apples, apples, oh ! so bright In the shops now, what a sight ! Bananas too, so firm and yellow, W h a t a treat for a little fellow.

M . A . , Form I l a .

" THAT WILL BE THE DAY " W h a t a d a y that will be When we d o n ' t need a book To b u y all our rations : And we needn't just look In the candy shop windows As we sadly pass b y , B u t go in and ask, For a bagful. Oh my I R.H.,

THINGS

ARE

NOT ALWAYS WHAT

III.

THEY SEEM

T a k e for example the sausage, one does not need an introduction, for who has not tasted that uninspiring, humble little thing that lies in great mounds upon the butcher's slab awaiting to be cut in pieces for the feeding of avid customers f These poor people, deceived so easily by t h a t polite, though stout, gentleman who stands so unassumingly behind an array of murderous tools, his mutton fists tucked beneath a voluminous apron whose strings barely meet behind his back, are content to endure the explosive nature of his food. Carrying off her prize the woman, a glint of triumph entering her eyes as she beholds her queue companions, allows the tiniest, pinkest tip of a sausage to stray outside its wrapper. " A l a s , " a stifled gasp escapes them as they behold the savoury morsel and look with open mouths at the sausage with inconceivable alertness. It has been obtained by long waiting and all t h a t remains to be seen is its reaction to the process called frying. The fat is hot and smoking in the pan, the woman stands eagerly over the gas-cooker and with infinite care deposits the sausage in the pan. A peremptory sizzle escapes with a general aroma, an appetising smell


9 issues from the pan and pervades the room, the woman stepping back surveys it with an extremely pleased countenance and carefully wipes her greasy fingers on a towel, so as to keep her clean white apron in its present condition. On her w a y to get a plate from the cupboard an unusual sound is heard from the direction of the pan. As usual curiosity overcomes her and with a few quick steps she is in sight of her precious sausage. Quite an alarming thing has happened, for the sausage growing in size, has assumed huge proportions and disaster seems imminent. The woman, very curious, peers at the spectacle closely, too closely, and she, with her head bent in a quizzical manner receives the whole force of the explosion which happens in the following w a y : At first there is a slight wheezing as t h a t of an old man with a perpetual cough, then the skin, so distorted by the internal pressures, can stretch no more, it has reached its limit, the sausage is ready for the final explosion ; the shrill piping does not deter the woman and she remains at her post to the death, or rather, to the end. Suddenly there is a snap, just a plain splitting of the skin, the woman remains demure b u t still curious—is it not usual that sausages split ? — b u t still there is its size, that is unaccountable ; so she remains bent over the pan. A splutter, a spurting of fat, then an absolutely unexpected volume of bread crumbs shoots in all directions from the pan. The woman, ever ready for emergencies, is, however, not quick enough to avoid this explosion and receives the full force of the " sausage." Trickles of burning fat flow down her apron which is smeared and black owing to her feverish haste to rid herself of the burning bread which she fried for sausage. A.N.H., VIb.

THE Oh ! What When What

sturdy do y o u we are funny

SNOWMAN

snowman cold do all through safely tucked thoughts run

and white, the night ! in bed, round your head ?

Children, when you are fast asleep, Jack Frost comes to me creepy creep. And he and I have lots of fun, And frolic till the night is done. Then when the daylight comes once more, And y o u come running through the door, f stand as still as still can be And let you throw snowballs at me. , R . C . , Form l i b . RECREATION

T h e d a y was frosty and S y b i l ' s dog, Diane, snuffed the air excitedly as I approached. Reaching the porch of the cottage where old Sybil, the game-keeper's widow, lived, I shouted a greeting. At my shout Diane's excited yelping developed into fierce barking. Deciding Sybil must have gone into the village shopping, I walked over and released Diane myself. T h e night before, I had planned to go down the fen shooting. I had taken out my old but reliable twelve bore and oiled it. I had even taken the trouble to clean my rubber thigh boots and lay out my tweeds and waterproofs. H a v i n g assembled my gear I sighed a sigh of contentment which quickly changed to consternation when I found I had no dog to retrieve. However, the problem was soon solved by Sybil who offered to lend me Diane.

»


10 D e c i d i n g t h a t I should like to t r y for some d u c k I set off at a b r i s k w a l k for Simonsmere. After several m i n u t e s ' w a l k i n g my h a n d s were red a n d g l o w i n g a n d the cold, sweet air sent t h e blood rushing t h r o u g h m y body. D i a n e too seemed to sense t h e briskness of t h e m o r n i n g as she t r o t t e d a l o n g a t m y side, occasionally sniffing a t some i n v i t i n g rabbit-hole. As all spaniels, D i a n e had long floppy ears and a scent t h a t distinguished her as a r e t r i e v i n g d o g . As I a p p r o a c h e d t h e spot where I w a s likely to m a k e a b a g I loaded a n d cocked m y rifle. A t t h i s D i a n e , w h o k n e w w h a t i t signified, r a n on, a m i d s t a w h i t e flurry of hoar frost, across a stretch of a p p a r e n t l y sound ice. 1 noted this, as I t h o u g h t it would m a k e a good position to h a v e a " b a n g " at the d u c k s as t h e y c a m e in later from t h e sea. A sharp bark ahead told me t h a t D i a n e had aroused s o m e t h i n g a n d I h a r d l y h a d t i m e to raise my rifle before a snipe flew up and outlined itself a g a i n s t t h e bleak, cold fens a n d a dull s k y t h a t w a s q u i c k l y t u r n i n g to n i g h t . The report o f m y g u n h a d scarcely died a w a y before D i a n e had t h e bird a t m y feet. W a r m e d a n d thrilled after m y f i r s t " b a g " I decided t o r e t u r n t o t h e s p o t I h a d p r e v i o u s l y noted a n d t r y for the d u c k . I eyed t h e ice a little d u b i o u s l y , b u t t h e d o g h a d gone across it so it m u s t h a v e been all right. W i t h t h a t t h o u g h t in my m i n d , I stepped on to t h e ice only to fall t h r o u g h after t a k i n g a few steps. L u c k i l y the w a t e r w a s not v e r y deep and I g o t w e t o n l y up to my waist, otherwise I m i g h t h a v e suffered a terrible death. A l t h o u g h I w a s shivering w i t h cold, I determined t h a t I would s t a y for t h e d u c k s , if I died in the a t t e m p t . I positioned myself with D i a n e b y m y side t o keep m e w a r m , a n d w a i t e d q u i e t l y s m o k i n g . T h e n , indist i n c t l y at first, I heard the h e a v y d r u m m i n g of m a n y w i n g s , as t h e d u c k s c a m e in for the night. I raised my rifle and shot at a bird in the rear of t h a t swiftlv m o v i n g mass, then s w i n g i n g round emptied m y second barrel. On t h e w a y home, h a p p y and wet. I called in at S y b i l ' s to t a k e D i a n e back. In t h e course of t h e ensuing conversation I t o l d her a b o u t my fall t h r o u g h t h e ice a n d , t r y i n g t o explain m y a p p a r e n t s t u p i d i t y , remarked t h a t it looked sound e n o u g h . " A h , " she said. " b u t t h i n g s are not a l w a y s w h a t t h e y seem t o be, even D i a n e k n o w s t h a t . " 1 smiled, b u t S y b i l did not notice me, she w a s t o o b u s y b r u s h i n g b u r r s o u t of D i a n e ' s s i l k y ears. H.B.McC., LIBRARY

VIb.

NOTES

We h a v e to report once more t h a t t h e L i b r a r y needs a new and more up-to-date s u p p l y of b o o k s . Some of the F i c t i o n is q u i t e u n s u i t a b l e for these d a y s a n d does n o t a t t r a c t readers as it should. It has been v e r y difficult d u r i n g the w a r y e a r s t o a d d t o t h e b o o k s o n t h e shelves, b u t w e h a v e on occasions been v e r y grateful to donors of books, i n c l u d i n g this t e r m Greener w h o b r o u g h t us a w e i g h t y c o n t r i b u t i o n . We should be v e r y pleased t o h a v e a n y o f the E n g l i s h Classics. SCHOOL HEAD

BOY :

PREFECTS :

T.

A.

P.

OFFICERS

Dunlevy.

T. A. P. Dunlevv, B. E. Blunt, D. R. Lunn, D. M. Wallace. M . W . Harrison," H . L . Joice, S . A . E r r i n g t o n , A . H . Stonehouse, J. A. Wells.

CAPTAIN OF FOOTBALI. : H O U S E CAPTAINS :

A. H.

Stonehouse.

Whitley Bay,

D.

R.

Lunu.

T y n e m o u t h , A . H . Stonehouse. M o n k s e a t o n , J . A . Wells. N o r t h Shields, T . A . P . D u n l e v y .


SUMMER SCHOOL

TERM NOTES

We welcomed back to the Staff Mr. G. G. Gentle and Mr. Fullarton after five years away in the A r m y . We congratulate Mr. Gentle on reaching the rank of Major and on his being mentioned in despatches for his services in Burma. Mr. Fullarton reached the less-exalted rank of Sergeant and served in France and in Germany. We also congratulate our former House Master, Mr. Buttanshaw, on being awarded the M . B . E . in the B i r t h d a y Honours for services in the R.A.F. Also in the Birthday Honours we note with pleasure the award of the O . B . E . (Civil Division) to Mr. E. L. Bitterman for his services as Chairman of the North-East Court of Referees. The Sports were held at the beginning of the term. the results appears later in the magazine.

A full record of

Later in the year there will be an account of the meetings and functions of the Old Boys' Club which has now returned to its pre-war activities. At the beginning of this term the Tynemouth Preparatory School at Monkseaton entered into possession and use of the new premises in Holywell Avenue. The house is more commodious than the other and better adapted tor use as a school. The coach-house has been adapted for use as a wetweather playground and a concrete playground is to be laid outside. We regret to announce the death of Dr. Douglas Martin who has been one of the Governors since 1934. Mr. B. S. Bates has been elected to take his place.

SUMMER III. I. Jun. T.P.S.

J. R. G. P. P.

TERM, Avete

1946

K. Tate. J. J. Pope. J. W. Corbitt, G. N. Harper, M. J. Luker, H. Morland, R. H .Stafi, J. L. Towers. Killick, B. M. Rhode, C. D. Scott, C. G. Wren.

Valete Via.

T. A. P. Dunlevy, Prefect 1944, Head B o y 1945, Matric. December, 1945. A. N. Hunter, School Cert. July, 1946. D. M. Wallace, Prefect 1946, Matric. July 1946. A. J. Boast. D. L. Pearson, J. W. Thompson, R. Travis. M. C. Winter. B. I. Speirs, R. G. Gardiner, A. D. Bowman, G. E. Jones. R. A. Peel, K. Sibbald. J. A. Lodge, C. B. Scott. P. J. Murray. R. B. Cubey.

VIb. V. IV. III. Ha. lib. 1. Jun.

PRIZES MATRICULATION :

D. R. Lunn, Distinctions in English, Scripture, Literature, History, J. D. K. D. S.

Latin.

A. M. A. A. M.

Mackie, Distinctions in Scripture, Literature. Wallace, Distinction in Geography. Forrest. Parkin. Rodgers.


12 SCHOOL C E R T I F I C A T E :

A. N. Hunter. E. Shippen. STOCKDALE

PRIZE

FOR L A N G U A G E S :

D. R. Lunn. FORM

V. IV. III. 11a. lib. I.

PRIZES

Brennan, Gofton W . , L u n n R. D. W a t t D . , Reavley, Turnbull W . W a t t J., Nichol, Gristwood, Armstrong. Richardson P . , Dixon, Peel, Davison, Carrick, Stephenson G . , Read, Scott C. B. Scott G . , Hardie R. M., L a m b .

TYNEMOUTH

HOUSE

NOTES

â&#x20AC;˘

House Master : Mr. WASTLE. House Captain : A. H. STONEHOUSE. This has been a term of great success in the realms of sport. We were the champion house in the sports, winning by a margin of thirty points. Special congratulations are due to E v a n s J. as Sports Champion. We also excelled in cricket, winning the House Matches by a wide margin. We defeated North Shields by seven wickets in the first round and Monkseaton by six wickets in the final. We have been represented on the First XI by A. H. Stonehouse (captain), M. W. Harrison, G. J. Shaw and J. K. E v a n s , and on the Under 14 by J. Wakefield (Captain), G. Stokoe, A. Caird, M. Sanderson and C. E v a n s . Congratulations to M. Harrison on gaining his First XI colours. There are five members of the house sitting their School Certificate this July. We wish them the best of luck. M c A u g h t r y , Armstrong, Peel, Stevenson J., Read, E v e r i t t C. and Wilson are to be congratulated on gaining high positions in their respective forms. We thank Mr. Wastle for the "scrumptious feed" which he gave to the winners of the various events in the sports in the school dining room, and also for the tea which he gave in B a x t e r ' s to the victorious house cricket team.

NORTH House Master :

SHIELDS

Mr. GENTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

T. DUNLEVY.

We are very pleased to welcome back our old House Master, Mr. Gentle, who has returned after several years' service in the Army. We hope that under his coaching we shall make our mark in inter-house activities. T h e House was very unfortunate in the Cricket House Matches this term being beaten by T y n e m o u t h in the first round. Joice, Laffey, D u n l e v y T . , McGilvray, Brown and Wardhaugh represented the House on the First X I , and Hedley, Hoskin, Rowell and L a m b e r t on the Under 14. Joice and Laffey are to be congratulated on gaining their Colours.. Congratulations are also due to all members of the House who have attained high positions in their term examinations. Finally we wish those who have taken the School Certificate this term the very best of luck.


13

WHITLEY

BAY

HOUSE

House Master : Mr. MILLER.

NOTES

House Captain :

D. R. LUNN.

We are pleased to say that once again we won the House Shield last term. Unfortunately in the realms of sport we were not so successful. B u t there is hope of better success in years to come. Wallace and Fenwick have played on the First XI and on the Under 14 we were well represented by Wakefield G . , Herron, Heyes and Meredith. We congratulate all our members who have obtained high positions in their exams. We wish the four members of the House who have sat for the School Certificate the best of luck.

MONKSEATON HOUSE NOTES House Master : Mr. BATES.

House Captain :

J. A. WELLS.

This term has brought round the Sports once more in which our House was very successful—winning the High Jump, the House Relay and several other races. Brennan and the W a t t brothers are to be congratulated again on being top of their respective forms. We hope they keep up this excellent standard. Forrest and Hardie have represented the House on the First X I , and Towers and Turnbull on the Under 14. We congratulate Forrest on being awarded his Cricket Colours. In the House Cricket Matches this term we easily beat Whitley B a y by 8 wickets, and with a bit of luck might have beaten T y n e m o u t h , too. Our best wishes go to all who are leaving us this term ; we wish them every success for the future.

THE

SPORTS

The sports were held on May n t h on the Preston Road Cricket Ground. The prizes were presented by Mrs. Ellison.

Results Long J u m p (over 14) : 1, Hunter A.; 2, E v a n s J.; 3, Stonehouse. L o n g J u m p ( 1 1 - 1 4 ) : 1, Lilburn ; 2, Richardson P.; 3, E v a n s C. L o n g J u m p (under TI) : 1, Arthur ; 2, Wigham P . ; 3, N a u g h t o n , Fawcett. Cricket Ball : 1, E v a n s J.; 2, Stonehouse ; 3, Greener. High J u m p (T1-T4) : 1, Hedley W . ; 2, Peel ; 3, Say. H i g h Jump (under 11) : 1, Sibbald, Wilson ; 3, S t u d d y , Hunter J. Mile (open) : 1, Stonehouse ; 2, Forrest ; 3, Rodgers. Quarter-mile (open) : 1, Stonehouse ; 2, E v a n s J.; 3, Forrest. 75 yds. ( 1 1 - 1 4 ) : 1, Meredith ; 2, Sutherland ; 3, Say. 75 yds. (under 11) : 1, Arthur ; 2, E v e r e t t C.; 3, Wilson. 75 yds. (over 6J) : 1, Sandon M.; 2, Whitfield ; 3, Gee. 75 yds. (under 6£) : 1, Tocher ; 2, Davies ; 3, Hobson G. 100 yds. (over 14) : 1, Wells ; 2, Stonehouse ; 3, E v a n s J. 75 yds. T . P . S . (A) : 1, Forrest S.; 2, Donaldson ; 3, Brown. 75 yds. T . P . S . (B) : 1, Robinson ; 2, E v a n s H . ; 3, McPherson. 75 yds. T . P . S . (C) : 1, Jones ; 2, Browell ; 3, Craven. 220 yds. (under 10) : 1, Checkley ; 2, Fenwick J.; 3, Dunlevy M. 220 yds. (10-11) : 1, Arthur ; 2, Simpson ; 3, F a w c e t t . High J u m p (over 14) : 1, Pringle ; 2, Wells ; 3, E v a n s J . 220 yds. (13-14) : 1, Hedley W . ; 2, Meredith ; 3, Wakefield G. 220 yds. (12-13) ; Richardson P . ; 2, Lilburn ; 3, Proctor. 220 yds. (11-12) : 1, W a t t J.; 2, E v a n s C.; 3, Curry. Half-mile (senior) : 1, E v a n s J.; 2, Forrest K . ; 3, Rodgers. Half-mile (junior) : 1, E v a n s C.; 2, Richardson P . ; 3, Alexander.

»


14 220 yds. (14-15) : 1, E v a n s J.; 2, Mackie ; 3, McGilvray. 220 yds. (15-16) : 1, Hunter A.; 2, Bristow ; 3, Forrest K. 220 yds. (over 16) : 1, Wells ; 2, Black F . ; 3, Joice. Handicap (under 12 : 1, Fenwick J.; 2, L a m b ; 3, Checkley. H a n d i c a p (over 12) : 1, Caird ;_2, Proctor ; 3, Hoskin. House Relay : i, Monkseaton ; 2, Tynemouth. Old Boys' Race : i, Lee A.; 2, Watson R.; 3, Boyes. Sports Champion E v a n s J. ( T y n e m o u t h ) . Middle C u p . . . Richardson P . (Monkseaton). Junior C u p Arthur (Whitley B a y ) . House C u p . . . . Tynemouth.

SUMMER

TERM

NATURE

NOTES

This term our short survey opens on a sad note. T h e Fulmars, on the cliffs at Hartley since January, left in May. On each visit between April 2nd and their departure they were witnessed sitting in pairs, displaying, and, towards the end of the period sitting on the ledges as though breeding. It is not unusual for these birds to frequent a proposed new station in the breeding season for some years before using it, b u t I have not been aMe to ascertain whether they habitually leave comparatively early in the season. Fulmars still freely patrol the coast. Waders, never so a b u n d a n t this last Winter as during the war, have rarely been seen after April. Oyster-Catchers have occasionally been 011 the beach, and some visited marshy ground near Ellington on June 22nd in company with other waders. Ringed Plovers were seen on the mudflats on the River B l y t h near Bedlington on May 25th, and, early in June, the courtship flight of two of these birds was witnessed over the sea-banks at Cullercoats. Great Black-backed Gulls have been seen on the River B l y t h , and an interesting contest between a Lesser Black-backed Gull and an eel, resulting in the death of the latter, was watched on July n t h . Perhaps the most interesting record this year is t h a t of the Pied F l y catcher nesting at Mitford. This bird, while not really rare is described in bird books as " l o c a l l y " distributed. Other recent local records of the bird are : a female (probably a departing migrant) at Cullercoats, September, 1943 ; a pair seen on several occasions at Shotley Bridge, April, 1945 ; and a male mentioned in the 1938 School Magazine as having been seen at Holywell Dene. There is space just to mention a few other observations : March 20—Mistle Thrush building at Cullercoats. April 2 6 — A T w i t e ' s (related closely to the Linnet) nest with two eggs, in a gorse bush near Bedlington Station. April 2 9 — A Cuckoo heard near the River B l y t h . May 4 — A W h i n c h a t near the Great North Road, Stannington. May 1 2 — A Stonechat at Mitford. May 3 0 — D i p p e r and Grey Wagtail at Mitford. June 10—-A family of Long-tailed Tits, a Reed-warbler and Chiff-chaff seen at R o t h b u r y . June 1 5 — A pair of Herons at Mitford. It is difficult to say to what extent these observations are remarkable without having a more detailed knowledge of the districts concerned. G.R.L. J.A.W. Form V.

CRICKET NOTES,

1946

Several of last year's promising cricketers having left somewhat unexpectedly before this term, I felt quite depressed at the prospects. The


15 team, however, after a shaky start has played well together, and although there has been a dearth of runs at times, the bowling and fielding has been good. Stonehouse, as Captain, has set a fine example in the field and latterly has been keeping wicket again well. He and Harrison have become quite an effective opening pair. Harrison's batting in particular has steadily improved throughout the term. His diligence, care and keenness to improve his batting has been a shining example which others might copy with profit to themselves and to the School. Forrest has bowled well throughout the season and been the mainspring of the attack, although at times both Laffey and Shaw have bowled well. Apart from matches with other schools the First XI has played matches with the Staff, the Parents and the Old Boys.. The Staff match provided an exciting finish, the School just failing to equal the Staff's total of 79. Needless to say the scorer's mathematical abilities were called in question, but the accusation proved to be unfounded. Four lady members of the Staff, Mrs. Hilton, Mrs. Turnbull, Miss Harrison and Miss McGuire very sportingly turned out and assisted in no small way, though not in actual runs, to the success of the proceedings. In the Parent's Match the fathers were unable to cope adequately with the bowling of Forrest and Shaw, and despite the gallant 24 by Mr. Nichol, were all out for 52. The School made the runs with the loss of two wickets, Harrison with 107 and Forrest with 64 being undefeated when stumps were drawn. On the following day an even greater catastrophe overtook the Old Boys, for Forrest and Shaw dismissed them for a meagre 16 runs, and perhaps the less said about that the better. A time limit second innnigs after tea provided some brighter cricket, the high light of which was a sparkling 53 not out for the Old Boys by Stokoe. In the House Matches Tynemouth have proved too strong for both their opponents, North Shields first and then Monkseaton in the final, winning both matches with little difficulty. Joice, Forrest, Laffey and Harrison are to be congratulated on obtaining this term their First XI Colours.

FIRST

XI

CHARACTERS

Stonehouse (Colours 1945). The Captain, has by his keenness on the field shown a fine example to the team. His batting has improved to a marked degree latterly and when he took over the job of wicket-keeper in the middle of the term showed once more some of the good quality he showed last season. Joice (Colours (1946). In the nets he has shown excellent batting form, but has been unfortunate in matches as far as scoring runs has been concerned. His fielding has been good. Forrest (Colours 1946). Has can always be relied upon to score Harrison (Colours 1946). As tinguished himself by his excellent could be improved.

been the team's most useful bowler and a few runs. He is an excellent fielder. the opening bat of the team he has disbatting. His fielding is rather slow and

Laffey (Colours 1946). Could bat well if he tried, but is apt to hit out. His bowling at the beginning of the season was good, but lately has deteriorated. He has maintained his high standard of fielding throughout the term.


16 Shaw., As a left-hand bowler he has taken many wickets with his fast leg break. His b a t t i n g should improve with practice. E v a n s J. Is by nature a hitter, b u t has tried to curb this tendency without much success. His fielding at point has been an inspiration to the side. D u n l e v y T. Can defend well, b u t lacks scoring strokes. fielding is not always sure, b u t his throwing in is accurate. Hardy.

A good change bowler with a steady length.

His ground

He has fielded

well. Brown. straight bat.

His fielding has been good, b u t he should learn to use a He shows promise as a bowler.

McGilvray. His b a t t i n g is clumsy and he is a p t to s k y the ball. is keen and energetic in the field, b u t his throwing in is very erratic.

TYNEMOUTH May May May June June June June June June July July

18 22 25 12 15 20 22 26 27 6 20

SCHOOL

He

CRICKET FIXTURESâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;RESULTS First XI

H e x h a m Grammar School Dame Allan's R o y a l Grammar School Morpeth Grammar School T y n e m o u t h High School Staff H e x h a m Grammar School Parents Old B o y s South Shields High School South Shields High School

JUNIOR

... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ...

Home Home Away Home Away Home Away Home Home Away Home

Lost, by Draw. Lost, by Lost, by Lost, by Lost, by Draw. Won, by Won, by Lost, by

7 wkts. 44 runs. 120 runs. 6 wkts. 1 run. 8 wkts. 10 wkts. 7 wkts.

CRICKET

The Under 14 XI has had an enjoyable though rather disappointing season. It opened well with a tie against South Shields ( a w a y ) , b u t drew one and lost five of its six remaining matches. An Under 15 XI played and lost one match. Some of the finishes have been close, b u t chances of success have been lost through indifferent b a t t i n g and unsteadiness in the field. Wakefield J., captain, impressed as a pace bowler and was the most successful batsman.. He took 24 wickets during the season, including 7 for 11 against South Shields, and scored 70 runs for an average of 8. Stokoe disappointed, though he has the makings of a batsman, b u t Heyes, Rowell and L a m b e r t showed considerable promise in the last few matches and should be very useful next year. Hedley W. bowled well on occasions, but is erratic. Wakefield G. kept wicket throughout. The XI was chosen from the following : Wakefield J. (captain), Stokoe, Hcskin, Wakefield G . , Hedley W . , Lambert, Caird, Sanderson, Merron, Heyes, Rcwell, Urwin, E v a n s C., Meredith.

Results South Shields High School Away ,, ,, Home Royal Grammar Sch., Ncle. Home St. Cuthbert's Grammar Sch. Home ,, ,, ,, (Under 15) Home ,, ,, Away Hexham Grammar School Home ,, ,, Away

Tied Lost Lost Drawn Lost Lost Lost Lost

41 runs each. 27. 28 for 5 wkts. 37 for 9 wkts. 3ÂŽ49 for 6 wkts. , 64 for 8 wkts 46. *736. 37 for 5 wkts. 3334 for 4 wkts. 27. 28 for 5 wkts.


17

THE

SIMONSIDES

Beneath the brow o' Simonside, O'er mound and moorland fair, I traced the course o' Blagdon burn To S e b b y ' s rocky lair. And then I climbed to Weatherhead Through b o g and rugged scree, And panting gained the summit, where Rewarded I should be. Northumberland in faded blue L a y stretched beneath my feet, A misty smudge from West to E a s t My vision to entreat. And poised above each stately peak A plume oi silver cloud Touched lightly on each tender brow Its master to enshroud. J.L., V.

WEEK-ENDS However happy he m a y be at work, almost every normal person looks forward to the week-end. It is, in theory, the time when the week's arrears of small jobs are attended to ; in practice, very often, thirty-six hours of doing nothing in particular. The man u n h a p p y at his work must measure his life from week-end to week-end. The most notable and distressing feature of the week-end is its speed in departing and its slowness in arriving. We ourselves often assist this illusion by spending a considerable portion of the forenoon in retirement. This m a y be very pleasant while it lasts, b u t a subsequent resentment is felt t h a t so much of the precious day is gone. No doubt plans have been made during the week for the utilisation of the day, b u t a very late breaklast stifles any lengthy enterprise, ft is decided to do a few odd jobs after dinner. B u t the afternoon is the most elusive period of the d a y : the sedentary period spent over an after-dinner cup of tea is extended, and the afternoon has flown. Time-wasting is very pleasant while it lasts, but it is disappointing to find, on Sunday night, that nothing really tangible has been done. Going a w a y for the week-end eradicates this feeling in some measure. The journey alone will provide incidents of interest and perhaps novelty, and your hosts will in all probability have arranged places to see and things to do. Nevertheless, I should not like to go a w a y every week-end ; there always seems so much to do at home, even if it is still undone on Sunday evening. Thousands of people spend each successive week-end in the same manner. I would say t h a t countless thousands attended football matches every Saturday, were it not for the fact t h a t t h e y are as regularly counted. In fact, every sport has its firm, often fanatical supporters who travel for hours and endure almost a n y discomfort in pursuit of their interest. Then there are the families t h a t go for a " run in the c a r , " and the elderly spinster sisters who go to Chapel every Sunday morning and for the same walk every Sunday afternoon. Perhaps the week-ends of the gardeners vary least of all. B u t f think the largest single group consists of those who mean to do so much, and end by doing so little, without being the worse for their leisure. Our freedom would indeed be lost if we could not, whatever our station, follow our own inclinations at the week-end.

G.R.L., V.

\


18

GOING TO THE DENTIST When I awoke I realised t h a t to-day was no ordinary d a y , but the d a y which I had dreaded for months ; the day when three of my teeth were to be extracted. f l o w quickly the hours passed. E v e r y time I looked at the clock the hands seemed to have flown round. Four o'clock already and time to get the bus down to the dentist's. The bus, instead of being late as I fervently prayed it would be, came two minutes early. T h e driver seemed to be going faster and faster There I was, sitting in the waiting-room. It had an air of sombre silence. T h e dentist put his head round the door. " N e x t , please !" He placed me in the chair. He took a large syringe and thrust it into my gum, where he emptied the contents. He took his forceps and p u t them in my mouth. He gripped the first topth " W a k e up ! I t ' s five minutes to eight and you are going to have your teeth out to-day !" J.F.M., IV.

PROSPECT VILLA " P r o s p e c t V i l l a " ! The name, which was on a brass plaque at the side of the large, ornamented gates, shone before my eyes, and I hesitated breathlessly for a second before stepping from the roadway and walking up the drive. On either side of the carriage drive were gardens gay with spring flowers, all of the newest and rarest strains, and these, being tastefully arranged, presented an agreeable harmony of colours. T h e afternoon was warm, one of the first mild d a y s of the season, and already the garden seats were put out, with striped red and white awnings, ready to be unfurled if the rays of the April sun should be too overpowering. There were lawntennis courts for both summer and winter. Urns, vases and statues abounded, as if p u t out for sale. Suddenly the drive took a sharp turn and I found myself some t w e n t y yards from the house. Prospect Villa was a building of some pretension, with a style of architecture which might be called Contractors' Composite. It was light and summery, more so than the climate would have justified, if it had been considered or consulted. The windows were large and opened to the ground. A large verandah would have protected the front of the house from scorching suns if the sun had ever come round that way. The upper part of the house was ornamented with h e a v y stone battlements, and there was a turret at one corner, loopholed and carrying a flagstaff. " My great-uncle must be a wealthy m a n , " I thought, as I stood on the broad steps of the villa residence looking in at the hall, hung with pictures, its handsome staircases richly carpeted, with marble figures on each landing, waiting apparently to take your hat or show you your w a y . " The oil business must be a very good t h i n g . " " N o t at h o m e , " said a servant in livery. " I'll w a i t , " I said, and I was invited to enter the drawing room and wait there. I looked a b o u t me. Although I was rather tired with walking, I could not find the courage to sit down. There were plenty of chairs, b u t I was doubtful whether they would bear my weight. Some of them had satin seats with flowers painted on them, roses, not without thorns, and lilies of matchless purity, which I could not think of desecrating. Others were of gilded cane, and spider-like proportions. The easy chairs and couches


19 were a l r e a d y occupied by silken cushions, well shaken u p , which left 110 room for a n y o n e else to rest upon t h e m . T h e r e w a s no place for a m a n of real flesh and blood and bone e x c e p t perhaps t h e carpet, so I remained s t a n d i n g and walked a b o u t with careful, silent steps, e x a m i n i n g the contents of t h e a p a r t m e n t . T h e r e was plenty to o c c u p y me, for the d r a w i n g room resembled a b a z a a r . E v e r y table w a s covered with ornaments. Old china, photographs, books in gorgeous bindings, little dogs, men and women, Swiss c o t t a g e s , cups and saucers, were spread a b o u t in careful profusion. It w a s difficult to pick one's w a y between the fancy tables and w h a t n o t s , all loaded with costly bric-a-brac, with which t h e room w a s thronged. A t this m o m e n t the servant entered and announced t h a t t h e master would receive me in the s t u d y . W h a t reception would I h a v e ? With nervous apprehension I stepped from t h e d r a w i n g room. I w a s soon to know. J . L . , V.

WORDS

OF

WISDOM

F o r Prefects : " N o r let t h y b a w l i n g fellows rack their throats."—MATTHEW ARNOLD. T h e new Colour : " For y o u t h e y call, the s w a y i n g mass, their eager faces t u r n i n g . " WALT

' After School Certificate : " F e a r no more t h e frown of the great, T h o u art past t h e t y r a n t ' s stroke."—SHAKESPEARE.

WHITMAN.

* J.A.W.,

LIBRARY

V.

NOTES

A rather monotonous L i b r a r y routine has t a k e n place this term since v e r y few books have been borrowed. T h i s we feel is due to t h e i m p o r t a n t e x a m s and light nights. H o w e v e r , we hope to h a v e more substantial support n e x t term, especially in the w a y of new books. T h e fact t h a t the school is responsible for tile upkeep of the L i b r a r y c a n n o t be over-emphasised, and t h e plea for new books still stands. We m i g h t add t h a t a l t h o u g h the shelves seem replete with b o o k s t h e y are w a n t i n g in up-to-date F i c t i o n . B o o k s have been checked in good time, b u t at the time of writing m a n y books h a v e y e t to be returned of the few t h a t were i s s u e d — t o o m a n y b o y s are not returning their books within t h e specified fortnight. A. N. HUNTER, Librarian.

SCHOOL HEAD BOY :

PREFECTS :

T. A.

OFFICERS

P. D u n l e v y .

T. A. P. D u n l e v y . B. E. B l u n t , D. R. L u n n , D. M. W a l l a c e , M . W . Harrison, H . L . Joice, S . A . E r r i n g t o n , J . A . Wells, A . H . Stonehouse.

C A P T A I N O F CRICKET : H O U S E CAPTAINS :

A.

H.

Stonehouse.

Whitley Bay,

D.

R.

Lunn.

T y n e m o u t h , A . H . Stonehouse. Monkseaton, J. A. Wells. N o r t h Shields, T . A . P . D u n l e v y .


20

AUTUMN TERM. SCHOOL

NOTES

A t the b e g i n n i n g o f t h e t e r m D . R . L u n n w a s a p p o i n t e d H e a d B o y a n d w a s installed at a special service at which Mrs. L u n n w a s present. T h e following were elected Prefects t h i s term : R. A. B r i s t o w , J. A .Mackie, K . A . Forrest, R . D . L u n n . J . W . Laffey, J . K . E v a n s . /4 15s. od. w a s collected for the C h r i s t m a s Fund of the Mission to Seamen. O n c e a g a i n we are indebted to N i c h o l for g i v i n g t w o film shows at w h i c h a collection w a s t a k e n . D u r i n g the y e a r ÂŁ53 17s. i d . w a s sent t o D r . B a r n a r d o ' s H o m e s b y the m e m b e r s of the Y o u n g Helpers' L e a g u e . T h i s is the highest t o t a l y e t achieved. T h e t o t a l n u m b e r of b o y s this t e r m has reached t h e highest in t h e history of the School. We now n u m b e r 320. Speech D a y will be held on M o n d a y , March 10th, KJ47, at the P l a z a , Tynemouth. It will be in the late afternoon. P a r e n t s will receive t i c k e t s of i n v i t a t i o n in d u e course. W e c o n g r a t u l a t e W . M . B u r n s i d e a n d C . M . S t o r e y o n their a p p o i n t ment t o b e L e g a l A d v i s e r and A c c o u n t a n t respectively t o the N o r t h e r n D i v i s i o n C o a l B o a r d under t h e Coal Mines A c t T h e D e b a t i n g S o c i e t y resumed this t e r m . An a c c o u n t of the proceedings will be found in t h i s issue. T h e School E n t e r t a i n m e n t w a s held on the last e v e n i n g of t e r m when i t e m s were given by v a r i o u s forms and individuals. We are pleased to record the a w a r d of t h e O . B . E . to Miss J. F r i t h for her services as one of t h e S u p e r i n t e n d e n t s in the W . R . N . S . Lor several years Miss F r i t h t a u g h t in the J u n i o r School at M o n k s e a t o n . She n o w holds a post with the Nuffield T r u s t in L o n d o n . In the D e c e m b e r School Certificate, Joice o b t a i n e d M a t r i c u l a t i o n with credits i n E n g l i s h L a n g u a g e , Scripture, E n g l i s h L i t e r a t u r e , F r e n c h , M a t h s , and Physics. C o x and M c C o n w a y , Hesslegrave a n d Miller all o b t a i n e d School Certificates. Forrest, Prest a n d Shippen obtained their necessary credits for M a t r i c u l a t i o n . OLD

BOYS'

N E W S

We c o n g r a t u l a t e the following on their e x a m i n a t i o n successes : CAMBRIDGE : A. I. W e l c h , E c o n o m i c s P r e l i m i n a r y . K I N G ' S COLLEGE :

ist M B.,

R.

E.

Burn.

2nd M . B . , D . W e b s t e r . B . S c . G e o l o g y 2nd year,

AUTUMN TERM. Avete VIb. V. IV.

III. I la. lib. I. Jun. T.P.S.

N. W. G. J. T. G. W. V. P. D. N. J. L. K. K.

O. P. Casey.

1946

Gilmore. A. Coats. H. Tait, J. P. Partridge, P. D. Partridge. E. F l e c k , 1). N. R e a y . M. Hately. S . H a l l . W . E . H a r e , D . I . H a l l w o o d , B . D . Harnier, F. Partridge. T. Bootle, M. W. Bates, D. W. Beardall, I. Atkinson, A. M. Shaw, P. M. McLeod. E . A p p l e t o n , V . E . B r o w n , E . H . C.road, H . M . G i l d b e r g , L a c e y , L . S o w e r b y , D . J - S t a n g e r , N . C . Wakefield. M. A r n o l d , T. R. d e V . B a l b i r n i e , V. M. B a r n e t - L a m b , P. Bell. J. M c G . Fletcher, R. S. Greenly, R. M. H o g g , M. Jones, A. G. I . a m b , J. H. M. M c K e n z i e , D. J. N e s b i t , G . 'Nesbit, E . F . Shield', C . S . W h i t a k e r .


21

Valcte VIb.

V. IV. III. I. Jun. T.P.S.

H. L. Joice, Prefect 1946, XI 1946, XV 1946, S.C. J u l y 1946, Matric. December 1946. E. Shippen, S.C. July 1946, Matric. December 1946. A. H. Stonehouse, Prefect 1945, XI 1944-5-6, XV 1945-6-7, Sports Champion 1946. H. B. McConway, S.C. December 1946. M. W. Harrison, Prefect 1945, XI 1946. F. M. Black. R . D . Basey, W . E . Brown. C. H. Gibson. J. G. Gibson, C. E. M. Hall. D. W. D. Caldwell. M. J. Croad, L. M. Fitzsimmons. J. D. Dawson, T. D. Grant, R. J. Hall.

OLD

BOYS'

CLUB

It is indeed gratifying to be able to record that great enthusiasm is being shown in the various activities of the Old Boys' Club. To say t h a t Pre-war standards have not only been attained b u t agreeably surpassed would certainly be no over-statement. Numbers are increasing weekly and the committee confidently look forward to a very bright future. To those of you who have not already joined m a y I take this opportunity of asking you to do so. All that is required of you is to send a subscription of ÂŁ1 is. to Mr. R. Harrison Thompson, 4, Ellison Place, Newcastle, which entitles y o u to life membership upon your name being formally passed through committee. A Re-Union Dinner was held at the R o y a l T u r k s Head Hotel, Newcastle, in September last and a very enjoyable evening was spent by approximately 75 Old Boys. On November 29th the Annual Dinner was held at the Grand Hotel, T y n e m o u t h , where we had a visit from the Dunelm Singers. This also was a very pleasant evening, the number of boys present surpassing that at the Re-Union Dinner. Our next function is the Annual Dance which is to be held this year at the Rex Hotel, Whitley B a y , on F r i d a y , January 31st, 1947, and on the following day we hope to have a d a y trip to Murravfield to see the International R u g b y Match. The Cricket committee are pressing steadily ahead with their fixture list and it is hoped that the coming season m a y see the re-birth of the Old Boys' Cricket Club. As to individual members we have to congratulate D. P. Sheedy on attaining C o u n t y honours on the Rugger field, whilst similar congratulations are extended to W. M. Burnside, D . F . C . , upon his recent appointment as Chief Legal Adviser to the Coal Board (Northern Region) and C. M. Storey upon his appointment as Chief Accountant to the same Board. In conclusion may I draw attention to the Memorial Tablet which it is proposed to have erected at the School for all those who lost their lives in the 1939-45 war. The committee are anxious t h a t no name be omitted and for this reason they wish to make a general appeal for all names and particulars to be submitted to them at the earliest possible moment. Wishing you all a very h a p p y and prosperous New Y e a r and looking forward to your continued co operation. R. H. DUNCAN, Hon. Secretary.

TYNEMOUTH

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL

T h e most important event in our School Y e a r has been our removal into new premises. The new School House (21, Holywell A v e n u e ) , detached from other buildings and standing in its own grounds, is ideal for its pur-

\


22 pose, and we work in very pleasant surroundings. W i t h t h e completion of the p l a y g r o u n d we shall feel t h a t we have a school of which we can be proud. W e h a v e changed t h e n a m e t o T y n e m o u t h P r e p a r a t o r y School t o avoid confusion with a school in t h e vicinity. D u r i n g the S p r i n g T e r m a p a r t y of 60 visited t h e T h e a t r e R o y a l to see " Peter P a n . " F o r m a n y of our y o u n g e r children it w a s their first visit to a theatre and the magic of the " w h i m s i c a l Sir J a m e s ' s " p l a y w a s v e r y real to t h e m . It w a s d u r i n g the E a s t e r V a c a t i o n t h a t our m o v e t o o k place, and our activities d u r i n g the S u m m e r T e r m , in Art, H a n d w o r k . D r a m a a n d Music, were directed towards a programme for an Open D a y . T h i s t o o k place at the end of term. Visitors saw each form's display of Handicrafts, A r t , History and G e o g r a p h y models. T h e rest of the afternoon w a s given over to a display of P h y s i c a l T r a i n i n g , C o u n t r y D a n c i n g , Singing, G a m e s , a Garden Song Scena, and t w o plays, " T h e Mad H a t t e r ' s T e a - p a r t y " and "Blackbird Pie." Mrs. Ellison presented the prizes to 1945 Prizewinners. F o r m I l i a . Peers. Tutton. I l l b . Laidler. Simpson. II. Hedley. Weatherhead. I. Dobson. Evans H. E. Progress Prizes : F o r m III. Jones D. II. Barker. I. W a t t (Carol). A collection to establish a School F u n d yielded i s . od. We began the A u t u m n T e r m with a H a r v e s t F e s t i v a l , afterwards t a k i n g the splendid collection of fruit and vegetables to Dr. B a r n a d o ' s H o m e at Cullercoats. Three children went to present the fruit and t h o r o u g h l y e n j o y e d seeing over t h e Home. T h e Christmas P a r t y was held in the R o y a l Hotel, and this y e a r we had a P u n c h and J u d y show which fascinated the Staff as much as t h e children. We were pleased to have M r . , Mrs. and Miss C. Ellison as our guests. O u r B o x O p e n i n g and C h r i s t m a s Collection for D r . B a r n a d o ' s amounted to ÂŁ15, and the usual a n n u a l collection of t o y s and books w a s taken t o the Cullercoats H o m e . H.G.G. 1 1946

Progress Prizes :

Form Ilia. Illb. II. I. F o r m III. II. I. NORTH

House Master :

PRIZEWINNERS

Jones D . R . 'Weatherhead G . Carol W a t t . Wright J. E. W a l k e r W. Lynden Warren. H a r b o t t l e J.

SHIELDS

Mr. GENTLE.

HOUSE

Laidler Hedley Dobson Browell

D. E. J. N. K. B. D.

NOTES

House C a p t a i n :

H. JOICE.

We offer our congratulations to P. L. P r e s t for g a i n i n g a Matriculation and to E. Shippen for gaining a School Certificate in t h e J u l y e x a m i n a t i o n s and to J. W. Laffey on b e i n g appointed a prefect. We also wish H. Joice success in his December e x a m i n a t i o n s . T h i s term, t h e House has contributed f i v e members t o t h e F i r s t X V . H. Joice, M. M c G i l v r a y and J. W a r d h a u g h gained their Colours, a n d Laffey and Skee also played. At t h e end of this term, Mr. Gentle arranged a House Q u i z , which we won by a clear lead of three points, Monkseaton being second. T h e Quiz team consisted of Laffey, Prest, M c G i l v r a y , D u n l e v y , W a r d h a u g h and Harrison A.


23 The House also contributed nine members to the Under 14 team, namely Hoskin, Hedley W . , Lambert, Lewis, T a y l o r , Davison, Turnbull I., Howell and Turnbull J. H. Finally we wish Mr. Gentle and all members of the House a Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Y e a r .

TYNEMOUTH House Master : Mr. WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

A. H. STONEHOUSE.

There have been no inter-house activities this term. Shaw, M c A u g h t r y , Reay, Hilton, Stephenson and E v e r e t t C. must be congratulated on gaining high positions in their respective forms. Four of our members sat their School Certificate examinations this December. We wish them the best of luck in their future careers. The School Debating Society was re-started this term, and Mackie was elected Secretary. We have been represented on the First XV team by J. K. E v a n s (Captain), A. H. Stonehouse (Vice-Captain), Mackie, Ward, Shaw, Mayhew and M c A u g h t r y , and on the Under 14 by J. Wakefield (Captain), Urwin, E v a n s C. and Stevenette. . Congratulations to A. H. Stonehouse on being selected to play for Northumberland C o u n t y Under 19 against the R o y a l Grammar School. He was chosen to play against Durham and played a splendid game. As a result he was chosen to play against Cumberland. J. Wakefield played for Northumberland Under 14 against Durham and against Cumberland. He was also chosen to play in the " T h r e e C o u n t i e s " Trial at Darlington. In closing we wish everyone a H a p p y and Prosperous New Y e a r .

WHITLEY House Master :

BAY

Mr. J. M. MILLER.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

D. R. LUNN.

We have had two members of the House playing for the First X V , Lunn and McConway, and the former was awarded his Colours. Gilmore played in several matches. Gofton, Fenwick, Richardson D. and Harrison D. have all played for the Under 16 team, and Say, Wakefield G . , Richardson P . , Meredith, Proctor and Herron have played for the Under 14 team. We were pleased to see that Wakefield G. and S a y were chosen to plav in the C o u n t y Trials. In the realm of school work we congratulate Lunn D. and Wallace on their excellent School Certificate results in J u l y when they both obtained Matriculation. We also congratulate the following on attaining high form positions : Lunn R . , Gofton, Reavley, Willey, Dixon, R y a n , Herbert, L a m b , Whitfield and Atkinson. We wish C o x and McConway success in the December examination. Our House Captain was appointed Head B o y at the beginning of term and we wish him success in his new office. Bristow and L u n n R. were appointed as Prefects this term. In the House Quiz, held at the end of the term, we were third. We wish all the house members a H a p p y Christmas and a Prosperous New Y e a r .

MONKSEATON HOUSE NOTES House Master :

Mr. B. S. BATES.

House Captain :

J. A. WELLS.

We are glad to report that, after a g a p of t w o years, we won the House Shield for the Summer Term. We thank all who contributed to this result. F o r their high form positions we congratulate the following : Brennan, W a t t V., Humble, Partridge P., Partridge J . , W a t t J . , Richardson P . , Hardie R. M. and Laidler. We congratulate Parkin, Rodgers and Forrest K. on their Matriculation successes in July. T h e y are all going on to take the Higher School Certificate.


24 F i v e members of the House have been playing for the School XV this term, Wells, Blunt, Forrest K . , Errington and Hardie R. G . , and of these B l u n t and Forrest K. have been given their Colours. Pringle played in the first few matches, b u t injuries have kept him out of the game latterly. We were second in the flouse Quiz at the end of term, being beaten by the winners. North Shields, by a very narrow margin. We wish all success to those who are leaving this term and wish them and all members of the House a H a p p y Christmas and a Prosperous New Year.

SENIOR

RUGBY

FOOTBALL

Senior football has not developed as well as I had hoped. In fairness to the First X V , it should be pointed out t h a t of nine School matches played, all except two were played on opponents' grounds. T w o home gamesâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;against Morpeth and South Shieldsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;were cancelled because of ground conditions. Of the nine games played, three were won (Tynemouth Municipal High School twice, and Dame A l l a n ' s ) , t w o were drawn (Whitley B a y and R . G . S . ) , and four lost (Whitley B a y , Morpeth, H e x h a m , and South Shields). Of these games the drawn match with R . G . S . at Newcastle was easily the best ; it was an exciting show throughout, and the School put up an excellent display of good R u g b y Football. Morpeth particularly, and Hexham have had very strong sides this season, b u t Morpeth only have beaten us at forward play. The School XV has been disappointing outside the scrum. Forrest and Blunt, though y o u n g and small, have combined well at half-back, and will do well if they are prepared to learn and study the game. The threequarters, though containing excellent talent, have never, except in the R . G . S . game, combined well, and dozens of tries have been thrown a w a y through selfishness. This is inexcusable in any game, whether school or international. E v a n s has captainpd the side well and is worth three or four average forwards, but he has not received the support he deserves. The School will not reach its pre-war standards until fifteen individuals are prepared to learn from their instructors and settle down as a team. Brilliant individualism leads nowhere, and one-handed giving and t a k i n g of passes, high tackling, and timidity cannot be tolerated. Stonehouse is to be congratulated on being selected to represent the C o u n t y in the all-age game against Durham. T h e " U n d e r 1 6 " team played four games, won one and lost three. Here again a very good pack saw most of its good work frittered a w a y by timid outsides. Perhaps next term will bring a more offensive spirit. B.S.B.

TYNEMOUTH FIRST XV v. WHITLEY GRAMMAR SCHOOL (14th September, 1946, at Whitley) This was the first game of the season and since both sides lacked practice, it was rather ragged. Nevertheless, the play was v e r y even, the result being in doubt right up to the final whistle. T h e T y n e m o u t h forwards did not play well together and the heeling was slow. As a result of this B l u n t was rather handicapped. Of the forwards, Joice, W a r d h a u g h and E v a n s played outstandingly, and Hesslegrave, on the wing, was excellent. Just before half-time Wells unfortunately missed an easy penalty goal, b u t this misfortune was compensated for by the fact that Whitley did likewise. At half-time neither side had scored and T y n e m o u t h had hopes of winning their first match. However, Whitley scored a t r y , which t h e y failed to convert, five minutes from the finish. In the remaining minutes, Tvnemouth, although they pressed hard, were unable to make up the lost points. 4


25 Whitley concentrated throughout the game on forward rushes, which Tynemouth forwards found difficult to stem. Owing to lack of ball supply, Tynemouth three-quarters were never able really to get going. Result.—Lost 3 — o . Team.—McGilvray ; Pringle, Gilmore, Hesslegrave ; Stonehouse, Blunt ; Wardhaugh, Joice, Lunn, Wells, McConway, Hardie, Mackie, Evans J. (Captain).

TYNEMOUTH FIRST XV

v.

HEXHAM GRAMMAR

SCHOOL

(Saturday, 21st September, at Hexham) This was rather a disappointing game. The Tynemouth forwards had the Hexham forwards beaten, but owing to lack of support from the threequarters and halves they did not gain much advantage from this. The Hexham halves were definitely superior to Tynemouth's and their threequarters also had control and definitely played together, whereas Tynemouth centres were much too selfish and gave the wing few passes and no room in which to manoeuvre. During the first half, Tynemouth scored from a penalty goal kicked by Wells. Shortly afterwards Stonehouse scored an unconverted try for Tynemouth while in the same period Hexham scored two penalty goals and a try, which they also failed to convert. Thus at half-time the home team was leading by three points. The second half was disastrous for Tynemouth, Hexham scoring two more penalty goals and two more tries. Another t r y was scored for Tynemouth by McGilvray, who came from full-back to score with the threequarters. In this game, Evans and McGilvray were again outstanding. Tynemouth threw away the match through lack of team work and inferiority at half-back. Result.—Hexham, 4 penalty goals, 3 tries, 21 pts.; Tynemouth, 1 penalty goal, 2 tries, 9 pts. T e a m . — M c G i l v r a y ; Hesslegrave, Stonehouse, Gilmore, Errington ; Forrest, Blunt ; Wardhaugh, Joice, Ward, Wells, McConway, Evans (Captain), Mackie, Hardie.

TYNEMOUTH FIRST XV v. WHITLEY GRAMMAR SCHOOL (Thursday, 10th October, at Percy Park) This was a very good hard game. The tackling on both sides was excellent and both sides should have scored from easy penalty kicks. It looked as though Tynemouth would win comfortably, but tries were missed owing to a lamentable lack of co-ordination with the three-quarters. The wing three-quarters, who might have Deen able to score thus rarely saw the ball. During the first half Tynemouth failed to score from a penalty kick and at half-time the score was o — o . The second half started with renewed vigour, but neither side succeeded in scoring. Towards the close of the game Whitley were awarded a penalty kick, but they also failed to score. In the few minutes remaining, in spite of fierce attacks by the exhausted players, the score remained unchanged, the result of a hard-fought, evenly-matched game being a draw, o — o . Team.—McGilvray ; Errington, Stonehouse, Gilmore, Hesslegrave ; Forrest, Blunt ; Lunn, Joice, Wardhaugh, Mackie, Hardie, Wells, McConway, E v a n s (Captain).


TYNEMOUTH

FIRST

XV

v.

TYNEMOUTH HIGH

SCHOOL

(Saturday, 12th October, at Percy Park) Although this was Tynemouth's first victory it was not a very satisfactory game. Tynemouth were much the better team and they had complete mastery in the scrum. Nevertheless the School only succeeded in obtaining two unconverted tries. Blunt, assisted by quick heeling from the scrum, gave out on excellent ball supply, but once again the effect of this was spoiled by the threequarters who failed to combine with the result that the wing three-quarters rarely saw the ball. The High School tackled and fought well, but they were beaten in all departments. Stonehouse scored an unconverted try and shortly afterwards Evans did likewise. Wells and McGilvray narrowly missed converting with excellent kicks from wide out. In spite of frequent attacks Tynemouth High School failed to score. Result.—Tynemouth School, 2 tries, 6 pts..; Tynemouth High School, Nil.

SCHOOL XV v. R.G.S. II

(Saturday, 26th October, at Jesmond) In this game Tynemouth were weakened by the absence of Errington and Mackie. The game was good and it is probable that with a full side the School would have won. The game was an excellent display of R u g b y at its best. Both sides kept the play open and good passing and good backing up were also noteworthy features of the game. R . G . S . scored first with a rush over the line after a throw-in with great determination and a few minutes afterwards Stonehouse ran well to score wide-out. There was no further scoring during the rest of the game. Both sides played hard and attacked often, but they were unable to get past the defence. Later Tynemouth were awarded a penalty kick from which Wells narrowly missed scoring. Result.—Tynemouth, i try, 3 pts.; R . G . S . , 1 try, 3 pts. Team.—McGilvray ; Gilmore, Laffey, Stonehouse, Hesslegrave ; Blunt, Forrest ; Lunn, Joice, Wardhaugh, Wells, McConway, Hardie, Skee, Evans.

SCHOOL XV v.

DAME ALLAN'S II

(Saturday, 19th October, at Northern's Ground) This match has been the most successful in the first half of the season. Dame Allan's 'A' team being beaten by 23—o. The School gave a much better display than in previous matches. The passing was good and as a result the play was kept open. There was a lot of passing among the forwards and this led up to several tries. The halves were very good. The first try was scored after a quick heel from the scrum, passed out by Blunt to Forrest to Stonehouse who scored. Shortly afterwards Stonehouse scored the second try after a good run. Wells failed to convert. Then Wells scored from a good dash but Evans failed to convert. Good three-quarter play enabled Errington to score the fourth unconverted try. A few minutes before half-time Stonehouse passed out to Laffey who passed to Hesslegrave enabling him to score. Blunt converted thus bringing the score to 1 7 — o at half-time. Tynemouth should have added many more points during the second half. The score was soon brought to 20—o by a pass from Forrest to Errington who scored. Then a penalty kick by Stonehouse from the extreme right was kicked to the extreme left and was well followed up by E v a n s to bring the score to 23—o. In the time remaining.Tynemouth were unable to score again. Dame Allan's made several attacks, but they were all stopped. Result.—Tynemouth, 6 tries, 1 goal. 23 pts.; Dame Allan's, Nil. Team.—McGilvray ; Errington, Stonehouse, Lafley, Hesslegrave ; Forrest. Blunt ; Lunn, Joice, Wardhaugh, Wells, McConway, Mackie, Ward,

Evans.


27

TYNEMOUTH SCHOOL (Under 16) v. WHITLEY G.S.

(Under 16)

(26th October, at Rockcliffe) This was the first Under 16 match of the season, and although Tynemouth lost 12—6 they were as good as the opposing side. Whitley opened the scoring with a penalty goal just under the posts. Tynemouth pressed hard but were unable to score. After play had moved into the Tynemouth half Whitley received the ball from a loose scrum and their stand-off scored. Tynemouth then began a series of attacks just before half-time and were rewarded by a try scored by McGilvray. This was not converted and at half-time the score was 6 — 3 in Whitley's favour. From the kick-off Tynemouth went into the Whitley half but were gradually driven back to their own touchline when they began to play rather half-heartedly and as a result Whitley were able to score an unconverted try. Later McGilvray scored for Tynemouth but failed to convert. The issue was settled when Whitley kicked a penalty goal. As there was no further scoring Whitley won by 12 points to 6. T e a m . — D u n l e v y ; Brown, Gofton, Wakefield J., Shaw; McGilvray, Fenwick; Wardhaugh, Brennan, Ward, Mayhew, McAughtry, Evans J., Skee, Mackie.

SCHOOL

XV v.

MORPETH

G.S.

(Wednesday, 30th October, at Morpeth) Tynemouth School was well beaten at Morpeth by a team which contained 9 of the previous season's players. With this very strong team they won by 26—3. by reason of their superior three-quarter play. The forwards were also kept down by their tall opponents and were usually beaten for possession both in the scrum and the line-out. Tynemouth lacked cohesion in the first half, but they played a much more lively game in the second half. E v a n s tackled courageously, but Morpeth's backing up usually left them with a spare man to score the tries. Wells kicked a penalty goal for Tynemouth ; however, the best kick of the match was a fine drop-goal by the Morpeth stand-off-half, from the 25 yard line. Result.—Morpeth, 2 goals, 4 tries, 1 drop-goal, 26 pts.; penalty goal, 3 pts.

Tynemouth, 1

Team.—McGilvray ; Errington, Laffey, Stonehouse, Hesslegrave ; Forrest, Lunn, Joice, Wardhaugh, Wells, McConway, Hardie, Mackie, E v a n s J.

JUNIOR

RUGBY

FOOTBALL

The most encouraging feature of the Junior Rugby has been the keenness of the competition for the last few places in the " U n d e r 1 4 " and the promise of enthusiasm of a number of those still too young and small for a place in the team (notably Hunter J., whose tackling has been an objectlesson to all). Though the " U n d e r 1 4 " have again had a disappointing season, as the only match they have won was that against Bede Collegiate, they have done considerably better than last year. They have almost always met larger and faster opponents, but on only two occasions have they lost by a wide margin. Wakefield J. at fly-half has been outstanding, and is to be congratulated on being chosen to represent the Northern Counties. Of the other outsides, Wakefield G. always goes really hard, but has too often missed his man through faulty positioning ; Davison at scrum-half is fearless at falling on the ball, but is still slow and not strong enough to give his fly-half a reasonably long pass.

t


28 The forwards, though usually out-weighted, have more than held their own in the tight, and Meredith has become a very useful hooker. In the loose Say has played extremely well, and Turnbull W. has stood out as the best type of hard-working forward. As last year, the main weakness of the side has been the feebleness of the tackling, and until this is improved thev will continue to lose. D.S.U.

AUTUMN

NATURE

NOTES.

1946

The weather has been even more varied than is usual, but temperatures have been generally low, and sleety snow has twice fallen, which is unusual in this coastal district before the New Year. Perhaps the most noticeable feature this autumn is one that began to be evident during last winter ; the decrease of sea-birds on the shore as a result of its more frequent use by people, a pleasure which we cannot begrudge them, as there are plenty of comparatively deserted parts of the coast to which the birds can resort. This means, however, that the observer must go in search of them, and so as complete a record as those provided during the war years cannot be compiled. Nevertheless, Ringed Plovers. Redshanks and Oyster-catchers have been seen on the shore at Tynemouth and Cullercoats since September, Ringed Plovers being the most abundant and usually seen in small groups, while Redshanks prefer to be alone. A lone Dunlin attached itself to a group of Ringed Plovers ; only two of these birds have been seen.

otherwise

Two Little Stints (another small wading-bird) were seen on the same d a y (October i ) . Three Turnstones were at Cullercoats on November 16 and on December 12 six were seen at St. Mary's Island, with 22 Oystercatchers. Late in July a few Redshanks, Dunlin and three Sanderling were on the River Blyth. Eider Ducks have been seen in small parties off shore at Cullercoats, and a flock of Widgeon spent an hour on the water off Tynemouth beach on September 25. A (lock of 20 Scoters flew North past Whitley B a y on October 5 and a straggling flock of 150 were at Seaton Sluice on December 12. Eleven Tufted Ducks arrived for their annual winter stay early in October, and have since steadily increased to 88 birds. A single Goldencrest (the smallest European bird) was seen at Cullercoats on October 8. A number of these birds were seen in October, 1943, and we believe them to be winter visitors from Scandinavia. Another was seen at Hepscott on August 15 which would be a resident. Redwings and Fieldfares, the best-known winter visitors, were first seen on September 30 and October 5 respectively. Swifts, Swallows and House Martins departed in September. The departure of Summer visitors was not very noticeable this year ; no Warblers or Redstarts, and only the Wheatear being seen on the shore in September. A Kingfisher was seen at Mitford on August 16. The little inhabited parts of the Northumbrian shore, which are numerous are considered by all leading ornithologists as being favoured with a large and varied number of regularly visiting birds so it is hoped that any one interested will utilise his advantage in living near to these places. This survey is not, of course, complete, but it is thought that comments on some observations will prove more interesting than a mere list of all of them. G.R.L.

J.A.W.


THE

CHRISTMAS

CONCERT

Perhaps the firmest indication of our gradual return to pre-war w a y s was the resumption on the last Monday of T e r m of the Christmas Concerts. It was the first since 1938. T h e Headmaster declared t h a t it was as good as a n y previous show, an attainment which should, we think, satisfy performers, organisers and audience alike. T h i s success should spur us on to produce a " B e s t E v e r " next year. T h e only general complaint we can make is about the high temperature of the Hall, which certainly affected the C o m m u n i t y Singing adversely, b u t appeared to have no undesirable effect on the less-crowded stage. The programme catered for all ages and all tastes, but we are sure t h a t Mrs. Hilton's superbly acted and produced extract from " A l i c e in W o n d e r l a n d , " T h e Mad H a t t e r ' s T e a P a r t y , appealed to the V l t h Forms and Staff perhaps even more than to the lower forms. It was performed by members of l i b , with E v e r e t t in the title-role, L a m b as Alice, Harmer as the Dormouse and Scott as the March Hare. The second play, a " W i l l i a m " episode, presented by members of the Third Form and produced by Miss Marshall, was almost equally g o o d â&#x20AC;&#x201D; indeed, some people considered it even better. The subject, " William the S h o w m a n , " was promising, and we were not disappointed. Fleck made a remarkably good William and he was a b l y supported by E v a n s , S t u d d y , Joicey, Mutch, Richardson P. and Heyes. These members of his Gang, in the second scene became K i n g Alfred, St. George, K i n g Charles and " a u d i e n c e " respectively. Between the various " t u r n s " carols were sung by the School, with Mr. Roberts at the piano, and the V t h F o r m Choir, accompanied by K. H. Miller, gave two items of carols. I^ack of rehearsal made it impossible to embark on any but the most familiar of these, b u t the renderings of old favourites was pleasing, in spite of subdued volume. Lack of volume was also the fault of the I V t h Form Band. This was rather surprising in view of the sounds which we have heard this enterprising b o d y produce only too frequently during the term. T h e y entertained us with a Musical Comedy selection and received a rousing ovation which must have been very gratifying to them. T a i t G. at the piano did sterling work. Messrs. K. H. Miller and D. Brennan played two piano duets that were loudly and deservedly applauded. A n y lack of colour in the first item, " Sanctuary of the Heart, ' was more than compensated for in the second, a lively rendering of " The Parade of the Tin Soldiers." T h e finale was provided by members of V I b , who presented an entertainment after the style of " Radio Forfeits." The chief organiser, G. Shaw, was unfortunately unable to be present to see the results of his hard work, G. R. L u n n deputised at very short notice in the " Y e s - N o " interlude, and gave M. Harrison and K. H. Miller time for breath. Some of the Staff became victims of the quiz and thus partly atoned for their failure this year to produce an item of their own. Mr. Bates disappointed us by surviving a maliciously obscure question, b u t Messrs. Wastle and Fullarton paid forfeits in such a spirited way as to prove t h a t they have missed their vocation. A word of consolation to Mrs. Turnbull.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;most people c a n ' t get A N Y noise out of a bugle ! As the National Anthem ended we all felt our evening had been well spent. We must thank all those who have worked hard to make the concert a success, especially Mr. Gentle, on whom so m a n v onerous duties fell. D.R.L

\


THE

DEBATING

SOCIETY

T h e School Debating Society was revived during the A u t u m n Term after a lapse of several years. The committee elected consisted of G. R. Lunn, D. R. Lunn, S. Errington, B. B l u n t and J. Mackie (Hon. Secretary). Mr. Gentle presided over the meetings, of which, during the term there were four. Meetings were held in the Hall after 4 p.m. and participation in debate was confined to Forms VI. and V . , although other forms were allowed to attend. We are still waiting for the V t h Form to speak. Three debates were held, the first two with compulsory attendance, the last on a voluntary basis. It was noticeable t h a t in the last debate interest shifted partly to the lower section of the School, and many members of I l a . were in the audience. The first debate concerned Housing, and the motion, supported by Messrs. Forrest and Prest and opposed by Messrs. B l u n t and Rodgers, was " T h a t Squatting is wholly justifiable." This debate went remarkably well for a first attempt, perhaps because of its topical interest. Mr. Forrest attacked the Housing Programme in no uncertain terms, and perhaps the most outstanding feature was Mr. D. Lunn's speech from the Floor in favour of the motion, which was carried by 26 votes to 22. T h e next debate, on the motion " T h a t this House believes in G h o s t s , " was not so animated and although Messrs. Miller and McGilvray showed almost religious fervour was, when put to a rather stolid house iost by 25 votes to 8. Easily the best debate was provided by the motion at the third meeting : " T h a t a school uniform is desirable." It proved highly controversial and was well supported by Messrs. G. R. L u n n and J. K. E v a n s , Messrs. Parkin and Errington opposing. As the speakers warmed up the excitement grew, and a particularly furious onslaught by Mr. Errington was evidently too much for some of the lesser brethren from I l a . w h o retired, with their chairs, in a panic. N o w we shall probably never see them again ! There were numerous speeches from the floor, and the motion was eventually carried by 20 votes to 1 1 . T h e House Quiz, which took the place of a debate at the last meeting of the term, proved a roaring success in more senses than one, and drew a large attendance from the rest of the school. The only hitch was a chaotic jam at the side door through which everyone seemed bent on t a k i n g a chair simultaneously. The "pressed m e n " of the four Houses, six to each team, were quizzed four times, making a total of 96 questions. Our thanks go to Mr. Gentle, who was Quizmaster, for the varied and v e r y fair range of questions, ranging from the position of a cow's horns in relation to its ears, to the whereabouts of the T a j Mahal. The final scores were : North Shields, 18 ; Monkseaton, 15 ; B a y , 14 ; T y n e m o u t h , 13.

Whitley J.M.

FLOWERS OF SPRING First comes the snowdrop garbed in white. Then the crocus stands upright. Follows the daffodil

with trumpet gay

T h e g a u d y tulip brightens array, P.R.H.,

Form Tib.


31

SECRETS OF THE SEA Down by the sea I love to be Where the waves sweep in from the deep, And as each one breaks on the rocks below T h e y tell y o u the secrets of long ago. Of pirate ships and fights at sea And tales of all their victories. Oh ! to have a ship of my own and seek adventure far from home. J . S . , Form l i b .

THE

SEA

A great white horse goes a-riding, Over me all the w a y . To the beach where people are laughing And children are h a p p y at play. A sandcastle goes toppling over As it's dashed beneath my spray ; The children shout for Rover W h o turns and scampers a w a y . B u t soon I'll sweep the sands quite clean Whilst evening peace descends, W i t h only the stars and moon to gleam, On my toil which never ends. M.G.S., Form IV.

A CAROL The night was dark, The wind was strong, When through the gloom There came a song, Which warmed the heart And brought c o n t e n t â&#x20AC;&#x201D; A carolling of The Blessed E v e n t . Children's voices Lifted clear, In love and praise Of Saviour, dear. A babe so small W h o lived to teach The whole wide world Of love and peace. Inside the house T h e y paused and smiled, Remembering T h a t little child. And in their hearts Crept tenderness F o r Him whose birth Brought happiness. M.G.S., Form IV.


32

LIBRARY

NOTES

This term has been on the whole a successful one. Several hundred books have been taken out, considerably more than in the corresponding term last year. The lower forms have shown the most interest. Possibly the top forms have been influenced by the destructive criticism of a few cynics. E v e n if some of the general Fiction has seen better d a y s the Scientific, Biographical and Historical sections contain m a n y valuable and up-to-date books, while in the Classical section works of the better-known writers can be found. Many of these books are not only interesting, but a great help in school work. We would like to appeal to those who regularly make use of the library to show their appreciation by giving a book or books so t h a t the scope of the library can be extended. Before the war it was customary for boys to do this when leaving. We are grateful to those who have given books this term. be glad to help in the choice of such gifts.

We will

G. R. LUNN, Librarian.

SCHOOL HEAD BOY : PREFECTS :

OFFICERS

D. R. L u n n . D. R. L u n n , B. E. Blunt, R. A. Bristow, J. A. Mackie, K.

A.

Forrest, R.

D. L u n n , J. W.

Laffey,

J. A. Wells,

J. K. E v a n s , S. A. Errington, M. W. Harrison, H. L. Joice, A. H. Stonehouse. CAPTAIN

OF FOOTBALL :

HOUSE CAPTAINS :

J.

K.

Evans.

W h i t l e y B a y , D. R. L u n n . T y n e m o u t h , A. H. Stonehouse. Monkseaton, J. A. Wells. North Shields, H. L. Joice.


TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL MAGAZINE.

SPRING TERM. SCHOOL

NOTES

The outstanding feature of the term was the long spell of atrocious weather during which we were unable to get any sort of exercise except that of shovelling snow. We were unable to carry out our normal plan of having the sports in the Easter term and were not able even to run off the heats. We regret the departure of Mrs. Turnbull from the Staff after three years' service, and in her place we welcome Mr. M. I. Brennan who will be responsible for the teaching of History. The House Football Cup was won by Monkseaton. IV. Jun. T.P.S.

H. D. G. A.

Avete Bootle. Bilclough. D. Evans, G. H. A. Gilman, D. G. Harrison, j. H. Hemy, Macdonald, G. Macdonald.

IV. III. lib.. I. T.P.S.

G. F. O. R. R. F.

Valete Oliver, P. Skee. Scott. Kirsebom. Scott. M. Hogg, J. S. McKenzie, J. H. M. McKenzie, S. Murray, E. Worsley.

NORTH SHIELDS HOUSE NOTES House Master : Mr. G E N T L E . House Captain : J. W . L A F F E Y . We began the term without the services of Joice who had captained the House for a short time. With Shippen he completed his matriculation during the December examinations and we wish them success in the future. Prest also completed his matriculation in December. This term we contributed two members to the X V , Wardhaugh and Laffey, and eight to the Under 14 team. They were Hoskin, Hedley W . , Taylor, Davison, Watson, Turnbull I., Rowell, and Turnbull J. H. We congratulate those who have reached the finals in the Sports and wish them success next term. Lastly congratulations to Lambert, Davison, Scott G., Harmer and Graham on gaining high positions in their forms. W H I T L E Y BAY HOUSE NOTES House Master : Mr. J. M. MILLER. House Captain : D. R. LUNN. The most important House event this term was, of course, the House Matches, played towards the end of the term. In these we were a good second, winning all our games against Tynemouth and North Shields, but unfortunately, losing both games against the all-conquering Monkseaton. It was a matter for regret that in each of the senior games a member of the opposing team was disabled. McConway is to be congratulated on gaining his School Certificate in December. Finally, we congratulate all those members of the House, who, by a steady term's work, have achieved high positions in their forms and added needed points to our House total. MONKSEATON HOUSE NOTES House Master : Mr. B . S. B A T E S . House Captain : J. A. W E L L S . With five regular First XV players, including the two wings, the stand-off, and the scrum-half, playing in the First VII in the House Matches it is not surprising that we gained top position. Both teams won all their matches, gaining maximum points. We look forward to a good result in the sports again next term, and the House Cricket Matches,


Watt D., Watt J., Humble, Partridge P., Partridge J., Richardson P., Hately, Carrick, Hardie and Laidler have all gained high positions in their forms and must be congratulated. We won the House Shield again last term by a substantial margin. Finally we offer our best wishes to the members of the House who take their School Certificate examination next term. TYNEMOUTH

HOUSE

NOTES

House Master : Mr. G. W A S T L E . House Captain : J. M A C K I E . We were unfortunate in the House Matches : J. K. Evans, the School rugger captain, injured his shoulder early in the second game and was unable to take further part ; and Stokoe was unabfe to play in the first two matches for the second team. Our first team drew with North Shields, but we lost the other matches. We can only hope for better results in the Sports. We were represented in the First XV by J. K. Evans, Mackie, Ward and Shaw, and in the Under 14 by Stokoe and Wakefield J. Our congratulations go to Wakefield, who played in several Under 14 county matches with distinction and later in the North-South trial. We must congratulate Hilton P., Read, and Stephenson G. on gaining high positions in their forms ; also Miller K. on obtaining his School Certificate in December. We wish Harrison M., a former member of the House, the best of luck in July, when he takes his School Certificate examination. RUGBYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;SPRING

TERM

1947

Prolonged bad weather made it impossible to play any School matches and there were few practice games. Fortunately the frost and snow disappeared just before the end of term and we were able to play the House Matches. Thanks to the absence of any other material we are able to write them up in greater detail than is usually possible. THE

HOUSE

MATCHES

The seven-a-side matches were delayed by the bad weather until the last Thursday and Friday of the term when some interesting football was seen, especially on the second day. Each House provided a first and second team, and Monkseaton, with five of the School XV in their first team and a formidable second seven, were comfortable winners. Tynemouth were unfortunate in losing J. K. Evans in the first minutes of their second match and North Shields were without McGilvray. A feature of the matches was the strong running of Hesslegrave for Monkseaton, and some of the smaller boys played courageously. Âť Ten points were awarded for a win by the First Seven and six points for a win by the Second Seven. Games and Results North Shields II v. Whitley Bay II. Whitley Bay, with a fairly big team, kept the small North Shields team in their own half for most of the game. In the first half W o o d F., .Wakefield G. and Richardson D. scored tries ; in the second, Richardson, Tate K. and Say added to the Whitley Bay score but play was more even. Tate converted the last try. Result : Whitley Bay '20, North Shields 0. .Monkseaton II v. Tynemouth II. Monseaton were the heavier side and won comfortably by a goal and three tries. The scorers were Reid (3) and Dodsworth. Humble converted the first try. Reid was well tackled several times after getting near to adding to the score. Result : Monkseaton 14, Tynemouth 0.


North Shields I v. Whitley Bay I. This was a closely fought game. North Shields began strongly and led at half-time with a try by Skee. In the second half, after some even play, Gilmore broke away to score between the posts arid convert his try. Result : Whitley Bay 5, North Shields 3. Moukseaton 1 v. Tynemouth I. Monkseaton proved their superiority from the first. Errington broke away and scored after a long run, and Hesslegrave had a try between the posts. Wells converted both tries. Errington again scored just before half-time. In the second half Forrest added to the score and Rodgers crossed after Hesslegrave had been brought down almost on the Tynemouth line. Result : Monkseaton 19, Tynemouth 0. North Shields II v. Monkseaton II. In the first half Humble converted tries by Dodsworth and Reid before lloskin kicked a penalty goal for North Shields. Further tries by Reid and Dodsworth in the second half were unconverted. Result : Monkseaton 10, North Shields 3. Whitley Bay II v. Tynemouth II. Whitley Bay started strongly with a try by Meredith, followed by one from Richardson which Tate converted. Tate then scored between the posts and Wakefield G. converted. The second half was more even, and Evans C. tackled well for Tynemouth. Tate scored a try between the posts. Result : Whitley Bay 10, Tynemouth 0. North Shields I v. Monkseaton I. Monkseaton were much too strong for North Shields, and had most of the ball except for a few moments at the beginning of the second half. Errington scored between the posts in the first minute despite good attempts to stop him and Wells converted. Then Wells scored between the posts but failed to convert. In the second half Errington broke away to score and Forrest converted. Later Forrest scored a try. Result : Monkseaton 21, North Shields, 0. Whitley Bay I v. Tynemouth I. This was a closely-fought game. Tynemouth were unfortunate in losing Evans, but Wakefield J. took his place. Just before half-time Lunn almost broke through for Whitley Bay, but Shaw tackled him. In the second hall the play was still very even, but near the end of the game Gilmore broke away to score the winning try. Result : Whitley Bay 3, Tynemouth 0. .Moukseaton II v. Whitley Bay II. This was one of the best games, the sides being keen and evenly matched. Dodsworth attempted many a breakthrough and gained some ground although he did not score. Richardson touched down for Whitley to save a try. Early in the second half Richardson P. scored for Monkseaton and two minutes later Reid crossed for Humble to convert. Result : Monkseaton 8, Whitley Bay 0. North Shields II v. Tyneniouth II. Tynemouth pressed hard in the first half, but Hedley scored a good try for North Shields after a breakthrough just before half-time. In the second half both sides came near to scoring, Evans twice for Tynemouth and lledley lor North Shields. Harrison finally made the game safe for North Shields by scoring after a scramble on the Tynemouth line. Result : North Shields 0, Tynemouth 0.


Monkseaton I v. Whitley Bay I. Whitley Bay fought hard and had the advantage in the second half when Errington had to leave the field with an injured knee. Hesslegrave ran well and scored three very good tries, two in the first half and on<in the second. Gilmore tackled well for Whitley Bay. Result :

Monkseaton 9, Whitley Bay 0.

Tynemouth I v. North Shields I. This game caused considerable excitement as Tynemouth needed to win to escape bottom place. They led by a try from Wakefield J. at half-time after a struggle on the North Shields line. In the second half Tynemouth began strongly and looked like increasing their lead, but North Shields pushed them back and finally Dunlevy scored after another scramble on the line and the game was drawn. Result :

Tynemouth ,3, North Shields 3.

Final Points :â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Monkseaton ... Whitley Bay North Shields Tynemouth FIRST

XV

...

...

48 32 II

y CHARACTERS

Evans J. K. (Colours 11)45-4(5-47). Has been a great success as captain of the side. He puts everything into his game, tackles splendidly and runs and supports well. He is full of enthusiasm for the game and is quite outstanding as a schoolboy forward. Stonchouse (Colours 1944-45-46-47). Last year's captain, he has taken on the less important role of vice-captain this season. Being faster and having more thrust than the other outsides, he is inclined to hang on to the ball too long. He played extremely well in the County All-age match against Durham and he should become a very useful member of a club side. McGilvray (Colours 1946-47). Was playing very well indeed as a centre threequarter. He broke his leg in the Christmas holidays and he will be a big loss to the X V . Forrest (Colours 1946-47). He has " c o m e o n " remarkably as a fly-half and he seems to have much more affection for Rugger now. He combines very happily with Blunt. Blunt (Colours 1946-47). A young scrum-half who has shown considerable skill and plenty of courage. He brings out the latent skill of Forrest, and is a great inspiration to the sitle. Wardhaugh (Colours 1946-47). A big front-row forward who has distinguished himself in the line-out. He is rather slow to back up. Lunn I). R. (Colours 1946-47). Another big front-row forward who, though a little slow and lumbering in the loose, has plenty of determination, lie plays hard to the end of the game. Joice (Colours 1946-47). Has hooked well but is inclined to be satisfied with good hooking ; he must learn to get into the loose and make use of his height in the line-out. MeComvay. Second-row forward. Well-built and hard-working at all times. Wells. Second-row forward. He is now keen and is an excellent placekick, but he does not always have the best of luck. Hesslegrave. Wing-threequarter. A very great asset to the side for he runs with determination and he is very fast. Gilmore. Can play at centre or on the wing. He is very strong, but he does not always make the best use of his weight and his tackling must improve.


Erring!on. Still runs very strongly and he has a long stride. He is showing much more keenness. Ward. A weighty utility forward who is much keener on the game than he was at the beginning of the season. Mackie. Lock ; he is keen and eager to learn, and is well-built for his position in the scrum. Hardie. Wing forward. Is very light but he is enthusiastic and tackles courageously. Pringle. Played only against Whitley when his old knee trouble returnedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;another great loss to the side. Skee. Came into the scrum late in the season and has shown great promise and keenness. SPEECH

DAY

The first Speech Day since March, 1939, was held in the Plaza, Tynemouth, on Monday, March 10th, in the evening. There was a very large attendance of parents and friends. In the absence of Dr. Charlesworth, the Chairman of the Governors, Mr. L. Pearson took the Chair. After lie had welcomed the parents and Lord Eustace Percy he called on the Headmaster to give his report. The Headmaster then gave an account of the progress of his School during the years of war. After briefly recounting the preparations made early in 1939 for carrying on and also for a possible move to a large house in the country he spoke of the gradual reduction of the Staff and the replacement of those called-up by mistresses. He spoke in very high praise of their work, and paid tribute to the help he received from those masters who remained. The work of the School had gone on steadily and although the numbers dropped for a time the standard had been maintained or improved. In the School Certificate 75 per cent, had passed and over 5'2 per cent, had matriculated. In the Higher Certificate 5 out of 6 had passed. The Junior Schools had been maintained and at Monkseaton they had now moved into a much larger and more suitable house where, under the care of Mrs. Gordon and Mrs. Barker and Miss Forster the numbers had risen to 05. This Junior School was now. recognised by the Ministry. In spite of the lack of masters the games had continued normally. The Headmaster then spoke of the grievously heavy casualty list suffered by the Old Boys, 25 of whom had given their lives during the war. The Old Boys' Club are placing a memorial to them in the School Hall and it is hoped soon to make an appeal to Old Boys and Parents for funds to build a new Assembly Hall which could also be used as a gymnasium. The list of war decorations showed 6 D.F.C., 1 A.F.C., 1 M.C., 2 M . B . E . , and 2 O . B . E . University successes included 10 M.B., B.S., 8 B.Sc., 1 Classics B.A. -At Cambridge one Old B o y obtained 1st class in the Nat. Science Tripos and was awarded a Scholarship at Queens' College. The Headmaster, after saying that the Old Boys' Club had once again started its activities, emphasised the value to the School of an energetic and strong b o d y of Old Boys. There had been an innovation that morning when a service of Thanksgiving had been held at Holy Saviour Church, when those who had been able to attend heard an inspiring address given by Canon Johnstone. This service would in future be an integral part of Speech Day. In conclusion the Headmaster spoke of a revival of interest in Greek and hoped for a better understanding; of the Classics which in his view were really the foundation-stone of knowledge. After the presentation of the prizes Lord Eustace Percy, Rector of King's College, gave his address. He said that the coming generation would have to meet the challenge of living in a small country which was temporarily poor, was faced with every kind of handicap, and which had exhausted itself in a fight which it believed to be true and worthwhile. They would have to forego much and work harder, but they had a chance of restoring the country to a happy, prosperous and noble state. It was easy for an entire generation to go stale. There had been successive disappointments at the slowness of the return to normal conditions and one


was liable to feel all sorts of grievances against the Government and everyb o d y else. Education founded on science and humanity would keep alive hope which sprang from memories of great things done in the past. PRIZES Matriculation. K. A. Forrest, H. L. Joice, D. R. Lunn, J. A. Mackie, D. A. Parkin, P. L. Prest, S. M. Rodgers, E. Shippen, D. M. Wallace. School Certificate. E. Cox, B. Hesslegrave, A. N. Hunter, H. B. McConway, K. H. Miller. Stockdale Prize for Languages. D. R. Lunn. History Prize (presented by Mrs. Turnbull). D. R. Lunn. FORM

PRIZES

V. IV. III. Ila. lib. 1 Jun. T.P.S.

D. I. Brennan, W. A. Gofton, G. R. Lunn. J. U. Reavley, W. Turnbull, D. N. Watt. D. B. Armstrong, R. B. Gristwood, D. Nichol, J D. Watt. G. G. Davison, W. S. Dixon, R. A. Peel, P. J. Richardson. A. S. Carrick, M. J. Read, G. H. Stephenson. R. M. Hardie, A. Lamb, G. R. Scott. N. W. Brady, T. M. Oliver, G. J. C. Whitfield, M. O. C Joy. Ilia. D. R. Jones, D. E. W. Laidler. IHb. E. G. Weatherhead, J. N. Hedley. II. K. B. Dobson, C. Watt. I. J. E. Wright, D. Browell. Progress Prizes presented by Mrs. Gordon). III. W. Walker. II. L. Warren. 1 J. Harbcttle. ADDRESS

GIVEN

BY

REV. CANON

ON

SPEECH

V. L. JOHNSTONE

DAY

My text is based on a passage in one of the Church's finest prayers. The General Thanksgiving. " And we beseech Thee, give us that due sense of all T h y mercies that our hearts may be unfeignedly thankful and that we show forth T h y praise not only with our lips but in our lives, by giving up ourselves to T h y service, and by walking together in holiness and righteousness all our lives." It is a common human failing to take things for grantedâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;all kinds of blessings are showered on us every dayâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but we just take it all ;.s a matter of course. Only if things go wrong do we turn to God and realise that there is a God who orders all tilings in heaven and earth. So let us try to correct that failing to-day by thanking God from the bottom of our hearts for everything that this School represents ; the very fact that you have a school at all after all the hazards of war, the fact that ii preserved its identity and its buildings all through the war years, the fact that you have warmth and lighting, school material and playgrounds, boots and warm clothes when children in so many lands have none of these things. Most of you will have been so young in the war years that you will hardly remember the extreme danger in which your nation stood. When I think of the war I think of March, 1942, when I was the Chaplain of a boys' school in Queensland. All around us the world seemed to be crashing. There was no sign of hope in Europe ; the German armies were devastating the plains of Russia ; Singapore had fallen and it seemed that Australia must be invaded. With '200 boys we had to leave our buildings and trekked into the Bush where in tents and sheds we ate, washed, played, drilled, did lessons and worshipped Cod. Yet that school never went under. Australia was never invaded. At EI Alamein and


Stalingrad the tide turned. God had spared us as He has spared yon. So we may well say to Him to-day " give us that due sense of all Thy mercies that our hearts may be unfeignedly thankful." But how does it go on ? " A n d that we show forth Thy praise not only with our lips but in our lives, by giving up ourselves to Thy service." That is where real gratitude expresses itself. If God spared us at that critical hour and if He continues to pour benefits upon us He does it for a purpose. We have our own sins and evils and could draw a very gloomy picture of the present state of our nation, but they are not such as to render us individually unfit for G o d ' s service. The fact that your school deliberately comes to Church on an occasion like this shows that your heart is in the right place, that you acknowledge G o d ' s sovereignty over your lives and that you are prepared to say to Him " Here am I, send m e . " Now I ask you boys to think very seriously about this. Y o u have a motto, " Service before self," and you have all your life's work before you. The future of England depends on how boys like yourselves are going to interpret a motto like that in your daily work. Think of the words that describe our life work. Doing a job, getting employment, starting a career, entering a profession, and following a vocation. Which words are going to be uppermost in your mind ? Is it just getting a j o b or being given employment—so many hours at so much a week ; is it just carving out a career in some business of trade or profession—just making a name for yourself and as much money as possible with a pension at the end of it. Or are you going to look at the whole of your future work in the light of a vocation, something God calls you to do because He wants it done ? It does not matter what the work is, whether it is dentistry, cobbling or coal-mining, you can look at it in one light or the other as a source of money, a living and only that or as a means of serving the world and thereby fulfilling God's purpose. Which is it going to be, service before self, or self before service ? That is the ideal I put before you to-day, but its fulfilment will depend on something else, something that that old prayer says in the next and final sentence, " and by walking before Thee in holiness and righteousness all our d a y s . " Righteousness means right conduct. Holiness means saintliness or a simple integrity^ based on daily contact with God. It is all very well to come to Church for an occasion like this (as I have said, it is a sign of grace in itself), but it is no use having just a nodding acquaintance with God and His Church. T o o many people try to do that to-day because they are too lazy or busy or pleasure-loving to do or be anything else with the result that they are utterly ineffective. God is unable to use them. They may have been to famous schools with the most striking mottoes to inspire tliem, but if they lose daily contact with God they fail utterly ; they are broken reeds and the world suffers in consequence. So let my last word to you be this—say your prayers and make your religion a real and definite part of your lives ; link up with some church that is alive and some priest or minister who will teach you the way of holiness. THE PIRATES When pirates used to roam the sea No people in the world were free, The noble princes used to save Princesses from the pirates' cave. T W O SEASONS Winter goes Bring out your hoes And rake your garden soil. Come, my hearties, In big parties For hard work and toil.

H.M.

(Juniors).


SPRING COMES The snow conies And summer goes And it grows very cold. Then winter goes And spring comes And buds are shooting up. TO

F.P.

(Juniors).

ROBIN

Robin with your breast so gay Whistling sweet your merry lay Bright of eye and sleek of wing What j o y to winter days you bring.

P.R.II.

(Ila.).

RABBITS In that field are forty rabbits And they are full ol funny habits. And in the middle of the night Y o u can see their eyes all shining bright. At the beginning ol each day They will always run away. BIRDS

IN

MY

(I.).

GARDEN

My garden holds so many birds I really cannot count them all. They fly and sing for my delight On tree and bush and hedge and wall The blackbird with his yellow bill, The stately thrush with speckled breast, The little wren with upturned tail, 1 d o n ' t know which I love the best. The noisy starling struts and fights. The cheeky sparrow twitters so, The blue-tit swinging on a branch, Brown robin with red breast aglow. Birds in my garden, stay, oh stay, And sing to me all through the day. THE

D.L.

R.C.

(Ila.).

PICTURE

Black had been poor and was now rich, and very proud of his wealth. White had been rich but was now poor. Black had worked for White's father in his big mill. Now young White had come to ask Black for a j o b in these same mills which Black now owned. He was waiting in a room in the mill-owner's house, looking at the fine pictures hanging on the wall. The door opened and Black entered. " Well, admiring my pictures, eh ?" " Yes, they are very fine," was the reply. "I bet you wish your father had left you a few pictures like t h o s e , " said the rich man. " My father has left me a picture better than any in this room !" said the other quietly. " Is that so ?" remarked Black. " I should like to see it, and if T like it I will buy i t . " " It is not lor sale," said the young man, " but I shall be glad to let you see it at a n y t i m e . "


" Then what about seeing it to-day ?" said Black. " C e r t a i n l y , " replied White. N o t long after this the two were speeding along in Black's big car, to a cottage on the moors. They got out of the car and went inside. " Where is it ?" asked Black. " H e r e , " replied the owner of the cottage. " What trick is this ?" the older man asked, as he looked at the bare walls. Young White, pointing to the window-frame, said : " That is the frame of my picture." The angry mill-owner looked through the window. Then his face changed. Never in his life had he seen such beauty. He gazed at it in wonder for some time, then turned to White, saying, " Y o u are right. There is no picture in my house as good as this. I have learned many things t o - d a y . " Of course, White got the job, and Black often came from ftis ugly mill to see White's wonderful picture. P.R.H. (Ila.). RATIONING They ration this, they ration that, They ration milk and they ration fat. They ration eggs and bacon too, Whatever can a fellow do ? At one time you could buy a bun, But now you can't and that's not fun. Y o u still can get a watery ice, But I d o n ' t find them very nice. I ' m getting as thin as thin can be Y o u can't get cofiee, you can't get tea. But they can't ration cricket and they can't ration air, And they can't ration rugger, so I d o n ' t care. J.B.P. (Ila.). MERRY

ENGLAND,

1947

Oh ! to be in England Where shortages are rife, Standing around in queues all day, It is a merry life. We can't get bread without B.U.s, And coal is also rationed, One sees large queues outside some shops For stockings, fully-fashioned. It snowed incessantly for eight whole weeks, To everyone's displeasure, And now the country's flooded out, The damage hard to measure. I think that when I am grown up I'll go and live abroad, Where food and clothes are plentiful, And I'll feel just like a lord. W.A.C. (IV.). SCHOOL OFFICERS D. R . Lunn. PREFECTS : D . R . Lunn, B. E. Blunt, R . A . Bristow, J. A . Mackie, K. A. Forrest, G. R. Lunn, J. A. Wells, J. K. Evans, S. A. Errington, J. W. Laffey. C A P T A I N OF F O O T B A L L : J. K . Evans. HOUSE CAPTAINS : Whitley Bay, D . R . Lunn. Tynemouth, J. Mackie. Monkseaton, J. A. Wells. North Shields, J. W. Laffey. HEAD BOY

:


10

SUMMER TERM. SCHOOL

NOTES

The term was rather uneventful and there is nothing out of the ordinary to report. The Sports were held on May 14th. A full record of the results appears later in this magazine. A very pleasant and instructive afternoon was spent by the 6th Form at the Mills of Messrs. Spillers Ltd. when we were shown the complete process of making flour from the time the grain is unloaded from a ship to the filling and weighing of sacks of flour. The Old Boys' Cricket Club re-started this summer and a series of very pleasant matches was played. An account of these will appear in this magazine. The tennis tournament was revived and was won by Forrest, who beat Pringle in the final, 6â&#x20AC;&#x201D;2,*6â&#x20AC;&#x201D;1. SUMMER lib. I. Jun. T.P.S.

Via. VIb.

V. III. Ila. I. Jun. T.P.S.

TERM. Avete

1947

B. R. Stockton. G. Archer, P. Donn, J. W. Perry. J. A. Broderick, R. W. Hickmott, H. J. G. Rang, B. R. McCoy, P. F. Richardson, D. E. Sutton, J. A. Turnbull, 1. K. Watson. C. P. Armatage, P. C. Dale, J. M. Donaldson, S. Frail, J. A. Frayling, M. M. Emmerson, H. P. Martin, B. H. Mason, J. L. Pilditch, M. J. Watson, R. A. P. Yarwood. Valete B. E. Blunt, Prefect 1045-7, Matric. July 1945, H.C. July 1947, XV 1946-7, County Scholarship. A. I. McAughtry, Matric. Tuly 1947. J. A. Wells, Prefect 1946-7, Matric. July 1947. R. A. Baty, S.Cert. July 1947. E. J. Cox, S.Cert. July 1947. B. Hesslegrave, S.Cert. July 1947. R. G. Hardie. S. A. Errington. D. E. Ward. P. E. Fawcett. G. H. Stephenson, N. P. Herbert, J. S. McKenzie. P. M. McLeod. A. M. Davis, A. Porter, E. A. Kelly. S. Appleby, W. J. Badsey, B. J. Bell, V. M. Evans.

PRIZES Higher Certificate. B. E. Blunt. Matriculation. D. I. Brennan, Distinction in English Language, French. W. A. Gofton, Distinction in Scripture. A. W. Harrison, Distinction in Scripture, French. G. R. Lunn, Distinction in English Language, English Literature, Geography. A. I. McAughtry. J. A. Wells. School Certificate. R. A. Batey, J- K. Evans, M. W. Harrison, B. Hesslegrave, J. W. Laffey, G. J. Shaw, J. Wardhaugh, J. M. W o o d . Stockdale Prize for Languages. B. E. Blunt.


11 MONKSEATON J

louse Master : Mr.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

B. S. BATES.

J.

A. WELLS.

First of all we wish to thank Mr. Bates sincerely for the very enjoyable evening we spent at Newcastle Empire in celebration of our winning the House R u g b y Matches last term. " D a n t e , " the famous deceptionist, provided the entertainment and a very amusing evening was had by all. We were unfortunate in losing the sports cup this term. However, we again won the relay race and obtained places in most of the events. We congratulate Forrest on winning the mile, Hesslegrave on winning the 220 yards, and Sutherland and Hateley on being first in their races. This term W a t t D. and Watt J. and Partridge P. and Partridge J., Humble, Carrick, Hateley and I.aidler have again obtained good form positions and must be complimented on their records. Richardson P., who is generally top of his form, has dropped a little down the list this term ; we hope he will sooi) be back to where he should be. We should like to offer our congratulations to Forrest on being made captain of cricket. Humble and Hardie have also played regularly in the First XI this season. At the time of writing we are very glad to say we have just won the House Cricket Matches. As usual we wish all our members who are leaving us this term the very best of luck for the future. TYNEMOUTH House Master : Mr. G.

HOUSE

A. WASTLE.

NOTES

House Captain :

J.

M.

MACKIE.

Most of our outstanding achievements this term have been in the sports field and have not, unfortunately, been so pronounced in scholastic circles. Evans J. excelled himself on sports day to the extent of winning the Senior Sports Cup for the second successive year-â&#x20AC;&#x201D;holding the additional honour of being the only person to have held the cup two years in succession ; our congratulations go to Evans, both for this fine effort and for gaining his cricket colours this term. Evans C., following the fraternal tradition, distinguished himself in no small degree at the same time. Our heartiest congratulations go to Hall G. ( l i b . ) who won the Junior Sports Cup ; similarly we must congratulate Edminson J., Blades, Porter B., Everett and Wilson for gaining places in events in the sports. We also had the honour, by virtue of the above efforts, of winning the House Sports Cup. This was soon magnificently rewarded by the really splendid party which Mr. Wastle took so much trouble to provide. Our heartfelt thanks go to Mr. Wastle for this party. We were well .represented in the School First XI this term by Evans J., Shaw, Wakefield, Mackie and Stokoe. The House was not so fortunate in the House Matches, and only took second place, being beaten by Monkseaton by a narrow margin. Our best wishes go to Evans J., Miller K . , Shaw and McAughtry, who took their School Certificate examination this July. We congratulate Hilton and Stephenson (11a.) on gaining high positions in their form. N. Calvert, an old b o y and former member of the House, has succceeded in his final law examinations, being the only student of the year to obtain first class honours for this degree, and also winning the Rennoldson Memorial Prize for Law. A. Lee, another former member of our House, has passed his Intermediate B.Com., and has won, by virtue of his success, an H. B. Saints Bequest. NORTH House Master :

Mr.

SHIELDS

GENTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

J.

W.

LAFFEY.

We congratulate Wardhaugh on being appointed a Prefect and wish him success. Our representatives this term in the XI were LafEey and Wardhaugh, and in the Under 14 Rowell, Lambert, Davison, Bower W . , Alexander,


Craney and Turnbull J. H. We were beaten in the House Matches by Tynemouth, but the matches showed that there is plenty of talent in the House. We also congratulate Lambert, Davison, Scott G., and Harmer on their high positions in their respective forms. W H I T L E Y B A Y HOUSE NOTES House Master : Mr. J . M. M I L L E R . House Captain : D . R . L U N N . This term, during which both the School Sports and the Cricket House Matches have taken place, has been one of almost unrelieved disaster for the House. For in the Sports our success in the junior events by no means made up for our failure in the senior. The result was a not very high points total. In the House Matches we were knocked out by the final victors, Monkseaton, in the first round. Several members of the House are taking their School Certificate examination in July and we wish them success. They include Lunn R . , Gofton, Fenwick and Giimore. Fenwick and Richardson D. both played regularly for the First XI and we were well represented in the Junior X I . Finally we congratulate those members of the House who have obtained high positions in their forms. TYNEMOUTH SCHOOL SPORTS Held on May 14th on the Preston Avenue Cricket Ground. The prizes were presented by Mrs. Lunn, mother of the head b o y of the School. Results Long Jump (over 1 4 ) : — 1 , Evans J.; 2, equal, Tilby and Rodgers. Long Jump (11-14):—1, equal, Lilburn and W a t t J.; 3, Richardson P. Long jump (under 1.1):—1, Hall G.; 2, Everett C.; 3, Fenwick J. Cricket Ball :—1, Evans J.; 2, Laffey ; 3, Blunt. High Jump (11-14):—1, Harrison T . ; 2, Hoskin ; 3, equal Blades and Rowell. High Jump (under 1 1 ) : — 1 , Hall G,; 2, Fenwick J.; 3, Black A. Mile Open :—1, Forrest ; 2, Evans J.; 3, Rodgers. Quarter-mile Open :—1, Evans J.; 2, Bristow ; 3, Hesslegrave. 75 yds. (11-14):—1, Sutherland J.; 2, W a t t J.; 3, Proctor. 75 yds. (under 11):—1, E v e r e t t ; 2, Hall G.; 3, Dunlevy. 75 yds. (over 6 J ) : — 1 , Gair ; 2, equal, Allman and Sanderson. 75 yds. (under 6 J ) : — 1 , equal, Corbett and Sowerby ; 3, Elliott R. 75 yds. (T.P.S. A . ) : — 1 , Donaldson M.; 2, Armitage ; 3, Robinson. 75 yds. (T.P.S. B . ) : — 1 , Evans E . ; 2, Jones W . ; 3, Badsey. 75 yds. (T.P.S. C . ) : — 1 , Craven ; 2, Parr ; 3, Burke. 100 yds. (over 1 4 ) : — 1 , Tilby ; 2, Evans J.; 3, Errington. 220 yds. (under 1 0 ) : — 1 , Bates M.; 2, Forrest S.; 3, Dunlevy. 220 yds. (10-11):—1, Hall G.; 2, Checkley ; 3, Fenwick J. High Jump (over 1 4 ) : — 1 , Evans J.; 2, equal, Wardhaugh and Errington. 220 yds. (13-14):—1, Sutherland J.; 2, P r o c t o r ; 3, Taylor D. 220 yds. (12-13):—1, Evans C.; 2, W a t t J.; 3, Edminson. 220 yds. (11-12):—1, Hateley ; 2, Porter J. B.; 3, Wilson. Half-mile (Senior):—1, Evans J.; 2, Wardhaugh ; 3, Rodgers. Half-mile (Junior):—1, Evans C.; 2, Richardson P.; 3, Hoskin. 220 yds. (14-15):—1, Hedley W . ; 2, Meredith ; 3, Wakefield T. 220 yds. ( 1 5 - 1 6 ) : — ! , Tilby ; 2, Gofton ; 3, Evans J. 220 yds. (over 1 6 ) : — 1 , Hesslegrave (School Record) ; 2, Bristow ; 3, Gilmore. School Handicap (under 1 2 ) : — 1 , Welch ; 2, Checkley ; 3, Bilclough. House Relay :—1, Monkseaton ; 2, Whitley Bay. Old Boys' Race :—1, Taylor ; 2, Harrison M.; 3, Walton. Parents' Race :—1, Mr. Hallwood ; 2, Mr. Allman ; 3, Mr. Bates. Sports Champion :—Evans J. ( T y n e m o u t h ) . Middle Cup :—Watt J. (Monkseaton). Junior Cup :—Hall G. (Tynemouth). House Cup :—Tynemouth.


SENIOR

CRICKET

The First XI started the season well with t w o wins, the first against Hexham G.S. at Hexham by six wickets, beating the clock by five minutes ; and the second against South Shields by the narrowest of margins—one run on the last ball of the last over. This was quite the most exciting game of the season, for the scores were level with one ball to go. Wardhaugh, facing his first ball, hit it straight to silly mid-off. Fenwick, luckily, had his wits about him and was half way down the pitch by the time the ball reached the fielder, who lost his head and threw it to the wrong end. For these two victims the School had to thank chiefly the batting of Forrest and Laffey, captain and vice-captain respectively, but Hardie, Shaw and Wakefield J. contributed their share by their steady bowling. In the following matches, if the batting of the side had been as good as its bowling and fielding, more games would have been won. As it was, only two more games were won, that against the Staff by two wickets, thanks to a stubborn stand by Laffey and Fenwick at a critical stage, and the other against Whitley Bay G.S. in the last match of the season, when Forrest made a very useful 47 runs. The usual matches were played with the Parents and Old Boys during Race Week, and produced two very enjoyable afternoons of cricket. The School, however, found the opposition in each instance stronger this year and were well beaten, by the Parents by 43 runs, and by the Old Boys by 7 wickets. Four wins, two draws and four defeats was an improvement on the previous season and we hope will be a forerunner of better seasons in the near future. Runs Runs Wkts. per wkt.

Leading Averages— Batting :

Forrest Laffey

'23 17.1

Bowling :

Forrest Shaw Hardie Evans Wakefield

152 146 149 105 194

8 11 19 9 '21

Results— May 10 May 17 May 31 junell June 19 June 21 June 25 June 26 July 6 July 12.

Away Hexham Grammar School South Shields High School ... Home Whitley Bay Grammar School . Away Morpeth Grammar School Home Home Staff Hexham Q.E. Grammar School Home Home Parents ... Home Old Boys , Away South Shields High School Whitley Bay Grammar School Home JUNIOR

. .. . .... .. . .. . . .. . ..,. .. .

Won by Won by Lost. Drawn. W o n by Drawn. Lost by Lost by Lost. Won.

'19 13.27 7.84 11.67 9.24 six wkts. one run. two wkts 43 runs. 7 wkts.

CRICKET

The Under 14 XI had a poor season, winning only one of its nine matches and losing six of the others by a wide margin. Of the batsmen remaining from the previous season only Rowell showed the improvement expected and he missed several matches. Evans batted well in the South Shields and Hexham games, and Craney, who is very young, came into the team for the last three matches and averaged 14 , he shows great promise. For the rest there was no mean between timidity and wild hitting. Heyes bowled steadily, with 25 wickets for 114, his best performances being 6 for 7 against Ascham House and 7 for 30 against Whitley Bay. Joicey, who was rather erratic, took 12 wickets for 102. Alexander and Richardson P. bowled quite well on occasions and Craney has the makings of a good spin bowler.


The fielding, which was peer at first, improved steadily, and was quite good at the end of the season, though still lacking in anticipation. Joicey held some good catches at point. The team was chosen from the following :— Lambert (Capt.), Evans C., Joicey, Rowell, Caird, Heyes, Proctor, Richardson P., Bower W . , Craney, Alexander, Dixon, Porter J.B., Davison, Stevenette, Read, Turnbull J. H. Results— Whitley Bay Grammar School Hexham Q.E. Grammar School Newcastle Royal Grammar School Whitley Bav Grammar School Whitley Bay Cricket Club Ascham House School St. Cuthbert's Grammar School South Shields High School Hexham Q.E. Grammar School FIRST

XI

Home Away Away Away AwayHome Home Away I lome

7 50 16 9 3 - -2 19 5 3 - -4 19 1 0 9 - -6 54 66 103— -8 17 20 33 7 8 - -1 27 9 0 - -6

Lost. Lost. Lost. Lost. Lost. Won. Lost. Lost. Lost.

CHARACTERS

Forrest (Captain). As captain he has set an example to the rest of the side by his keenness and alertness in the field. His batting, though lacking style, has been responsible in no small measure for the most successful season the First XI have had since before the war. Laffey. Has batted with mixed success and has succeeded in making useful runs in his role as a hitter. His fielding is good. Evans. His batting and bowling have improved greatly this term, especially in the last few games. His fielding has been an inspiration to the rest of the side. Shaw. His batting and fielding this season have shown a lack of confidence, but he has bowled with moderate success. Hardie. Has bowled well throughout the season. His fielding is reliable. Wakefield. His batting has been rather disappointing. He has been the most useful bowler, and has fielded well in the slips. Wardhaugh. He is by nature a hitter, but he has met with only moderate success this season. His fielding has been very good. Fenwick. He is too careless in his batting and he should learn to play a straight bat. He has kept wicket very well. Mackie. His fielding has been very good. He should do well as a batsman if he learns that there are strokes other than that of playing forward. Richardson. Can defend well, but he lacks a scoring shot. He has had moderate success in the field as point. Stokoe. A very keen player. He has fielded very well and shpuld do well next season as a batsman. VISIT

TO

SPIELER S

FACTORY, .NEWCASTLE

Our visit to Spiller's Newcastle Quay factory was one which we may well remember. The building itself is an imposing ferro-concrete structure —ten storeys of it. Confronted with it we felt rather as an ant must when confronted by a brick. The building is divided into two parts, the West block, which is almost windowless, containing the granary or storehouse, and the East block—a window-cleaner's nightmare—containing the actual mill plant. The two blocks are joined by two corridors which span the gap seven or eight storeys up. We saw, on nearing the building, that an American grain ship, the John L. Lee, was being unloaded at the quayside. T w o travelling cranes with large hoses snaking down from their booms into the holds were busily sucking up the precious grain, before transporting it by means of conveyor belt to the vats or bins of the West block,


Alter meeting Air. Say, by whose kindness we were allowed to see this factory, and signing the visitors' book,, we started our tour under the guidance of two of the Assistant Managers. First we crossed one of the corridors leading to the West block. Here, after ascending by lift, we entered the weighing room. This is entirely filled by a large automatic weigher and has a peculiar smell. The weigher is a funnel-shaped machine, designed to accumulate the grain from the conveyor belt until it weighs exactly one ton. Then with a deafening boom and a large cloud of pollen dust the whole lot whistles downwards. This machine also computes the tonnage entering the building by means of a counter. As we entered this room our nostrils were assailed with the peculiar odour of the pollen dust which carpeted the floor and hung in the air like a mist, and nearly everybody began to sneeze. We were told that this weighing machine, which was an Avery, was the sole specimen of British machinery in the building. Next we were shown, a few floors farther down, the bins into which the grain shoots after being weighed. These are enormous, square wooden containers, which, we were told, rested on a floor on the storey below and are perfectly free or " floating." If this were not so any movement of grain in them would probably have endangered the whole building. The temperature in these containers has to be carefully watched. This is done by electrical means, the results being shown on rotating temperature-time graphs. This building contained about 35,000 tons of grain at that time. Our next move was to the roof. This was indeed an experience ! With a " t o p of the w o r l d " feeling we walked gaily over to the perimeter wall to glance nonchalantly at the view. There was a noticeable recoil almost immediately. This view of Tyneside was the most remarkable we had seen. The coaly Tyne could be traced for miles with its shipyards, bridges and ships. Below, small black things moved across the road and swarms of dusty, floury, toy-like wagons hustled to and fro. From here we saw the giant cowlsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;four of themâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;which represent the exhaust end of the air conditioning system of the building. Out of the gaping mouths of these ventilators drifts a long, powdery, Everest-like streamer of flour dust. These cowls provide the ventilation for the East block, for it is here that the actual milling and cleaning processes are carried out. Having seen the storage end of the business we were taken across into the East buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the active part of the factory. The grain crosses between the two buildings from West to East by a corridor and conveyor belt so that it arrives in the top storey of the other building. From here it trickles down from floor to floor, going through one or more processes on each, until, at the basement, it is put into a bag as flour, ready for the baker. The first process which we saw was the washing and cleaning of the grain. The room was impregnated with the rather sickly smell of wet grain and we did not linger there. The floor below contained the drying plant, which works rather like a car radiator, the grain filtering through a series of hot tubes. For the purpose of the workers a vertical escalator system has been installed. This is an endless belt running vertically for the whole height of the building through a series of holes cut in the floor. It has a large number of steps upon which anyone may rise or descend from floor to floor. The next floor contained the sorting or grading machines. There are about seventy of them, all alike. The grading of the grain is done by size, by means of a disc machine ; this we were allowed to see in action after one of the covers had been removed. It consists essentially of a number of discs on a central spindle, running in a trough of grain. On the sides of each disc are a large number of indentations, all of the same size. When the discs are rotated in the grain the smaller grains are shot away, whilst the larger grains are left to be led down to the next process by wooden chutes.


And so we proceeded through the whole factory, floor by floor. One of the floors which we had been waiting to see—the milling room—came into sight at last. But what an uninspiring sight and what a pattern of regularity ! Merely row upon row of silent shining machines, completely encased. Again our guide came to the rescue and showed us how they worked—mainly a matter of two helically-grooved rollers rotating in the same direction at diiferent speeds, with a gap equal to the thickness of a grain between the rollers. Thus different machines are required for different sizes of grain ; that is why the grain has to be graded by size first of all. One of the things which impressed Us most was the noticeable lack of labour and we were assured that - on some floors two men sufficed to tend sixty or seventy machines. Occasionally we were shown "foreign bodies" extracted from the grain by means of electro-magnets—anything from 6in. nails to specks of iron. All the chutes are made of pitch pine and extremely shiny and smart they look, reducing the risk of any metallic content in the flour. We saw numerous ingenious screening plaints for extracting husk from the flour and a most interesting air-extraction plant for sucking the air from the flour. In this building the atmosphere was noticeably free from dust, thanks to the extremely efficient air conditioning system. Down to earth again, we arrived at the packing floor. This was very busy—almost like civilisation again, with men trundling barrows and sacks to and fro and bags of all sizes shooting dizzily down spiral chutes. After a visit to the factory workshop—where a mill roller was being re-grooved—we were shown the heart of the mill, the electric motor supplying power to almost every floor of the building. On entering this room our senses were dulled by a deafening high-pitched whine. In the Centre stood a huge motor, which we were told, develops 800 h.p., and beside it a glittering array of imposing dials, switches and lights. The transmission of power from this central source to each floor is accomplished by an intricate system of large flywheels and belts. At the end of our visit we were very kindly given tea and a snack. I think the things which impressed us most of all were the cleanliness of each storey, with its polished wooden floors and chutes, the number of machines and the small labour force required for them and the numerous and intricate operations carried out by the machines ; also a rather impressive but irritating comparison of the different grades of flour as used in Britain and America served to show how much whiter our flour could be. Our grateful thanks for this extremely interesting visit are due to Mr. Say, to the Headmaster, and especially to our guides. - J.M., VIA. CHESTERS On 7th June the Headmaster, Mr. Bates and a party of classical students paid a visit to the Roman bridge and camp at Chesters, on the North Tyne. The expedition, of which we were part, was organised by King's College, Archaeological Society and led by Dr. Richmond, the wellknown authority on Roman Britain. We first visited the remains of the Bridge. This was built at the same time as the Wall on the site of an earlier erection to carry the military road across the North Tyne over 1800 years ago in 138 A . D . Considerable portions of the bridge were visible and we learnt much from Dr Richmond's explanations of the various marks on the stone. Of special interest were a pillar from which wires were stretched across the river to prevent the Northern enemies from " s h o o t i n g " the bridge, and the fact that the large blocks of which the bridge is built were placed in position in the same way as those of Tynemouth pier.


After a lunch in the rain we made our way to the fort on the other side of the river ; this fort was built to defend the bridge. All the main outlines of the fort as well as fairly extensive remains of a bath-house are visible, so that a good idea of what the average Roman camp was like can be obtained. Nearly half of the 5ยง acres is taken up with the quarters of the garrison of 512 Spaniards. Each man had considerably more space allowed him than has the soldier of the New Modern Army. The rest of the ground is taken up with offices, the commandant's house, and a temple in which the standards of the Legion were kept. Outside the commandant's house is a well which is still filled with fresh water. This, however, was only used during the frequent sieges. In normal times the water was supplied by aqueducts, which may still be seen. Between the camp and the river the bath-house is situated. This very well-preserved building still has walls standing to a height of 15 feet. The massive buttresses used to prevent the building falling into the river and the complicated system of warming the baths are especially impressive. A little way from the camp is a museum in which the inscribed stones and monuments found in the camp have been collected. Some of these show great artistic skill. The pleasure of our visit was much increased by the surroundings of the camp ; by the composite effect of romantic stones and natural beauty. Our visit to Chesters has made me feel that organised visits to other ancient remains in the district would be profitable. Durham Cathedral, Corstopitum, Finchale Abbey, Newcastle Castle and the Black Gate are all within easy reach. A start could be made with Tynemouth Priory. D . R . L . , VIA. THE

WOODS

As I was walking on the way, 1 met two squirrels red and gray, But what they said I cannot say, As I was walking on the way. These squirrels that were red and gray, I think their names were Fig and Fay. Their home is in the apple tree, And from that perch for miles they see. A b o y had chanced to come that way, I think he saw my little Fay, The baby squirrel squeaked with j o y And said he'd like to be a boy. Fig and Fay are best of friends, They dance about on their tail ends, The b a b y squirrel is too small. And so he gives the woodland call. The apple tree is in the wood, I ' d plant another if 1 could, And all the beasts could come and look Then take a drink from yonder brook. Those squirrels that are red and gray, I go to see them every day, And every day I go to play, And that is all I have to say. THE

J . T . B . , I.

WINDMILL

There is a windmill on a hill With slender sails fair. And you can see them going round In the morning air.

P.G., I.


THE

BLUEBELLS

The bluebells come in the spring, When you touch them they will ring They grow in the fields But they have no shields.

THE

PLUNGE

Clang ! The bell rings. The form springs From its seats As one man. Down to the pool .Where the water's cool, To drown our sorrows In salty water. Cold stone floors, Ill-fitting doors To the lockers. " It's w a r m , " we're told, But Br-r-r, it's cold. And thenâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; When then ? We jump. Splash ! THE

W . W . , I.

A.W.H. VIB.

SEASONS

Cold blows the wind across the moor, Fingers are numb and toes are sore ; But winter passes, comes the spring, Oh ! how that April rain can sting ! The May flowers bloom and then comes June, July and August pass too soon. Then mellow autumn brings its fruit And swarms of flies and wasps to boot. Winter againâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;it's dark at four, Cold blows the wind across the moor.

MY

JOURNEY

FROM

PERSIA

TO

M.S., IV.

ENGLAND

On the morning we were due to leave Abadan to travel home to England we boarded a bus at 0.15 to take us to Khoramshar. We then transferred to a motor launch and proceeded up the Shat-Elarab river to Basra, where we were to join the flying-boat. We arrived in Basra at 11.30 and after having lunch at the Airport Hotel we had to wait till 1 o'clock for the arrival of the flying-boat. Whilst we were waiting I went up into the watchtower and saw planes leaving for India. The flying-boat was half-an-hour late in arriving and after it had refuelled all the passengers were taken aboard. We were shown to our seats and asked to fasten our safety belts. Five minutes later we were up in the air heading for Cairo. On this part of the journey whenever I looked out of the window of the plane all 1 could see was desert for miles and miles. After six hours we flew over the Suez Canal where I saw two ships on their way to Port Said. We circled above Cairo, then came down slowly to land in the harbour. We were taken ashore by a motor-launch and after going through the Customs we were taken to Shepherd's Hotel, where we spent the night.


I was up early the next morning and after breakfast, my mother, my father and I went into the town to do some shopping. We returned at 9 o'clock as we had to be aboard the flying-boat by half-past. At 9.45 we were in the air again and on the second stage of our journey, to Port Augustus, in Italy. We flew over Alexandria then out over the Mediterranean, and at 4.15 we came to rest in the harbour. After spending the night there we left at 7 a.m. for Marseilles, in the south of France. We arrived there at 11 and, after refuelling and minor repairs, took off again and were on our way to Poole, near Southampton, where we arrived at half past five. After having sandwiches and tea we went to the station and travelled to London. We spent the night in London and travelled home the next day. J.McK., IIB. SCHOOL HEAD

BOY

PREFECTS

: :

D. R. Lunn, B. E. Blunt, R. A. Bristow, J. A. Mackie, K. A. Forrest,

G. R. Lunn,

S. A. Errington, C A P T A I N OF C R I C K E T HOUSE

OFFICERS

D . R . Lunn.

CAPTAINS

:

:

K.

A.

J. A. Wells,

J. W. Laffey,

Forrest.

Whitley Bay,

D.

R.

Lunn.

. Tynemouth, J. A. Mackie. Monkseaton, J. A. Wells. North Shields, J. W. Laffey.

"V

J. K. Evans,

J. Wardhaugh.


AUTUMN TERM. SCHOOL

NOTES

On Saturday, November 8th, the Bishop of Newcastle dedicated the War Memorial Tablet. The Service is described later in this magazine. The sum of £8 4s. 1d. was collected from the sale of Haig Poppies. Our usual contribution to the Christmas Fund of the Missions to Seamen was £1 15s. During the year £32 was sent to Dr. Barnado's Homes by the members of the Young Helpers' League. Towards the end of term a party paid a visit to the Glass Works at Lemington. The numbers at the end of the year exceeded the previous record. We now number 340. In the December School Certificate N. Gilmore obtained his School Certificate and J. K. Evans, J. W. Laffey, G. J. Shaw and J. M. W o o d obtained the necessary credits for Matriculation. AUTUMN TERM, IV. lib. I. Jun. T.P.S.

1947

Avete

J. T. A. Slater. J. T. Ainslie, J. D. F. Carter, R. H. Jackson, C. L. Johnson, P. W. Nicholas, J. F. Slater. C. D. Eraser, J. C. Sheales, A. W. Harper, P. Scott, P. W. Grist, A. Summerson, J. A. Heald, W. M. Thompson. J. Rowland, J. D. Oliver, J. B. Oliver, R. M. White, R. H. Dixon, D. B. Gentle, B. Mahoney, G. Phillips, J. R. Bower, C. W. Dale, M. H. Jackson, D. M. H. Hayes, B. Turnbull. J. R. Davison, E. A. Babington, D. M. Thorp, D. F. Lawson, J. E. R. Lyall, A. Musgrave, S. L. Atkinson, P. Part, E. M. Jensen, R. E. Lewis, S. M. Boulton, A. E. McKinnell, K. M. Parritt, P. E. Young, P. C. Walker, M. J. C. McCarty, V. J. Waterhouse, J. D. J. Sainsbury, J. H. Steer, S. C. Steer. Valete

Vlb.

V. I. Jun.

N. Gilmore, S.C. December 1947. G. J. Shaw, S.C. July 1947, Matric. December 1947. J. Wardhaugh, S.C. July 1947, Prefect 1947, XV 1946-7. J. M. W o o d , S.C. July, Matric. December 1947. J. H. Wakefield. I. J. Tait. R. M. O'Brady-Jones. C. P. Dunlevy. M. J. Pringle. K. R. Dodsworth, G. E. Wakefield, T. R. Young. F. M. Porter. B. Turnbull. TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL OLD

BOYS'

CLUB

The first major function of the Old Boys' Club since last year's issue of the School Magazine was the Annual Dance. This was held at the Rex Hotel, Whitley Bay, at the end of January, 1947, and proved a real success. Some 100 Old Boys and their iriends attended. This year the Annual Dance is to be held at the R e x Hotel on January 30th. We are looking forward to a very enjoyable evening. In the summer the Old Boys' Cricket Club had a very full fixture list and many very enjoyable outings were made. In this connection our thanks must be extended to George Simpson whose untiring efforts made the season such a success. We missed the services of G. B. Shearer w h o is now in India. His place on the committee was filled by J. C. Clark.


Alter the close of the cricket season the next function was the Dedication and Unveiling of the War Memorial Tablet in the School to those Old Boys who gave their lives in the two wars. This was held on the Saturday before Remembrance Day. The Bishop of Newcastle dedicated the Tablet after it had been unveiled by L. Pearson on behalf of the Old Boys' Club. About a fortnight after this event we held our Annual Dinner at the Grand Hotel, Tynemouth, at which some R5 Old Boys were present, and here again we have to report a very successful evening. Among those present were Mr. Maynard, probably one of the oldest of our Old Boys ; Mr. Colton, who used to be on the School Staff, and the present Head B o y , D. R. Lunn. In conclusion may I again appeal to all Old Boys who have not already done so to send their Life Membership Subscription of One Guinea to the lion. Treasurer, R. H. Thompson, c / o 4 Ellison Place, Newcastle-on-Tyne, when we shall be glad to welcome them to our ever-increasing circle. A verv happy and prosperous Ne\» Year to you all. R. H. DUNCAN, Hon. Secretary TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL OLD BOYS' Season 1947

CRICKET

CLUB

The 1947 season saw the revival of the Old Boys' Cricket Club, which passed out of being—from the playing point of view at any rate—on the outbreak of war in 1939. The question of re-starting the Cricket Club was first discussed at a General Meeting of the Old Boys' Club held during the summer of 194ti and a small committee, consisting of E. N. Larke, H. R. Duncan, B. S. Bates and G. L. Simpson was appointed to investigate the possibility of making fixtures, acquiring gear, etc. As a result we were ready to re-start with a fairly full fixture list by the commencement of last season. Unfortunately lack of interest on the part of the Old Boys at this stage nearly brought about the disbandment of the Club before a match was played, and it was only as a result of an appeal by Mr. Ellison at a General Meeting held in April of last year that the Cricket Club was able to carry on. Mr. Ellison pointed out that in pre-war days the Cricket Club had always been a really live activity of the Old Boys and it would be a pity if it were not revived. Further, having made fixtures for the season, if these fixtures were not fulfilled as arranged it would be extremely difficult, if not indeed impossible, to get these fixtures back again. As a consequence a number of enthusiasts did promise their active support and we were able—with valuable help from the School—to field a full side for all matches played. The Committee wish to take this opportunity of thanking those members of the School team and the Staff who stepped into the breach, often at short notice, when we were short. From the playing aspect the season was not a great success, but the main thing was that we did get started. However, the results are not so important as the game itself, and win or lose, we usually managed to enjoy ourselves. Of the twelve matches played, three were won—against The School, Woolsington and Lemington—whilst there were a number of close finishes and a number of severe defeats, namely those at the hands of Durham Colleges, Riding Mill, Matfen and Whitley Bay. Unfortunately we cannot give details of any individual performances because our records do not always differentiate between the Elliott twins, who were our best performers, and consequently it would be hardly fair to single out any individual for particular mention. We look forward to getting the Club going properly on a sounder basis next season, when a number of plans which the Committee have in mind will be put before the members and will result, we trust, in better playing support and consequently improved results. It is hoped that many of the boys on leaving School will support the Club and help us in the seasons ahead to get the Club back to the standard of pre-war days.


TYNEMOUTH

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL

NOTES

1947 has proved a successful and happy year for us. Quite settled now in our new premises, and with the addition of a flagged playground, we find the number in the School has risen to 69. During the Spring Term weather conditions made any extra school activities impossible. Once again during the Summer Term we resumed our weekly visit to a nearby field for games, the top form playing cricket on these occasions. Towards the end of term we had a film show in aid of the N . S . P . C . A . given by Wells of Tynemouth School. The special animal films shown were much enjoyed. The prizewinners for the school year, ending July, 1947, are :— Form I Barbara Rhode, A. Lewis. Progress—R. S. Greenly. Form II J. A. Wright, D. R. Browell, P. Burke. Progress—R. Boyle. Form I l i a .

Moira Gordon,

A. M. Donaldson.

Illb.

K. B. Dobson. Progress—M. C. Alexander. The term ended with a picnic on the beach at Briardene to which parents were invited. Bathing, paddling and a sand-castle competition lor each form helped to make the afternoon a very enjoyable one. Miss Forster left us at the end of the term to undertake further training. She had been at the Preparatory School for over eight years, and we wish her happiness and success in her new undertaking. As a mark of appreciation of her work a cheque from the staff and children was presented to Miss Forster by the Headmaster. Miss K. Baird joined the Staff at the beginning of the Autumn Term. While we feel that she is no stranger to us, having been at Tynemouth School, we hope she will be happy with us at Monkseaton. At the end of September we once again held a Harvest Festival, afterwards taking the fruit and vegetables to Dr. Barnado's Home at Cullercoats. Miss Kaye, the new Northern Counties representative for Dr. Barnado's Homes, visited us later in the term, and twenty-three new members were enrolled. Over £8 was collected, and the usual Christmas collection of toys and clothes for the Homes proved to be the best ever made. P o p p y Day collections amounted to £4 9s. 9d. War Savings during the year came to £193 8s. 6d., bringing the total amount collected to over £1,280. As usual the Christmas Party was held at the R o y a l Hotel. A conjuror provided the programme which entertained the Staff as much as the children. We ended the term with a concert, to which parents were invited. This consisted of Carol Singing, Christmas Plays by each of the Forms I and II, and a Nativity Play by Form III. Parents expressed great appreciation of the items given, and altogether the occasion was one of enjovment for both children and parents. H.G.G. TYNEMOUTH House Master :

Mr.

G.

A. WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES House Captain :

J.

MACKIE.

Our House notes this term concern Rugger rather than scholastic achievements. However, our heartiest congratulations must go to Shaw G., Evans J. K., and Miller K. H. who were successful in their July School Certificate examination—Miller matriculating. We hope that Shaw and Evans will complete their matriculation this December. We are sorry that Shaw is leaving us this term and wish him every success in the future. Hilton P. and Reay are to be congratulated on gaining high positions in form this term.


Wo have beeil represented in the First XV this term by J. K. Evans, who is the Captain of the team, Wakefield J., Mayhew and Mackie. Evans has had the distinction of being picked to play in the Schoolboys' County Trial on 20th December and our sincere wishes of good luck go with him. We have also contributed five members to the Under 16 team, namely Wakefield J. (Captain), Stokoe, Mayhew, Tate J. and Urwin. We have several members in the Under 14 team also, including Evans C. (Captain), Blades, Edminson and Stevenette. We are pleased to learn that Evans has been chosen as Reserve for the County Under 14 team. With this record we are looking forward to the House Matches. NORTH House Master : Mr.

SHIELDS

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

GENTLE.

J.

W .

LAFFEY.

We must begin by congratulating Laffey and Wardhaugh on gaining their School Certificates in July and wishing Dunlevy success in December. This term we contributed three members to the First X V , namely Wardhaugh, Laffey and Dunlevy, and six members to the Under 14 team. Although our teams will be weakened next term we are looking forward to a keen tussle in the House Matches. We must also congratulate Lambert, Davison, Craney, Scott G., Harmer and Gair on gaining high positions in their forms. Finally we wish Mr. Gentle and all members of the House a Merry Christmas and hope that 1948 will bring them success and happiness. WHITLEY House Master :

Mr.

BAY

MILLER.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

D.

R.

LUNN.

The Autumn term is never marked by House Activities but we have played our fair share in School activities. In the XV we have been represented by D. R. Lunn, Fenwick and Gilmore, with Bristow, Gofton, Harrison D., Meredith and Richardson D. playing in some matches. We congratulate Lunn on being chosen to play in the first County Trial. Arthur, Bower I., Dixon, Harrison J., Heyes, Proctor and Ryan have all played for the Under 14 team. In the July examinations Lunn R. and Gofton obtained matriculation and W o o d and Cox their School Certificates. We congratulate them on their success. Gilmore and W o o d sit again at Christmas and we wish them luck. Having sustained a broken leg in a School match Fenwick was not able to take the examination. We hope his recovery will be speedy and complete. The following obtained high places in their respective forms : Reavley, Harrison D., Nichol, Dixon, Atkinson, Morland, Robinson and Summerson. MONKSEATON House Master : Mr.

BATES.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

K.

A.

FORREST.

We are very sorry to lose our late House Captain, Wells. We offer our congratulations to Blunt on his splendid result in the Higher School Certificate ; also to Brennan and Wells on gaining Matriculations, and to Baty on obtaining his School Certificate. We have contributed five members to the First XV this term, namely Forrest, Reid, Rogers, Dodsworth and Brennan ; we have been represented on the Under 14 by Hately, Turnbull W . , Watt J., Partridge P., and on the Under 14| by Richardson P., Turnbull W . , Watt J. and Tait G. We heartily congratulate Watt, Turnbull W . , W a t t J., Partridge J., Partridge P., Richardson P., Carrick, Hately, Laidler and Gair on their high position in form. We wish Pringle success in the School Certificate at Christmas. We look forward with confidence to the House Matches next term. We end by wishing all the members of our House a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.


SENIOR

RUGBY

FOOTBALL

The return to R u g b y worthy of the School is slow, yet this term has not been without its bright spots. McGilvray and Pringle, both still unfit, have been sadly missed and Blunt's place at scrum-half has not been adequately filled. Moreover, Evans missed many games early in the term and Fenwick many later. Hopes ran high when the first two games against Whitley and Hexham (away) were lost narrowly. We beat Tynemouth High School, but then proceeded to lose disastrously at Bede Grammar School and at Morpeth. These two games were, in fact, the only black spots, for we were unfortunate to lose by very narrow margins to Tynemouth High School, South Shields and Bede. In the games against the Royal Grammar School we lost 8—6 and 6—5, and in both matches School had the majority of the play, did most of the attacking, but had little luck. Evans, when able to play, has been a wonderful inspiration to the side, and the forwards have played very well indeed with Wardhaugh and Lunn outstanding. The weakness of the side has been a general one outside the scrum : the halves and three-quarters have not made use of the good work of the forwards and there has been lack of co-ordination in the line. In the last game against R.G.S. Wardhaugh and Lunn were playing in county trials and Dunlevy had an examination. In spite of their absence the team played lemarkably well. Next term may bring better things. Our heartiest congratulations go to J. K. Evans, who has played for the County All-age Schools XV against Cumberland. The Newcastle Journal reported that he was an outstanding forward. B.S.B. FIRST

XV

v. W H I T L E Y

GRAMMAR

SCHOOL

(Played at Percy Park on September 18th) This was the first match of the season and was played on very hard ground. The home pack was weakened by the transfer of Evans from the pack to the three-quarter line. For the first ten minutes of the game the home side more than held their own. The forwards were quick on the ball and fought hard. At half-time there was no score. In the second half Whitley did the attacking and Tynemouth had to struggle to keep their opponents from crossing their line. Forrest nearly scored but at once Whitley went into an attack and scored an unconverted try wide-out. This was the only score of the match Forrest and Evans were outstanding among the three-quarters and Wardhaugh led the forwards well. Final score.—Tynemouth, nil. Whitley Grammar School, 3 points. T e a m . — G i l m o r e ; Laffey, Wakefield J.. Evans (Capt.), Reid ; Forrest, Fenwick ; Lunn, Harrison D., Wardhaugh. Gofton, Meredith, Rodgers, Mayhew, Mackie. FIRST

XV

v.

HEXHAM

GRAMMAR

SCHOOL

(Piayed at Dene Park, Hexham, on September 20th) This was a disappointing game as both sides played poor football. Tynemouth did not approach the form shown in the previous game, the forwards failing to heel quickly and cleanly. For Tynemouth, Forrest put Mackie over for an un-converted try and then scored himself after following up a punt ahead. Hexham ran from their own 25 to score under the posts and converted. They scored three unconverted tries to win by 14 points to 6, points. Team.—Gilmore ; Laffey, Wakefield J., Evans, Reid ; Forrest, Fenwick ; Lunn, Harrison D . , Wardhaugh, Gofton, Meredith, Rodgers, Mayhew, Mackie.


FIRST

v.

XV

TYNEMOUTH

HIGH

SCHOOL

(Played at Priors Park on September 24th) The School soon went ahead with an unconverted try by Evans and a dropped penalty goal by Wakefield. Then the High School equalised with two penalty goals owing to failure to observe the offside rule. A little later the same cause led to another penalty goal being kicked by the High School. Then the School went ahead again with a try from Lunn which Evans converted. Soon afterwards the High School scored an unconverted try to lead again. In the last few minutes Laffey scored an unconverted try after the only real constructive three-quarter movement of the game. Final score.—Tynemouth, 1 goal, 1 penalty goal, '2 tries, 14 points. High School, 3 penalty goals, 1 try, 12 points. FIRST

v.

XV

BEDE

GRAMMAR

SCHOOL

(Played at Sunderland on September 27th) From Tynemouth's point of view this was R u g b y at its very worst. The side showed no life or initiative and it was a game to forget. Final score.—Bede Grammar School, 7 goals, 3 tries, 1 penalty goal, 47 pts. Tynemouth School, nil. Team.—Gilmore ; Richardson, Evans, l.affey, Reid ; Forrest, Dodsworth ; Lunn, Harrison D . , Wardhaugh, Mayhew, Brennan, Rodgers, Fenwick, Mackie. v.

FIRST XV

TYNEMOUTH

HIGH

SCHOOL

(Played ^t Priors Park on October 4th) This was a scrappy game. The team had to be re-arranged, Bristow playing in the place of Evans who had pulled a muscle. There was little constructive play. Forrest scored an excellent try and Fenwick kicked a good penalty goal. Later another try was scored by Lunn. The High School scored four times. Final score.—Tynemouth School, 2 tries, 1 penalty goal, 9 points. High School, 3 tries, 1 goal, 14 points. Team.—Fenwick : Reid, Laffey, Richardson, Bristow ; Forrest, Dodsworth ; Lunn, Harrison D., Wardhaugh, Mayhew, Gofton, Rodgers, Tait I., Mackie. FIRST

XV

v.

MORPETH

GRAMMAR

SCHOOL

(Played at Morpeth on October 8th) This was a disastrous match, the Tynemouth team being overrun by a team which showed itself superior in every way. Tackling was almost non-existent and it was not until the closing stages that the Tynemouth team showed any life or dash. Wakefield dropped a very good penalty goal from a difficult angle. Final score.—Morpeth Grammar School, (i goals, 7 tries, 51 points. Tynemouth School, 1 penalty goal, 3 points. Team.—Fenwick ; Gilmore, Forrest, Laffey, Reid ; Wakefield, Dodsworth ; Lunn, Brennan, Wardhaugh, Mayhew, Tait I., Mackie, Harrison D . , Rodgers. FIRST

XV

v.

SOUTH SHIELDS

HIGH

SCHOOL

(Played at Percy Park on October 29th) Tynemouth, losing the toss, kicked off against a strong breeze. They played well to hold South Shields to a lead of 6—0 at half-time. In the second half South Shields took advantage of the slowness of the home side and scored 4 tries. The Tynemouth reply was a penalty goal. They failed to take advantage of the wind. The side as a whole showed considerable improvement and Dunlevy was an outstanding forward.


26 Final score.—Fenwick ; Reid, l.afTey, Forrest, Gilmore ; Wakefield, Dodsworth ; I.uiin, Dunlevy, Wardhaugh, Mayhew, Tait I., Mackie, Harrison D., Rogers. FIRST

XV

v.

BEDE

GRAMMAR

SCHOOL

(Played at Percy Park on November 22nd) From the start Tynemouth tried hard to avenge their away defeat. After a few minutes play Fenwick left the field with a broken leg. Evans went to full-back in his place and Wardhaugh led the forwards. The side played with much spirit and among the forwards Dunlevy was always outstanding. Bede scored two tries which first-time tackling should have prevented. After Wakefield had failed to convert a penalty kick Dunlevy was successful with another in front of the posts. Further weak tackling led to Bede scoring two more tries. Tynemouth pressed in the second half and were unlucky not to score. Final score.—Tynemouth School, I penalty, 3 points. Bede Grammar School, 4 tries, 12 points. Team.—Fenwick ; Gilmore, Forrest, Laffey, Reid ; Wakefield, Dodsworth ; Lunn, Dunlevy, Wardhaugh, Mayhew, Tait I., Evans, Mackie. JUNIOR

RUGBY,

1947

If one judges merely by results, this season has again been most unsuccessful The Under 13 have played t w o matches against Ascham House, winning the first 3—0, and drawing the return 6—6, while the Under. 14 and Under 14^ have lost all their matches, by a large margin in the majority of cases. This lack of success, however, has not been due, to any large extent, to lack of skill. One cause has been the absence of two of their best forwards—Turnbull W. for half of the term, and Turnbull J. II. for almost the whole of it. A second, and more decisive reason, is that they have almost invariably had to play against sides considerably heavier than themselves. But the most importa t reason is that until near the end of the term too few of the team realised the vital necessity of hard tackling, going all out all the time, and not waiting to see what the other man is going to do with the ball. Of the forwards, Taylor has been outstanding lor the sustained fierceness of his play, and turnbull W . , Watson and Joicey have been real hard-working forwards, while Ilarirson T. has saved numerous tries by intelligent covering over to the corner-flag. In the last few games Heyes has shewn much promise at scrum-half and throughout the season Evans's tackling at fly-half has been excellent, but he has held on to the ball too long in attack. Hedlev W. has been the best three-quarter ; his handling is excellent and though he has had little chance in attack he has constantly made use of his speed to bring down opponents on the far side of the field : and Hall has tackled very well indeed for a b o y still only 11^. At full-back Hunter has been too small to have had much of a chance but has occasionally tackled well, while in the last two matches Tait G., though slow, has shewn complete fearlessness. To end on a more optimistic note there is tremendous enthusiasm and much promise amongst those not yet old or large enough to play in Junior matches. Finally, the Under 14J in their match against Morpeth, a much heavier and faster side, at the end of the term, though beaten 0—-42, gave easily the best performance of any Junior team in the last three seasons. There was not a single case of funking or flagging from kick-off to no-side, but they played R u g b y Football as it should be played. D.S.U. AUTUMN

NATURE

NOTES,

1947

A magnificent summer, probably the best many of us can recall, was followed by an autumn, the first six weeks of which appeared to be an extension ol summer. The highest temperature of the year was reached on September 11th, as well as during July, and not even a slight ground frost reached the district till November 11th. The year's characteristic


extremities produced twelve degrees of frost four days later, while at the beginning of December there was an even harder night frost and a day of unyielding frost, since when the weather has been more conventional. There was little evidence of departing migrants on this part of the coast this autumn. Wheatears, which usually break their journey from the hills during the first week in September, were seen on only three occasions, the first on September 7th, a week later than usual, presumably on account of the mild weather. A Stonechat was seen near Cullercoats beach during September ; I have only one previous record of the bird for this district, a migrant seen arriving last March. Twenty Redwings, the most familiar winter visitors, crossed the coast at Tynemouth on October 20th, but have not been seen in the district since. This has been the worst autumn for watching shore birds, whose numbers have steadily decreased since the re-opening of the beaches at the end of the war. It has been easy to keep a record of every " w a d e r " seen : Oystercatchers, formerly seen daily, and as many as 120 together in 1942, have been seen on only three occasions at Tynemouth and Cullercoats, and Redshanks twelve times, mostly single birds, but both are more numerous on the quieter coast about St. Mary's Island. Five Swans flew South past Tynemouth on September 25th, and Scoters (black diving ducks) have been seen on five occasions, including flocks of forty and ninety-five, the latter off Seaton Sluice, on December 2fith. They were accompanied on this occasion by two Great Crested Grebes, usually inhabitants of inland waters, and not widespread in the North, but tending to visit the sea during the winter months. One or two Eiderducks have been seen off Cullercoats on several days, especially during December. The Quarry Pool, Whitley Bay, has been most disappointing, no Tufted Ducks having been seen there this autumn. Should we have severe weather, it is hoped you will remember the need for feeding birds, on account of the beneficial activities of many of them, especially Starlings. The interest obtained from watch'rig these bin's alotv will repay the trouble, and in cold weather, timid birds, even the fieldloving ones such as Redwings, come close to houses. Even in these hard times some household scraps can be found. T receive very few reports, although I know many in the School are interested. More reports would increase the scope of these notes. G.R.L. VISIT

TO

LEMINGTON

GLASSWORKS

On December 10th a party of boys, accompanied by the Headmaster, paid a visit to Lemington. After meeting the Manager, Mr. Scott, an old b o y of Tynemouth School, we split up into two parties under the guidance of two Assistant Managers. Our first visit was to the storage and mixing room. The sand and chemicals are stored in large bins from which they are drawn and weighed as required. They are thoroughly mixed bv mechanical means and carried to the furnaces in wooden barrows. The types of glass manufactured are mainly of the soft or lead and the hard or soda varieties. The sand used consists of white and brown sand ; the white sand being the purer and finer of the two, is used for the better and harder glass. Lead glass, we are told, contains red lead which makes the glass softer, but which gives it a greater lustre thus it us? for Lableware and wireless valves. In the second room, the pressing room, we saw glass articles being stamped or pressed out by means of dies and mouldsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;such articles as bicycle reflectors, street lamp covers, butter dishes and sundry tableware. The molten glass is carried from the furnaces to the moulds by dipping steel rods into the glass and collecting a ball of it on the end. Tn this room there were several blowing operations being performed as well. The main objects being made were large X - r a y tubes ; these are blown in the normal way in the shape of a large sausage, then they are y â&#x20AC;˘ ,<.', in moulds where the shaping process is completed.


28 The next workshop contained an extremely interesting bulb-making machine, worked by compressed air. This is in the form of a revolving turntable, round the edge of which there are a large number of moulds. This machine has an output of 6,000 bulbs per hour. As the bulbs are made they are fed into a second machine which trims off the excess glass by means of a series of gas jets. After seeing various checking tests carried out we were shown the shop in which television tubes were being made. This contains several furnaces, all gas fired, having a consumption of about 15,000 cubic feet of gas per hour. There was also a special " t a n k " furnace in the course of construction for the production of Triplex type glass. The fireclay pots which contain the chemicals to be fused and which have to withstand a temperature of about 1,500 degrees Centigrade are all hand made. The drying out process for these pots takes anything up to t w o yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and their average life is thirty melting operations. Then we were taken into the older part of the factory where we were shown the inside of the .old glass-making kiln. This is nearly 120 feet high and is roughly cone-shaped. It may be seen lor miles and is a local landmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;so much so that the Air Ministry has refused permission to dismantle it because of its value as such. Looking up from below at a small round patch of sky we were alarmed to note that the hole was not truly circular. We were casually informed that bricks do occasionally drop to the floor, but nobody has encountered one on its downward journey yet. The purpose of the tall cone-shaped chimney with the large openings at its base was to create the necessary draught for the fire which it used to contain. The next Department we were shown was that in which glass articles are finished smoothly by grindstones. These are merely large, horizontal sandstones upon which the edges to be trimmed are placed. In this department also lamp covers were being graded with respect to their properties of absorption of white light. This was being done by means of an apparatus called a photometer, not unlike that used by aspiring School Certificate physicists. Finally we were shown a comparatively new process, that of welding glass to metal ; we also saw the factory showcase of articles manufactured ranging from Cathode R a y tubes to bicycle reflectors. Our thanks are due to Mr. Scott, by whose kind permission we were allowed to visit the factory, to our guides and to the Headmaster who organised this most informative visit. J.M., V i a . THE

SCHOOL

CONCERT

The evening of the last Monday of Term was enlivened in traditional manner and with more than traditional success by the School Concert. A Czech carol, beautifully staged by Mrs. Hilton and sung with obvious delight by members of the 1st Form, set the standard for the whole evening. After this, nearly every Form provided some contribution to make up a varied entertainment. Bilclough, Shaw and Laidler from l i b gave recitations which were well received, " The Y a k , " by Laidler, being particularly pleasing. An extract from " T o m Sawyer," showing us how to get a fence whitewashed, was presented next by much-disguised members of I l a and III. Mrs. Hilton is to be congratulated on her clever adaptation of the story and on the colourful costumes and elaborate set which she worked so hard to build up. This production almost brought the atmosphere of the countryside into the School Hall. The part of T o m was played by Lamb, Auntie Polly by Hadaway, Sid by Welch, and other parts by Arthur, Everett, Scott G. and Harmer. This was followed by two French songs, tunefully presented by the combined voices of Form III. Miss Marshall was well rewarded in the standard achieved for all her strenuous coaching. The author of the IVth Form sketch wisely preferred to remain anonymous. Fleck, as the long-suffering master, and Alexander, Richardson P.. Joicey, Heyes, Evans C., Mutch, Ryan and Blades as the scholars


29 seemed quite at home in presenting School as it just isn't, and everyone, cast and audience, showed tremendous gusto in this production of " The Stationery P e r i o d . " Then came a version of " Twenty Questions," presented by members of VIb, with Mr. Brennan as a Question-master who really knew his job. The team, consisting of Willey, McGilvray, Scarth, Meredith and Watt D., in spite of a strange reluctance to speak up, won at the post by guessing a whalemeat sausage. Mayhew kept the score and Reid chalked up the objects with illustrations. Finally there was the long-awaited contribution from V i a . They confounded all speculation by presenting a Melodrama. This, portraying the adventures of a beautiful country wench at the hands of a wicked Squire, and her rescue in the nick of time by Honest Tom. was written and produced by G. R. Lunn. A. W. Harrison was the heroine, S. Rodgers her widowed mother, R. A. Bristow Honest Ten and K. A. Forrest apparently in his element as the wicked Squire. The play, which was in two scenes had a rapturous reception which spoke for the quality of the acting and the script. K. H. Miller and D. Brennan increased V l a ' s quota by their vigorous vet sensitive tendering of two piano duets, " Country Gardens " and " The Skaters' W a l t z , " and the audience drowned scene-changing noises with whole-hearted carol singing. Mention must be made here of K. H. Miller, who acted as accompanist throughout and put in much thankless work at rehearsal ; also of P. Prest, who acted as stage-manager. There were snags, as always ; the Concert, coming when it does, suffers from under-rehearsal, and the smallness of the stage leads to such hitches as that which delayed the beginning of this year's concert by some twenty minutes. It is unfortunate, too, that some part of the audience should seek relief from rather cramped accommodation by shuffling during the performance of musical items. But, generally speaking, it was a successful evening, and the audience showed its appreciation of the hard work put in by everyone concerned, and especially by Miss Marshall, Mrs. Hilton and Mr. Gentle in producing and organising the show. The loud cheers which rounded off the concert must have been gratifying to them after so much apprehension. D.R.L. THE

FRIDAY

CLUB

In September, at a boisterous meeting of the School Debating Society, it was decided to expand the Society to cover a wider field of activities. Thus came into being what we now call the Friday Club. This title was chosen after several high-sounding alternatives, which would almost certainly have driven potential members away, had been reluctantly rejected. The Club has met most Friday evenings after some publicity consisting of a charter or draft of principles drawn up by the brothers Lunn and some posters created by Lunn G. had awakened the interest of some twenty members of the V l t h Form. Activities have so far been fairly equally divided between talks, visits to the theatre, piano and gramophone recitals, quizzes, a play-reading and a debate. T w o members of the Staff have given talks : Mr. Brennan gave a paper on " The Powers of Observation " which was most absorbing, and brought out with great success how limited our powers of observation are. Mr. Gentle gave us a long-awaited talk on Burma and jungle warfare. We learned more perhaps about the humorous side of operations than any other, for example the method used by a field artillery unit of warning the cookhouse of its return from manoeuvres by firing two rounds at it. This talk was illustrated by various maps and an enjoyable evening was spent at West House by all except perhaps Mr. Gentle. Jnr., who was rudely invaded in the middle of supper. Later in the term we were taught more about our


local village of Cullercoats by G. Lunn. This was a most informative talk : I do not think many of us knew that Cullercoats used to be a leading coal port supplied by the Whitley Colliery. Our first gramophone evening was held in the Study, by kind permission of the Headmaster. Miss Frances Ellison played and gave programme notes on an interesting selection of records, including Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony and Elgar's Enigma Variations. Later in the term J. K. Evans played us a number of interesting records among which were Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata and selections from Schwanda the Bagpiper.. Among its members the Club is fortunate to have two accomplished pianists who have each given us a recital. Laffey entertained us with a selection of light classical music, including Finlandia by Sibelius, Liszt's Second Hungarian Rhapsody, and Cnopin s Nocturne m h. Flat. it. H. Miller played some selections from the Gilbert and Sullivan Operas, including excerpts from " The Mikado " and " H.M.S. Pinafore." These Piano evenings were especially appreciated because members of the Club were providing the entertainment. Three excursions were made during the term, two to the theatre, one to an exhibition. A performance of Benjamin Britten's humorous light opera, " Albert Herring," was enjoyed at the theatre Royal, and another small party saw an interesting production of " Measure for Measure " at the People's Theatre. The exhibition was of the History of Shakespearean Production and was held at King's College. It consisted of a well-managed display of prints and photographs, tracing developments in production and the structure of stage and theatre. The steady elaboration of production which reached its zenith in the last century was emphasised. The modern trend, we were told, is a return to the idea of the Elizabethan stage. The value of our visit was increased by the lecturer, who, after an unpromising introduction, proved both entertaining and informative. We have had one quiz and it has whetted our appetite for more. Mr. Gentle amassed the questions by virtue of great patience and acted as Quizmaster. The questions covered a wide range and the competitive spirit was keen and vociferous, especially over the last " t e a m " question, which developed into a race betvvee.i the master minds as to who could think of the Seventh Dwarf before his neighbour. Our play-reading activities have been restricted to one play so far, namely " Macbeth." This, though taking almost three hours to finish, proved a great success, thanks to the eiiorts of those taking part, especially those who took the rather trying parts of the witches and succeeded in coming away with extremely sore throats, il nothing else. The solitary debate was not very inspiring and showed the need for greater preparation of material and adherence to the conventions of debate. We hope to do better next time. The motion that " Professionalism is the Bane of Sport " did not draw the expected crowd and was eventually lost by 4 votes to 10. J. K. Evans and J. Mackie spoke for, S. M. Rodgers and i,. Parkin against the motion. As a grand finale to the first t< rm's meet ngs of the Club we were given a party by Mrs. Lunn. For this our heartfelt thanks are due to Mrs. Lunn â&#x20AC;&#x201D;we all appreciate the difficulty of providing anything of this sort nowadaysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and to the brothers Lunn who put in so much work to organise the many games. This was a magnificent evening. Altogether a most encouraging start for the reincarnated Debating Society. Thanks are due to all those who have contributed to our meetings and we hope to expand both membership and activities in the New Year. J.M.


OUR

SAILORS

Oh, jolly, jolly sailors In ships upon the sea ; I am writing this to thank you, I-or the things you bring to me. From New Zealand and South Africa Our Christmas joint may come ; And spirits from Jamaica, For Christmas pud needs rum. Wherever things may come from, I think we ought to praise Our brave and plucky sailors, W h o m Britain seems to raise.

'

C.E., Ila.

BONGO Bongo "chasing butterflies All on a summer's day, But wasn't good at catching them And they all got away. Bongo chased some rabbits But soon was tired of that, Then came across a ball to chew And an old man's Sunday hat. Bongo curled in his basket. Oh ! what a happy sight, After a d a y ' s adventuring He lay down for the night.

THE

MOWING

OF

A

W.P.H.

Ila.

LAWN

" The mowing ol a lawn 1" The phrase seems harmless enough. Yet, the moment I saw it, my mind travelled back to those seemingly far-off summer days. " Now's my c h a n c e , " I said to myself, " now's my chance to pour forth my hatred for lawns and everything connected with them. Mr. Brennan, the history master, is always telling us that the only way to keep a country happy is to give its citizens free speech. Well, I ' m going to make myself happy and do a little free speaking. First of all, imagine yourself in the sitting room of an ordinary suburban house. I am in that sitting room, reading a book, or, perhaps, listening to the wireless. A nice peaceful picture, isn't it ? Outside the sun is shining on the green lawn. But suddenly, the peace and quiet are disturbed, as the voice of adult authority cries, " Peter, cut that l a w n . " In such a way are many of my summer afternoons disturbed ; in cutting a lawn, which, if we were patriotic enough, should be a potato bed. But, there is nothing I can do about it. So I am left alone in that sitting room with my thoughts, which, needless to say, are very bitter. After a few minutes sulking I gather up my weapons and sally forth to the fight. Viciously I haul the lawn mower on to the turf, all the time cursing, in my mind, everybody and everything. " W h y can't we have an electric one like they have in the park ? All I ' d have to do then would be to steer it. Where's that oil can ? Ah, got it. Oh, my sainted aunt, no oil in the t h i n g . " So I storm out of the garage and work off my rage on the lawn and the mower. Now an ordinary lawn is easy to mow. Y o u just start at the inside and work out, or start at the outside and work in. But our lawn is different. It was specially thought out for my benefit. It's an ornamental lawn. Visitors say it's beautiful. So it should be, considering all the sweat I've put into it. When visitors praise it, Dad smirks, and says he's put a lot of work into it ! That's all I get for my blood, toil, sweat and tears. Its construction must have taken a great deal of careful thought. Certainly,


nothing like it could be thought up in less than a week. There isn't a clear run of three feet in the whole thing. Sometimes in my fevered brain I imagine that I see one, and I go charging down a narrow path about six inches wide and end up in a tulip bed. Sometimes in the hot weather, when the sweat is pouring down my face, and tulips, wallflowers, lawn and lawn mower dance before my eyes, I get lost. When I say I get lost I mean that I can get out myself but I can't get the lawn mower out, because I can't lift it over the flower beds. When that happens I wait until the heat of the day has passed, and in the half light of dusk, strain my eyes trying to find a way along hidden pathways less than a foot wide. Usually, however, I manage to get out. Perhaps I am a little prejudiced in the matter of lawns. Maybe that is because I see other boys charging haphazardly round a lawn with a mower and sending out a shower of green clippings, while I meander daintily along slippery green pathways which are so narrow that a tight-rope walker would catch his breath at them. In conclusion may I make an offer to anyone interested in taking early morning constitutionals ? Our lawn is open to anyone whose h o b b y it is. I give them my word of honour that, if they take advantage of this generous offer, they will never pass the same flower bed twice. P.W., VIb. DUMMY I went into the shop and I saw him stuck there. With his clothes very spruce and his dandified air From his shiny black shoes to his wavy brown hair, And there he was standing, Looking. I asked him which floor for the gentlemen's ties ; He told me no truths and he told me no lies ; Pie looked at me straight with those steely grey eyes, And still he just stood there, Looking. I asked him once more, and my wrath became plain ; I asked him again, and I asked him again ; I started to think that he wasn't quite sane, But still he just stood there, Looking. The people who passed looked quite strangely at me, They thought I was mad, that was easy to see, Small children came pointing and gurgling with glee ; And then it just dawned on m e â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Dummy! A.W.H., SCHOOL HEAD BOY PREFECTS :

:

D.

R.

Lunn.

D.

R.

Lunn,

G. R. Lunn. C A P T A I N OF F O O T B A L L HOUSE

CAPTAINS

:

:

J

R.

OFFICERS

A. Bristow,

J. K. Evans, K.

J.

A. Mackie,

J. W. Laffey,

Evans.

Whitley Bay,

Via.

D.

R.

Lunn.

Tynemouth, J. A. Mackie. Monkseaton, K. A. Forrest. North Shields, J. W. Laffey.

K.

A. Forrest,

J. Wardhaugh.


1

TYNEMOUTH SCHOOL MAGAZINE. SPRING SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES

We regret the departure of Mr. J. F. Roberts after four years' service. Speech Day was held away the prizes. In the Church at which the R e v . address. An account of the magazine.

on March 16th, when Sir Ralph Mortimer gave morning a Service was held at Holy Saviour O. F. Granlund, Vicar of Embleton, gave the the Speech Day proceedings is given later in

The House Football Cup was won by Monkseaton. Avete Ila

J. Wardhaugh.

Jun.

N. W. G. Corbett, J. Davis, W. S. Legg, G. G. Pope, E. B. Pope, G. S. Watson.

T.P.S.

R. E. Dale, G. S. Goldstone, M. Henthorne, M. W. Leyshon, J. Purvis.

Ila

B.D.

Valete Harmer.

lib

S. B. Forrest.

I.

H. Morland.

Jun.

P. R. H. Staff,

T.P.S.

G. H. Gilman, R. S. Greenly, J. L. Pilditch, M. T. H. T o d d , P. M. Read, J. N. Stevens.

D. M. H. Hayes.

N O R T H SHIELDS HOUSE NOTES House Master: Mr.

G.

G.

GENTLE.

Houfe Captain:

J.

W .

LAFFEY.

We started this term without the services of Dunlevy, C., and Wardhaugh, and we wish them every success for the future. Only one member, Laffey, represented the House regularly in the 1st X V , and he obtained his colours. Prest and Tilby also glayed once or twice. Hedley, W . , Taylor, Hunter, Turnbull, J. H . , and Watson, gave good service in the Junior XV and Taylor played for the Coast Schools against South Shields. Hedley was also chosen to play, but was unfit. As the House is still rather below strength we were outplayed in the House matches, especially in the Ilnd team, which consisted mainly of boys under 14. We hope to make up for this in the Sports and House Cricket. Congratulations are due to all those members who have gained high positions in their forms. We hope that they will continue to bring the House valuable points, and that others will be inspired by their example.


1

2 WHITLEY House Master: Mr.

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

J. M . MILLER.

D.

R.

LUNN.

Whitley Bay has played a prominent part in school activities this term. In the House matches a distressing situation arose in which we, l i v i n g victory in sight, had to watch Tynemouth fight and lose our battle. Nevertheless we can claim a good second place and congratulate our teams. Lunn D . , Meredith, Tate J. K . , Harrison D . , Gofton, Richardson D . , Say and Bristow, have all represented us in the 1st X V , and Harrison T. and Arthur in the Junior X V . W o o d J. is to be congratulated on his Matriculation and Gilmore on his School Certificate, in the December exams. Reavley, Meredith, Harrison D . , Nichol, Dixon, Harrison T . , Lamb, Nicholas, Whitfield, Atkinson, Morland and Robinson all obtained good positions in their forms. TYNEMOUTH House Master: Mr. G. A.

WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain: J. A.

MACKIE.

This term Tynemouth managed to gain only third place in the House R u g b y matches, despite the encouragement received from Whitley Bay supporters in the later stages. In the 1st XV we were represented by J. K. Evans (Capt.), Mackie and Mayhew, and in the Junior XV by Evans C. F. and Hall. J. K. Evans is to be congratulated on being chosen to play for the County Allages X V . We look forward to greater success in the Sports and House Cricket next term. G. Shaw and J. K. Evans are to be congratulated on their Matriculation in December, and Lilburn, Hilton P. and Laidler on gaining high positions in their forms. MONKSEATON House Master: Mr.

B. S

BATES.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

K.

A . FORREST.

This term has been a successful one for the House. We contributed four regular members to the 1st XV in Forrest, Reid, Rodgers and Brennan, and an occasional one in W a t t D . ; Turnbull W . , W a t t J., Partridge P. and Hately played for the Junior X V . We were again successful in winning the House Football Cup, but only after a much harder struggle than last year's. Our lead over Whitley Bay was maintained only by beating Tynemouth in the last 1st Team match, and this game was very exciting. The following are to be congratulated in keeping us to the front by gaining high positions in their forms: W a t t D . , Partridge J., Partridge P . , Richardson P . , Hately, Carrick, Hardie, Partridge W . , Laidler and Donaldson. R U G B Y F O O T B A L L â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S P R I N G T E R M 1948 This must have been a record Lent term for the number of games played: the weather has been kind throughout, there has been little sickness, and as a result five games of rugger and one of Soccer have taken place on most games days. The House Competition was a great success and all boys showed great spirit and keenness.

V


The 1st XV improves steadily but seems rather luckless. At the end of the Christmas Term we lost to the Royal Grammar School in two excellent games by (i—8 and 5—6. Our first game this term we lost to Hexham 5—9. With only a little luck we should have won these three games. South Shields beat us convincingly 24—0. but we won a good game with Gateshead 12—0. In the last game of the season, and without Evans J., we lost the return match 0-—3, at Gateshead. Unfortunately the Morpeth and Dame Allan's games were both cancelled. An excellent Under l(i game took place against R . G . S . We lost 0—15, but there was very little between the sides and spectators saw some very good Rugby Football. On the whole things are certainly looking brighter. Most boys in the School are keen—boys in the lower forms are particularly enthusiastic, and good results should soon come. Evans has been a very good captain but his side has had little luck and there have been many injuries. FIRST

XV

CHARACTERS

Evans, J. K. (Colours 1945-6-7-8). Quite in a class by himself as a local schoolboy Rugby Footballer. He is tu be congratulated on his fxcellent game for the County All-Age against Cumberland and the Rorders. rlis best position is wing forward but he has played very well at lly li;ilt for the X V . His weakness as a captain is a slight intolerance—he cannot understand why all the boys in the School are not as keen on rugger as he is himself. Lunn, D. R. (Vice-capt. Colours 1946-7-8). Has worked untiringly as a front-row forward, using his height and weight to good advantage. He backs up his three-quarters and tackles well. Forrest, K. A. (Colours 1946-7-8). Has natural ability for the game and on some days plays as if inspired but on others is inclined to lose heart. Laffey, J. W. (Colours 1947-8). Because of the shortage of second players in the team it was necessary for him to play in three different positions, and in each he proved himself equally capable. Wardhaugh, J. (Colours 1946-7-8) and Dunlevy, C. T w o big, hardworking forwards whose services were lost after the first half of the season. They were a great loss to the team. Fenwick, E. Was playing well at full-back until he was unfortunate enough to fracture his leg in the return match with Bede. Prest. Mackie.

Played very well at scrum-half after a none too sure beginning. A good loose-forward, who tackles and backs up well.

Reid. Played well as a wing three-quarter, (luring the season.

improving his tackling

Rodgers. A keen, but light forward, rather inclined to be selfish with the ball. A fairly sound tackier, handicapped by lack of weight. Gofton.

A very useful second row forward.

Mayhew. A forward who must learn to tackle low and to fall on the ball when necessary. Harrison, D.

A big front-row forward who still has to learn to tackle.

Meredith and Brennan. about the position.

Are both hookers, but with a lot to learn

Tiiby, Richardson, D . , Bristow and Hedley, W. Have all played in the three-quarter line, and each one of them must learn to run straight and tackle low before going any further.


4 THE

HOUSE

MATCHES

The weather being favourable, the House Competition was held earlier in the term than was possible last year, Monkseaton winning the Cup for the second year in succession. They had to resist a strong challenge fiom Whitley Bay, who were again second, this year only four points behind. The destination of the Cup was decided in the last match of the competition, when Tynemouth I fought well to keep Monkseaton I down to two goals. As usual the matches were played seven-a-side, each house providing two teams. Ten points were awarded for a win by the First Seven, and six points for a win by the Second Seven. Results Monkseaton I

.

10

North Shields

...

0

Monkseaton I

.

10

Tynemouth ...

...

0

JMonkseaton 1 -

.. .

11

Whitley

...

0

Whitley Bay I

..

0

Tynemouth ...

...

0

Whitley Bay I

..

3

North

Shields

...

0

Tynemouth

I

.

14

North

Shields

...

8

Monkseaton 11

.

21

North

Shields

...

0

Monkseaton II

.

13

Tynemouth ...

...

0

Whitley

... 12

Monkseaton 11 Whitley

Bay II

Whitley Bay 11 Tynemouth Final

Bay

II

0 . .. 29 ..

North

Bay Shields

6

Tynemouth

3

North

...

0

...

...

3

Shields

...

0

Table Monkseaton

42 points

Whitley

38

Bay

Tynemouth North

16

Shields

0 JUNIOR

RUGBY

In their matches this term the Under 14ÂŁ have again been beaten by a wide margin on each occasion and have failed to do themselves justice. As before Christmas, lack of vigour and too much timidity, rather than lack of skill, have been the reasons for their defeat. The Under 15 have had one match against Bede Collegiate and though beaten 0â&#x20AC;&#x201D;12 had at least as much of the play as their opponents and with a little more luck might easily have won. The Third Form have had two matches, against the Royal Grammar School and Dame Allan's, losing the first and drawing the second. Though naturally the standard of play was not high, several boys showed great promise for next season. Finally Turnbull W. and Taylor are to be congratulated on playing for the Coast Schools against South Shields. Evans C. and Hedley W. were also chosen to play but were unfit. Evans C. was also reserve for the county Under 14| against the Border Schools. D.S.U. SPEECH

DAY

Speech Day was again held in the Plaza, Tynemouth, on Tuesday, March 16th. There was a large gathering of parents and friends present when Dr. J. Chariesworth opened the proceedings. After welcoming those


present the Chairman of the Governors spoke of some of the difficulties which had faced the School during the previous year. He spoke of the difficulty in obtaining the required text-books and regretted that more paper and binding materials were not being made available for what would be a good investment for the future. He felt that those responsible for the allocation of paper supplies might well consider adopting a different policy. He also mentioned that there was developing a widespread shortage of teachers qualified to take advanced work. In his review of the year the Headmaster expressed his agreement with what had been said by the Chairman. There was a severe shortage of books and of laboratory apparatus which hindered the work of a school. In the Higher Certificate the one entrant had a very successful result and had been awarded a County Scholarship. Of 20 School Certificate entrants 10 attained matriculation standard, 5 obtained their School Certificates. The Headmaster then gave particulars of successes of Old Boys which had, by an oversight, been omitted from the Magazine. These included a First in the English Tripos at Cambridge, a First L L . R at King's College, Newcastle, an M.B., B.S. at Newcastle and a B.Sc. at Newcastle. The full details are given in this edition of the Magazine. In games there had not been the improvement which had been expected. In concluding th Headmaster expressed the hope that in the near future the School would be able to restore all its pre-war facilities. It was to this end that it was proposed to erect a Memorial Hall in memory ot those Old Boys who fell in the war. After presenting the prizes Sir Ralph Mortimer spoke briefly about loyalty to great ideals. PRIZES Higher Certificate B. E. Blunt. Matriculation D. I. Brennan, J. K. Evans, W. A. Gofton, A. W. Harrison, J. W. Lalfey, G. R. Lunn, A. I. McAughtrey, G. J. Shaw, J. A. Wells, J. M." W o o d , K. H. Miller. School Certificate R. A. Baty, M. W. Gilmore.

Harrison, B.

Hesslegrave,

J.

Wardhaugh, N.

Stockdale Prize for Languages B. E. Blunt, J. Wardhaugh. FORM

PRIZES

V.

A. J. Humble, J. U. Reavley, D. N. Watt.

IV.

R. R. Gristwood, D. A. Lambert, D. Nichol, J. P. Partridge, P. D. Partridge, J. D. Watt.

III.

G. JA. E.

Ila. lib. 1.

G. Davison, W. S. Dixon, D. N. Reay, P. J . Richardson, A. Ryan .

S. Carrick, J .M. Hately, P. R. Hilton, M. J. Read, G. Stephenson. C. F. Everett, R. M. Hardie, R. D. Harmer, A. Lamb, G. R. Scott. I. Atkinson, D. R. Jones, D. E. W. Laidler, W. J. N. Walker, G. J. C. Whitfield.'


6 Jun. A. W. R. Gair, M. O. C. Joy, H. Morland. Jun. B. V. E. Brown, D. L. Sowerby. T.P.S.

Form III.

N. Gordon, A. M. Donaldson, K. B. Dobson.

II.

D. Browell, P. Burke, J. E. Wright.

1.

C. A. Lewis, B. M. Rhode.

Progress Prizes (presented by Mrs. Gordon) 111.

M. C. Alexander.

II.

R. C. Boyle.

I.

R. S. Greenly. OLD

BOYS'

NEWS

(Successes w o n , i n 1947, omitted from the 1947 magazine). Pi S. Chesney

(1939-43).—First Class English Tripos, Cambridge.

N. Calvert (1936-44).—First Class L L . B . Newcastle. Marris Memorial Prize. A. Hand (1931-40) .—M B., B.S. R. A. W o o d

(1933-41).—B.Sc., Newcastle.

1). R. Bradley (1932-41).—Travelling Scholarship in Classics. THE

FRIDAY

CLUB

Having introduced itself last term, the Friday Club can claim to have established itself this term. A meeting was held every week, and a varied programme provided. A larger membership would have been welcome, but there are sufficient interested supporters to make the efforts of the committee worthwhile, and a strong contingent from VIB and even a few inquiries from V give hope of a long life for the Club. An Extraordinary General Meeting was held at the beginning of term to ratify the Club's charter, drawn up after the experimental period of last term. It was also decided to join the British Drama League, primarily to borrow sets of plays for reading. As not all members were interested in this proposal, a Play-reading Group, whose members pay a small annual subscription, was formed. The present arrangement, whereby Higher Cert. Maths is taught in the evening, made it impossible for J. A. Mackie to contnue his active support, so G. R. Lunn was elected Secretary in his place. We are most grateful to Mackie for his invaluable services in dealing with the many difficulties which beset the Club in its infancy. In view of V I B ' s support Meredith was elected to the Committee to represent the form. A. N. Hunter, an old boy, and D. R. Lunn provided our first evening's entertainment. Hunter, at the piano, played admirably a programme of music by Grieg, Chopin, Albeniz, and McDowell. Lunn read a carefully arranged selection of English poetry, with richness of description as its theme, entitled " Infinite R i c h e s , " each passage being welded into the programme with a few remarks. Miss Frances Ellison gave another musical evening, one of our best-attended meetings, with records including Mozart's " Eine Kleine Nachtmusik." some of Dvorak's Slavonic Dances and " Omphale's Spinning Wheel " by Saint Saens. We have read two plays, Galsworthv's " Silver Box " and Shaw's " Androcles and the L i o n , " both of which, judging by the good reading and subsequent discussion, were enjoyed. Meredith, in both, was outstanding, and Mr. Brennan roared most realistically as the lion. Mr.


7 Gentle was persuaded to give a further talk on Burma; this time he concentrated on the country and people rather than on war experiences, but was equally interesting. He concluded with some most entertaining extracts from the SEAC magazine, " V i c t o r y . " Mr. Brennan, under the heading " The Master of the Short S t o r y , " gave a talk on the life and work of O. Henry. The Headmaster, at a meeting to which philatelists from lower forms were invited, displayed his line collection of British stamps, and traced the history of the postage system in this country. A general knowledge Quiz was arranged for the evening before Halfterm. The questions covered a wide range, and some were found a little difficult, but the evening was an enjoyable one. A small party saw the production of Webster's " The White Devil " at the People's' Theatre, but we were unable to obtain tickets to hear the Turin Symphony Orchestra. A good evening was spent at West House on the last day of term, when our meeting was converted into a party by the delightful and substantial refreshments provided by Mrs. Gentle. Messrs. Latfey, Harrison and Miller played the piano, Rodgers read poems from Reginald Arkell's " Green Fingers," and Meredith some of Gilbert's songs, which gave an even better opportunity of appreciating their wit than when they are sung. Mr. Gentle ran a short quiz, and also entertained us with further excerpts from " V i c t o r y . " D. R. Lunn provided a display of old prints of local scenes. The evening was a most fitting end to a successful term. We must thank Mr. Gentle for his continued interest and ever ready assistance. G.R.L. THE

(Hon. Sec.).

CASTLE

The castle of Newcastle was built by Henry II in the year 1172 and it took five years to build. When it was built it looked very like it does today. Other kings have added bits on to it but it is now in ruins and houses are now built where parts of the castle used to stand. The only parts that are left now are the Keep and Black Gate which is now a museum. In the museum there are coins left by the Saxons and Romans. There are also some heads of old skeletons and some Roman combs made out of bones of people and a model of the castle when it was first built. The Keep is square with a tower at each corner. It is built of stone and has very thick walls. There is a fireplace inside so big that you can stand under it. On the walls there are guns and helmets hanging up and on the floor there is a big stone coffin and some stone balls which they used to fire from cannons. Y o u can walk up a spiral staircase inside each tower and look through windows which are just like slits in the walls. The windows were made like this so that when the castle was attacked it was very hard for the archers to shoot their arrows through them from the outside. The stairs wind up the tower on to the top of the keep which has a flat roof with battlements all round it. At one side of the Keep there are dungeons where they kept their prisoners tied up with chains to the wall. When you come out of the Keep you can see the slits for the portcullis in the top of the archway, which has a lot of zig-zag carving round it. Although the castle is now in ruins many people still go to see it because it is so old and famous in history. J.A.S.W. (T.P.S.).


8 BIRDS Ee, Ee, Ee, cries the gull upon the seas, Caw, Caw, Caw, cries the rook among the trees; Coo, Coo, Coo, cries the dove among the eaves, Chirrup, Chirrup, Chirrup, says the sparrow in the leaves. Kree, Kree, Kree, cries the eagle in the hills, Cuckoo, Cuckoo, Cuckoo, says the cuckoo by the rills; Twitter, Twitter, Twitter, cries the swallow in the air, Kee, Kee, Kee, cries the falcon in the snare. K.B.D.

(I).

SURPRISE OF SPRING As Father whistled in the lane, He sensed the Spring in every vein; The primroses, flowers and lambs so gay, He had seen from the train this happy day. He thought of his garden and of his wife, He pictured :and pondered the beauty of life; He had reached the porch when he heard her say: " My dear! Will you beat the carpets today? " ' D.B.A.

(V).

SONNET O silver urn, appearing one bright morn Without the wall of stone which stands^between The street of concrete and our worm-cast lawn! Hast thou come here to blind us with thy sheen? Thou hast a band of scarlet round thy waist: Apart from this thou art of silver hue. This indicates the Council's dashing tasteâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; (The lamp-posts' silver is set off with blue). We used to trudge along with off'rings ( d r y ) , To where the older urn now sadly grieves, And thither would we trek with bowls heaped high With carrot-tops and wilting cabbage-leaves. But thou art almost on our window-sill: If we had hens thou'ldst be more handy still. A.W.H.

(VIA).

SCHOOL O F F I C E R S I IF.AD

BOY:

PREFECTS:

D. R. Lunn. D. R. Lunn, R. A. Bristow, J. A. Mackie, K. A. Forrest G. R.

Lunn, J. K. Evans, J. W. Laffey,

S. M. Rodgers, M. A. McGilvray. C.\I'TAIN

OF

FOOTBALL:

!L( USE CAPTAINS:

J.

K.

Evans.

Whitley Bay, D. R. Lunn. Tynemouth. J. K. Evans. Monkseaton, K. A. Forrest. North Shields, J. W. Laffey.

K. H.

Miller


9

SUMMER SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES

The Sports were held at the beginning of the term on April 28th, when most of the events were decided. Owing to rain a few of the events had to be postponed until a later date. The prizes were presented by Mrs. Lunn at school. A full record of the results appears later in this magazine. We congratulate all those who were successful in the July exams., and especially D. R. Lunn on his award of a Major County Scholarship. The tennis tournament was won for the second year in succession by Forrest who beat Laffey in the final 7â&#x20AC;&#x201D;5, Gâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;2. E. H. Fenwick was awarded his Cricket Colours. The School heard with great sorrow on May 1st, of the death, as the result of an accident, of a member of the Tynemouth junior School, Gerald J. W. Corbitt, aged 7. SUMMER

TERM,

1948

Avcte IV.

P. A. Milne.

I.

H. P. Manning.

Jun.

S. A. I. F.

T.P.S.

L. Baty, N. J- Holgate, A. Luker, J. K. Thompson, Webb. ' W. Graham, A. M. Hulme, J. B. Oliver, D. A. Reay, R. Robinson, J. A. Thompson. Valete

Via.

.

VIb

D. R. Lunn, Prefect 1945, Head Boy 1946-8, Matric. Julv 1946, H.C. July 1948, Major County Scholarship,' XV 1946-7-8. R. A. Bristow, Prefect 1946-8, Matric. July 1946, H.C. July 1948. 1. A. Mackie, Prefect 1946-8, Matric. July 1946, H.C. Julv 1948. D. A. Parkin, Matric. July 1946, H.C. July 1948. S. M. Rodgers, Prefect 1948, Matric. Julv 1946, H.C. July 1948. K. A. Forrest, Prefect 1946-8, Matric July 1946, XI 1946-7-8, X V 1946-7-8. P. L. Prest, Matric July 1946. J. W. Laffey, Prefect 1946-7-8, Matric Dec. 1947, Xf 1946-7-8. D. J. Harrison, S. Cert. July 1948. M. A. McGilvray, Prefect 1948, S. Cert. July 1948, XV 1946-7-8. ]. Hoskin, S. Cert. 1948. F. G. Willey, Matric. July 1948. E. H. Fenwick XI 1948. " R. G. L e e , J. IT. Reid, D. B, Richardson, G. C. Stokor, B. W. Turner.


10 V.

T. A. Walker, 1). C. Lewis, J. C. D o d d , W

A. Coats.

IV.

I. Bower, G. W. Bower.

ila.

B. R. Stockton, J. C. Fernvick, P. W. E. llare, R. C. Dodsworth.

lib.

P. A. M. Shaw.

I.

M. O. C. Joy, I. W. Wigham, N. C. Wakefield.

Jun.

G. Hobson, D. Hobson, R. C. Stanger, V. Unsworth, |. K Bower, B. Mahony.

T.P.S.

W. C. Craven, S. L. Atkinson, D. Crone.

D. Allan, P. Wigham,

PRIZES Higher Certificate D. R. J. D. S.

R. A. A. A. M.

Lunn, Distinctions in Latin, History. Bristow. Mackie. Parkin. Rodgers.

Matriculation J. D. A. I. F.

U. N. J. F. G.

Reavley, Distinction in French Watt, Distinctions in Scripture, Literature, Latin, Greek, French Humble. Meredith. Willey.

School Certificate D. J. M. R. W.

J. Harrison. Hoskin. A. McGilvray. M. de Souza. Turnbull.

Stockdale Prize for Languages D. N. Watt, D. R. Lunn. Prize for Science J. A.

Mackie. WHITLEY

House Master: Mr. J. M.

BAY

MILLER.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

D. R .

LUNN.

In summer, as during the other terms, we are able to offer a balanced mixture of success at both work and sport. We reached the finals in the House Matches, but had to concede first place to North Shields. E. Fenwick (Colours, 1948), Richardson D . , Gofton and Herron played for the 1st X I ; Milne, Heyes (Captain), Jeffcock, Arthur, Harrison T. and Crozier for the Under 14 X I . Congratulations are due to the following, who distinguished themselves in the Term exams.: Dixon, Crozier, Lamb, Whitfield, Nicholas, Atkinson, Robinson and Heald.


11 MONKSEATON House Master: Mr.

B.

S.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

BATES.

K.

A.

FORREST.

This has not been a very successful term with regard to sport, but we have been represented in the 1st XI by K. A. Forrest (Captain), Humble and Reid. Black played several times for the Under 14 X I . Forrest is to be congratulated on winning the School Tennis Tournament for the second year in succession. The following have obtained high positions in their forms: Watt J., Partridge P., Partridge J., Gristwood, Richardson P., Hately, Canrick, Lavelle, I.aidler, Hardie, Partridge W . , and Donaldson.

NORTH House Master : Mr.

G.

G.

SHIELDS GENTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain :

J.

W.

LAFFEY.

The first thing to report this term is the winning of the House Cricket Cup, which was lost about three years ago. We hope that, as before, it has come to stay. Mr. and Mrs. Gentle must be thanked for the tea they gave to celebrate this triumph. In the 1st XI we were represented by J. W. Laffey, Prest, McGilvray and Hedley W . ; in the Under 14 XI by Bower W . , Craney, Scott ('.., Smiles and Turnbull J. H. Lambert, Davison and Scott G., are to be congratulated on obtaining high positions in their forms. TYNEMOUTH House Master: Mr.

G.

A.

WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

J.

A.

MACKIE.

This term we have again won the School Sports, with a comfortable lead over our nearest rivals. J. K. Evans now has the distinction of being the only person to have held the Senior Cup for three successive years, and his brother, Evans C., won the Middle Cup. Our heartiest congratulations go to both. Edminson, Hall J. and Crawshaw also won valuable points for the House. We are very grateful again to Mr. Wastle fo: the splendid treat he gave us to celebrate our victory. We did not distinguish ourselves in the House Cricket Matches, but were well represented in the 1st XI by J. K. Evans, Stokoe, Mackie and Lee. Evans C., Read and Porter J. B. played in the Under 14 X I . The following obtained high positions in their forms: Hilton P., Everett C.. Lilburn and Reay. TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL SPORTS

Held on April 28th on the Preston Avenue Cricket Ground. Owing to heavy rain it was not possible to run off the School Handicaps, the House Relay, the Old Boys' iace, or the Parents' race. The Relay and Handicaps were run off on Thursday, April 29th in cold and showery weather. T w o School records were broken, Evans J. throwing the cricket ball 99 yards 2 feet 9 inches, and Tilby winning the 220 yards (over Hi) in 2"< 2 / 5 t h seconds. The prizes won on Sports Day were presented by Mrs. Lunn, mother of the head boy of the School.


12 Results Long Jump (over 1 4 ) : — 1 , Evans J.; 2, Reid; 3, Rodgcrs. Long Jump (11-14):—1, Evans C.; 2, Edminson; 3, Hately. Long Jump (under 11)—1, Dunlevy; 2, Bates M.; 3, Pope. Cricket Ball:—1, Evans J.; 2, Laffey;

3, Prest.

High Jump (11-14):—1, Harrison T . ; 2, Ryan; 3 equal, Edminson, Hately High Jump (under 11):—1, Bates M.; 2 equal, Crawford and Brady. Mile Open:—1, Evans J.; 2, Forrest K.; 3, Rodgers. Quarter-mile Open:—1, Tilby; 2, Evans J.; 3, Forrest K. 75 yds.

(11-14):—1, Evans C.; 2, Harrison T.; 3, Hately.

75 yds. (under 11):—1, Donaldson; 2, Dunlevy; 3, Bootle. 75 yds. (under 0 | ) : — 1, B. McCoy; 2, D. Sutton; 3, Pope. 75 yds. (over 6 | ) : — 1 , Oliver; 2, Corbitt; 3, Hobson. 100 yds. (over 1 4 ) : — 1 , Tilby; 2, Evans J.; 3, Forrest K. 75 yds. (T.S.P. A . ) : — 1 , McDonald G.; 2, Mason; 3, Jones. 75 yds.

(T.S.P. B . ) : — 1 , H. Martin; 2, Nesbitt; 3, S. Frail.

75 yds. (T.S.P. C . ) : — 1 , Waterhouse; 2, Oliver; 3, D. Thorpe. 220 yds. (under 10):—1, Donaldson; 2, Carter; 3, Wigham I. 220 yds.

( 1 0 - 1 1 ) : — ! , Dunlevy; 2, Stobbs; 3, Ainslie.

High Jump (over 14):—1, Evans J.; 2, Rodgers; 3, Tilby. 220 yds. (13-14):—1, Evans C.; 2, Harrison T.; 3, Ryan. 220 yds. (12-13)

Hately; 2, Wilson; 3, Arthur.

220 yds. 11-12):—1, Hall (}.; 2, Checkley; 3, Welch. Half-mile

(Senior):'—1, Evans J.; 2, Rodgers; 3, Reid.

Half-mile (Junior):—1, Evans C.; 2, Harrison T . ; 3, Welch. 220 yds. (14-15):—1, Taylor; 2, Proctor; 3, Sutherland J. 220 yds.

(15-10):—1, Hedley; 2, Meredith; 3, Herron.

220 yds. (over 1 6 ) : — I . Tilby; 2, Evans J.; 3, Forrest K. School Handicap (under 1 2 ) : — 1 , Thompson J.; 2, Armitage; 3, Grist. House Relay:—1 equal Monkseaton and School Handicap

Whitley Bay.

(over 12):—1, Evans C.; 2, Crawshaw; 3, Davison.

Sports Champion:—Evans J. Middle Cup:—Evans C. Junior Cup:—Dunlevy. House Cup:—Tynemouth. C R I C K E T N O T E S — 1948 The weather has certainly been most unkind to us this term from the point of view of ordinary games, for there have been more wet games afternoons this term than I can remember having occurred for many years. The 1st XI and Under 14 XI have been comparatively lucky in having only two matches each scratched because of the weather, and one of these was fitted in again later in the term. The 1st XI on the whole have had quite a successful season. They nave actually been decisively beaten in only three school matches—twice


13 by Morpctll and once by Hexham, on whom they nearly had their revenge in the return match. Ihey were beaten by the clock when in a commanding position. In Race Week, however, having decisively beaten the Parents' XL on the Tuesday, the 1st XI were themselves well and truly beaten by a strong Old Boys' XI on the Thursday. Incidentally the Old Boys managed to held two X l s 011 this day, their 2nd XI also winning against Uie bcfiool 2nd XI during the course oi a very enjoyable afternoon's cricket. The weather during Race Week was kinder to us than at any other time during the term. The 1st X I ' s greatest assets have been their alertness in the field and Forrest's leadership and captaincy, in particular his judicious setting of the field. Their chief weakness has been the lack of good change bowlers. Forrest and Evans have bowled well and have usually been sufficient in themselves to trouble the opposing batsmen, but more matches would piobably have been w on outright if we had had another bow lei or two who could always be relied on to continue the good work already begun. As regards batting there have too often been too many '' passengers '' in the side. It has been cheering, however, to see on many occasions the later batsmen, Fenwick in particular, not being overawed by earlier failures and successfully laying about the bowling with zest. Everyone, I am sure, is sorry that Laffey, the Vice-Captain, has never found his form this term. It would have been \ery pleasing if he had managed to repeat some of his performances of last season. Evans and Stokoe, on the other hand, have shown marked improvement in batting, and, with Forrest and F'enwick, have been the most consistent run-scorers. Evans has also been outstanding as a bowler, and his excellent fielding and general alertness have in no small way contributed to the high standard of fielding noticeable in most of the matches. FIRST

XI

CHARACTERS

K. A. Forrest, l i e has captained the 1st XI very well indeed. l i e has shown excellent judgment in the setting of the field and by his keenness and alertness has set a very good example to the rest of the team. His one fault, not quite so noticeable latterly, has been his tendency to be somewhat outspokenly critical of lapses in the field. On most occasions he has batted very well and has been difficult to get out when set, and his bowling, though not brilliant, has always been steady and of a good enough length to keep the batsmen on the alert. J.M.M. J. W. Laffey. fielded well.

His batting has been very disappointing, but he has

J. K. Evans. He has bowled well throughout the season and has fielded brilliantly. His batting shows great improvement. E. Fenwick. His batting, though lacking style, has been reliable and lie has scored a lot of runs this season. He has kept wicket well. Richardson. He has been a most useful batsman in emergencies, for he keeps a straight bat. There is room for improvement in his fielding. Stokoe. He has batted and fielded well this season, and bowled with moderate success. Humble. His batting and fielding have been disappointing this year, and his bowling lacks fire and accuracy. McGilvray. His batting has been disappointing and his leg injury has handicapped him in the field. Prest. Reid. is poor.

He has batted quite well and his fielding is good. Can defend well but lacks a scoring stroke.

His throwing in


14 Gofton. He is a good defensive bat, without many scoring strokes, but he has played some useful innings lately. He is rather slow and not alert enough in the field. Hedley, W.

He is a promising all-rounder, but still rather ungainly. K.A.F. THE

STAFF

MATCH

The annual match against the Staff, after a false start on a particularly wet afternoon, was eventually played on the last afternoon of term and resulted in a resounding and unexpected victory for the Staff by 53 runs. Mr. Miller made a pleasing 63 before he was run out, and the Staff team as a whole put up a creditable performance in the field, some good catches and run outs making up for bowling which was limited by the unfortunate absence of the Headmaster and the unfitness of Mr. Bates.

JUNIOR

CRICKET

The Under 14 XI began badly and it was soon evident that the 13-14 age group was incapable of providing match-winning material. After the fiasco at South Shields only a nucleus of this group was retained, and younger boys were tried out, a few at a time, with the result that the team, in the second half of the term, had an average^age of under 13. This experiment was not immediately successful, but a revival became noticeable in the away game with R . G . S . , when we made 54 and took their first three wickets for five runs, though they recovered to win comfortably. The two displays against Hexham, which followed, were admirable in every way, and as at least seven of the team will be under 14 next year we hope for better results against some of the big, confident opposition that has lorded it over us since the war. Heyes captained the XI fairly well, but was too easily discouraged and never fulfilled his previous promise as a bowler. He kept wicket well ia the last three matches, and made up for earlier batting failures with a stout-hearted 21 at Hexham which was the foundation of our winning total. Milne, a newcomer to the School, batted soundly throughout, though he lacks scoring strokes. He had two scores of 20, fielded very well, and was a successful, though erratic, change bowler. Other members of the team worthy of special mention are Scott G., with a top score of 28, and 14 wickcts for 8 runs each, including 6 for 20 against Hexham away; Turnbull J. H . , out of the team through illness in the first half of the term, but easily the steadiest bowler, w-ith 6 for 10 against Hexham at Tynemouth, and a good fielder; Read and Porter J. B . , courageous and increasingly successful batsmen; and Craney, who again batted and bowled well. With the exception of Turnbull, all these boys are well under 13. An Under 12 match, played against Tynemouth C.C. Juniors on the first Friday evening of the holidays and lost by 70 runs to 72, showed that there will be keen competition for the places in next year's junior team. This match, incidentally, with its close finish, provided great excitement and we hope to renew the fixture next year. The following played in three or more matches:â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Heyes (Capt.), Bower W . , Milne, Craney, Evans C., Crozier, Harrison T . . Porter [. B., Read, Turnbull J. H . , Smiles, Black, Scott G., Jeffcock and Arthur. G,G,G,

V


15 Results— 1st X I May

8

June

July

H.S.

Away

..

85

30-6

2(i

Morpeth G.S

Home

..

48

118-6

29

Whitley

Away

..

44-5

Away

.. 109-5

Away

..

90.7 42-9

5 12

-

Tynemouth

S.

..

Bay G.S.

Shields

H.S.

R . G . S . 2nd XI

...

47 51

Drawn Lost Drawn Won

103-8

Drawn

69

Drawn

88

Won

19

Tynemouth

Home

..

23

Parents

Home

.. 126

24

Old

Home

.

97

30

Hexham Q.E.G.S.

Away

.

50

Away

.

65

66-4

Lost

Home

.

74-8

94-9

Drawn

85-9

Drawn

3 10

H.S.

Boys

Morpeth

G.S.

S. Shields H.S

17

llexham

20

Staff

Q.E.G.S.

167 51-4

Lost Lost

Home

.

69-3

Home

.

81

134

Lost

Home

.

11

69

Lost

R.G.S

Home

.

29

62-5

Lost

S. Shields H.S.

Away

3

108-6

Lost

S. Shields H . S

Home

.

25

94-6

Lost

Tynemouth H.S.

Away

.

32

89-2

Lost

Whitley

Home

.

41

122-2

Lost

Away

.

54

Under 14 Tynemouth

H.S.

Bay G.S.

R.G.S

.

XI

114-7

Lost

Hexham

Q.E.G.S.

Home

. 102-6

29-9

Drawn

Hexham

Q.E.G.S.

Away

.

63

59

Won

.

70

72

Lost

Under 12 X I July

10

Tynemouth

C.C.

Juniors 1 st X I Averages—

Baiting :—Fenwick, 25 ; Forrest, 15 ; Evans, 10. Bowling :—Evans, 54 w k t s . — A v . 7.8. HOUSE

Forrest, 31 wkts.—Av. 13.7.

MATCHES

The House semi-finals were played on one of the few sunny afternoons in June, and the final between showers a fortnight later. After three fairly close matches North Shields, rather unexpectedly, but none the less deservedly, won their first success in the field since the end of the war. Semi-finals

Final

Whitley Bay 92

Tynemouth 80.

North Shields 59-5

Morkseaton 55.

North Shields 71

Whitley Bay 50.


16 Teams North Shields:—J. W. Laffey (Capt.), McGilvray, Prest, Hedley W . , Tilby, Lambert, Scott G., Alexander, Powell, Craney, Bower W. Whitley B a y : — E . Fenwick (Capt.), Richardson, Gofton, Herron, Bristow, Milne, Proctor, Heyes, Meredith, Dixon. Monkseaton:—K. Forrest (Capt.), Reid, Humble, Rodgers, Rootle, W a t t D . , Towers, Black A., Turnbull, Richardson P.

Tate J., Joicey,

Tynemouth:—J. Evans (Capt.), Mackie, Stokoe, Thompson btarth, Lee, Blades, Porter J. B . , Evans C., Sanderson, Caird. NATURE

W.,

NOTES

The often-expressed fear that a mild winter brings an indifferent summer has been justified, for, apart from an occasional sunny day, the only real summer weather was a period of five days in the middle of May. This has not spoilt the benefits of the early Spring, and a good corn crop is expected at a time when it is most important. An exceptionally fine display of hawthorn blossom marked the latter half of May; in these parts it is usually June before there is much bloom on the hedges. Country people take a good crop of " haws " as an indication of a hard winter to follow. Cuckoos have been about the Holywell Dene and Briar Dene areas throughout the summer; and a fledged young bird was seen on July 17th. A young bird was found in a skylark's nest 011 Embleton Golf Links, and was subsequently killed by a golf ball. Swifts returned to their usual hyunts, but the absence of fine warm evenings has made them less noticeable. There have been fewer house-martins than usual; a few sand-martins nested in the cliffs at Collywell Bay, Seaton Sluice. Two wheatears were at St. Mary's Island as late as May 14th, very late for one of the earliest migrants, but they prefer higher ground for breeding than anything in this district. The only coast birds that are about in summer are gulls and fulmars. Although five pairs of fulmars have been seen on the cliffs at Hartley during the Spring, they again do not appear to have nested there. Throughout. the summer cormorants have been seen on the Black Midden Rocks, Tynemouth. Four sheld-ducks were seen near Rlyth Harbour on July 10th. There have been no waders on the shore, but curlews can be seen in the fields near Holywell Dene and are probably nesting in the neighbourhood. While on holiday it is interesting to make lists of all the birds (or (lowers or butterflies) seen in a particular area. In this way you will find out the places where most species can be seen. G.R.L. THE

LIBRARY

The Library has had its usual summer rest, although, probably because of the rather poor weather, not so complete a one as sometimes. The 1st and H l r d Forms have patronised the Library freely throughout the term, and there have been a number of less regular borrowers from all the other forms. Cricket has made it difficult to open the Library at regular times. Several bovs have given books in good condition this term, for which we are most grateful.


17 THE

FRIDAY

CLUB

We have restricted our Summer Team activities to the reading of two piays, for it is not the aim of the Society to compete with either outdoor sport or exams. Shaw's " The Apple Cart " was read in May, and Ian H a y ' s amusing comedy, " Housemaster," on the last evening ol term. Both were well read and apparently enjoyed. A varied programme of weekly meetings is being arranged for the dark winter nights ahead, when it is hoped we shall be joined by a substantial contingent of the new VIB. We are most grateful for tin support given to the Club in its infancy by those members of VIA who are leaving. The second annual general meeting will be held early next term for the election of officers and any other business. G . R . L . (Hon. Sec.). ANCIENT

BRITONS

Ancient Britons in their tribes They walk about with spears, They go into the wild, wild woods With dogs to hunt the deers. The women they just stay at home And weave or make corn cakes, They do that while the men they roam To bring back tasty steals. B. O L I V E R THE

(1).

NOVICES

The Skipper and the Passenger went sailing hand in hand, They wept like anything because they could not see the land. " I f we knew where we were," they said, " Then sailing would be g r a n d . " The skipper said the cosines were very much ajar, And the angles of the tangents were horizontular. " It's really very o d d , " he said, â&#x20AC;˘ " We can't find where we a r e . " Said Passenger to Skipper: " It's all so clear to me, Our course is W S E by N as accurate as can be. Now we know where we a r e , " he said. " I hope you will agree." At break of dawn next morning they leapt straight out of bed, And saw what they thought Calais, was really Flamborough Head. But it didn't matter in the least, For they went to Poole instead. A.B. ( V . ) SEASIDE

MEMORY

The seasideâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a slap of sea and a tickle of sand. A fanfare of opening sunshades. A tune on an ice cream cornet. A wince and whinny of bathers. A rolling of trousers and a tucking of dresses. A squealing of children as they poke at stranded jellyfish while stolid parents spread newspapers over faces. Cricket on the sand and rides on donkeys. Little naked navvies building fleeting castles and digging canals; uncles huddling over lukewarm ale in tiger-striped marquees. Mountainous mothers in black gasping under the discarded dresses of daughters who venture shrilly into the gobbling waves. Father, in the once-a'-year sun, taking fifty winks.


18 Liquorice allsorts begin to melt and sticks of rock are sucked. Sand is in the spongecake, sandflies in the watercress. The sun has declared war on the butter and the butter runs. Now there is the patient task of burying relatives in the sand or the princely pastime of pouring it down the necks of sisters: the shriek, the shake, the slap. The noise of pummelling Punch and Judy is heard, with the pleading of the ravenous gulls, the donkey-bray, harmonicas, toy trumpets, laughing, shouting, the cough of the motor-boat in the bay, the hooting of tugs and tramps from the river. Dusk comes suddenly, sand and sea are ruffled by a cold gust as the reflection of the smoking sun is splashed across the water. Spades, buckets, towels, bats, balls, empty hampers and knitting are collected. The noise of the fair-ground calls; above the belabouring of the batherless sea can be heard the raucous voices of the stallholders, the croaking of the hoopla girls. Roll up, roll up! Pennies are burning in a hundred pockets. Pale young men squint along the sights of rifles and aim at pingpong balls dancing on fountains. A collier at a strength-machine spits on his hands while a barndoor-chested man stands outside a booth inviting any sportsman to a quid if he lasts a round; wiry, c o c k y , boozed sportsmen strut in, but soon they reel out and still that bored, teak face remains. Pop-filled and jam-smeared urchins scream before distorting mirrors a.-, their reflections wither and bulge in the glass. A daring dash of schoolboys with their fathers' trilbies cocked at a desperate angle over one eye wink and whistle while coconuts rain from their perches and the Wall of Death is a spinning rim of ruin. Young men, heroic after pints, stand up on the flying chairaplanes, crimson, tousled, and against the rules, ('â&#x20AC;˘iris in dark, skulled and cross-boned tunnels, scream, and are comforted. All the fun of the fair! J.W.L., VIA. SCHOOL O F F I C E R S HEAD

BOY:

PREFECTS:

D. R . Lunn. D.

Lunn,

R.

G. R.

R.

Lunn, J.

A. Bristow, K.

J.

A. Mackie,

Evans, J. W.

S. M. Rodgers, M. A. McGilvray. CAPTAIN OF C R I C K E T : HOUSE

CAPTAINS:

K. A. Forrest. Whitley Bay, D.

R.

Lunn.

Tynemouth, J. A. Mackie. Monkseaton, K. A. Forrest. North Shields, J. W. Laffey.

Laffey,

K.

A. Forrest.

K. H.

Miller,


19

AUTUMN SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES

The weather (luring the term was so kind that only one day's games had to be put off. Early in the term J. K. Evans was appointed Head Boy and we were pleased to welcome Mrs. Evans at the ceremony of installation. The follow ing School Prefects were appointed this term: D. I. Brennan, W. A. (lofton, A. W. Harrison, A. J. Humble, W. G. Mayhew, J. F. Meiedith, J. U. Reavley, D. N. Watt. A visit was paid by the senior boys to a performance of the film " Hamlet." We congratulate D. R. Lunn on his award of an Open Scholarship in History at King's College, Cambridge. This follows the award of a County Scholarship in July on the lesult of the Higher Certificate. In the December School Certificate Matriculation standard was reached b.- J. R. Martin, W. Thompson and W. Turnbull. School Certificates were awarded to W. G. Mayhew, G. B. Scarth, R. M. de Souza, G. W. Tilby and G. Towers. III. IIA. IIB. 1. Jun. T.P.S.

Avete B. H. Nelson. B. D. Parritt. J. D. Brown. I. D. Smith. G. A. M. Naughton, R. Linkleter, B. Corner, A. K. Walker, D. R. Jameson, C. Phillips, A. Sutherland, M. C. Miller, 1. Watson, P. G. Carter, G. F. Brown, P. M. Merrick, (,. Nelson. J. F. J. Lambert, V. L. Cozens, P. W. A. Brown, S. H. Webb-Jones, P. M. Jones, R. D. Harbottle, J. A. McGillivray, D. J. Nicholls, M. H. Kitchen, D. P. H. Ainsworth, K. Alexander, J. W. Rumbellow, J. Cowen, J. McD. Low rie, R. D. Nesbit. Valete

IV.

J. Herron. j. R. Martin, Matric. December 1948. W. Thompson, Matric. December 1948. G. W. Tilby, School Cert. December 1948. G. Towers, School Cert. December 1948. A. Black.

IIA.

M. Sandon, E. D. Sandon.

V1B.

I.

A. J. Allman.

T.P.S.

J. M. Arnold, V. M. Barnet-Lamb. T Y N E M O U T H SCHOOL O L D

BOYS' CLUB

This year's activities of the Old Boys' Club have been confined mainly to the usual two Annual events the Dance and the Dinnerâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and the performances of the Cricket Club. As to the Dance, this was held again at the R e x Hotel, Whitley Bay, January and was attended by approximately 200 Old Boys and friends. A very enjoyable evening was spent by all.


20 The Annual Dinner held in October, for the first time in Newcastle at the Crown Hotel, was attended by only some 40 Old Boys. In view of the small attendance some fears are now entertained by the Committee as to the continuance every alternate year of Newcastle as a suitable rendezvous for this event. The Cricket Club had a successful season in spite of very real'difficulties and every fixture was creditably honoured. We much regret the departure from this locality of Mr. G. L. Simpson who was always a very keen enthusiast and a very willing worker. High hopes for next season are entertained by the Cricket Club Committee and all new members will be made very welcome. In conclusion might 1 mention that some move is already '' on foot '' to change the name of the " Old Boys' Club " to " Old Boys' Association," but. no doubt more will be heard on this point at the next Annual General Meeting. R. H. D U N C A N , Hon. Sec. TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL

OLD

BOYS'

C R I C K E T CLUB

The Old Boys' Cricket Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a very active part of the School Old Boys' Associationâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;had a very successful season. The Club, honoured all its 18 fixtures, recording wins against the School and in the first match against Otterburn Hall. The other games were drawn or lost but as they are all " friendlies " the result does not matter much so long as everybody has an enjoyable game. Our transport difficulties were solved on one occasion by the team and supporters travelling as far as. Otterburn in a furniture van. The lights on the van failed when we were four miles from Newcastle on the return journey, which had to be completed by trolley-bus. We require more playing members so that we can field as strong a team as possible for the 1949 season. Efforts are to be made to obtain the use of a ground when possible so that we can entertain some oi the teams we now play. At present all our matches are played " a w a y . " We would like to bring to the notice of all Old Boys and Parents of l,ovs now in the School the existence of the Cricket Club and to ask for their support both financially and in general. Vice-Presidents would be very welcome. The subscription is one guinea. Patrons and Non-Playing Members at five shillings also would be much appreciated. The Club wishes to express its regret at the illness of R. T. Downie and wishes him a rapid recovery. To all members of the Club now serving in the Forces we send our best wishes. The Hon. Secretary is Mr. R. L Elliott, " O s l o , " Irwin Road, Wallsend, and the Hon. Treasurer is Mr. H. G. Walton, 77, Newton Road, High Heaton, Newcastle-on-Tyne, 7. OLD

BOYS'

NEWS

Cambridge. J. F. Purdy (1936-40), 1st Class Mechanical Science Tripos. tion, King's College. Liverpool. H. L. Ross, Master of Radiology.

Exhibi-


21 Durham,

King's College.

J. G. Walton (1935-42), B.D.S. R. Burn (1939-45), 3rd B.D.S. A. R. Proctor (1940-45), 2nd B . D . S . D. Webster (1937-43). 3rd M.B., B.S. C. F. Mallett (1935-37), 2nd M.B., B.S. N. Stockdale (1927-37). Honours LL.B. J. W. Hall (1931-41), A . M . I . C . E : N. K. Lakey (1937-45), 1st Law Soc. Exam. O. P. Casey (1942-44), 1st class B.Sc., Geology. D. R. Bradley (1932-41), 1st class Honours Classics. Awarded Sir W m . Stephenson Studentship. B E. Blunt (1940-47). Awarded Sir W m . Marris Travelling Scholarship for Classics. L 1 P Sheedy and P. J. Whitelock played for Durham and Northumberland respectively at " R u g g e r . " TYNEMOUTH

PREPARATORY

SCHOOL

1948 has been a busy and interesting year for us, with the school filled to its capacity. Since each form is full, it will probably become impossible in future to accept any new entrants except in September each year. During the Spring Term a party of to see " P e t e r P a n . " Several parents travelled by private buses. Judging from b o y (" And the bus never stopped once as much appreciated as the show.

ninety visited the accompanied the the naive remark ") the method of

Theatre Royal children, who of a first form transport was

The Summer Term saw the re-introduction of the usual weekly visit to a nearby field for games. A party of older children paid a visit to the Norman Castle and Black Gate .Museum in Newcastle where, no doubt, the exhibit attracting most attention was the complete skeleton from the Roman excavations at ^outh Shields. 1 lowever there was no doubt as to the success of the outing, and there must be few of the party who will not remember for all time that Norman Arches are Round and decorated with Zig-Zag Carving (the capitals are their own!) The term ended with a Rounders Match between boys leaving us and a team from the rest of form III. This was followed by refreshments and we have to thank parents for many generous gifts to supplement the ice-cream and lemonade. The efforts of the school in support of the Garden Fete held at Dr. Barnardo's Home. Cullereoats, requires mention. The response of parents and children to an appeal for gifts was most generous, with the result that the stall run by T . P . S . realised over ÂŁ25. The prizewinners for Form I.

the year ending July 1948 are:â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

D. Sainsbury, Diana Thorp.

Form II.

Kathleen M. Jones, J. C. Parr.

Form IIIB.

Susan Frail, P. Burke

Form IIIA.

K. B. Dobson, B. H. Mason, W. II. Jones.

Progress Prizes: Form 1, A. McKinnell; Form II, Helen Martin: Form HI, G. Macdonald. Early in the Autumn Term we held our usual Harvest Festival, after which the fruit and vegetables were given to the Children's Homes, North Shields. Miss Connington, the Matron, attended the service and thanked the children for their gifts.


22 Poppy Day collection amounted to Âą 4 / 3 / 7 . There has been a steady falling olf in Savings, the total for the year being just over ÂŁ150. After having almost a full attendance during the term, the numbers dropped suddenly as the result of whooping-cough and chicken-pox, and with the attendance down to 50% it was thought advisable to close the school a week before the end of term. This meant cancelling the Christmas Concert, and postponing the party. We hope to have a completely recovered school next term, ready to enjoy the party on Friday, January 14th, in the Royal Hotel. H.G.G. TYNEMOUTH House Master: Mr.

G.

A.

HOUSE

NOTES House Captain :

WASTLE.

J.

K.

EVANS.

This term we feel the loss of our House Captain J. A. Mackie, who left after obtaining an excellent result in the Higher School Certificate (1 Special Credit ; 2 Credits) and we wish him well in his future career. J K. Evans, who took his pla.ce, was also elected Head B o y . The House was represented in the 1st XV by J. K. Evans '(capt.), C. F. Evans, J. Urwin, A. Blades, and in the Junior teams by C. F. Evans, Caird, Stevenette, Read, Sergeant and Crawshaw. C. F. Evans is to be congratulated on being picked to play at scrum-half for the County under 15 team against Durham. Reay, Hilton and Everett C. are to be congratulated on attaining high positions in their forms, and May hew on being appointed a School Prefect. NORTH House Master:

Mr.

G.

G.

SHIELDS GENTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

W . A.

GOFTON.

Last term we lost the services of Laffey who has gone into the army, and we wish him every success in the future. We are pleased to welcome in his place Gofton, who will take over as House Captain. We congratulate Davison, Scott and Corner on their high positions in form, and McGilvray and floskin on gaining their School Certificates in July. We were well represented in the 1st XV by Gofton, Harrison A . , Tilby and Hedley W . , and in the under 14 by Davison ( c a p t . ) , Hunter, Smiles, Turnbull J. H . , Wardhaugh and Craney. The House can confidently look forward to next term's House Matches. Gofton and Harrison A. are to be congratulated on being appointed School Prefects. MONKSEATON House Master: Mr.

B.

S.

BATES.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain:

A.

J.

HUMBLE.

We are sorry to say goodbye to Forrest, who left this term, and wish him the best of luck in the future. We welcome Humble in his place. This term unfortunately we lost the House Shield to Whitley Bay, but hope to win it again next term. We congratulate Watt J., Partridge J. and P., Carrick, Hardie, Laidler, Gair and Naughton G. on doing well in their forms. Rodgers and Parkin are to be congratulated on obtaining their Higher Certificates; Humble and W a t t D. on their Matriculations and Turnbull W. on his School Certificate. This term we have been well represented in the School XV by Bootle, Humble, Joicey, Lloyd, Towers, Turnbull W . , W a t t D . , and W a t t J. and i.i the Under 14 by Carrick, Curry, Hately, Harrison B., and Walker G. Turnbull W. is to be congratulated on playing for the Coast Schools under 15 team. Brennan, Humble, and W a t t D. are to be congratulated on being appointed Prefects this term.


23 WHITLEY House Master: Mr. J.

M.

BAY

MILLER.

HOUSE NOTES House Captain:

G.

R.

LUNN.

Whitley Bay has taken a full share in all aspects of School life this terra. We have provided four regular players for each team, Meredith, Say, Tate j. K . , and Herron in the 1st XV and Arthur, Welch, Jeffcock and Bates in the under 14. Dixon has played a few games for the 1st X V , and Turnbull J. H. was chosen to play in the under 15 County trial. We congratulate Reavley, Meredith and Willey on their Matriculation; de Souza obtained his School Certificate and we hope he will matriculate in December. Lunn D. and Bristow obtained their Higher Certificates, standing result earning him a County Borough Scholarship.

Lunn's out-

We won the Summer Term House Shield with a comfortable margin. Meredith, Reavley and Gofton were appointed Prefects at the beginning oi the term. Unfortunately we had to cede Gofton to North Shields where he has become House Captain. Dixon, Harrison. T.. Lamb. Whitfield, Atkinson, Brown, and Mason are to be congratulated on their high form positions. SENIOR

Robinson

RUGBY

Senior Rugby Football in the School has been very disappointing this term: it was obvious some time ago that we should have a poor side, for the right material is not present in the school. It was not encouraging to find at the beginning of the term that we had lost 12 of last year's X V â&#x20AC;&#x201D; only Evans, the captain, Gofton and Meredith being available. Most of the 12 newcomers were small and inexperienced, and Hexham, with most ot last year's side available, defeated us soundly in the first game, at Dene Park. Indeed the chief reason for our lack of success is that in every match the XV has been very much out-weighted. The best XV that the school could field included boys who were still under 15, and when 1st XV and " Under 15 " games have clashed it was not considered fair to the " Under 15 " side to deprive it of the services of these boys. Frank Evans and John Watt, who are in this category, have played splendidly, and, with Urwin, have often been examples of what courage can do. But courage and determination from the small section of the XV and the wonderful example that John Evans has set are not sufficient to carry the side. The defence has been generally very weak, and but for John Evans' tackling the points scored against the ..school would have been much higher. There have been one or two bright spotsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;notably the game against the High School, when the w hole XV played well. The " Under Hi " team lost the matches with Royal Grammar School by narrow margins and put up a show more in keeping w ith Tynemouth School traditions. The reason is, no doubt, that most of the 1st XV are still under 10 and they were thus meeting opponents who were approximately equal in weight. It is clear that the schools which our 1st XV plays have such an overwhelming superiority in numbers that we are always outweighted, and it might be wise in future to plan matches against opponents whom we can tackle with reasonable chance of success. It is often said in rugger circles that a good big 'un will always beat a good little 'un. In our case we have many good little 'uns but our few big 'uns are not very good. Under Mr. Unsworth's care and enthusiasm the under 14's and under 15's have played well, and when these boys come up to the top of tile school the outlook should be very much brighter. B.S.B.


24 Tynamouth School 1st XV v. Hexham G.S. 1st XV Saturday, September 23th, at Dene Park, Hexham.

Kick-off,

10.30 a.m.

This was the School's lirst game. Evans, J. K . , Meredith, J. F . , and Gofton, W . , were the only remaining members -of last season's 1st X V . , whilst Hexham had their old three-quarter line and a very good pack. Tynemouth were outclassed throughout, particularly in defence. Frank Evans made a very promising debut at scrum-half, but received no protection from his wing-forwards. John Evans did well but could not carry the rest of the side' on his shoulders. Tries were scored frequently throughout, but Tynemouth better in the second half against the wind and the slope.

played

Final Score: Hexham Grammar School (5 gls., 7 tries), 40 points; Tynemouth School, Nil. T e a m : Humble. Hedley, Bootle, Tate, J. K., Tilby, Evans, J. K., IÂŁvans i C. F., Watt, D . , Meredith, Harrison, A., Say, Gofton, Taylor, Towers, Turnbull. Tynemouth School 1st XV v. T . M . H . S . 1st XV Tuesday September 28th, at T.M.H.S. ground. Kick-oli 4.30 p.m. A strong wind was blowing diagonally across the field. School kicked off with the wind in the first half and played courageously and well against a much heavier side, which included Hewitson, a strong centre. School did most of the pressing in this half, but T.M.H.S. came away with spasmodic bursts and after 10 minutes scored an unconverted try. J. K. Evans soon equalised with an excellent penalty-goal from well out. T.M.H.S. secured the lead with a goal which should have been stopped by the School wing-forwards. The change of ends gave T . M . H . S . the advantage of the wind and they made full use of their weight, but the School played very pluckily. T.M.H.S. added six tries, only one being converted. The combination of the Evans brothers at half-back was very good indeed and Frank, who is still under 15, played a remarkably good game. Urwin and Bootle, young newcomers, played well and the display was most heartening. Final Score: T . M . H . S (6 tries, 2 gls.) 28 points; School (1 pen. goal) 3 points Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Whitley Bay G.S. 1st XV Thursday, September 30th. Kick off 4.15 p.m. The School side looked very small against the weighty opposition of Whitley Bay. who thus had considerable advantage in the scrums and line out. School played with the slope in the first hall and were unlucky not to score on two occasions. Urwin was off the field for most of this half with a bleeding nose. Whitley scored 2 goals, but Evans replied with a grand run which resulted in an unconverted try. Whitley scored three further tries to bring the score to 19-3 at half time. In the second half Whitley Bay's weight and stronger running tired the Tynemouth forwards but they played up courageously. J. Evans was in his best form and he was well supported by his brother, and by Humble and Hedley. The School put up a spirited display against a very strong side. Final Score: Whitley Bay G.S (4 goals, 6 tries), 38 points; Tynemouth School (1 try) 3 points. T e a m : Humble; Herron, Bootle, Hedley, Tilby; J. K. Evans, C.. F. Evans, D. Watt, Meredith, Harrison, A. Blades, Say, Taylor, Urwin Gofton.


Tynemouth School " A " XV v. Gateshead G.S. Saturday, October 2nd.

Kick-off

10.30 a.m.

School played with sun and .-lope but seemed lethargic and slow to take advantage of many opportunities to kick ahead, follow up and score Most of the work fell to Evans who missed his brother's accurate passing from the scrum Gateshead scored a snap try after 20 minutes and soon after Harrison, A., was forced to retire with a dislocated collar bone After this set-back play deteriorated considerably and tries were added at frequent intervals to the Gateshead total. Final Score: Fynemouth school, Nil; Gateshead G.S., 34 points. Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Bede Grammar School 1st XV Saturday, October 9th, at Percy Paik. The side was weakened by the loss of Harrison who dislocated his collar-bone the previous week against Gateshead. Turnbull, W., and Evans, C., were absent as their services were required on the under 15 team. School played well in the first fifteen minutes of the game though outweighted in all departments. Bede scrum had no difficulty in pushing Tynemouth off the ball and consequently their three-quarters were well supplied throughout the game. Evans played his usual game and kicked an excellent penalty-goal, but the rest of the team played only in patches and many tries could have been stopped by courageous tackling. Final Score: Tynemouth School (1 pen. goal), 3 points; Bede Grammar School (5 goals, 3 tries), 34 points. T e a m : Humble; llerron, Bootle, Hedley, Tilby; J. K. Evans, Tate, J. K.; Watt, D., Meredith, Towers, Joicey, Say, Taylor, Thompson, \\\, Gofton. Tyncmouth School 1st XV v. Dame Allan's Saturday, October 22nd, at Fenham.

Kick-off

10.30 a.m.

Dame Allans were reported to be very strong and had already beaten Bede. School played only moderately and rarely secured the ball from the scrum. Meredith and Gofton changed places as hooker but there was no improvement. In the first half Dame Allan's scored 2 goals and three tries. Tynemouth replying with a grand try by Tilby who ran well after receiving from Tate, K ; the kick failed. In the second half Dame Allan's added 4 tries and a goal, Tynemouth replied with a try by Tilby after receiving from Evans from a 25 dropkick. School were outweighted generally, but there was little of interest in the game apart from the good play at half-back on the part of Evans brothers and two good tries by Tilby. Final Score: Dame Allan's (3 goals, 7 tries) 36 points, School (2 tries) (i points. Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Morpeth G.S. 1st XV Wednesday, November 3rd.

At Percy Park.

Kick-off 2.30 p.m.

For this game Tynemouth had Evans C., off ill and Urwin took his place at scrum-half. School kicked off against the wind and played quite well against a strong side. The score at half-time was 19-3 to Morpeth.


26 Tate, J. K., having kicked a penalty-goal for Tynemouth they should have won in the second-half if only more advantage had been taken of the wind. The obvious policy was to use the boot to the ball but all the players continued with the orthodox tactics of backing the ball, and so the advantage was lost. Morpeth added a further 20 points and Evans, J. K . , kicked a penaltygoal for Tynemouth. Final Score: Tynemouth School, 2 pen.-goals, (i points. :l goals, 8 tries, 39 points.

Morpeth G.S.,

Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Whitley Bay G.S. 1st XV Saturday, November 13th.

At Whitley (Percy Park unfit).

Tynemouth opened the scoring with a brilliant interception by John Evans who converted this try. School played well in the first half but as usual were very much outweighed and rarely hooked the ball. Whitley replied with two unconverted tries and a goal. Tynemouth scored again through Evans after some good work by Tate in the centre. Evans again converted. Whitley added a further try and a goal, the try being scored as a result of the Tynemouth scrum being pushed back over the line. Whitley finished w ith a converted try scored under the posts. Final Score: Tynemouth School (2 goals), G.S. (3 goals, 3 tries), 24 points.

10 points.

Whitley Bay

T e a m : Humble, Tilby, Tate, Hedley, Herron, Evans, Urwin, Joicey, Meredith, Watt, D . , Say, Gofton, Lloyd, Bootle, Taylor. Tynsmouth School 1st XV v. R.G.S. Saturday, December 4th.

At Priors Park (Percy Park unfit).

School were weakened by the absence of Humble and Joicey, and were very much outweighed in all departments. Tynemouth heeled only verv rarely being generally pushed off the ball and the outsides had therefore little opportunity for attack. J. K. Evans was prominent throughout and early in the game made a fine opening for Tilby who beat the full-back cleverly and scored wide out. Evans' kick failed. This was School's only score. R.G.S. in each half scored 2 goals and two tries. This was a very pleasant game in spite of the mud, and R . G S. ran out worthy winners Final Score: Tynemouth School (1 try), 3 points. School (4 goals, 4 tries), 32 points.

Royal Grammar

T e a m : Lloyd, Tilby, Tate, Hedley, Herron. J, K. Evans, Evans, C., Watt, D., Meredith. Bootle, Say, Gofton, Urwin, Blades, Taylor. Tynemouth School 1st XV v. South Shields G.S. Saturday, December 11th.

At South Shields.

This game, played on a very muddy pitch was interesting and not as one-sided as the =core would suggest. South Shields had a good pack and strong running three-quarters who demonstrated the importance of backingup. Almost all the South Shields tries came as a result of quick, short, inter-passing by forwards and three-quarters combined. For Tynemouth Evans played as well as ever and he combined well with Urwin. who played a most courageous game at scrum-half.


27 At the end of the first half South Shields were leading by 22-0 but in the second-half Tate replied with a good penalty goal and Tilby and .Meredith combined in scoring an unconverted try. South Shields in this half added a further 19 points. Final Score: South Shields G.S. (4 goals, 1 dropped goal, (i tries). 11 points. Tynemouth School (1 penalty goal 1 try), 0 points. Tynemouth School Under 16 Team v. Whitley Bay G.S. Under 16 Saturday, September 18th.

At Percy Park.

Both sides were weak and obviously needed a lot of practice. Tynemouth had the advantage in the scrum but the halves failed to combine and Hedley was inclined to run across the field instead of straight for the try-line. Tynemouth played with the wind in the first half and held Whitley to one try. T w o good opportunities to score were lost by Tynemouth through bad finishing. In the second half Whitley added 2 goals and a try. Final Score: Tynemouth School under 10 nil. Whitley Bay G.S. under IK (2 goals, 2 tries), 10 points. Tynemouth School Under 16 v. R.G.S. Under 16 Saturday, October 16th.

At Percy Park.

The sides seemed to be more evenly matched than in previous games. Both teams lacked fire and Tynemouth failed to exploit the weakness of the opposing defence with a slippery ball. R . G . S . scored early with a penalty-goal and added 2 tries which should have been stopped with normal tackling. Tynemouth replied with an unconverted try by Hedley who also kicked a penalty-goal. R.G.S. added a further goal and a try. Some knowledgeable spectators claimed to be able to see improvement in the School XV but play was still far from lively and there seemed to be a complete lack of initiative in the outsides, while the forwards were generally sluggish. Lloyd in a new role as fullback did well and Evans C. played soundly at scrum-half. Final Score: Tynemouth School under 16 (1 try, 1 penalty goal), 6 points. R . G . S . under 16 (I goal, 1 penalty goal, 3 tries), 17 points. Tynemouth School Under 16 v. Whitley Bay G.S. Under 16 Saturday, October 30th.

At Whitley Bay.

Whitley were not strong opponents but School still lacked aggressive ness and a rather feeble game was the result Tynemouth led most of the first half with a penalty-goal by Hedley. School failed to make use of superior weight in the scrum, but the tackling was better than usual, Blades being prominent with two good tackles. Whitley BaV equalised with a trv and made sure of victory with a goal and a further unconverted try. Final Score: Tynemouth under 10 (1 penalty-goal), 3 points. Bay G.S. (1 goal, 2 tries). 11 points.

Whitley


28 JUNIOR

R U G B Y , 1948

The keenness and enthusiasm which even last season was showing itself among a certain number of the juniors has this year spread to almost all those under 15, and tnere lias been, foi 'he first time for at least three years, real competition for a place in a junior team. In consequence the results of n atches have been incomparably better. In only one match—that against Wnitlev Bay under 15 early in the season—did we receive a crushing defeat; and this result was reversed in the return game later. The Under 14 lost a number of matches by a fairly narrow margin and are to be heartily congratulated on their wins against the Royal Grammar School and South Shields High School—both schools with six or seven times the number of boys from which to choose. The regularly twice for counties

outstanding Junior has been Evans, C. F., who has played for the school 1st XV and is to be congratulated on playing the county Under 15 and being choosen to play in the Northern Trial.

When the enormous improvement in the results has been so much due to good team work and an altogether more aggressive spirit, it is almost invidious to signal out individuals for praise. But of the forwards Turnbull, J. H., once he learns to tackle hard, has the makings of a first class player, for he is a born footballer with a fine sense of position; Partridge. P., Arthur and Curry have been full of dash and fight and Harrison, T . ' s defensive play has been very good. Outside the scrum, Davison is a vastly improved scrum-half, especially in defence; Ilately has shown much greater determination in attack, and Hall's tackling has hern superb. D.S.U. Results Under 13— Ascham House Ascham House

...

,..

5 - -12 3 -- 0

...

Away Home

Lost Lost

...

Home Away Away Home

0 - - 6 Lost 18—-11 W o n 9 - -23 Lost (>—- 0 Won

...

Home Home Home Away Away Away

0 - -54 3 - -11 3 - -20 11—-"8 0 - -22 0 - -20

Under 14— Hexham Q E. Grammar School .. Newcastle Royal Grammar School Dame Allan's School South Shields High School Under 15— Whitley Bay Grammar School .. Gateshead Grammar School Ralph Gardner's School Whitley Bay Grammar School Morpeth Grammar School ... Ralph Gardner's School ... FRIDAY

CLUB

... ...

Lost Lost Lost Won Lost Lost

NOTES

This term marked the beginning of the Friday Club's second year, and on the first Friday evening the Second Annual General .Meeting was held with Mr. Gentle in the chair. G R Lunn as secretary, and Meredith, Brennan, Evans as committee members were re-elected and were joined byMiller and Humble in place of Lunn D., Rodgers and Mackie who have left As the " Friday Club " is intended to replace the many sectional societies that would flourish in a larger school, we have endeavoured to provide a varied programme. On September 22th, there was a gramophone


29 discussion, in which members brought a record and introduced it. This meeting produced a pleasing response from 6B but their interest has not been generally maintained. On the following Friday evening we lead the play " Coriolanus." and on October 8th an interesting programme was largely compiled by Mr. Gentle of gramophone records and appropriate excerpts from, amongst others, Neville Tardus' " Autobiography " and Priestley's " A n g e l P a v e m e n t . ' We had a second play-reading of J. M. Barrie's " The Admirable Crichton " on October 15th, and on October 22nd, a talk called " The Six Faces of Malaya " by the Rev A. W e b b , which drew a large and interested audience. Mr. W e b b gave an excellent account of the relations between the different races of Malaya. We did not hold a meeting during the following week, so that members could attend the " D'Oyle Carte Opera' ' at the Theatre Royal; most members made several visits. Halfterm was marked by a General Knowledge Quiz presented by Mr. Gentle, on Thursday, November 4th The Headmaster kindly arranged our affiliation to the Tynemouth Antiquarian Society. A la-ge party attended two films presented by the Society, " The Story of Money " and " The Beginnings of H i s t o r y . " Prizes were offered for essays on these subjects and presented on December 10th to Watt D., and Lambert. A party saw " The People's Thea+fe " production of " Coriolanus " >n November 19th. The final meeting on Tuesday, December 14th. was a reading of J. Bridie's entertaining play " Mr. B o l f r y . " There was no meetings on November 20th or December 3rd because of the exams. We already have a fairly full programme for next term so, with its present support the Friday Club should continue to thrive. G. R. LUNN (Secretary). THE

LIBRARY

The Library has been supported this term largely by a number of regular borrowers, but many more books have been taken out than during the corresponding term last year. The 1st Form have been by far the most numerous borrowers, but all forms have some " regulars." The Library is now open on Mondays, so that the sessions are now evenly spaced throughout the week. Many people are still unaware that the Library is meant to be selfsupporting and new books should be provided by those who use it. The Headmaster has been most generous in giving, amongst many books, a complete new set of ' Newnes Pictorial Knowledge " and a volume of " The New Natural History " Mrs. Hilton has also given some new books, and an unknown and untraceable donor has given two brand-new Arthur Ransome books, which are proving most popular. Several others have brought books, for which we are grateful. K. H. Miller became Assistant Librarian last term and has been very helpful, especially in taking the Junior sessions, and for his work in typing a complete new catalogue. THE

SCHOOL

CONCERT

The Christmas Concert, held on the evening of the last Monday of Term began, as ordained by tradition, with an item from the 1st Form. This year the whole form took part in a tableau entitled " The Spirit of Christmas." In spite of obviously unrehearsed trouble with the improvised lighting and the difficulty of marshalling some thirty small boys on a narrow stage this item succeeded in creating the right atmosphere for the whole evening. Mrs. Hilton, who devised the tableau, and went to mfinite trouble in dressing the performers, is to be congratulated on the xolourful result of her labours.


30 This was followed by a delightful episode produced by Mrs. Miller. It was the Cautionary Tale about the inquisitive little b o y w h o was eaten by a lion. Form Lib, in chorus supplied the narrative, with Gair as the unfortunate victim, Pope as the keeper, and Grist as a lion that might indeed affright the ladies i l a succeeded in shedding their load onto the identical shoulders of the Paisley twins, who recited with superb confidence Mrs. Hilton's clever " T w o Little Lads from School are We " â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a pleasant echo of the ' Mikado." The III Form were responsible for the loudest laughs of the evening with their caricature of " 20 Questions " This was a witty sketch, written and produced by Mrs. Hilton, with Mr. Bates' imposing figure as the victim. The mysterious object, his bath water, was kept a closely guarded secret and the apposite questions, all planned with malice aforethought, that iust failed to reveal it, kept the whole audience laughing. The cast included " Stuart M c L a m b , " as question master, " Richard Bumbleby " (Scott, G.), " Daphne " Hallwood, " Anona " Mitchell, Raymond Glen Everitt " and Partridge W. The " l a d i e s " were devastating. One of the highlights of the evening was two groups of French songs, one from l i b , one from 111. both trained by Miss Marshall. The smaller boys sang vociferously, around an ingenious camp-fire, and the III Form showed both musical skill and feeling. The IV Form's contribution was the little " Pyramus and Thisbe " episode from " A Midsummer Night's Dream," produced by Mr. Gentle, who again organised the concert and acted as announcer of the various items. The rather archaic humour of this play was no obstacle to a wholehearted performance in which all the cast thoroughly enjoyed themselves. Porter J. B., as Thisbe. showed considerable talent, and Carrick did well as Pyramus. The lesser parts were more than adequately performed by Davis (Wall), Read (Prologue), Arthur (Lion), and Craney (Moonshine). An outstanding merit was the general clearness of diction throughout. The talented team that made the 1!)47 IV Form play so successful this year represent the V Form in two scenes from " Nicholas N i c k l e b y , " entitled " A Day at Dotheboys Hall." These were produced by a new and welcome volunteer, Mr. Brennan. This item, with Fleck as Mr. Squeers, Alexander as Mrs. Squeers, Richardson P. as Smike, Heyes as Nicholas, and Ryan, Blades and Thompson P. as the scholars, was again excellent, though the actors did not seem to find the subject matter quite as congenial as last year's. The concert came to an end, apart from some carols by the audience, with an old Cornish Mummer's Play, " St. George and the Dragon." This was present by members of V i a , and produced, with topical additions to the dialogue, by G. R. Lunn. This seasonable item was played with so great an abandon that the audience onlv just escaped injury from disintegrating weapons, and the many who had not suffered previous and equally unfounded fears for the life and limbs of the protagonists at rehearsal, showed expected aporehension. Reavley, as St. George, Evans as ( N . H . I , version), and Meredith as the Giant Turpin did their best to atone for the almost complete absence of plot in the play, by the vigour of their performance; while Miller, who had relinquished his role of accompanist to Rrennan in order to do battle as the Turkish Knight showed new and unexpected gifts, including an india-rubber back. The colourful costumes too, were well-conceived.


31 So ended what was, on the whole, in my opinion, the best of all the school concerts. No single item came up to the standard of the best of previous years, but there was nothing sub-standard. Next year's effort will have to be good to better this one and such improvement will have to be in the subject matter rather than in the acting and production, which could hardly be bettered. D.R.L. NATURE

NOTES

The poor weather that characterised most of the summer extended throughout the autumn, which produced few interesting extremes, apart from the heavy rains of September. The abandoning of the beaches by the many shore birds that wintered there during the war is even more pronounced this year than last. I saw no waders on the shore at Cullercoats until September 28th, when a redshank and a ringed plover were present, and since then only an occasional oyster catcher or redshank has down by. 1 have seen no others on the shore any nearer the built-up area than St .Mary's Island at the end of December. The various species of gull and the grotesque cormorant alone lemain faithful to this part of the coast. The most interesting birds have, however, paid brief visits: a Great Northern Diver at St. Mary's in December, and a Great Crested Grebe close to the shore in Cullercoats Bay on November 30th. This bird became very scarce during the last half of the Nineteenth Century, but is now much more numerous and widely distributed. Large numbers of peewits have taken up their winter quarters in the steadily decreasing Broadway fields, and do not appear unduly perturbed by the growing network of roads and drains. As early as September 13th there was a flock of 200, together with 50 of the less common Golden Plover. There were also a few of these on October 28th. Like the shore, the Quarry pool, at Whitley Ray, has not been revisited by its usual winter Hock of Tufted Ducks. Four Waterhens appear to be the sole occupants. It seems as if the price of seeing interesting wildfowl will be harsh weather after the new year, which would probably bring birds to the coast from inland and from the North. Many people may think this is too great a price to pav. G.R.L. S U M M E R H O L I D A Y S , 1948 A Visit to Switzerland We left Victoria on the " Golden Arrow " at 9 a.m. and had a twohour trip to Dover, where we were to catch the Channel steamer. The Cook's courier came round to talk to us and introduce us to our other companions; also to give us packed lunches to eat on the Fiench train. At Dover the boat was waiting: a great white steamer, rising and falling gently with the swell of the tide. She was the " Invicta," used during the invasion of the Normany beaches. After a good crossing we approached the harbour of Calais, but it was nothing like the Calais we expected to see. The stone piers were falling to pieces and sunken ships lay on either side of us. The great cranes stood idle, except for the one bringing registered baggage off the ship. New customs houses had been built and all around one could see the terribl? b o m b damage.


32 We were soon on the train and made ourselves comfortable to pass the longest part of the journey. At 9 p.m. we separated for the night so that there were two people to each compartment. My friend, Donald Nichol, and I shared a compartment and we lay down on the seats to try to get some sleep. At 4 a.m. we arrived at Basel, where we had to change and go through the customs again, and as there was an hour to spare we went into the buffet to nave not coffee and crisp bread-rolls. At 5-10 we boarded a Swiss electric train and soon the beautiful countryside was rushing by. It was a dull day when the train entered a long tunnel which took us beneath some mountains, but as we came out at the other end the sun was shining brilliantly and we were able to appreciate the beautiful valleys as we passed through them, the mountain sides covered in pine trees rising almost vertically on either side of us. In the afternoon we reached the lake of Neuchatel, and after running parallel to it lor a mile or t w o we arrived at the town of the same name. Our last stop! Our long, tiring journey was forgotten as we gazed at the place where we were to spend the next fortnight. We took a tramcar to the Funiculaire de Chaumont which took us to the top of the mountain in twelve minutes. There was a wonderful view of Neuchatel from the car. The school where we were staj'ing was a good example of a Swiss chalet. From the windows could be seen the whole lake of Neuchatel, and just beyond it the lake of Morat. In the background were the Alps, with the Jungfrau towering above them, and their colour died from crimson red to pink as the sun set. No words can express the beauty of the scenery which met our eyes all through the fortnight, 'the air was purer, the sky bluer than anything we had ever known. 1 shall remember every clay, but have room here only for some of my most vivid memories. The Plage was one of the first places we visited. There are lawns for you to play on, with parallel bars and swings, but most people like either to lie in the sun or sit at a table and have lemonade and cakes. A b o u t a hundred yards from the shore are diving boards, masts to climb and rafts. This is one-of the most popular spots in town. On 1st August, the Swiss celebrate their national day, and at night great bonfires were lit and fireworks displayed. F'rom the top ol the mountain could be seen many bonfires, some of which were on the lake, dotted here and there like lanterns. On the top of Chaumont was also a bonfire which was lit with ceremony. There was a procession, at the head of which came two people, who were going to light the fire, carrying torches, and behind them came children, each with a lantern. After a speech everyone sang the Swiss National Anthem, while the bonfire was lit and fireworks were let off. Great rockets zoomed into the still night, showering multi-coloured stars. Bangers were let off behind unsuspecting people, much to the delight of others. Squibs, volcanoes, Roman candles and Catherine wheels all added to the fun. At last the bonfire died down and everyone left, either to return home or to dance and drink white wine at the hotels until the early hours of the morning. The most exciting of the trips was the one to Berne. We packed a picnic lunch and set off for the station. One could sit beside the driver and look out of the front of the train, which was one of the newest models. On arrival at Berne we first made our way to the river, where we watched the bears. There were three bear-pits, two with old bears in, the other with young ones. Of course the young ones were the attraction. Everyone laughed to see their antics. One made a dash and another, side-stepping, watched him fall into a pond. Then they both climbed a tree and the wet one pushed the other out of the tree, rushed down, and sat on him.


33 After lunch, including .some good ice-cream, we went to the top of the cathedral to view Berne. We could see for miles. We also visited the famous clock, to see the little golden figures play when it strikes the hour. .Morat is said to be a miniature Berne, so we did not miss the opportunity of seeing it Taking a motor-boat from the harbour of Neuchatel, we crossed the lake to the river which joins it fo the lake of Morat, and having cruised amid wonderful scenery for about three miles we saw the river broaden out into the lake of Morat. The town was on the other side, and as we approached we saw that it was indeed something like Berne. We made our way towards the battlements surrounding the town; the top was covered with a red tiled roof. For the next hour we admired the magnificent display of goods in the shops. One day we took a train to the little village of Champ de Moulin, consisting of four houses and one hotel, and from there hiked back to Neuchatel. Around here are all the beauty-spots, such as Gorges de 1'Areuse, which is a deep cleft with the footpath cut into solid rock and an old stone bridge spanning the river at the bottom. Coming out of the mysterious darkness of the gorge we entered brilliant sunshine; the crystalclear river broadened and we walked along the green bank among the pine trees. Another day, walking down the other side of Chaumont, we came to the village of Valangin, where stands a centuries-old chateau, over-looking the village. It is now used as a museum and every room is just as it was a hundred years ago In a room where the daughters of the owner used to work are pieces of fine lace w hich are only half-finished. Far more gruesome is the gaoler's bedroom, where behind the bed is a cavity where people were cut up and thrown into the river beneath. The dungeons, w ith all the implements of torture, can be seen, but a two mile passage under the ground is blocked up. These days, with many others just as enjoyable, helped to make a liolidav which will never be forgotten M.G.S. (VIb). An Adventure off the Northumberland Coast It had rained all morning, but just after lunch it stopped and the sun came out. We decided to go for a sail. As there was hardly any wind we took the dinghy with us because the yacht had 110 auxiliary motor. About half a mile from the harbour entrance we noticed a large black cloud hurrying towards us from the North. The next moment a violent squall hit us, bringing with it heavy rain which reduced visibility to a few yards. The yacht heeled over till her gunwales were awash, the mast bending under the strain. Eventually we managed to luff but the tack o n j h e jib split and it shot halfway up the forestay. It was taken in but the halyard unrove and fell in the sea. The mainsail also had to be lowered and this was done with difficulty because the boom swung from side to side, threatening to knock anyone not quick enough to dodge it, into the water. There were other vachts in difficulties and I was alarmed to see a boat capsize and I could not see what happened to the crew. But we had troubles of our own. I turned round and saw the dinghy about fifty yards astern: her painter had snapped. The waves were about twenty feet high at times. They were breaking and there was a danger of our being swamped. As it was there was a good deal of water aboard. We had to bail and for every bucket' that was thrown out as much came in. We passed a small yacht plunging about at her anchor, and we could see her crew in the cockpit.


34 Our boat would not answer to its helm and the skipper saw with increasing alarm that we were heading straight for St. Mary's Island. If we ran ashore there the yacht would certainly be broken up on the rocks with little hope of survival for us. We had no sea-anchor so we had to use a bucket on the longest rope we had. This did not help much becaus" the bucket was too small. We managed to rig a small sail and this helped us a little, but it was mostly by luck that we were able to keep clear of the island, hven so we passed within about fifty yards of it. Our troubles were still not over, as the wind had not lessened appreciably. We now had to think of how to clear the outlying rocks at Cullercoats and then get into the Tyne. If we could not accomplish the latter we would have to run before the gale until it blew itself out, an alternative which we did not relish as we were soaked through and very cold About a quarter of an hour after we had passed St. Mary's I saw something that looked like a boat, but I wasn't sure. It soon turned out to be the Blyth life-boat. They passed us a rope and started to tow us back to Blyth. After U few minutes we saw that we could not do it because we were ' taking it green." So the life-boat turned round and towed us to the Tyne. Just off the North Pier there was a confused sea, caused by the backwash from it. We were towed through it and became a little wetter. Eventually we made fast to a buoy near the North Shields ferrv landing, having been at sea about four hours. We were taken home by ambulance. W . S . D . (V). To Glencoe by Bus We started from Irvine in Ayrshire, went along the Kilmarnock road, and soon arrived at Glasgow. We then went along Cumbernauld Street to Stirling. On the way we saw the famous battlefield of Bannockburn ami Stirling Castle rising high above the town. As we left Stirling we could see the Wallace monument perched on the top of a hill outside the town. Our next stop was at Callander, for lunch. Callander is in Perthshire, and is at the foot of the Highlands. To the North we could see the peaks of some of the big mountains. Leaving Callander we went by the lovely Pass of Lery and alongside Loch Lubnaig, which is about five miles long. On the left we could see another road leading to Balquidder, where R o b R o y is buried. We soon reached Lochearnhead, where we had a magnificent view of Loch Earn We then entered Glen Ogle, where we saw three bridges, almost parallel. The first was an old Roman road, the second on Genera] W a d e ' s military road', and the third on the modern highway. At Lix toll we turned left into Glen Dochart and as we emerged from this glen we saw the great bulk of Ben More (3,843 ft.). At the foot of this mountain, near the roadside, we saw the ruined cottage where R o b R o y Macgregor once lived. At Crianlarich we joined the road from Loch Lomond and followed it to Tyndrum. Here we turned right and went over Rannoch Moor. Soon we came to Loch Tulla and near the edge of the loch we saw a fir plantation which is said to be the only remnant of the Caledonian Forest. We then ascended the Black Mount and coming down the other side saw what is probably the wildest and most awesome scenery in Scotland. Here we saw a man coming along the road w ith a deer over his shoulders. Shortly afterwards we entered the Pass of ("dencoe and saw the Three Sisters, which are three mountains all of similar shape. Then came the Glen of Weeping, and Glencoe. At the end of the pass, where the massacre of 1692 took place there is a red granite cross which reads:


" This cross is reverently erected in memory Of Maclan, Chief of the Macdonalds of Glencoe who fell with his people in the massacre of Glencoe of February, 1692, by his direct descendant, Ellen Burns Macdonatd of Glencoe, August, 1883. Their name liveth for evermore." We returned by the same route to Tyndrum, then alongside Loch Lomond to Balloch, where we had tea, and so home to Irvine. J.W.

(VIB).

Cycling through England Our endeavours to reach the South Coast without enduring the exorbitant levy imposed by British Railways provided us with a most enjoyable holiday in itself, and introduced us to parts of the country entirely unknown to us. Loyal though I try to be, I must confess that the first day's journey was the least inspiring, including as it did Gateshead, pitheaps, Ferryhill and Darlington. A strong South-west wind was most discouraging and provoked a diffident remark about train times which was ignored, and we reached our night's abode, in the lower part of Wensleydale, early in the evening. It was one of the many hostels tactlessly placed at the top of a hill, with a deceitful signpost at the b o t t o m to raise false hopes. Our departure from Masham provided the thrill of treading pastures new, and apart from an undiagnosed disease in one of the bicycles, which was largely if unscientifically alleviated, began with a comfortable ride through gentle market gardens to Ripon. We could spend only a few minutes in this small cathedral city, patronising some richly-stocked porkshops, as was, we thought, our duty. We then passed through the prosperous farmland of the Vale of York to the city itself, a most perplexing place of one-way streets and droves of cyclists. At this stage we cheated, and took a train to Grantham. The following day saw an improvement in the weather which heralded the brief summer of 1948 (the last week in July), to make pleasant our ride through the undulating midland countryside, by the old town of Market Harborough, with its tiny Sixteenth Century grammar school raised on piles in the market-place, Northampton, of b o o t and shoe fame, then through a singularly sparsely inhabited, although cultivated district (we wondered who did the cultivating) until we sighted the distressingly suburban suburbs of Oxford. Unfortunately, it takes more than the empty colleges to provide Oxford with an academic atmosphere during the heat-wave at the height of the tourist season; the extreme warmth of the next day curtailed our sightseeing and drove us, willing, to the river meadows. The heat was unrelenting for the rest of our journey southwards. We passed through the small towns of Abingdon and Newbury (home of the Speenhamland System) and spent the night at Winchester, England's ancient capital. Its principal industry appears to be boosting King Alfred The hostel there was an old watermill, spanning the river, and advertising bathing under the hostel. We stood gratefully in the river, like cattle in a lake, revelling in the coolness of the water, while the shade from the sun was still welcome, although it was evening. At ten o ' c l o c k a curfew was sounded in the city but no-one seemed particularly interested. The next day we completed our journey South; we reached our restingplace at the mouth of Chichester harbour after crossing the superb, richlywooded, hilly Downs country of Sussex and becoming involved in Goodwood race crowds.


36 After three weeks of recuperation we set out again for Northern climes, taking an entirely different loute. The first day took us by Godalming and Guildford, through Richmond Park, which had an unwonted activity about it as it housed the various Olympic Games teams, along the famous Richmond Terrace, with its magnificent command of the Thames below, to Putney. We got out of the London area, after a few days' orgy of theatregoing, by the North Circular Road, which circles so interminably lound N . W . London that we began to fear we must be completely circumnavigating the metropolis before we reached the heavily-numbered signs which we knew led to our ultimate release, onto the Great North Road. At Baldock we abandoned ourselves to the pianary unknown of East Anglia, reaching Cambridge during the afternoon. Cambridge has the charm of not shouting its eminence as a seat of learning, but merely allows it to mingle with the features of an attractive country town, thus providing for itself an entirely individual personality. It has so many one-way streets that on one of the few others it proclaims proudly: " This is a two-way s t r e e t " ! We spent our second night in this district at Houghton Mill, in Huntingdon. We were the last to arrive at the hostel and so had to make our beds amongst the mysterious giant cog-wheels of milling machinery, and sleep beneath threatening floor spouts. The next day was the first during either journey on which we had to dress for rain, so we had been most fortunate in view of the generally poor summer. A fairly quick ride took us to Grantham by the early afternoon, and from there we reached York once again rather more quickly than might have been expected of unathletic cyclists! We spent two nights at York, and so had a whole day to sample some of its rich store of history. From Y o r k our route was similar to that of our outward journey and we reached home knowing that we had converted the journey into the highlight of the holiday, instead of being merely a means to an end. G.R.L. VIA). SCHOOL HEAD

OF

SCHOOL:

PREFECTS!

J. K.

OFFICERS

Evans.

J. K. Evans, G. R . Lunn, K. H . Miller, W . A. Gofton, D.

I.

J.

F.

Brennan, Meredith,

A. J.

W.

Harrison,

U.

Reavley,

W. G. Mayhew. CAPTAIN

OF F O O T B A L L :

HOUSE CAPTAINS:

J. K. Evans.

Whitley Bay, G. R . Lunn. Tynemouth. J. K. Evans. North Shields, W. A. Gofton. Monkseaton, A. J. Humble.

A. D.

J.

Humble, N.

Watt,


1

TYNEMOUTH SCHOOL MAGAZINE. SPRING TERM. We welcome Mr. R. A. Wilson, B.Sc., Durham, to the Stafi to take charge of the Mathematics and Physics. Speech Day was held on February 22nd when Sir Lawrie Edwards gave away the prizes In the morning a Service was held at Holy Saviour Church at which the address was given by the Rev. L. B. Tirrell. An account of Speech Day proceedings is given later in the magazine. The Heats of the Sports were held towards the end of term so thaf all was ready for the Finals at the beginning of the Summer term. The House Football Cup was won by Tynemouth. Avete

lib. IV. Jun. T.P.S

G. R. G. D.

A. B. K W.

Fairbairn, M. Stephens. Wallace. Egner, E. M. Foreman, J. P. J. Rang, R. A. Ramsay. Mclntyre, C. D. Macey.

VIb. IV. Ila. I. Jun. T.P.S.

J. K. Tate. M. J. Read. P. W. Nicholas. C. M. Leighton. A. Sutherland. J. F. Harbottle. P. Port.

Valete

TYNEMOUTH

House Master: Mr.

G. A . WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain: J.

K . EVANS.

This has been a most successful term for Tynemouth House in all Branches of School activity. For the first time in four years we won the House Rugby competition by a clear margin of eighteen points. In celebration of our win Mr- Wastle, with the help of his many generous friends, provided a scrumptious feed. We hope Mr. Wastle will convey our heartfelt thanks to all those who contributed. We were represented on the 1st XV by J. K. Evans (capt.), C. F. Evans, Mayhew, Urwin and Blades A., and on the junior teams by C! F. Evans, Caird, Edminson, Stevenette, Crawshaw and Hall. C. F. Evans is to be congratulated on being picked to play at scrum-half for the County " under 15 " XV against Durham, Cumberland Scottish Borders and on playing in a Northern Counties trial. J. K. Evans was reserve for the County " All Ages 15." Thompson W., Martin, and Mayhew are to be congratulated on their success in the December School Certificate, and Slater, Hilton and Everett on attaining high positions in their respective forms. We look forward to the sports and cricket matches hoping to acquit ourselves well in both.


2 W H I T L E Y BAY H O U S E N O T E S

House Master: Mr. J. W.

MILLER.

House Captain:

G.

R . LUNN.

In the Major event of the term, the House Matches, Whitley Ray obtained second place after losing the decisive last game to Tynemouth. Had the junior teams played as well as the seniors we might have won. Meredith, Tate J K., Say and Dixon have represented the House on the 1st XV, Meredith has also captained the " Under 16 " team. Proctor, Ryan, Iieyes, Harrison T., and Arthur have all played on the junior teams. We congratulate Dixon, Harrison T., Lamb, Whitfield, Atkinson, Robinson. Heald, Brown, Mason and Dobson, who have obtained good form positions. MONKSEATON

House Master: Mr.

B.

S,

B\TES.

HOUSE NOTES

House Captain: A. J.

HUMBLE.

This term the House Matches were held as usual, but unfortunately we did not particularly distinguish ourselves. For the first two games, however, we had several of our best players unfit. The second team is to be congratulated on winning all its matches which augurs well for the future. We have been well represented on the 1st XV this tem by Bootle, Humble, Joicey, Lloyd, Watt D., and Watt J., and on the junior teams by Carrick, Curry, Harrison B., Hately, Gristwood, Naughton R., Partridge J., Turnbull W., and Walker G. The following are to be congratulated on obtaining high positions in their respective forms: Richardson P., Carrick, Hately, Hardy, Laidler, Gair, Donaldson, and Naughton G. Turnbull W., is to be congratulated on obtaining his Matriculation and Towers his School Certificate. N O R T H SHIELDS HOUSE

House Master: Mr.

G.

G.

GENTLE.

NOTES

House Captain:

W . A . GOFTON.

We were sorry this term to lose the services of Tilby, an asset to the House in sporting activities because of his exceptional speed. We congratulate him on gaining his School Certificate in December and we wish him every success for the future. In the House Matches we were most unfortunate not to acquire a higher position, however, by an excellent final victory we made sure of avoiding the " wooden spoon." The junior team played courageously against stronger opposition. This term we contributed four regular members to the 1st XV. Gofton, Harrison A., Taylor and Hedley and a greater proportion to the junior XVs; Davison (capt.), Watson. Rhode, Turnbull J. H., Smiles, Turnbull I., and Craney. Davison and Scott G., receive our congratulations on gaining high positions in their respective forms and Gofton on gaining a credit in Greek in the December School Certificate after only one year's work. We hope to emulate last year's success in the Cricket House Matches. SENIOR

RUGBY

FOOTBALLâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;SPRING

TERM

1949

We have lost only two days of rugger this term and there has been very little sickness. On most Tuesdays and Thursdays therefore there have been two games at Prior's Park, Rockcliff and Percy Park.


3 The House Cup Competition was run off very successfully and Tynemouth, who included the all-important Evans brothers, were lairly certain winners from the start. School 1st XV matches were played against strong opposition provided by Morpeth, Dame Allans. Hexham and South Shields. An under 1G game was played against the Royal Grammar School. Though all the matches were lost, Tynemouth generally played well in the first half of each match but almost invariably lost heart in the second half. The under 14.and under 15 teams which have done so well under Mr. Unsworth's untiring care should in a season or two dispel the darkness that has settled upon our Senior football. 1st X V C H A R A C T E R S

Evans J. K. (Colours 1.945-6-7-8-9) has continued to do the work of half-a-dozen boys and the XV has_ come to rely on him almost entirely. Thus he has had far mors to do than could in any circumstances be expected of him. He is quite outstanding on the field, and is at home in anv position. B.S.B. Humble. Failed to develop into a full-back and so played during the latter hali' of the season as a back-row forward. Tate, J. K. A useful centre-threequarter who, if he tried, could play even better, his tackling could be improved. Hedley, W. One of the mainstays of the team. He tried hard throughout the season and his tackling often saved the school from being beaten by a larger score. Lloyd. Started in the pack but eventually replaced Humble at fullback. A very keen player. Taylor. A back-row forward whose keeness led him off-side on too many occasions. Evans, C. F. Though still under 15, his showing at scrum-half for the 1st XV was outstanding. He tackles excellently. Watt, D. A hard working forward who should improve tremendously next season. Say. He tries hard but his tackling and backing up could be improved. His height is useful in the line-out. Gofton. Has played well as a second row forward, tackling and backing up well. Urtvln. Was required to play both at wing-forward and at scrumhalf and has shown himself as being equally capable in either position. Meredith. The school hooker who, though playing hard in the scrum, never put his turn of speed to good account. Mayhew. Played at wing-forward during the second half of the season. His chief fault is not thinking about what he is doing with the result that he is often off-side. Harrison, A. Played well in the second row till he had his collarbone damaged. We were pleased to have him back in the side towards the end of the season after his recovery. Bootle. Has shown great keeness for the game. His tackling, though better, could still be improved. He plays best when in the threequarters.


4 Blades. A wing threequarter whose services were required on only a few occasions. He can play a good game if he wants; but he must be keener if he hopes to retain his place on any team. Joicey. Has played well when called and next season he should develop into a useful forward. â&#x20AC;˘ ixon. Though he has a good turn of speed his tackling leaves a lot to be desired. HOUSE

MATCHES

Seven-a-side matches were again played, each house providing a first and second team. Tynemouth, with John and Frank Evans playing together, started firm favourites and finished with a lead of 19 points over the runners-up, Whitley Bay. Ten points were awarded for a win by a 1st VII and six points for a win by a 2nd team. Monkseaton received the " wooden spoon," being one point behind North Shields and two points behind Whitley Bay. Results

North Shields I Tynemouth 1 Tynemouth I Tynemouth I Whitley Bay I Whitley Bay I Monkseaton II Monkseaton 11 Monkseaton II North Shields II North Shields 11 Tynemouth II Tynemouth II

..

.. ..

.. ..

16 38 3 6 19 10 9 3 21 0 11 16 0

Monkseaton Monkseaton North Shields Whitley Bay Monkseaton North Shields North Shields Tynemouth Whitley Bay Tynemouth Whitley Bay Whitley Bay North Shields

0 0 0 3 0 6 3 0 6 0 0 0 0

Final Position

Tynemouth Whitley Bay North Shields Monkseaton

39 20 19 18

points. points. points. points.

J U N I O R R U G B Y â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S P R I N G T E R M , 1949

This term has been much the most successful that the school has had since the war, and this improvement has been in no small measure due to fine example set by Evans C. F. He has not only been the outstanding player but has also shown real powers of leadership and he is to be congratulated on being chosen to play for the county " Under 15 " against Cumberland and the Boarder Schools and to play in the Northern counties trial.


5 In the first match against Dame Allan's, the " Under 14 " were beaten by a narrow margin after a very even game. The following week the " Under 15 " though heavily defeated by a much heavier and faster side from Morpeth, played very well indeed and never gave up. In the next match against the R.G.S. the " Under 14 " played unaccountably badly, and deserved the trouncing which they received. The season ended in a most gratifying fashion with four wins. The " Under 15 " beat Bede comfortably and Gateshead G.S. narrowly, and the " Under 14 " beat South Shields H.S. by two tries to nil and finished by an easy victory over Hexham G.S. in revenge for their defeat early in the season. In this last game Carrick among the backs and Turnbull J. H. were outstanding, but the whole side played excellent football and it was a pleasure to see the way in which the ball was handled by forwards as well as by backs. Finally, there is much promising talent and almost universal enthusiasm among those still too young for these teams, so that there is every hope of the school doing even better next year. D.S.U. Results

14 15 14 15 15 14 14

v v V V V V V

Dame Allan's Morpeth G.S. Newcastle R.G.S. Bede Gateshead G.S. South Shields H.S. ... Hexham Q.E. G.S. ...

... ... ... ... ... ... ...

L L L W W W W

10--18 Away 0 - -42 Home 0 - -44 Home 12-- 0 Away 1 4 --11 Away 6 -- 0 Away 2 4 -- 0 Away

Tynemouth School 1st XV v Morpeth G.S. 1st XV

January 9th. At Morpeth. This first game of the term was played at Morpeth in very boisterous weather for a very strong wind blew across the pitch and play was confined for the most part to a small area near the far touch line. Tynemouth did most of the attacking and the forwards should have scored often, but their finishing was poor. All Morpeth's tries were scored from individual break-aways from their own line. Tynemouth replied with a penalty-goal by John Evans. Morpeth G.S., 20 pts.; Tynemouth School, 3 pts. Team: Humble; Lloyd, Hedley, Tate J. K., Dixon; J. K. Evans, Evans C. F.; Watt D., Meredith, Harrison A., Say, Gofton, Taylor, Mayhew, Urwin. Tynemouth School 1st XV v Dame Allan's School 1st XV

Saturday, January 22nd. Dame Allan's brought a very strong side and School did exceptionally well to hold them in the first half to 8 points to 3 points. In the second half Dame Allan's reorganised and played sparkling football which completely overwhelmed the weak Tynemouth defence. Dame Allan's goalkicker was a great asset to his side for of the ten tries scored in this half he converted eight. Final Score: Dame Allan's School 1st XV (9 goals, 3 tries), 54 points. Tynemouth School 1st XV (1 penalty-goal) 3 points. Team : Humble; Lloyd Hedley, Evans C. F., Porter; Evans J. K., Urwin; Watt D., Meredith, Harrison, Say, Gofton, Mayhew, Taylor, Watt J.


6 Tynemouth School under 16 16 XV v R.G.S. under 16 XV

Saturday. January 29th. At Benton. Tynemouth, though feeling the absence of Frank Evans and Bootle, hoped to do well against a team to which they had lost by a narrow margin at Priors Park earlier in the season The Grammar School had been strengthened by a strong running right wing three-quarter who was responsible for most of his side's points. Again the School was out-weighted and the ball rarely reached the wings. The wing-forwards hardly ever corner-flagged and Lloyd received little assistance against the powerful Grammar School outsides. Royal Grammar School " under 16 " (1 goal, 9 tries), 32 points. Tynemouth School " under 16 ", Nil. Tynemouth School 1st XV v Hexham G.S.

Saturday, February 19th. At Percy Park. School took the field even weaker than usual, for Meredith was now declared unfit for the rest of the season, and Joicey and Dixon were not available through sickness. Moreover two or three boysâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;notably Evans C.â&#x20AC;&#x201D;who would normally have been playing for the first XV, were required on the " under 15 " side at Sunderland. Fortunately Hexham brought a weaker side than had met us earlier in the season. The first half produced some determined and keen play with School holding their advantage but finishing weakly. Hexham scored an unconverted try from a break through from a line-out on Tynemouth's line. The second half saw Tynemouth fade away and weak defensive play let Hexham in with three tries, all being converted. Final Score: Tynemouth School, Nil. Hexham Grammar School (3 goals, 1 try), 18 points. Team: Lloyd; Porter, Hedley, Tate, Blades; Evans J. K., Evans C.; Scarth, Watt, Harrison, Say, Gofton, Taylor, Humble, Mayhew. SPEECH

DAY

Speech Day was held on February 22nd and, as is now our custom, it began with a Service at Holy Saviour Church which was very well attended by parents and friends of the School. The address was given by the Rev. L. B. Tirrell, the Vicar, who for many years has been teaching Scripture in the upper part of the School. This was the last appearance of Mr. Tirrell in this capacity, as he has accepted a pofet in Condon where he will be responsible for Religious Teaching in a large number of schools. The theme of his address was " Finding the Right Way." In the late afternoon Prizegiving was held at the Plaza. Dr. Charlesworth, the Chairman of the Governors, welcomed the large gathering of parents and friends. The Headmaster in his opening remarks regretted the departure of Mr. Tirrell and spoke of the bond which was growing up between the School and the local Church as something which in time would benefit both. The Schools, here and in Monkseaton, had a visit from H.M.I, which though not in the nature of a full inspection had proved instructive In the Higher Certificate 5 out of 7 candidates had passed. D. R. Lunn had been awarded a County Scholarship and later had won an Open Scholarship in History at King's College, Cambridge. In the School Certificate out of 23 candidates 10 obtained matriculation standard and 7 passed. Sir Lawrence Edwards then presented the prizes and gave a short address to the boys. He deplored the tendency of people to criticise the younger generation for their shortcomings and pointed out that this criticism was no new thing. Young people had brought victory and freedom to this nation and the world by the display of two virtues, honesty and hard work,


7 PRIZES Higher Certificate, County Scholarship and College, Cambridge

Open Scholarship

at King's

D. R. Lunn.

Higher

Certificate

R. A. Bristow, D. A. Parkin, J. A. Mackie, S. M. Rodgers. Matriculation

D. J. Harrison, A, J. Humble, J. R. Martin, J. F. Meredith, J. U. Reavley, W. Thompson, W. Turnbull, D. N. Watt, F. G. Willey. School Certificate

J. Hoskins, W. G. Mayhew. M. A. McGilvray, G. B. Scarth, R. M. de Souza, C. W Tilby, G. Towers.

Stockdale Prize for Languages

D. R. Lunn, D. N. Watt.

Prize for Science

J. A. Mackie. FORM

V. IV. III. Ila. lib. I. Jun.

PRIZES

J. D. Watt, P. D. Partridge, J. P. Partridge, D. A. Lambert, D. Nichol. P. J. Richardson, D. W. Lilburn, G. G. Davison, W. S. Dixon, D. N. Reay. P. R. Hilton, A. S. .Carrick, T. M. Hately, T. D. Harrison. G. R. Scott, A. Lamb, W. F. Partridge, R. M- Hardie, C. F. Everett. D. E. W. Laidler, P. W. Nicholas, I. Atkinson, D- R. Jones, G. J. C. Whitfield, W. J. N. Walker. W. R. Gair, P. J. Robinson, A. Summerson, A. M. Donaldson, C. D. Fraser. (A) V. Unsworth, R. S. Sutton.

Progress Priz*

D. L. Sowerby. (B) B. R. McCoy, R. A. Dixon. (B) B R. McCoy, R. A. Dixon. Progress Prize

T.P.S.

C. W. Dale. Ilia. K. B. Dobson, B. H. Mason, W. H. Jones. Illb. S. Frail, P. Burke. II. K. M. Jones, J. C. Parr. I. J. D. J. Sainsbury, D. M. Thorp.

Progress Prizes (presented by Mrs. Gordon). III. G. Macdonald. II. H. P. Martin. McKinnell. Easter Term, 1949 THE

I. A. E.

F R I D A Y CLUB

The first meeting, held on the second day of term, was an " outdoor '


8 one at North Shields for the Antiquarian Society's lecture " Roman Corbridge " by one of the younger archaeologists, W, P. Hedley. The following week J. F. Meredith provided gramophone presentation of Gilbert's and Sullivan's " Patience " ; our appreciation was greatly enhanced by the excellent gramophone and comfortable accommodation kindly provided by R. M. de Souza. On February 28th, Rev. L. B. Tirrell gave a talk " Tynemouth Priory through the Ages," which revealed a great store of interesting information and made us realise the wonderful heritage enjoyed by the parish of Tynemouth Priory, which it does not appear to fully appreciate. A second talk was given on March 4th, by Mr. Williams, until recently holder of an important administrative post in Nigeria; he talked about the country and his work. The large number ot questions that followed showed the interest aroused by this talk. We have read two plays this term; our first Shakespearean Comedy " Much Ado About Nothing " on February 4th, and on February 25th " The Man of Destiny " by G. B. Shaw whose plays always prove popular. Messrs. Gentle, Meredith, Miller, Harrison and Lunn contributed to a Miscellany programme on February 18th, which included gramophone records, poems, excerpts from Punch and some of Gilbert's songs. The fact that the meeting was sustained till after 9 o'clock by mutual consent is a measure of its success. On March 10th a small party attended a most entertaining lecture by Mr. Peter Scott on " The Severn Wildfowl Trust," illustrated by films and Mr. Scott's skill with chalk. D Nichol provided a film show on March 18th. A rather unconstitutional departure from the advertised programme resulted in our seeing " Holiday Camp " which was thoroughly enjoyed. One of the most important items, a lecture by Madame de la Courcelle on " Roman France," arranged for March' 25th was unfortunately cancelled at a few hours' notice owing to the lecturer's indisposition. We concluded on the last evening of term with a mixed entertainment in lighter vein, as demanded by the festal occasion provided bv Messrs. B. S. Bates, G. C. Gentle 1 K. Evans, A. W. Harrison, I. F. Meredith, K. H. Miller, and G. R. Lunn The " Friday Club " has now had a sufficiently long life for some conclusions to be drawn: formal talks are the most popular type of meeting, producing an audience of about twenty and Miscellany evenings can claim second place, but " outdoor meetings," generally speaking, have attracted only a small party. A Play-reading usually draws a fairly small but keen group. We have an unpleasant feeling that the Club closes its second winter season in a less strong position than it did the first. Support from 6b, although quite good numerically on occasions, is rather casual and oassive, while a number of 6a tend to find previous engagements for Friday night, often, we suspect, of a less educational nature. BIRD

NOTES

RECORDED

IN

EGYPT

In the Desert there is not much scope for ornithological study and the chances of having a " good day " are very remote, but I can name the more common species which one meets; but first I would like to say a few words about the locality in which I was stationed.


9 The Suez Canal connects the Red Sea at Suez with the Mediterranean at Port Said. About half way down the Canal widens into the Bitter Lakes near to which is situated Fayid with all its Army Camps. As in our country the most abundant and self-possessed bird is the Sparrow, not an exact replica of our own species but very similar. The army buildings housed scores of nests. A close runner-up in numbers is the semi-domesticated pigeon, the same type as is found around towns and in Trafalgar Square. Their favourite haunt and breeding place at Fayid was the inside of the Army Kinema Corporation cinema. When the windows were closed at night for a show the birds usually sat quietly on the beams but occasionally uttering a soft " coo " during the performance. The wild resident pigeon is know as the Palm Dove and is a very delightful little bird very like our Turtle Dove except that the upper parts and the tips of the tail feathers are sandy coloured. The call of " coo coo coo-coo coo " is at first pleasing but becomes very monotonous if repeated for long. During the month of September, 1948, swallows were seen usually flying singly or in twos and odd ones were observed during the latter part of August. Egypt is not on the migration route for our swallows and only once has the British species been reported from that area. An obvious heron-type of bird was quite frequently seen in and around irrigation ditches. The plumage is pure white in contrast with the black bill and legs. I think I am correct in saying that they were Little Egrets. One further species is worthy of note. It is a large buzzard-like bird which I often saw quartering the ground around the camp with a slow sedate flight punctuated by long graceful glides. The general colour is mottled brown; the beak hooked like a typical bird of prey; the tail deeply forked and the wings which are slightly bent backwards are rounded at the ends and slotted. I am inclined to think that it is a relation of the Black Kite which is found in Egypt. J.A.W. CORNIX

ET

HYDRIA

(The Crow and the Pitcher)

Pridem mane fuit calidum; comix sitiebat, Nam plures horas, ipsa petebat aquam. Spes sua continuavit adhuc, neque fessa erat ilia, Tumque petens hydriam vidit avis subito! In qua non aqua multa fuit, sod erat satis illi, Talis enim volucris paullulum aquam biberet. Jam potura fuit; necdum poterat bibere, eheu! Esse superficiem sensit aqua altiorem. " Vae mihi. Sedabone sitem, vel quomodo?" dixit Primum: sed cepit consilium subito. Nam tot erant lapides circum, paucosque coegit, Demissis in aquam: mox erat orta satis. Sic potuit cornix potare, nec haec sitiebat. Utque voluntas est, dicitur esse modum. P.R.H.

Form IV.


10 SCHOOL O F F I C E R S HEAD B O Y :

J.

K.

Evans.

PREFECTS:

J.

K.

Evans, G. R. Lunn,

K.

H.

Miller, W. A. Gofton,

D. I. Brennan, A. W. Harrison, A. J. Humble, J. F. Meredith, J. U. Reavley, D. N. Watt, W. G. Mayhew. CAPTAIN OF F O O T B A L L : H O U S E CAPTAINS:

J. K .

Evans.

Whitley Bay, G. R. Lunn. Tynemouth, J. K. Evans. Monkseaton, A. J. Humble. *

North Shields, W. A. Gofton. SCHOOL

NOTES

The Sports were held at the beginning of the term. The weather was kind and the programme was completed under very good conditions for running. The prizes were presented by Mrs. Evans. A full record of the results appears later in the magazine. W. A. Gofton, A. J. Humble and M. R. Lloyd were awarded their Cricket Colours.


11

SUMMER

TERM.

S U M M E R T E R M , 1949 Avete

Jun. T.P.S.

P. Bilton, D. B. Buglass, D. N. Larke, B. Money, T. L. Payn, C. Purvis. L. Anderson, C. A. Cameron, P. H. Dobson. A. D. H. Hetherington. K. D. Wright. Valete

Via.

J. K. Evans, Prefect 1946-9, Head Boy 1948-9, S. Cert. July 1947. XI 1948-49. XV 1945-6-7-8-9. G. R. Lunn, Prefect 1946-49, Matric. July 1947, H. Cert. 1949. K. H. Miller. Prefect 1948-9, Matric. July 1947. W. A. Gofton, Prefect 1948-9, Matric. July 1947, H. Cert. 1949 XI 1949. D. L.' Brennan, Prefect 1948-9, Matric. July 1947, H. Cert. 1949. A. W. Harrison, Prefect 1948-9, Matric. July 1947, H. Cert. 1949. J. U. Reavley, Prefect 1948-9, Matric. July 1948.

VIb.

W. G. Mayhew, Prefect 1948-9, S. Cert. 1949. R. B. Gristwood, Matric. July 1949. D. Nichol, Matric. July 1949. M. G. Sanderson, Matric. July 1949. J. A. Urwin, S. Cert. July 1949. R. H. Harrison. A. Hilton. G. T. Tait.

V.

A. Blades, D. J. Joicey, R. F. Rowell, J. Edminson.

IV.

I. B Davis, J F. Sutherland.

Ila.

G. J. C. Whitfield, D .R. Jones, R. J. E. Clarkson, D. O. Paisley, J. M. Paisley, N. W. Brady. A. Webb, D. B. Gentle, D. Bilclough, V. E. Brown. T. R. G. Balbirnie. S. M. Boulton, S. Frail, J. A. Frayhng, K. M. Jones, A. G. Lamb, H. P. Martin, A. Musgrave, B. M. Rhode, C. S. Whitaker.

Jun. T.P.S.

PRIZES Higher Certificate

D. I. Brennan, W. A. Gofton, A. W. Harrison, G. R. Lunn. Matriculation

R. B. Gristwood, Distinction in History. J. P. Partridge, Distinctions in Latin, Greek and French. P. D. Partridge Distinctions in Scripture, Greek and French. J. D. Watt, Distinctions in English Language, French and Mathematics. D. Nichol. Distinctions in English Language. M. J. Sanderson. School Certicate

D. B. Armstrong, W Hedley, W. G. Mayhew, D. Taylor, J. A. Urwin.


12 MONKSEATON HOUSE NOTES

House Master: Mr

B.

S.

BATES.

House Captain: A. J.

HUMBLE.

So far as the cricket results are concerned this term has been rather disappointing. Although we have been well represented on the XI by A. J. Humble, M. R. r.loyd and Richardson P., we were well beaten in the first round of the House Matches by Tynemouth. Humble and Lloyd are to be congratulated on receiving their colours. Hallwood and Hately have played regularly for the "Under 14." In the Sports we did better and finished second to Tynemouth. Hately and Donaldson are to be congratulated on being the junior champions. We have been much more successful in the sphere of work and Carrick, Hardie, Laidler, Walker W., Gair, Donaldson, Naughton G., and Jones W., are to be congratulated on doing well in their respective forms. Finally, we wish all members of the House who are sitting their Higher and School Certificates the best of luck. TYNEMOUTH

House Master: Mr.

G. A

WASTLE.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain: J.

K . EVANS.

The first duty of the house is to congratulate Mr. Wastle on his 25th anniversary as a master of Tynemouth School and to wish him all the best in future years. In the realm of school activities we have had a reasonably successful term. Once again we won the Sports Cup, Evans J. K., winning the Senior Challenge Cup for the fourth time in succession. In the Cricket House Matches we got into the final but were well beaten by North Shields to whom we give our heartiest congratulations. Though not successful in the House Matches we were well represented on the School XI by J. K. Evans (capt.), Caird, Davison and Scarth. The following are to be congratulated on gaining high positions in their respective forms: Lilburn, Hilton T., Laidler and Robinson. We are sorry to say good-bye this term to J. K. Evans who has been an active member of the House for many years; we wish him all the best for the future. To close we would like to wish all those who have taken their School or Higher Certificate the best of luck. NORTH

House Master:

MR

SHIELDS HOUSE

G . G . GENTLE.

NOTES

House Captain:

W . A . GOFTON.

We must first express our great sorrow that Mr. Gentle is leaving us this term. He has been an excellent house master, being very anxious for the success of the house. We wish him all the best of good wishes for the future We are pleased to be able to report our success in the House Matches and in this connection would like to thank Mr. Gentle heartily for the excellent " feed " he gave the team in reward for their exertions. They iealise how difficult it must have been for him to provide for them, when his household was on the point of removal. We offer our good wishes to those taking the Higher and School Certificates this term, and we congratulate those who have gained high positions in their respective forms.


13 It remains to hope that all members of the house will have a refreshing holiday. WHITLEY

House Master: Mr.

J.

M.

BAY

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain: G.

MILLER.

R . LUNN.

In the main house event of the term, the House Matches, although we failed to emerge from the first round, our match with North Shields was an excellent game with the very close result of 78-75. Heyes, Harrison T., Procter and Dixon have played on the 1st XI and we were well represented on the Junior XI. We congratulate Dixon. Harrison T., Milne, Lamb, Whitfield and Robinson on their good form positions. We give our best wishes to all our members who are leaving this term, and to all those who have been taking the Higher and School Certificate examinations. TYNEMOUTH

SCHOOL

Held at Preston Avenue on May 4th.

SPORTS

One new record was set up.

In the High Jump, 11-14, Hately jumped 4 ft. 4J ins., beating the previous record set up in 1925. Results

Long Jump (over 14):—1, Evans J.; 2, Evans C.; 3, Hadley W. Long Jump (11-14):—1, Hately and Hall; 3, Arthur. Long Jump (under 11):—1, Gair; 2, Everett D.; 3, Jones D. Cricket Ball:—1. Evans J.; 2, Mavhew; 3, Scarth. High Jump (11-14):—1, Hately; 2,'Hall; 3 equal, Checkley and Gofton R. High Jump (under 11):—1, Donaldson; 2 equal, Beardall and Whitfield. Mile Open:—1, Evans J.; 2, Evans C.; 3, Gofton W. yuarter-mile Open:—1. Evans J.; 2, Hedley W.; 3, Gofton W. 75 yds. (11-14):—1. Hately; 2, Carrick; 3, Hall. 75 yds. (under 11):—1 equal, Carter and Donaldson; 3, Beardall. 75 yds. (under 6J):—1, Luker; 2, Merrick; 3, Watson G. 75 yds. (over 6J):—1, Jackson; 2 Towers; 3. Bowmaker K. 100 yards (over 14):—1, Meredith; 2, Evans J.; 3, Gofton W. 75 yds. T.P.S. (A) :—1, Parr; 2, Boulton; 3, Henthorne. 75 yds. T.P.S. (B):—1, Ster; 2, Jones K.; 3, McKinnell. 75 yds. T.P.S. (C):— 1, Hulme; 2. Jones P.; 3, Donaldson J. 220 yds. (under 10):—1, Oliver J. D.; 2, Naughton G.; 3, Heald. 220 yds. (10-11):—1, Donaldson; 2 equal, Carter and Beardall. High Jump (over 14):—1, Evans J.; 2, Meredith; 3, Harrison A. 220 yds. (13-14):—1, Hately; 2, Carrick; 3, Naughton R. 220 yds. (12-13):—1, Hall; 2, Checkley; 3, Stephenson M. 220 yds. (11-12):—1, Dunlevy; 2, Bootle; 3, Parritt. Half-mile (Senior):—1, Evans J.; 2, Gofton W.; 3, Lloyd. Half-mile (Junior):—-1, Crawshaw; 2, Hall; 3, Carrick. 220 yds. (14-15):—1, Watt J.; 2, Gristwood; 3, Harrison T. 220 yds. (15-16):—1, Blades, 2 Sutherland J.; 3, Lilburn. 220 yds. (over 16):—1, Evans J.; 2, Hedley W.; 3, Mereditii. School Handicap (under 12):—1, Jones W.; 2, Sowerby; 3, Oliver J. D House Relay:—1, North Shields. School Handicap (over 12):—1, Checkley; 2, Welch; 3, Andrews. Sports Champion : —Evans J Middle Cup:—Hately. Junior Cup:—Donaldson. House Cup: —Tynemouth,


14 CRICKET

N O T E S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1949

The 1st XI have had a poor season as far as winning matches was concerned. It was evident early on in the season that there was little talent in the sixth forms. The policy has been, therefore, to concentrate on the younger boys who showed promise as cricketers in the school and this policy should bear fruit next season. The 1st XI began the season with a game against the Old Boys' Cricket XI at Smith's Park. There was also the usual fixture in Race Week with the Old Boys' Club which put out two strong teams. Although the School lost these matches they put up a good fight and enjoyed a very good afternoon's cricket in excellent weather. The School also played the Parents' XI in Race Week and this match the 1st XI won, their only win of the season The match against the Staff was played on June 14th Thanks chiefly to good knocks by Mr. Gentle and Mr. Laidler the Staff total reached 110 which the School XI were unable to beat. Miss Maguire very sportingh turned out at the last moment for the Staff and succeeded in breaking her " duck." Gofton, Humble and Lloyd are to be congratulated on gaining their Colours this term. With so many young and keen players available we look forward to a more successful season next year. FIRST ELEVEN

CHARACTERS

Exans, J. K. He has had a difficult task captaining a young and inexperienced 1st XI. He has set a fine example in the field and his bowling has been outstanding. He batted well at the beginning of the season but has made few runs latterly owing to an unfortunate tendency to get himself out l.b.w. J.M.M. Humble, A. J. (Colour 1949). A good steady opening bowler who on occasions excelled in accuracy. His batting as a left-hander, however, was rather disappointing and his ground fielding could be safer. Gofton, W. A. (Colours 1949). He has opened the innings throughout the season and though never making an outstanding score he was always steady. His slow bowling and fielding have at all times been outstanding. Lloyd, M.R. (Colours 1949). A promising left-handed batsman who made some good scores. He is a safe fielder. Caird, A. T. Despite his small size he has proved an all-round asset to the side. As a batsman he has many good strokes and as a fielder he is very safe. His bowling shows promise. Heyes, P. H. The school wicket-keeper who on occasions played very well. He is a promising bat. Turnbull, J. H. A useful bowler who keeps a good length and a safe and reliable fielder. He can hit the ball hard but at present his defence is not sound. Proctor, J. N. A natural hitter who can make runs but he must learn to curb this tendency when the position of the game calls for careful play. His fielding could be improved. Harrison, T. D. A young player who should develop into a useful member of the 1st XI both as a batsman and as a left-hand bowler. He lacks concentration in the field. Richardson, P. J. A small player who possesses the keenness which has not had its just reward this season. His batting has improved and he may develop into an off-spin bowler. Davison, G. G. He should develop into a useful bat when he gains confidence as he has the strokes. He is keen in the field and has bowling ability.


15 1 St XI A V E R A G E S â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S U M M E R T E R M , 1949 Batting

J. H- Evans W. L. Gofton M. Lloyd ... Proctor J. ... Heyes P. Caird A. Turnbull J. H.

Times Innings Not Out Runs 14 0 158 14 0 98 14 1 63 10 1 56 12 1 77 12 1 58 3 0 28

J. H. Evans A. Humble W. L. Gofton Turnbull J. H.

Overs 126 82 41 39

Highest Score Average 56. 11.3 23 7 27 4.85 24 6.2 24 7 17 5.3 16 9.3

Bowling

...

1st

Opponents T.S. Old Boys C.C. A T.M.H.S H S. Shields H.S. ... A Hexham G.S. A T.M.H.S A Tynemouth J. H S. Shields H.S. ... Morpeth G.S. Staff Hexham G.S. Whitley Bay G.S. Parents Old Boys Royal G.S. Whitley Bay G.S....

H A H H A H H H H

For 69 34 25 31 31 94 for 9 dec. 107 34 88 62 54 84 for 5 80 30 for 8 33 JUNIOR

Maidens Runs 345 38 19 226 2 216 7 81

Wickets 36 18 19 6

Average 9.6 12.6 11.4 13.5

XI

Against 74 56 for 1 wkt. 86 for 9 wkts. dec. 182 for 6 wkts. dec. 32 for o wkts.

Lost Lost Lost Lost Lost

49 for 84 for 147 for 110 63 for 55 for 83 125 109 131 for

Draw Draw Lost by 113 runs Lost by 22 runs Lost by 3 wkts. Lost by 5 wkts. Won by 5 wkts. Lost by 45 runs Draw Lost by 5 wkts.

8 wkts. 6 wkts. 7 wkts. dec. 7 wkts. 5 wkts.

8 wkts.

Result by 5 runs by 10 wkts. by 53 runs by 151 runs by 10 wkts.

CRICKET

On the face of it, a record of one win and one draw in thirteen matches is not impressive, but the Under 14 team has had an enjoyable season, the whole side has shown great keeness, and its general performance has been more satisfactory than that of the three previous post-war XIs. With most of the team, including Craney, the captain, still under fourteen next year more matches should be won. The best performance was against Morpeth (away), when fhe School batting second, scored 93 runs to win by 1 wicket, but exciting finishes might easily have resulted in victory against Whitley Bay and Hexham (home).


16 The batting was generally stronger, but showed some lack of enterprise. Craney's 56 at Morpeth was delightful and he had good scores against Hexham and Whitley Bay. Cranev and Arthur bowled steadily and the latter shows considerable promise. The team was handicapped by a lack of change bowlers. Jelfcock was hostile, but erratic, and Scott G. did not iind his form of last season with either bat or ball, although he fielded brilliantly in the slips. The fielding was generally good, and Hallwood showed promise as wicketkeeper. Craney proved a sound captain, apart from being the most successful batsman and bowler. Team from: Craney (Capt.), Milne, Scott G., Arthur, Davis, Hallwood, J elf cock, Hately Dunievy, Porter J. B., McKinnell, Bilclough. Averages: Batting: Craney, 12.7. Arthur, 23 at 11.8.

Bowling:

Craney, 31 at 10.5;

Matches

Opponent

For

Tynemouth H.S. ... R.G.S Tynemouth C.C. ... S. Shields H.S. ... R.G.S Hexham G.S. Morpeth G.S. Whitley Bay G.S. Ascham House Morpeth G.S. S. Shields H.S. ... Whitley Bay G.S. Hexham G.S.

A 41 H 19 A 45 H 17 A 37 A 55 A 93 for 9 H 85 A 63 H 39 A 34 A 25 H 48

Against 48 for 4 wkts. 80 for 9 wkts. 73 for 7 wkts. 104: for 8 wkts. 101 for 5 wkts. 152 for 7 wkts. 92 for 7 wkts. 105 for 6 wkts. 93 99 82 for 2 wkts. 65 for 7 wkts. 36 for 8 wkts.

dec. dec. dec. dec. dec. dec. dec.

dec. dec.

Result Lost by 6 wkts. Lost by 51 runs Lost by 28 runs Lost by 87 runs Lost by 64 runs Lost by 97 runs Won by 1 wkt. Lost by 20 runs Lost by 30 runs Lost by 60 runs Lost by 48 runs Lost by 40 runs Draw

On the last day of term a match was arranged between our 12-year-olds and those of the Royal Grammar School. A very enjoyable afternoon's cricket resulted, but owing to absences we had to field a side weak in bowling. The R.G.S. boys took full advantage of this and knocked up 148 runs for 5 wickets, and with two good fast bowlers to open their attack, soon had the school side m difficulties. Bilclough, who opened our innings, refused, however, to be daunted and was still at the crease with 25 runs to his credit when our innings closed with a total of 46. EXPEDITION

TO

ROMAN

WALL

The morning of July 18th was dull and overcast; nevertheless accompanied by Mr. Bates we set out from Marlborough Crescent for an inspection of Hadrian's Wall. Alighting at Chollerford we visited the remains of the Roman Bridge which once spanned the North Tyne. After an interesting lecture on it from ,Mr. Bates we returned to the road and walked up-hill for over three miles and after about a mile on the level we came to Procolitia. Here once stood a Roman stronghold famous for its baths and the Well of Coventina. In this well 13,487 coins have been found; we inspected it but returned no richer. As it was now past mid-day we decided to have our lunch. Lunch finished we set out along the road once more. So far the Roman Wall and the road had been parallel, but at Fozy Moss we left the road following the course of the Wall. Soon we


reached the small farm of Sewing Shields but failed to find the Centurial Stone of which we had read Passing Broomlee Lough we came to Borcovicium or Housesteads. After a quick look round, the Museum was visited and some time was spent in examining the many interesting relics to be seen there. Under the guidance of Mr. Bates we then made a detailed inspection of the Camp, the granaries and the four gates. Leaving Borcovicium we reached the best stretch of the Wall and were able to walk along it for a considerable distance. On the way we examined two well-preserved Mile Castles before reaching Cuddy's Crag from where we had a good view of Crag Lough. From here we made our way to the Twice Brewed Inn where we were able to get a bus home. W.T. J.U.R. A T R I P TO T H E

ROMAN

W A L L AT

BIRDOSWALD

This trip under the auspices of the Northumberland and Durham Classical Association was held on the 28th of May, 1949. About half a dozen boys with the Headmaster and Mr. Bates accompanied the party which was conducted in two luxurious motor-coaches. The weather was favourable but not brilliant. We were very fortunate in having as our guide Dr. Ian Richmond, the great authority on all things Roman and the Wall in particular Indeed only a few weeks previously he had visited the School to deliver a lecture on " Roman Engineering " to the " Friday Club." Having assembled at the Bus Station suitably armed with picnic lunch we set off. Our route lay for the first stage up that well-known bank and down that steep slope known respectively as Westgate Road and Denton Burn. On the way we could see on our left the remains of the Wall at Condercum or Benwell and other fragments such as those at Heddon-onthe-Wall. These have been carefully preserved by the Ministry of Works. At Heddon we took the road to Corbridge and Hexham and thereafter our way lay through Haltwhistle and Greenhead. Soon after leaving Gilsland we left the main road and wending our way over a road rightly named " second class " we arrived at Birdoswald. Its Roman name was for long believed to be Amboglanna but it has now been shown that it should be Camboglanna. This camp although by no means as interesting as Housesteads or, Chesters owing to the small amount visible is nevertheless noteworthy. It is approached from the road on the North through a farmhouse which incorporates in its walls large portions of the original Wall. The position of the Fort is very striking. On the south side the ground plunges steeply to the winding stream of the River Irthing. From this exposed position we were rewarded by a magnificent view to the South across the line of the Newcastle to Carlisle railway. In Roman times the important road called the Stanegate roughly followed its course. The method of signalling from Birdoswald is interesting. To the South-West of the Fort and visible from it is the steep hill known as Whin Rigg. The forts called Thorp and Nether Denton, to the east and west of Birdoswald, were invisible to each other owing to the spur of the hill there. Thus this signal station was used to act as a link between these forts receiving its messages from Birdoswald In the Fort itself the East Gate is in good condition having been recently restored. The ruts caused by chariot wheels are still visible. We now went westwards to Appletree where the Turf Wall is visible. This was only a temporary erection built before the stone wall and it was furnished with stone turrets. Thus with the Vallum or Ditch, now regarded as the civilian boundary of the Empire south of the military area round the Wall, and the Turf and Stone Walls, a very remarkable conjunction of circumstances is visible. The Vallum with its attendant mounds on each side is an excellent example of Roman skillâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;shooting as straight as an arrow up hill and down dale. We now travelled still further west


18 ward to Pike Hill signal tower on the summit of the ridge from where a view is obtained of all North Cumberland. This tower was independent of the system on the Wall giving greater facility for communication with other signal towers similar to those just mentioned. A few hundred yards away, at the bottom of the hill, is wall-turret 52A at the edge of the road, which has been diverted to allow the wall to be left as it was excavated. Our last call on the Wall was at Hare Hill where can be seen "the highest remaining portion of the Wall reaching a height of twelve feet, almost that of the original. We have now reached the end of the Roman sites but something most impressive still awaits us. This is Lanercost Priory. We were conducted round the Priory by the Vicar who gave us its history. It was built in the Xlth century for Augustinian monks and the nave is still used as a parish church. The walls are built in red and grey stones from the Wall giving the exterior a striking appearance. Some interesting Roman inscriptions are to be seen in the undercroft south of the church. The ruins of the Prior's House and the Refectory are also to be seen with a staircase built for the monks in reach of the church from their dormitory when midnight mass was held. In the chancel are the tombs of the Howard family After a most enjoj'able day we set off on the journey home with the country looking its best in the evening sun. At Greenhead we branch off on to the high road and follow the line of the Wall and Vallum, one on either side until the former disappears under the road and only the conspicuous ridge of the Vallum remains. G.R.L. SCHOOL O F F I C E R S HEAD

BOY:

PREFECTS:

J.

K.

Evans

K Evans, G. R Lunn, K . H. Miller, W. A. Gofton, D. I. Brennan, A. W. Harrison, A. J. Ilumble, J. F. Meredith, J. U. Reavley, D. N. Watt, W. G. Mayhew.

J

HOUSE CAPTAINS:

Monkseaton, A. J . Humble. Tynemouth. J. K. Evans. North Shields, W. A. Gofton. Whitley Bay, G R. Lunn.


19

AUTUMN SCHOOL

TERM. NOTES

We regret the departure of Mr. Gentle after many years of service in the school and wish him and Mrs. Gentle happiness in their new surroundings. Mr. P. A. Reid, B.A., of Jesus College, Cambridge, has been appointed in place of Mr. Gentle and we welcome him to the Stafi. J. F. Meredith was appointed Head Boy and we were pleased to welcome Mr. and Mrs. Meredith at the ceremony of installation. The following School Prefects were appointed this term: W. Turnbull, G. B. Scarth, R. M. de Soyza, J. D. Watt, W. S. Dixon, C. F. Evans, D. A. Lambert, M R. Lloyd. In the December School Certificate Examination the following reached Matriculation standard: D. B. Armstrong, W. A. Charlton, W. Hedley, D. A. Lambert J. C. Porter, D. Taylor. School Certificates were awarded to M. R. Lloyd and M. H. Say. Avete

III.

G. W. Douglas, D. L. Gill.

IIA.

D. R. Darling, P. D Main, K. F. Scott, I. Soulsby, F. M. Brown.

I.

T. J Bird, K. B. Jarvis, A. W. Purdue, J. Williams, P. R. Curry.

Jun.

J. Askew, D. K. Bavidge, J. K. Bower, D. M. Dickenson, P. F. Gill. S. K. D. Hill, J. E. Ketton, J. S. Legg, E. G. Marshall, M. E. Norvell, P. G. White, P. R. Wolstenholm, A. R. Yeeles.

T.P.S.

J. S. M C. G.

A. N. J. J. C.

Ashton, E. S. Atkinson, M. H. Bridges, J. E. Clark, Duncan, S. J. M. Dawson, D. M. Forgie, B. E. Fraser, Hart, D. A. Hudson, E. D. Larke, G. A. McGillivray, Moore, E. K. Phillips, K. E. Robson, R. Robinson, Scott, E. W. T. Thorp, J. H. Webb, G. M. Young. Valete

Via.

A. J. Humble, Prefect 1948-9, Matric. July 1948, XI 1949. P. D- Partridge, Matric. July 1949.

VIb.

D. B. Armstrong, S. Cert. July 1949, Matric. Dec. 1949, XV 1949-50. M. R. Lloyd, S. Cert. Dec. 1949, XI 1949. J. C. Porter, Matric. Dec. 1949. M. H. Say, S. Cert. Dec. 1949. D. Taylor, S. Cert. July 1949, Matric. Dec. 1949.

V.

J. B. Porter.

III.

I. Sutherland, E. G. Whitaker

Jun.

C. W. Dale, G. F. Brown.

T.P.S.

P. C. Dale. V. J. Waterhouse,


20 MONKSEATON

House Master: Mr.

B . S . BATES.

HOUSE NOTES

House Captain: A.

J . HUMBLE.

This term has been a successful one though the House Shield was lost to Tynemouth. Our congratulations are extended to Brennan for his Higher Certificate in July and to the excellent results in the School Certificate by Gristwood, Partridge J., Partridge P., and Watt J., all of whom gained their Matriculation. Our best wishes go to Brennan and Gristwood and all others who are leaving us-this term, and we wish them success in the future. Lloyd and Watt J. are to be congratulated on being appointed Prefects, but we lost the former to North Shields at the beginning of the term. We have every reason to be proud of our Rugbv. The following were regular members of the XV except when the younger ones were plaving in the Junior teams: Curry, Harrison B., Hately I Turnbull J. H., Watt D., and Watt J., with Carrick in the " Under 15." Curry played for the Northumberland Boys' " Under 15 " Team. also congratulate Watt D. on the award of his XV Colours. TYNEMOUTH

House Master: Mr

G . A . WASTLE

HOUSE

We

NOTES

House Captain:

G . B . SCARTH.

This term we no longer have Evans J. as House Captain but in his place we welcome Scarth. Congratulations to Scarth and Evans C. on their appointment as Prefects We congratulate Scarth, Armstrong and Sanderson on matriculating in July and Urwin on obtaining his School Certificate. Lilburn, Reay, Hilton and Purdue gained high positions in their respective forms. Evans C. has succeeded his brother as Captain of the XV and Hall captained the " Under 14 " team. We extend our good wishes to Armstrong and wish him success in the future. We also most heartily congratulate our Housemaster, Mr. Wastle, on having completed tweny-five years' service at Tynemouth School. N O R T H SHIELDS HOUSE

House Master:

NOTES

House Captain:

D.

A.

LAMBERT.

We are sorry to say goodbye to W. A. Gofton, who has left to go to King's College, and we wish him every success in the future. Tie, and Harrison A. are to be congratulated on obtaining their Higher Certificates. It is to be hoped that the latter and the other members of the house concerned, will matriculate in December. On the first XV we have been well represented by W. Hedley, Lloyd, Taylor, Porter and Rhode, and on the " Under 15," victorious in the Coast Schools' Shield Competition, by Davidson (Captain), Turnbull J. H., for the first XV. Hedley is to be congratulated on obtaining his well-deserved Colours, and Rhode and Turnbull J. IT. on being chosen as full-back and reserve respectively, for the county " Under 15 " against Durham. Davidson, Wardhaugh, and Scott G. are fo be congratulated on attaining high positions in their forms, and Lambert and Lloyd on being appointed School Prefects


21 WHITLEY

House Master: Mr J. M.

BAY

MILLER.

HOUSE

NOTES

House Captain: J. F.

MEREDITH.

This term we welcome Meredith as house captain in place of G. R. Lunn. The latter is to be congratulated on gaining his Higher Certificate, and we wish him success in the future. In the realm of school "work we congratulate Nichol on his excellent Matriculation and Dixon, Milne, Crozier, Lamb, Andrews, Brown J. D., Robinson, Dobson, and Henthorne on gaining high positions in their forms. We wish Say success in the December examination. We have been well represented on the school rugby teams this term. On the 1st XV by Say, Proctor, Meredith, Dixon, and Harrison T., and on the junior teams by Bates, Lamb, Arthur. Harrison T. is to be congratulated on being a member of the " Under 15 '' team which won the Coast Shield and also for scoring one of the tries. At the beginning of the term Meredith was appointed Head Boy and we wish him success in his new office. Dixon and de Souza were appointed as Prefects this term. We wish all the members of the house a Happy Christmas and Prosperous New Year. T Y N E M O U T H SCHOOL O L D BOYS' A S S O C I A T I O N ANNUAL

REPORT,

1949

Since the last publication of the School Magazine the main item of interest with regard to the Old Boys' Club, is its change of name to the Tynemouth School Old Boys' Association. This was decided uopn by an overwhelming majority of Old Boys at the Annual Meeting in January. The Association's activities this year have at last begun to take on their pre-war shape; the Cricket Club has commenced to expand, the Annual Golf Outing has been re-introduced, the Annual Dinner had a record number of members in attendance and the Annual Dance was its usual success. Let me elaborate on these points a little: the reader will find- elsewhere in this Magazine a report from the Cricket Club Secretary, but I would like to say thisâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the Committee do sincerely hope Boys leaving the School, and those still attending will give their wholehearted support to the Cricket Club, for those Old Boys who have had the unenvious job of running the Club do so richly deserve it. As I have mentioned the Annual Golf Outing was re-introduced this year and was held as previously at Foxton Hall, Alnmouth. An enjoyable day's golfing was had by all and the Competition was won on this occasion by Mr. R. B Storer, the presentation of the Crofton Trophy Cup by Mr. H. B. Crofton taking place at the Annual Dinner. The Association is arranging for the outing to be held at Foxton Hall again in 1950 and would welcome the application of any Parent who would like to attend. With regard to the Annual Dinner which was once again held in Tynemouth, this turned out to be a great success as a record number of Old Boys were in attendance, the actual number being 77. This is even better than the Reunion Dinner held in Newcastle in 1946 and it is hoped that such good attendances will be carried on in the forthcoming years. After the Dinner Mr. G. A. Wastle was presented with a leather


grip by members of the Association to mark their appreciation of his 25 years of loyal and energetic service on the Staff of the School. Membership of the Association now stands, at 368 and although new Members are coming in steadily- the Committee feel that these numbers should be somewhat greater than they are at present, in view of The excellent fellowship and spirit which is to be found within the Association. Let me urge all boys who are leaving the School to join the Association immediately and thus carry on into later life, the friendships which they have made and the fine tradition of the School into their business careers. J.H.D., Hon. Secy. OLD

BOYS'

NEWS

Cambridge

J. C. Barclay (1933-44), Law Tripos. Pt. 1. London

N. K. Lakev (1937-45), Inter Law Examination. Durham

D. J. C. A. A. R.

Webster (1937-43). M.B., B.S. M. Wood (1936-47), 1st M-B. F. Mallett (1935-7), 3rd M.B. I. McAughtry (1941-7), 2nd B.D.S. R. Proctor (1940-5), 3rd B.D S. Burn (1939-45), 4th B D.S. T Y N E M O U T H SCHOOL O L D BOYS' C R I C K E T C L U B

The Secretary of the Old Bovs' Cricket Club gave a report of the activities at the General Meeting of the Association. He said that the Cricket Club was very much alive and that during the 1949 season had played 20 matches, winning 9, losing 9 and drawing 2The Club are tenants of Smith's Park, North Shields, and the Secretary expressed the thanks of the Club to the Borough Surveyor and The Parks and Sands Committee lor granting the tenancy. This has contributed in a very large degree to the success of the 1949 season. With the renewal of the tenancy for the 1950 season the Club looked forward to another successful and enjovable season. All the clubs which the Old Boys entertained on their home ground were very appreciative of the hospitality extended to them and the thanks of the club are extended to the Committee, Members and the Ladies for their support throughout the summer. Membership of the Club is now made up of the following: Vice-Presidents ... ... ... ... 9 Members ... ... 14 Patrons 28 a total of 51 in all. The adoption of the Patron at an annual subscription of 5 / - proved very popular and a great souice of revenue to the Club. At the end of the season, a dinner was held at the Imperial Hotel, Jesmond, at which trophies were presented to R. Watson for the highest batting average, and to A. Milne for the best bowling analysis. These trophies were given to the Club by Messrs. A. E. Shearer and H. Walton respectively. Afterwards the party proceeded to the Jesmond Playhouse.


23 The first Cricket Club Dance was held at the Rex Hotel, Whitley Bay, on Friday, 16th November, 1949, and this proved very successful, both socially and financially. The Club Secretary, R. L. Elliott, of 40, Shorestone Avenue, Cullercoats, will be pleased to hear from anyone interested in the activities of the Club. TYNEMOUTH

P R E P A R A T O R Y SCHOOL

The main event of 1949 at Monkseaton was one involving change of staff. After more than five years' work with us Mrs. Barker resigned in July as a result of her husband's new appointment in the West Riding. We should like to express our gratitude to Mrs. Barker for all her hard work on our behalf, and to wish her happiness in her new life in Yorkshire. In Mrs. Barker's place we welcome Mrs. Lawson to the Staff. We wish her a long and happy stay with us. At the end of Summer Term we held an Open Day, with an entertainment by the children. This was held on the front lawn. The programme was representative of the expression work taken normally in school, and included the following: â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Form I Singing Games Form II P T. Display. Forms II & III Mimeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;" Sleeping Beauty." Form III Folk Dancing. " The Mad Hatter's Tea Party." Play, " Who Stole the Tarts?" At the end of the concert P. Burke presented Mrs. Barker wrth a tea service in Sheffield Plate, the gift of the school and our old boys now at Tynemouth. The parents were then free to inspect the exhibition of work in school. The three form rooms were re-arranged for this purpose, as every child in the school had work on view. We decided that the only fair way for parents to estimate the standard of work was for them to see specimens of all work. Parents and visitors were very generous m their praise of the work. As well as individual work each form had on view examples of communal work. Form I had a model portraying life on the farm. Form II had made a Red Indian scene with drying " furs " and skins pegged out and even minute " fish " hanging up to dry. Form Ill's model showed life in Japan. Festoons of small lanterns (one made and painted by each child), a pagoda, cherry trees " in bloom " and microscopic " silk worm cocoons " on match-box trays made a very realistic scene. Individual handwork included wool and raffia weaving, needlework and knitting, simple book binding, modelling and wooden stools, stained polished and the tops woven with sea-grass. Our Harvest Festival Service this year was conducted by the Rev. R. Macey, father of one of our boys and vicar of St. Stephen's, Seaton Delaval. Afterwards the fruit was sent to the Stannington Children's Sanatorium to which place we also sent a splendid collection of toys at Christmas Very appreciative letters were received from the Matron on both occasions.


24 The prizewinners for the school year are as follows: â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Form Ilia. P. Burke, Susan Frail. Form Illb. Kathleen Jones. Form II. G Goldstone, M. Watson, E. Babington. Form I. Frances Robinson, C. Macey. Progress Prizes: Form III, J. C. Parr; Form II, June Donaldson; Form I, Phyllis Jones. The year ended with the Christmas Party held at the Royal Hotel. An excellent conjuring show was enjoyed by the school and our visitors, The Headmaster and Mrs. Ellison. H.G.G. SENIOR

RUGBY FOOTBALL

Our rugger this term has been largely spoiled by weather conditions. The first two Under 16 games arranged against Whitley Bay and The Royal Grammar School were cancelled because of hard ground. Then, when all the inhabitants of the district were anxiously watching the press for news that Fontburn reservoir was filling up, we looked out of the school window to see the rain which caused the cancellation of our matches with Morpeth, South Shields, Dame Allans and The Royal Grammar School. In the games which we were able to play we were sadly outweighted in all departments Most of our Ist XV are under sixteen and many are under fifteen. Thus we are seriously handicapped from the start, for opponents in 1st XV football are often boys of eighteen. The XV did very well at Gateshead, where the Grammar School 1st XV was held to 6 pts., and with luck Tynemouth should have won. Morpeth, Whitley Bay and Hexham towering above us, won decisively. The encouraging feature of School rugby is the skill and enthusiasm of boys under fifteen, who, whether playing in 1st XV, Under 16, Under 15 or ordinary practice games, have generally played admirably. The Under 15 team did splendidly to win the Coast Schools Shield in a game against Ralph Gardner School, which reminded us of the enthusiasm of old. B.S.B. Tynemouth School, Under 16 v. Whitley Bay Grammar School, Under 16.

Saturday, November 5th, at Whitley Bay. The school was sadly weakened by the absence of six boys playing in the County Under 15 trial and four others sick. Whitley Bay did not provide clever or strong opposition and the game as a result was very dull. In wet and muddy conditions the obvious policy was to forget the normal tactics of Rugby Football and use the " boot to the ball " and follow up quickly Instead of adopting this policy, Tynemouth endeavoured to heel and pass but their efforts failed. As a result much hard work, especially by the forwards, was frittered away and by seizing their chances Whitley Bay scored 2 goals and three tries. Result

Whitley Bay Grammar School 2 gls., 3 tries (10 pts.). Tynemouth School, Nil. Team: Rhode, Dixon, Smiles, Richardson P., Turnbull I., Proctor, Evans C., Walker, Arthur, Harrison B., Taylor, Watt N., Watt J., Partridge J., Partridge P.


Tynemouth School 1st X V . v. Gateshead Grammar School 1st X V .

Saturday, October 8th, at Gateshead. For the first match of the season several very young players were included and they all played well, with Rhode having an excellent game at full back. Tiie opposition was strong and heavy. The school pack played we.l together under the leadership of Watt N. but hooking was weak and Gateshead secured the ball in most scrums. Gateshead scored two unconverted tries. For Tynemouth, Lloyd, Hedley and Hately were unlucky not to score and a penalty kick by Humble dropped just under the bar. The team showed promise and played with greater enthusiasm than during last season. Result

Gateshead Grammar School (2 tries), 6 pts. Tynemouth School, Nil. Team: Rhode, Dixon, Humble, Lloyd, Hately, Hedley W., Evans C., Watt IS., Watson, I/lereditii, Say, Scarth, Watt J., Taylor, Turnbull J. Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Hexham Grammar School 1st X V .

Saturday, October 22nd, at Percy Park. Hexham brought their usual strong side including an outstanding hooker. As a result of this Tynemouth saw nothing of the ball from set scrums and rarely from loose scrums. Play was fairly even and there was no score for the first twenty-five minutes. At half time Hexham led by a goal and a try to nil. In the second half they added another try and two goals. Tvnemouth's chief weaknesses were hooking and tackling in the centre. Moreover the full back received little help from the wing forwards. Result

Hexham Grammar School (3 goals, 2 tries), 21 pts. Tynemouth School, Nil. Team: Rhode, Meredith, Proctor, Lloyd, Hately, Evans C., Hedley W., Watt N., Watson Watt J., Say, Humble, Harrison T., Taylor, Turnbull j. Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Whitley Bay Grammar School 1st X V .

Thursday, October 27th, at Percy Park. Tynemouth without Hately and Proctor faced a big strong-running side from Whitley. Turnbnll J., playing at scrum half as an experiment was the youngest and easilv the best player on the School side. He was well supported by Taylor, but the rest of the side played poorly, showing life and enthusiasm only in loose mauls. Ash, the Whitley fly half, who had been selected to play for Rockcliff 1st XV, was a menace at all times, and he was well supported by strong three-quarters. At half time Whitley had scored 2 goals and 2 tries. Evans replied with a well kicked goal for Tynemouth. In the second half Whitley added 3 further goals and 3 tries. Result

Whitley Bay Grammar School (5 goals, 5 tries), 40 pts. Tynemouth School (1 penalty goal), 3 pts. Team: Rhode. Porter J. C., Lloyd, Hedley W., Meredith, Evans C., Turnbull J., Watt p., Watson, Humble, Say, Scarth, Harrison T., Taylor, Watt J.


26 Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Whitley Bay Grammar School 1st XV

Saturday, November 12th, at Whitley Bay. School was weakened by the absence of Say and in the first few minutes of the game bv an injury to Humble who had to leave the field for the rest of the game. The game started off disastrously for Tynemouth letting Whitley through three times quite early on, they were soon thirteen points down. After the initial shocks School played together better but were always at a disadvantage against a very heavy scrum and strong running outsides. In this half Whitley added a further eight points, taking full advantage of a very strong wind and rain behind them. The second half saw a completely changed Tynemouth XV. Hedley put in some magnificent tackling and Rhode too brought off two or three spectacular tackles. Lloyd and Evans were prominent with intelligent kicking and Turnbull played a lively game at scrum half. Though very much outweighted in all positions and having lost Humble for most of the game, Tynemouth fought well and were not disgraced. Result

Whitley Bay Grammar School (5 goals, 2 tries), 31 pts. Tynemouth School, Nil. Team: Rhode, Lloyd, Hedley, Proctor, Hately, Evans C., Turnbull J., Watt N., Tavlor, Meredith, Scarth, Humble, Harrison T., Curry, Watt J. Tynemouth School 1st XV v. Morpeth Grammar School 1st X V .

Saturday, December 23rd, at Morpeth. The Tynemouth team was weakened by the absence of Rhode, Curry, and Turnbull J., on duty with the County Boys XV, and also of Harrison T., Dixon and Humble, who were unwell, in spite of this and of the stormy cross wind and muddy conditions a most pleasant game was played. There was little between the sides, but Morpeth was quicker to seize opportunities. They had a strong aggressive three-quarter line and made use of the strong wind. The Tynemouth team was slow to adapt itself to the conditions and was content to try and play orthodox Rugby Football. Watt N. was one of the few who played the right game and he scored an excellent try: the result of his own effort. Morpeth replied with three tries in the first half and a try and a goal in the second half. Result

Morpeth Grammar School 1st XV (1 goal, 4 tries), 17 pts. Tynemouth School (1 try), 3 pts. Team: Lloyd, Turnbull I., Porter J. C., Proctor, Hatelv, Hedley W., Evans C., Watt N., Taylor, Meredith, Say, Scarth, Watt J.," Turnbull W., Harrison B. Autumn Term, 1949. JUNIOR

RUGBY

Though a few of those who last season showed great promise have failed to come up to expectations, others have developed an unsuspected talent for the game, and on the whole the stanclard and spirit of play has been most encouraging. The " Under 13J " played one match against Ascham House, who were a weak side and quite unable to cope with Hall, who had a field-day, scoring six tries.


27 The " Under 14 " are a, young side and have been inclined to rely too much on Hall in defence: however, in the last match of the term, though heavily defeated, they played very well indeed and it was not until near the end when the forwards were tired and their opponents were able to score rather freely. The "Under 15"' have played three matches: they were unluckv to be beaten by Ralph Gardner's by two penalty goals to a try in the first match. in the second they over-whelmed Monkseaton Grammar School, and in the final of the Coast Schools' Shield they defeated Ralph Gardner's. In the " Under 14 " Hall has been magnificent in defence and very dangerous in attack; of the forwards. Partridge W. and Jeffcock have played extremely well and improved with every game, whilst Harrison W's. tackling has been excellent. At full-back and scrum-half Bootle and Bates, both very young, have shown the greatest promise and in another year or two should be very good indeed. The success of the " Under 15 " was chiefly due to their excellent team-work, so that it is almost invidious to signal out names, but Davison captained the side splendidly and if only he had been fit earlier would almost certainly have played for the County Under 15. At full-back Rhode's tackling and falling on the ball was above reproach; Carrick, Hall, Hately, Smiles were all very good, and of the forwards Harrison T., Curry, Harrison B. and above all Turnbull J. H., were outstanding. Finally, Carrick, Hately, Hall, Harrison T. and Turnbull J. H. are to be congratulated on playing in the County " Under 15 " 1 rials, and Rhode on playing for the County " Under 15 " once and Curry twTce. D.S.U. Results Under 13*

Ascham House

Away

38— 0

Won

Home 14— 9 Away 0— 12 Home 0—-18 Home 0— 40

Won Lost Lost Lost

Under 14

Ralph Gardner's School ... Gateshead Grammar School Whitley Bay Grammar School ... Morpeth Grammar School

... ...

Under 15

Ralph Gardner's School Monkseaton Grammar School ... Ralph Gardner's School

...

Away Away Home

3— 6 Lost 70— 3 Won 12— 3 Won D . S.U

Coast Schools' Shield Final

Played at Smith's Park, on November 24th, 1949. Ralph Gardner's started off with great fierceness and for the first quarter of an hour did most of the attacking by forward rushes. Their three-quarters were not very skilful however, and seldom looked like scoring, especially as their fastest wing was marked by Hall who gave him no chance to get away. Ralph Gardner's were the first to score, by their fly-half dropping an excellent goal when he was apparently hemmed in. Soon afterwards Hall, running with great determination, scored near the corner-flag. The School, by playing better football and remaining steady under pressure,


28 had by this time clearly gained the ascendancy, and soon after half-time Turnbull, J. H., who was easilv the best forward on the field, made an opening for Carrick who cut through to score near the posts. The school continued to press, with Turnbull, Harrison T. and "Sergeant time and again leading forward rushes, and from a line-out in the Ralph Gardner's 25, Harrison T. forced his way over. The last try came near the end when in a scrum several yards from the goal-line the school got the ball, held it and pushed their opponents back over the line. Throughout the match Davison .played splendidly in attack and defence and his tactics and control of the game as captain were excellent. Result

Tynemouth School (4 tries), 12 points. Ralph Gardner School (1 dropped goal), 3 points. " THE

F R I D A Y CLUB "

We are sorry to say goodbye this term to G. R. Lunn and Mr. Gentle, who have done so much valuable work for the " Friday Club " since it started two years ago. It is through their arduous work that the " Friday Club " has reached its present position and we hope that it will continue to thrive for many years to come. The third annual general meeting was held on the first Friday of term and it was encouraging to see the large number of people who attended it. We would like to take this opportunity of welcoming Mr. Reid who presided over the meeting. A. J. Humble was elected Secretary in the place of G R. Lunn, and Meredith was re-elected to the Committee. The new Committee members elected being de Souza and Turnbull W. The first meeting was held on Friday, September 23rd, when we read Bernard Shaw's play " Caesar and Cleopatra." Meredith and Scarth were outstanding in the two principal roles. The following Friday K. H. Miller very kindly gave a programme of classical music which was very much enjoyed by a small but appreciative audience. On Friday, October 7th, G. R. Lunnâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;the retiring Secretaryâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;consented to give a short talk on " The Delectable Duchy." This talk was very interesting and amusing, being concerned with the habits and customs of the Cornish people. The following Friday, nine members of the " Friday Club " paid a visit to the " People's Theatre " to see Shakespeare's play, " Cymbaline." This is not one of his best known plays but it was done very well by the Company. The' next week Madame de la Courcelle gave an interesting talk on " Roman France." This lecture was illustrated by lantern slides which were very instructive, along with the talk, not only to the classical members of Via but to everyone. Because of the visit of the D'Oyle Carte Opera Company there were no meetings of the " Friday Club " for the next two weeks so that those members who wished to could go and see them. As a sequel to this visit J. F. Meredith gave a recital of " The Mikado." The audience enjoyed this programme.


29 I would like to take this opportunity of thanking Mr. Wilson once again for the loan of his radiogram without which the programmes given by Miller and Meredith would have been impossible. During the Summer Holidays W. Turnbull had visited France and on November 18th he gave a very Interesting talk on this experience. The Committee decided that another play should be read, and on November 25th the " Friday Club " read Sheridan's farce, " The Rivals." This play was enjoyed by all and Mr. Reid and Meredith were outstanding in two of the main roles. One of the most interesting meetings was the talk given by Mr. B. E. Blunt on the last Thursday of term. Mr. Blunt had visited Greece during the Easter and his talk was concerned with his experiences there. On the whole this has been a successful term with small but appreciative audiences. We hope that with the New Year the size of the audiences will increase, especially from the members of Vlb. TO CHESTERS

During the early part of the Christmas term, the Via classical class decided that, while the weather held, a further investigation of Roman remains along the Wall might well be made to advantage. This seemed likely, as indeed proved the fact, to be the last of several trips along the Wall undertaken this year. Thus on Tuesday of half-term a small group of boys, led by Mr. Bates, assembled at Marlborough Crescent 'bus station and travelled by 'bus to Hexham. On arriving there the party set out on foot to Chesters, a distance of some 6 or 7 miles. This journey nearly completed, two of our more enthusiastic members overtook us on bicycles. Making our way to the river bank we arrived at the Roman Bridge. There is today but one abutment, the easte/n of the later bridge remaining (I say " later '' because beneath the massive masonry of this abutment lie, so we are told, the remains of an earlier bridge). There is also evidence to show that this abutment was also a tower and a mill; a cutting right through the masonry being generally recognised as a millrace. There is also an abundance of lewis holes (used for lifting and placing stone slabs). This bridge it seems, was capable of carrying a road 20ft. wide, giving some indication of the magnitude of the task whicITwas incorporated in its building. Its main function, however," was not carrying the road but carrying the Wall, which stretches away from each side of it, on one side tc the East and the other through the camp of Chesters to the Solway Firth and the West. Making a detour over the modern bridge we arrived at the camp itself. Here Mr. Bates, aided by a handbook, took upon himself the task of lecturer. The main features of the camp correspond with the general pattern, being built in the form of a rectangle with rounded corners. However only the gateways' and the main internal features lie exposed to view. Inside the camp itself the most noticeable feature is an open paved court flanked by the remains of pillars with a well to one side; and with a little imagination the scene can easily be reconstructed. Another impressive structure is the treasury, an underground vault approachable bv a flight of steps, its roof is still intact. For preservation half the entrances are blocked-up, which does not, however, prevent a rather difficult entrance from being made. The Bath-house is perhaps one of the most interesting features not only of the camp but of the whole


30 Wall. To the casual observer this building must appear to be a complete maze and the wonder is that so much has been distinguished, hot and cold bathrooms and boiler rooms. However, a controversial element of this building are the niches lying deep in a wall of the dressing room, for which no-one can assign a purpose and in this, perhaps, their Tnferest lies. From here we retraced our steps to the museum. This museum is, perhaps, the most interesting of all those on the Wall as not only are the exhibits out of Chesters camp but pieces of interest are arranged there, from the whole length of the Wall. The interest of our party, however, was chiefly centred around a certain corn measure with which we were acquainted, and it was to this object of interest that we first repaired This measure is unique, but it was not this which seemed the most striking feature; the inscription on it stands cut clearly as if it were new. A most interesting Roman lady's shoe warrants mention on account of its state of preservation. After briefly looking at the statues, our visit to the camp was somewhat sharply curtailed owing to the late hour The cyclists departed in great haste and those remaining started to tramp once more to Hexham. On its arrival at Newcastle the party, wishing each other farewell. broke up and each proceeded to their respective homes, having enjoyed an interesting and instructive outing. J.P.P. and P.D.P. (Via). T H E SCHOOL C O N C E R T

In keeping with the school tradition, this year's Christmas Concert opened with a large-scale item from Form I, entitled " Rhymes with a Difference," arranged and presented by Mrs. Hilton. The Fourth Form followed with an amusing episode called " Radiomania or The Listener's Nightmare " which aimed harmless fun at the B.B.C. After this came French Songs from Form lib who were well up to the high standard set in previous years and sang with enthusiasm. The audience was then treated to a special visit from the celebrated show " Have a Go." This was meticulously unrehearsed and the members of the team were taken from all walks in life (from different forms in the school) and the whole was co-ordinated by Mrs. Hilton. *

The first part Of the programme was concluded by a solo from Brian Oliver who sang the Carol " Holy Night." Two short plays " Honesty is the Best Policy " and " Sound and Fury " presented by the members of Form V and produced by Mr. Brennan opened the second part of the evening's programme. These two humorous numbers were well received by the audience. The Third Form then sang, as their contribution to the entertainment, three French Songs. These songs, as those for lib were selected by Miss Marshall who also trained the singers. The pianoforte accompaniment to all the French songs was arranged by Miss Harrison who also accompanied all the singing. After a short interval during which the School sang a Carol, Form VIb raised the curtain with a really hair-raising presentation of " A Night at an Inn." The plav was well cast and as an ambitious choice was indeed well performed. The plav was arranged and produced by Mr. Reid under whose guidance the technical difficulties were easily overcome by the actors. Another carol formed a brief interlude before the final item.


31 The honour of providing the final item was, as usual, given to Form Via who gave an extremelv good performance of the one-act play " THread of Scarlet." Great care and preparation had gone into the rehearsing of the play. The production was in the hands of Partridge and Meredith spared no trouble to add verisimilitude to his off-stage thunder and lightning effects. The order of the programme was arranged by Mr. Reid who also" supervised the whole concert. Our thanks are due to him and also to those who were responsible for the electrical arrangements and all the other back stage work. The singing of " Adeste Fideles " brought the curtain down on yet another School Concert. K.M.M. LIBRARY

NOTES

Librarians: G. B. Scarth and R. M. de Souza. This term we have had a good number of regular users of the library, mostly from the lower forms, and the number of books taken out rose sharply as compared with the number taken out in the Summer Term. Via helped " en bloc " to take out and check each book and then to replace it in the correct order SCHOOL H E A D OF THE S C H O O L : PREFECTS:

J. F .

OFFICERS

Meredith.

J . F . Meredith, A . J . Humble, D . N . Watt, W. Turnbull, G. B. Scarth, R. M. de Souza, J- D. J

â&#x20AC;˘*

Watt, W. S. Dixon, C. F. Evans, D. A. Lambert, M. R Lloyd CAPTAIN OF FOOTBALL : H O U S E CAPTAINS :

C . F. Evans. Whitley Bay, J. F. Meredith. Tvnemouth, G. B. Scarth. North Shields, D. A. Lambert. Monkseaton, A. J. Humble.

King's Magazine 1940-1949  

A PDF document of the magazines released by King's School from 1940 - 1949

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