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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

Here is the bird that never ew Here is the tree that never grew Here is the bell that never rang Here is the ďŹ sh that never swam

Matthew McFadyen, Primary 7 (1) Matthew McFadyen

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

CONTENTS

Matthew McFadyen

Introduction

Page 2

Who was St Mungo?

Page 3

His Birth

Page 4

His Work

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The Four Miracles

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His Death

Page 7

Timeline

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Quiz Time!

Page 9

Bibliography

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Quiz Answers

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

INTRODUCTION When I was given this project, I looked at lots of famous Scots to research – from inventors to national heroes and even royalty. After ruling out many of the others, I decided to do my report on St Mungo as he was one of the less obvious – and more challenging people to research. I also liked the idea of researching St Mungo as my Mum works for Thenew Housing Association – Thenew was St Mungo’s Mum! A few years ago, a local sculptor made a statue of Thenew and presented it to Thenew Housing Association - the statue sits in my Mum’s office.

Hand-carved Thenew sculpture

Matthew McFadyen

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

WHO WAS ST MUNGO?

Because St Mungo lived so long ago, a lot of the stories written about him are difďŹ cult to conďŹ rm. What is known about him was that he was one of the most important people in the Church. He was the founder of Glasgow and is the Patron Saint of the City. It is also thought he was the great-nephew of King Arthur.

Mosaic of St Mungo

Matthew McFadyen

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

HIS BIRTH

The exact date of St Mungo’s birth is not known, however he is believed to have been born around the year 528AD. It is thought that Tenew (later known as Thenew) had an affair with her cousin – Owain. Because she was pregnant and not married, this was seen as a capital offence and her father – King Loth – felt he had to kill his daughter.

He ordered her to be thrown off a hill near Edinburgh. She managed to survive the fall so her father abandoned her by putting her in a small boat and sending her to sea. The boat drifted over to Culross where St Thenew had her baby son. She called him Kentigern, but he later became known as Mungo – this was the nickname given to him by St Serf, who had found St Thenew, given her a home at his monastery and helped bring up and educate her son.

Matthew McFadyen

Culross - St Mungo’s birthplace

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

HIS WORK

St Mungo did his training at St Serf’s monastery, and at the age of 25 he began his missionary work on the banks of the River Clyde, where Christianity had already been introduced by St Ninian. St Mungo visited the home of a dying man called Fergus – he died on the night that Mungo visited. Mungo placed Fergus’s body on a cart pulled by two wild bulls, and asked them to take the body to a place ordered by the Lord.

In 565AD a group of anti-Christians, lead by King Morken of Strathclyde, forced St Mungo out of Scotland. He spent some time in Wales where he founded another cathedral. Some years later, the new King of Strathclyde – King Riderch – invited Mungo to return to his kingdom. Mungo was happy to accept this invitation and came back to Scotland in 585AD.

The bulls stopped at a place known as Cathures where Fergus was buried. Mungo named the spot Glasgui which means “dear green place” and he built a church on the site. This is where the Glasgow Cathedral now stands. St Mungo worked in the district for approximately 13 years, living in a small cell and converting local people by his preaching.

Glasgow Cathedral Matthew McFadyen

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

THE FOUR MIRACLES

During his life, it is thought that St Mungo performed four religious miracles. There is a verse which is used to remember these miracles: Here is the bird that never flew Here is the tree that never grew Here is the bell that never rang Here is the fish that never swam

The most famous of these miracles is about the fish. King Riderch thought his wife - Queen Languoreth – was plotting against him, as she no longer had the ring he had given her. He did not believe that she had lost it. She asked Mungo to help. He ordered a messenger to catch a salmon in the river. On opening the fish, the ring was found inside, which allowed the Queen to be saved from execution. The Bird — Mungo brought St Serf’s pet robin back to life, which had been killed by some classmates, hoping to blame him for its death.

Matthew McFadyen

The Tree — Mungo had been left in charge of a fire in St Serf’s monastery. He fell asleep and the fire went out. Taking branches from a tree, he restarted the fire. The Bell — the bell is thought to have been brought by Mungo from Rome. It was used in services and to mourn the dead. The original bell no longer exists, and a replacement is now on display in Glasgow. These four miracles are also pictured in Glasgow’s Coat of Arms.

Glasgow Coat of Arms

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

HIS DEATH

We know that St Mungo died on Sunday 13th January however it is not clear exactly what year – this varies from 612AD - 614AD.

There is also some confusion over how he died. Some people believe that he died in his bath, but there is another story about him dying after he carried out a baptism.

St Mungo was buried in Glasgow Cathedral and his tomb can be found in the lower church. His tomb is covered by a very colourful “hippy quilt” and many people visit this tomb every year.

In those days, baptisms were done by completely immersing the person under water, although they did try to warm up the water a little beforehand! It is thought that St Mungo caught a cold after performing a baptism on 6th January and he died a week later. The date of St Mungo’s death is kept as his feast day and this is still celebrated by some people in Scotland.

St Mungo’s tomb at Glasgow Cathedral Matthew McFadyen

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

TIMELINE

The following is a timeline based on the life of St Mungo:

St Mungo was driven out of Scotland by a group of anti-Christians, lead by King Morken

St Mungo was born in Culross, Fife

585AD

553AD 528AD

Matthew McFadyen

After ďŹ nishing his training at St Serf’s Monastery, St Mungo began his missionary work

St Mungo died on 13th January. His tomb lies in Glasgow Cathedral

565AD

St Mungo returned to Scotland, after being invited back by King Riderch who had replaced King Morten

612AD - 614AD

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

QUIZ TIME The following questions are based on my report - the answers can be found on page 12

Q1: What is the name of St Mungo’s mother? Q2: Where was St Mungo born? Q3: What was St Mungo’s real name? Q4: Who gave Mungo his nickname? Q5: At what age did St Mungo begin his missionary work? Q6: What was the name of the dying man that St Mungo visited? Q7: Which King invited St Mungo back to Scotland? Q8: What object did St Mungo find inside the fish? Q9: Where did St Mungo bring the bell from? Q10: What date did St Mungo die? Q11: Where can St Mungo’s tomb be found? Q12: What covers St Mungo’s tomb?

Matthew McFadyen

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

BIBLIOGRAPHY I used the following resources to research my project: Books & Leaflets “Oxford Dictionary of Saints” by David Farmer “The Heart of Glasgow” by Jack House “Look at Glasgow Cathedral”

Websites www.wikipedia.org www.undiscoveredscotland.co.uk www.thenewhousing.co.uk www.glasgow.gov.uk

Visits I visited the Glasgow Cathedral and St Mungo’s Museum of Religious Art

Matthew McFadyen

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Primary 7 Project

All About St Mungo

QUIZ TIME - ANSWERS Q1: St Mungo’s mother was called Thenew or Tenew Q2: St Mungo was born in Culross Q3: St Mungo’s real name was Kentigern Q4: St Mungo got his nickname from St Serf Q5: St Mungo begin his missionary work at the age of 25 Q6: The dying man that St Mungo visited was called Fergus Q7: King Riderch invited St Mungo back to Scotland Q8: St Mungo found a ring inside the fish Q9: St Mungo brought the bell from Rome Q10: St Mungo died on Sunday 13th January Q11: St Mungo’s tomb be found in Glasgow Cathedral Q12: A hippy quilt covers St Mungo’s tomb

Matthew McFadyen

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St Mungo Project