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KANEKO BOARD OF DIRECTORS Bruce Carpenter Henry Davis Robert Duncan (Co-Chair) Deryl F. Hamann Frank Hayes (Treasurer) Larry Jobeun (Secretary) Ree and Jun Kaneko Vicki Krecek Karen Linder Marilyn and Carl Mammel Royce Maynard John P. Nelson (Vice Chairman) Zach Rawling Polina Schlott, MPA Robert Schlott (Co-Chair) Steve Seline Therman Statom


THE FOUNDATION


AMONG THE MANY APPROACHES TO CREATIVITY CELEBRATED BY KANEKO ARE THE PATHWAYS EXPLORED BY JUN KANEKO HIMSELF. OVER THE COURSE OF 50 YEARS SPENT WORKING IN BOTH HIS NATIVE JAPAN AND THE UNITED STATES, JUN HAS USED CLAY AND OTHER MATERIALS AS A DOORWAY INTO THE VERY NATURE OF OBJECTS, ATTEMPTING TO UNDERSTAND HOW THEY OCCUPY SPACE IN OUR WORLD, HOW THEY RELATE TO ONE ANOTHER AND HOW THEY HELP US EXPERIENCE OUR HUMANITY IN A MEANINGFUL WAY


When one understands the trajectory of Jun Kaneko’s life, the inception of KANEKO in Omaha fits intuitively into his artistic journey and the Omaha creative community at large. Jun was born in Nagoya, Japan, in 1942, and studied painting with Satoshi Ogawa during his adolescence— working in his studio during the day and attending high school in the evening.

Jun came to the United States in 1963 to continue his studies at Chouinard Institute of Art, when his introduction to Fred Marer drew him to sculptural ceramics. He proceeded to study with Peter Voulkos, Paul Soldner, and Jerry Rothman in California during the time now defined as the Contemporary Ceramics Movement in America. The following decade, Jun taught at some of the nation’s leading art schools, including Scripps College, Rhode Island School of Design and Cranbrook Academy of Art, before settling permanently in Omaha in 1986. 9


KANEKO was established in 1998 by Jun and his wife Ree, whose extensive experience with the Omaha arts community, nonprofit administration and collaboration have been an essential part of the organization’s development. KANEKO was imagined as an open space to explore and encourage the process of creativity, and how it impacts our lives. Ree and Jun wanted to expose audiences to how creativity manifests itself across a whole range of human activity—art, science, philosophy, business, urban planning, education—to cultivate creativity in our citizens and invest in a creative society.


CREATIVITY BEGINS WITH AN IDEA—SEEING THINGS DIFFERENTLY. OUR PURPOSE IS EXPLORING THE CREATIVE PROCESS—HOW AN NEW IDEA IS BORN INTO THE ARTS, SCIENCES AND PHILOSOPY. THERE IS NO RESTRICTION FOR CREATIVE ACTIVITY. IMAGINATION HAS COMPLETE FREEDOM.


SUPPORTING AND PROMOTING FREEDOM IN CREATIVITY IS KANEKO’S MISSION.


THE BUILDINGS


LOCATED IN THREE HISTORIC WAREHOUSE BUILDINGS, KANEKO’S PHYSICAL SPACE IS AS INSPIRING AS ITS ORIGINAL PROGRAMMING. IT IS A UNIQUE ARENA FOR THE EXPLORATION OF IDEAS, ART FORMS, TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCES AND SCIENTIFIC DISCOVERIES, AND AN OPEN FORUM FOR DEBATE, DISCUSSION, CONTEMPLATION AND INNOVATION.


KANEKO is housed in the former home of the Fairmont Creamery Company, which was incorporated in 1884 in Fairmont, Nebraska. The company was founded for the production and sale of butter, eggs and poultry.

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The Fairmont Creamery Company had a rapid expansion after the turn of the century. The general offices were moved from Fairmont, NE to Omaha, NE in 1907, which was a more convenient location. By 1930 the company had nearly 3,000 cream stations throughout the United States providing a market for their home-separated cream.

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Ice cream was first manufactured at the Omaha plant in 1907. By 1934, ice cream was made at nearly all plants. In 1920 Fairmont created what is believed to have been the first refrigerated ice cream delivery truck in the United States. This truck, built by an Omaha mechanic, was used to service retail stores from the factory. 19


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During the 1970s, Fairmont Foods closed and disposed of several of its original dairy and snack food operations and moved its headquarters from Omaha to Houston. The last ice cream processing plant, located in Omaha, was closed in December 1982 after being bought out by Circle K Corporation.

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Jun acquired the first Old Market warehouse building in 1988, and subsequently purchased two adjacent buildings. By 2003, renovations began to present KANEKO to the public. Los Angeles architect Mark Mack was named the principal architect and designer, integrating the historic structures with contemporary design elements, balancing the duality of preservation and innovation. The first space in the KANEKO complex opened to the public in 2009 was the former 9,200 square-foot Ford Allied Van garage building. The renovations designed by Mack and implemented by Omaha architect William Stott. Now known as SPACE 1, the interior is free of columns or other vertical supports, making the uninterrupted space unusually versatile. Ideal for exhibitions, performances, seminars and large audiences, the SPACE 1 renovation was funded by Omaha philanthropist Richard D. Holland and its opening heralded the exciting future of KANEKO.

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KANEKO COMPLETED RENOVATION OF ITS EXISTING SPACE IN 2013, CREATING MULTI-LEVEL EXHIBIT GALLERIES, CREATIVE PROGRAMMING SPACES AND MULTIMEDIA ROOMS ON BOTH THE LOWER AND UPPER LEVELS.


THESE RENOVATIONS TRIPLED THE USABLE SPACE FOR KANEKO AND ITS PARTNERS


A collaborative effort between KANEKO and the University of Nebraska at Omaha, the KANEKOUNO Library opened its doors in 2009. This creativity library is a state-of-the-art facility of the future, a space that provides resources, stimuli and intellectual possibilities.

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watercolor of Space 6, Mark Mack

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renovations, pre-2007


watercolor of Space 5, Mark Mack

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30


31


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CREATING DIALOGUE

Wade Davis, Light at the Edge of the World, May 2008


OUR GOAL DURING KANEKO’S INITIAL PROGRAMMING PERIOD WAS TO CREATE DIALOGUE, SHARE CREATIVE CONCEPTS AND ENGAGE THE COMMUNITY.


The Great Minds lecture series, a forum for the world’s most advanced thinkers, began with the inaugural lecture presented by Wade Davis, National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence. Subsequent speakers included Sir Ken Robinson, celebrated scholar on creativity and education; Dr. Kathy Schick and Dr. Nicholas Toth, archeologists at the Leakey Foundation; Nicholas Kristof, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author; and Sweeta Noori of Women for Women International. This high-caliber roster continued with Joan Acocello, acclaimed critic for The New Yorker magazine; Josh Cooley, Academy Awardwinning animator of the celebrated animated films Up and Ratatouille; and singer, songwriter and author Rosanne Cash. PORTALS, the collaborative contemporary project developed and realized by the Experimental Studio at KANEKO, was brought to audiences to witness the creation of exceptional art. A professional team made up of two musicians, a filmmaker, a poet and a dancer responded to a new work written especially for PORTALS by composer Phillip Glass. Violinist Timothy Fain and dancer/ choreographer Benjamin Millepied performed Glass’s six-movement suite based on Leonard Cohen’s Book of Longing, which premiered in New York City, traveled back to Omaha where it was created and performed at KANEKO and then moved on to Los Angelels, and continues to tour throughout the U.S. Just as the Experimental Studio encouraged freeform thinking at KANEKO, IDEA LAB is a programmatic umbrella that manifests the KANEKO concept in the community. IDEA LAB has built pivotal educational programs such as Seeing With New Eyes, a new way of teaching and learning for American Indian children and teens, which has been successfully adopted by the public school system. Steel sculptures by the renowned American abstract sculptor Fletcher Benton anchored an exhibit of his work at KANEKO, Folded Square Alphabets and Numericals. His pieces from this series served as a focal point for a season of programs and events. 35


Big Omaha, May 2014


Omaha Symphony, New Music Symposium, May 2012


ARCH 1, Mark Mack + Unrealized Projects, March 2013


PORTALS Experimental Studio, April 2011

Omaha Fashion Week, March 2012


Big Omaha, 2013

AS THE MOST PUBLIC FACE OF KANEKO, PROGRAMMING MANIFESTS AN EXPANSIVE DEFINITION OF CREATIVITY. KANEKO PRESENTS LECTURES, EXHIBITIONS AND READINGS BY VISUAL AND LITERARY ARTISTS; PERFORMANCES BY MUSICIANS, DANCERS, ACTORS AND CONCEPTUALISTS; AND LECTURES BY SCIENTISTS AND PHILOSOPHERS WHO ARE ACTIVELY CREATING OUR WORLD. SEMINARS, WORKSHOPS, CLASSES AND CAMPS INVITE THE CURIOUS TO BECOME PERSONALLY INVOLVED IN LEARNING ABOUT BOTH NEW AND FAMILIAR SUBJECTS.


Big Omaha, 2013

Big Omaha, 2013


National Cartoonists Society Conference, October 2010

INCREASED PROGRAMMING CONTINUES TO CONNECT KANEKO’S MISSION WITH THE COMMUNITY. KANEKO ORIGINAL PROGRAMMING—SUCH AS REIMAGINING LEADERSHIP, FEEDBACK, EKO NOVA AND THE GREAT MINDS SERIES—IS BEING EXPANDED AS KANEKO UTILIZES THE EXISTING SPACE RENOVATIONS AND THE ADDITION OF THE ATRIUM AND THE COLLECTION BUILDING. KANEKO ALSO CONTINUES TO HOST ANNUAL SUMMER CAMPS FOCUSING ON EXPLORING THE CREATIVE PROCESS IN ART, DESIGN, ARCHITECTURE AND BEYOND. SHARING IDEAS, SPACE AND CREATIVE ENERGY IS WHAT KANEKO IS ALL ABOUT. IN ADDITION TO RUNNING OUR OWN INNOVATIVE PROGRAMS, KANEKO ALSO PARTNERS WITH OTHERS WHO ARE CONTRIBUTING TO THE CREATIVE CULTURE IN THE OMAHA-METRO AREA.


Seeing With New Eyes, Summer 2012


KANEKO Camps, Architecture Camp, Summer 2013


Fletcher Benton, Folded Square Alphabets and Numericals, September 2010


Stanford Lipsey, Affinity of Form, April 2011


Big Omaha, 2014


KANEKO Camps, Architecture Camp, Summer 2014

EDUCATION IS IMPLICIT IN ALL KANEKO PROGRAMS, WHICH ENCOURAGE PEOPLE TO BECOME ACTIVE CONTRIBUTORS TO THE FABRIC OF KANEKO. WORKING WITH PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS, UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS, KANEKO OFFERS INTERACTIVE EXPERIENCES AND HANDS-ON WORKSHOPS TO ENGAGE AND EMPOWER THE COMMUNITY WITH THE CREATIVE PROCESS.


Omaha Under the Radar, Music For 18 Musicians, July 2014


Nicholas Kristof and Sonia Nazario, (Un)Covering Human Crises, November 2009


KANEKO Camps, Video Game Design Camp, Summer 2014


Reimagining Leadership, September 2013


Louder Than A Bomb, March 2014


Great Plains Theatre Conference, ĂŚtherplough performance, May 2014


Patrick Siler, brush workshop, June 2013


Truck-A-Tecture, Summer 2014


Off-Site, Summer 2014


No Strangers, Spring 2014


THE C A M PA I G N FOR K A N E KO


T H E C A M PA I G N F O R K A N E KO COLLECTION BUILDING OPENS

Pledged for Collection Building

Atrium Project Funded & Opens

2016 2015 2014

Interior Renovations Complete & New Spaces Open Interior Renovations Begin

2013

2012

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35 M 34 33 32 31 30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8

Bow Truss Opens & K-UNO Library Opens Bow Truss Renovations Early Interior Renovations

2011 2010 2009 2008 2003

KANEKO founded

1998

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 MILLION

EVENTS

YEAR

TOTAL


In creating a unified campus, visionary architect Mark Mack identifies his primary goal as integrating the historic structures with contemporary design elements. This duality of preservation and innovation is manifest in the zigzag roof profile of the steel and glass façade, presenting the regeneration of the original warehouse structures as a new aesthetic presence. The elegant, industrial veneer also unifies the disparate roof lines and volumes of the historic buildings. Inside, a dynamic series of wide stairways surround a central atrium space. As visitors proceed up the stairs, moving from the main entrance and first floor programming spaces to the second floor, they arrive at a large, light-filled, gallery space that anchors KANEKO as an open environment for contemplating, questioning, and learning. Staff offices, conference rooms, storage areas and other functional spaces are easily accessible from the public areas. Outside, distinctive black and white striped granite sidewalks delineate the campus, announcing KANEKO to the historic downtown district. The welcoming aesthetic of the new Atrium and a new area dedicated to view work from the growing KANEKO collection will be complemented by a new retail space showcasing program and mission-related merchandise. This space is projected to increase foot traffic and attendance numbers at KANEKO and will capitalize on the proximity the Old Market and its large public following.

The Atrium Project is the gateway to the final phase of the KANEKO Campus, the Collection Building, which will provide a permanent location for the massive KANEKO Collection. The Collection at KANEKO is the conceptual nucleus of the Campus. A contemporary exhibition area, archive and storage facility that is contiguous with the other KANEKO spaces, The Collection now comprises of works by Jun, artists and objects that have influenced him. Jun has promised more than 2000 works to The Collection, making it a premier resource for, study, research, programming and teaching. Guest curators, artists, art history students, and staff can interpret works from The Collection, tracing Kaneko’s artistic process and his aesthetic evolution. The Collection will also maintain an active lending program and an ongoing calendar of internationally travelling exhibitions. When elementary, middle and high school students tour The Collection they learn about the impetus for KANEKO, and that exposure to art of the highest quality can inspire them to experiment and be creative. The general audience sees the exceptional collection as a vivid introduction to KANEKO’s origins. As KANEKO evolves, The Collection will remain the heart of the campus, bringing all who enter back to the source of KANEKO. We request your support to complete the KANEKO Campus. Over seven years of increasingly comprehensive programming has laid a strong foundation of exploring the creative process, engaging the local community, and building an international presence. Realizing these projects will solidify KANEKO as a world-class center for creativity.

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THE CONTINUED RENOVATION OF KANEKO BEGINS WITH THE ADDITION OF THE STEEL AND GLASS ATRIUM ON THE NORTH SIDE OF THE KANEKO BUILDING. OUR NEW FRONT ENTRANCE—APPROXIMATELY ONE BLOCK LONG AND SPANNING FROM 11TH TO 12TH STREETS—IS SCHEDULED TO BREAK GROUND SOON. A BLACK AND WHITE GRANITE SIDEWALK INSTALLATION, DESIGNED BY JUN KANEKO, WILL SURROUND THE KANEKO CAMPUS, SETTING THE BUILDING APART FROM ANY BUILDING IN THE REGION AND CREATING A PLAZA-LIKE EFFECT ON JONES STREET.


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THE WELCOMING AESTHETIC OF THE ATRIUM WILL BE COMPLEMENTED BY A NEW RETAIL SPACE SHOWCASING PROGRAM AND MISSIONRELATED MERCHANDISE, AS WELL AS PROVIDING ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICES— ENHANCEMENTS THAT WILL PROMOTE AND SERVE THE MISSION OF KANEKO WELL INTO THE FUTURE.


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THE COLLECTION BUILDING WILL SIT SOUTH OF SPACE 1. ALSO DESIGNED BY MARK MACK, KANEKO’S NEW COLLECTION BUILDING WILL HOUSE THE CORE COLLECTION OF WORKS AND ARCHIVAL RECORDS BY JUN KANEKO, PROVIDING EXAMPLES OF NOTES, SKETCHBOOKS, PHOTOGRAPHS AND WORKS CHRONICLING HIS IMPORTANT AND VARIED CAREER. THIS BUILDING WILL ALSO HOUSE ANTIQUITIES AND OTHER WORKS BY INTERNATIONALLY RESPECTED ARTISTS IN THE KANEKO COLLECTION. THIS COLLECTION WILL BE OPEN TO THE PUBLIC AND AVAILABLE FOR RESEARCH AND STUDY IN KEEPING WITH KANEKO’S MISSION.


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STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN THE HISTORICAL FABRIC OF THE OLD MARKET AND A WORLD IN A STATE OF MOTION AND CHANGE, THE CONTEMPORARY ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN OF COLLECTION BUILDING AIMS TO TO STAND AS A SYMBOL OF JUN KANEKO’S WORK IN CONTRAST TO THE EXISTING BRICK BUILDINGS ON THE KANEKO CAMPUS. RISING FROM THE BLACK AND WHITE GRANITE SIDEWALK INSTALLATION THAT SURROUNDS THE KANEKO CAMPUS, THE COLLECTION BUILDING WILL NOT ONLY CONNECT TO THE EXISTING SPACE 1, BUT WILL ALSO ALLOW FOR BOTH INDOOR EXHIBITION SPACE AND OUTDOOR SCULPTURE GARDENS FOR EVER-CHANGING EXHIBITIONS. THE LOCATION OF KANEKO, SURROUNDED BY DOWNTOWN HOUSING AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS, AND THE EXPANSION OF THE KANEKO CAMPUS SOLIDIFY THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE OLD MARKET AND KANEKO AS A CENTER FOR CREATIVITY.

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COLLECTION GALLERY STORAGE 1

PARKING GARAGE

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PARKING GARAGE

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LEAVENWORTH STREET

RAMP DOWN TO PARKING

GALLERY A: 2,707 sq ft

ground floor

STORAGE

11TH STREET

A: 3,710 sq ft

LOBBY

A: 1,109 sq ft

RECIEVING

KANEKO-UNO LIBRARY A: 3,446 sq ft

SPACE 1 A:9,200 sq ft

SPACE 2 A: 2,191 sq ft

SPACE 3 A: 3,275 sq ft

F

W

M

A: 908 sq ft

ATRIUM

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JONES STREET

EDUCATIONAL CATERING W OFFICES A: 908 sq ft

M

12TH STREET

SPACE 4 A: 4,224 sq ft


OPEN TO BELOW

second floor COLLECTION A: 3,987 sq ft +14'-0"

W

M

EL

PRIVATE

STORAGE

SPACE 5

SPACE 6

A: 4,989 sq ft +14'-2"

A: 4,771 sq ft

W M

+14'-2"

+10'-11"

+14'-2"

ADMIN

A: 1,105 sq ft

DIR

A: 390 sq ft

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RAMP DOWN TO PARKING

REMOVABLE PANELS FOR LOADING

+6'-0"

STEEL STAIR WITH GLASS RAILING

GALLERY A: 2,707 sq ft +6'-0"

+4'-0"

+4'-0"

STORAGE A: 3,710 sq ft

+2'-0"

STAIR OR RAMP

+2'-0"

OPEN TO BELOW

LOADING GATE ROLL-UP DOOR

ground floor LOBBY

A: 1,109 sq ft -2'-0"

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REMOVABLE PANELS FOR LOADING

RAMP UP

RAMP UP

OPEN TO BELOW

ROOF DECK

OPEN TO BELOW

+26'-0"

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ROOF DECK 17

STEEL STAIR WITH GLASS RAILING

STEEL STAIR WITH GLASS RAILING

GALLERY

7

GALLERY

A: 4,000 sq ft

A: 3,715 sq ft

+14'-0"

17

+26'-0"

EVENTSPACE

18

A: 2,246 sq ft

19 +38'-0"

W

second floor

M

EL

W

third floor

M

EL

W

M

EL

fourth floor

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Thank you to our generous donors and partners 1,000,000+ Anonymous Karen and Robert Duncan Holland Family Foundation Richard Holland Ree and Jun Kaneko Marilyn and Carl Mammel $500,000—999,999 Karen and James Linder, M.D. Ichiro Okada Omaha Community Foundation

$25,000—49,999

Alan and Marcia Baer Family Charitable Trust

Leisa and David Austin

Bentley Gallery, Inc.

Sandy Besser Susie Buffett

Clark Creative Group Distribution Fund Dorothy B. Davis Family Foundation Sandie Eskin Eskin Family Foundation Linda Esterling and Steve Wake Gallery Kasahara Gebert Contemporary

Polina and Bob Schlott

Ursula M. and Stephen J. Gebert

$250,000—499,999

Lincoln Community Foundation

Susan and Michael Dell Peter Kiewit Foundation Sheila and Michael Rips Weitz Family Foundation $100,000— 249,999 Anonymous Robert B. Daugherty Foundation Henry A. Davis

Daryl Lillie and John Lillie Nicolaysen Art Museum Omaha World Herald Kathy and Troy Perry Eve and Fred Simon Vrana Construction Wake Charitable Foundation

Bullseye Glass Company Elaine and Sidney Cohen The Contemporary Museum Barbara and Eric Dobkin Dobkin Family Foundation Elaine Baker Gallery Frank Hayes Gail Severn Gallery Humanities Nebraska Imago Galleries Iowa West Foundation Jewish Federation of Omaha Foundation Vicki and David Krecek Elaine and Earl Liff Nebraska Community Foundation Sharee and Murray Newman Omaha Hotel Corporation Brian Pelowski Justin Perri

Douglas County

Deb Peterson

First National Bank of Omaha

SilverStone Group

Gerry and Bruce Lauritzen Kathy and Marc LeBaron Nebraska Arts Council Anne and John P. Nelson Sherwood Foundation Gail and Mike Yanney

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$50,000—99,999

Patricia and Earl Scudder Kippy Boulton Stroud Warren Distribution Woods Charitable Fund Donna Woods and Jon Hinrichs Kristae and Peter Zandbergen


$10,000—24,999

Shirley and Michael Sorrell

Acklie Charitable Foundation

Ann and Gene Spence

John and Kelly Balistreri

Therman Statom University of Iowa

Rkachea and Bruce Carpenter ConAgra Foods (Research, Quality and Innovation) Alice Corning and Richard Massey Elaine Baker Gallery Carol Gendler Gerald Peters Gallery Carmen and John Gottschalk Jan E. Hailey Sidonie Haines HDR ilumin Larry A. Jobeun Locks Gallery Patricia and John MacDonald Nancy and Michael McCarthy Nana Smith and J.B. Milliken Mission Clay Products Montessori Co-op School Sandy and Jeffrey A. Passer, M.D. Perry V. Haines Foundation Peggy Reinecke and Dean Arkfeld Sherry Leedy Gallery Betiana and Todd Simon Annette and Paul Smith Lisa and Thomas Smith Smith Kramer Fine Art Services

University of Nebraska Foundation University of Wyoming

Suzanne and Walter Scott Foundation

Troia Schonlau

Turkey and Peter Stremmel

The Springcreek Foundation

Dr. Peter Suzuki Monté and Duane Thompson Ted Townsend

Valmont Industries, Inc.

Union Pacific Corporation

Dawn and Carl Von Bernuth

Lyn and C. Thomas White

Dorothy and Fred Weiss

Kate and Roger Weitz

William Traver Gallery

$5,000—9,999

$2,500—4,999

Dayton Visual Arts Center Marilyn and Terry Diamond Melissa and Patrick J. Duffy Ayman El-Mohandes, MBBCh, MD, MPH The Fabric Workshop and Museum

Angie and Dan Muhleisen Fredrick P. Ogren Paypal, Inc. RDO Truck Center

Anita and Ron Wornick

Dicobe Tapes, Inc. Shehzad Hasan Helen and Richard Kelley Lincoln Financial Foundation Maurine Littleton Locks Gallery Royce Maynard McCarthy Capital Corporation Morgan Stanley

Georgina and Thomas Russo

Nancy and Steven Oliver

Laura Russo Gallery

Jeanne and Bill Penry Louis G. Pol

Laura and Greg Schnackel

Mary and John Wilson

Chabad-Lubavich of Nebraska

Jane and Ky Rohman

Betty and Jack Schafer

Diane Wilsey

Jan Buckingham and Lauren Ronald

Peter Durst

Jewish Community Foundation (California)

Lou Ann and Del Weber

Bruce Frasier Architects

Claire M. Hubbard Foundation International Sculpture Center

University of Nebraska – Omaha

Cindy and Mogens C. Bay

Alice Corning and Richard Massey

Maureen and Richard Hunt

Union Bank and Trust

Lela Autio

Howard Farber

FVB Foundation, Inc.

Sue and Steve Seline

Rena Bransten Gallery Susan Schonlau

Thanks to our corporate partners for their ongoing support: First National Bank and SilverStone Group. Thanks to the Nebraska Arts Council and the Nebraska Cultural Endowment for providing operating support, and the Peter Kiewit Foundation, Daugherty Foundation, Sherwood Foundation and Humanities Nebraska for supporting KANEKO programming.

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